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Sample records for activate human dendritic

  1. Reovirus activates human dendritic cells to promote innate antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Errington, Fiona; Steele, Lynette; Prestwich, Robin; Harrington, Kevin J; Pandha, Hardev S; Vidal, Laura; de Bono, Johann; Selby, Peter; Coffey, Matt; Vile, Richard; Melcher, Alan

    2008-05-01

    Oncolytic viruses can exert their antitumor activity via direct oncolysis or activation of antitumor immunity. Although reovirus is currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of localized or disseminated cancer, any potential immune contribution to its efficacy has not been addressed. This is the first study to investigate the ability of reovirus to activate human dendritic cells (DC), key regulators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Reovirus induced DC maturation and stimulated the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-alpha, TNF-alpha, IL-12p70, and IL-6. Activation of DC by reovirus was not dependent on viral replication, while cytokine production (but not phenotypic maturation) was inhibited by blockade of PKR and NF-kappaB signaling. Upon coculture with autologous NK cells, reovirus-activated DC up-regulated IFN-gamma production and increased NK cytolytic activity. Moreover, short-term coculture of reovirus-activated DC with autologous T cells also enhanced T cell cytokine secretion (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) and induced non-Ag restricted tumor cell killing. These data demonstrate for the first time that reovirus directly activates human DC and that reovirus-activated DC stimulate innate killing by not only NK cells, but also T cells, suggesting a novel potential role for T cells in oncolytic virus-induced local tumor cell death. Hence reovirus recognition by DC may trigger innate effector mechanisms to complement the virus's direct cytotoxicity, potentially enhancing the efficacy of reovirus as a therapeutic agent.

  2. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+) pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins.

  3. Ragweed Subpollen Particles of Respirable Size Activate Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V.; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins. PMID:23251688

  4. Design of phosphorylated dendritic architectures to promote human monocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Poupot, Mary; Griffe, Laurent; Marchand, Patrice; Maraval, Alexandrine; Rolland, Olivier; Martinet, Ludovic; L'Faqihi-Olive, Fatima-Ezzahra; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Poupot, Rémy

    2006-11-01

    As first defensive line, monocytes are a pivotal cell population of innate immunity. Monocyte activation can be relevant to a range of immune conditions and responses. Here we present new insights into the activation of monocytes by a series of phosphonic acid-terminated, phosphorus-containing dendrimers. Various dendritic or subdendritic structures were synthesized and tested, revealing the basic structural requirements for monocyte activation. We showed that multivalent character and phosphonic acid capping of dendrimers are crucial for monocyte targeting and activation. Confocal videomicroscopy showed that a fluorescein-tagged dendrimer binds to isolated monocytes and gets internalized within a few seconds. We also found that dendrimers follow the phagolysosomial route during internalization by monocytes. Finally, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments between a specifically designed fluorescent dendrimer and phycoerythrin-coupled antibodies. We showed that the typical innate Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 is clearly involved, but not alone, in the sensing of dendrimers by monocytes. In conclusion, phosphorus-containing dendrimers appear as precisely tunable nanobiotools able to target and activate human innate immunity and thus prove to be good candidates to develop new drugs for immunotherapies.

  5. Medroxyprogesterone acetate impairs human dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Quispe Calla, N E; Ghonime, M G; Cherpes, T L; Vicetti Miguel, R D

    2015-05-01

    Does medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) impair human dendritic cell (DC) activation and function? In vitro MPA treatment suppressed expression of CD40 and CD80 by human primary DCs responding to Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist stimulation (i.e. DC activation). Moreover, this MPA-mediated decrease in CD40 expression impaired DC capacity to stimulate T cell proliferation (i.e. DC function). MPA is the active molecule in Depo-Provera(®) (DMPA), a commonly used injectable hormonal contraceptive (HC). Although DMPA treatment of mice prior to viral mucosal tissue infection impaired the capacity of DCs to up-regulate CD40 and CD80 and prime virus-specific T cell proliferation, neither DC activation marker expression nor the ability of DCs to promote T cell proliferation were affected by in vitro progesterone treatment of human DCs generated from peripheral blood monocytes. This cross-sectional study examined MPA-mediated effects on the activation and function of human primary untouched peripheral blood DCs. Human DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by negative immunomagnetic selection were incubated for 24 h with various concentrations of MPA. After an additional 24 h incubation with the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flow cytometry was used to evaluate DC phenotype (i.e. expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR). In separate experiments, primary untouched human DCs were sequentially MPA-treated, poly I:C-activated, and incubated for 7 days with fluorescently labeled naïve allogeneic T cells. Flow cytometry was then used to quantify allogeneic T cell proliferation. Several pharmacologically relevant concentrations of MPA dramatically reduced CD40 and CD80 expression in human primary DCs responding to the immunostimulant poly I:C. In addition, MPA-treated DCs displayed a reduced capacity to promote allogeneic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation. In other DC: T cell co-cultures, the addition of antibody blocking the CD40

  6. Haemophilus ducreyi partially activates human myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Banks, Keith E; Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses to bacteria. How Haemophilus ducreyi, which causes genital ulcers and regional lymphadenitis, interacts with DC is unknown. H. ducreyi evades uptake by polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage-like cell lines by secreting LspA1 and LspA2. Many H. ducreyi strains express cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), and recombinant CDT causes apoptosis of DC in vitro. Here, we examined interactions between DC and H. ducreyi 35000HP, which produces LspA1, LspA2, and CDT. In human volunteers infected with 35000HP, the ratio of myeloid DC to plasmacytoid DC was 2.8:1 in lesions, compared to a ratio of 1:1 in peripheral blood. Using myeloid DC derived from monocytes as surrogates for lesional DC, we found that DC infected with 35000HP remained as viable as uninfected DC for up to 48 h. Gentamicin protection and confocal microscopy assays demonstrated that DC ingested and killed 35000HP, but killing was incomplete at 48 h. The expression of LspA1 and LspA2 did not inhibit the uptake of H. ducreyi, despite inactivating Src kinases. Infection of DC with live 35000HP caused less cell surface marker activation than infection with heat-killed 35000HP and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibited maturation by LPS. However, infection of DC with live bacteria caused the secretion of significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha than infection with heat-killed bacteria and LPS. The survival of H. ducreyi in DC may provide a mechanism by which the organism traffics to lymph nodes. Partial activation of DC may abrogate the establishment of a full Th1 response and an environment that promotes phagocytosis.

  7. Human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; McGovern, Naomi; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells are highly adapted to their role of presenting antigen and directing immune responses. Developmental studies indicate that DCs originate independently from monocytes and tissue macrophages. Emerging evidence also suggests that distinct subsets of DCs have intrinsic differences that lead to functional specialisation in the generation of immunity. Comparative studies are now allowing many of these properties to be more fully understood in the context of human immunology. PMID:23621371

  8. Lysosome-Dependent Activation of Human Dendritic Cells by the Vaccine Adjuvant QS-21

    PubMed Central

    Welsby, Iain; Detienne, Sophie; N’Kuli, Francisca; Thomas, Séverine; Wouters, Sandrine; Bechtold, Viviane; De Wit, Dominique; Gineste, Romain; Reinheckel, Thomas; Elouahabi, Abdelatif; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Didierlaurent, Arnaud M.; Goriely, Stanislas

    2017-01-01

    The adjuvant properties of the saponin QS-21 have been known for decades. It is a component of the Adjuvant System AS01 that is used in several vaccine candidates. QS-21 strongly potentiates both cellular and humoral immune responses to purified antigens, yet how it activates immune cells is largely unknown. Here, we report that QS-21 directly activated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and promoted a pro-inflammatory transcriptional program. Cholesterol-dependent QS-21 endocytosis followed by lysosomal destabilization and Syk kinase activation were prerequisites for this response. Cathepsin B, a lysosomal cysteine protease, was essential for moDC activation in vitro and contributed to the adjuvant effects of QS-21 in vivo. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the pathways involved in the direct activation of antigen-presenting cells by a clinically relevant QS-21 formulation. PMID:28105029

  9. Particulate β-glucans synergistically activate TLR4 and Dectin-1 in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabudhe, Neha M; Dokter-Fokkens, Jelleke; de Vos, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The major receptor for β(1-3)-glucans on immune cells is considered to be Dectin-1 receptor. Particulate β-glucans induce stronger immune responses than soluble β-glucans by clustering of Dectin-1 receptors. Here, it was hypothesized that activation of other pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) can also contribute to enhanced activity of immune cells after exposure to particulate β-glucans. To test this hypothesis, reporter cell lines were designed expressing TLR4 with either Dectin-1A or Dectin-1B, that is, one of the two transcript variants of human Dectin-1 receptors. Enhanced NF-κB activation was observed after stimulation with particulate β-glucans in both Dectin-1A-TLR4 and the Dectin-1B-TLR4 cell lines. This was different with soluble β-glucans, which enhanced activation in Dectin-1A-TLR4 cell lines but not in Dectin-1B-TLR4 cells. The synergistic activation of TLR4 and Dectin-1 by particulate β-glucans was confirmed in human dendritic cells. The effects of particulate β-glucan induced TLR4 binding were regulatory as blocking TLR4 enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-23, IL-4, IL-6, and TNF-α production. These results suggest that TLR4 and Dectin-1 are synergistically activated by particulate β-glucans, wherein TLR4 activates an immune regulatory pathway in human dendritic cells. Our data suggest that β-glucan is an immune regulatory ligand for TLR4. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Residual endotoxin contaminations in recombinant proteins are sufficient to activate human CD1c+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Harald; Schmittner, Maria; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available recombinant proteins are produced in Escherichia coli, and most suppliers guarantee contamination levels of less than 1 endotoxin unit (EU). When we analysed commercially available proteins for their endotoxin content, we found contamination levels in the same range as generally stated in the data sheets, but also some that were higher. To analyse whether these low levels of contamination have an effect on immune cells, we stimulated the monocytic cell line THP-1, primary human monocytes, in vitro differentiated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and primary human CD1c+ dendritic cells (DCs) with very low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; ranging from 0.002-2 ng/ml). We show that CD1c+ DCs especially can be activated by minimal amounts of LPS, equivalent to the levels of endotoxin contamination we detected in some commercially available proteins. Notably, the enhanced endotoxin sensitivity of CD1c+ DCs was closely correlated with high CD14 expression levels observed in CD1c+ DCs that had been maintained in cell culture medium for 24 hours. When working with cells that are particularly sensitive to LPS, even low endotoxin contamination may generate erroneous data. We therefore recommend that recombinant proteins be thoroughly screened for endotoxin contamination using the limulus amebocyte lysate test, fluorescence-based assays, or a luciferase based NF-κB reporter assay involving highly LPS-sensitive cells overexpressing TLR4, MD-2 and CD14.

  11. Brucella β 1,2 Cyclic Glucan Is an Activator of Human and Mouse Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anna; Pérez-Gutierrez, Camino; Banchereau, Romain; Dutartre, Hélène; Lecine, Patrick; Dullaers, Melissa; Mello, Marielle; Pinto Salcedo, Suzana; Muller, Alexandre; Leserman, Lee; Levy, Yves; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandy; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Klechevsky, Eynav; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, SangKon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4+ T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:23166489

  12. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucan is an activator of human and mouse dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anna; Pérez-Gutierrez, Camino; Banchereau, Romain; Dutartre, Hélène; Lecine, Patrick; Dullaers, Melissa; Mello, Marielle; Salcedo, Suzana Pinto; Muller, Alexandre; Leserman, Lee; Levy, Yves; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandy; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Klechevsky, Eynav; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, Sangkon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4(+) T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies.

  13. Activation of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusions of human dendritic cells and breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianlin; Avigan, David; Chen, Dongshu; Wu, Zekui; Koido, Shigeo; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kufe, Donald

    2000-01-01

    We have reported that fusions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) and murine carcinoma cells reverse unresponsiveness to tumor-associated antigens and induce the rejection of established metastases. In the present study, fusions were generated with primary human breast carcinoma cells and autologous DCs. Fusion cells coexpressed tumor-associated antigens and DC-derived costimulatory molecules. The fusion cells also retained the functional potency of DCs and stimulated autologous T cell proliferation. Significantly, the results show that autologous T cells are primed by the fusion cells to induce MHC class I-dependent lysis of autologous breast tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that fusions of human breast cancer cells and DCs activate T cell responses against autologous tumors. PMID:10688917

  14. Active properties of neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Cristie, B R

    1996-01-01

    Dendrites of neurons in the central nervous system are the principal sites for excitatory synaptic input. Although little is known about their function, two disparate perspectives have arisen to describe the activity patterns inherent to these diverse tree-like structures. Dendrites are thus considered either passive or active in their role in integrating synaptic inputs. This review follows the history of dendritic research from before the turn of the century to the present, with a primary focus on the hippocampus. A number of recent techniques, including high-speed fluorescence imaging and dendritic patch clamping, have provided new information and perspectives about the active properties of dendrites. The results support previous notions about the dendritic propagation of action potentials and also indicate which types of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are expressed and functionally active in dendrites. Possible roles for the active properties of dendrites in synaptic plasticity and integration are also discussed.

  15. Human dendritic cell activation induced by a permannosylated dendron containing an antigenic GM3-lactone mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Javier; Ballerini, Clara; Comito, Giuseppina; Nativi, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vaccination strategies based on dendritic cells (DCs) armed with specific tumor antigens have been widely exploited due the properties of these immune cells in coordinating an innate and adaptive response. Here, we describe the convergent synthesis of the bifunctional multivalent glycodendron 5, which contains nine residues of mannose for DC targeting and one residue of an immunogenic mimetic of a carbohydrate melanoma associated antigen. The immunological assays demonstrated that the glycodendron 5 is able to induce human immature DC activation in terms of a phenotype expression of co-stimulatory molecules expression and MHCII. Furthermore, DCs activated by the glycodendron 5 stimulate T lymphocytes to proliferate in a mixed lymphocytes reaction (MLR). PMID:24991284

  16. TSLP-activated dendritic cells induce human T follicular helper cell differentiation through OX40-ligand.

    PubMed

    Pattarini, Lucia; Trichot, Coline; Bogiatzi, Sofia; Grandclaudon, Maximilien; Meller, Stephan; Keuylian, Zela; Durand, Melanie; Volpe, Elisabetta; Madonna, Stefania; Cavani, Andrea; Chiricozzi, Andrea; Romanelli, Marco; Hori, Toshiyuki; Hovnanian, Alain; Homey, Bernhard; Soumelis, Vassili

    2017-05-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) are important regulators of humoral responses. Human Tfh polarization pathways have been thus far associated with Th1 and Th17 polarization pathways. How human Tfh cells differentiate in Th2-skewed environments is unknown. We show that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)-activated dendritic cells (DCs) promote human Tfh differentiation from naive CD4 T cells. We identified a novel population, distinct from Th2 cells, expressing IL-21 and TNF, suggestive of inflammatory cells. TSLP-induced T cells expressed CXCR5, CXCL13, ICOS, PD1, BCL6, BTLA, and SAP, among other Tfh markers. Functionally, TSLP-DC-polarized T cells induced IgE secretion by memory B cells, and this depended on IL-4Rα. TSLP-activated DCs stimulated circulating memory Tfh cells to produce IL-21 and CXCL13. Mechanistically, TSLP-induced Tfh differentiation depended on OX40-ligand, but not on ICOS-ligand. Our results delineate a pathway of human Tfh differentiation in Th2 environments. © 2017 Pattarini et al.

  17. Brugia malayi infective larvae fail to activate Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells in human skin.

    PubMed

    Cotton, R N; McDonald-Fleming, R; Boyd, A; Spates, K; Nutman, T B; Tolouei Semnani, R

    2015-02-01

    Filarial infection in humans is initiated when a mosquito deposits third-stage parasite larvae (L3) in the skin. Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) are the first cells that the parasite encounters, and L3s must evade these highly effective antigen-presenting cells to establish infection. To assess LC and DDC responses to L3 in human skin, we employed three models of increasing physiologic relevance: in vitro-generated LCs, epidermal blister explants and full-thickness human skin sections. In vitro-generated LCs expressed TLR1-10 and robustly produced IL-6 and TNF-α in response to PolyI:C, but pre-exposure to L3s did not alter inflammatory cytokine production or TLR expression. L3s did not modulate expression of LC markers CDH1, CD207, or CD1a, or the regulatory products TSLP or IDO in epidermal explants or in vitro-generated LC. LC, CD14+ DDC, CD1c+ DC and CD141+ DC from human skin sections were analysed by flow cytometry. While PolyI:C potently induced CCL22 production in LC, CD1c+ DC, and CD141+ DC, and IL-10 production in LC, L3s did not modulate the numbers of or cytokine production by any skin DC subset. L3s broadly failed to activate or modulate LCs or DDCs, suggesting filarial larvae expertly evade APC detection in human skin.

  18. Inhibition of Human Dendritic Cell Activation by Hydroethanolic But Not Lipophilic Extracts of Turmeric (Curcuma longa)

    PubMed Central

    Krasovsky, Joseph; Chang, David H.; Deng, Gary; Yeung, Simon; Lee, Mavis; Leung, Ping Chung; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Cassileth, Barrie; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.

    2015-01-01

    Turmeric has been extensively utilized in Indian and Chinese medicine for its immune-modulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells specialized to initiate and regulate immunity. The ability of DCs to initiate immunity is linked to their activation status. The effects of turmeric on human DCs have not been studied. Here we show that hydroethanolic (HEE) but not lipophilic “supercritical” extraction (SCE) of turmeric inhibits the activation of human DCs in response to inflammatory cytokines. Treatment of DCs with HEE also inhibits the ability of DCs to stimulate the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Importantly, the lipophilic fraction does not synergize with the hydroethanolic fraction for the ability of inhibiting DC maturation. Rather, culturing of DCs with the combination of HEE and SCE leads to partial abrogation of the effects of HEE on the MLR initiated by DCs. These data provide a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric. However, they suggest that these extracts are not synergistic and may contain components with mutually antagonistic effects on human DCs. Harnessing the immune effects of turmeric may benefit from specifically targeting the active fractions. PMID:19034830

  19. Inhibition of human dendritic cell activation by hydroethanolic but not lipophilic extracts of turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    PubMed

    Krasovsky, Joseph; Chang, David H; Deng, Gary; Yeung, Simon; Lee, Mavis; Leung, Ping Chung; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Cassileth, Barrie; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2009-03-01

    Turmeric has been extensively utilized in Indian and Chinese medicine for its immune-modulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells specialized to initiate and regulate immunity. The ability of DCs to initiate immunity is linked to their activation status. The effects of turmeric on human DCs have not been studied. Here we show that hydroethanolic (HEE) but not lipophilic "supercritical" extraction (SCE) of turmeric inhibits the activation of human DCs in response to inflammatory cytokines. Treatment of DCs with HEE also inhibits the ability of DCs to stimulate the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Importantly, the lipophilic fraction does not synergize with the hydroethanolic fraction for the ability of inhibiting DC maturation. Rather, culturing of DCs with the combination of HEE and SCE leads to partial abrogation of the effects of HEE on the MLR initiated by DCs. These data provide a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric. However, they suggest that these extracts are not synergistic and may contain components with mutually antagonistic effects on human DCs. Harnessing the immune effects of turmeric may benefit from specifically targeting the active fractions.

  20. Curdlan induces DC-mediated Th17 polarization via Jagged1 activation in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Takehiro; Hashimoto, Kumiko; Takagi, Rie; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Matsushita, Sho

    2010-06-01

    Th17-inducing activity is carried by certain polysaccharides such as beta-glucan derived from Candia albicans. Our previous studies have shown that Th1- and Th2-inducing activities can be qualitatively evaluated by the expression patterns of Notch ligand isoforms, using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DCs) and some leukemic cell lines such as THP-1. The association of Th17-inducing activities with Notch ligand expression patterns has been unclear. Mo-DCs from healthy volunteers were co-cultured with HLA-DR-nonshared allogeneic CD4+ naïve T cells to induce a mixed lymphocyte reaction, in the presence of adjuvants, such as curdlan. Culture supernatants were assayed for IFNgamma, IL-5 and IL-17 by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Notch ligand expression on Mo-DCs and THP-1 cells was evaluated by using RT-PCR. The present study shows that curdlan, one of the beta-glucans, has the ability to induce DC-mediated Th17 differentiation. It is also interesting to note that Jagged1 mRNA in Mo-DCs and THP-1 cells is up-regulated by curdlan. Furthermore, polyclonal anti-Jagged1 antibody inhibited such DC-mediated Th17 differentiation. This study suggests that curdlan induces human DC-mediated Th17 polarization via Jagged1 activation in DCs.

  1. Timothy syndrome is associated with activity-dependent dendritic retraction in rodent and human neurons.

    PubMed

    Krey, Jocelyn F; Paşca, Sergiu P; Shcheglovitov, Aleksandr; Yazawa, Masayuki; Schwemberger, Rachel; Rasmusson, Randall; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E

    2013-02-01

    L-type voltage gated calcium channels have an important role in neuronal development by promoting dendritic growth and arborization. A point mutation in the gene encoding Ca(V)1.2 causes Timothy syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We report that channels with the Timothy syndrome alteration cause activity-dependent dendrite retraction in rat and mouse neurons and in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons from individuals with Timothy syndrome. Dendrite retraction was independent of calcium permeation through the mutant channel, was associated with ectopic activation of RhoA and was inhibited by overexpression of the channel-associated GTPase Gem. These results suggest that Ca(V)1.2 can activate RhoA signaling independently of Ca(2+) and provide insights into the cellular basis of Timothy syndrome and other ASDs.

  2. Activation and measurement of NLRP3 inflammasome activity using IL-1β in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Melissa V; Miller, Elizabeth A; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2014-05-22

    Inflammatory processes resulting from the secretion of Interleukin (IL)-1 family cytokines by immune cells lead to local or systemic inflammation, tissue remodeling and repair, and virologic control(1) (,) (2) . Interleukin-1β is an essential element of the innate immune response and contributes to eliminate invading pathogens while preventing the establishment of persistent infection(1-5). Inflammasomes are the key signaling platform for the activation of interleukin 1 converting enzyme (ICE or Caspase-1). The NLRP3 inflammasome requires at least two signals in DCs to cause IL-1β secretion(6). Pro-IL-1β protein expression is limited in resting cells; therefore a priming signal is required for IL-1β transcription and protein expression. A second signal sensed by NLRP3 results in the formation of the multi-protein NLRP3 inflammasome. The ability of dendritic cells to respond to the signals required for IL-1β secretion can be tested using a synthetic purine, R848, which is sensed by TLR8 in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (moDCs) to prime cells, followed by activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome with the bacterial toxin and potassium ionophore, nigericin. Monocyte derived DCs are easily produced in culture and provide significantly more cells than purified human myeloid DCs. The method presented here differs from other inflammasome assays in that it uses in vitro human, instead of mouse derived, DCs thus allowing for the study of the inflammasome in human disease and infection.

  3. Immature human dendritic cells enhance their migration through KCa3.1 channel activation.

    PubMed

    Crottès, David; Félix, Romain; Meley, Daniel; Chadet, Stéphanie; Herr, Florence; Audiger, Cindy; Soriani, Olivier; Vandier, Christophe; Roger, Sébastien; Angoulvant, Denis; Velge-Roussel, Florence

    2016-04-01

    Migration capacity is essential for dendritic cells (DCs) to present antigen to T cells for the induction of immune response. The DC migration is supposed to be a calcium-dependent process, while not fully understood. Here, we report a role of the KCa3.1/IK1/SK4 channels in the migration capacity of both immature (iDC) and mature (mDC) human CD14(+)-derived DCs. KCa3.1 channels were shown to control the membrane potential of human DC and the Ca(2+) entry, which is directly related to migration capacities. The expression of migration marker such as CCR5 and CCR7 was modified in both types of DCs by TRAM-34 (100nM). But, only the migration of iDC was decreased by use of both TRAM-34 and KCa3.1 siRNA. Confocal analyses showed a close localization of CCR5 with KCa3.1 in the steady state of iDC. Finally, the implication of KCa3.1 seems to be limited to the migration capacities as T cell activation of DCs appeared unchanged. Altogether, these results demonstrated that KCa3.1 channels have a pro-migratory effect on iDC migration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 in human iDC play a major role in their migration and constitute an attractive target for the cell therapy optimization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cholesterol crystals activate Syk and PI3 kinase in human macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Corr, Emma M; Cunningham, Clare C; Dunne, Aisling

    2016-08-01

    Cholesterol crystals are a key component of atherosclerotic lesions where they promote pro-inflammatory cytokine production and plaque destabilization. Antagonists of inflammatory mediators and agents that dissolve or prevent the formation of cholesterol crystals are being explored as potential therapeutics for atherothrombosis. We sought to identify signalling molecules activated following exposure of immune cells to cholesterol crystals with the view to identifying novel therapeutic targets. Human macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) were exposed to cholesterol crystals and activation of signalling molecules was assessed by immunoblotting. The role of Syk and PI3K in crystal-induced interleukin (IL)-1 production was determined by ELISA using specific kinase inhibitors. Real-time PCR was employed to examine the role of Syk/PI3K in cholesterol crystal-induced expression of S100 proteins and MMPs. Exposure of human macrophages and DC to cholesterol crystals induced robust activation of Syk and PI3K within 2-5 min. Pharmacological inhibition of Syk/PI3K reduced crystal-induced IL-1α/β production by approximately 80%. Activation of the downstream MAP kinases, MEK and ERK, was suppressed following inhibition of Syk and PI3K. Finally, inhibition of both Syk and PI3K significantly reduced cholesterol crystal-induced S100A8 and MMP1 gene expression by >70% while inhibition of PI3K also reduced S100A12 expression. Cholesterol crystals activate specific cell signalling pathways which drive the production of inflammatory cytokines and degradative enzymes known to contribute to disease initiation and progression. These molecular events are dependent on activation of Syk and PI3K, hence, they represent potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of cholesterol crystal-related pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of the RelB transcription factor correlates with the activation of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Clark, G J; Gunningham, S; Troy, A; Vuckovic, S; Hart, D N J

    1999-01-01

    The RelB gene product is a member of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB family of transcription factors. It has been identified recently within mouse antigen-presenting cells and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). Disruption of the mouse RelB gene is accompanied, amongst other phenotypes, by abnormalities in the antigen-presenting cell lineages. In order to define RelB expression during human DC differentiation, we have analysed RelB mRNA by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and RelB protein by intracellular staining in CD34+ precursors and different types of DC preparations. RelB mRNA was not detected in CD34+ precursor populations. Fresh blood DC (lineage−human leucocyte antigen-DR+ (lin−HLA-DR+)) lacked RelB mRNA and cytoplasmic RelB protein but a period of in vitro culture induced RelB expression in blood DC. Purified Langerhans’ cells (LC) (CD1a+ HLA-DR+) failed to express RelB mRNA. Immunocytochemical staining identified RelB protein in human skin epithelium. RelB protein was expressed in a very few CD1a+, CD83+ or CMRF-44+ dermal DC but was not present in CD1a+ LC. Tonsil DC (lin−HLA-DR+ CMRF-44+) were positive for RelB mRNA and RelB protein. Intestinal DC (HLA-DR+) also lacked immunoreactive RelB protein. The majority of interdigitating CD83+, CMRF-44+, CMRF-56+ or p55+ DC located in paracortical T-lymphocyte areas of lymph node and tonsil contained RelB protein. The expression of RelB mRNA and RelB protein correlates with the activated phase of blood DC and the postmigration cell (activated) stage of tissue DC development. PMID:10540217

  6. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  7. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation inhibits in vitro differentiation of human monocytes and Langerhans dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Richter, Susanne; Kneidinger, Doris; Waltenberger, Darina; Woisetschläger, Maximilian; Strobl, Herbert

    2009-07-01

    The transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) represents a promising therapeutic target in allergy and autoimmunity. AhR signaling induced by the newly described ligand VAF347 inhibits allergic lung inflammation as well as suppresses pancreatic islet allograft rejection. These effects are likely mediated via alterations in dendritic cell (DC) function. Moreover, VAF347 induces tolerogenic DCs. Langerhans cells (LCs) are immediate targets of exogenous AhR ligands at epithelial surfaces; how they respond to AhR ligands remained undefined. We studied AhR expression and function in human LCs and myelopoietic cell subsets using a lineage differentiation and gene transduction model of human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. We found that AhR is highly regulated during myeloid subset differentiation. LCs expressed highest AhR levels followed by monocytes. Conversely, neutrophil granulocytes lacked AhR expression. AhR ligands including VAF347 arrested the differentiation of monocytes and LCs at an early precursor cell stage, whereas progenitor cell expansion or granulopoiesis remained unimpaired. AhR expression was coregulated with the transcription factor PU.1 during myeloid subset differentiation. VAF347 inhibited PU.1 induction during initial monocytic differentiation, and ectopic PU.1 restored monocyte and LC generation in the presence of this compound. AhR ligands failed to interfere with cytokine receptor signaling during LC differentiation and failed to impair LC activation/maturation. VAF347-mediated antiproliferative effect on precursors undergoing LC lineage differentiation occurred in a clinically applicable serum-free culture model and was not accompanied by apoptosis induction. In conclusion, AhR agonist signaling interferes with transcriptional processes leading to monocyte/DC lineage commitment of human myeloid progenitor cells.

  8. Saccharomyces boulardii inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of human dendritic cells and T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S; Przesdzing, I; Metzke, D; Schmitz, J; Radbruch, A; Baumgart, D C

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) is a probiotic yeast preparation that has demonstrated efficacy in inflammatory and infectious disorders of the gastrointestinal tract in controlled clinical trials. Although patients clearly benefit from treatment with Sb, little is known on how Sb unfolds its anti-inflammatory properties in humans. Dendritic cells (DC) balance tolerance and immunity and are involved critically in the control of T cell activation. Thus, they are believed to have a pivotal role in the initiation and perpetuation of chronic inflammatory disorders, not only in the gut. We therefore decided to investigate if Sb modulates DC function. Culture of primary (native, non-monocyte-derived) human myeloid CD1c+CD11c+CD123– DC (mDC) in the presence of Sb culture supernatant (active component molecular weight < 3 kDa, as evaluated by membrane partition chromatography) reduced significantly expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD80 (P < 0·01) and the DC mobilization marker CC-chemokine receptor CCR7 (CD197) (P < 0·001) induced by the prototypical microbial antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, secretion of key proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6 were notably reduced, while the secretion of anti-inflammatory IL-10 increased. Finally, Sb supernatant inhibited the proliferation of naive T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction with mDC. In summary, our data suggest that Sb may exhibit part of its anti-inflammatory potential through modulation of DC phenotype, function and migration by inhibition of their immune response to bacterial microbial surrogate antigens such as LPS. PMID:19161443

  9. Salvianolic acid B suppresses maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by activating PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Aijun; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Shijun; Shi, Dazhuo; Xu, Lei; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Keqiang; Chen, Keji; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a water-soluble antioxidant derived from a Chinese medicinal herb, is known to be effective in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-atherosclerotic effect of Sal B might be mediated by suppressing maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (h-monDC). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH h-monDC were derived by incubating purified human monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4. h-monDC were pre-incubated with or without Sal B and stimulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in the presence or absence of PPARγ siRNA. Expression of h-monDC membrane molecules (CD40, CD86, CD1a, HLA-DR) were analysed by FACS, cytokines were measured by elisa and the TLR4-associated signalling pathway was determined by Western blotting. KEY RESULTS Ox-LDL promoted h-monDC maturation, stimulated CD40, CD86, CD1a, HLA-DR expression and IL-12, IL-10, TNF-α production; and up-regulated TLR4 signalling. These effects were inhibited by Sal B. Sal B also triggered PPARγ activation and promoted PPARγ nuclear translocation, attenuated ox-LDL-induced up-regulation of TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 and inhibited the downstream p38-MAPK signalling cascade. Knocking down PPARγ with the corresponding siRNA blocked these effects of Sal B. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data suggested that Sal B effectively suppressed maturation of h-monDC induced by ox-LDL through PPARγ activation. PMID:21649636

  10. Pig skin includes dendritic cell subsets transcriptomically related to human CD1a and CD14 dendritic cells presenting different migrating behaviors and T cell activation capacities.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Florian; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Maisonnasse, Pauline; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Bouguyon, Edwige; Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickael; Simon, Gaëlle; Ezquerra, Angel; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Bonneau, Michel; Dalod, Marc; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Bertho, Nicolas

    2014-12-15

    Swine skin is one of the best structural models for human skin, widely used to probe drug transcutaneous passage and to test new skin vaccination devices. However, little is known about its composition in immune cells, and among them dendritic cells (DC), that are essential in the initiation of the immune response. After a first seminal work describing four different DC subpopulations in pig skin, we hereafter deepen the characterization of these cells, showing the similarities between swine DC subsets and their human counterparts. Using comparative transcriptomic study, classical phenotyping as well as in vivo and in vitro functional studies, we show that swine CD163(pos) dermal DC (DDC) are transcriptomically similar to the human CD14(pos) DDC. CD163(pos) DDC are recruited in inflamed skin, they migrate in inflamed lymph but they are not attracted toward CCL21, and they modestly activate allogeneic CD8 T cells. We also show that CD163(low) DDC are transcriptomically similar to the human CD1a(pos) DDC. CD163(low) DDC migrate toward CCL21, they activate allogeneic CD8 and CD4 T cells and, like their potential human lung counterpart, they skew CD4 T cells toward a Th17 profile. We thus conclude that swine skin is a relevant model for human skin vaccination. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Natural amines inhibit activation of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells through CXCR4 engagement

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nikaïa; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Davidson, Sophia; Dutrieux, Jacques; Chauveau, Lise; Cutolo, Pasquale; Dy, Michel; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Manoury, Bénédicte; Zirafi, Onofrio; McCort-Tranchepain, Isabelle; Durroux, Thierry; Bachelerie, Françoise; Schwartz, Olivier; Münch, Jan; Wack, Andreas; Nisole, Sébastien; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are specialized in secretion of type I interferon in response to pathogens. Here we show that natural monoamines and synthetic amines inhibit pDC activation by RNA viruses. Furthermore, a synthetic analogue of histamine reduces type I interferon production in a mouse model of influenza infection. We identify CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) as a receptor used by amines to inhibit pDC. Our study establishes a functional link between natural amines and the innate immune system and identifies CXCR4 as a potential ‘on-off' switch of pDC activity with therapeutic potential. PMID:28181493

  12. PM10-stimulated airway epithelial cells activate primary human dendritic cells independent of uric acid: application of an in vitro model system exposing dendritic cells to airway epithelial cell-conditioned media.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Jeremy A; Alexis, Neil E; Pui, Mandy; Wong, SzeWing; Fung, Elkie; Hansbro, Phillip; Knight, Darryl A; Sin, Don D; Carlsten, Chris

    2014-08-01

    Airway epithelial cells represent the first line of defence against inhaled insults, including air pollution. Air pollution can activate innate immune signalling in airway epithelial cells leading to the production of soluble mediators that can influence downstream inflammatory cells. Our objective was to develop and validate a model of dendritic cell exposure to airway epithelial cell-conditioned media. After establishing the model, we explored how soluble mediators released from airway epithelial cells in response to air pollution influenced the phenotype of dendritic cells. Human airway epithelial cells were cultured under control and urban particulate matter (PM10) exposure conditions with or without pharmacological inhibitors of the uric acid pathway. Culture supernatants were collected for conditioned media experiments with peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived dendritic cells analysed by flow cytometry. Monocytes derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in interleukin-4 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor differentiated into immature dendritic cells that phenotypically differentiated into mature dendritic cells in response to conditioned media from phorbol myristate acetate-activated THP-1 monocytes. Exposure of immature dendritic cells to conditioned media from airway epithelial cells exposed to PM10 resulted in dendritic cell maturation that was independent of uric acid. We present a conditioned media model useful for interrogating the contribution of soluble mediators produced by airway epithelial cells to dendritic cell phenotype and function. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PM10 exposure induces airway epithelial cell production of soluble mediators that induce maturation of dendritic cells independent of uric acid. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activators affect the maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gosset, P; Charbonnier, A S; Delerive, P; Fontaine, J; Staels, B; Pestel, J; Tonnel, A B; Trottein, F

    2001-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma ), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has recently been described as a modulator of macrophage functions and as an inhibitor of T cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PPARgamma in dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen-presenting cells. We showed that PPARgamma is highly expressed in immature human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) and that it may affect the immunostimulatory function of MDDC stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or via CD40 ligand (CD40L). We found that the synthetic PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone (as well as pioglitazone and troglitazone) significantly increases on LPS- and CD40L-activated MDDC, the surface expression of CD36 (by 184% and 104%, respectively) and CD86 (by 54% and 48%), whereas it reduces the synthesis of CD80 (by 42% and 42%). Moreover, activation of PPARgamma resulted in a dramatic decreased secretion of the Th1-promoting factor IL-12 in LPS- and CD40L-stimulated cells (by 47% and 62%), while the production of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 was unaffected. Finally, PPARgamma ligands down-modulate the synthesis of IFN-gamma -inducible protein-10 (recently termed as CXCL10) and RANTES (CCL5), both chemokines involved in the recruitment of Th1 lymphocytes (by 49% and 30%), but not the levels of the Th2 cell-attracting chemokines,macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (CCL17), in mature MDDC. Taken together, our data suggest that activation of PPARgamma in human DC may have an impact in the orientation of primary and secondary immune responses by favoring type 2 responses.

  14. Indoor pollutant hexabromocyclododecane enhances house dust mite-induced activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Canbaz, Derya; Lebre, M Cristina; Logiantara, Adrian; van Ree, Ronald; van Rijt, Leonie S

    2016-11-01

    The indoor pollutant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has been added as flame retardant to many consumer products but detaches and accumulates in house dust. Inhalation of house dust leads to exposure to house dust mite (HDM) allergens in the presence of HBCD. Activation of dendritic cells is crucial in the sensitization to HDM allergens. The current study examined whether exposure to HBCD affected activation/maturation of HDM-exposed human dendritic cells (DC). Human monocyte-derived DC (moDC) were exposed simultaneously to HDM and a concentration range of HBCD (0.1-20 μM) in vitro. HDM exposure of moDC induced expression of co-stimulatory molecule CD80 and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, simultaneous exposure of moDC to HBCD and HDM enhanced the expression of antigen presenting molecule HLA-DR, co-stimulatory molecule CD86 and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 depending on the dose of HBCD. Our results indicate that simultaneous exposure of HDM and HBCD can enhance the antigen presentation and maturation/activation of DC.

  15. Replication-Independent Activation of Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by the Paramyxovirus SV5 Requires TLR7 and Autophagy Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Manuse, Mary J.; Briggs, Caitlin M.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2010-01-01

    The paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5 (SV5) is a poor inducer of interferon (IFN) secretion in all cell types tested so far, including primary epithelial cells and primary human myeloid dendritic cells. SV5 is hypothesized to limit induction of antiviral responses through control of viral gene expression and production of the V protein antagonist. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are known to uniquely express toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and are a main producer of IFN-alpha among peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to many viruses. Here, we tested whether SV5 would remain a poor inducer of IFN in primary human pDCs. The efficiency of SV5 infection of pDCs could be increased by an increasing multiplicity of infection. pDCs infected by both live and UV-inactivated SV5 induced large amounts of IFN-alpha secretion and resulted in upregulation of maturation markers CD80 and CD86. However, IL-6 secretion was not induced by SV5 infection. When TLR7 signaling was inhibited, SV5 induced less IFN secretion and CD80 expression, and there was a corresponding increase in number of infected cells. Similar effects were seen with inhibitors of cellular autophagy pathways, suggesting that the SV5 activation of pDC requires access to the cytoplasm and autophagic sampling of cytoplasmic contents. These results have implications for control of SV5 infections in vivo and for development of SV5 as a vaccine vector. PMID:20605567

  16. Activation and genetic modification of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Michael, Agnieszka; John, Justin; Meyer, Brendan; Pandha, Hardev

    2010-03-05

    Live attenuated bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella typhimurium, have shown promise as delivery vehicles for DNA. We have examined two new strains of S. typhimurium and their impact on dendritic cell maturation (CD12-sifA/aroC mutant and WT05-ssaV/aroC, both in TML background). Strain WT05 matured dendritic cells in a more efficient way; caused higher release of cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-1beta; and was efficient for gene transfer. These findings suggest that the genetic background of the attenuation can influence the pattern of inflammatory immune response to Salmonella infection.

  17. Selective Activation of Human Dendritic Cells by OM-85 through a NF-kB and MAPK Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Scutera, Sara; Somma, Paolo; Salvi, Valentina; Musso, Tiziana; Tabbia, Giuseppe; Bardessono, Marco; Pasquali, Christian; Mantovani, Alberto; Sozzani, Silvano; Bosisio, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom®, Broncho-Munal®, Ommunal®, Paxoral®, Vaxoral®), a product made of the water soluble fractions of 21 inactivated bacterial strain patterns responsible for respiratory tract infections, is used for the prevention of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and acute exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. OM-85 is able to potentiate both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for OM-85 activation are still largely unknown. Purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of OM-85 stimulation on human dendritic cell functions. We show that OM-85 selectively induced NF-kB and MAPK activation in human DC with no detectable action on the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathway. As a consequence, chemokines (i.e. CXCL8, CXCL6, CCL3, CCL20, CCL22) and B-cell activating cytokines (i.e. IL-6, BAFF and IL-10) were strongly upregulated. OM-85 also synergized with the action of classical pro-inflammatory stimuli used at suboptimal concentrations. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with COPD, a pathological condition often associated with altered PRR expression pattern, fully retained the capability to respond to OM-85. These results provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of OM-85 activation of the immune response and strengthen the rational for its use in clinical settings. PMID:24386121

  18. Dendritic transport element of human arc mRNA confers RNA degradation activity in a translation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Kensuke; Ohno, Mutsuhito; Kataoka, Naoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Localization of mRNA in neuronal cells is a critical process for spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression. Cytoplasmic localization of mRNA is often conferred by transport elements in 3' untranslated region (UTR). Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (arc) mRNA is one of the localizing mRNAs in neuronal cells, and its localization is mediated by dendritic targeting element (DTE). As arc mRNA has introns in its 3' UTR, it was thought that arc mRNA is a natural target of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, we show that DTE in human arc 3' UTR has destabilizing activity of RNA independent of NMD pathway. DTE alone was able to cause instability of the reporter mRNA and this degradation was dependent on translation. Our results indicate that DTE has dual activity in mRNA transport and degradation, which suggests the novel spatiotemporal regulation mechanism of activity-dependent degradation of the mRNA.

  19. Isolation and generation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Smita; Archer, Gerald E; Tedder, Thomas F

    2012-11-01

    Dendritic cells are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells (APC), which may be isolated or generated from human blood mononuclear cells. Although mature blood dendritic cells normally represent ∼0.2% of human blood mononuclear cells, their frequency can be greatly increased using the cell enrichment methods described in this unit. More highly purified dendritic cell preparations can be obtained from these populations by sorting of fluorescence-labeled cells. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be generated from monocytes by culture with the appropriate cytokines, as described here. In addition, a negative selection approach is provided that may be employed to generate cell preparations that have been depleted of dendritic cells to be used for comparison in functional studies.

  20. DC-SCRIPT Regulates IL-10 Production in Human Dendritic Cells by Modulating NF-κBp65 Activation.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Poghosyan, Susanna; Hontelez, Saartje; Louche, Pauline; Looman, Maaike W G; Ansems, Marleen; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-08-15

    The balance between tolerance and immunity is important for the outcome of an infection or cancer, and dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of this balance. DC-specific transcript (DC-SCRIPT) is a protein expressed by DCs and has been demonstrated to suppress both TLR-mediated expression of IL-10 and glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Because GILZ is known to promote IL-10 production, we investigated whether these two processes are linked. Dual-knockdown and inhibition experiments demonstrated that neither GILZ nor glucocorticoid receptor play a role in TLR-induced IL-10 production after DC-SCRIPT knockdown. The NF-κB pathway is another route involved in IL-10 production after DC activation. Strikingly, inhibition of NF-κB led to a decreased TLR-mediated IL-10 production in DC-SCRIPT knockdown DCs. Moreover, DC-SCRIPT knockdown DCs showed enhanced phosphorylation, acetylation, and IL10 enhancer binding of the NF-κB subunit p65. These data demonstrate that besides nuclear receptor regulation, DC-SCRIPT also modulates activation of NF-κBp65 after TLR activation in human DCs.

  1. Enhanced activation of human dendritic cells by inducible CD40 and Toll-like receptor-4 ligation.

    PubMed

    Lapteva, Natalia; Seethammagari, Mamatha R; Hanks, Brent A; Jiang, Jianghong; Levitt, Jonathan M; Slawin, Kevin M; Spencer, David M

    2007-11-01

    Despite the potency of dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells for priming adaptive immunity, DC-based cancer vaccines have been largely insufficient to effectively reduce tumor burden or prevent tumor progression in most patients. To enhance DC-based vaccines, we used the combination of a synthetic ligand-inducible CD40 receptor (iCD40) along with Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) ligation in human monocyte-derived DCs. The iCD40 receptor permits targeted, reversible activation of CD40 in vivo, potentially bypassing the essential role of CD4(+) T cells for activation of DCs. As a rigorous preclinical study of this approach, we evaluated key parameters of DC activation and function. Whereas neither iCD40 nor TLR-4 signaling alone led to high levels of interleukin (IL)-12p70 and IL-6, using iCD40 in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or monophosphoryl lipid A led to strongly synergistic production of both. Furthermore, this approach led to high expression of DC maturation markers, epitope-specific CTL and T helper 1 responses, as well as DC migration in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, use of iCD40-modified and LPS-stimulated DCs led to targeted expansion of autologous T cells against tumor-associated antigens, including prostate-specific membrane antigen, and elimination of preestablished tumors, supporting this technology as a potent strategy for DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  2. IL-2 phosphorylates STAT5 to drive IFN-γ production and activation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herr, Florence; Lemoine, Roxane; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Meley, Daniel; Kazma, Ihab; Heraud, Audrey; Velge-Roussel, Florence; Baron, Christophe; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2014-06-15

    Human dendritic cells (hDCs) produce IL-2 and express IL-2R α-chain (CD25), but the role of IL-2 in DC functions is not well defined. A recent study suggested that the main function of CD25 on hDCs was to transpresent IL-2 to activate T lymphocytes. Our results demonstrate the expression of the three chains of the IL-2R on hDCs and that IL-2 induces STAT5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, use of inhibitors of p-STAT5 revealed that IL-2 increases LPS-induced IFN-γ through STAT5 phosphorylation. Finally, we report that IL-2 increases the ability of hDCs to activate helpless CD8(+) T cells, most likely because of IL-2-triggered IFN-γ synthesis, as we previously described. For the first time, to our knowledge, we disclose that IL-2 induces monocyte-derived hDC's functional maturation and activation through IL-2R binding. Interestingly, our study suggests a direct effect of anti-CD25 mAbs on hDCs that may contribute to their clinical efficacy.

  3. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces TLR2-Mediated Migration of Activated Dendritic Cells in an Ex Vivo Human Skin Model.

    PubMed

    Mason, Lauren M K; Wagemakers, Alex; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Oei, Anneke; van der Pot, Wouter J; Ahmed, Kalam; van der Poll, Tom; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Hovius, Joppe W R

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted into the skin of the host where it encounters and interacts with two dendritic cell (DC) subsets; Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal DCs (DDCs). These cells recognize pathogens via pattern recognition receptors, mature and migrate out of the skin into draining lymph nodes, where they orchestrate adaptive immune responses. In order to investigate the response of skin DCs during the early immunopathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis, we injected B. burgdorferi intradermally into full-thickness human skin and studied the migration of DCs out of the skin, the activation profile and phenotype of migrated cells. We found a significant increase in the migration of LCs and DDCs in response to B. burgdorferi. Notably, migration was prevented by blocking TLR2. DCs migrated from skin inoculated with higher numbers of spirochetes expressed significantly higher levels of CD83 and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines. No difference was observed in the expression of HLA-DR, CD86, CD38, or CCR7. To conclude, we have established an ex vivo human skin model to study DC-B. burgdorferi interactions. Using this model, we have demonstrated that B. burgdorferi-induced DC migration is mediated by TLR2. Our findings underscore the utility of this model as a valuable tool to study immunity to spirochetal infections.

  4. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces TLR2-Mediated Migration of Activated Dendritic Cells in an Ex Vivo Human Skin Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagemakers, Alex; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Oei, Anneke; van der Pot, Wouter J.; Ahmed, Kalam; van der Poll, Tom; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted into the skin of the host where it encounters and interacts with two dendritic cell (DC) subsets; Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal DCs (DDCs). These cells recognize pathogens via pattern recognition receptors, mature and migrate out of the skin into draining lymph nodes, where they orchestrate adaptive immune responses. In order to investigate the response of skin DCs during the early immunopathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis, we injected B. burgdorferi intradermally into full-thickness human skin and studied the migration of DCs out of the skin, the activation profile and phenotype of migrated cells. We found a significant increase in the migration of LCs and DDCs in response to B. burgdorferi. Notably, migration was prevented by blocking TLR2. DCs migrated from skin inoculated with higher numbers of spirochetes expressed significantly higher levels of CD83 and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines. No difference was observed in the expression of HLA-DR, CD86, CD38, or CCR7. To conclude, we have established an ex vivo human skin model to study DC-B. burgdorferi interactions. Using this model, we have demonstrated that B. burgdorferi-induced DC migration is mediated by TLR2. Our findings underscore the utility of this model as a valuable tool to study immunity to spirochetal infections. PMID:27695100

  5. Soluble helminth products suppress clinical signs in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and differentially modulate human dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kuijk, Loes M; Klaver, Elsenoor J; Kooij, Gijs; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Heijnen, Priscilla; Bruijns, Sven C M; Kringel, Helene; Pinelli, Elena; Kraal, Georg; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkstra, Christine D; Bouma, Gerd; van Die, Irma

    2012-06-01

    The increased incidence of auto-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in the developed countries seems to be caused by an imbalance of the immune system due to the lack of proper regulation. Helminth parasites are well known modulators of the immune system and as such are of great interest for the treatment of these disorders. Clinical studies showed that administration of eggs of the pig nematode Trichuris suis to patients with inflammatory bowel disease reduces the disease severity. Here we demonstrate that treatment with soluble products from the nematodes T. suis and Trichinella spiralis induces significant suppression of symptoms in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a validated animal model for multiple sclerosis. These data show that infection with live nematodes is not a prerequisite for suppression of inflammation. To translate these results to the human system, the effects of soluble products of T. suis, T. spiralis and Schistosoma mansoni on the phenotype and function of human dendritic cells (DCs) were compared. Our data show that soluble products of T. suis, S. mansoni and T. spiralis suppress TNF-α and IL-12 secretion by TLR-activated human DCs, and that T. suis and S. mansoni, but not T. spiralis, strongly enhance expression of OX40L. Furthermore, helminth-primed human DCs differentially suppress the development of Th1 and/or Th17 cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that soluble helminth products have strong immunomodulatory capacities, but might exert their effects through different mechanisms. The suppressed secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines together with an upregulation of OX40L expression on human DCs might contribute to achieve this modulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Active Dendrites Enhance Neuronal Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Kinouchi, Osame; Copelli, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range. PMID:19521531

  7. West Nile virus-infected human dendritic cells fail to fully activate invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kovats, S; Turner, S; Simmons, A; Powe, T; Chakravarty, E; Alberola-Ila, J

    2016-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection is a mosquito-borne zoonosis with increasing prevalence in the United States. WNV infection begins in the skin, and the virus replicates initially in keratinocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). In the skin and cutaneous lymph nodes, infected DCs are likely to interact with invariant natural killer T cells (iNKTs). Bidirectional interactions between DCs and iNKTs amplify the innate immune response to viral infections, thus controlling viral load and regulating adaptive immunity. iNKTs are stimulated by CD1d-bound lipid antigens or activated indirectly by inflammatory cytokines. We exposed human monocyte-derived DCs to WNV Kunjin and determined their ability to activate isolated blood iNKTs. DCs became infected as judged by synthesis of viral mRNA and Envelope and NS-1 proteins, but did not undergo significant apoptosis. Infected DCs up-regulated the co-stimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, but showed decreased expression of CD1d. WNV infection induced DC secretion of type I interferon (IFN), but no or minimal interleukin (IL)-12, IL-23, IL-18 or IL-10. Unexpectedly, we found that the WNV-infected DCs stimulated human iNKTs to up-regulate CD69 and produce low amounts of IL-10, but not proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Both CD1d and IFNAR blockade partially abrogated this iNKT response, suggesting involvement of a T cell receptor (TCR)-CD1d interaction and type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) signalling. Thus, WNV infection interferes with DC-iNKT interactions by preventing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. iNKTs may be a source of IL-10 observed in human flavivirus infections and initiate an anti-inflammatory innate response that limits adaptive immunity and immune pathology upon WNV infection. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  8. Imidazoquinoline TLR8 agonists activate human newborn monocytes and dendritic cells via adenosine-refractory and caspase-1-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Philbin, Victoria J.; Dowling, David J.; Gallington, Leighanne C.; Cortés, Guadalupe; Tan, Zhen; Suter, Eugénie E.; Chi, Kevin W.; Shuckett, Ariel; Stoler-Barak, Liat; Tomai, Mark; Miller, Richard L.; Mansfield, Keith; Levy, Ofer

    2012-01-01

    Background Newborns suffer frequent infection and manifest impaired vaccine responses, motivating a search for neonatal vaccine adjuvants. Alum is a neonatal adjuvant, but may confer a Th2 bias. Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are candidate adjuvants, but human neonatal cord blood monocytes (Mos) demonstrate impaired Th1-polarizing responses to many TLR agonists due to plasma adenosine acting via cAMP. TLR8 agonists, including imidazoquinolines (IMQs) such as the small synthetic 3M-002, induce adult-level TNF from neonatal Mos, but the scope and mechanisms of IMQ-induced activation of neonatal Mos and Mo-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) have not been reported. Objectives To characterize IMQ-induced activation of neonatal Mos and MoDCs. Methods Neonatal cord and adult peripheral blood Mos and MoDCs were cultured in autologous plasma; Alum- and TLR agonist-induced cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules were measured. TLR8 and inflammasome function were assayed using siRNA and western blotting/caspase-1 inhibitory peptide, respectively. The ontogeny of TLR8 agonist–induced cytokine responses was defined in Rhesus macaque whole blood ex vivo. Results IMQs were more potent and effective than Alum at inducing TNF and IL-1β from Mos. 3M-002 induced robust TLR pathway transcriptome activation and Th1-polarizing cytokine production in neonatal and adult Mos and MoDCs, signaling via TLR8 in an adenosine/cAMP- refractory manner. Newborn MoDCs displayed impaired LPS/ATP-induced caspase-1-mediated IL-1β production, but robust 3M-002-induced caspase-1-mediated inflammasome activation independent of exogenous ATP. TLR8-IMQs induced robust TNF and IL-1β in whole blood of Rhesus macaques at birth and infancy. Conclusions IMQ TLR8 agonists engage adenosine-refractory TLR8 and inflammasome pathways to induce robust Mo and MoDC activation and represent promising neonatal adjuvants. PMID:22521247

  9. Direct Activation of Human Dendritic Cells by Particle-Bound but Not Soluble MHC Class II Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Baleeiro, Renato B.; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Dähne, Lars; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A.; Walden, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key activators of cellular immune responses through their capacity to induce naïve T cells and sustained effector T cell responses. This capacity is a function of their superior efficiency of antigen presentation via MHC class I and class II molecules, and the expression of co-stimulatory cell surface molecules and cytokines. Maturation of DCs is induced by microbial factors via pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, pro-inflammatory cytokines or cognate interaction with CD4+ T cells. Here we show that, unexpectedly, the PanDR helper T cell epitope PADRE, a generic T helper cell antigen presented by a large fraction of HLA-DR alleles, when delivered in particle-bound form induced maturation of human DCs. The DCs that received the particle-bound PADRE displayed all features of fully mature DCs, such as high expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, CD83, the MHC-II molecule HLA-DR, secretion of high levels of the biologically active IL-12 (IL-12p70) and induction of vigorous proliferation of naïve CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, the maturation of DCs induced by particle-bound PADRE was shown to involve sphingosine kinase, calcium signaling from internal sources and downstream signaling through the MAP kinase and the p72syk pathways, and finally activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Based on our findings, we propose that particle-bound PADRE may be used as a DC activator in DC-based vaccines. PMID:23658796

  10. The cystine/glutamate antiporter regulates indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase protein levels and enzymatic activity in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Mildred L; D'Angelo, June A; Grimes, Zachary M; Fiebiger, Edda; Dickinson, Bonny L

    2012-11-30

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the tryptophan-catabolizing pathway and a key regulator of peripheral immune tolerance. As the suppressive effects of IDO are predominantly mediated by dendritic cells (DCs) and IDO-competent DCs promote long-term immunologic tolerance, a detailed understanding of how IDO expression and activity is regulated in these cells is central to the rational design of therapies to induce robust immune tolerance. We previously reported that the cystine/glutamate antiporter modulates the functional expression of IDO in human monocyte-derived DCs. Specifically, we showed that blocking antiporter uptake of cystine significantly increased both IDO mRNA and IDO enzymatic activity and that this correlated with impaired DC presentation of exogenous antigen to T cells via MHC class II and the cross-presentation pathway. The antiporter regulates intracellular and extracellular redox by transporting cystine into the cell in exchange for glutamate. Intracellular cystine is reduced to cysteine to support biosynthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione and cysteine is exported from the cell where it functions as an extracellular antioxidant. Here we show that antiporter control of IDO expression in DCs is reversible, independent of interferon-γ, regulated by redox, and requires active protein synthesis. These findings highlight a role for antiporter regulation of cellular redox as a critical control point for modulating IDO expression and activity in DCs. Thus, systemic disease and aging, processes that perturb redox homeostasis, may adversely affect immunity by promoting the generation of IDO-competent DCs.

  11. Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens are internalized by human dendritic cells through multiple C-type lectins and suppress TLR-induced dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    van Liempt, Ellis; van Vliet, Sandra J; Engering, Anneke; García Vallejo, Juan Jesus; Bank, Christine M C; Sanchez-Hernandez, Marta; van Kooyk, Yvette; van Die, Irma

    2007-04-01

    In schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease caused by helminths, the parasite eggs induce a T helper 2 cell (T(H)2) response in the host. Here, the specific role of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in initiation and polarization of the egg-specific T cell responses was examined. We demonstrate that immature DCs (iDCs) pulsed with schistosome soluble egg antigens (SEA) do not show an increase in expression of co-stimulatory molecules or cytokines, indicating that no conventional maturation was induced. The ability of SEA to affect the Toll-like receptor (TLR) induced maturation of iDCs was examined by copulsing the DCs with SEA and TLR-ligands. SEA suppressed both the maturation of iDCs induced by poly-I:C and LPS, as indicated by a decrease in co-stimulatory molecule expression and production of IL-12, IL-6 and TNF-alpha. In addition, SEA suppressed T(H)1 responses induced by the poly-I:C-pulsed DCs, and skewed the LPS-induced mixed response towards a T(H)2 response. Immature DCs rapidly internalized SEA through the C-type lectins DC-SIGN, MGL and the mannose receptor and the antigens were targeted to MHC class II-positive lysosomal compartments. The internalization of SEA by multiple C-type lectins may be important to regulate the response of the iDCs to TLR-induced signals.

  12. The inclusion into PLGA nanoparticles enables α-bisabolol to efficiently inhibit the human dendritic cell pro-inflammatory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marongiu, Laura; Donini, Marta; Bovi, Michele; Perduca, Massimiliano; Vivian, Federico; Romeo, Alessandro; Mariotto, Sofia; Monaco, Hugo L.; Dusi, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    α-bisabolol, a natural sesquiterpene alcohol, has generated considerable interest for its anti-inflammatory activity. Since the mechanisms of this anti-inflammatory action remain poorly understood, we investigated whether α-bisabolol affects the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12, IL-23, IL-6, and TNFα by human dendritic cells (DCs). We found that α-bisabolol did not induce the secretion of these cytokines and did not affect their release induced upon DC challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a well-known immune cell stimulator. As α-bisabolol is scarcely ingested by the cells, we wondered whether the inclusion of α-bisabolol into nanoparticles could favor its internalization by DCs and consequently its effects on cytokine secretion. We then prepared and characterized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles, with a dynamic light scattering peak centered at 154 nm and a half width at half maximum of about 48 nm. These particles were unable to affect per se cytokine secretion by both resting and LPS-stimulated DCs and were internalized by human DCs as demonstrated by confocal microscopy analysis. We then loaded PLGA nanoparticles with α-bisabolol and we observed that PLGA-associated α-bisabolol did not stimulate the cytokine release by resting DCs, but decreased IL-12, IL-23, IL-6, and TNFα secretion by LPS-stimulated DCs. Our results indicate that α-bisabolol inclusion into PLGA nanoparticles represents a very promising tool for designing new anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic and, possibly, immunosuppressive therapeutic strategies.

  13. HIV-1 gp120 activates the STAT3/interleukin-6 axis in primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Del Cornò, Manuela; Donninelli, Gloria; Varano, Barbara; Da Sacco, Letizia; Masotti, Andrea; Gessani, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are fundamental for the initiation of immune responses and are important players in AIDS immunopathogenesis. The modulation of DC functional activities represents a strategic mechanism for HIV-1 to evade immune surveillance. Impairment of DC function may result from bystander effects of HIV-1 envelope proteins independently of direct HIV-1 infection. In this study, we report that exposure of immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to HIV-1 R5 gp120 resulted in the CCR5-dependent production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/NF-κB pathways. IL-6 in turn activated STAT3 by an autocrine loop. Concomitantly, gp120 promoted an early activation of STAT3 that further contributed to IL-6 induction. This activation paralleled a concomitant upregulation of the STAT3 inhibitor PIAS3. Notably, STAT3/IL-6 pathway activation was not affected by the CCR5-specific ligand CCL4. These results identify STAT3 as a key signaling intermediate activated by gp120 in MDDCs and highlight the existence of a virus-induced dysregulation of the IL-6/STAT3 axis. HIV-1 gp120 signaling through STAT3 may provide an explanation for the impairment of DC function observed upon HIV exposure. This study provides new evidence for the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggered by HIV-1 gp120 in human DCs in the absence of productive infection, emphasizing a role of aberrant signaling in early virus-host interaction, contributing to viral pathogenesis. We identified STAT3 as a key component in the gp120-mediated signaling cascade involving MAPK and NF-κB components and ultimately leading to IL-6 secretion. STAT3 now is recognized as a key regulator of DC functions. Thus, the identification of this transcription factor as a signaling molecule mediating some of gp120's biological effects unveils a new mechanism by which HIV-1 may deregulate DC functions and contribute to AIDS pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology

  14. Differential Activation of Human Monocyte-Derived and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by West Nile Virus Generated in Different Host Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria Carlan; Guerrero-Plata, Antonieta; Gilfoy, Felicia D.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Mason, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in innate immunity and antiviral responses. In this study, we investigated the production of alpha interferon (IFN-α) and inducible chemokines by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) infected with West Nile virus (WNV), an emergent pathogen whose infection can lead to severe cases of encephalitis in the elderly, children, and immunocompromised individuals. Our experiments demonstrated that WNV grown in mammalian cells (WNVVero) was a potent inducer of IFN-α secretion in pDCs and, to a lesser degree, in mDCs. The ability of WNVVero to induce IFN-α in pDCs did not require viral replication and was prevented by the treatment of cells with bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, suggesting that it was dependent on endosomal Toll-like receptor recognition. On the other hand, IFN-α production in mDCs required viral replication and was associated with the nuclear translocation of IRF3 and viral antigen expression. Strikingly, pDCs failed to produce IFN-α when stimulated with WNV grown in mosquito cells (WNVC7/10), while mDCs responded similarly to WNVVero or WNVC7/10. Moreover, the IFN-dependent chemokine IP-10 was produced in substantial amounts by pDCs in response to WNVVero but not WNVC7/10, while interleukin-8 was produced in greater amounts by mDCs infected with WNVC7/10 than in those infected with WNVVero. These findings suggest that cell-specific mechanisms of WNV recognition leading to the production of type I IFN and inflammatory chemokines by DCs may contribute to both the innate immune response and disease pathogenesis in human infections. PMID:17913823

  15. Active dendrites, potassium channels and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Christie, Brian R; Frick, Andreas; Gray, Richard; Hoffman, Dax A; Schexnayder, Lalania K; Watanabe, Shigeo; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2003-01-01

    The dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus express numerous types of voltage-gated ion channel, but the distributions or densities of many of these channels are very non-uniform. Sodium channels in the dendrites are responsible for action potential (AP) propagation from the axon into the dendrites (back-propagation); calcium channels are responsible for local changes in dendritic calcium concentrations following back-propagating APs and synaptic potentials; and potassium channels help regulate overall dendritic excitability. Several lines of evidence are presented here to suggest that back-propagating APs, when coincident with excitatory synaptic input, can lead to the induction of either long-term depression (LTD) or long-term potentiation (LTP). The induction of LTD or LTP is correlated with the magnitude of the rise in intracellular calcium. When brief bursts of synaptic potentials are paired with postsynaptic APs in a theta-burst pairing paradigm, the induction of LTP is dependent on the invasion of the AP into the dendritic tree. The amplitude of the AP in the dendrites is dependent, in part, on the activity of a transient, A-type potassium channel that is expressed at high density in the dendrites and correlates with the induction of the LTP. Furthermore, during the expression phase of the LTP, there are local changes in dendritic excitability that may result from modulation of the functioning of this transient potassium channel. The results support the view that the active properties of dendrites play important roles in synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity of these neurons. PMID:12740112

  16. Propolis modulates miRNAs involved in TLR-4 pathway, NF-κB activation, cytokine production and in the bactericidal activity of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Bruno J; Santiago, Karina B; Cardoso, Eliza O; Freire, Paula P; Carvalho, Robson F; Golim, Marjorie A; Sforcin, José M

    2016-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells, essential for recognition and presentation of pathogens to T cells. Propolis, a resinous material produced by bees from various plants, exhibits numerous biological properties, highlighting its immunomodulatory action. Here, we assayed the effects of propolis on the maturation and function of human DCs. DCs were generated from human monocytes and incubated with propolis and LPS. NF-κB and cytokines production were determined by ELISA. microRNA's expression was analysed by RT-qPCR and cell markers detection by flow cytometry. Colony-forming units were obtained to assess the bactericidal activity of propolis-treated DCs. Propolis activated DCs in the presence of LPS, inducing NF-kB, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 production. The inhibition of hsa-miR-148a and hsa-miR-148b abolished the inhibitory effects on HLA-DR and pro-inflammatory cytokines. The increased expression of hsa-miR-155 may be correlated to the increase in TLR-4 and CD86 expression, maintaining LPS-induced expression of HLA-DR and CD40. Such parameters may be involved in the increased bactericidal activity of DCs against Streptococcus mutans. Propolis modulated the maturation and function of DCs and may be useful in the initial steps of the immune response, providing a novel approach to the development of DC-based strategies and for the discovery of new immunomodulators. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. A phased strategy to differentiate human CD14+monocytes into classically and alternatively activated macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Jelani C; Hernandez, James R; Verdone, James E; Campbell, Scott P; Drake, Charles G; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    There are currently several in vitro strategies to differentiate human CD14(+) monocytes isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) into the M1 or M2 macrophage cell types. Each cell type is then verified using flow cytometric analysis of cell-surface markers. Human CD14(+) monocytes have the potential to differentiate into M1 and M2 macrophages, both of which demonstrate varying degrees of cell-surface antigen overlap. Using multiple surface markers with current macrophage polarization protocols, our data reveal several limitations of currently used methods, such as highly ambiguous cell types that possess cell-surface marker overlap and functional similarities. Utilizing interleukin-6 (IL-6) and two phases of cytokine exposure, we have developed a protocol to differentiate human monocytes into M1, M2, or dendritic cells (DCs) with greater efficiency and fidelity relative to macrophages and DCs that are produced by commonly used methods. This is achieved via alterations in cytokine composition, dosing, and incubation times, as well as improvements in verification methodology. Our method reliably reproduces human in vitro monocyte-derived DCs and macrophage models that will aid in better defining and understanding innate and adaptive immunity, as well as pathologic states.

  18. Activation and selective IL-17 response of human Vγ9Vδ2 T lymphocytes by TLR-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Presti, Elena Lo; Caccamo, Nadia; Orlando, Valentina; Dieli, Francesco; Meraviglia, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Vγ9Vδ2 T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are two distinct cell types of innate immunity that participate in early phases of immune response. We investigated whether a close functional relationship exists between these two cell populations using an in vitro co-culture in a human system. pDCs that had been activated by IL-3 and the TLR9 ligand CpG induced substantial activation of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells upon co-culture, which was cell-to-cell contact dependent, as demonstrated in transwell experiments, but that did not involve any of the costimulatory molecules potentially expressed by pDCs or Vγ9V2 T cells, such as ICOS-L, OX40 and CD40L. Activated pDCs selectively induced IL-17, but not IFN-γ, responses of Vγ9Vδ2T cells, which was dominant over the antigen-induced response, and this was associated with the expansion of memory (both central and effector memory) subsets of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Overall, our results provide a further piece of information on the complex relationship between these two populations of cells with innate immunity features during inflammatory responses. PMID:27590513

  19. Tumor-derived α-fetoprotein impairs the differentiation and T cell stimulatory activity of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Angela D; Shi, Jian; Butterfield, Lisa H

    2014-12-01

    Several tumor-derived factors have been implicated in dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction in cancer patients. α-fetoprotein (AFP) is an oncofetal Ag that is highly expressed in abnormalities of prenatal development and several epithelial cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In HCC patients exhibiting high levels of serum AFP, we observed a lower ratio of myeloid/plasmacytoid circulating DCs compared with patients with low serum AFP levels and healthy donors. To test the effect of AFP on DC differentiation in vitro, peripheral blood monocytes from healthy donors were cultured in the presence of cord blood-derived normal AFP (nAFP) or HCC tumor-derived AFP (tAFP), and DC phenotype and function were assessed. Although the nAFP and tAFP isoforms only differ at one carbohydrate group, low (physiological) levels of tAFP, but not nAFP, significantly inhibited DC differentiation. tAFP-conditioned DCs expressed diminished levels of DC maturation markers, retained a monocyte-like morphology, exhibited limited production of inflammatory mediators, and failed to induce robust T cell proliferative responses. Mechanistic studies revealed that the suppressive activity of tAFP is dependent on the presence of low molecular mass (LMM) species that copurify with tAFP and function equivalently to the LMM fractions of both tumor and nontumor cell lysates. These data reveal the unique ability of tAFP to serve as a chaperone protein for LMM molecules, both endogenous and ubiquitous in nature, which function cooperatively to impair DC differentiation and function. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches that antagonize the regulatory properties of tAFP will be critical to enhance immunity and improve clinical outcomes.

  20. Nanoparticle-mediated combinatorial targeting of multiple human dendritic cell (DC) subsets leads to enhanced T cell activation via IL-15-dependent DC crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Kartik; Ragheb, Ragy; Fahmy, Tarek M; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Dhodapkar, Kavita M

    2014-09-01

    Most vaccines depend on coadministration of Ags and adjuvants that activate APCs. Nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as an attractive vehicle for synchronized delivery of Ags and adjuvants to APCs and can be targeted to specific cell types, such as dendritic cells (DCs), which are potent APCs. Which subset of human DCs should be targeted for optimal activation of T cell immunity, however, remains unknown. In this article, we describe a poly-lactic-coglycolic acid-based NP platform, wherein avidin-decorated NPs can be targeted to multiple human DC subsets via biotinylated Abs. Both BDCA3(+) and monocyte-derived DC-SIGN(+) NP-loaded DCs were equally effective at generating Ag-specific human T cells in culture, including against complex peptide mixtures from viral and tumor Ags across multiple MHC molecules. Ab-mediated targeting of NPs to distinct DC subsets led to enhanced T cell immunity. However, combination targeting to both DC-SIGN and BDCA3(+) DCs led to significantly greater activation of T cells compared with targeting either DC subset alone. Enhanced T cell activation following combination targeting depended on DC-mediated cytokine release and was IL-15 dependent. These data demonstrate that simultaneous targeting of multiple DC subsets may improve NP vaccines by engaging DC crosstalk and provides a novel approach to improving vaccines against pathogens and tumors.

  1. Cell-free culture supernatant of Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 decreases pro-inflammatory cytokines in human dendritic cells challenged with Salmonella typhi through TLR activation.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Matencio, Esther; Bernal, Maria J; Romero, Fernando; Gil, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the first point of contact between gut commensals and our immune system. Despite growing evidence of the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics, the interactions between the cells of the intestinal immune system and bacteria remain largely unknown. Indeed,, the aim of this work was to determine whether the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS) have immunomodulatory effects in human intestinal-like dendritic cells (DCs) and how they respond to the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and also to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in these interactions. Human DCs were directly challenged with B. breve/CFS, S. typhi or a combination of these stimuli for 4 h. The expression pattern of genes involved in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway and cytokine secretion was analyzed. CFS decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human intestinal DCs challenged with S. typhi. In contrast, the B. breve CNCM I-4035 probiotic strain was a potent inducer of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines tested, i.e., TNF-α, IL-8 and RANTES, as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines including IL-10. CFS restored TGF-β levels in the presence of Salmonella. Live B.breve and its supernatant enhanced innate immune responses by the activation of TLR signaling pathway. These treatments upregulated TLR9 gene transcription. In addition, CFS was a more potent inducer of TLR9 expression than the probiotic bacteria in the presence of S. typhi. Expression levels of CASP8 and IRAK4 were also increased by CFS, and both treatments induced TOLLIP gene expression. Our results indicate that the probiotic strain B. breve CNCM I-4035 affects the intestinal immune response, whereas its supernatant exerts anti-inflammatory effects mediated by DCs. This supernatant may protect immune system from highly infectious agents such as Salmonella typhi and can down-regulate pro

  2. Hexa-acylation and KDO(2)-glycosylation determine the specific immunostimulatory activity of Neisseria meningitidis lipid A for human monocyte derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zughaier, Susu; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Stephens, David S; Pulendran, Bali

    2006-02-27

    To better understand immune modulation by endotoxin and facilitate the development of novel vaccine adjuvants, the structural requirements of Neisseria meningitidis lipopoly(oligo)saccharide (LOS) for activation of human monocyte derived dendritic cell (MDDC) was determined. Highly purified LOS from wild type and genetically-defined mutants of N. meningitidis serogroup B were used. Unglycosylated or penta-acylated meningococcal KDO(2)-lipid A failed to induce human MDDC maturation and activation. However, both wild type meningococcal LOS and KDO(2)-lipid A, significantly up-regulated CD80, CD83 and CD86 and released significantly higher amounts of IL-12p70, IL-6, IL-10, TNFalpha, MCP-1, IP-10 and RANTES. Further, DCs stimulated with wild type or KDO(2)-lipid A but not meningococcal lipid A or penta-acylated KDO(2)-lipid A stimulated naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells to secrete enhanced levels of IFN-gamma, relative to T cells primed with immature DCs. In contrast to Escherichia coli LPS, IL-5 production was enhanced or maintained in CD4+ T-cells stimulated with MDDC exposed to wild-type meningococcal LOS and KDO(2)-lipid A. These data suggest that KDO linked to a fully acylated meningococcal lipid A is required for meningococcal endotoxin's immunostimulatory activity of human MDDC via TLR4/MD-2 and that different endotoxin structures influence Th responses mediated by MDDC.

  3. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2013-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic domains. In the proximal domain, action potentials initiated in the axon backpropagate actively with large amplitude and fast time course. In the distal domain, Na+ channel–mediated dendritic spikes are efficiently initiated by waveforms mimicking synaptic events. CA3 pyramidal neuron dendrites showed a high Na+-to-K+ conductance density ratio, providing ideal conditions for active backpropagation and dendritic spike initiation. Dendritic spikes may enhance the computational power of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal network. PMID:22388958

  4. Interaction of Mycoplasma hominis PG21 with Human Dendritic Cells: Interleukin-23-Inducing Mycoplasmal Lipoproteins and Inflammasome Activation of the Cell.

    PubMed

    Goret, J; Béven, L; Faustin, B; Contin-Bordes, C; Le Roy, C; Claverol, S; Renaudin, H; Bébéar, C; Pereyre, S

    2017-08-01

    Mycoplasma hominis lacks a cell wall, and lipoproteins anchored to the extracellular side of the plasma membrane are in direct contact with the host components. A Triton X-114 extract of M. hominis enriched with lipoproteins was shown to stimulate the production of interleukin-23 (IL-23) by human dendritic cells (hDCs). The inflammasome activation of the host cell has never been reported upon M. hominis infection. We studied here the interaction between M. hominis PG21 and hDCs by analyzing both the inflammation-inducing mycoplasmal lipoproteins and the inflammasome activation of the host cell. IL-23-inducing lipoproteins were determined using a sequential extraction strategy with two nondenaturing detergents, Sarkosyl and Triton X-114, followed by SDS-PAGE separation and mass spectrometry identification. The activation of the hDC inflammasome was assessed using PCR array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We defined a list of 24 lipoproteins that could induce the secretion of IL-23 by hDCs, 5 with a molecular mass between 20 and 35 kDa and 19 with a molecular mass between 40 and 100 kDa. Among them, lipoprotein MHO_4720 was identified as potentially bioactive, and a synthetic lipopeptide corresponding to the N-terminal part of the lipoprotein was subsequently shown to induce IL-23 release by hDCs. Regarding the hDC innate immune response, inflammasome activation with caspase-dependent production of IL-1β was observed. After 24 h of coincubation of hDCs with M. hominis, downregulation of the NLRP3-encoding gene and of the adaptor PYCARD-encoding gene was noticed. Overall, this study provides insight into both protagonists of the interaction of M. hominis and hDCs.IMPORTANCEMycoplasma hominis is a human urogenital pathogen involved in gynecologic and opportunistic infections. M. hominis lacks a cell wall, and its membrane contains many lipoproteins that are anchored to the extracellular side of the plasma membrane. In the present study, we focused on

  5. A DNA vaccine against tuberculosis based on the 65 kDa heat-shock protein differentially activates human macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Luís H; Wowk, Pryscilla F; Silva, Célio L; Trombone, Ana PF; Coelho-Castelo, Arlete AM; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria C; Moretto, Edson L; Bonato, Vânia LD

    2008-01-01

    Background A number of reports have demonstrated that rodents immunized with DNA vaccines can produce antibodies and cellular immune responses presenting a long-lasting protective immunity. These findings have attracted considerable interest in the field of DNA vaccination. We have previously described the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a DNA vaccine encoding the Mycobacterium leprae 65 kDa heat shock protein (DNA-HSP65) in a murine model of tuberculosis. As DNA vaccines are often less effective in humans, we aimed to find out how the DNA-HSP65 stimulates human immune responses. Methods To address this question, we analysed the activation of both human macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) cultured with DNA-HSP65. Then, these cells stimulated with the DNA vaccine were evaluated regarding the expression of surface markers, cytokine production and microbicidal activity. Results It was observed that DCs and macrophages presented different ability to uptake DNA vaccine. Under DNA stimulation, macrophages, characterized as CD11b+/CD86+/HLA-DR+, produced high levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 (pro-inflammatory cytokines), and IL-10 (anti-inflammatory cytokine). Besides, they also presented a microbicidal activity higher than that observed in DCs after infection with M. tuberculosis. On the other hand, DCs, characterized as CD11c+/CD86+/CD123-/BDCA-4+/IFN-alpha-, produced high levels of IL-12 and low levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10. Finally, the DNA-HSP65 vaccine was able to induce proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conclusion Our data suggest that the immune response is differently activated by the DNA-HSP65 vaccine in humans. These findings provide important clues to the design of new strategies for using DNA vaccines in human immunotherapy. PMID:18208592

  6. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  7. Random Positions of Dendritic Spines in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  8. ESAT-6 and HspX Improve the Effectiveness of BCG to Induce Human Dendritic Cells-Dependent Th1 and NK Cells Activation

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Laura; Donini, Marta; Toffali, Lara; Zenaro, Elena; Dusi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The limited efficacy of the BCG vaccine against tuberculosis is partly due to the missing expression of immunogenic proteins. We analyzed whether the addition to BCG of ESAT-6 and HspX, two Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens, could enhance its capacity to activate human dendritic cells (DCs). BCG showed a weak ability to induce DC maturation, cytokine release, and CD4+ lymphocytes and NK cells activation. The addition of ESAT-6 or HspX alone to BCG-stimulated DC did not improve these processes, whereas their simultaneous addition enhanced BCG-dependent DC maturation and cytokine release, as well as the ability of BCG-treated DCs to stimulate IFN-γ release and CD69 expression by CD4+ lymphocytes and NK cells. Addition of TLR2-blocking antibody decreased IL-12 release by BCG-stimulated DCs incubated with ESAT-6 and HspX, as well as IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ lymphocytes co-cultured with these cells. Moreover, HspX and ESAT-6 improved the capacity of BCG-treated DCs to induce the expression of memory phenotype marker CD45RO in naïve CD4+ T cells. Our results indicate that ESAT-6 and HspX cooperation enables BCG-treated human DCs to induce T lymphocyte and NK cell-mediated immune responses through TLR2-dependent IL-12 secretion. Therefore ESAT-6 and HspX represent good candidates for improving the effectiveness of BCG vaccination. PMID:24130733

  9. The Attenuated Brucella abortus Strain 19 Invades, Persists in, and Activates Human Dendritic Cells, and Induces the Secretion of IL-12p70 but Not IL-23

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Mario; Eisenblätter, Martin; Jasny, Edith; Fehlings, Michael; Finke, Antje; Gayum, Hermine; Rüschendorf, Ursula; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Moos, Verena; Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Schumann, Ralf R.; Mielke, Martin E.; Ignatius, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vectors have been proposed as novel vaccine strategies to induce strong cellular immunity. Attenuated strains of Brucella abortus comprise promising vector candidates since they have the potential to induce strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in the absence of excessive inflammation as observed with other Gram-negative bacteria. However, some Brucella strains interfere with the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), which is essential for antigen-specific T-cell priming. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of human monocyte-derived DCs with the smooth attenuated B. abortus strain (S) 19, which has previously been employed successfully to vaccinate cattle. Methodology/Principal findings We first looked into the potential of S19 to hamper the cytokine-induced maturation of DCs; however, infected cells expressed CD25, CD40, CD80, and CD86 to a comparable extent as uninfected, cytokine-matured DCs. Furthermore, S19 activated DCs in the absence of exogeneous stimuli, enhanced the expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR, and was able to persist intracellularly without causing cytotoxicity. Thus, DCs provide a cellular niche for persisting brucellae in vivo as a permanent source of antigen. S19-infected DCs produced IL-12/23p40, IL-12p70, and IL-10, but not IL-23. While heat-killed bacteria also activated DCs, soluble mediators were not involved in S19-induced activation of human DCs. HEK 293 transfectants revealed cellular activation by S19 primarily through engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2. Conclusions/Significance Thus, as an immunological prerequisite for vaccine efficacy, B. abortus S19 potently infects and potently activates (most likely via TLR2) human DCs to produce Th1-promoting cytokines. PMID:23805193

  10. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0384 TITLE: Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for...Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER CA100463 5c...Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) on human dendritic cells (DCs) to optimize Lm-based DC cancer vaccines. The project aims are: 1) Compare the activation and

  11. Plasmodium falciparum Infection of Human Volunteers Activates Monocytes and CD16+ Dendritic Cells and Induces Upregulation of CD16 and CD1c Expression.

    PubMed

    Teirlinck, Anne C; Roestenberg, Meta; Bijker, Else M; Hoffman, Stephen L; Sauerwein, Robert W; Scholzen, Anja

    2015-09-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key players in the induction and regulation of immune responses. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, determination of which cells and pathways are activated in the network of APCs remains elusive. We therefore investigated the effects of a controlled human malaria infection in healthy, malaria-naive volunteers on the subset composition and activation status of dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes. While subsets of monocytes increased in frequency during blood-stage infection, DC frequencies remained largely stable. Activation markers classically associated with peptide presentation to and priming of αβT cells, HLA-DR and CD86, were upregulated in monocytes and inflammatory CD16 myeloid DCs (mDCs) but not in the classical CD1c, BDCA2, or BDCA3 DC subsets. In addition, these activated APC subsets showed increased expression of CD1c, which is involved in glycolipid antigen presentation, and of the immune complex binding Fcγ receptor III (CD16). Our data show that P. falciparum asexual parasites do not activate classical DC subsets but instead activate mainly monocytes and inflammatory CD16 mDCs and appear to prime alternative activation pathways via induction of CD16 and/or CD1c. Changes in expression of these surface molecules might increase antigen capture and enhance glycolipid antigen presentation in addition to the classical major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) peptide presentation and thereby contribute to the initiation of T-cell responses in malaria. (This study has been registered at Clinicaltrials.gov under registration no. NCT01086917.).

  12. E6 and E7 fusion immunoglobulin from human papilloma virus 16 induces dendritic cell maturation and antigen specific activation of T helper 1 response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Hur, Yu Jin; Lee, Suk Jun; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu; Oh, Yu-Koung; Jung, Woon-Won; Seo, Jong Bok; Nam, Myung Hee; Choi, Inho; Chun, Taehoon

    2011-04-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 causes cervical cancer. Induction of oncogenesis by HPV 16 is primarily dependent on the function of E6 and E7 proteins, which inactivate the function of p53 and pRB, respectively. Thus, blocking the activity of the E6 and E7 proteins from HPV 16 is critical to inhibiting oncogenesis during infection. We have expressed and purified soluble HPV 16 E6 and E7 fusion immunoglobulin (Ig), which were combined with the constant region of an Ig heavy chain, in a mammalian system. To assess whether soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs induce effective cellular immune responses, immature dendritic cells (DCs) were treated with these fusion proteins. Soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs effectively induced maturation of DCs. Furthermore, immunization with soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs in mice resulted in antigen-specific activation of T helper 1 (Th1) cells. This is the first comprehensive study to show the molecular basis of how soluble HPV 16 E6 or E7 fusion Igs induces Th1 responses through the maturation of DCs. In addition, we show that DC therapy using soluble HPV E6 and E7 fusion Igs may be a valuable tool for controlling the progress of cervical cancer.

  13. IL-6 down-regulates HLA class II expression and IL-12 production of human dendritic cells to impair activation of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yosuke; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Takahashi, Norihiko; Ohtake, Junya; Kaneumi, Shun; Sumida, Kentaro; Homma, Shigenori; Kawamura, Hideki; Minagawa, Nozomi; Shibasaki, Susumu; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-02-01

    Immunosuppression in tumor microenvironments critically affects the success of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we focused on the role of interleukin (IL)-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) signaling cascade in immune regulation by human dendritic cells (DCs). IL-6-conditioned monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) impaired the presenting ability of cancer-related antigens. Interferon (IFN)-γ production attenuated by CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with IL-6-conditioned MoDCs corresponded with decreased DC IL-12p70 production. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and CD86 expression was significantly reduced in CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy donors by IL-6 treatment and was STAT3 dependent. Arginase-1 (ARG1), lysosomal protease, cathepsin L (CTSL), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were involved in the reduction of surface HLA-DR expression. Gene expressions of ARG1, CTSL, COX2, and IL6 were higher in tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells compared with PBMCs isolated from colorectal cancer patients. Expression of surface HLA-DR and CD86 on CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells was down-regulated, and T cell-stimulating ability was attenuated compared with PBMCs, suggesting that an immunosuppressive phenotype might be induced by IL-6, ARG1, CTSL, and COX2 in tumor sites of colorectal cancer patients. There was a relationship between HLA-DR expression levels in tumor tissues and the size of CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell compartments. Our findings indicate that IL-6 causes a dysfunction in human DCs that activates cancer antigen-specific Th cells, suggesting that blocking the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway might be a promising strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Urban particulate matter suppresses priming of T helper type 1 cells by granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Nick C; Faith, Alex; Pfeffer, Paul; Lu, Haw; Kelly, Frank J; Hawrylowicz, Catherine M; Lee, Tak H

    2014-02-01

    Urban particulate matter (UPM) exacerbates asthmatic lung inflammation and depresses lung immunity. Lung dendritic cells (DCs) react to airway particulates, and have a critical role in linking innate and adaptive immunity, but the direct effects of UPM on DCs, that have been activated by granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a product of stimulated normal human bronchial epithelial cells, has not been investigated. Human blood CD1c(+) DCs were purified and activated with UPM in the presence or absence of GM-CSF with and without LPS, and DC maturation was assessed by flow cytometry. DC stimulatory capacity and priming of 5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled naive CD4 T cells was investigated using the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. T cell proliferation and effector function were assessed using flow cytometry and secreted cytokines were measured by combined bead array. UPM enhanced DC maturation in an LPS-independent manner. DCs activated by UPM plus GM-CSF (UPM + GM-CSF DCs) induced higher naive CD4 T cell proliferation in the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction than DCs pretreated by GM-CSF alone (GM-CSF DCs), and elicited both substantially lower levels of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-5 secretion, and lower frequencies of alloantigen-specific T helper (Th) type 1 effector cells than naive CD4 T cells primed by GM-CSF DCs. UPM-stimulated DCs produced IL-6 and TNF-α. Neutralization of IL-6 decreased naive CD4 T cell proliferation stimulated by UPM + GM-CSF DCs, and significantly increased the frequency of alloantigen-specific Th1 effector cells, but did not reverse UPM-induced inhibition of IFN-γ secretion. We conclude that UPM enhances GM-CSF-induced DC maturation and stimulatory capacity, but inhibits the generation of Th1 cells. Thus, UPM exposure may impair Th1 responses to pulmonary pathogens.

  15. Cutting Edge: Immature human dendritic cells express latency-associated peptide and inhibit T cell activation in a TGF-beta-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Roopali; Anderson, David E; Weiner, Howard L

    2007-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in both initiating immune responses and in maintaining peripheral tolerance. However, the exact mechanism by which DCs instruct/influence the generation of effector vs regulatory T cells is not clear. In this study, we present evidence that TGF-beta, an important immunoregulatory molecule, is present on the surface of ex vivo immature human DCs bound by latency-associated peptide (LAP). Maturation of DCs upon stimulation with LPS results in loss of membrane-bound LAP and up-regulation of HLA class II and costimulatory molecules. The presence of LAP on immature DCs selectively inhibits Th1 cell but not Th17 cell differentiation and is required for differentiation and/or survival of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells. Taken together, our results indicate that surface expression of TGF-beta on DCs in association with LAP is one of the mechanisms by which immature DCs limit T cell activation and thus prevent autoimmune responses.

  16. Interleukin-1 and Interferon-γ Orchestrate β-Glucan-Activated Human Dendritic Cell Programming via IκB-ζ Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Marco; Dzutsev, Amiran K.; Li, Hongchuan; Riteau, Nicolas; Gerosa, Franca; Shenderov, Kevin; Winkler-Pickett, Robin; Provezza, Lisa; Riboldi, Elena; Leighty, Robert M.; Orr, Selinda J.; Steinhagen, Folkert; Wewers, Mark D.; Sher, Alan; Anderson, Stephen K.; Goldszmid, Romina; McVicar, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of microbial components via innate receptors including the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1, together with the inflammatory environment, programs dendritic cells (DCs) to orchestrate the magnitude and type of adaptive immune responses. The exposure to β-glucan, a known Dectin-1 agonist and component of fungi, yeasts, and certain immune support supplements, activates DCs to induce T helper (Th)17 cells that are essential against fungal pathogens and extracellular bacteria but may trigger inflammatory pathology or autoimmune diseases. However, the exact mechanisms of DC programming by β-glucan have not yet been fully elucidated. Using a gene expression/perturbation approach, we demonstrate that in human DCs β-glucan transcriptionally activates via an interleukin (IL)-1- and inflammasome-mediated positive feedback late-induced genes that bridge innate and adaptive immunity. We report that in addition to its known ability to directly prime T cells toward the Th17 lineage, IL-1 by promoting the transcriptional cofactor inhibitor of κB-ζ (IκB-ζ) also programs β-glucan-exposed DCs to express cell adhesion and migration mediators, antimicrobial molecules, and Th17-polarizing factors. Interferon (IFN)-γ interferes with the IL-1/IκB-ζ axis in β-glucan-activated DCs and promotes T cell-mediated immune responses with increased release of IFN-γ and IL-22, and diminished production of IL-17. Thus, our results identify IL-1 and IFN-γ as regulators of DC programming by β-glucan. These molecular networks provide new insights into the regulation of the Th17 response as well as new targets for the modulation of immune responses to β-glucan-containing microorganisms. PMID:25474109

  17. Interleukin-1 and interferon-γ orchestrate β-glucan-activated human dendritic cell programming via IκB-ζ modulation.

    PubMed

    Cardone, Marco; Dzutsev, Amiran K; Li, Hongchuan; Riteau, Nicolas; Gerosa, Franca; Shenderov, Kevin; Winkler-Pickett, Robin; Provezza, Lisa; Riboldi, Elena; Leighty, Robert M; Orr, Selinda J; Steinhagen, Folkert; Wewers, Mark D; Sher, Alan; Anderson, Stephen K; Goldszmid, Romina; McVicar, Daniel W; Lyakh, Lyudmila; Trinchieri, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of microbial components via innate receptors including the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1, together with the inflammatory environment, programs dendritic cells (DCs) to orchestrate the magnitude and type of adaptive immune responses. The exposure to β-glucan, a known Dectin-1 agonist and component of fungi, yeasts, and certain immune support supplements, activates DCs to induce T helper (Th)17 cells that are essential against fungal pathogens and extracellular bacteria but may trigger inflammatory pathology or autoimmune diseases. However, the exact mechanisms of DC programming by β-glucan have not yet been fully elucidated. Using a gene expression/perturbation approach, we demonstrate that in human DCs β-glucan transcriptionally activates via an interleukin (IL)-1- and inflammasome-mediated positive feedback late-induced genes that bridge innate and adaptive immunity. We report that in addition to its known ability to directly prime T cells toward the Th17 lineage, IL-1 by promoting the transcriptional cofactor inhibitor of κB-ζ (IκB-ζ) also programs β-glucan-exposed DCs to express cell adhesion and migration mediators, antimicrobial molecules, and Th17-polarizing factors. Interferon (IFN)-γ interferes with the IL-1/IκB-ζ axis in β-glucan-activated DCs and promotes T cell-mediated immune responses with increased release of IFN-γ and IL-22, and diminished production of IL-17. Thus, our results identify IL-1 and IFN-γ as regulators of DC programming by β-glucan. These molecular networks provide new insights into the regulation of the Th17 response as well as new targets for the modulation of immune responses to β-glucan-containing microorganisms.

  18. Up-regulation of EP2 and EP3 receptors in human tolerogenic dendritic cells boosts the immunosuppressive activity of PGE2.

    PubMed

    Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Cabezón, Raquel; Borgman, Kyra J E; España, Carolina; Lozano, Juan Jose; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are APCs essential in regulating the immune response. PGE2, produced during inflammation, has a pivotal role in the maturation of DCs and, therefore, is vital for the immune response. The large variety of biologic functions governed by PGE2 is mediated by its signaling through 4 distinct E-type prostanoid (EP) receptors. Immunogenic DCs express EP2 and EP4, which mediate the PGE2 signaling. However, the expression and function of EP receptors in human tolerogenic DCs (tol-DCs), which present an inhibitory phenotype, have not yet, to our knowledge, been assessed. To clarify the role of EP receptors in tol-DCs, we examined the expression of different EP receptors and their effect using selective agonists in human cells. We find that EP2 and EP3 expression are up-regulated in in vitro-generated tol-DCs compared with mature DCs (mDCs). Activation of EP2-EP4 has a direct effect on the surface expression of costimulatory molecules and maturation receptors, such as CD80, CD83, and CD86 or MHCII and CCR7 in tol-DCs, the latter being exclusively modulated by PGE2-EP4 signaling. Importantly, we find that EP2 and EP3 receptors are involved in tolerance induction through IL-10 production by tol-DCs. These results are in sharp contrast with the inflammatory role of EP4 Moreover, we show that DCs generated in the presence of agonists for EP receptors, induce naive T cell differentiation toward polarized Th1/Th17 cells. Given the differential effects of EP receptors, our results suggest that EP receptor agonist/antagonists might become relevant novel drug templates to modulate immune response. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. Dendritic Cell Activity Driven by Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Producing Human IL-18, in Healthy BCG Vaccinated Adults.

    PubMed

    Szpakowski, Piotr; Biet, Franck; Locht, Camille; Paszkiewicz, Małgorzata; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Allain, Fabrice; Fol, Marek; Pestel, Joël; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains an enormous global burden, despite wide vaccination coverage with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against this disease, indicating that BCG-driven immunity is insufficient to protect the human population against tuberculosis. In this study we constructed recombinant BCG producing human IL-18 (rBCGhIL-18) and investigated whether human IL-18 produced by rBCGhIL-18 modulates DC functions and enhances Th1 responses to mycobacterial antigens in humans. We found that the costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules were significantly upregulated on rBCGhIL-18-infected DCs, whereas the stimulation of DCs with nonrecombinant BCG was less effective. In contrast, both BCG strains decreased the DC-SIGN expression on human DCs. The rBCGhIL-18 increased IL-23, IL-10, and IP-10 production by DCs to a greater extent than nonrecombinant BCG. In a coculture system of CD4(+) T cells and loaded DCs, rBCGhIL-18 favoured strong IFN-γ but also IL-10 production by naive T cells but not by memory T cells. This was much less the case for nonrecombinant BCG. Thus the expression of IL-18 by recombinant BCG increases IL-23, IP-10, and IL-10 expression by human DCs and enhances their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 expression by naive T cells, without affecting the maturation phenotype of the DCs.

  20. Dendritic Cell Activity Driven by Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Producing Human IL-18, in Healthy BCG Vaccinated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Biet, Franck; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Fol, Marek; Pestel, Joël

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains an enormous global burden, despite wide vaccination coverage with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against this disease, indicating that BCG-driven immunity is insufficient to protect the human population against tuberculosis. In this study we constructed recombinant BCG producing human IL-18 (rBCGhIL-18) and investigated whether human IL-18 produced by rBCGhIL-18 modulates DC functions and enhances Th1 responses to mycobacterial antigens in humans. We found that the costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules were significantly upregulated on rBCGhIL-18-infected DCs, whereas the stimulation of DCs with nonrecombinant BCG was less effective. In contrast, both BCG strains decreased the DC-SIGN expression on human DCs. The rBCGhIL-18 increased IL-23, IL-10, and IP-10 production by DCs to a greater extent than nonrecombinant BCG. In a coculture system of CD4+ T cells and loaded DCs, rBCGhIL-18 favoured strong IFN-γ but also IL-10 production by naive T cells but not by memory T cells. This was much less the case for nonrecombinant BCG. Thus the expression of IL-18 by recombinant BCG increases IL-23, IP-10, and IL-10 expression by human DCs and enhances their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 expression by naive T cells, without affecting the maturation phenotype of the DCs. PMID:26339658

  1. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  2. Infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by ANDES Hantavirus enhances pro-inflammatory state, the secretion of active MMP-9 and indirectly enhances endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Andes virus (ANDV), a rodent-borne Hantavirus, is the major etiological agent of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in South America, which is mainly characterized by a vascular leakage with high rate of fatal outcomes for infected patients. Currently, neither specific therapy nor vaccines are available against this pathogen. ANDV infects both dendritic and epithelial cells, but in despite that the severity of the disease directly correlates with the viral RNA load, considerable evidence suggests that immune mechanisms rather than direct viral cytopathology are responsible for plasma leakage in HCPS. Here, we assessed the possible effect of soluble factors, induced in viral-activated DCs, on endothelial permeability. Activated immune cells, including DC, secrete gelatinolytic matrix metalloproteases (gMMP-2 and -9) that modulate the vascular permeability for their trafficking. Methods A clinical ANDES isolate was used to infect DC derived from primary PBMC. Maturation and pro-inflammatory phenotypes of ANDES-infected DC were assessed by studying the expression of receptors, cytokines and active gMMP-9, as well as some of their functional status. The ANDES-infected DC supernatants were assessed for their capacity to enhance a monolayer endothelial permeability using primary human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Results Here, we show that in vitro primary DCs infected by a clinical isolate of ANDV shed virus RNA and proteins, suggesting a competent viral replication in these cells. Moreover, this infection induces an enhanced expression of soluble pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α and the active gMMP-9, as well as a decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These viral activated cells are less sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, supernatants from ANDV-infected DCs were able to indirectly enhance the permeability of a monolayer of primary HUVEC. Conclusions Primary human DCs, that are primarily

  3. Activity-dependent trafficking of lysosomes in dendrites and dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Goo, Marisa S; Sancho, Laura; Slepak, Natalia; Boassa, Daniela; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Bloodgood, Brenda L; Patrick, Gentry N

    2017-08-07

    In neurons, lysosomes, which degrade membrane and cytoplasmic components, are thought to primarily reside in somatic and axonal compartments, but there is little understanding of their distribution and function in dendrites. Here, we used conventional and two-photon imaging and electron microscopy to show that lysosomes traffic bidirectionally in dendrites and are present in dendritic spines. We find that lysosome inhibition alters their mobility and also decreases dendritic spine number. Furthermore, perturbing microtubule and actin cytoskeletal dynamics has an inverse relationship on the distribution and motility of lysosomes in dendrites. We also find trafficking of lysosomes is correlated with synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptors. Strikingly, lysosomes traffic to dendritic spines in an activity-dependent manner and can be recruited to individual spines in response to local activation. These data indicate the position of lysosomes is regulated by synaptic activity and thus plays an instructive role in the turnover of synaptic membrane proteins. © 2017 Goo et al.

  4. Enterovirus-71 virus-like particles induce the activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells through TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Li; Hu, Yu-Chen; Liang, Cheng-Chao; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Liang, Yu-Chih; Yuan, Hui-Ping; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes seasonal epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has a high mortality rate among young children. We recently demonstrated potent induction of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response in monkeys immunized with EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs), with a morphology resembling that of infectious EV71 virions but not containing a viral genome, which could potentially be safe as a vaccine for EV71. To elucidate the mechanisms through which EV71 VLPs induce cell-mediated immunity, we studied the immunomodulatory effects of EV71 VLPs on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), which bind to and incorporate EV71 VLPs. DC treatment with EV71 VLPs enhanced the expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, CD40, CD54, and HLA-DR on the cell surface; increased the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs; and suppressed the capacity of DCs for endocytosis. Treatment with EV71 VLPs also enhanced the ability of DCs to stimulate naïve T cells and induced secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ by T cells and Th1 cell responses. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 suppressed the capacity of EV71 VLPs to induce the production of IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs and inhibited EV71 VLPs binding to DCs. Our study findings clarified the important role for TLR4 signaling in DCs in response to EV71 VLPs and showed that EV71 VLPs induced inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IκBα) degradation and nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-κB) activation.

  5. Human dendritic cell DC-SIGN and TLR-2 mediate complementary immune regulatory activities in response to Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1.

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Schiavi, Elisa; Ziegler, Mario; Groeger, David; Healy, Selena; Grant, Ray; O'Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota is required for optimal host development and ongoing immune homeostasis. Lactobacilli are common inhabitants of the mammalian large intestine and immunoregulatory effects have been described for certain, but not all, strains. The mechanisms underpinning these protective effects are beginning to be elucidated. One such protective organism is Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 (Lb. rhamnosus JB-1). Lb. murinus has no such anti-inflammatory protective effects and was used as a comparator organism. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were co-incubated with bacteria and analysed over time for bacterial adhesion and intracellular processing, costimulatory molecule expression, cytokine secretion and induction of lymphocyte polarization. Neutralising antibodies were utilized to identify the responsible MDDC receptors. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhered to MDDCs, but internalization and intracellular processing was significantly delayed, compared to Lb. murinus which was rapidly internalized and processed. Lb. murinus induced CD80 and CD86 expression, accompanied by high levels of cytokine secretion, while Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 was a poor inducer of costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 primed MDDCs induced Foxp3 expression in autologous lymphocytes, while Lb. murinus primed MDDCs induced Foxp3, T-bet and Ror-γt expression. DC-SIGN was required for Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhesion and influenced IL-12 secretion, while TLR-2 influenced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion. Here we demonstrate that the delayed kinetics of bacterial processing by MDDCs correlates with MDDC activation and stimulation of lymphocytes. Thus, inhibition or delay of intracellular processing may be a novel strategy by which certain commensals may avoid the induction of proinflammatory responses.

  6. Human Dendritic Cell DC-SIGN and TLR-2 Mediate Complementary Immune Regulatory Activities in Response to Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Schiavi, Elisa; Ziegler, Mario; Groeger, David; Healy, Selena; Grant, Ray; O’Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota is required for optimal host development and ongoing immune homeostasis. Lactobacilli are common inhabitants of the mammalian large intestine and immunoregulatory effects have been described for certain, but not all, strains. The mechanisms underpinning these protective effects are beginning to be elucidated. One such protective organism is Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 (Lb. rhamnosus JB-1). Lb. murinus has no such anti-inflammatory protective effects and was used as a comparator organism. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were co-incubated with bacteria and analysed over time for bacterial adhesion and intracellular processing, costimulatory molecule expression, cytokine secretion and induction of lymphocyte polarization. Neutralising antibodies were utilized to identify the responsible MDDC receptors. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhered to MDDCs, but internalization and intracellular processing was significantly delayed, compared to Lb. murinus which was rapidly internalized and processed. Lb. murinus induced CD80 and CD86 expression, accompanied by high levels of cytokine secretion, while Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 was a poor inducer of costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 primed MDDCs induced Foxp3 expression in autologous lymphocytes, while Lb. murinus primed MDDCs induced Foxp3, T-bet and Ror-γt expression. DC-SIGN was required for Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhesion and influenced IL-12 secretion, while TLR-2 influenced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion. Here we demonstrate that the delayed kinetics of bacterial processing by MDDCs correlates with MDDC activation and stimulation of lymphocytes. Thus, inhibition or delay of intracellular processing may be a novel strategy by which certain commensals may avoid the induction of proinflammatory responses. PMID:25816321

  7. Enterovirus-71 Virus-Like Particles Induce the Activation and Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells through TLR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Li; Hu, Yu-Chen; Liang, Cheng-Chao; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Liang, Yu-Chih; Yuan, Hui-Ping; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes seasonal epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has a high mortality rate among young children. We recently demonstrated potent induction of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response in monkeys immunized with EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs), with a morphology resembling that of infectious EV71 virions but not containing a viral genome, which could potentially be safe as a vaccine for EV71. To elucidate the mechanisms through which EV71 VLPs induce cell-mediated immunity, we studied the immunomodulatory effects of EV71 VLPs on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), which bind to and incorporate EV71 VLPs. DC treatment with EV71 VLPs enhanced the expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, CD40, CD54, and HLA-DR on the cell surface; increased the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs; and suppressed the capacity of DCs for endocytosis. Treatment with EV71 VLPs also enhanced the ability of DCs to stimulate naïve T cells and induced secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ by T cells and Th1 cell responses. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 suppressed the capacity of EV71 VLPs to induce the production of IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs and inhibited EV71 VLPs binding to DCs. Our study findings clarified the important role for TLR4 signaling in DCs in response to EV71 VLPs and showed that EV71 VLPs induced inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IκBα) degradation and nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-κB) activation. PMID:25360749

  8. Aqueous extracts from Menyanthes trifoliate and Achillea millefolium affect maturation of human dendritic cells and their activation of allogeneic CD4+ T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Gudbjorg; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Vikingsson, Arnor; Hardardottir, Ingibjorg; Freysdottir, Jona

    2011-06-14

    Menyanthes trifoliate and Achillea millefolium have been used in traditional medicine to ameliorate chronic inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to identify the effects of ethanol and aqueous extracts of Menyanthes trifoliate and Achillea millefolium on maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and their ability to activate allogeneic CD4(+) T cells. Human monocyte-derived DCs were matured in the absence or presence of lyophilised aqoueous or ethanol extracts from Menyanthes trifoliate or Achillea millefolium and their expression of surface molecules analysed with flow cytometry and cytokine secretion measured by ELISA. DCs matured in the presence of aqueous extracts from Menyanthes trifoliate and Achillea millefolium were co-cultured with allogeneic CD4(+) T cells and the expression of surface molecules by T cells and their cytokine secretion and cell proliferation determined. Maturation of DCs in the presence of aqueous extracts from Menyanthes trifoliate or Achillea millefolium did not affect expression of the surface molecules examined but reduced the ratio of secreted IL-12p40/IL-10, compared with that by DCs matured in the absence of extracts. Allogeneic CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with DCs matured in the presence of aqueous extract from Menyanthes trifoliate secreted less IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 than CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with DCs matured without an extract. Maturation of DCs in the presence of aqueous extract from Achillea millefolium decreased IL-17 secretion but did not affect IFN-γ and IL-10 secretion by allogeneic CD4(+) T cells. Aqueous extract from Menyanthes trifoliate induces a suppressive phenotype of DCs that has reduced capacity to induce Th1 and Th17 stimulation of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells, whereas aqueous extract from Achillea millefolium reduces the capacity of DCs to induce a Th17 response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dendritic integration in pyramidal neurons during network activity and disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lucy M

    2014-04-01

    Neurons have intricate dendritic morphologies which come in an array of shapes and sizes. Not only do they give neurons their unique appearance, but dendrites also endow neurons with the ability to receive and transform synaptic inputs. We now have a wealth of information about the functioning of dendrites which suggests that the integration of synaptic inputs is highly dependent on both dendritic properties and neuronal input patterns. It has been shown that dendrites can perform non-linear processing, actively transforming synaptic input into Na(+) spikes, Ca(2+) plateau spikes and NMDA spikes. These membrane non-linearities can have a large impact on the neuronal output and have been shown to be regulated by numerous factors including synaptic inhibition. Many neuropathological diseases involve changes in how dendrites receive and package synaptic input by altering dendritic spine characteristics, ion channel expression and the inhibitory control of dendrites. This review focuses on the role of dendrites in integrating and transforming input and what goes wrong in the case of neuropathological diseases.

  10. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M.; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S.; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections. PMID:27683575

  11. Random positions of dendritic spines in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-23

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410078-07$15.00/0.

  12. Tumor-derived alpha-fetoprotein impairs the differentiation and T cell stimulatory activity of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Angela D.; Shi, Jian; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2014-01-01

    Several tumor-derived factors have been implicated in DC dysfunction in cancer patients. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is an oncofetal antigen that is highly expressed in abnormalities of prenatal development and several epithelial cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In HCC patients exhibiting high levels of serum AFP, we have observed a lower ratio of myeloid-to-plasmacytoid circulating DC compared to patients with low serum AFP levels and healthy donors. To test the effect of AFP on DC differentiation in vitro, peripheral blood monocytes from healthy donors were cultured in the presence of cord blood-derived normal AFP (nAFP) or HCC tumor-derived AFP (tAFP), and DC phenotype and function was assessed. Although the nAFP and tAFP isoforms only differ at one carbohydrate group, low (physiological) levels of tAFP, but not nAFP, significantly inhibited DC differentiation. tAFP-conditioned DC expressed diminished levels of DC maturation markers, retained a monocyte-like morphology, exhibited limited production of inflammatory mediators, and failed to induce robust T cell proliferative responses. Mechanistic studies revealed that the suppressive activity of tAFP is dependent on the presence of low molecular weight (LMW) species that i) co-purify with tAFP, and ii) function equivalently to the LMW fractions of both tumor and non-tumor cell lysates. These data reveal the unique ability of tAFP to serve as a chaperone protein for LMW molecules, both endogenous and ubiquitous in nature, which function cooperatively to impair DC differentiation and function. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches that antagonize the regulatory properties of tAFP will be critical to enhance immunity and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25355916

  13. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, E; Terwilliger, E F; Bos, H J; Kalland, K H; Poznansky, M C; Bacon, O M; Haseltine, W A

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to replicate in primary blood dendritic cells was investigated. Dendritic cells compose less than 1% of the circulating leukocytes and are nondividing cells. Highly purified preparations of dendritic cells were obtained using recent advances in cell fractionation. The results of these experiments show that dendritic cells, in contrast to monocytes and T cells, support the active replication of all strains of HIV-1 tested, including T-cell tropic and monocyte/macrophage tropic isolates. The dendritic cell cultures supported much more virus production than did cultures of primary unseparated T cells, CD4+ T cells, and adherent as well as nonadherent monocytes. Replication of HIV-1 in dendritic cells produces no noticeable cytopathic effect nor does it decrease total cell number. The ability of the nonreplicating dendritic cells to support high levels of replication of HIV-1 suggests that this antigen-presenting cell population, which is also capable of supporting clonal T-cell growth, may play a central role in HIV pathogenesis, serving as a source of continued infection of CD4+ T cells and as a reservoir of virus infection. Images PMID:1910172

  14. Bordetella pertussis Commits Human Dendritic Cells to Promote a Th1/Th17 Response through the Activity of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin and MAPK-Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Nasso, Maria; Cheung, Gordon Yiu Chong; Coote, John Graham; Ausiello, Clara Maria

    2010-01-01

    The complex pathology of B. pertussis infection is due to multiple virulence factors having disparate effects on different cell types. We focused our investigation on the ability of B. pertussis to modulate host immunity, in particular on the role played by adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA), an important virulence factor of B. pertussis. As a tool, we used human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDC), an ex vivo model useful for the evaluation of the regulatory potential of DC on T cell immune responses. The work compared MDDC functions after encounter with wild-type B. pertussis (BpWT) or a mutant lacking CyaA (BpCyaA−), or the BpCyaA− strain supplemented with either the fully functional CyaA or a derivative, CyaA*, lacking adenylate cyclase activity. As a first step, MDDC maturation, cytokine production, and modulation of T helper cell polarization were evaluated. As a second step, engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and TLR4 by B. pertussis and the signaling events connected to this were analyzed. These approaches allowed us to demonstrate that CyaA expressed by B. pertussis strongly interferes with DC functions, by reducing the expression of phenotypic markers and immunomodulatory cytokines, and blocking IL-12p70 production. B. pertussis-treated MDDC promoted a mixed Th1/Th17 polarization, and the activity of CyaA altered the Th1/Th17 balance, enhancing Th17 and limiting Th1 expansion. We also demonstrated that Th1 effectors are induced by B. pertussis-MDDC in the absence of IL-12p70 through an ERK1/2 dependent mechanism, and that p38 MAPK is essential for MDDC-driven Th17 expansion. The data suggest that CyaA mediates an escape strategy for the bacterium, since it reduces Th1 immunity and increases Th17 responses thought to be responsible, when the response is exacerbated, for enhanced lung inflammation and injury. PMID:20090944

  15. Human dendritic cells - stars in the skin.

    PubMed

    Klechevsky, Eynav

    2013-12-01

    "A properly functioning adaptive immune system signifies the best features of life. It is diverse beyond compare, tolerant without fail, and capable of behaving appropriately with a myriad of infections and other challenges. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required to explain how this remarkable system is energized and directed." This is a quote by one of the greatest immunologists our community has ever known, and the father of dendritic cells, Ralph Steinman. Steinman's discovery of DCs in 1973 and his subsequent research opened a new field of study within immunology: DC biology and in particular the role of DCs in immune regulation in health and disease. Here, I review themes from our work and others on the complex network of dendritic cells in the skin and discuss the significance of skin DCs in understanding aspects of host defense against infections, the pathology of inflammatory skin diseases, and speculate on the future effective immune-based therapies. © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. DOWN-REGULATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCER AND ACTIVATOR OF TRANSCRIPTION 3 IMPROVES HUMAN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA-DERIVED DENDRITIC CELL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Michael T.; Miller, Austin; Sait, Sheila N.; Ford, Laurie A.; Minderman, Hans; Wang, Eunice S.; Lee, Kelvin P.; Baumann, Heinz; Wetzler, Meir

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 inhibits dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and is constitutively activated in blasts of approximately half of AML patients. We investigated the correlation between STAT3 activity, DC maturation and the ability to stimulate T-cells in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-derived DCs. STAT3 knock-down by shRNAmir increased the ability of AML-DCs to stimulate T-cells. Treatment of AML-DC with arsenic trioxide, but not AG490, JSI-124 or NSC-74859, led to a more mature phenotype and enhanced T-cell stimulation, while having minimal effect on normal DC. We conclude that AML-DCs have improved immunogenicity after reducing STAT3. PMID:23628554

  17. Stochastic Ion Channel Gating in Dendritic Neurons: Morphology Dependence and Probabilistic Synaptic Activation of Dendritic Spikes

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Matthew F.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal activity is mediated through changes in the probability of stochastic transitions between open and closed states of ion channels. While differences in morphology define neuronal cell types and may underlie neurological disorders, very little is known about influences of stochastic ion channel gating in neurons with complex morphology. We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. For typical neurons, the amplitude of membrane potential fluctuations depends on channel kinetics as well as open probability. Using a detailed model of a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that when intrinsic ion channels gate stochastically, the probability of initiation of dendritic or somatic spikes by dendritic synaptic input varies continuously between zero and one, whereas when ion channels gate deterministically, the probability is either zero or one. At physiological firing rates, stochastic gating of dendritic ion channels almost completely accounts for probabilistic somatic and dendritic spikes generated by the fully stochastic model. These results suggest that the consequences of stochastic ion channel gating differ globally between neuronal cell-types and locally between neuronal compartments. Whereas dendritic neurons are often assumed to behave deterministically, our simulations suggest that a direct consequence of stochastic gating of intrinsic ion channels is that spike output may instead be a probabilistic function of patterns of synaptic input to dendrites. PMID:20711353

  18. Somato-dendritic Synaptic Plasticity and Error-backpropagation in Active Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Schiess, Mathieu; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade dendrites of cortical neurons have been shown to nonlinearly combine synaptic inputs by evoking local dendritic spikes. It has been suggested that these nonlinearities raise the computational power of a single neuron, making it comparable to a 2-layer network of point neurons. But how these nonlinearities can be incorporated into the synaptic plasticity to optimally support learning remains unclear. We present a theoretically derived synaptic plasticity rule for supervised and reinforcement learning that depends on the timing of the presynaptic, the dendritic and the postsynaptic spikes. For supervised learning, the rule can be seen as a biological version of the classical error-backpropagation algorithm applied to the dendritic case. When modulated by a delayed reward signal, the same plasticity is shown to maximize the expected reward in reinforcement learning for various coding scenarios. Our framework makes specific experimental predictions and highlights the unique advantage of active dendrites for implementing powerful synaptic plasticity rules that have access to downstream information via backpropagation of action potentials. PMID:26841235

  19. Immune activation: death, danger and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pulendran, Bali

    2004-01-06

    Dendritic cells are critical for host immunity, and sense microbes with pathogen recognition receptors. New evidence indicates that these cells also sense uric acid crystals in dead cells, suggesting that the immune system is conscious not only of pathogens, but also of death and danger.

  20. Transpresentation of interleukin-15 by IL-15/IL-15Rα mRNA-engineered human dendritic cells boosts antitumoral natural killer cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Van Acker, Heleen; De Reu, Hans; Anguille, Sébastien; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi

    2015-01-01

    In cancer immunotherapy, the use of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination strategies can improve overall survival, but until now durable clinical responses remain scarce. To date, DC vaccines are designed primarily to induce effective T-cell responses, ignoring the antitumor activity potential of natural killer (NK) cells. Aiming to further improve current DC vaccination outcome, we engineered monocyte-derived DC to produce interleukin (IL)-15 and/or IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Rα) using mRNA electroporation. The addition of IL-15Rα to the protocol, enabling IL-15 transpresentation to neighboring NK cells, resulted in significantly better NK-cell activation compared to IL-15 alone. Next to upregulation of NK-cell membrane activation markers, IL-15 transpresentation resulted in increased NK-cell secretion of IFN-γ, granzyme B and perforin. Moreover, IL-15-transpresenting DC/NK cell cocultures from both healthy donors and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients in remission showed markedly enhanced cytotoxic activity against NK cell sensitive and resistant tumor cells. Blocking IL-15 transpresentation abrogated NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells, pointing to a pivotal role of IL-15 transpresentation by IL-15Rα to exert its NK cell-activating effects. In conclusion, we report an attractive approach to improve antitumoral NK-cell activity in DC-based vaccine strategies through the use of IL-15/IL-15Rα mRNA-engineered designer DC. PMID:26675759

  1. Increased expression with differential subcellular location of cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G in human CD4(+) T-cell activation and dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Harold; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Martinez-Navio, José M; Rodríguez-García, Marta; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Climent, Núria; Prado, Carolina; Gil, Cristina; Plana, Montserrat; García, Felipe; Miró, José M; Franco, Rafael; Borras, Francesc E; Navaratnam, Naveenan; Gatell, José M; Gallart, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G; A3G) is an innate defense protein showing activity against retroviruses and retrotransposons. Activated CD4(+) T cells are highly permissive for HIV-1 replication, whereas resting CD4(+) T cells are refractory. Dendritic cells (DCs), especially mature DCs, are also refractory. We investigated whether these differences could be related to a differential A3G expression and/or subcellular distribution. We found that A3G mRNA and protein expression is very low in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs, but increases strongly following T-cell activation and DC maturation. The Apo-7 anti-A3G monoclonal antibody (mAb), which was specifically developed, confirmed these differences at the protein level and disclosed that A3G is mainly cytoplasmic in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs. Nevertheless, A3G translocates to the nucleus in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, yet remaining cytoplasmic in matured DCs, a finding confirmed by immunoblotting analysis of cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Apo-7 mAb was able to immunoprecipitate endogenous A3G allowing to detect complexes with numerous proteins in activated-proliferating but not in resting CD4(+) T cells. The results show for the first time the nuclear translocation of A3G in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells.

  2. Psoriasis in humans is associated with down-regulation of galectins in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, H; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Bonay, Pedro; Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Cibrian, Danay; Sanchez-Cuellar, Silvia; Dauden, Esteban; Fresno, Manuel; García-Diez, Amaro; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    We have investigated the expression and role of galectin-1 and other galectins in psoriasis and in the Th1/Th17 effector and dendritic cell responses associated with this chronic inflammatory skin condition. To determine differences between psoriasis patients and healthy donors, expression of galectins was analysed by RT-PCR in skin samples and on epidermal and peripheral blood dendritic cells by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. In the skin of healthy donors, galectin-1, -3 and -9 were expressed in a high proportion of Langerhans cells. Also, galectins were differentially expressed in peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets; galectin-1 and galectin-9 were highly expressed in peripheral myeloid dendritic cells compared with plasmacytoid dendritic cells. We found that non-lesional as well as lesional skin samples from psoriasis patients had low levels of galectin-1 at the mRNA and protein levels, in parallel with low levels of IL-10 mRNA compared with skin from healthy patients. However, only lesional skin samples expressed high levels of Th1/Th17 cytokines. The analysis of galectin-1 expression showed that this protein was down-regulated in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells as well as in peripheral blood CD11c(+) DCs from psoriasis patients. Expression of galectin-1 correlated with IL-17 and IL-10 expression and with the psoriasis area and index activity. Addition of galectin-1 to co-cultures of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with autologous T lymphocytes from psoriasis patients attenuated the Th1 response. Conversely, blockade of galectin binding increased IFNγ production and inhibited IL-10 secretion in co-cultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells with CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest a model in which galectin-1 down-regulation contributes to the exacerbation of the Th1/Th17 effector response in psoriasis patients. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Dendritic Cells in Human Atherosclerosis: From Circulation to Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Van Vré, Emily A.; Van Brussel, Ilse; Bosmans, Johan M.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Bult, Hidde

    2011-01-01

    Background. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with atherosclerotic plaques containing inflammatory infiltrates predominantly consisting of monocytes/macrophages and activated T cells. More recent is the implication of dendritic cells (DCs) in the disease. Since DCs were demonstrated in human arteries in 1995, numerous studies in humans suggest a role for these professional antigen-presenting cells in atherosclerosis. Aim. This paper focuses on the observations made in blood and arteries of patients with atherosclerosis. In principal, flow cytometric analyses show that circulating myeloid (m) and plasmacytoid (p) DCs are diminished in coronary artery disease, while immunohistochemical studies describe increased intimal DC counts with evolving plaque stages. Moreover, mDCs and pDCs appear to behave differently in atherosclerosis. Yet, the origin of plaque DCs and their relationship with blood DCs are unknown. Therefore, several explanations for the observed changes are postulated. In addition, the technical challenges and discrepancies in the research field are discussed. Future. Future studies in humans, in combination with experimental animal studies will unravel mechanisms leading to altered blood and plaque DCs in atherosclerosis. As DCs are crucial for inducing but also dampening immune responses, understanding their life cycle, trafficking and function in atherosclerosis will determine potential use of DCs in antiatherogenic therapies. PMID:21976788

  4. Translating neuronal activity into dendrite elaboration: signaling to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Growth and elaboration of neuronal processes is key to establishing neuronal connectivity critical for an optimally functioning nervous system. Neuronal activity clearly influences neuronal connectivity and does so via intracellular calcium signaling. A number of CaMKs and MAPKs convey the calcium signal initiated by neuronal activity. Several of these kinases interact with substrates in close proximity to the plasma membrane and alter dendrite structure locally via these local interactions. However, many calcium-activated kinases, such as Ras-MAPK and CaMKIV, target proteins in the nucleus, either by activating a downstream substrate that is a component of a signaling cascade or by directly acting within the nucleus. It is the activation of nuclear signaling and gene transcription that is thought to mediate global changes in dendrite complexity. The identification of calcium-sensitive transcription factors and transcriptional coactivators provides substantial evidence that gene transcription is a prevalent mechanism by which neuronal activity is translated into changes in dendrite complexity. The present review presents an overview of the role of neuronal activity in the development of neuronal dendrites, the signaling mechanisms that translate neuronal activity into gene transcription, and the transcribed effectors that regulate dendrite complexity. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The Influence of Ouabain on Human Dendritic Cells Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, C. R.; Valente, R. C.; Echevarria-Lima, J.; Fontes, C. F. L.; de Araujo-Martins, L.; Araujo, E. G.; Rumjanek, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although known as a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor, several other cellular and systemic actions have been ascribed to the steroid Ouabain (Oua). Particularly in the immune system, our group showed that Ouabain acts on decreasing lymphocyte proliferation, synergizing with glucocorticoids in spontaneous thymocyte apoptosis, and also lessening CD14 expression and blocking CD16 upregulation on human monocytes. However, Ouabain effects on dendritic cells (DCs) were not explored so far. Considering the peculiar plasticity and the importance of DCs in immune responses, the aim of our study was to investigate DC maturation under Ouabain influence. To generate immature DCs, human monocytes were cultured with IL-4 and GM-CSF (5 days). To investigate Ouabain role on DC activation, DCs were stimulated with TNF-α for 48 h in the presence or absence of Ouabain. TNF-induced CD83 expression and IL-12 production were abolished in DCs incubated with 100 nM Ouabain, though DC functional capacity concerning lymphocyte activation remained unaltered. Nevertheless, TNF-α-induced antigen capture downregulation, another maturation marker, occurred even in the presence of Ouabain. Besides, Ouabain increased HLA-DR and CD86 expression, whereas CD80 expression was maintained. Collectively, our results suggest that DCs respond to Ouabain maturating into a distinct category, possibly contributing to the balance between immunity and tolerance. PMID:25609892

  6. Modulatory effects on dendritic cells by human herpesvirus 6

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Rasmus; Svensson, Mattias; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B are β-herpesviruses approaching 100% seroprevalance worldwide. These viruses are involved in several clinical syndromes and have important immunomodulatory effects. Dendritic cells (DC) are key players in innate and adaptive immunity. Accordingly, DC are implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including infections. In this review the effects of HHV-6 infection on DC will be discussed. PMID:25983728

  7. Distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saraga, Fernanda; Ng, Leo; Skinner, Frances K

    2006-03-01

    Gap junctions allow direct electrical communication between CNS neurons. From theoretical and modeling studies, it is well known that although gap junctions can act to synchronize network output, they can also give rise to many other dynamic patterns including antiphase and other phase-locked states. The particular network pattern that arises depends on cellular, intrinsic properties that affect firing frequencies as well as the strength and location of the gap junctions. Interneurons or GABAergic neurons in hippocampus are diverse in their cellular characteristics and have been shown to have active dendrites. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic neurons, also known as basket cells, can contact one another via gap junctions on their distal dendrites. Using two-cell network models, we explore how distal electrical connections affect network output. We build multi-compartment models of hippocampal basket cells using NEURON and endow them with varying amounts of active dendrites. Two-cell networks of these model cells as well as reduced versions are explored. The relationship between intrinsic frequency and the level of active dendrites allows us to define three regions based on what sort of network dynamics occur with distal gap junction coupling. Weak coupling theory is used to predict the delineation of these regions as well as examination of phase response curves and distal dendritic polarization levels. We find that a nonmonotonic dependence of network dynamic characteristics (phase lags) on gap junction conductance occurs. This suggests that distal electrical coupling and active dendrite levels can control how sensitive network dynamics are to gap junction modulation. With the extended geometry, gap junctions located at more distal locations must have larger conductances for pure synchrony to occur. Furthermore, based on simulations with heterogeneous networks, it may be that one requires active dendrites if phase-locking is to occur in networks formed

  8. Contribution of Fcγ receptors to human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and the impairment of T-cell activation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Roberto S; Ramirez, Bruno A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Cautivo, Kelly M; Riquelme, Sebastián A; Prado, Carolina E; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of infant hospitalization related to respiratory disease. Infection with hRSV produces abundant infiltration of immune cells into the airways, which combined with an exacerbated pro-inflammatory immune response can lead to significant damage to the lungs. Human RSV re-infection is extremely frequent, suggesting that this virus may have evolved molecular mechanisms that interfere with host adaptive immunity. Infection with hRSV can be reduced by administering a humanized neutralizing antibody against the virus fusion protein in high-risk infants. Although neutralizing antibodies against hRSV effectively block the infection of airway epithelial cells, here we show that both, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and lung DCs undergo infection with IgG-coated virus (hRSV-IC), albeit abortive. Yet, this is enough to negatively modulate DC function. We observed that such a process is mediated by Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) expressed on the surface of DCs. Remarkably, we also observed that in the absence of hRSV-specific antibodies FcγRIII knockout mice displayed significantly less cellular infiltration in the lungs after hRSV infection, compared with wild-type mice, suggesting a potentially harmful, IgG-independent role for this receptor in hRSV disease. Our findings support the notion that FcγRs can contribute significantly to the modulation of DC function by hRSV and hRSV-IC. Further, we provide evidence for an involvement of FcγRIII in the development of hRSV pathogenesis.

  9. Phenotypic Characterization of Five Dendritic Cell Subsets in Human Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Kelly L.; Hock, Barry D.; McKenzie, Judith L.; Hart, Derek N. J.

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of several antigens on the three currently defined tonsil dendritic cell (DC) subsets encouraged us to re-examine tonsil DCs using a new method that minimized DC differentiation and activation during their preparation. Three-color flow cytometry and dual-color immunohistology was used in conjunction with an extensive panel of antibodies to relevant DC-related antigens to analyze lin− HLA-DR+ tonsil DCs. Here we identify, quantify, and locate five tonsil DC subsets based on their relative expression of the HLA-DR, CD11c, CD13, and CD123 antigens. In situ localization identified four of these DC subsets as distinct interdigitating DC populations. These included three new interdigitating DC subsets defined as HLA-DRhi CD11c+ DCs, HLA-DRmod CD11c+ CD13+ DCs, and HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123− DCs, as well as the plasmacytoid DCs (HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123+). These subsets differed in their expression of DC-associated differentiation/activation antigens and co-stimulator molecules including CD83, CMRF-44, CMRF-56, 2-7, CD86, and 4-1BB ligand. The fifth HLA-DRmod CD11c+ DC subset was identified as germinal center DCs, but contrary to previous reports they are redefined as lacking the CD13 antigen. The definition and extensive phenotypic analysis of these five DC subsets in human tonsil extends our understanding of the complexity of DC biology. PMID:11438475

  10. Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) activates RhoGTPases, induces actin polymerization and inhibits migration of human dendritic cells, but does not influence macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Blöcker, Dagmar; Berod, Luciana; Fluhr, Joachim W; Orth, Joachim; Idzko, Marco; Aktories, Klaus; Norgauer, Johannes

    2006-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as one of the principal initiators of immune responses. In their immature state, they migrate into peripheral tissue in order to uptake antigen and to patrol for danger signals. Upon maturation, they acquire the ability to migrate to the lymph nodes and present the captured antigens to T cells in order to direct the development of specific immune responses. There is evidence that microbial compounds interfere with proper functions of DCs in order to block innate and specific immunity. Here we characterized the influence of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) on monocyte-derived DCs. Using pull-down assays with recombinant rhotekin or p21-activated kinase, we demonstrated the activation of RhoGTPases by PMT in DCs. Moreover, PMT induced changes in DC morphology and actin polymerization, impaired chemotaxin-induced actin re-organization and inhibited their migration response. However, macropinocytosis was not influenced by PMT. In summary, these data indicate that PMT inhibits proper function of the motility machinery in DCs, which might limit the development of adaptive immune surveillance during infection with Pasteurella multocida.

  11. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency.

  12. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency. PMID:27413170

  13. Dendrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers have found that as melted metals and alloys (combinations of metals) solidify, they can form with different arrangements of atoms, called microstructures. These microstructures depend on the shape of the interface (boundary) between the melted metal and the solid crystal it is forming. There are generally three shapes that the interface can take: planar, or flat; cellular, which looks like the cells of a beehive; and dendritic, which resembles tiny fir trees. Convection at this interface can affect the interface shape and hide the other phenomena (physical events). To reduce the effects of convection, researchers conduct experiments that examine and control conditions at the interface in microgravity. Microgravity also helps in the study of alloys composed of two metals that do not mix. On Earth, the liquid mixtures of these alloys settle into different layers due to gravity. In microgravity, the liquid metals do not settle, and a solid more uniform mixture of both metals can be formed.

  14. Binding of HIV-1 gp120 to DC-SIGN Promotes ASK-1-Dependent Activation-Induced Apoptosis of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Vera S. F.; Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Wang, Shu-Rong; Li, Zhongye; Ma, Jing; Lin, Chia-Wei; Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Chang, Kao-Ping; Kung, Sui-Sum; Wu, Yi-Chia; Chu, Cheng-Wei; Tai, Hsiao-Ting; Gao, George F.; Zheng, Bojian; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Austyn, Jonathan M.; Lin, Chen-Lung S.

    2013-01-01

    During disease progression to AIDS, HIV-1 infected individuals become increasingly immunosuppressed and susceptible to opportunistic infections. It has also been demonstrated that multiple subsets of dendritic cells (DC), including DC-SIGN(+) cells, become significantly depleted in the blood and lymphoid tissues of AIDS patients, which may contribute to the failure in initiating effective host immune responses. The mechanism for DC depletion, however, is unclear. It is also known that vast quantities of viral envelope protein gp120 are shed from maturing HIV-1 virions and form circulating immune complexes in the serum of HIV-1-infected individuals, but the pathological role of gp120 in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains elusive. Here we describe a previously unrecognized mechanism of DC death in chronic HIV-1 infection, in which ligation of DC-SIGN by gp120 sensitizes DC to undergo accelerated apoptosis in response to a variety of activation stimuli. The cultured monocyte-derived DC and also freshly-isolated DC-SIGN(+) blood DC that were exposed to either cross-linked recombinant gp120 or immune-complex gp120 in HIV(+) serum underwent considerable apoptosis after CD40 ligation or exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-1β. Furthermore, circulating DC-SIGN(+) DC that were isolated directly from HIV-1(+) individuals had actually been pre-sensitized by serum gp120 for activation-induced exorbitant apoptosis. In all cases the DC apoptosis was substantially inhibited by DC-SIGN blockade. Finally, we showed that accelerated DC apoptosis was a direct consequence of excessive activation of the pro-apoptotic molecule ASK-1 and transfection of siRNA against ASK-1 significantly prevented the activation-induced excessive DC death. Our study discloses a previously unknown mechanism of immune modulation by envelope protein gp120, provides new insights into HIV immunopathogenesis, and suggests potential therapeutic approaches to

  15. Jet exhaust particles alter human dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Ferry, D; Rolland, C; Delhaye, D; Barlesi, F; Robert, P; Bongrand, P; Vitte, Joana

    2011-03-01

    Among combustion-derived air pollutants, little is known about jet kerosene characteristics and effects. Particles yielded by experimental kerosene combustion in a jet engine were characterized with electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Immature human monocyte-derived dendritic cells were exposed for 18 h to 10, 25 or 100 μg/mL jet exhaust particles and/or Escherichia coli-derived endotoxin. Antigen-presenting and costimulation molecules (HLA DR, CD40, CD80, CD86, CD11c), tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 production were measured. The primary particles of jet exhaust are spherical (9.9 nm), carbonaceous and exert an adjuvant effect on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell maturation in vitro. Concomitant particle and endotoxin stimulation induced a high cytokine production with low antigen-presenting molecules; particle contact prior to endotoxin contact led to an opposite phenotype. Finally, low cytokine production and high costimulation molecules were present when particle adjunction followed endotoxin contact. Jet exhaust particles act as adjuvants to endotoxin-induced dendritic cell maturation, suggesting possible implications for human health and a role for the time pattern of infectious and pollutant interplay.

  16. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-12-11

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon(®)) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  17. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J.; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon®) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo. PMID:27973435

  18. Histamine Regulates Actin Cytoskeleton in Human Toll-like Receptor 4-activated Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells Tuning CD4+ T Lymphocyte Response.

    PubMed

    Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Manuelli, Cinzia; Nosi, Daniele; Masini, Emanuela; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Ballerini, Clara

    2016-07-08

    Histamine, a major mediator in allergic diseases, differentially regulates the polarizing ability of dendritic cells after Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation, by not completely explained mechanisms. In this study we investigated the effects of histamine on innate immune reaction during the response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs) to different TLR stimuli: LPS, specific for TLR4, and Pam3Cys, specific for heterodimer molecule TLR1/TLR2. We investigated actin remodeling induced by histamine together with mDCs phenotype, cytokine production, and the stimulatory and polarizing ability of Th0. By confocal microscopy and RT-PCR expression of Rac1/CdC42 Rho GTPases, responsible for actin remodeling, we show that histamine selectively modifies actin cytoskeleton organization induced by TLR4, but not TLR2 and this correlates with increased IL4 production and decreased IFNγ by primed T cells. We also demonstrate that histamine-induced cytoskeleton organization is at least in part mediated by down-regulation of small Rho GTPase CdC42 and the protein target PAK1, but not by down-regulation of Rac1. The presence and relative expression of histamine receptors HR1-4 and TLRs were determined as well. Independently of actin remodeling, histamine down-regulates IL12p70 and CXCL10 production in mDCs after TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation. We also observed a trend of IL10 up-regulation that, despite previous reports, did not reach statistical significance.

  19. HIV-1 gp120 influences the expression of microRNAs in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells via STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Masotti, Andrea; Donninelli, Gloria; Da Sacco, Letizia; Varano, Barbara; Del Cornò, Manuela; Gessani, Sandra

    2015-06-27

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are an abundant class of small non-coding RNAs (~22 nt) that reprogram gene expression by targeting mRNA degradation and translational disruption. An emerging concept implicates miR coupling with transcription factors in myeloid cell development and function, thus contributing to host defense and inflammation. The important role that these molecules play in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 is only now emerging. We provide evidence that exposure of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) to recombinant HIV-1 R5 gp120, but not to CCR5 natural ligand CCL4, influences the expression of a panel of miRs (i.e., miR-21, miR-155 and miR-181b) regulated by STAT3 and potentially targeting genes belonging to the STAT3 signaling pathway. The blockage of gp120-induced STAT3 activation impairs gp120 capacity to modulate the expression level of above mentioned miRs. Predictive analysis of miR putative targets emphasizes that these miRs share common target genes. Furthermore, gene ontology and pathway enrichment analysis outline that these genes mainly belong to biological processes related to regulation of transcription, in a complex network of interactions involving pathways relevant to HIV-DC interaction. Overall, these results point to gp120-triggered modulation of miR expression via STAT3 activation as a novel molecular mechanism exploited by HIV-1 to affect DC biology and thus modulate the immune response through complex regulatory loops involving, at the same time, miRs and transcription factors.

  20. Nanostructured lipid carriers loaded with resveratrol modulate human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, João P; Neves, Ana R; Silva, Andreia M; Barbosa, Mário A; Reis, M Salette; Santos, Susana G

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are promising targets for drug delivery, as they can induce immunity or tolerance. The current study aims to examine the potential of using nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) as delivery systems for human DC by evaluating nanoparticle internalization, cell labeling, and drug activity. NLC were formulated incorporating the fluorochrome fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-NLC) or the natural anti-inflammatory molecule resveratrol (rsv-NLC). Primary human DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes, and the innovative imaging flow cytometry technique was used to examine FITC-NLC internalization. The capacity of rsv-NLC to inhibit DC activation in response to proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) was investigated by conventional flow cytometry. A combination of imaging and conventional flow cytometry was used to assess NLC cytotoxicity. The results obtained indicate that both NLC formulations were stable over time, with mean diameter <200 nm and highly negative zeta potential (about −30 mV). When DCs were placed in contact with NLC, imaging flow cytometry clearly showed that DCs efficiently internalized FITC-NLC, with nearly 100% of cells internalizing nanoparticles upon 1 hour of incubation. Both immature and mature DCs internalized NLC to high and comparable levels, and without cytotoxicity. Stimulating DC with TNF-α in the presence of rsv-NLC revealed that, using these nanoparticles, very small concentrations of rsv were sufficient to significantly decrease surface expression of activation marker CD83 (5 µM) and major histocompatibility complex-class II molecule human leukocyte antigen – antigen D related (10 µM), both upregulated in response to TNF-α stimulation. Rsv-NLC were compared with free rsv; at 5 µM, rsv-NLC were able to inhibit nuclear factor κ beta phosphorylation and significantly decrease the level of interleukin-12/23, both upregulated in response to TNF-α, while 10 µM free rsv were

  1. Mannoproteins from Cryptococcus neoformans promote dendritic cell maturation and activation.

    PubMed

    Pietrella, Donatella; Corbucci, Cristina; Perito, Stefano; Bistoni, Giovanni; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2005-02-01

    Our previous data show that mannoproteins (MPs) from Cryptococcus neoformans are able to induce protective responses against both C. neoformans and Candida albicans. Here we provide evidence that MPs foster maturation and activation of human dendritic cells (DCs). Maturation was evaluated by the ability of MPs to facilitate expression of costimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD86, CD83, and major histocompatibility complex classes I and II and to inhibit receptors such as CD14, CD16, and CD32. Activation of DCs was measured by the capacity of MPs to promote interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion. DC-induced maturation and interleukin-12 induction are largely mediated by engagement of mannose receptors and presume MP internalization and degradation. DC activation leads to IkappaBalpha phosphorylation, which is necessary for nuclear factor kappaB transmigration into the nucleus. MP-loaded DCs are efficient stimulators of T cells and show a remarkable capacity to promote CD4 and CD8 proliferation. In conclusion, we have evidenced a novel regulatory role of MPs that promotes their candidacy as a vaccine against fungi.

  2. Mannoproteins from Cryptococcus neoformans Promote Dendritic Cell Maturation and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pietrella, Donatella; Corbucci, Cristina; Perito, Stefano; Bistoni, Giovanni; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Our previous data show that mannoproteins (MPs) from Cryptococcus neoformans are able to induce protective responses against both C. neoformans and Candida albicans. Here we provide evidence that MPs foster maturation and activation of human dendritic cells (DCs). Maturation was evaluated by the ability of MPs to facilitate expression of costimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD86, CD83, and major histocompatibility complex classes I and II and to inhibit receptors such as CD14, CD16, and CD32. Activation of DCs was measured by the capacity of MPs to promote interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion. DC-induced maturation and interleukin-12 induction are largely mediated by engagement of mannose receptors and presume MP internalization and degradation. DC activation leads to IκBα phosphorylation, which is necessary for nuclear factor κB transmigration into the nucleus. MP-loaded DCs are efficient stimulators of T cells and show a remarkable capacity to promote CD4 and CD8 proliferation. In conclusion, we have evidenced a novel regulatory role of MPs that promotes their candidacy as a vaccine against fungi. PMID:15664921

  3. Human cytomegalovirus alters localization of MHC class II and dendrite morphology in mature Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew W; Hertel, Laura; Louie, Ryan K; Burster, Timo; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Abate, Davide A; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2006-09-15

    Hemopoietic stem cell-derived mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (LC) are susceptible to productive infection by human CMV (HCMV). To investigate the impact of infection on this cell type, we examined HLA-DR biosynthesis and trafficking in mature LC cultures exposed to HCMV. We found decreased surface HLA-DR levels in viral Ag-positive as well as in Ag-negative mature LC. Inhibition of HLA-DR was independent of expression of unique short US2-US11 region gene products by HCMV. Indeed, exposure to UV-inactivated virus, but not to conditioned medium from infected cells, was sufficient to reduce HLA-DR on mature LC, implicating particle binding/penetration in this effect. Reduced surface levels reflected an altered distribution of HLA-DR because total cellular HLA-DR was not diminished. Accumulation of HLA-DR was not explained by altered cathepsin S activity. Mature, peptide-loaded HLA-DR molecules were retained within cells, as assessed by the proportion of SDS-stable HLA-DR dimers. A block in egress was implicated, as endocytosis of surface HLA-DR was not increased. Immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated the intracellular retention of HLA-DR and revealed markedly fewer HLA-DR-positive dendritic projections in infected mature LC. Unexpectedly, light microscopic analyses showed a dramatic loss of the dendrites themselves and immunofluorescence revealed that cytoskeletal elements crucial for the formation and maintenance of dendrites are disrupted in viral Ag-positive cells. Consistent with these dendrite effects, HCMV-infected mature LC exhibit markedly reduced chemotaxis in response to lymphoid chemokines. Thus, HCMV impedes MHC class II molecule trafficking, dendritic projections, and migration of mature LC. These changes likely contribute to the reduced activation of CD4+ T cells by HCMV-infected mature LC.

  4. An Engineered Herpesvirus Activates Dendritic Cells and Induces Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yijie; Chen, Min; Jin, Huali; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; He, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are human pathogens that switch between lytic and latent infection. While attenuated HSV is explored for vaccine, the underlying event remains poorly defined. Here we report that recombinant HSV-1 with a mutation in the γ134.5 protein, a virulence factor, stimulates dendritic cell (DC) maturation which is dependent on TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). When exposed to CD11+ DCs, the mutant virus that lacks the amino terminus of γ134.5 undergoes temporal replication without production of infectious virus. Mechanistically, this leads to sequential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and p65/RelA. In correlation, DCs up-regulate the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. However, selective inhibition of TBK1 precludes phosphorylation of IRF3 and subsequent DC activation by the γ134.5 mutant. Herein, the γ134.5 mutant is immune-stimulatory and non-destructive to DCs. Remarkably, upon immunization the γ134.5 mutant induces protection against lethal challenge by the wild type virus, indicative of its vaccine potential. Furthermore, CD11+ DCs primed by the γ134.5 mutant in vivo mediate protection upon adoptive transfer. These results suggest that activation of TBK1 by engineered HSV is crucial for DC maturation, which may contribute to protective immunity. PMID:28150813

  5. Cross-Presentation in Mouse and Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation designates the presentation of exogenous antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and is essential for the initiation of cytotoxic immune responses. It is now well established that dendritic cells (DCs) are the best cross-presenting cells. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cross-presentation. We will also describe the different DC subsets identified in mouse and human, and their functional specialization for cross-presentation. Finally, we will summarize the current knowledge of the role of cross-presentation in pathological situations.

  6. Generation of mouse and human dendritic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xueheng; Zhou, Yifan; Wu, Tao; Zhu, Xinyi; Lai, Wenlong; Wu, Li

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) that can orchestrate immune responses and maintain host homeostasis, are indispensable components of the immune system. Although distributed widely in many lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, their rarity in number has become a limiting factor for DC related research and therapies. Therefore, methods for efficiently generating large numbers of DC resembling their in vivo counterparts are urgently needed for DC related research and therapies. Herein we summarize the current methods for generating mouse and human DC in vitro and hope that these will facilitate both studies of DC biology and their clinical applications.

  7. Presence and regulation of the endocannabinoid system in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matias, Isabel; Pochard, Pierre; Orlando, Pierangelo; Salzet, Michel; Pestel, Joel; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2002-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids, have been detected in several blood immune cells, including monocytes/macrophages, basophils and lymphocytes. However, their presence in dendritic cells, which play a key role in the initiation and development of the immune response, has never been investigated. Here we have analyzed human dendritic cells for the presence of the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, and one of the enzymes mostly responsible for endocannabinoid hydrolysis, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By using a very sensitive liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometric (LC-APCI-MS) method, lipids extracted from immature dendritic cells were shown to contain 2-AG, anandamide and the anti-inflammatory anandamide congener, N-palmitoylethanolamine (PalEtn) (2.1 +/- 1.0, 0.14 +/- 0.02 and 8.2 +/- 3.9 pmol x 10(-7) cells, respectively). The amounts of 2-AG, but not anandamide or PalEtn, were significantly increased following cell maturation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the allergen Der p 1 (2.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively). By using both RT-PCR and Western immunoblotting, dendritic cells were also found to express measurable amounts of CB1 and CB2 receptors and of FAAH. Cell maturation did not consistently modify the expression of these proteins, although in some cell preparations a decrease of the levels of both CB1 and CB2 mRNA transcripts was observed after LPS stimulation. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the endogenous cannabinoid system is present in human dendritic cells and can be regulated by cell activation.

  8. Travelling waves in a model of quasi-active dendrites with active spines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Dendrites, the major components of neurons, have many different types of branching structures and are involved in receiving and integrating thousands of synaptic inputs from other neurons. Dendritic spines with excitable channels can be present in large densities on the dendrites of many cells. The recently proposed Spike-Diffuse-Spike (SDS) model that is described by a system of point hot-spots (with an integrate-and-fire process) embedded throughout a passive tree has been shown to provide a reasonable caricature of a dendritic tree with supra-threshold dynamics. Interestingly, real dendrites equipped with voltage-gated ion channels can exhibit not only supra-threshold responses, but also sub-threshold dynamics. This sub-threshold resonant-like oscillatory behaviour has already been shown to be adequately described by a quasi-active membrane. In this paper we introduce a mathematical model of a branched dendritic tree based upon a generalisation of the SDS model where the active spines are assumed to be distributed along a quasi-active dendritic structure. We demonstrate how solitary and periodic travelling wave solutions can be constructed for both continuous and discrete spine distributions. In both cases the speed of such waves is calculated as a function of system parameters. We also illustrate that the model can be naturally generalised to an arbitrary branched dendritic geometry whilst remaining computationally simple. The spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal activity are shown to be significantly influenced by the properties of the quasi-active membrane. Active (sub- and supra-threshold) properties of dendrites are known to vary considerably among cell types and animal species, and this theoretical framework can be used in studying the combined role of complex dendritic morphologies and active conductances in rich neuronal dynamics.

  9. Viral infection triggers rapid differentiation of human blood monocytes into dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wanqiu; Gibbs, James S; Lu, Xiuju; Brooke, Christopher B; Roy, Devika; Modlin, Robert L; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2012-03-29

    Surprisingly little is known about the interaction of human blood mononuclear cells with viruses. Here, we show that monocytes are the predominant cell type infected when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are exposed to viruses ex vivo. Remarkably, infection with vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, and a variety of influenza A viruses (including circulating swine-origin virus) induces monocytes to differentiate within 18 hours into CD16(-)CD83(+) mature dendritic cells with enhanced capacity to activate T cells. Differentiation into dendritic cells does not require cell division and occurs despite the synthesis of viral proteins, which demonstrates that monocytes counteract the capacity of these highly lytic viruses to hijack host cell biosynthetic capacity. Indeed, differentiation requires infectious virus and viral protein synthesis. These findings demonstrate that monocytes are uniquely susceptible to viral infection among blood mononuclear cells, with the likely purpose of generating cells with enhanced capacity to activate innate and acquired antiviral immunity.

  10. Longitudinal Tracking of Human Dendritic Cells in Murine Models Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Leboeuf, Marylene; Dickson, Stephen; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Merad, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Ex vivo generated dendritic cells are currently used to induce therapeutic immunity in solid tumors. Effective immune response requires dendritic cells to home and remain in lymphoid organs to allow for adequate interaction with T lymphocytes. The aim of the current study was to detect and track Feridex labeled human dendritic cells in murine models using magnetic resonance imaging. Human dendritic cells were incubated with Feridex and the effect of labeling on dendritic cells immune function was evaluated. Ex vivo dendritic cell phantoms were used to estimate sensitivity of the magnetic resonance methods and in vivo homing was evaluated after intravenous or subcutaneous injection. R2*-maps of liver, spleen, and draining lymph nodes were obtained and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or relaxometry methods were used to quantify the Feridex tissue concentrations. Correlations between in vivo R2* values and iron content were then determined. Feridex labeling did not affect dendritic cell maturation or function. Phantom results indicated that it was possible to detect 125 dendritic cells within a given slice. Strong correlation between in vivo R2* values and iron deposition was observed. Importantly, Feridex-labeled dendritic cells were detected in the spleen for up to 2 weeks postintravenous injection. This study suggests that magnetic resonance imaging may be used to longitudinally track Feridex-labeled human dendritic cells for up to 2 weeks after injection. PMID:20593373

  11. Rotavirus activates dendritic cells derived from umbilical cord blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Martinez, D; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, L; Badillo-Godinez, O; Lopez-Guerrero, D; Santana-Calderon, A; Cortez-Gomez, R; Ramirez-Pliego, O; Esquivel-Guadarrama, F

    2016-10-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of acute infectious diarrhea in human neonates and infants. However, the studies aimed at dissecting the anti-virus immune response have been mainly performed in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in innate and acquired immune responses. Therefore, it is very important to determine the response of neonatal and infant DCs to rotavirus and to compare it to the response of adult DCs. Thus, we determined the response of monocyte-derived DCs from umbilical cord blood (UCB) and adult peripheral blood (PB) to rotavirus in vitro. It was found that the rotavirus and its genome, composed of segmented doubled stranded RNA (dsRNA), induced the activation of neonatal DCs, as these cells up-regulated the levels of CD40, CD86, MHC II, TLR-3 and TLR-4, the production of cytokines IL-6, IL-12/23p40, IL-10, TGF-β (but not of IL-12p70), and the message for TNF-α and IFN-β. This activation enabled the neonatal DCs to induce a strong proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells and the production of IFN-γ. Moreover, neonatal DCs could be infected by rotavirus and sustain its replication. Neonatal DCs had a similar response as adult DCs towards rotavirus and its genome. However, adult DCs had a biased pro-inflammatory response compared to neonatal DCs, which showed a biased regulatory profile, as they produced higher levels of IL-10 and TGF-β, and were less efficient in inducing a Th1 type response. So it can be concluded that rotavirus and its genome can induce the activation of neonatal DCs in spite of their tolerogenic bias.

  12. Type I (CD64) and type II (CD32) Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis by human blood dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fanger, N A; Wardwell, K; Shen, L; Tedder, T F; Guyre, P M

    1996-07-15

    Three classes of Fc receptors for IgG, Fc gamma RI (CD64), Fc gamma RII (CD32), and Fc gamma RIII (CD16), are expressed on blood leukocytes. Although Fc gamma R are important phagocytic receptors on phagocytes, most reports suggest that dendritic cells lack Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis and express significant levels of only CD32. We now report that phagocytically active forms of both CD64 and CD32 are expressed significantly on at least one subset of human blood dendritic cells. Countercurrent elutriation and magnetic bead selection were used to rapidly enrich subsets of blood dendritic cells (CD33brightCD14-HLA-DRbrightCD83-) and monocytes (CD33brightCD14brightHLA-DRdimCD83-). Upon culture for 2 days, dendritic cells became CD83-positive and markedly increased HLA-DR expression, whereas monocytes did not express CD83 and exhibited reduced levels of HLA-DR. Constitutive CD64 expression was identified on this circulating dendritic cell population, but at a lower level than on monocytes. CD64 expression by dendritic cells and monocytes did not decrease during 2 days in culture, and was up-regulated on both cell types following incubation with IFN-gamma. Freshly isolated blood dendritic cells performed CD64- and CD32-mediated phagocytosis, although at a lower level than monocytes. Dendritic cells generated by culture of adherent mononuclear cells in granulocyte-macrophage CSF and IL-4 also up-regulated CD64 following IFN-gamma stimulation, and mediated CD64-dependent phagocytosis. These results indicate that both CD64 and CD32 expressed on blood dendritic cells may play a role in uptake of foreign particles and macromolecules through a phagocytic mechanism before trafficking to T cell-reactive areas.

  13. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2008-09-26

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14{sup +} monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant.

  14. Induction of maturation and activation of human dendritic cells: A mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of Viscum album as complimentary therapy in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elluru, Sri Ramulu; van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; Delignat, Sandrine; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Friboulet, Alain; Kaveri, Srini V; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2008-01-01

    Background Viscum album (VA) preparations have been used as a complimentary therapy in cancer. In addition to their cytotoxic properties, they have also been shown to have immunostimulatory properties. In the present study, we examine the hypothesis that the VA preparations induce activation of human DC that facilitates effective tumor regression. Methods Four day old monocyte-derived immature DCs were treated with VA Qu Spez at 5, 10 and 15 μg/ml for 48 hrs. The expression of surface molecules was analyzed by flow cytometry. The ability of Qu Spez-educated DC to stimulate T cells was analyzed by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction and activation of Melan-A/MART-1-specific M77-80 CD8+T cells. Cytokines in cell free culture supernatant was analyzed by cytokine bead array assay. Results VA Qu Spez stimulated DCs presented with increased expression of antigen presenting molecule HLA-DR and of co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86. The VA Qu Spez also induced the secretion of inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Further, Qu Spez-educated DC stimulated CD4+T cells in a allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction and activated melanoma antigen Melan-A/MART-1-specific M77-80 CD8+T cells as evidenced by increased secretion of TNF-α and IFNγ. Conclusion The VA preparations stimulate the maturation and activation of human DCs, which may facilitate anti-tumoral immune responses. These results should assist in understanding the immunostimulatory properties of VA preparations and improving the therapeutic strategies. PMID:18533025

  15. Active subthreshold dendritic conductances shape the local field potential

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Torbjørn V.; Remme, Michiel W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The local field potential (LFP), the low‐frequency part of extracellular potentials recorded in neural tissue, is often used for probing neural circuit activity. Interpreting the LFP signal is difficult, however.While the cortical LFP is thought mainly to reflect synaptic inputs onto pyramidal neurons, little is known about the role of the various subthreshold active conductances in shaping the LFP.By means of biophysical modelling we obtain a comprehensive qualitative understanding of how the LFP generated by a single pyramidal neuron depends on the type and spatial distribution of active subthreshold currents.For pyramidal neurons, the h‐type channels probably play a key role and can cause a distinct resonance in the LFP power spectrum.Our results show that the LFP signal can give information about the active properties of neurons and imply that preferred frequencies in the LFP can result from those cellular properties instead of, for example, network dynamics. Abstract The main contribution to the local field potential (LFP) is thought to stem from synaptic input to neurons and the ensuing subthreshold dendritic processing. The role of active dendritic conductances in shaping the LFP has received little attention, even though such ion channels are known to affect the subthreshold neuron dynamics. Here we used a modelling approach to investigate the effects of subthreshold dendritic conductances on the LFP. Using a biophysically detailed, experimentally constrained model of a cortical pyramidal neuron, we identified conditions under which subthreshold active conductances are a major factor in shaping the LFP. We found that, in particular, the hyperpolarization‐activated inward current, I h, can have a sizable effect and cause a resonance in the LFP power spectral density. To get a general, qualitative understanding of how any subthreshold active dendritic conductance and its cellular distribution can affect the LFP, we next performed a systematic

  16. Early Immune Regulatory Changes in a Primary Controlled Human Plasmodium vivax Infection: CD1c(+) Myeloid Dendritic Cell Maturation Arrest, Induction of the Kynurenine Pathway, and Regulatory T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Woodberry, Tonia; Loughland, Jessica R; Minigo, Gabriela; Burel, Julie G; Amante, Fiona H; Piera, Kim A; McNeil, Yvette; Yeo, Tsin W; Good, Michael F; Doolan, Denise L; Engwerda, Christian R; McCarthy, James S; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2017-06-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria remains a major public health problem. The requirements for acquisition of protective immunity to the species are not clear. Dendritic cells (DC) are essential for immune cell priming but also perform immune regulatory functions, along with regulatory T cells (Treg). An important function of DC involves activation of the kynurenine pathway via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Using a controlled human experimental infection study with blood-stage P. vivax, we characterized plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and myeloid DC (mDC) subset maturation, CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo) Treg activation, and IDO activity. Blood samples were collected from six healthy adults preinoculation, at peak parasitemia (day 14; ∼31,400 parasites/ml), and 24 and 48 h after antimalarial treatment. CD1c(+) and CD141(+) mDC and pDC numbers markedly declined at peak parasitemia, while CD16(+) mDC numbers appeared less affected. HLA-DR expression was selectively reduced on CD1c(+) mDC, increased on CD16(+) mDC, and was unaltered on pDC. Plasma IFN-γ increased significantly and was correlated with an increased kynurenine/tryptophan (KT) ratio, a measure of IDO activity. At peak parasitemia, Treg presented an activated CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo) CD45RA(-) phenotype and upregulated TNFR2 expression. In a mixed-effects model, the KT ratio was positively associated with an increase in activated Treg. Our data demonstrate that a primary P. vivax infection exerts immune modulatory effects by impairing HLA-DR expression on CD1c(+) mDC while activating CD16(+) mDC. Induction of the kynurenine pathway and increased Treg activation, together with skewed mDC maturation, suggest P. vivax promotes an immunosuppressive environment, likely impairing the development of a protective host immune response. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Chung, MD, PhD...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine...ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to study the immunomodulatory effect of Listeria on human dendritic cells (DCs) to optimize Listeria - based

  18. Human XCR1+ Dendritic Cells Derived In Vitro from CD34+ Progenitors Closely Resemble Blood Dendritic Cells, Including Their Adjuvant Responsiveness, Contrary to Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Sreekumar; Ollion, Vincent; Colletti, Nicholas; Chelbi, Rabie; Montanana-Sanchis, Frédéric; Liu, Hong; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Sanchez, Cindy; Savoret, Juliette; Perrot, Ivan; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Fossum, Even; Bechlian, Didier; Chabannon, Christian; Bogen, Bjarne; Asselin-Paturel, Carine; Shaw, Michael; Soos, Timothy; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) have been used in the clinic with moderately encouraging results. Mouse XCR1+ DC excel at cross-presentation, can be targeted in vivo to induce protective immunity, and share characteristics with XCR1+ human DC. Assessment of the immunoactivation potential of XCR1+ human DC is hindered by their paucity in vivo and by their lack of a well-defined in vitro counterpart. We report in this study a protocol generating both XCR1+ and XCR1− human DC in CD34+ progenitor cultures (CD34-DC). Gene expression profiling, phenotypic characterization, and functional studies demonstrated that XCR1− CD34-DC are similar to canonical MoDC, whereas XCR1+ CD34-DC resemble XCR1+ blood DC (bDC). XCR1+ DC were strongly activated by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid but not LPS, and conversely for MoDC. XCR1+ DC and MoDC expressed strikingly different patterns of molecules involved in inflammation and in cross-talk with NK or T cells. XCR1+ CD34-DC but not MoDC efficiently cross-presented a cell-associated Ag upon stimulation by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or R848, likewise to what was reported for XCR1+ bDC. Hence, it is feasible to generate high numbers of bona fide XCR1+ human DC in vitro as a model to decipher the functions of XCR1+ bDC and as a potential source of XCR1+ DC for clinical use. PMID:25009205

  19. HIV-1 Tat Protein Induces Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Human Dendritic Cells and Monocytes/Macrophages through Engagement of TLR4-MD2-CD14 Complex and Activation of NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leghmari, Kaoutar; Serrero, Manutea; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein induced the expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) on dendritic cells (DCs) through a TLR4 pathway. However, the underlying mechanisms by which HIV-1 Tat protein induces the abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system seen in HIV-1 infected patients remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that HIV-1 Tat protein induced the production of significant amounts of the pro-inflammatory IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines by DCs and monocytes from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. Such production was abrogated in the presence of anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies or soluble recombinant TLR4-MD2 as a decoy receptor, suggesting TLR4 was recruited by Tat protein. Tat-induced murine IL-6 and CXCL1/KC a functional homologue of human IL-8 was abolished in peritoneal macrophages derived from TLR4 KO but not from Wt mice, confirming the involvement of the TLR4 pathway. Furthermore, the recruitment of TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex by Tat protein was demonstrated by the activation of TLR4 downstream pathways including NF-κB and SOCS-1 and by down-modulation of cell surface TLR4 by endocytosis in dynamin and lipid-raft-dependent manners. Collectively, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that HIV-1 Tat interacts with TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex and activates the NF-κB pathway, leading to overproduction of IL-6 and IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines by myeloid cells from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which HIV-1, via its early expressed Tat protein, hijacks the TLR4 pathway, hence establishing abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system. PMID:26090662

  20. The Spread of Ras Activity Triggered by Activation of a Single Dendritic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Christopher D.; Yasuda, Ryohei; Zhong, Haining; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-01-01

    In neurons, individual dendritic spines isolate NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ accumulations from the dendrite and other spines. However, it is not known to what extent spines compartmentalize signaling events downstream of Ca2+ influx. We combined two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with two-photon glutamate uncaging to image the activity of the small GTPase Ras following NMDA receptor activation at individual spines. Induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) triggered robust Ca2+-dependent Ras activation in single spines that decayed in approximately 5 minutes. Ras activity spread over approximately 10 micrometers of dendrite and invaded neighboring spines by diffusion. The spread of Ras-dependent signaling was necessary for the local regulation of the threshold for LTP induction. Thus Ca2+-dependent synaptic signals can spread to couple multiple synapses on short stretches of dendrite. PMID:18556515

  1. Molecular mechanisms of dendrite morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arikkath, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Dendrites are key integrators of synaptic information in neurons and play vital roles in neuronal plasticity. Hence, it is necessary that dendrite arborization is precisely controlled and coordinated with synaptic activity to ensure appropriate functional neural network integrity. In the past several years, it has become increasingly clear that several cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms contribute to dendritic arborization. In this review, we will discuss some of the molecular mechanisms that regulate dendrite morphogenesis, particularly in cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons and some of the implications of aberrant dendritic morphology for human disease. Finally, we will discuss the current challenges and future directions in the field. PMID:23293584

  2. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Dendritic Complexity by Semaphorin 3A through Farp1

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic arbors are complex neuronal structures that receive and process synaptic inputs. One mechanism regulating dendrite differentiation is Semaphorin/Plexin signaling, specifically through binding of soluble Sema3A to Neuropilin/PlexinA coreceptors. Here we show that the protein Farp1 [FERM, RhoGEF (ARHGEF), and pleckstrin domain protein 1], a Rac1 activator previously identified as a synaptogenic signaling protein, contributes to establishing dendrite tip number and total dendritic branch length in maturing rat neurons and is sufficient to promote dendrite complexity. Aiming to define its upstream partners, our results support that Farp1 interacts with the Neuropilin-1/PlexinA1 complex and colocalizes with PlexinA1 along dendritic shafts. Functionally, Farp1 is required by Sema3A to promote dendritic arborization of hippocampal neurons, and Sema3A regulates dendritic F-actin distribution via Farp1. Unexpectedly, Sema3A also requires neuronal activity to promote dendritic complexity, presumably because silencing neurons leads to a proteasome-dependent reduction of PlexinA1 in dendrites. These results provide new insights into how activity and soluble cues cooperate to refine dendritic morphology through intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:24899721

  3. Subcellular Topography of Visually Driven Dendritic Activity in the Vertebrate Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Johann H.; Engert, Florian

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural pathways projecting from sensory organs to higher brain centers form topographic maps in which neighbor relationships are preserved from a sending to a receiving neural population. Sensory input can generate compartmentalized electrical and biochemical activity in the dendrites of a receiving neuron. Here, we show that in the developing retinotectal projection of young Xenopus tadpoles, visually driven Ca2+ signals are topographically organized at the subcellular, dendritic scale. Functional in vivo two-photon Ca2+ imaging revealed that the sensitivity of dendritic Ca2+ signals to stimulus location in visual space is correlated with their anatomical position within the dendritic tree of individual neurons. This topographic distribution was dependent on NMDAR activation, whereas global Ca2+ signals were mediated by Ca2+ influx through dendritic, voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. These findings suggest a framework for plasticity models that invoke local dendritic Ca2+ signaling in the elaboration of neural connectivity and dendrite-specific information storage. PMID:19323998

  4. Identification of novel dendritic cell subset markers in human blood.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Fabian; Hackstein, Holger

    2014-01-10

    Human dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of innate and adaptive immunity that can be divided in at least three major subpopulations: plasmacytoid DC (pDC), myeloid type 1 DC (mDC1) and myeloid type 2 DC (mDC2) exhibiting different functions. However, research, diagnostic and cell therapeutic studies on human DC subsets are limited because only few DC subset markers have been identified so far. Especially mDC2 representing the rarest blood DC subset are difficult to be separated from mDC1 and pDC due to a paucity of mDC2 markers. We have combined multiparameter flow cytometry analysis of human blood DC subsets with systematic expression analysis of 332 surface antigens in magnetic bead-enriched blood DC samples. The initial analysis revealed eight novel putative DC subset markers CD26, CD85a, CD109, CD172a, CD200, CD200R, CD275 and CD301 that were subsequently tested in bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from healthy blood donors. Secondary analysis of PBMC samples confirmed three novel DC subset markers CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase IV), CD85a (Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B3) and CD275 (inducible costimulator ligand). CD85a is specifically expressed in mDC1 and CD26 and CD275 represent novel mDC2 markers. These markers will facilitate human DC subset discrimination and additionally provide insight into potentially novel DC subset-specific functions.

  5. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from horses differ from dendritic cells of humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Mauel, Susanne; Steinbach, Falko; Ludwig, Hanns

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the initiators of immune responses and are present in most tissues in vivo. To generate myeloid DC from monocytes (MoDC) in vitro the necessary cytokines are granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Using degenerated primers delineated from other species and rapid amplification of cDNA ends reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RACE RT-PCR), the cDNA of equine (eq.) GM-CSF was cloned and found to have a point deletion at the 3′-end of eq.GM-CSF, resulting in a 24-nucleotide extended open reading frame not described in any species thus far. For differentiating eq.MoDC, monocytes were stimulated with eq.GM-CSF and eq.IL-4. The eq.MoDC was analysed by both light and electron microscopy and by flow cytometry and mixed lymphocyte reaction. The eq.MoDC obtained had the typical morphology and function of DC, including the ability to stimulate allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. In contrast to the human system, however, monocytes had to be differentiated for 6–7 days before immature DC were obtained. Our data also indicate that lipopolysaccharide or poly(I:C) alone are not sufficient to confer the full phenotypic transition into mature DC. Thus our study contributes to understanding the heterogeneity of immunity and adds important information on the equine immune system, which is clearly distinct from those of mice or man. PMID:16556260

  6. Designing vaccines based on biology of human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles and Hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. In some cases, the induction of cellular rather than humoral responses may be more important as the goal is to control and eliminate the existing infection rather than to prevent it. Our increased understanding of the mechanisms of antigen presentation, particularly with the description of DC subsets with distinct functions, as well as their plasticity in responding to extrinsic signals, represent opportunities to develop novel vaccines. In addition, we foresee that this increased knowledge will permit us to design vaccines that will reprogram the immune system to intervene therapeutically in cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:21029958

  7. Aminopeptidase N (CD13) Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor-Cardoso, Mónica I.; Frausto-Del-Río, Dulce A.

    2013-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13) is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (FcγRs). In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages. PMID:24063007

  8. Three-dimensional spatial modeling of spines along dendritic networks in human cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Larrañaga, Pedro; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; DeFelipe, Javier; Bielza, Concha

    2017-01-01

    We modeled spine distribution along the dendritic networks of pyramidal neurons in both basal and apical dendrites. To do this, we applied network spatial analysis because spines can only lie on the dendritic shaft. We expanded the existing 2D computational techniques for spatial analysis along networks to perform a 3D network spatial analysis. We analyzed five detailed reconstructions of adult human pyramidal neurons of the temporal cortex with a total of more than 32,000 spines. We confirmed that there is a spatial variation in spine density that is dependent on the distance to the cell body in all dendrites. Considering the dendritic arborizations of each pyramidal cell as a group of instances of the same observation (the neuron), we used replicated point patterns together with network spatial analysis for the first time to search for significant differences in the spine distribution of basal dendrites between different cells and between all the basal and apical dendrites. To do this, we used a recent variant of Ripley’s K function defined to work along networks. The results showed that there were no significant differences in spine distribution along basal arbors of the same neuron and along basal arbors of different pyramidal neurons. This suggests that dendritic spine distribution in basal dendritic arbors adheres to common rules. However, we did find significant differences in spine distribution along basal versus apical networks. Therefore, not only do apical and basal dendritic arborizations have distinct morphologies but they also obey different rules of spine distribution. Specifically, the results suggested that spines are more clustered along apical than in basal dendrites. Collectively, the results further highlighted that synaptic input information processing is different between these two dendritic domains. PMID:28662210

  9. Three-dimensional spatial modeling of spines along dendritic networks in human cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Larrañaga, Pedro; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; DeFelipe, Javier; Bielza, Concha

    2017-01-01

    We modeled spine distribution along the dendritic networks of pyramidal neurons in both basal and apical dendrites. To do this, we applied network spatial analysis because spines can only lie on the dendritic shaft. We expanded the existing 2D computational techniques for spatial analysis along networks to perform a 3D network spatial analysis. We analyzed five detailed reconstructions of adult human pyramidal neurons of the temporal cortex with a total of more than 32,000 spines. We confirmed that there is a spatial variation in spine density that is dependent on the distance to the cell body in all dendrites. Considering the dendritic arborizations of each pyramidal cell as a group of instances of the same observation (the neuron), we used replicated point patterns together with network spatial analysis for the first time to search for significant differences in the spine distribution of basal dendrites between different cells and between all the basal and apical dendrites. To do this, we used a recent variant of Ripley's K function defined to work along networks. The results showed that there were no significant differences in spine distribution along basal arbors of the same neuron and along basal arbors of different pyramidal neurons. This suggests that dendritic spine distribution in basal dendritic arbors adheres to common rules. However, we did find significant differences in spine distribution along basal versus apical networks. Therefore, not only do apical and basal dendritic arborizations have distinct morphologies but they also obey different rules of spine distribution. Specifically, the results suggested that spines are more clustered along apical than in basal dendrites. Collectively, the results further highlighted that synaptic input information processing is different between these two dendritic domains.

  10. Thymoquinone from nutraceutical black cumin oil activates Neu4 sialidase in live macrophage, dendritic, and normal and type I sialidosis human fibroblast cells via GPCR Galphai proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Trisha M; Jayanth, Preethi; Amith, Schammim Ray; Gilmour, Alanna; Guzzo, Christina; Gee, Katrina; Beyaert, Rudi; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2010-04-01

    Anti-inflammatory activities of thymoquinone (TQ) have been demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo studies. However, the precise mechanism(s) of TQ in these anti-inflammatory activities is not well understood. Using a newly developed assay to detect sialidase activity in live macrophage cells (Glycoconj J doi: 10.1007/s10719-009-9239-8 ), here we show that TQ has no inhibitory effect on endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 macrophage cells. In contrast, the parent black seed oil (BSO) and another constituent of BSO para-cymene (p-CY) completely block LPS induced sialidase activity. All of these compounds had no effect on cell viability. On the other hand, TQ induces a vigorous sialidase activity in live BMC-2 macrophage cells in a dose dependent manner as well in live DC-2.4 dendritic cells, HEK-TLR4/MD2, HEK293, SP1 mammary adenocarcinoma cells, human WT and 1140F01 and WG0544 type I sialidosis fibroblast cells. Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate) inhibits TQ-induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 cells with an IC(50) of 0.0194 microM compared to an IC(50) of 19.1 microM for neuraminidase inhibitor DANA (2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid). Anti-Neu1, -2 and -3 antibodies have no inhibition of TQ-induced sialidase activity in live BMC-2 and human THP-1 macrophage cells but anti-Neu4 antibodies completely block this activity. There is a vigorous sialidase activity associated with TQ treated live primary bone marrow (BM) macrophage cells derived from WT and hypomorphic cathepsin A mice with a secondary Neu1 deficiency (NeuI KD), but not from Neu4 knockout (Neu4 KO) mice. Pertussis toxin (PTX), a specific inhibitor of Galphai proteins of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and the broad range inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) galardin and piperazine applied to live BMC-2, THP-1 and primary BM macrophage cells completely block TQ-induced sialidase activity. These same inhibitory effects are not observed with the GM1

  11. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3–7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  12. Immunomodulatory effects of aqueous and organic fractions from Petiveria alliacea on human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Santander, Sandra Paola; Hernández, John Fredy; Barreto, Claudia Cifuentes; Cifuentes B, Claudia; Masayuki, Aoki; M, Aoki; Moins-Teisserenc, Hélène; H, Moins-Teisserenc; Fiorentino, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Petiveria alliacea is a plant traditionally known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of its immunomodulatory properties are still unknown. Dendritic cells (DC) promote adaptive immune response by activating T lymphocytes, inducing an effector response or tolerance depending on the DC differentiation level. Herein, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of aqueous and organic plant fractions from P. alliacea using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. The phenotype, cytokine secretion and gene expression were estimated after treatment with the plant fractions. We found that P. alliacea aqueous fraction induced morphological changes and co-stimulatory expression of CD86, indicating partial DC maturation. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, and TNF-α were secreted. The fraction also increased NF-κB gene expression while down-regulating TGFβ gene expression. These results suggest that the aqueous fraction can induce partial DC activation, a situation that can be relevant in tolerance induction. It is important to state that the organic fraction by itself does not show any immunomodulatory activity. This study provides evidence for possible immunomodulatory activity of P. alliacea extracts which has been used in traditional medicine in Colombia.

  13. Dendritic cell-mediated immune humanization of mice: implications for allogeneic and xenogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Gustavo; Daenthanasanmak, Anusara; Münz, Christian; Raykova, Ana; Guzmán, Carlos A; Riese, Peggy; Figueiredo, Constanca; Länger, Florian; Schneider, Andreas; Macke, Laura; Sundarasetty, Bala Sai; Witte, Torsten; Ganser, Arnold; Stripecke, Renata

    2014-05-15

    De novo regeneration of immunity is a major problem after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). HCT modeling in severely compromised immune-deficient animals transplanted with human stem cells is currently limited because of incomplete maturation of lymphocytes and scarce adaptive responses. Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal for the organization of lymph nodes and activation of naive T and B cells. Human DC function after HCT could be augmented with adoptively transferred donor-derived DC. In this study, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of long-lived human DC coexpressing high levels of human IFN-α, human GM-CSF, and a clinically relevant Ag (CMV pp65 protein) promoted human lymphatic remodeling in immune-deficient NOD.Rag1(-/-).IL-2rγ(-/-) mice transplanted with human CD34(+) cells. After immunization, draining lymph nodes became replenished with terminally differentiated human follicular Th cells, plasma B cells, and memory helper and cytotoxic T cells. Human Igs against pp65 were detectable in plasma, demonstrating IgG class-switch recombination. Human T cells recovered from mice showed functional reactivity against pp65. Adoptive immunotherapy with engineered DC provides a novel strategy for de novo immune reconstitution after human HCT and a practical and effective tool for studying human lymphatic regeneration in vivo in immune deficient xenograft hosts.

  14. Prostaglandin E2 regulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of PKCζ

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Glynis; Fricke, Alex; Fender, Anne; McClelland, Lindy; Jacobs, Stacey

    2007-01-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid signaling intermediates released by keratinocytes in response to ultraviolet irradiation (UVR) in the skin. The main prostaglandin released following UVR is PGE2, a ligand for 4 related G-protein coupled receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4). Our previous work established that PGE2 stimulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of the EP1 and EP3 receptors. The purpose of the present report is to define the signaling intermediates involved in EP1 and EP3-dependent dendrite formation in human melanocytes. We recently showed that activation of the atypical PKCζ isoform stimulates melanocyte dendricity in response to treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine. We therefore examined the potential contribution of PKCζ activation on EP1 and EP3-dependent dendrite formation in melanocytes. Stimulation of the EP1 and EP3 receptors by selective agonists activated PKCζ, and inhibition of PKCζ activation abrogated EP1 and EP3-receptor mediated melanocyte dendricity. Because of the importance of Rho-GTP binding proteins in the regulation of melanocyte dendricity, we also examined the effect of EP1 and EP3 receptor activation on Rac and Rho activity. Neither Rac nor Rho was activated upon treatment with EP1,3-receptor agonists. We show that melanocytes express only the EP3A1 isoform, but not the EP3B receptor isoform, previously associated with Rho activation, consistent with a lack of Rho stimulation by EP3 agonists. Our data suggest that PKCζ activation plays a predominant role in regulation of PGE2-dependent melanocyte dendricity. PMID:17850789

  15. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} regulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of PKC{zeta}

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis Fricke, Alex; Fender, Anne; McClelland, Lindy; Jacobs, Stacey

    2007-11-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid signaling intermediates released by keratinocytes in response to ultraviolet irradiation (UVR) in the skin. The main prostaglandin released following UVR is PGE{sub 2}, a ligand for 4 related G-protein-coupled receptors (EP{sub 1}, EP{sub 2}, EP{sub 3} and EP{sub 4}). Our previous work established that PGE{sub 2} stimulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors. The purpose of the present report is to define the signaling intermediates involved in EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in human melanocytes. We recently showed that activation of the atypical PKC{zeta} isoform stimulates melanocyte dendricity in response to treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine. We therefore examined the potential contribution of PKC{zeta} activation on EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in melanocytes. Stimulation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors by selective agonists activated PKC{zeta}, and inhibition of PKC{zeta} activation abrogated EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-receptor-mediated melanocyte dendricity. Because of the importance of Rho-GTP binding proteins in the regulation of melanocyte dendricity, we also examined the effect of EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptor activation on Rac and Rho activity. Neither Rac nor Rho was activated upon treatment with EP{sub 1,3}-receptor agonists. We show that melanocytes express only the EP{sub 3A1} isoform, but not the EP{sub 3B} receptor isoform, previously associated with Rho activation, consistent with a lack of Rho stimulation by EP{sub 3} agonists. Our data suggest that PKC{zeta} activation plays a predominant role in regulation of PGE{sub 2}-dependent melanocyte dendricity.

  16. [In vitro culture of human dendritic cells by using a HydroCell™].

    PubMed

    Aruga, Atsushi; Kogen, Yumi; Sakai, Mayuko; Kotera, Yoshihito; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2011-11-01

    Cancer Immunotherapy using dendritic cells would be a feasible and useful tool for cancer treatment. However, no immunotherapy has been approved in Japan because of a lack of any randomized clinical studies. We are now trying to develop an automatic dendritic cell culture system in order to perform a large-scale randomized clinical trial. In this study, we investigated the utility of a HydroCell™ for in vitro culture of human dendritic cells induced from peripheral blood monocytes. The dendritic cells grew one and a half times when they were cultured in a HydroCell™. All the cells were floating and harvested easily without any enzymes. The cells expressed the CD80 and CD83 molecules on their surface and still had strong phagocytosis. This results demonstrated that a HydroCell™ was a useful tool for in vitro culture of dendritic cells.

  17. Impact of Aging on Dendritic Cell Functions in humans

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Anshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Aging is a paradox of reduced immunity and chronic inflammation. Dendritic cells are central orchestrators of the immune response with a key role in the generation of immunity and maintenance of tolerance. The functions of DCs are compromised with age. There is no major effect on the numbers and phenotype of DC subsets in aged subjects; nevertheless, their capacity to phagocytose antigens and migrate is impaired with age. There is aberrant cytokine secretion by various DC subsets with CDCs secreting increased basal level of pro-inflammatory cytokines but the response on stimulation to foreign antigens is decreased. In contrast, the response to self antigens is increased suggesting erosion of peripheral self tolerance. PDC subset also secretes reduced IFN-alpha in response to viruses. The capacity of DCs to prime T cell responses is also affected. Aging thus has a profound affect on DC functions. Present review summarizes the effect of advancing age on DC functions in humans in the context of both immunity and tolerance. PMID:20619360

  18. Thrombin regulates the function of human blood dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Kashiwagi, Yoichiro; Shimabukuro, Yoshio; Murakami, Shinya E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-12-14

    Thrombin is the key enzyme in the coagulation cascade and activates endothelial cells, neutrophils and monocytes via protease-activated receptors (PARs). At the inflammatory site, immune cells have an opportunity to encounter thrombin. However little is known about the effect of thrombin for dendritic cells (DC), which are efficient antigen-presenting cells and play important roles in initiating and regulating immune responses. The present study revealed that thrombin has the ability to stimulate blood DC. Plasmacytoid DC (PDC) and myeloid DC (MDC) isolated from PBMC expressed PAR-1 and released MCP-1, IL-10, and IL-12 after thrombin stimulation. Unlike blood DC, monocyte-derived DC (MoDC), differentiated in vitro did not express PAR-1 and were unresponsive to thrombin. Effects of thrombin on blood DC were significantly diminished by the addition of anti-PAR-1 Ab or hirudin, serine protease inhibitor. Moreover, thrombin induced HLA-DR and CD86 expression on DC and the thrombin-treated DC induced allogenic T cell proliferation. These findings indicate that thrombin plays a role in the regulation of blood DC functions.

  19. Potassium channels control the interaction between active dendritic integration compartments in layer 5 cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Mark T.; Xu, Ning-Long; Magee, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Active dendritic synaptic integration enhances the computational power of neurons. Such nonlinear processing generates an object-localization signal in the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5B cortical pyramidal neurons during sensory-motor behaviour. Here we employ electrophysiological and optical approaches in brain-slices and behaving animals to investigate how excitatory synaptic input to this distal dendritic compartment influences neuronal output. We find that active dendritic integration throughout the apical dendritic tuft is highly compartmentalized by voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels. A high-density of both transient and sustained KV channels was observed in all apical dendritic compartments. These channels potently regulated the interaction between apical dendritic tuft, trunk, and axo-somatic integration zones to control neuronal output in vitro as well as the engagement of dendritic nonlinear processing in vivo during sensory-motor behaviour. Thus, KV channels dynamically tune the interaction between active dendritic integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons to shape behaviourally relevant neuronal computations. PMID:23931999

  20. Isolation of follicular dendritic cells from human tonsils and adenoids. III. Analysis of their Fc receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, E; Radoux, D; Kinet-Denoel, C; Moeremans, M; De Mey, J; Simar, L J

    1985-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDC), isolated from human tonsils or adenoids, were tested for their capacity to retain monomeric, aggregated or antigen-bound human antibodies in the absence of serum. FDC retain fluorescein-labelled heat-aggregated human immunoglobulins, but not monomeric ones nor fluorescein-labelled F(ab')2 in monomeric or aggregated form. Ultrastructural observations showed that colloidal gold-labelled monomeric, or antigen-bound, antibodies directed against tetanus toxoid are retained by dendrites and membrane infoldings of FDC but are never located in cytoplasmic vesicles. This retention was inhibited by incubating FDC with unlabelled aggregated or antigen-bound antibodies. When gold-labelled anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies were incubated in the presence of protein-A before the contact with FDC, a strong reduction of their retention occurred. This further suggested the presence of Fc receptors on isolated tonsillar FDC. Endocytosis was not observed in isolated FDC, even after prolonged incubation in presence of labelled immune complexes: their Fc receptors are, thus, not related to a phagocytic activity as they are in macrophages. Simultaneous ultrastructural labelling of Fc and C3b receptors with colloidal gold particles of different sizes did not reveal any clear relations between these two receptors on the surface of FDC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3156811

  1. Functional Impairment of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells during Schistosoma haematobium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Bart; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Kruize, Yvonne C. M.; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Schistosoma infection is often characterized by a state of T cell hyporesponsiveness of the host. Suppression of dendritic cell (DC) function could be one of the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, since Schistosoma antigens are potent modulators of dendritic cell function in vitro. Yet, it remains to be established whether DC function is modulated during chronic human Schistosoma infection in vivo. To address this question, the effect of Schistosoma haematobium infection on the function of human blood DC was evaluated. We found that plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid DC (mDC) from infected subjects were present at lower frequencies in peripheral blood and that mDC displayed lower expression levels of HLA-DR compared to those from uninfected individuals. Furthermore, mDC from infected subjects, but not pDC, were found to have a reduced capacity to respond to TLR ligands, as determined by MAPK signaling, cytokine production and expression of maturation markers. Moreover, the T cell activating capacity of TLR-matured mDC from infected subjects was lower, likely as a result of reduced HLA-DR expression. Collectively these data show that S. haematobium infection is associated with functional impairment of human DC function in vivo and provide new insights into the underlying mechanisms of T cell hyporesponsiveness during chronic schistosomiasis. PMID:20422029

  2. Active action potential propagation but not initiation in thalamic interneuron dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus modulate the activity of thalamocortical cells in response to excitatory input through the release of inhibitory neurotransmitter from both axons and dendrites. The exact mechanisms by which release can occur from dendrites are, however, not well understood. Recent experiments using calcium imaging have suggested that Na/K based action potentials can evoke calcium transients in dendrites via local active conductances, making the back-propagating action potential a candidate for dendritic neurotransmitter release. In this study, we employed high temporal and spatial resolution voltage-sensitive dye imaging to assess the characteristics of dendritic voltage deflections in response to Na/K action potentials in interneurons of the mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. We found that trains or single action potentials elicited by somatic current injection or local synaptic stimulation led to action potentials that rapidly and actively back-propagated throughout the entire dendritic arbor and into the fine filiform dendritic appendages known to release GABAergic vesicles. Action potentials always appeared first in the soma or proximal dendrite in response to somatic current injection or local synaptic stimulation, and the rapid back-propagation into the dendritic arbor depended upon voltage-gated sodium and TEA-sensitive potassium channels. Our results indicate that thalamic interneuron dendrites integrate synaptic inputs that initiate action potentials, most likely in the axon initial segment, that then back-propagate with high-fidelity into the dendrites, resulting in a nearly synchronous release of GABA from both axonal and dendritic compartments. PMID:22171033

  3. Liaison between natural killer cells and dendritic cells in human gestation

    PubMed Central

    Leno-Durán, Ester; Muñoz-Fernández, Raquel; García Olivares, Enrique; Tirado-González, Irene

    2014-01-01

    A successful pregnancy relies on immunological adaptations that allow the fetus to grow and develop in the uterus, despite being recognized by maternal immune cells. Among several immunocompetent cell types present within the human maternal/fetal interface, DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) and CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells are of major importance for early pregnancy maintenance, not only generating maternal immunological tolerance but also regulating stromal cell differentiation. Previous reports show the presence of NK–DC cell conjugates in first trimester human decidua, suggesting that these cells may play a role in the modulation of the local immune response within the uterus. While effective immunity is necessary to protect the mother from harmful pathogens, some form of tolerance must be activated to avoid an immune response against fetal antigens. This review article discusses current evidence concerning the functions of DC and NK cells in pregnancy and their liaison in human decidua. PMID:24954224

  4. Liaison between natural killer cells and dendritic cells in human gestation.

    PubMed

    Leno-Durán, Ester; Muñoz-Fernández, Raquel; Olivares, Enrique García; Tirado-González, Irene

    2014-09-01

    A successful pregnancy relies on immunological adaptations that allow the fetus to grow and develop in the uterus, despite being recognized by maternal immune cells. Among several immunocompetent cell types present within the human maternal/fetal interface, DC-SIGN(+) dendritic cells (DCs) and CD56(+) natural killer (NK) cells are of major importance for early pregnancy maintenance, not only generating maternal immunological tolerance but also regulating stromal cell differentiation. Previous reports show the presence of NK-DC cell conjugates in first trimester human decidua, suggesting that these cells may play a role in the modulation of the local immune response within the uterus. While effective immunity is necessary to protect the mother from harmful pathogens, some form of tolerance must be activated to avoid an immune response against fetal antigens. This review article discusses current evidence concerning the functions of DC and NK cells in pregnancy and their liaison in human decidua.

  5. Distinct behavior of human Langerhans cells and inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells at tight junctions in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazue; Kubo, Akiharu; Fujita, Harumi; Yokouchi, Mariko; Ishii, Ken; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Nomura, Toshifumi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kouyama, Keisuke; Ebihara, Tamotsu; Nagao, Keisuke; Amagai, Masayuki

    2014-10-01

    The stratum corneum and tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in the epidermis. Dendrites of activated Langerhans cells (LCs) extend beyond the TJs to capture external antigens in mice. LCs and inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells (IDECs) are observed in the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). We sought to investigate the characteristics of LCs and IDECs and the distribution of their antigen capture receptors in relation to TJs in normal and AD skin. We characterized the interactions of LCs and IDECs with TJs and the expression patterns of langerin and FcεRI by using whole-mount epidermal sheets from healthy subjects and patients with AD, ichthyosis vulgaris, and psoriasis vulgaris. As in mouse skin, activated LCs penetrate TJs in human skin. The number of LCs with TJ penetration increased approximately 5-fold in erythematous lesional skin of patients with AD but not in nonlesional skin of patients with AD or lesions of patients with ichthyosis vulgaris or psoriasis. In contrast, IDECs localized in the lower part of the epidermis, and their dendrites extended horizontally without penetration through TJs. Although langerin accumulated on the tips of dendrites of activated LCs, FcεRI was expressed diffusely on the cell surfaces on LCs and IDECs in lesional skin from patients with AD. These findings highlight interesting differences between LCs and IDECs in epidermis of patients with AD, where LCs, but not IDECs, extend dendrites through the TJs, likely to capture antigens from outside the TJ barrier with a polarized distribution of langerin but not FcεRI. These behavioral differences between skin dendritic cells might reflect an important pathophysiology of AD. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inflammatory responses of primary human dendritic cells towards polydimethylsiloxane and polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Roch, Toralf; Kratz, Karl; Ma, Nan; Lendlein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Although frequently used as implants materials, both polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are often associated with adverse effects including foreign body responses. Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial for the initiation of immune reactions and could also play a role in foreign body associated inflammations. Therefore, the interaction of DC with PDMS and PTFE was investigated regarding their capacity to induce undesired cell activation. Medical grade PDMS and PTFE films were embedded into polystyrene PS inserts via injection molding to prevent the DC from migrating below the substrate and thereby, interacting not only with the test sample but also with the culture vessel material. The viability, the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, and the cytokine/chemokine profiles were determined after 24 hours incubation of the DC with PDMS or PTFE. Blank PS inserts and tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) served as reference materials. The viability of DC was not substantially influenced after incubation with PDMS and PTFE. However, both polymers induced DC activation indicated by the upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules. The release profiles of 14 soluble inflammatory mediators showed substantial differences between PDMS, PTFE, PS, and TCP. This study showed the potential of PTFE and PDMS to activate primary human dendritic cells, which could be an explanation for the often observed inflammatory events associated with the implantation of these polymers.

  7. Suppression of Dendritic Cell Activation by Diabetes Autoantigens Linked to the Cholera Toxin B Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Payne, Kimberly; Baez, Mavely; Jutzy, Jessica; Wall, Nathan; Langridge, William

    2010-01-01

    Antigen presenting cells, specifically dendritic cells (DCs) are a focal point in the delicate balance between T cell tolerance and immune responses contributing to the onset of type I diabetes (T1D). Weak adjuvant proteins like the cholera toxin B subunit when linked to autoantigens may sufficiently alter the balance of this initial immune response to suppress the development of autoimmunity. To assess adjuvant enhancement of autoantigen mediated immune suppression of Type 1 diabetes, we examined the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-proinsulin fusion protein (CTB-INS) activation of immature dendritic cells (iDC) at the earliest detectable stage of the human immune response. In this study, Incubation of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived immature DCs with CTB-INS autoantigen fusion protein increased the surface membrane expression of DC toll-like receptor (TLR-2) while no significant upregulation in TLR-4 expression was detected. Inoculation of iDCs with CTB stimulated the biosynthesis of both CD86 and CD83 co-stimulatory factors demonstrating an immunostimulatory role for CTB in both DC activation and maturation. In contrast, incubation of iDCs with proinsulin partially suppressed CD86 co-stimulatory factor mediated DC activation, while incubation of iDCs with CTB-INS fusion protein completely suppressed iDC biosynthesis of both CD86 and CD83 costimulatory factors. The incubation of iDCs with increasing amounts of insulin did not increase the level of immune suppression but rather activated DC maturation by stimulating increased biosynthesis of both CD86 and CD83 costimulatory factors. Inoculation of iDCs with CTB-INS fusion protein dramatically increased secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and suppressed synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL12/23 p40 subunit protein suggesting that linkage of CTB to insulin (INS) may play an important role in mediating DC guidance of cognate naïve Th0 cell development into immunosuppressive T

  8. Hierarchical Pd-Sn alloy nanosheet dendrites: an economical and highly active catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liang-Xin; Wang, An-Liang; Ou, Yan-Nan; Li, Qi; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Wen-Xia; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical alloy nanosheet dendrites (ANSDs) are highly favorable for superior catalytic performance and efficient utilization of catalyst because of the special characteristics of alloys, nanosheets, and dendritic nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a facile and efficient electrodeposition approach for the controllable synthesis of Pd-Sn ANSDs with high surface area. These synthesized Pd-Sn ANSDs exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and superior long-term cycle stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The enhanced electrocataytic activity of Pd-Sn ANSDs may be attributed to Pd-Sn alloys, nanosheet dendrite induced promotional effect, large number of active sites on dendrite surface, large surface area, and good electrical contact with the base electrode. Because of the simple implement and high flexibility, the proposed approach can be considered as a general and powerful strategy to synthesize the alloy electrocatalysts with high surface areas and open dendritic nanostructures.

  9. Age-Based Comparison of Human Dendritic Spine Structure Using Complete Three-Dimensional Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Robles, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the morphology of the dendritic spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. However, unfortunately, there are scant data available regarding the detailed morphology of these structures for the human cerebral cortex. In the present study, we analyzed over 8900 individual dendritic spines that were completely 3D reconstructed along the length of apical and basal dendrites of layer III pyramidal neurons in the cingulate cortex of 2 male humans (aged 40 and 85 years old), using intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in fixed tissue. We assembled a large, quantitative database, which revealed a major reduction in spine densities in the aged case. Specifically, small and short spines of basal dendrites and long spines of apical dendrites were lost, regardless of the distance from the soma. Given the age difference between the cases, our results suggest selective alterations in spines with aging in humans and indicate that the spine volume and length are regulated by different biological mechanisms. PMID:22710613

  10. Intense and specialized dendritic localization of the fragile X mental retardation protein in binaural brainstem neurons: a comparative study in the alligator, chicken, gerbil, and human.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Sakano, Hitomi; Beebe, Karisa; Brown, Maile R; de Laat, Rian; Bothwell, Mark; Kulesza, Randy J; Rubel, Edwin W

    2014-06-15

    Neuronal dendrites are structurally and functionally dynamic in response to changes in afferent activity. The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an mRNA binding protein that regulates activity-dependent protein synthesis and morphological dynamics of dendrites. Loss and abnormal expression of FMRP occur in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and some forms of autism spectrum disorders. To provide further understanding of how FMRP signaling regulates dendritic dynamics, we examined dendritic expression and localization of FMRP in the reptilian and avian nucleus laminaris (NL) and its mammalian analogue, the medial superior olive (MSO), in rodents and humans. NL/MSO neurons are specialized for temporal processing of low-frequency sounds for binaural hearing, which is impaired in FXS. Protein BLAST analyses first demonstrate that the FMRP amino acid sequences in the alligator and chicken are highly similar to human FMRP with identical mRNA-binding and phosphorylation sites, suggesting that FMRP functions similarly across vertebrates. Immunocytochemistry further reveals that NL/MSO neurons have very high levels of dendritic FMRP in low-frequency hearing vertebrates including alligator, chicken, gerbil, and human. Remarkably, dendritic FMRP in NL/MSO neurons often accumulates at branch points and enlarged distal tips, loci known to be critical for branch-specific dendritic arbor dynamics. These observations support an important role for FMRP in regulating dendritic properties of binaural neurons that are essential for low-frequency sound localization and auditory scene segregation, and support the relevance of studying this regulation in nonhuman vertebrates that use low frequencies in order to further understand human auditory processing disorders.

  11. The whipworm (Trichuris suis) secretes prostaglandin E2 to suppress proinflammatory properties in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Laan, Lisa C; Williams, Andrew R; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Giera, Martin; Kooij, Gijs; Vlasakov, Iliyan; Kalay, Hakan; Kringel, Helene; Nejsum, Peter; Thamsborg, Stig M; Wuhrer, Manfred; Dijkstra, Christine D; Cummings, Richard D; van Die, Irma

    2017-02-01

    Clinical trials have shown that administration of the nematode Trichuris suis can be beneficial in treating various immune disorders. To provide insight into the mechanisms by which this worm suppresses inflammatory responses, an active component was purified from T. suis soluble products (TsSPs) that suppress---- TNF and IL-12 secretion from LPS-activated human dendritic cells (DCs). Analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry identified this compound as prostaglandin (PG)E2. The purified compound showed similar properties compared with TsSPs and commercial PGE2 in modulating LPS-induced expression of many cytokines and chemokines and in modulating Rab7B and P2RX7 expression in human DCs. Furthermore, the TsSP-induced reduction of TNF secretion from DCs is reversed by receptor antagonists for EP2 and EP4, indicating PGE2 action. T. suis secretes extremely high amounts of PGE2 (45-90 ng/mg protein) within their excretory/secretory products but few related lipid mediators as established by metabololipidomic analysis. Culture of T. suis with several cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors that inhibit mammalian prostaglandin synthesis affected the worm's motility but did not inhibit PGE2 secretion, suggesting that the worms can synthesize PGE2 via a COX-independent pathway. We conclude that T. suis secretes PGE2 to suppress proinflammatory responses in human DCs, thereby modulating the host's immune response.-Laan, L. C., Williams, A. R., Stavenhagen, K., Giera, M., Kooij, G., Vlasakov, I., Kalay, H., Kringel, H., Nejsum, P., Thamsborg, S. M., Wuhrer, M., Dijkstra, C. D., Cummings, R. D., van Die, I. The whipworm (Trichuris suis) secretes prostaglandin E2 to suppress proinflammatory properties in human dendritic cells. © FASEB.

  12. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  13. Lenalidomide increases human dendritic cell maturation in multiple myeloma patients targeting monocyte differentiation and modulating mesenchymal stromal cell inhibitory properties.

    PubMed

    Costa, Federica; Vescovini, Rosanna; Bolzoni, Marina; Marchica, Valentina; Storti, Paola; Toscani, Denise; Accardi, Fabrizio; Notarfranchi, Laura; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Manferdini, Cristina; Manni, Sabrina; Todaro, Giannalisa; Lisignoli, Gina; Piazza, Francesco; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2017-08-08

    The use of Lenalidomide (LEN), to reverse tumor-mediated immune suppression and amplify multiple myeloma-specific immunity is currently being explored. Particularly, LEN effects on dendritic cells (DCs) are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of LEN on DC differentiation and activity. DCs were differentiated either from CD14(+) cells obtained from patients with multiple myeloma or from a human monocytic cell line. LEN, at the concentration range reached in vivo, significantly increased the median intensity expression of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD209 by DCs derived from both bone marrow and peripheral myeloma monocytes and enhanced the production of Interleukin-8, C-C motif chemokine ligand (CCL) 2, CCL5 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Consistently, LEN pre-treated DCs showed an increased ability to stimulate autologous CD3(+) cell proliferation. LEN effect on dendritic differentiation was associated with the degradation of the Cereblon-related factors Ikaros and Aiolos. Moreover, we showed that LEN also blunted mesenchymal stromal cell inhibitory effect on dendritic differentiation, inhibiting Casein Kinase-1α levels. Finally, in vitro data were confirmed in ex vivo cultures obtained from relapsed myeloma patients treated with LEN, showing a significant increase of DC differentiation from peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, LEN increased the expression of mature dendritic markers both directly and indirectly and enhanced DC ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and to release chemokines. This suggests a new possible mechanism by which LEN could exert its anti-myeloma activity.

  14. Salivary Tick Cystatin OmC2 Targets Lysosomal Cathepsins S and C in Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Zavašnik-Bergant, Tina; Vidmar, Robert; Sekirnik, Andreja; Fonović, Marko; Salát, Jiří; Grunclová, Lenka; Kopáček, Petr; Turk, Boris

    2017-01-01

    To ensure successful feeding tick saliva contains a number of inhibitory proteins that interfere with the host immune response and help to create a permissive environment for pathogen transmission. Among the potential targets of the salivary cystatins are two host cysteine proteases, cathepsin S, which is essential for antigen- and invariant chain-processing, and cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase 1, DPP1), which plays a critical role in processing and activation of the granule serine proteases. Here, the effect of salivary cystatin OmC2 from Ornithodoros moubata was studied using differentiated MUTZ-3 cells as a model of immature dendritic cells of the host skin. Following internalization, cystatin OmC2 was initially found to inhibit the activity of several cysteine cathepsins, as indicated by the decreased rates of degradation of fluorogenic peptide substrates. To identify targets, affinity chromatography was used to isolate His-tagged cystatin OmC2 together with the bound proteins from MUTZ-3 cells. Cathepsins S and C were identified in these complexes by mass spectrometry and confirmed by immunoblotting. Furthermore, reduced increase in the surface expression of MHC II and CD86, which are associated with the maturation of dendritic cells, was observed. In contrast, human inhibitor cystatin C, which is normally expressed and secreted by dendritic cells, did not affect the expression of CD86. It is proposed that internalization of salivary cystatin OmC2 by the host dendritic cells targets cathepsins S and C, thereby affecting their maturation.

  15. Quercetin protects against atherosclerosis by inhibiting dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiqun; Wang, Wenting; Wang, Dongliang; Ling, Wenhua

    2017-09-01

    Quercetin is a typical flavonol with atheroprotective effects, but the effect of quercetin on dendritic cell (DC) maturation in relation to atherosclerosis has not yet been clearly defined. Thus, we investigated whether quercetin can inhibit DC maturation and evaluated its potential value in atherosclerosis progression in ApoE(-/-) mice. Quercetin consumption inhibited DC activation, inflammatory response and suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. Subsequently, quercetin treatment inhibited the phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs, as evidenced not only by downregulation of CD80, CD86, MHC-II, IL-6 and IL-12 but also by a reduction in the ability to stimulate T cell allogeneic proliferation. Finally, an in vitro study demonstrated that quercetin inhibited DC maturation via upregulation of Dabs, which then downregulated the Src/PI3K/Akt-NF-κB-inflammatory pathways. Our data indicate that quercetin attenuates atherosclerosis progression by regulating DC activation via Dab2 protein expression. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The Soil Bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus Bath Interacts with Human Dendritic Cells to Modulate Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Indrelid, Stine; Kleiveland, Charlotte; Holst, René; Jacobsen, Morten; Lea, Tor

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased in Western countries during the course of the twentieth century, and is evolving to be a global disease. Recently we showed that a bacterial meal of a non-commensal, non-pathogenic methanotrophic soil bacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath prevents experimentally induced colitis in a murine model of IBD. The mechanism behind the effect has this far not been identified. Here, for the first time we show that M. capsulatus, a soil bacterium adheres specifically to human dendritic cells, influencing DC maturation, cytokine production, and subsequent T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. We characterize the immune modulatory properties of M. capsulatus and compare its immunological properties to those of another Gram-negative gammaproteobacterium, the commensal Escherichia coli K12, and the immune modulatory Gram-positive probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro. M. capsulatus induces intermediate phenotypic and functional DC maturation. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction M. capsulatus-primed monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) enhance T cell expression of CD25, the γ-chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor, supports cell proliferation, and induce a T cell cytokine profile different from both E. coli K12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. M. capsulatus Bath thus interacts specifically with MoDC, affecting MoDC maturation, cytokine profile, and subsequent MoDC directed T cell polarization. PMID:28293233

  17. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Display and Shed B Cell Maturation Antigen upon TLR Engagement.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Elisabeth; Musumeci, Andrea; Thaler, Franziska S; Laurent, Sarah; Ellwart, Joachim W; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Krug, Anne; Meinl, Edgar

    2017-04-15

    The BAFF-APRIL system is best known for its control of B cell homeostasis, and it is a target of therapeutic intervention in autoimmune diseases and lymphoma. By analyzing the expression of the three receptors of this system, B cell maturation Ag (BCMA), transmembrane activator and CAML interactor, and BAFF receptor, in sorted human immune cell subsets, we found that BCMA was transcribed in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in both blood and lymphoid tissue. Circulating human pDCs contained BCMA protein without displaying it on the cell surface. After engagement of TLR7/8 or TLR9, BCMA was detected also on the cell surface of pDCs. The display of BCMA on the surface of human pDCs was accompanied by release of soluble BCMA (sBCMA); inhibition of γ-secretase enhanced surface expression of BCMA and reduced the release of sBCMA by pDCs. In contrast with human pDCs, murine pDCs did not express BCMA, not even after TLR9 activation. In this study, we extend the spectrum of BCMA expression to human pDCs. sBCMA derived from pDCs might determine local availability of its high-affinity ligand APRIL, because sBCMA has been shown to function as an APRIL-specific decoy. Further, therapeutic trials targeting BCMA in patients with multiple myeloma should consider possible effects on pDCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. The Synthetic Immunomodulator Murabutide Controls Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication at Multiple Levels in Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Darcissac, Edith C. A.; Truong, Marie-José; Dewulf, Joëlle; Mouton, Yves; Capron, André; Bahr, George M.

    2000-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells are known to play an important role in the establishment and persistence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Besides antiretroviral therapy, several immune-based interventions are being evaluated with the aim of achieving better control of virus replication in reservoir cells. Murabutide is a safe synthetic immunomodulator presenting a capacity to enhance nonspecific resistance against viral infections and to target cells of the reticuloendothelial system. In this study, we have examined the ability of Murabutide to control HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in acutely infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and dendritic cells (MDDCs). Highly significant suppression of viral replication was consistently observed in Murabutide-treated cultures of both cell types. Murabutide did not affect virus entry, reverse transcriptase activity, or early proviral DNA formation in the cytoplasm of infected cells. However, treated MDMs and MDDCs showed a dramatic reduction in nuclear viral two-long terminal repeat circular form and viral mRNA transcripts. This HIV-1-suppressive activity was not mediated by inhibiting cellular DNA synthesis or by activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, Murabutide-stimulated cells expressed reduced CD4 and CCR5 receptors and secreted high levels of β-chemokines, although neutralization of the released chemokines did not alter the HIV-1-suppressive activity of Murabutide. These results provide evidence that a clinically acceptable immunomodulator can activate multiple effector pathways in macrophages and in dendritic cells, rendering them nonpermissive for HIV-1 replication. PMID:10933686

  19. Isolation and In Vitro Generation of Gene-Manipulated Human Plasmacytoid and Conventional Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schotte, Remko; Schmidlin, Heike; Nagasawa, Maho; Dontje, Wendy; Karrich, Julien J.; Uittenbogaart, Christel; Spits, Hergen; Blom, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of human lymphocyte development has increased significantly over the past 20 years. In particular, our insight into human T- and B-cell development has improved (1, 2). Nonetheless, there are many gaps in our understanding, particularly regarding the early stages of development of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into downstream lineage-biased and lineage-restricted precursors and the molecular mechanisms underlying these activities. The same holds true for our knowledge of human dendritic cell (DC) development. While the amount of data on the different subsets of conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly increases in mice (3, 4), the developmental stages of different DC subsets in humans remain poorly defined (2). The relatively easy access to patient material and therefore human precursor cells that can be isolated from these tissues combined with the availability of in vitro and in vivo differentiation assays allows studies in the field of human hematopoietic development, including that of DCs. In addition, the opportunities to manipulate gene expression, by stable overexpression of a gene of interest or RNA interference-mediated knockdown, generate valuable information about the mechanisms underlying lineage commitment and differentiation. PMID:19941106

  20. Targeting human dendritic cells in situ to improve vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Kartik; Dhodapkar, Kavita M; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2014-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity. The potent antigen presenting properties of DCs makes them a valuable target for the delivery of immunogenic cargo. Recent clinical studies describing in situ DC targeting with antibody-mediated targeting of DC receptor through DEC-205 provide new opportunities for the clinical application of DC-targeted vaccines. Further advances with nanoparticle vectors which can encapsulate antigens and adjuvants within the same compartment and be targeted against diverse DC subsets also represent an attractive strategy for targeting DCs. This review provides a brief summary of the rationale behind targeting dendritic cells in situ, the existing pre-clinical and clinical data on these vaccines and challenges faced by the next generation DC-targeted vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Blue light irradiation suppresses dendritic cells activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael R; Abel, Manuela; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; Rudolph, Berenice; Becker, Detlef; von Stebut, Esther

    2013-08-01

    Blue light is a UV-free irradiation suitable for treating chronic skin inflammation, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and hand- and foot eczema. However, a better understanding of the mode of action is still missing. For this reason, we investigated whether dendritic cells (DC) are directly affected by blue light irradiation in vitro. Here, we report that irradiation neither induced apoptosis nor maturation of monocyte-derived and myeloid DC. However, subsequent DC maturation upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation was impaired in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by maturation markers and cytokine release. Moreover, the potential of this DC to induce cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4 T cells was reduced. In conclusion, unlike UV irradiation, blue light irradiation at high and low doses only resulted in impaired DC maturation upon activation and a reduced subsequent stimulatory capacity in allogeneic MLRs with strongest effects at higher doses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Adipose Recruitment and Activation of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Fuel Metaflammation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrit Raj; Bhattacharya, Roopkatha; Bhattacharya, Shamik; Nargis, Titli; Rahaman, Oindrila; Duttagupta, Pritam; Raychaudhuri, Deblina; Liu, Chinky Shiu Chen; Roy, Shounak; Ghosh, Parasar; Khanna, Shashi; Chaudhuri, Tamonas; Tantia, Om; Haak, Stefan; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chakrabarti, Partha; Ganguly, Dipyaman

    2016-11-01

    In obese individuals, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is the seat of chronic low-grade inflammation (metaflammation), but the mechanistic link between increased adiposity and metaflammation largely remains unclear. In obese individuals, deregulation of a specific adipokine, chemerin, contributes to innate initiation of metaflammation by recruiting circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) into VAT through chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1). Adipose tissue-derived high-mobility group B1 (HMGB1) protein activates Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the adipose-recruited pDCs by transporting extracellular DNA through receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and induces production of type I interferons (IFNs). Type I IFNs in turn help in proinflammatory polarization of adipose-resident macrophages. IFN signature gene expression in VAT correlates with both adipose tissue and systemic insulin resistance (IR) in obese individuals, which is represented by ADIPO-IR and HOMA2-IR, respectively, and defines two subgroups with different susceptibility to IR. Thus, this study reveals a pathway that drives adipose tissue inflammation and consequent IR in obesity.

  3. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantano, Serafino . E-mail: serafino.pantano@unil.ch; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response.

  4. Somatic versus Dendritic Resonance: Differential Filtering of Inputs through Non-Uniform Distributions of Active Conductances

    PubMed Central

    Zhuchkova, Ekaterina; Remme, Michiel W. H.; Schreiber, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic inputs to neurons are processed in a frequency-dependent manner, with either low-pass or resonant response characteristics. These types of filtering play a key role in the frequency-specific information flow in neuronal networks. While the generation of resonance by specific ionic conductances is well investigated, less attention has been paid to the spatial distribution of the resonance-generating conductances across a neuron. In pyramidal neurons – one of the major excitatory cell-types in the mammalian brain – a steep gradient of resonance-generating h-conductances with a 60-fold increase towards distal dendrites has been demonstrated experimentally. Because the dendritic trees of these cells are large, spatial compartmentalization of resonant properties can be expected. Here, we use mathematical descriptions of spatially extended neurons to investigate the consequences of such a distal, dendritic localization of h-conductances for signal processing. While neurons with short dendrites do not exhibit a pronounced compartmentalization of resonance, i.e. the filter properties of dendrites and soma are similar, we find that neurons with longer dendrites ( space constant) can show distinct filtering of dendritic and somatic inputs due to electrotonic segregation. Moreover, we show that for such neurons, experimental classification as resonant versus nonresonant can be misleading when based on somatic recordings, because for these morphologies a dendritic resonance could easily be undetectable when using somatic input. Nevertheless, noise-driven membrane-potential oscillations caused by dendritic resonance can propagate to the soma where they can be recorded, hence contrasting with the low-pass filtering at the soma. We conclude that non-uniform distributions of active conductances can underlie differential filtering of synaptic input in neurons with spatially extended dendrites, like pyramidal neurons, bearing relevance for the localization

  5. Toxoplasma gondii-Infected Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Induce T-Lymphocyte Dysfunction and Contact-Dependent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuang; Marches, Florentina; Borvak, Jozef; Zou, Weiping; Channon, Jacqueline; White, Michael; Radke, Jay; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells ignite adaptive immunity by priming naïve T lymphocytes. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) infected with Toxoplasma gondii induce T-lymphocyte gamma interferon production and may thus activate T. gondii-specific immunity. However, we now demonstrate that T. gondii-infected MDDCs are poor at activating T lymphocytes and are unable to induce specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. On the other hand, MDDCs acquiring nonviable T. gondii antigens directly, or indirectly through captured apoptotic or necrotic cell bodies, induce potent T-lymphocyte activation. T lymphocytes exposed to infected MDDCs are significantly impaired in upregulation of CD69 and CD28, are refractory to activation, and die through contact-dependent apoptosis mediated by an as-yet-unidentified mechanism not requiring Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, leukocyte function antigen 1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 10, alpha interferon, gamma interferon, prostaglandins, or reactive nitrogen intermediates. Bystander T lymphocytes that were neither infected nor apoptotic were refractory to activation, suggesting global dysfunction. Immunosuppression and T-lymphocyte unresponsiveness and apoptosis are typical of acute T. gondii infection. Our data suggest that infected dendritic cells contribute to these processes. On the other hand, host cells infected with T. gondii are resistant to multiple inducers of apoptosis. Thus, regulation of host cell and bystander cell apoptosis by viable T. gondii may be significant components of a strategy to evade immunity and enhance intracellular parasite survival. PMID:11895936

  6. Crosstalk Between PKA and Epac Regulates the Phenotypic Maturation and Function of Human Dendritic Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Jone; D’Angelo, June A.; Park, YongKeun; Summa, Christopher M.; Aiken, Martha L.; Morales, Eric; Badizadegan, Kamran; Fiebiger, Edda; Dickinson, Bonny L.

    2010-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent signaling pathways that orchestrate dendritic cell (DC) maturation remain to be defined in detail. While cAMP was previously thought to signal exclusively through PKA, it is now clear that cAMP also activates Epac, a second major cAMP effector. Whether cAMP signaling via PKA is sufficient to drive DC maturation or whether Epac plays a role has not been examined. Here, we used cAMP analogs to selectively activate PKA or Epac in human monocyte-derived DCs and examined the effect of these signaling pathways on several hallmarks of DC maturation. We show that PKA activation induces DC maturation as evident by the increased cell surface expression of MHC class II, co-stimulatory molecules and the maturation marker CD83. PKA activation also reduces DC endocytosis and stimulates chemotaxis to the lymph node-associated chemokines CXCL12 and CCL21. Although PKA signaling largely suppresses cytokine production, the net effect of PKA activation translates to enhanced DC activation of allogeneic T cells. In contrast to the stimulatory effects of PKA, Epac signaling has no effect on DC maturation or function. Rather, Epac suppresses the effects of PKA when both pathways are activated simultaneously. These data reveal a previously unrecognized crosstalk between the PKA and Epac signaling pathways in DCs and raise the possibility that therapeutics targeting PKA may generate immunogenic DCs while those that activate Epac may produce tolerogenic DCs capable of attenuating allergic or autoimmune disease. PMID:20729327

  7. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Mediated by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Chung, M D , Ph D...CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy 5b...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to study the immunomodulatory effect of Listeria on

  8. Controlled synthesis of m-BiVO4 dendrites for enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Shi, Weidong; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    Well-defined m-BiVO4 dendrites have been synthesized using a simple hydrothermal method without adding organic surfactant. A series of time-dependent experiments were conducted to investigate the shape formation mechanism of the m-BiVO4 dendrites. Furthermore, the corresponding growth mechanism which involved the Ostwald ripening process has been discussed. The m-BiVO4 dendrites showed great enhanced activity in the visible-light photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) solution which might be attributed to the special morphology.

  9. Influence of organophosphate poisoning on human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Marina; Koppe, Franziska; Stenger, Bernhard; Brochhausen, Christoph; Schmidt, Annette; Steinritz, Dirk; Thiermann, Horst; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Pohl, Christine

    2013-12-05

    Organophosphourus compounds (OPC, including nerve agents and pesticides) exhibit acute toxicity by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Lung affections are frequent complications and a risk factor for death. In addition, epidemiological studies reported immunological alterations after OPC exposure. In our experiments we investigated the effects of organophosphourus pesticides dimethoate and chlorpyrifos on dendritic cells (DC) that are essential for the initial immune response, especially in the pulmonary system. DC, differentiated from the monocyte cell line THP-1 by using various cytokines (IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-α, Ionomycin), were exposed to organophosphourus compounds at different concentrations for a 24h time period. DC were characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence using typical dendritic cell markers (e.g., CD11c, CD209 and CD83). After OPC exposure we investigated cell death, the secretion profile of inflammatory mediators, changes of DC morphology, and the effect on protein kinase signalling pathways. Our results revealed a successful differentiation of THP-1 into DC. OPC exposure caused a significant concentration-dependent influence on DC: Dendrites of the DC were shortened and damaged, DC-specific cell surface markers (i.e., CD83and CD209) decreased dramatically after chlorpyrifos exposure. Interestingly, the effects caused by dimethoate were in general less pronounced. The organophosphourus compounds affected the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1ß and IL-8. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly down regulated. Protein kinases like the Akt family or ERK, which are essential for cell survival and proliferation, were inhibited by both OPC. These findings indicate that the tested organophosphourus compounds induced significant changes in cell morphology, inhibited anti-inflammatory cytokines and influenced important protein signalling pathways which are involved in regulation of apoptosis. Thus our results highlight

  10. Constitutive activation of neuronal Src causes aberrant dendritic morphogenesis in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Takenori; Morone, Nobuhiro; Yuasa, Shigeki; Nada, Shigeyuki; Okada, Masato

    2007-02-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases are essential for neural development, but their in vivo functions remain elusive because of functional compensation among family members. To elucidate the roles of individual Src family members in vivo, we generated transgenic mice expressing the neuronal form of c-Src (n-Src), Fyn, and their constitutively active forms in cerebellar Purkinje cells using the L7 promoter. The expression of the constitutively active n-Src retarded the postnatal development of Purkinje cells and disrupted dendritic morphogenesis, whereas the wild-type n-Src had only moderate effects. Neither wild-type nor constitutively active Fyn over-expression significantly affected Purkinje-cell morphology. The aberrant Purkinje cells in n-Src transgenic mice retained multiple dendritic shafts extending in non-polarized directions and were located heterotopically in the molecular layer. Ultrastructural observation of the dendritic shafts revealed that the microtubules of n-Src transgenic mice were more densely and irregularly arranged, and had structural deformities. In primary culture, Purkinje cells from n-Src transgenic mice developed abnormally thick dendritic shafts and large growth-cone-like structures with poorly extended dendrites, which could be rescued by treatment with a selective inhibitor of Src family kinases, PP2. These results suggest that n-Src activity regulates the dendritic morphogenesis of Purkinje cells through affecting microtubule organization.

  11. Human parainfluenza virus type 2 vector induces dendritic cell maturation without viral RNA replication/transcription.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenichiro; Fukumura, Masayuki; Ohtsuka, Junpei; Kawano, Mitsuo; Nosaka, Tetsuya

    2013-07-01

    The dendritic cell (DC), a most potent antigen-presenting cell, plays a key role in vaccine therapy against infectious diseases and malignant tumors. Although advantages of viral vectors for vaccine therapy have been reported, potential risks for adverse effects prevent them from being licensed for clinical use. Human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2), one of the members of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a nonsegmented and negative-stranded RNA virus. We have developed a reverse genetics system for the production of infectious hPIV2 lacking the F gene (hPIV2ΔF), wherein various advantages for vaccine therapy exist, such as cytoplasmic replication/transcription, nontransmissible infectivity, and extremely high transduction efficacy in various types of target cells. Here we demonstrate that hPIV2ΔF shows high transduction efficiency in human DCs, while not so high in mouse DCs. In addition, hPIV2ΔF sufficiently induces maturation of both human and murine DCs, and the maturation state of both human and murine DCs is almost equivalent to that induced by lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, alkylating agent β-propiolactone-inactivated hPIV2ΔF (BPL-hPIV2ΔF) elicits DC maturation without viral replication/transcription. These results suggest that hPIV2ΔF may be a useful tool for vaccine therapy as a novel type of paramyxoviral vector, which is single-round infectious vector and has potential adjuvant activity.

  12. A role for multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4; ABCC4) in human dendritic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Scheffer, George L.; Reurs, Anneke W.; Lindenberg, Jelle J.; Oerlemans, Ruud; Jansen, Gerrit; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Glasgow, Joel N.; Pereboev, Alexander; Curiel, David T.; Scheper, Rik J.

    2008-01-01

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to migrate from peripheral organs to lymph nodes (LNs) is important in the initiation of a T cell–mediated immune response. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) and the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1; ABCC1) have been shown to play a role in both human and murine DC migration. Here we show that a more recently discovered family member, MRP4 (ABCC4), is expressed on both epidermal and dermal human skin DCs and contributes to the migratory capacity of DCs. Pharmacological inhibition of MRP4 activity or down-regulation through RNAi in DCs resulted in reduced migration of DCs from human skin explants and of in vitro generated Langerhans cells. The responsible MRP4 substrate remains to be identified as exogenous addition of MRP4's known substrates prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4 and D4, or cyclic nucleotides (all previously implicated in DC migration) could not restore migration. This notwithstanding, our data show that MRP4 is an important protein, significantly contributing to human DC migration toward the draining lymph nodes, and therefore relevant for the initiation of an immune response and a possible target for immunotherapy. PMID:18625884

  13. Characterization of the Kynurenine Pathway in CD8(+) Human Primary Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Braidy, Nady; Rossez, Helene; Lim, Chai K; Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Brew, Bruce J; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-11-01

    The kynurenine (KYN) pathway (KP) is a major degradative pathway of the amino acid, L-tryptophan (TRP), that ultimately leads to the anabolism of the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. TRP catabolism results in the production of several important metabolites, including the major immune tolerance-inducing metabolite KYN, and the neurotoxin and excitotoxin quinolinic acid. Dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to mediate immunoregulatory roles that mediated by TRP catabolism. However, characterization of the KP in human DCs has so far only been partly delineated. It is critical to understand which KP enzymes are expressed and which KP metabolites are produced to be able to understand their regulatory effects on the immune response. In this study, we characterized the KP in human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) in comparison with the human primary macrophages using RT-PCR, high-pressure gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the KP is entirely expressed in human MDDC. Following activation of the KP using interferon gamma, MDDCs can mediate apoptosis of T h cells in vitro. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating KP metabolism in MDDCs may provide renewed insight for the development of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating immunological effects and peripheral tolerance.

  14. Galactomannan from Caesalpinia spinosa induces phenotypic and functional maturation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Santander, S P; Aoki, M; Hernandez, J F; Pombo, M; Moins-Teisserenc, H; Mooney, N; Fiorentino, S

    2011-06-01

    Plant polysaccharides present an interesting potential as immunomodulators, particularly in the induction of antitumoral responses, principally because of their molecular complexity and low in vivo toxicity. Activation of dendritic cells (DCs) could improve antitumoral responses usually diminished in cancer patients, and natural adjuvants provide a possibility of inducing this activation. Herein, we investigated the immunomodulatory activity of a neutral plant polysaccharide Galactomannan on human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDC). MDDCs were stimulated with Galactomannan (GLM) from Caesalpinia spinosa and both phenotypic and functional activities were assessed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. The phagocytic ability of MDDCs was determined by using E-coli pHrodo particles and induction of T-lymphocyte allostimulation was determined after T-cell staining with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE). In MDDCs, purified Galactomannan induced phenotypic maturation revealed by increased expression of CD83, CD86, CD206, and HLA-DR. Functional experiments showed the loss of particulate antigen uptake in Galactomannan-stimulated DCs and increased alloantigen presentation capacity. Finally, Galactomannan increased protein and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p70, and TNF-α. These data reveal that Galactomannan obtained from Caesalpinia spinosa promotes effective activation of MDDCs. This adjuvant-like activity may have therapeutic applications in clinical settings where immune responses need boosting.

  15. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy reveals rerouting of SNARE trafficking driving dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Verboogen, Daniëlle Rianne José; González Mancha, Natalia; Ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2017-05-19

    SNARE proteins play a crucial role in intracellular trafficking by catalyzing membrane fusion, but assigning SNAREs to specific intracellular transport routes is challenging with current techniques. We developed a novel Förster resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FRET-FLIM)-based technique allowing visualization of real-time local interactions of fluorescently tagged SNARE proteins in live cells. We used FRET-FLIM to delineate the trafficking steps underlying the release of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human blood-derived dendritic cells. We found that activation of dendritic cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide leads to increased FRET of fluorescently labeled syntaxin 4 with VAMP3 specifically at the plasma membrane, indicating increased SNARE complex formation, whereas FRET with other tested SNAREs was unaltered. Our results revealed that SNARE complexing is a key regulatory step for cytokine production by immune cells and prove the applicability of FRET-FLIM for visualizing SNARE complexes in live cells with subcellular spatial resolution.

  16. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in beryllium-induced dendritic cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, L.; Huang, Z.; Gillespie, M.; Mroz, P.M.; Maier, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a role in the regulation of immune responses to haptens, which in turn impact DC maturation. Whether beryllium (Be) is able to induce DC maturation and if this occurs via the MAPK pathway is not known. Primary monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) models were generated from Be non-exposed healthy volunteers as a non-sensitized cell model, while PBMCs from BeS (Be sensitized) and CBD (chronic beryllium disease) were used as disease models. The response of these cells to Be was evaluated. The expression of CD40 was increased significantly (p<0.05) on HLA-DP Glu69+ moDCs after 100 μM BeSO4-stimulation. BeSO4 induced p38MAPK phosphorylation, while IκB-α was degraded in Be-stimulated moDCs. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked Be-induced NF-κB activation in moDCs, suggesting that p38MAPK and NF-κB are dependently activated by BeSO4. Furthermore, in BeS and CBD subjects, SB203580 downregulated Be-stimulated proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased Be-stimulated TNF-α and IFNγ cytokine production. Taken together, this study suggests that Be-induces non-sensitized Glu69+ DCs maturation, and that p38MAPK signaling is important in the Be-stimulated DCs activation as well as subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine production in BeS and CBD. In total, the MAPK pathway may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human granulomatous lung diseases. PMID:25454621

  17. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in beryllium-induced dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Huang, Z; Gillespie, M; Mroz, P M; Maier, L A

    2014-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a role in the regulation of immune responses to haptens, which in turn impact DC maturation. Whether beryllium (Be) is able to induce DC maturation and if this occurs via the MAPK pathway is not known. Primary monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) models were generated from Be non-exposed healthy volunteers as a non-sensitized cell model, while PBMCs from BeS (Be sensitized) and CBD (chronic beryllium disease) were used as disease models. The response of these cells to Be was evaluated. The expression of CD40 was increased significantly (p<0.05) on HLA-DP Glu69+ moDCs after 100 μM BeSO₄-stimulation. BeSO₄ induced p38MAPK phosphorylation, while IκB-α was degraded in Be-stimulated moDCs. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked Be-induced NF-κB activation in moDCs, suggesting that p38MAPK and NF-κB are dependently activated by BeSO₄. Furthermore, in BeS and CBD subjects, SB203580 downregulated Be-stimulated proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased Be-stimulated TNF-α and IFNγ cytokine production. Taken together, this study suggests that Be-induces non-sensitized Glu69+ DCs maturation, and that p38MAPK signaling is important in the Be-stimulated DCs activation as well as subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine production in BeS and CBD. In total, the MAPK pathway may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human granulomatous lung diseases. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Dendritic Cells Mitigate NK-Cell Dysfunction Mediated by Nonselective JAK1/2 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Curran, Shane A; Shyer, Justin A; St Angelo, Erin T; Talbot, Lillian R; Sharma, Sneh; Chung, David J; Heller, Glenn; Hsu, Katharine C; Betts, Brian C; Young, James W

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have achieved positive responses in myeloproliferative neoplasms, but at the expense of decreased natural killer (NK) cell numbers and compromised function. Selective JAK2 inhibition may also have a role in preventing and treating graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although JAK inhibitors can impair monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDC) activation and function and suppress effector T-cell responses, the effects on NK cells and the relevant mechanisms remain undefined. Using common γc cytokines and distinct human dendritic cell (DC) subtypes, we compared the effects of a JAK2-specific (TG101348) with a less selective JAK1/2 (ruxolitinib) inhibitor on NK-cell activation and function. Ruxolitinib treatment completely blocked IL2, IL15, and DC-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, along with the capacity of NK cells to secrete IFNγ or lyse NK cell-sensitive targets. Only NK-cell proliferation stimulated by moDCs resisted ruxolitinib treatment. In contrast, TG101348 treatment of stimulated NK cells resulted in far less functional compromise. TG101348 completely inhibited only soluble IL15-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, which Langerhans-type DCs (LCs), presenting membrane-bound IL15 in trans, could salvage. These results demonstrate that ruxolitinib's nonselective inhibition of JAK1/2 results in profound NK-cell dysfunction by blocking downstream pSTAT5, hence providing a persuasive rationale for the development of selective JAK2 inhibitors for immunotherapeutic applications. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(1); 52-60. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Sensor IRE1α Enhances IL-23 Expression by Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Saioa; Fernández, José Javier; Terán-Cabanillas, Eli; Herrero, Carmen; Alonso, Sara; Azogil, Alicia; Montero, Olimpio; Iwawaki, Takao; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R; Fernández, Nieves; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) exposed to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) undergo bioenergetic changes that influence the immune response. We found that stimulation with PAMPs enhanced glycolysis in DCs, whereas oxidative phosphorylation remained unaltered. Glucose starvation and the hexokinase inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) modulated cytokine expression in stimulated DCs. Strikingly, IL23A was markedly induced upon 2-DG treatment, but not during glucose deprivation. Since 2-DG can also rapidly inhibit protein N-glycosylation, we postulated that this compound could induce IL-23 in DCs via activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Indeed, stimulation of DCs with PAMPs in the presence of 2-DG robustly activated inositol-requiring protein 1α (IRE1α) signaling and to a lesser extent the PERK arm of the unfolded protein response. Additional ER stressors such as tunicamycin and thapsigargin also promoted IL-23 expression by PAMP-stimulated DCs. Pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic analyses using conditional knockout mice revealed that IL-23 induction in ER stressed DCs stimulated with PAMPs was IRE1α/X-box binding protein 1-dependent upon zymosan stimulation. Interestingly, we further evidenced PERK-mediated and CAAT/enhancer-binding protein β-dependent trans-activation of IL23A upon lipopolysaccharide treatment. Our findings uncover that the ER stress response can potently modulate cytokine expression in PAMP-stimulated human DCs.

  20. Environmentally relevant dose of arsenic interferes in functions of human monocytes derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Abbas; Salmani, Vahid

    2017-06-05

    Arsenic is a major environmental pollutant and highly hazardous toxin to human health, which well established as carcinogen and immune deregulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) have a pivotal role in cell-mediated immunity for T-cell activation and antigen presentation. In this study, T cell activation, some key functional genes expression, cell stability and phagocytosis capacity of human monocytes derived DCs (MDDCs) were analyzed after in vitro exposure to very low dose of arsenic for 12 and 24h. Arsenic decreased continually phagocytosis capacity of MDDCs. Furthermore, down-regulation of the cell-surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD40 after 24h post treatment with arsenic, confirmed arsenic interferers in the phagocytosis process. Pro inflammatory cytokines, IL1β and TNFα were more expressed in arsenic-treated MDDCs while IL6 transiently was down regulated. In general, our novel findings here strongly suggest that low level of arsenic dysregulates four fundamental immune processes of DCs. Mechanistically; this could explain the observed immunodeficiency activity of Arsenic, and give direction for comprehension the pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Sensor IRE1α Enhances IL-23 Expression by Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Saioa; Fernández, José Javier; Terán-Cabanillas, Eli; Herrero, Carmen; Alonso, Sara; Azogil, Alicia; Montero, Olimpio; Iwawaki, Takao; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Fernández, Nieves; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) exposed to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) undergo bioenergetic changes that influence the immune response. We found that stimulation with PAMPs enhanced glycolysis in DCs, whereas oxidative phosphorylation remained unaltered. Glucose starvation and the hexokinase inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) modulated cytokine expression in stimulated DCs. Strikingly, IL23A was markedly induced upon 2-DG treatment, but not during glucose deprivation. Since 2-DG can also rapidly inhibit protein N-glycosylation, we postulated that this compound could induce IL-23 in DCs via activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Indeed, stimulation of DCs with PAMPs in the presence of 2-DG robustly activated inositol-requiring protein 1α (IRE1α) signaling and to a lesser extent the PERK arm of the unfolded protein response. Additional ER stressors such as tunicamycin and thapsigargin also promoted IL-23 expression by PAMP-stimulated DCs. Pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic analyses using conditional knockout mice revealed that IL-23 induction in ER stressed DCs stimulated with PAMPs was IRE1α/X-box binding protein 1-dependent upon zymosan stimulation. Interestingly, we further evidenced PERK-mediated and CAAT/enhancer-binding protein β-dependent trans-activation of IL23A upon lipopolysaccharide treatment. Our findings uncover that the ER stress response can potently modulate cytokine expression in PAMP-stimulated human DCs. PMID:28674530

  2. Regulation of dendrite growth by the Cdc42 activator Zizimin1/Dock9 in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Kazuya; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2009-06-01

    Rho family small GTPases are key regulators of morphological changes in neurons. Cdc42, one of the most characterized members of the Rho family of proteins, is involved in axon and dendrite outgrowth through cytoskeletal reorganization. Recent studies have identified Zizimin1, a member of the Dock180-related family of proteins [also called CDM (Ced-5/Dock180/Myoblast city)-zizimin homology (CZH) proteins], as a specific guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Cdc42. However, the physiological function of Zizimin1 is totally unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of Zizimin1 in dendrite development in rat hippocampal neurons. In situ hybridization and Western blot analysis showed that Zizimin1 is strongly expressed in the developing brain including in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in late developmental stages. Overexpression of wild-type Zizimin1 promoted dendrite growth, whereas knockdown of Zizimin1 by short hairpin RNA or expression of a mutant Zizimin1 lacking Cdc42 GEF activity suppressed dendrite growth in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Both the N-terminal CZH1 domain, which is conserved among CZH proteins, and the Pleckstrin homology domain of Zizimin1 are involved in membrane localization, Cdc42 activation, and regulation of dendrite growth. Thus, these results suggest that Zizimin1 plays an important role in dendrite growth in hippocampal neurons through activation of Cdc42.

  3. A mixture of bacterial mechanical lysates is more efficient than single strain lysate and of bacterial-derived soluble products for the induction of an activating phenotype in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Barbara; Agazzi, Alessia; D'Agostino, Antonella; Antonini, Francesca; Costa, Gregorio; Sabatini, Federica; Ferlazzo, Guido; Melioli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), following an optimal maturation, are able to drive an efficient immune-response. For this, both co-stimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), activation molecules (CD83) and peptide presenting molecules (HLA) are over-expressed. The in vitro treatment of immature DC with fragments of bacterial strains, obtained by using a mechanical lysis as well as with bacterial-derived molecules (such as lipopolysaccharide and protido-glycan), induced the maturation of DCs and the secretion of a panel of cytokines and chemokines. Of note, ex vivo treated circulating DCs and plasmacytoid DCs were also activated by these bacterial bodies. However, while the particulate fraction of single bacterial strains or soluble bacterial-derived molecules induced a sub-optimal maturation (as evaluated by the expression of an activating phenotype on DCs and the amount of cytokine secretion), the addition of the mixture of the particulate fractions of the different bacterial strains was able to mediate an optimal maturation. These results were also confirmed by using the secretion of both cytokines and chemokines as markers of DC activation. All these findings suggest that the particulate fraction of bacterial lysate mixtures, because of their ability to interact with different surface structures, might be exploited not only as an immunogen, but also as an adjuvant treatment to boost an immune-response to poorly "antigenic" proteins, such as cancer antigens or allergens.

  4. The Tug-of-War between Dendritic Cells and Human Chronic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Saifur; Khan, Zafar K.; Jain, Pooja

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is under constant challenge from many viruses, some of which the body is successfully able to clear. Other viruses have evolved to escape the host immune responses and thus persist, leading to the development of chronic diseases. Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play a major role in both innate and adaptive immunity against different pathogens. This review focuses on the interaction of different chronic viruses with dendritic cells and the viruses’ ability to exploit this critical cell type to their advantage so as to establish persistence within the host. PMID:22053973

  5. Active Dendrites and Differential Distribution of Calcium Channels Enable Functional Compartmentalization of Golgi Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Stephanie; Hull, Court

    2015-01-01

    Interneurons are essential to controlling excitability, timing, and synaptic integration in neuronal networks. Golgi cells (GoCs) serve these roles at the input layer of the cerebellar cortex by releasing GABA to inhibit granule cells (grcs). GoCs are excited by mossy fibers (MFs) and grcs and provide feedforward and feedback inhibition to grcs. Here we investigate two important aspects of GoC physiology: the properties of GoC dendrites and the role of calcium signaling in regulating GoC spontaneous activity. Although GoC dendrites are extensive, previous studies concluded they are devoid of voltage-gated ion channels. Hence, the current view holds that somatic voltage signals decay passively within GoC dendrites, and grc synapses onto distal dendrites are not amplified and are therefore ineffective at firing GoCs because of strong passive attenuation. Using whole-cell recording and calcium imaging in rat slices, we find that dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels allow somatic action potentials to activate voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) along the entire dendritic length, with R-type and T-type VGCCs preferentially located distally. We show that R- and T-type VGCCs located in the dendrites can boost distal synaptic inputs and promote burst firing. Active dendrites are thus critical to the regulation of GoC activity, and consequently, to the processing of input to the cerebellar cortex. In contrast, we find that N-type channels are preferentially located near the soma, and control the frequency and pattern of spontaneous firing through their close association with calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels. Thus, VGCC types are differentially distributed and serve specialized functions within GoCs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Interneurons are essential to neural processing because they modulate excitability, timing, and synaptic integration within circuits. At the input layer of the cerebellar cortex, a single type of interneuron, the Golgi cell (GoC), carries

  6. High mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic capacity represent a metabolic phenotype of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Malinarich, Frano; Duan, Kaibo; Hamid, Raudhah Abdull; Bijin, Au; Lin, Wu Xue; Poidinger, Michael; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie; Connolly, John E

    2015-06-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) regulate the balance between immunity and tolerance through selective activation by environmental and pathogen-derived triggers. To characterize the rapid changes that occur during this process, we analyzed the underlying metabolic activity across a spectrum of functional DC activation states, from immunogenic to tolerogenic. We found that in contrast to the pronounced proinflammatory program of mature DCs, tolerogenic DCs displayed a markedly augmented catabolic pathway, related to oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, and glycolysis. Functionally, tolerogenic DCs demonstrated the highest mitochondrial oxidative activity, production of reactive oxygen species, superoxide, and increased spare respiratory capacity. Furthermore, assembled, electron transport chain complexes were significantly more abundant in tolerogenic DCs. At the level of glycolysis, tolerogenic and mature DCs showed similar glycolytic rates, but glycolytic capacity and reserve were more pronounced in tolerogenic DCs. The enhanced glycolytic reserve and respiratory capacity observed in these DCs were reflected in a higher metabolic plasticity to maintain intracellular ATP content. Interestingly, tolerogenic and mature DCs manifested substantially different expression of proteins involved in the fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathway, and FAO activity was significantly higher in tolerogenic DCs. Inhibition of FAO prevented the function of tolerogenic DCs and partially restored T cell stimulatory capacity, demonstrating their dependence on this pathway. Overall, tolerogenic DCs show metabolic signatures of increased oxidative phosphorylation programing, a shift in redox state, and high plasticity for metabolic adaptation. These observations point to a mechanism for rapid genome-wide reprograming by modulation of underlying cellular metabolism during DC differentiation.

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor produced by human umbilical tissue-derived cells is required for its effect on hippocampal dendritic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Alder, Janet; Kramer, Brian C; Hoskin, Casey; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2012-06-01

    The potential for nonembryonic cells to promote differentiation of neuronal cells has therapeutic implications for regeneration of neurons damaged by stroke or injury and avoids many ethical and safety concerns. The authors have assessed the capacity of human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) to enhance differentiation of rodent hippocampal neurons. Co-culture of hippocampal cells with hUTC or hMSC in transwell inserts for 3 days resulted in increase of several dendritic parameters including the number and length of primary dendrites. The effect of hUTC or hMSC on dendritic maturation was only apparent on neurons grown for 2 weeks in vitro prior to co-culture. Changes in dendritic morphology in the presence of hUTC were also accompanied by increased expression of the presynaptic marker synaptotagmin and the postsynaptic marker postsynaptic density protein 95 kDa (PSD95) suggesting that there may also be an increase in the number of synapses formed in the presence of hUTC. The effect of hUTC and hMSC on hippocampal cells in co-culture was comparable to those induced by treatment with recombinant human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) implying that a similar factor may be released from hUTC or hMSC. Analysis of hUTC-conditioned medium by ELISA demonstrated that BDNF was indeed secreted. An antibody that blocks the actions of BDNF partially inhibited the actions of hUTC on dendritic morphology suggesting that BDNF is at least one of the factors secreted from the cells to promote dendritic maturation. These results indicate that hUTC secrete biologically active BDNF, which can affect dendritic morphology.

  8. Muramyl dipeptide-Lys stimulates the function of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Todate, A; Suda, T; Kuwata, H; Chida, K; Nakamura, H

    2001-11-01

    Muramyl dipeptide (MDP)-Lys (L18), a synthetic MDP analogue derived from bacterial cell walls, has been reported to be a potent immunoadjuvant that enhances protective immunity against pathogens and tumors by stimulating immune-competent cells, such as monocytes and macrophages. However, it is not known whether MDP-Lys modulates the function of dendritic cells (DCs), which are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and play a crucial role in initiating T cell-mediated immunity. Therefore, we examined the effects of MDP-Lys on the expression of surface molecules, cytokine production, and antigen-presenting function of human DCs generated from peripheral blood cells in the presence of interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We found that MDP-Lys markedly up-regulated the expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and CD40, but not human leukocyte antigen-DR, and stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and IL-12 (p40) by human DCs in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, MDP-Lys-treated DCs showed enhanced antigen-presenting function compared with untreated DCs, as assessed by an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. These results suggested that the immunoadjuvant activity of MDP-Lys in vivo is mediated, in part, by its stimulation of DC function.

  9. Human Dendritic Cell Functional Specialization in Steady-State and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boltjes, Arjan; van Wijk, Femke

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) represent a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells that are crucial in initiating and shaping immune responses. Although all DC are capable of antigen-uptake, processing, and presentation to T cells, DC subtypes differ in their origin, location, migration patterns, and specialized immunological roles. While in recent years, there have been rapid advances in understanding DC subset ontogeny, development, and function in mice, relatively little is known about the heterogeneity and functional specialization of human DC subsets, especially in tissues. In steady-state, DC progenitors deriving from the bone marrow give rise to lymphoid organ-resident DC and to migratory tissue DC that act as tissue sentinels. During inflammation additional DC and monocytes are recruited to the tissues where they are further activated and promote T helper cell subset polarization depending on the environment. In the current review, we will give an overview of the latest developments in human DC research both in steady-state and under inflammatory conditions. In this context, we review recent findings on DC subsets, DC-mediated cross-presentation, monocyte-DC relationships, inflammatory DC development, and DC-instructed T-cell polarization. Finally, we discuss the potential role of human DC in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24744755

  10. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies.

  11. Human gastric epithelial cells contribute to gastric immune regulation by providing retinoic acid to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bimczok, D; Kao, J Y; Zhang, M; Cochrun, S; Mannon, P; Peter, S; Wilcox, C M; Mönkemüller, K E; Harris, P R; Grams, J M; Stahl, R D; Smith, P D; Smythies, L E

    2015-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by Helicobacter pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule retinol (ROL), and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of ROL synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation.

  12. Suppression of dendritic cell activation by diabetes autoantigens linked to the cholera toxin B subunit.

    PubMed

    Odumosu, Oludare; Payne, Kimberly; Baez, Ineavely; Jutzy, Jessica; Wall, Nathan; Langridge, William

    2011-04-01

    Antigen presenting cells, specifically dendritic cells (DCs) are a focal point in the delicate balance between T cell tolerance and immune responses contributing to the onset of type I diabetes (T1D). Weak adjuvant proteins like the cholera toxin B subunit when linked to autoantigens may sufficiently alter the balance of this initial immune response to suppress the development of autoimmunity. To assess adjuvant enhancement of autoantigen mediated immune suppression of Type 1 diabetes, we examined the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-proinsulin fusion protein (CTB-INS) activation of immature dendritic cells (iDC) at the earliest detectable stage of the human immune response. In this study, Incubation of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived immature DCs with CTB-INS autoantigen fusion protein increased the surface membrane expression of DC Toll-like receptor (TLR-2) while no significant upregulation in TLR-4 expression was detected. Inoculation of iDCs with CTB stimulated the biosynthesis of both CD86 and CD83 co-stimulatory factors demonstrating an immunostimulatory role for CTB in both DC activation and maturation. In contrast, incubation of iDCs with proinsulin partially suppressed CD86 co-stimulatory factor mediated DC activation, while incubation of iDCs with CTB-INS fusion protein completely suppressed iDC biosynthesis of both CD86 and CD83 costimulatory factors. The incubation of iDCs with increasing amounts of insulin did not increase the level of immune suppression but rather activated DC maturation by stimulating increased biosynthesis of both CD86 and CD83 costimulatory factors. Inoculation of iDCs with CTB-INS fusion protein dramatically increased secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and suppressed synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL12/23 p40 subunit protein suggesting that linkage of CTB to insulin (INS) may play an important role in mediating DC guidance of cognate naïve Th0 cell development into immunosuppressive T

  13. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  14. Spherical Lactic Acid Bacteria Activate Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Immunomodulatory Function via TLR9-Dependent Crosstalk with Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jounai, Kenta; Ikado, Kumiko; Sugimura, Tetsu; Ano, Yasuhisa; Braun, Jonathan; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are a specialized sensor of viral and bacterial nucleic acids and a major producer of IFN-α that promotes host defense by priming both innate and acquired immune responses. Although synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, pathogenic bacteria and viruses activate pDC, there is limited investigation of non-pathogenic microbiota that are in wide industrial dietary use, such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we screened for LAB strains, which induce pDC activation and IFN-α production using murine bone marrow (BM)-derived Flt-3L induced dendritic cell culture. Microbial strains with such activity on pDC were absent in a diversity of bacillary strains, but were observed in certain spherical species (Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Pediococcus), which was correlated with their capacity for uptake by pDC. Detailed study of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis JCM5805 and JCM20101 revealed that the major type I and type III interferons were induced (IFN-α, -β, and λ). IFN-α induction was TLR9 and MyD88-dependent; a slight impairment was also observed in TLR4-/- cells. While these responses occurred with purified pDC, IFN-α production was synergistic upon co-culture with myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), an interaction that required direct mDC-pDC contact. L. lactis strains also stimulated expression of immunoregulatory receptors on pDC (ICOS-L and PD-L1), and accordingly augmented pDC induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg compared to the Lactobacillus strain. Oral administration of L. lactis JCM5805 induced significant activation of pDC resident in the intestinal draining mesenteric lymph nodes, but not in a remote lymphoid site (spleen). Taken together, certain non-pathogenic spherical LAB in wide dietary use has potent and diverse immunomodulatory effects on pDC potentially relevant to anti-viral immunity and chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:22505996

  15. Active dendrites regulate the impact of gliotransmission on rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ashhad, Sufyan

    2016-01-01

    An important consequence of gliotransmission, a signaling mechanism that involves glial release of active transmitter molecules, is its manifestation as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent slow inward currents in neurons. However, the intraneuronal spatial dynamics of these events or the role of active dendrites in regulating their amplitude and spatial spread have remained unexplored. Here, we used somatic and/or dendritic recordings from rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons and demonstrate that a majority of NMDAR-dependent spontaneous slow excitatory potentials (SEP) originate at dendritic locations and are significantly attenuated through their propagation across the neuronal arbor. We substantiated the astrocytic origin of SEPs through paired neuron–astrocyte recordings, where we found that specific infusion of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) into either distal or proximal astrocytes enhanced the amplitude and frequency of neuronal SEPs. Importantly, SEPs recorded after InsP3 infusion into distal astrocytes exhibited significantly slower kinetics compared with those recorded after proximal infusion. Furthermore, using neuron-specific infusion of pharmacological agents and morphologically realistic conductance-based computational models, we demonstrate that dendritically expressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide–gated (HCN) and transient potassium channels play critical roles in regulating the strength, kinetics, and compartmentalization of neuronal SEPs. Finally, through the application of subtype-specific receptor blockers during paired neuron–astrocyte recordings, we provide evidence that GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing NMDARs predominantly mediate perisomatic and dendritic SEPs, respectively. Our results unveil an important role for active dendrites in regulating the impact of gliotransmission on neurons and suggest astrocytes as a source of dendritic plateau potentials that have been implicated in localized plasticity and place

  16. Developmental expression of the SRF co-activator MAL in brain: role in regulating dendritic morphology.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Jun; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Masaaki; Baraban, Jay M; Tabuchi, Akiko

    2006-09-01

    The dynamic changes in dendritic morphology displayed by developing and mature neurons have stimulated interest in deciphering the signaling pathways involved. Recent studies have identified megakaryocytic acute leukemia (MAL), a serum response factor (SRF) co-activator, as a key component of a signaling pathway linking changes in the actin cytoskeleton to SRF-mediated transcription. To help define the role of this pathway in regulating dendritic morphology, we have characterized the pattern of MAL expression in the developing and adult brain, and have examined its role in regulating dendritic morphology in cultured cortical neurons. In histological studies of mouse brain, we found prominent expression of MAL in neurons in adult hippocampus and cerebral cortex. MAL immunostaining revealed localization of this protein in neuronal cell bodies and apical dendrites. During development, an increase in MAL expression occurs during the second post-natal week. Expression of dominant negative MAL constructs or MAL siRNA in cortical neurons grown in primary culture reduces the number of dendritic processes and decreases the basal level of SRF-mediated transcription. Taken together, these findings indicate that the MAL-SRF signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating dendritic morphology.

  17. Lenalidomide increases human dendritic cell maturation in multiple myeloma patients targeting monocyte differentiation and modulating mesenchymal stromal cell inhibitory properties

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Federica; Vescovini, Rosanna; Bolzoni, Marina; Marchica, Valentina; Storti, Paola; Toscani, Denise; Accardi, Fabrizio; Notarfranchi, Laura; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Manferdini, Cristina; Manni, Sabrina; Todaro, Giannalisa; Lisignoli, Gina; Piazza, Francesco; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The use of Lenalidomide (LEN), to reverse tumor-mediated immune suppression and amplify multiple myeloma-specific immunity is currently being explored. Particularly, LEN effects on dendritic cells (DCs) are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of LEN on DC differentiation and activity. DCs were differentiated either from CD14+ cells obtained from patients with multiple myeloma or from a human monocytic cell line. LEN, at the concentration range reached in vivo, significantly increased the median intensity expression of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD209 by DCs derived from both bone marrow and peripheral myeloma monocytes and enhanced the production of Interleukin-8, C-C motif chemokine ligand (CCL) 2, CCL5 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Consistently, LEN pre-treated DCs showed an increased ability to stimulate autologous CD3+ cell proliferation. LEN effect on dendritic differentiation was associated with the degradation of the Cereblon-related factors Ikaros and Aiolos. Moreover, we showed that LEN also blunted mesenchymal stromal cell inhibitory effect on dendritic differentiation, inhibiting Casein Kinase-1α levels. Finally, in vitro data were confirmed in ex vivo cultures obtained from relapsed myeloma patients treated with LEN, showing a significant increase of DC differentiation from peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, LEN increased the expression of mature dendritic markers both directly and indirectly and enhanced DC ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and to release chemokines. This suggests a new possible mechanism by which LEN could exert its anti-myeloma activity. PMID:28881793

  18. Induction of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase in Human Dendritic Cells by a Cholera Toxin B Subunit—Proinsulin Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nicholas, Dequina A.; Zhang, Kangling; Kim, Nan-Sun; Hamilton, Brittany N.; Larios, Marco; Zhang, Guangyu; Umezawa, Kazuo; Firek, Anthony F.; Langridge, William H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC) were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS). Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1). Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines) showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention of type 1

  19. PGE2 Elevates IL-23 Production in Human Dendritic Cells via a cAMP Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Quanxing; Yin, Zhao; Zhao, Bei; Sun, Fei; Yu, Haisheng; Yin, Xiangyun; Zhang, Liguo; Wang, Shouli

    2015-01-01

    PGE2 elevates IL-23 production in mouse dendritic cells while inhibits IL-23 production in isolated human monocytes. Whether this differential effect of PGE2 on IL-23 production is cell-type- or species-specific has not been investigated in detail. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of PGE2 on IL-23 production in human DCs and the possible underlying mechanisms. Human monocytes derived dendritic cells (Mo-DCs) were pretreated with or without PGE2. Then the cells were incubated with zymosan. Our results demonstrated that PGE2 promoted zymosan-induced IL-23 production in a concentration dependent manner. In addition, it was found that PGE2 is also able to elevate MyD88-mediated IL-23 p19 promoter activity. More importantly, ELISA data demonstrated that db-cAMP, a cAMP analog, and forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator, can mimic the effect of PGE2 on zymosan-induced IL-23 production, and rp-cAMP, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, can block the effect of PGE2. Moreover, PGE2 can increase zymosan-induced expression of the mRNA levels of both p19 and p40 subunits, which was mimicked by db-cAMP and forskolin. Our data suggest that PGE2 elevates the production of IL-23 in human Mo-DCs via a cAMP dependent pathway. PMID:26412948

  20. Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesins Contribute to Streptococcus gordonii-Induced Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun Byeol; Kim, Sun Kyung; Seo, Ho Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the induction of immunity by recognition, capture, process, and presentation of antigens from infectious microbes. Streptococcus gordonii is able to cause life-threatening systemic diseases such as infective endocarditis. Serine-rich repeat (SRR) glycoproteins of S. gordonii are sialic acid-binding adhesins mediating the bacterial adherence to the host and the development of infective endocarditis. Thus, the SRR adhesins are potentially involved in the bacterial adherence to DCs and the maturation and activation of DCs required for the induction of immunity to S. gordonii. Here, we investigated the phenotypic and functional changes of human monocyte-derived DCs treated with wild-type S. gordonii or the SRR adhesin-deficient mutant. The mutant poorly bound to DCs and only weakly increased the expression of CD83, CD86, MHC class II, and PD-L1 on DCs compared with the wild-type. In addition, the mutant induced lower levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 than the wild-type in DCs. When DCs sensitized with the mutant were co-cultured with autologous T cells, they induced weaker proliferation and activation of T cells than DCs stimulated with the wild-type. Blockade of SRR adhesin with 3′-sialyllactose markedly reduced S. gordonii binding and internalization, causing attenuation of the bacterial immunostimulatory potency in DC maturation. Collectively, our results suggest that SRR adhesins of S. gordonii are important for maturation and activation of DCs. PMID:28408901

  1. Integrin Activation Through the Hematopoietic Adapter Molecule ADAP Regulates Dendritic Development of Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Thiere, Marlen; Kliche, Stefanie; Müller, Bettina; Teuber, Jan; Nold, Isabell; Stork, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion and signaling is of critical importance for neuronal differentiation. Recent evidence suggests that an "inside-out" activation of β1-integrin, similar to that observed in hematopoietic cells, contributes to the growth and branching of dendrites. In this study, we investigated the role of the hematopoietic adaptor protein adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in these processes. We demonstrate the expression of ADAP in the developing and adult nervous hippocampus, and in outgrowing dendrites of primary hippocampal neurons. We further show that ADAP occurs in a complex with another adaptor protein signal-transducing kinase-associated phosphoprotein-homolog (SKAP-HOM), with the Rap1 effector protein RAPL and the Hippo kinase macrophage-stimulating 1 (MST1), resembling an ADAP/SKAP module that has been previously described in T-cells and is critically involved in "inside-out" activation of integrins. Knock down of ADAP resulted in reduced expression of activated β1-integrin on dendrites. It furthermore reduced the differentiation of developing neurons, as indicated by reduced dendrite growth and decreased expression of the dendritic marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2). Our data suggest that an ADAP-dependent integrin-activation similar to that described in hematopoietic cells contributes to the differentiation of neuronal cells.

  2. Integrin Activation Through the Hematopoietic Adapter Molecule ADAP Regulates Dendritic Development of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thiere, Marlen; Kliche, Stefanie; Müller, Bettina; Teuber, Jan; Nold, Isabell; Stork, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion and signaling is of critical importance for neuronal differentiation. Recent evidence suggests that an “inside-out” activation of β1-integrin, similar to that observed in hematopoietic cells, contributes to the growth and branching of dendrites. In this study, we investigated the role of the hematopoietic adaptor protein adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in these processes. We demonstrate the expression of ADAP in the developing and adult nervous hippocampus, and in outgrowing dendrites of primary hippocampal neurons. We further show that ADAP occurs in a complex with another adaptor protein signal-transducing kinase-associated phosphoprotein-homolog (SKAP-HOM), with the Rap1 effector protein RAPL and the Hippo kinase macrophage-stimulating 1 (MST1), resembling an ADAP/SKAP module that has been previously described in T-cells and is critically involved in “inside-out” activation of integrins. Knock down of ADAP resulted in reduced expression of activated β1-integrin on dendrites. It furthermore reduced the differentiation of developing neurons, as indicated by reduced dendrite growth and decreased expression of the dendritic marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2). Our data suggest that an ADAP-dependent integrin-activation similar to that described in hematopoietic cells contributes to the differentiation of neuronal cells. PMID:27746719

  3. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Chung, MD, PhD...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0384 Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to study the immunomodulatory effect of Listeria on human

  4. Reactivity of chemical sensitizers toward amino acids in cellulo plays a role in the activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in human monocyte dendritic cells and the THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Migdal, Camille; Botton, Jérémie; El Ali, Zeina; Azoury, Marie-Eliane; Guldemann, Joan; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Pallardy, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis resulting from skin sensitization is an inflammatory skin disease linked to the use of chemicals termed haptens. Chemical reactivity is necessary for a chemical to be a sensitizer, allowing both covalent binding to proteins and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) by mimicking "danger signals." The aim of this study was to evaluate how the reactivity of chemical sensitizers toward amino acids translates into a biological response using the activation of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway, which was assessed by the induction of three Nrf2 target genes (ho-1, nqo1, and il-8) and Nrf2 protein accumulation. Nrf2 activation is known to play a role in numerous detoxification mechanisms that could regulate danger signal outcomes in myeloid cells. Monocyte-derived DCs and THP-1 cells were exposed to (a) haptens with cysteine, lysine, or cysteine/lysine reactivity, (b) pro-/prehaptens, and (c) nonsensitizing molecules with reducing or oxidative properties (17 molecules in total). Chemicals were classified as "Nrf2 pathway activators" when at least two Nrf2 target genes associated with Nrf2 protein expression were induced. Results showed that most chemical sensitizers having cysteine and cysteine/lysine affinities were inducers of the Nrf2 pathway in both cell models, whereas lysine-reactive chemicals were less efficient. In THP-1 cells, the Nrf2 pathway was also activated by pro-/prehaptens. Regression analysis revealed that ho-1 and nqo1 expressions were found to be associated with chemical sensitizer reactivity to cysteine, providing evidence of the importance of chemical reactivity, as a part of danger signals, in DC biology.

  5. Impaired dendritic inhibition leads to epileptic activity in a computer model of CA3.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, M; Neymotin, Samuel A; Krothapalli, Srinivasa B

    2015-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a common type of epilepsy with hippocampus as the usual site of origin. The CA3 subfield of hippocampus is reported to have a low epileptic threshold and hence initiates the disorder in patients with TLE. This study computationally investigates how impaired dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells in the vulnerable CA3 subfield leads to generation of epileptic activity. A model of CA3 subfield consisting of 800 pyramidal cells, 200 basket cells (BC) and 200 Oriens-Lacunosum Moleculare (O-LM) interneurons was used. The dendritic inhibition provided by O-LM interneurons is reported to be selectively impaired in some TLEs. A step-wise approach is taken to investigate how alterations in network connectivity lead to generation of epileptic patterns. Initially, dendritic inhibition alone was reduced, followed by an increase in the external inputs received at the distal dendrites of pyramidal cells, and finally additional changes were made at the synapses between all neurons in the network. In the first case, when the dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells alone was reduced, the local field potential activity changed from a theta-modulated gamma pattern to a prominently gamma frequency pattern. In the second case, in addition to this reduction of dendritic inhibition, with a simultaneous large increase in the external excitatory inputs received by pyramidal cells, the basket cells entered a state of depolarization block, causing the network to generate a typical ictal activity pattern. In the third case, when the dendritic inhibition onto the pyramidal cells was reduced and changes were simultaneously made in synaptic connectivity between all neurons in the network, the basket cells were again observed to enter depolarization block. In the third case, impairment of dendritic inhibition required to generate an ictal activity pattern was lesser than the two previous cases. Moreover, the ictal like activity began earlier in the third case

  6. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells resident in human thymus drive natural Treg cell development.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gayo, Enrique; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Corbí, Angel L; Toribio, María L

    2010-07-01

    The generation of natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) is crucial for the establishment of immunologic self-tolerance and the prevention of autoimmunity. Still, the origin of nTregs and the mechanisms governing their differentiation within the thymus are poorly understood, particularly in humans. It was recently shown that conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) in human thymus were capable of inducing nTreg differentiation. However, the function of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), the other major subset of thymic DCs, remains unknown. Here we report that pDCs resident in the human thymus, when activated with CD40 ligand (CD40L) plus interleukin-3, efficiently promoted the generation of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) nTregs from autologous thymocytes. The progenitors of these nTregs were selectively found within CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes that had accomplished positive selection, as judged by their CD69(hi)TCR(hi) phenotype. Supporting the involvement of the CD40-CD40L pathway in pDC-induced nTreg generation, we show that positively selected CD4(+)CD8(+) progenitors specifically transcribed CD40L in vivo and up-regulated CD40L expression on T-cell receptor engagement, thereby promoting the activation of pDCs. Finally, evidence is provided that nTregs primed by pDCs displayed reciprocal interleukin-10/transforming growth factor-beta cytokine expression profiles compared with nTregs primed by cDCs. This functional diversity further supports a nonredundant tolerogenic role for thymic pDCs in the human thymus.

  7. Oncostatin M production by human dendritic cells in response to bacterial products.

    PubMed

    Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo; Todate, Akihito; Ide, Kyotaro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Kuwata, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2002-03-21

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a pleiomorphic cytokine that belongs to the IL-6 cytokine family. It is produced by activated T cells and monocytes/macrophages and plays an important role in the process of inflammatory responses. Although dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to secrete a variety of cytokines, it is not elucidated whether DCs are able to produce OSM. To clarify this, using human DCs derived from peripheral blood cells, we measured the protein levels of OSM in the supernatants of DC cultures by ELISA and examined the expression of OSM mRNA by RT-PCR after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or fixed Staphylococcus aureus (SACS). Upon stimulation with bacterial products, DCs secreted a large amount of OSM protein in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the expression of OSM mRNA by DCs was markedly up-regulated. Compared the ability of DCs to produce OSM with that of monocytes, which are major producers of OSM, DCs released significantly higher amounts of OSM protein in the culture supernatants than monocytes. These findings indicate for the first time that human monocyte-derived DCs can synthesize and secrete large amounts of OSM in response to bacterial products, suggesting that OSM produced by DCs at infectious sites may play a role in modulating inflammatory responses.

  8. PGE2 confers survivin-dependent apoptosis resistance in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baratelli, Felicita; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie; Zhu, Li; Escuadro, Brian; Sharma, Sherven; Reckamp, Karen; Dohadwala, Mariam; Dubinett, Steven M

    2005-08-01

    Control of apoptosis is fundamental for dendritic cell (DC) homeostasis. Numerous factors maintain DC viability throughout their lifespan, including inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. Among them, survivin is overexpressed in many human malignancies, but its physiological function in normal cells has not been fully delineated. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), also overproduced in several malignancies, has shown to induce proapoptotic and antiapoptotic effects in different cell types, including immune cells. In DC, PGE2 predominantly affects maturation and modulates immune functions. Here, we show that exposure of monocyte-derived DC to PGE2 (10(-5) M) for 72 h significantly increased DC survivin mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, DC, matured with lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha, did not reveal survivin induction in response to PGE2. Following exposure to apoptotic stimuli, DC treated with PGE2 exhibited an overall increased viability compared with control DC, and this effect was correlated inversely with caspase-3 activation. Moreover, PGE2-treated, survivin-deficient DC demonstrated reduced viability in response to apoptotic stimuli. Further analysis indicated that PGE2 induced DC survivin expression in an E prostanoid (EP)2/EP4 receptor and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent manner. These findings suggest that PGE2-dependent regulation of survivin is important in modulating apoptosis resistance in human DC.

  9. Thimerosal compromises human dendritic cell maturation, IL-12 production, chemokine release, and T-helper polarization.

    PubMed

    Loison, Emily; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Thimerosal is a preservative used in multidose vials of vaccine formulations to prevent bacterial and fungal contamination. We recently reported that nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal induce cell cycle arrest of human T cells activated via the TCR and inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production, thus interfering with T-cell functions. Given the essential role of dendritic cells (DCs) in T-cell polarization and vaccine immunity, we studied the influence of non-toxic concentrations of thimerosal on DC maturation and functions. Ex-vivo exposure of human monocyte-derived DCs to nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal prevented LPS-induced DC maturation, as evidenced by the inhibition of morphological changes and a decreased expression of the maturation markers CD86 and HLA-DR. In addition thimerosal dampened their proinflammatory response, in particular the production of the Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12, as well as TNF-α and IL-6. DC-dependent T helper polarization was altered, leading to a decreased production of IFN-γ IP10 and GM-CSF and increased levels of IL-8, IL-9, and MIP-1α. Although multi-dose vials of vaccines containing thimerosal remain important for vaccine delivery, our results alert about the ex-vivo immunomodulatory effects of thimerosal on DCs, a key player for the induction of an adaptive response.

  10. Thimerosal compromises human dendritic cell maturation, IL-12 production, chemokine release, and T-helper polarization

    PubMed Central

    Loison, Emily; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Thimerosal is a preservative used in multidose vials of vaccine formulations to prevent bacterial and fungal contamination. We recently reported that nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal induce cell cycle arrest of human T cells activated via the TCR and inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production, thus interfering with T-cell functions. Given the essential role of dendritic cells (DCs) in T-cell polarization and vaccine immunity, we studied the influence of non-toxic concentrations of thimerosal on DC maturation and functions. Ex-vivo exposure of human monocyte-derived DCs to nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal prevented LPS-induced DC maturation, as evidenced by the inhibition of morphological changes and a decreased expression of the maturation markers CD86 and HLA-DR. In addition thimerosal dampened their proinflammatory response, in particular the production of the Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12, as well as TNF-α and IL-6. DC-dependent T helper polarization was altered, leading to a decreased production of IFN-γ IP10 and GM-CSF and increased levels of IL-8, IL-9, and MIP-1α. Although multi-dose vials of vaccines containing thimerosal remain important for vaccine delivery, our results alert about the ex-vivo immunomodulatory effects of thimerosal on DCs, a key player for the induction of an adaptive response PMID:25424939

  11. Recruitment and endo-lysosomal activation of TLR9 in dendritic cells infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Ropert, Catherine; Melo, Mariane B; Parroche, Peggy; Junqueira, Caroline F; Teixeira, Santuza M R; Sirois, Cherilyn; Kasperkovitz, Pia; Knetter, Cathrine F; Lien, Egil; Latz, Eicke; Golenbock, Douglas T; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2008-07-15

    TLR9 is critical in parasite recognition and host resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, no information is available regarding nucleotide sequences and cellular events involved on T. cruzi recognition by TLR9. In silico wide analysis associated with in vitro screening of synthetic oligonucleotides demonstrates that the retrotransposon VIPER elements and mucin-like glycoprotein (TcMUC) genes in the T. cruzi genome are highly enriched for CpG motifs that are immunostimulatory for mouse and human TLR9, respectively. Importantly, infection with T. cruzi triggers high levels of luciferase activity under NF-kappaB-dependent transcription in HEK cells cotransfected with human TLR9, but not in control (cotransfected with human MD2/TLR4) HEK cells. Further, we observed translocation of TLR9 to the lysosomes during invasion/uptake of T. cruzi parasites by dendritic cells. Consistently, potent proinflammatory activity was observed when highly unmethylated T. cruzi genomic DNA was delivered to the endo-lysosomal compartment of host cells expressing TLR9. Thus, together our results indicate that the unmethylated CpG motifs found in the T. cruzi genome are likely to be main parasite targets and probably become available to TLR9 when parasites are destroyed in the lysosome-fused vacuoles during parasite invasion/uptake by phagocytes.

  12. Human Dendritic Cell Response Signatures Distinguish 1918, Pandemic, and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Boris M; Thakar, Juilee; Albrecht, Randy A; Avey, Stefan; Zaslavsky, Elena; Marjanovic, Nada; Chikina, Maria; Fribourg, Miguel; Hayot, Fernand; Schmolke, Mirco; Meng, Hailong; Wetmur, James; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Kleinstein, Steven H; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2015-10-01

    Influenza viruses continue to present global threats to human health. Antigenic drift and shift, genetic reassortment, and cross-species transmission generate new strains with differences in epidemiology and clinical severity. We compared the temporal transcriptional responses of human dendritic cells (DC) to infection with two pandemic (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918, A/California/4/2009) and two seasonal (A/New Caledonia/20/1999, A/Texas/36/1991) H1N1 influenza viruses. Strain-specific response differences included stronger activation of NF-κB following infection with A/New Caledonia/20/1999 and a unique cluster of genes expressed following infection with A/Brevig Mission/1/1918. A common antiviral program showing strain-specific timing was identified in the early DC response and found to correspond with reported transcript changes in blood during symptomatic human influenza virus infection. Comparison of the global responses to the seasonal and pandemic strains showed that a dramatic divergence occurred after 4 h, with only the seasonal strains inducing widespread mRNA loss. Continuously evolving influenza viruses present a global threat to human health; however, these host responses display strain-dependent differences that are incompletely understood. Thus, we conducted a detailed comparative study assessing the immune responses of human DC to infection with two pandemic and two seasonal H1N1 influenza strains. We identified in the immune response to viral infection both common and strain-specific features. Among the stain-specific elements were a time shift of the interferon-stimulated gene response, selective induction of NF-κB signaling by one of the seasonal strains, and massive RNA degradation as early as 4 h postinfection by the seasonal, but not the pandemic, viruses. These findings illuminate new aspects of the distinct differences in the immune responses to pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All

  13. Human Dendritic Cell Response Signatures Distinguish 1918, Pandemic, and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Boris M.; Thakar, Juilee; Albrecht, Randy A.; Avey, Stefan; Zaslavsky, Elena; Marjanovic, Nada; Chikina, Maria; Fribourg, Miguel; Hayot, Fernand; Schmolke, Mirco; Meng, Hailong; Wetmur, James; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viruses continue to present global threats to human health. Antigenic drift and shift, genetic reassortment, and cross-species transmission generate new strains with differences in epidemiology and clinical severity. We compared the temporal transcriptional responses of human dendritic cells (DC) to infection with two pandemic (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918, A/California/4/2009) and two seasonal (A/New Caledonia/20/1999, A/Texas/36/1991) H1N1 influenza viruses. Strain-specific response differences included stronger activation of NF-κB following infection with A/New Caledonia/20/1999 and a unique cluster of genes expressed following infection with A/Brevig Mission/1/1918. A common antiviral program showing strain-specific timing was identified in the early DC response and found to correspond with reported transcript changes in blood during symptomatic human influenza virus infection. Comparison of the global responses to the seasonal and pandemic strains showed that a dramatic divergence occurred after 4 h, with only the seasonal strains inducing widespread mRNA loss. IMPORTANCE Continuously evolving influenza viruses present a global threat to human health; however, these host responses display strain-dependent differences that are incompletely understood. Thus, we conducted a detailed comparative study assessing the immune responses of human DC to infection with two pandemic and two seasonal H1N1 influenza strains. We identified in the immune response to viral infection both common and strain-specific features. Among the stain-specific elements were a time shift of the interferon-stimulated gene response, selective induction of NF-κB signaling by one of the seasonal strains, and massive RNA degradation as early as 4 h postinfection by the seasonal, but not the pandemic, viruses. These findings illuminate new aspects of the distinct differences in the immune responses to pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses. PMID:26223639

  14. Class 3 semaphorins induce F-actin reorganization in human dendritic cells: Role in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Curreli, Sabrina; Wong, Bin Sheng; Latinovic, Olga; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Stamatos, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are soluble proteins that are well recognized for their role in guiding axonal migration during neuronal development. In the immune system, Sema3A has been shown to influence murine dendritic cell (DC) migration by signaling through a neuropilin (NRP)-1/plexin-A1 coreceptor axis. Potential roles for class 3 Semas in human DCs have yet to be described. We tested the hypothesis that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, each with a unique NRP-1 and/or NRP-2 binding specificity, influence human DC migration. In this report, we find that although NRP-1 and NRP-2 are expressed in human immature DCs (imDCs), NRP-2 expression increases as cells mature further, whereas expression of NRP-1 declines dramatically. Elevated levels of RNA encoding plexin-A1 and -A3 are present in both imDCs and mature DC (mDCs), supporting the relevance of Sema/NRP/plexin signaling pathways in these cells. Sema3A, -3C, and -3F bind to human DCs, with Sema3F binding predominantly through NRP-2. The binding of these Semas leads to reorganization of actin filaments at the plasma membrane and increased transwell migration in the absence or presence of chemokine CCL19. Microfluidic chamber assays failed to demonstrate consistent changes in speed of Sema3C-treated DCs, suggesting increased cell deformability as a possible explanation for enhanced transwell migration. Although monocytes express RNA encoding Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, only RNA encoding Sema3C increases robustly during DC differentiation. These data suggest that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, likely with coreceptors NRP-1, NRP-2, and plexin-A1 and/or -A3, promote migration and possibly other activities of human DCs during innate and adaptive immune responses.

  15. Human intestinal epithelial cells promote the differentiation of tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Iliev, I D; Spadoni, I; Mileti, E; Matteoli, G; Sonzogni, A; Sampietro, G M; Foschi, D; Caprioli, F; Viale, G; Rescigno, M

    2009-11-01

    In mice, a subpopulation of gut dendritic cells (DCs) expressing CD103 drives the development of regulatory T (T(reg)) cells. Further, it was recently described that the cross-talk between human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and DCs helps in maintaining gut immune homeostasis via the induction of non-inflammatory DCs. In this study, an analysis was carried out to determine whether IECs could promote the differentiation of CD103+ tolerogenic DCs, and the function of primary CD103+ DCs isolated from human mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) was evaluated. Monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and circulating CD1c+ DCs were conditioned or not with supernatants from Caco-2 cells or IECs isolated from healthy donors or donors with Crohn's disease and analysed for their ability to induce T(reg) cell differentiation. In some cases, transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta), retinoic acid (RA) or thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were neutralised before conditioning. CD103+ and CD103- DCs were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) from MLNs and used in T(reg) cell differentiation experiments. It was found that human IECs promoted the differentiation of tolerogenic DCs able to drive the development of adaptive Foxp3+ T(reg) cells. This control was lost in patients with Crohn's disease and paralleled a reduced expression of tolerogenic factors by primary IECs. MoDCs differentiated with RA or IEC supernatant upregulated the expression of CD103. Consistently, human primary CD103+ DCs isolated from MLNs were endowed with the ability to drive T(reg) cell differentiation. This subset of DCs expressed CCR7 and probably represents a lamina propria-derived migratory population. A population of tolerogenic CD103+ DCs was identified in the human gut that probably differentiate in response to IEC-derived factors and drive T(reg) cell development.

  16. Communication between Human Dendritic Cell Subsets in Tuberculosis: Requirements for Naive CD4+ T Cell Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Laura; Farinacci, Maura; Bechtle, Marina; Stäber, Manuela; Zedler, Ulrike; Baiocchini, Andrea; del Nonno, Franca; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Human primary dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous by phenotype, function, and tissue localization and distinct from inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs. Current information regarding the susceptibility and functional role of primary human DC subsets to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is limited. Here, we dissect the response of different primary DC subsets to Mtb infection. Myeloid CD11c+ cells and pDCs (C-type lectin 4C+ cells) were located in human lymph nodes (LNs) of tuberculosis (TB) patients by histochemistry. Rare CD141hi DCs (C-type lectin 9A+ cells) were also identified. Infection with live Mtb revealed a higher responsiveness of myeloid CD1c+ DCs compared to CD141hi DCs and pDCs. CD1c+ DCs produced interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and IL-1β but not IL-12p70, a cytokine important for Th1 activation and host defenses against Mtb. Yet, CD1c+ DCs were able to activate autologous naïve CD4+ T cells. By combining cell purification with fluorescence-activated cell sorting and gene expression profiling on rare cell populations, we detected in responding CD4+ T cells, genes related to effector-cytolytic functions and transcription factors associated with Th1, Th17, and Treg polarization, suggesting multifunctional properties in our experimental conditions. Finally, immunohistologic analyses revealed contact between CD11c+ cells and pDCs in LNs of TB patients and in vitro data suggest that cooperation between Mtb-infected CD1c+ DCs and pDCs favors stimulation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25071784

  17. Dendritic cell-elicited B-cell activation fosters immune privilege via IL-10 signals in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Wu, Rui-Qi; Wei, Yuan; Liu, Rui-Xian; Yang, Dong; Xiao, Xiao; Zheng, Limin; Li, Bo; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Kuang, Dong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    B cells are prominent components of human solid tumours, but activation status and functions of these cells in human cancers remain elusive. Here we establish that over 50% B cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) exhibit an FcγRIIlow/− activated phenotype, and high infiltration of these cells positively correlates with cancer progression. Environmental semimature dendritic cells, but not macrophages, can operate in a CD95L-dependent pathway to generate FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells. Early activation of monocytes in cancer environments is critical for the generation of semimature dendritic cells and subsequent FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells. More importantly, the activated FcγRIIlow/− B cells from HCC tumours, but not the resting FcγRIIhigh B cells, without external stimulation suppress autologous tumour-specific cytotoxic T-cell immunity via IL-10 signals. Collectively, generation of FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells may represent a mechanism by which the immune activation is linked to immune tolerance in the tumour milieu. PMID:27853178

  18. Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronan-Pulsed Human Dendritic Cells Showed Increased Migration Capacity and Induced Resistance to Tumor Chemoattraction

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Manglio; Bayo, Juan; Piccioni, Flavia; Malvicini, Mariana; Fiore, Esteban; Peixoto, Estanislao; García, Mariana G.; Aquino, Jorge B.; Gonzalez Campaña, Ariel; Podestá, Gustavo; Terres, Marcelo; Andriani, Oscar; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that ex vivo pre-conditioning of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) with low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW HA) induces antitumor immunity against colorectal carcinoma (CRC) in mice. In the present study we investigated the effects of LMW HA priming on human-tumor-pulsed monocytes-derived dendritic cells (DC/TL) obtained from healthy donors and patients with CRC. LMW HA treatment resulted in an improved maturation state of DC/TL and an enhanced mixed leucocyte reaction activity in vivo. Importantly, pre-conditioning of DC/TL with LMW HA increased their ability to migrate and reduced their attraction to human tumor derived supernatants. These effects were associated with increased CCR7 expression levels in DC. Indeed, a significant increase in migratory response toward CCL21 was observed in LMW HA primed tumor-pulsed monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC/TL/LMW HA) when compared to LWM HA untreated cells (DC/TL). Moreover, LMW HA priming modulated other mechanisms implicated in DC migration toward lymph nodes such as the metalloproteinase activity. Furthermore, it also resulted in a significant reduction in DC migratory capacity toward tumor supernatant and IL8 in vitro. Consistently, LMW HA dramatically enhanced in vivo DC recruitment to tumor-regional lymph nodes and reduced DC migration toward tumor tissue. This study shows that LMW HA –a poorly immunogenic molecule- represents a promising candidate to improve human DC maturation protocols in the context of DC-based vaccines development, due to its ability to enhance their immunogenic properties as well as their migratory capacity toward lymph nodes instead of tumors. PMID:25238610

  19. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T.-C.; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  20. Herbal medicine IMOD suppresses LPS-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines in human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Saeedeh; Drewniak, Agata; Sarrami-Forooshani, Ramin; Kaptein, Tanja M.; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional medicines that stimulate or modulate the immune system can be used as innovative approaches to treat immunological diseases. The herbal medicine IMOD has been shown to strongly modulate immune responses in several animal studies as well as in clinical trials. However, little is known about the mechanisms of IMOD to modulate immunity. Here we have investigated whether IMOD modulates the immunological function of human dendritic cells (DCs). IMOD alone did not induce DC maturation nor production of cytokines. Notably, IMOD decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12 p70, and TNFα by LPS-activated DCs at both mRNA and protein levels in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, treatment with IMOD did not affect LPS induced-production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, IMOD inhibited T cell activation/proliferation by LPS-treated DCs and skewed T-cells responses toward the T helper type 2 polarization. These data strongly indicate that IMOD has a potent immunomodulatory ability that affects TLR signaling and thereby modulates DC function. Insight into the immunomodulatory effect of herbal medicine IMOD may provide innovative strategies to affect the immune system and to help combat various diseases. PMID:25870561

  1. Mycobacterium bovis BCG-infected neutrophils and dendritic cells cooperate to induce specific T cell responses in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Morel, Céline; Badell, Edgar; Abadie, Valérie; Robledo, Macarena; Setterblad, Niclas; Gluckman, Jean Claude; Gicquel, Brigitte; Boudaly, Sarah; Winter, Nathalie

    2008-02-01

    Neutrophils are increasingly thought to modulate dendritic cell (DC) functions. We investigated the role of the neutrophil-DC partnership in the response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG-the vaccine used against tuberculosis. We compared neutrophil-DC crosstalk in humans and mice, searching for functional differences. In both species, neutrophils captured fluorescent BCG-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were more phagocytic than DC. Non-apoptotic BCG-infected neutrophils clustered with immature DC, establishing intimate contacts with dendrites, at which fluorescent intact bacilli were observed. Physical interactions between neutrophils and DC were required for DC activation. Human BCG-infected DC produced interleukin (IL)-10, an inhibitory cytokine, whereas DC exposed to BCG-infected neutrophils produced low to undetectable amounts of the cytokine. Mouse BCG-infected neutrophils induced sustained IL-2 production by DC. Human DC exposed to BCG-infected neutrophils stimulated recall T cell reactivity from vaccinated donors. Mouse DC infected with recombinant ovalbumin (OVA)-producing BCG (rBCG(ova)) elicited proliferation of TCR-OVA-transgenic CD4 and CD8 T cells. Moreover, exposing DC to rBCG(ova)-infected neutrophils enhanced OVA presentation. Thus, in mice and humans, neutrophils help DC to cross-present BCG antigens to T cells. Our results suggest that this "ménage à trois" involving neutrophils, DC and T cells plays a major role in the immune response to BCG.

  2. Dendritic Cell-Mediated Phagocytosis but Not Immune Activation Is Enhanced by Plasmin

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rachael J.; Samson, Andre L.; Au, Amanda E.-L.; Scholzen, Anja; Fuchsberger, Martina; Kong, Ying Y.; Freeman, Roxann; Mifsud, Nicole A.; Plebanski, Magdalena; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Removal of dead cells in the absence of concomitant immune stimulation is essential for tissue homeostasis. We recently identified an injury-induced protein misfolding event that orchestrates the plasmin-dependent proteolytic degradation of necrotic cells. As impaired clearance of dead cells by the innate immune system predisposes to autoimmunity, we determined whether plasmin could influence endocytosis and immune cell stimulation by dendritic cells – a critical cell that links the innate and adaptive immune systems. We find that plasmin generated on the surface of necrotic cells enhances their phagocytic removal by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Plasmin also promoted phagocytosis of protease-resistant microparticles by diverse mouse dendritic cell sub-types both in vitro and in vivo. Together with an increased phagocytic capacity, plasmin-treated dendritic cells maintain an immature phenotype, exhibit reduced migration to lymph nodes, increase their expression/release of the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-β, and lose their capacity to mount an allogeneic response. Collectively, our findings support a novel role for plasmin formed on dead cells and other phagocytic targets in maintaining tissue homeostasis by increasing the phagocytic function of dendritic cells while simultaneously decreasing their immunostimulatory capacity consistent with producing an immunosuppressive state. PMID:26132730

  3. Phenotypic and functional activation of hyporesponsive KIRnegNKG2Aneg human NK-cell precursors requires IL12p70 provided by Poly(I:C)-matured monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Curran, Shane A; Romano, Emanuela; Kennedy, Michael G; Hsu, Katharine C; Young, James W

    2014-10-01

    A functionally responsive natural killer (NK)-cell repertoire requires the acquisition of inhibitory NKG2A and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) through pathways that remain undefined. Functional donor NK cells expressing KIRs for non-self class I MHC ligands contribute to a positive outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) by targeting HLA-matched recipient leukemic cells. Insofar as circulating donor conventional dendritic cells (DC) reconstitute with comparable kinetics with donor NK cells after alloHSCT, we used hyporesponsive KIRnegNKG2Aneg precursor cells to evaluate how specific DC subtypes generate a functionally active NK-cell repertoire. Both monocyte-derived DCs (moDC) and Langerhans-type DCs (LC) induce KIRnegNKG2Aneg precursor cells to express the inhibitory receptors NKG2A and KIR, without requiring cell proliferation. Poly(I:C)-matured moDCs significantly augmented the expression of NKG2A, but not KIR, in an IL12p70-dependent manner. Although all DC-stimulated KIRnegNKG2Aneg cells were able to acquire cytolytic activity against class I MHC-negative targets, the ability to secrete IFNγ was restricted to cells that were stimulated by IL12p70-producing, poly(I:C)-matured moDCs. This critical ability of poly(I:C)-matured moDCs to provide IL12p70 to developing KIRnegNKG2Aneg precursors results in a dom4inant, multifunctional, NKG2Apos NK-cell population that is capable of both cytolysis and IFNγ production. Poly(I:C)-matured moDCs are, therefore, the most effective conventional DC subtype for generating a functionally competent NK-cell repertoire by an IL12p70-dependent mechanism.

  4. Aerosol Delivery of Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Target and Activate Dendritic Cells in a 3D Lung Cellular Model.

    PubMed

    Fytianos, Kleanthis; Chortarea, Savvina; Rodriguez-Lorenzo, Laura; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2017-01-24

    Nanocarrier design combined with pulmonary drug delivery holds great promise for the treatment of respiratory tract disorders. In particular, targeting of dendritic cells that are key immune cells to enhance or suppress an immune response in the lung is a promising approach for the treatment of allergic diseases. Fluorescently encoded poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-coated gold nanoparticles, functionalized with either negative (-COO(-)) or positive (-NH3(+)) surface charges, were functionalized with a DC-SIGN antibody on the particle surface, enabling binding to a dendritic cell surface receptor. A 3D coculture model consisting of epithelial and immune cells (macrophages and dendritic cells) mimicking the human lung epithelial tissue barrier was employed to assess the effects of aerosolized AuNPs. PVA-NH2 AuNPs showed higher uptake compared to that of their -COOH counterparts, with the highest uptake recorded in macrophages, as shown by flow cytometry. None of the AuNPs induced cytotoxicity or necrosis or increased cytokine secretion, whereas only PVA-NH2 AuNPs induced higher apoptosis levels. DC-SIGN AuNPs showed significantly increased uptake by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) with subsequent activation compared to non-antibody-conjugated control AuNPs, independent of surface charge. Our results show that DC-SIGN conjugation to the AuNPs enhanced MDDC targeting and activation in a complex 3D lung cell model. These findings highlight the potential of immunoengineering approaches to the targeting and activation of immune cells in the lung by nanocarriers.

  5. A polymeric bacterial protein activates dendritic cells via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Berguer, Paula M; Mundiñano, Juliana; Piazzon, Isabel; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2006-02-15

    The enzyme lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) is a highly immunogenic protein that folds as a stable dimer of pentamers. It is possible to insert foreign peptides and proteins at the 10 N terminus of BLS without disrupting its general folding, and these chimeras are very efficient to elicit systemic and oral immunity without adjuvants. In this study, we show that BLS stimulates bone marrow dendritic cells from mice in vitro to up-regulate the levels of costimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80, and CD86) and major histocompatibility class II Ag. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of several chemokines are increased, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion is induced upon exposure to BLS. In vivo, BLS increases the number of dendritic cells and their expression of CD62L in the draining lymph node. All of the observed effects are dependent on TLR4, and clearly independent of LPS contamination. The described characteristics of BLS make this protein an excellent candidate for vaccine development.

  6. Responsiveness of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells to thimerosal and mercury derivatives.

    PubMed

    Migdal, C; Tailhardat, M; Courtellemont, P; Haftek, M; Serres, M

    2010-07-01

    Several cases of skin sensitization have been reported following the application of thimerosal, which is composed of ethyl mercury and thiosalicylic acid (TSA). However, few in vitro studies have been carried out on human dendritic cells (DCs) which play an essential role in the initiation of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of the present study was to identify the effect of thimerosal and other mercury compounds on human DCs. To address this purpose, DCs derived from monocytes (mono-DCs) were used. Data show that thimerosal and mercury derivatives induced DC activation, as monitored by CD86 and HLA-DR overexpression associated with the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 8, similarly to lipopolysaccharide and the sensitizers, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and nickel sulfate, which were used as positive controls. In contrast, TSA, the non-mercury part of thimerosal, as well as dichloronitrobenzene, a DNCB negative control, and the irritant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, had no effect. Moreover, oxidative stress, monitored by ROS induction and depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, was induced by thimerosal and mercury compounds, as well as DNCB, in comparison with hydrogen peroxide, used as a positive control. The role of thiol oxidation in the initiation of mono-DC activation was confirmed by a pre-treatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine which strongly decreased chemical-induced CD86 overexpression. These data are in agreement with several clinical observations of the high relevance of thimerosal in patch-test reactions and prove that human mono-DCs are useful in vitro tools for determining the allergenic potency of chemicals.

  7. Responsiveness of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells to thimerosal and mercury derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Migdal, C.; Tailhardat, M.; Courtellemont, P.; Haftek, M.; Serres, M.

    2010-07-15

    Several cases of skin sensitization have been reported following the application of thimerosal, which is composed of ethyl mercury and thiosalicylic acid (TSA). However, few in vitro studies have been carried out on human dendritic cells (DCs) which play an essential role in the initiation of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of the present study was to identify the effect of thimerosal and other mercury compounds on human DCs. To address this purpose, DCs derived from monocytes (mono-DCs) were used. Data show that thimerosal and mercury derivatives induced DC activation, as monitored by CD86 and HLA-DR overexpression associated with the secretion of tumor necrosis factor {alpha} and interleukin 8, similarly to lipopolysaccharide and the sensitizers, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and nickel sulfate, which were used as positive controls. In contrast, TSA, the non-mercury part of thimerosal, as well as dichloronitrobenzene, a DNCB negative control, and the irritant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, had no effect. Moreover, oxidative stress, monitored by ROS induction and depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, was induced by thimerosal and mercury compounds, as well as DNCB, in comparison with hydrogen peroxide, used as a positive control. The role of thiol oxidation in the initiation of mono-DC activation was confirmed by a pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine which strongly decreased chemical-induced CD86 overexpression. These data are in agreement with several clinical observations of the high relevance of thimerosal in patch-test reactions and prove that human mono-DCs are useful in vitro tools for determining the allergenic potency of chemicals.

  8. Immune-Complexed Adenovirus Induce AIM2-Mediated Pyroptosis in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eichholz, Karsten; Bru, Thierry; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Fernandes, Paulo; Mennechet, Franck J. D.; Manel, Nicolas; Alves, Paula; Perreau, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are nonenveloped proteinaceous particles containing a linear double-stranded DNA genome. HAdVs cause a spectrum of pathologies in all populations regardless of health standards. Following repeat exposure to multiple HAdV types, we develop robust and long-lived humoral and cellular immune responses that provide life-long protection from de novo infections and persistent HAdV. How HAdVs, anti-HAdV antibodies and antigen presenting cells (APCs) interact to influence infection is still incompletely understood. In our study, we used physical, pharmacological, biochemical, fluorescence and electron microscopy, molecular and cell biology approaches to dissect the impact of immune-complexed HAdV (IC-HAdV) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). We show that IC-HAdV generate stabilized complexes of ~200 nm that are efficiently internalized by, and aggregate in, MoDCs. By comparing IC-HAdV, IC-empty capsid, IC-Ad2ts1 (a HAdV-C2 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation that impacts protease encapsidation) and IC-AdL40Q (a HAdV-C5 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation in protein VI), we demonstrate that protein VI-dependent endosomal escape is required for the HAdV genome to engage the DNA pattern recognition receptor AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2). AIM2 engagement induces pyroptotic MoDC death via ASC (apoptosis-associated speck protein containing a caspase activation/recruitment domain) aggregation, inflammasome formation, caspase 1 activation, and IL-1β and gasdermin D (GSDMD) cleavage. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how humoral immunity initiates an innate immune response to HAdV-C5 in human professional APCs. PMID:27636895

  9. In vivo blockade of neural activity alters dendritic development of neonatal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Groc, Laurent; Petanjek, Zdravko; Gustafsson, Bengt; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Hanse, Eric; Khazipov, Roustem

    2002-11-01

    During development, neural activity has been proposed to promote neuronal growth. During the first postnatal week, the hippocampus is characterized by an oscillating neural network activity and a rapid neuronal growth. In the present study we tested in vivo, by injecting tetanus toxin into the hippocampus of P1 rats, whether this neural activity indeed promotes growth of pyramidal cells. We have previously shown that tetanus toxin injection leads to a strong reduction in the frequency of spontaneous GABA and glutamatergic synaptic currents, and to a complete blockade of the early neural network activity during the first postnatal week. Morphology of neurobiotin-filled CA1 pyramidal cells was analyzed at the end of the first postnatal week (P6-10). In activity-reduced neurons, the total length of basal dendritic tree was three times less than control. The number, but not the length, of basal dendritic branches was affected. The growth impairment was restricted to the basal dendrites. The apical dendrite, the axons, or the soma grew normally during activity deprivation. Thus, the in vivo neural activity in the neonate hippocampus seems to promote neuronal growth by initiating novel branches.

  10. Nrf2-dependent repression of interleukin-12 expression in human dendritic cells exposed to inorganic arsenic.

    PubMed

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Génard, Romain; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic, a well-known Nrf2 inducer, exerts immunosuppressive properties. In this context, we recently reported that the differentiation of human blood monocytes into immature dendritic cells (DCs), in the presence of low and noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenic, represses the ability of DCs to release key cytokines in response to different stimulating agents. Particularly, arsenic inhibits the expression of human interleukin-12 (IL-12, also named IL-12p70), a major proinflammatory cytokine that controls the differentiation of Th1 lymphocytes. In the present study, we determined if Nrf2 could contribute to these arsenic immunotoxic effects. To this goal, human monocyte-derived DCs were first differentiated in the absence of metalloid and then pretreated with arsenic just before DC stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Under these experimental conditions, arsenic rapidly and stably activates Nrf2 and increases the expression of Nrf2 target genes. It also significantly inhibits IL-12 expression in activated DCs, at both mRNA and protein levels. Particularly, arsenic reduces mRNA levels of IL12A and IL12B genes which encodes the p35 and p40 subunits of IL-12p70, respectively. tert-Butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a reference Nrf2 inducer, mimics arsenic effects and potently inhibits IL-12 expression. Genetic inhibition of Nrf2 expression markedly prevents the repression of both IL12 mRNA and IL-12 protein levels triggered by arsenic and tBHQ in human LPS-stimulated DCs. In addition, arsenic significantly reduces IL-12 mRNA levels in LPS-activated bone marrow-derived DCs from Nrf2+/+ mice but not in DCs from Nrf2-/- mice. Finally, we show that, besides IL-12, arsenic significantly reduces the expression of IL-23, another heterodimer containing the p40 subunit. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that arsenic represses IL-12 expression in human-activated DCs by specifically stimulating Nrf2 activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surface lipoproteome of Mycoplasma hominis PG21 and differential expression after contact with human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Goret, Julien; Le Roy, Chloé; Touati, Arabella; Mesureur, Jennifer; Renaudin, Hélène; Claverol, Stéphane; Bébéar, Cécile; Béven, Laure; Pereyre, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    To assess the lipoproteins that are involved in the interaction between Mycoplasma hominis and human dendritic cells. The surface lipoproteome of M. hominis PG21 was characterized by using Triton X-114 extraction and LC-MS/MS identification. The transcriptional changes in lipoprotein genes upon contact with human dendritic cells were determined by using reverse transcription quantitative PCR after identification of reference genes suitable for normalization. A large-scale overexpression of lipoprotein genes was observed with 21 upregulated transcripts. Seven genes of unknown function were M. hominis species specific and six genes were putatively associated with increased nutrient capture from the host cell and adhesion. M. hominis regulates lipoprotein gene expression and may use species-specific mechanisms during the host colonization process.

  12. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities.

  13. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K.; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities. PMID:28348519

  14. Human macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), a novel chemoattractant for monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Godiska, R; Chantry, D; Raport, C J; Sozzani, S; Allavena, P; Leviten, D; Mantovani, A; Gray, P W

    1997-05-05

    A cDNA encoding a novel human chemokine was isolated by random sequencing of cDNA clones from human monocyte-derived macrophages. This protein has been termed macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) because it appears to be synthesized specifically by cells of the macrophage lineage. MDC has the four-cysteine motif and other highly conserved residues characteristic of CC chemokines, but it shares <35% identity with any of the known chemokines. Recombinant MDC was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and purified by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. NH2-terminal sequencing and mass spectrophotometry were used to verify the NH2 terminus and molecular mass of recombinant MDC (8,081 dalton). In microchamber migration assays, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and IL-2-activated natural killer cells migrated to MDC in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal chemotactic response at 1 ng/ml. Freshly isolated monocytes also migrated toward MDC, but with a peak response at 100 ng/ml MDC. Northern analyses indicated MDC is highly expressed in macrophages and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not in monocytes, natural killer cells, or several cell lines of epithelial, endothelial, or fibroblast origin. High expression was also detected in normal thymus and less expression in lung and spleen. Unlike most other CC chemokines, MDC is encoded on human chromosome 16. MDC is thus a unique member of the CC chemokine family that may play a fundamental role in the function of dendritic cells, natural killer cells, and monocytes.

  15. Isolation of IL-12p70-competent human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jonas N; Brix, Susanne

    2012-12-14

    Diverse methodologies ranging from experimental immunological studies to immunotherapy involve the application of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). Considerable donor-dependent variations in the moDC production of IL-12p70 affect the outcome of these methodologies. It has been shown that moDCs generated under standard conditions develop into two subsets based on CD1a-expression with the CD1a+ moDCs being the main IL-12p70 producers. This has however not been generally accepted, which we show here because the subset described as CD1a-negative does express CD1a, but at a lower level than the other subset. We further characterize the phenotype of these two subsets, showing that the CD1a-hi subset has a greater immunogenic phenotype, making this subset more suitable for immunotherapy. The two subsets have previously been separated by cell sorting, but as this technique is not available to many laboratories and has incompatibility with clinical settings, a more widely useable technique is warranted. Therefore we tested if magnetic-activated cell sorting is useful for the purpose, and show that it is possible to isolate IL-12p70-competent CD1a-hi moDCs to a <92% purity, irrespective of the starting purity.

  16. A novel human B-lymphocyte antigen shared with lymphoid dendritic cells: characterization by monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Takami, T; Kokai, Y; Yuasa, H; Fujimoto, J; Takei, T; Kikuchi, K

    1985-01-01

    A novel cell-surface antigen (L25) expressed on human B cells was identified using a B cell-reactive monoclonal antibody (TB1-4D5). This L25 antigen was expressed on most B-lineage cells but not other cell types including thymocytes, T cells, granulocytes and monocytes. Thus, L25 existed on the majority of normal B cells present in the blood and lymphoid tissues, on cultured cell lines derived from normal and malignant B cells, and on neoplastic cells isolated from patients with B cell-derived malignancies. Though L25 was persistently expressed on B cells until 7 days after their activation with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), neither normal nor neoplastic plasma cells expressed L25. Moreover, L25 was present on cultured as well as freshly isolated leukaemic cells with common acute lymphatic leukaemia (CALL) antigen, which have been thought to correspond to the early B-cell ontogeny. Besides pan-B cell reactivity of TB1-4D5 antibody, it apparently cross-reacted with so-called dendritic or interdigitating cells located in the thymic-dependent areas of peripheral lymphoid organs, which have been presumably ascribed to those associated with accessory-cell function. Functional studies showed that anti-L25 (TB1-4D5) antibody had inhibitory effect on induction of immunoglobulin synthesis by PWM-stimulated B cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3907905

  17. [Features of functional activity of dendritic cells in tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Sennikov, S V; Obleukhova, I A; Kurilin, V V; Kulikova, E V; Khristin, A A

    2015-01-01

    During recent years much data, accumulated on biology, function and role of dendritic cells (DC) in cancer development, in a new way allow assessing their role in disease process. Identification of features of DC functional state as well as their interaction and influence on the immune cells in tumor growth can be used as a basis for a new approach to cancer therapy enhancing standard therapy efficacy. The review analyzes different mechanisms of escaping of tumor cell from immune surveillance involving DC as one of the main participants of antitumor immune response. Also the prospects of using DC for vaccination are discussed. DC can be promising target for therapeutic strategies and also can be used for formation of antitumor response and cell therapy.

  18. Facile synthesis of dendritic gold nanostructures with hyperbranched architectures and their electrocatalytic activity toward ethanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianshe; Han, Xinyi; Wang, Dawei; Liu, Dong; You, Tianyan

    2013-09-25

    Gold dendritic nanostructures with hyperbranched architectures were synthesized by the galvanic replacement reaction between nickel wire and HAuCl4 in aqueous solution. The study revealed that the morphology of the obtained nanostructures strongly depended on experimental parameters such as the HAuCl4 solution concentration, reaction temperature, and time, as well as stirring or not. According to the investigation of the growth process, it was proposed that gold nanoparticles with rough surfaces were first deposited on the nickel substrate and that subsequent growth preferentially occurred on the preformed gold nanoparticles, finally leading to the formation of hyperbranched gold dendrites via a self-organization process under nonequilibrium conditions. The electrochemical experiment results demonstrated that the as-obtained gold dendrites exhibited high catalytic activity toward ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution, indicating that this nanomaterial may be a potential catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  19. Efficient generation of canine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Isotani, Mayu; Katsuma, Kensuke; Tamura, Kyoichi; Yamada, Misato; Yagihara, Hiroko; Azakami, Daigo; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2006-08-01

    Because of their unsurpassed potency in presenting antigens to naive T cells, dendritic cells are considered to be an important candidate in the development of immunotherapeutic strategies. Despite the high potential of dendritic cell-based immunotherapy, as a so-called dendritic cell vaccination, few clinical approaches using dendritic cell vaccination have been performed in the dog because of very limited information regarding the generation of canine dendritic cells and their functional properties. We therefore established a protocol for the efficient generation of dendritic cells from canine bone marrow cells using recombinant feline granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and canine interleukin-4. Dendritic cells were generated efficiently: a yield of 1-9 x 10(6) cells per approximately 0.5 ml of canine bone marrow aspiration was achieved. These dendritic cells showed features shared with mouse and human dendritic cells: dendrite morphology, expression of surface markers MHC class II and CD11c, and up-regulation of molecules related to antigen presentation (MHC class II, B7-1, and B7-2) by activation with lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, the dendritic cells demonstrated phagocytic activity, processing activity of pinocytosed proteins, and activation of allogeneic T cells far more potent than that by macrophages. Our findings suggest that the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functional for the capturing and processing of antigens and the initiation of T cell responses.

  20. Chemomodulation of human dendritic cell function by antineoplastic agents in low noncytotoxic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Kaneno, Ramon; Shurin, Galina V; Tourkova, Irina L; Shurin, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    The dose-delivery schedule of conventional chemotherapy, which determines its efficacy and toxicity, is based on the maximum tolerated dose. This strategy has lead to cure and disease control in a significant number of patients but is associated with significant short-term and long-term toxicity. Recent data demonstrate that moderately low-dose chemotherapy may be efficiently combined with immunotherapy, particularly with dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, to improve the overall therapeutic efficacy. However, the direct effects of low and ultra-low concentrations on DCs are still unknown. Here we characterized the effects of low noncytotoxic concentrations of different classes of chemotherapeutic agents on human DCs in vitro. DCs treated with antimicrotubule agents vincristine, vinblastine, and paclitaxel or with antimetabolites 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and methotrexate, showed increased expression of CD83 and CD40 molecules. Expression of CD80 on DCs was also stimulated by vinblastine, paclitaxel, azacytidine, methotrexate, and mitomycin C used in low nontoxic concentrations. Furthermore, 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, methotrexate, and mitomycin C increased the ability of human DCs to stimulate proliferation of allogeneic T lymphocytes. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that in low noncytotoxic concentrations chemotherapeutic agents do not induce apoptosis of DCs, but directly enhance DC maturation and function. This suggests that modulation of human DCs by noncytotoxic concentrations of antineoplastic drugs, i.e. chemomodulation, might represent a novel approach for up-regulation of functional activity of resident DCs in the tumor microenvironment or improving the efficacy of DCs prepared ex vivo for subsequent vaccinations. PMID:19591684

  1. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A1[S

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2–12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells “foamy DCs” and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  2. Proteoglycans regulate the chemotaxis of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hironori; Takahashi, Kenji; Monzen, Satoru; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which play an essential role in the immune system. The transition from immature DC (iDCs) to mature DCs (mDCs) requires appropriate maturation stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines or pathogen-derived components. Proteoglycans (PGs), which are composed of core proteins and the glycosaminoglycans that bind to them, are one of the main components of the extracellular matrix around pathogens such as bacteria. This study investigated the effects of PG extracted from the nasal septum cartilage of whale (W-PG) on the maturation of DCs derived from human peripheral blood monocytes. iDCs were prepared from human monocytes using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The iDCs were stimulated by W-PG alone. In another type of experiment, the iDCs were stimulated by MIX (tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))) or a combination of MIX plus W-PG. The stimulation of W-PG alone did not induce the phenotypic maturation from iDCs. However, W-PG promoted the up-regulation of chemokine receptor CCR7-surface expression and the chemotactic responsiveness to CCR7 ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3beta on MIX-stimulated mDCs although W-PG did not influence matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity which is an important factor in DC migration through the extracellular matrix. The findings that W-PG can selectively regulate the chemotactic activity of DCs in vitro under inflammatory conditions therefore indicate that the interaction of PGs with immune cells including DCs plays an important role in the immune response under the milieu of innate immunity.

  3. CTLA-4 is expressed by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and regulates their functions.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stefania; Carrega, Paolo; Saverino, Daniele; Piccioli, Patrizia; Camoriano, Marta; Morabito, Anna; Dozin, Beatrice; Fontana, Vincenzo; Simone, Rita; Mortara, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Ferlazzo, Guido; Pistillo, Maria Pia

    2010-10-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is the major negative regulator of T-cell responses, although growing evidence supports its wider role as an immune attenuator that may also act in other cell lineages. Here, we have analyzed the expression of CTLA-4 in human monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and the effect of its engagement on cytokine production and T-cell stimulatory activity by mature DCs. CTLA-4 was highly expressed on freshly isolated monocytes, then down-modulated upon differentiation toward immature DCs (iDCs) and it was markedly upregulated on mature DCs obtained with different stimulations (lipopolysaccharides [LPS], Poly:IC, cytokines). In line with the functional role of CTLA-4 in T cells, treatment of mDCs with an agonistic anti-CTLA-4 mAb significantly enhanced secretion of regulatory interleukin (IL)-10 but reduced secretion of IL-8/IL-12 pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as autologous CD4+ T-cell proliferation in response to stimulation with recall antigen purified protein derivative (PPD) loaded-DCs. Neutralization of IL-10 with an anti-IL-10 antibody during the mDCs-CD4+ T-cell co-culture partially restored the ability of anti-CTLA-4-treated mDCs to stimulate T-cell proliferation in response to PPD. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that CTLA-4 receptor is expressed by human monocyte-derived mDCs upon their full activation and that it exerts immune modulatory effects.

  4. Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Promotes Dendritic Spine Recovery and Improves Neurological Outcome Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Catano, Marcela; Echeverry, Ramiro; Torre, Enrique; Haile, Woldeab B.; An, Jie; Chen, Changhua; Cheng, Lihong; Nicholson, Andrew; Tong, Frank C.; Park, Jaekeun

    2014-01-01

    Spines are dendritic protrusions that receive most of the excitatory input in the brain. Early after the onset of cerebral ischemia dendritic spines in the peri-infarct cortex are replaced by areas of focal swelling, and their re-emergence from these varicosities is associated with neurological recovery after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine proteinase that plays a central role in tissue remodeling via binding to the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report that cerebral cortical neurons release uPA during the recovery phase from ischemic stroke in vivo or hypoxia in vitro. Although uPA does not have an effect on ischemia- or hypoxia-induced neuronal death, genetic deficiency of uPA (uPA−/−) or uPAR (uPAR−/−) abrogates functional recovery after AIS. Treatment with recombinant uPA after ischemic stroke induces neurological recovery in wild-type and uPA−/− but not in uPAR−/− mice. Diffusion tensor imaging studies indicate that uPA−/− mice have increased water diffusivity and decreased anisotropy associated with impaired dendritic spine recovery and decreased length of distal neurites in the peri-infarct cortex. We found that the excitotoxic injury induces the clustering of uPAR in dendritic varicosities, and that the binding of uPA to uPAR promotes the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and re-emergence of dendritic filopodia from uPAR-enriched varicosities. This effect is independent of uPA's proteolytic properties and instead is mediated by Rac-regulated profilin expression and cofilin phosphorylation. Our data indicate that binding of uPA to uPAR promotes dendritic spine recovery and improves functional outcome following AIS. PMID:25339736

  5. Activity-dependent alterations in the sensitivity to BDNF-TrkB signaling may promote excessive dendritic arborization and spinogenesis in fragile X syndrome in order to compensate for compromised postsynaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Cho, Kyoung Joo

    2014-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common cause of inherited human mental retardation, results from the loss of function of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). To date, most researchers have thought that FXS neural pathologies are primarily caused by extreme dendritic branching and spine formation. With this rationale, several researchers attempted to prune dendritic branches and reduce the number of spines in FXS animal models. We propose that increased dendritic arborization and spinogenesis in FXS are developed rather as secondary compensatory responses to counteract the compromised postsynaptic activity during uncontrollable metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD). When postsynaptic and electrical activities become dampened in FXS, dendritic trees can increase their sensitivity to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) by using the molecular sensor called eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and taking advantage of the tight coupling of mGluR and BDNF-TrkB signaling pathways. Then, this activity-dependent elevation of the BDNF signaling can strategically alter dendritic morphologies to foster branching and develop spine structures in order to improve the postsynaptic response in FXS. Our model suggests a new therapeutic rationale for FXS: correcting the postsynaptic and electrical activity first, and then repairing structural abnormalities of dendrites. Then, it may be possible to successfully fix the dendritic morphologies without affecting the survival of neurons. Our theory may also be generalized to explain aberrant dendritic structures observed in other neurobehavioral diseases, such as tuberous sclerosis, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, and channelopathies, which accompany high postsynaptic and electrical activity.

  6. Exceptional methanol electro-oxidation activity by bimetallic concave and dendritic Pt-Cu nanocrystals catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Xia; Zhou, Hui-Jing; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2014-01-01

    PtCux (x = 1, 2 and 3) bimetallic nanocrystals with concave surface and dendritic morphology were prepared and used as electrocatalysts in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized via one-pot co-reduction of H2PtCl6 and Cu(acac)2 by oleylamine and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in an autoclave at 180 °C. The concave dendritic bimetallic nanostructure consisted of a core rich in Cu and nanodendrites rich in Pt, which was formed via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pt. It was found that PVP played an important role in initiating, facilitating, and directing the replacement reaction. The electrochemical properties of the PtCux were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The concave dendritic PtCu2/C nanocrystals exhibited exceptionally high activity and strong poisoning resistance in MOR. At 0.75 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE) the mass activity and specific activity of PtCu2/C were 3.3 and 4.1 times higher than those of the commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively. The enhanced catalytic activity could be attributed to the unique concave dendritic morphology of the bimetallic nanocrystals.

  7. Human IDO-competent, long-lived immunoregulatory dendritic cells induced by intracellular pathogen, and their fate in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rajeev K; Miles, Brodie; Parmar, Rajesh; Garg, Neeraj K; Dalai, Sarat K; Baban, Babak; Cutler, Christopher W

    2017-02-15

    Targeting of myeloid-dendritic cell receptor DC-SIGN by numerous chronic infectious agents, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, is shown to drive-differentiation of monocytes into dysfunctional mDCs. These mDCs exhibit alterations of their fine-tuned homeostatic function and contribute to dysregulated immune-responses. Here, we utilize P. gingivalis mutant strains to show that pathogen-differentiated mDCs from primary human-monocytes display anti-apoptotic profile, exhibited by elevated phosphorylated-Foxo1, phosphorylated-Akt1, and decreased Bim-expression. This results in an overall inhibition of DC-apoptosis. Direct stimulation of complex component CD40 on DCs leads to activation of Akt1, suggesting CD40 involvement in anti-apoptotic effects observed. Further, these DCs drove dampened CD8(+) T-cell and Th1/Th17 effector-responses while inducing CD25(+)Foxp3(+)CD127(-) Tregs. In vitro Treg induction was mediated by DC expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and was confirmed in IDO-KO mouse model. Pathogen-infected &CMFDA-labeled MoDCs long-lasting survival was confirmed in a huMoDC reconstituted humanized mice. In conclusion, our data implicate PDDCs as an important target for resolution of chronic infection.

  8. Human IDO-competent, long-lived immunoregulatory dendritic cells induced by intracellular pathogen, and their fate in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Rajeev K.; Miles, Brodie; Parmar, Rajesh; Garg, Neeraj K.; Dalai, Sarat K.; Baban, Babak; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2017-01-01

    Targeting of myeloid-dendritic cell receptor DC-SIGN by numerous chronic infectious agents, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, is shown to drive-differentiation of monocytes into dysfunctional mDCs. These mDCs exhibit alterations of their fine-tuned homeostatic function and contribute to dysregulated immune-responses. Here, we utilize P. gingivalis mutant strains to show that pathogen-differentiated mDCs from primary human-monocytes display anti-apoptotic profile, exhibited by elevated phosphorylated-Foxo1, phosphorylated-Akt1, and decreased Bim-expression. This results in an overall inhibition of DC-apoptosis. Direct stimulation of complex component CD40 on DCs leads to activation of Akt1, suggesting CD40 involvement in anti-apoptotic effects observed. Further, these DCs drove dampened CD8+ T-cell and Th1/Th17 effector-responses while inducing CD25+Foxp3+CD127− Tregs. In vitro Treg induction was mediated by DC expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and was confirmed in IDO-KO mouse model. Pathogen-infected & CMFDA-labeled MoDCs long-lasting survival was confirmed in a huMoDC reconstituted humanized mice. In conclusion, our data implicate PDDCs as an important target for resolution of chronic infection. PMID:28198424

  9. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells protect against atherosclerosis by tuning T cell proliferation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Daissormont, Isabelle T.M.N.; Christ, Anette; Temmerman, Lieve; Millares, Stefan Sampedro; Seijkens, Tom; Rousch, Mat; Poggi, Marjorie; Boon, Louis; van der Loos, Chris; Daemen, Mat; Lutgens, Esther; Halvorsen, Bente; Aukrust, Pal; Janssen, Edith; Biessen, Erik A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Unlike conventional dendritic cells (cDC), plasmacytoid DCs (pDC) are poor in antigen presentation and critical for type I interferon response. While proposed to be present in human atherosclerotic lesions, their role in atherosclerosis remains elusive. Objective To investigate the role of pDC in atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We show that pDC are scarcely present in human atherosclerotic lesions, and almost absent in mouse plaques. Surprisingly, pDC depletion by 120G8 mAb administration was seen to promote plaque T cell accumulation and exacerbate lesion development and progression in LDLr−/− mice. PDC depletion was accompanied by increased CD4+ T cell proliferation, IFN-γ expression by splenic T cells and plasma IFN-γ levels. Lymphoid tissue pDC from atherosclerotic mice showed increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression and IDO blockage abrogated the pDC suppressive effect on T cell proliferation. Conclusion Our data reveal a protective role for pDC in atherosclerosis, possibly by dampening T cell proliferation and activity in peripheral lymphoid tissue, rendering pDC an interesting target for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:22021930

  10. Molecular Basis for Ebolavirus VP35 Suppression of Human Dendritic Cell Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Benjamin; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F.; Martinez, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) VP35 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein that inhibits RIG-I signaling and alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) responses by both dsRNA-binding-dependent and -independent mechanisms. VP35 also suppresses dendritic cell (DC) maturation. Here, we define the pathways and mechanisms through which VP35 impairs DC maturation. Wild-type VP35 (VP35-WT) and two well-characterized VP35 mutants (F239A and R322A) that independently ablate dsRNA binding and RIG-I inhibition were delivered to primary human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) using a lentivirus-based expression system. VP35-WT suppressed not only IFN-α/β but also proinflammatory responses following stimulation of MDDCs with activators of RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling, including RIG-I activators such as Sendai virus (SeV) or 5′-triphosphate RNA, or MDA5 activators such as encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or poly(I·C). The F239A and R322A mutants exhibited greatly reduced suppression of IFN-α/β and proinflammatory cytokine production following treatment of DCs with RLR agonists. VP35-WT also blocked the upregulation of DC maturation markers and the stimulation of allogeneic T cell responses upon SeV infection, whereas the mutants did not. In contrast to the RLR activators, VP35-WT and the VP35 mutants impaired IFN-β production induced by Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) or TLR4 agonists but failed to inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production induced by TLR2, TLR3, or TLR4 agonists. Furthermore, VP35 did not prevent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of surface markers of MDDC maturation and did not prevent LPS-triggered allogeneic T cell stimulation. Therefore, VP35 is a general antagonist of DC responses to RLR activation. However, TLR agonists can circumvent many of the inhibitory effects of VP35. Therefore, it may be possible to counteract EBOV immune evasion by using treatments that bypass the VP35-imposed block to DC maturation. IMPORTANCE The VP35

  11. Transcriptional Classification and Functional Characterization of Human Airway Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vineet I; Booth, J Leland; Duggan, Elizabeth S; Cate, Steven; White, Vicky L; Hutchings, David; Kovats, Susan; Burian, Dennis M; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Metcalf, Jordan P

    2017-02-01

    The respiratory system is a complex network of many cell types, including subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells that work together to maintain steady-state respiration. Owing to limitations in acquiring cells from healthy human lung, these subsets remain poorly characterized transcriptionally and phenotypically. We set out to systematically identify these subsets in human airways by developing a schema of isolating large numbers of cells by whole-lung bronchoalveolar lavage. Six subsets of phagocytic APC (HLA-DR(+)) were consistently observed. Aside from alveolar macrophages, subsets of Langerin(+), BDCA1(-)CD14(+), BDCA1(+)CD14(+), BDCA1(+)CD14(-), and BDCA1(-)CD14(-) cells were identified. These subsets varied in their ability to internalize Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus anthracis particles. All subsets were more efficient at internalizing S. aureus and B. anthracis compared with E. coli Alveolar macrophages and CD14(+) cells were overall more efficient at particle internalization compared with the four other populations. Subsets were further separated into two groups based on their inherent capacities to upregulate surface CD83, CD86, and CCR7 expression levels. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling revealed a clade of "true dendritic cells" consisting of Langerin(+), BDCA1(+)CD14(+), and BDCA1(+)CD14(-) cells. The dendritic cell clade was distinct from a macrophage/monocyte clade, as supported by higher mRNA expression levels of several dendritic cell-associated genes, including CD1, FLT3, CX3CR1, and CCR6 Each clade, and each member of both clades, was discerned by specific upregulated genes, which can serve as markers for future studies in healthy and diseased states.

  12. βIII Spectrin Is Necessary for Formation of the Constricted Neck of Dendritic Spines and Regulation of Synaptic Activity in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Efimova, Nadia; Korobova, Farida; Stankewich, Michael C; Moberly, Andrew H; Stolz, Donna B; Wang, Junling; Kashina, Anna; Ma, Minghong; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2017-07-05

    Dendritic spines are postsynaptic structures in neurons often having a mushroom-like shape. Physiological significance and cytoskeletal mechanisms that maintain this shape are poorly understood. The spectrin-based membrane skeleton maintains the biconcave shape of erythrocytes, but whether spectrins also determine the shape of nonerythroid cells is less clear. We show that βIII spectrin in hippocampal and cortical neurons from rodent embryos of both sexes is distributed throughout the somatodendritic compartment but is particularly enriched in the neck and base of dendritic spines and largely absent from spine heads. Electron microscopy revealed that βIII spectrin forms a detergent-resistant cytoskeletal network at these sites. Knockdown of βIII spectrin results in a significant decrease in the density of dendritic spines. Surprisingly, the density of presynaptic terminals is not affected by βIII spectrin knockdown. However, instead of making normal spiny synapses, the presynaptic structures in βIII spectrin-depleted neurons make shaft synapses that exhibit increased amplitudes of miniature EPSCs indicative of excessive postsynaptic excitation. Thus, βIII spectrin is necessary for formation of the constricted shape of the spine neck, which in turn controls communication between the synapse and the parent dendrite to prevent excessive excitation. Notably, mutations of SPTNB2 encoding βIII spectrin are associated with neurodegenerative syndromes, spinocerebellar ataxia Type 5, and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia Type 1, but molecular mechanisms linking βIII spectrin functions to neuronal pathologies remain unresolved. Our data suggest that spinocerebellar ataxia Type 5 and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia Type 1 pathology likely arises from poorly controlled synaptic activity that leads to excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dendritic spines are small protrusions from neuronal

  13. Inhibitory effect of cepharanthine on dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomofumi; Nishi, Yosuke; Toyama, Masaaki; Yoshinaga, Keisuke; Baba, Masanori

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that connect innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are considered as a major target for controlling excessive immune responses. In this study, the effect of cepharanthine (CEP), a biscoclaurine alkaloid isolated from Stephania cepharantha Hayata, on murine DCs was examined in vitro. CEP inhibited antigen uptake by DCs at a concentration between 1 and 5 μg/ml. Although CEP did not inhibit the expression of costimulatory molecules and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in DCs, the compound inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced DC maturation determined by the expression of costimulatory molecules and MHC class I. In addition, CEP could reduce the production of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in LPS-stimulated DCs. DCs treated with CEP were found to be a poor stimulator of allogeneic T cell proliferation and interferon-γ production from the cells. These results suggest that CEP may have great potential as an immunoregulatory agent against various autoimmune diseases and allergy.

  14. A human coronavirus responsible for the common cold massively kills dendritic cells but not monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Millet, Jean; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Law, Helen; Vabret, Astrid; Lorin, Valérie; Escriou, Nicolas; Albert, Matthew L; Nal, Béatrice; Tangy, Frédéric

    2012-07-01

    Human coronaviruses are associated with upper respiratory tract infections that occasionally spread to the lungs and other organs. Although airway epithelial cells represent an important target for infection, the respiratory epithelium is also composed of an elaborate network of dendritic cells (DCs) that are essential sentinels of the immune system, sensing pathogens and presenting foreign antigens to T lymphocytes. In this report, we show that in vitro infection by human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) induces massive cytopathic effects in DCs, including the formation of large syncytia and cell death within only few hours. In contrast, monocytes are much more resistant to infection and cytopathic effects despite similar expression levels of CD13, the membrane receptor for HCoV-229E. While the differentiation of monocytes into DCs in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 requires 5 days, only 24 h are sufficient for these cytokines to sensitize monocytes to cell death and cytopathic effects when infected by HCoV-229E. Cell death induced by HCoV-229E is independent of TRAIL, FasL, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and caspase activity, indicating that viral replication is directly responsible for the observed cytopathic effects. The consequence of DC death at the early stage of HCoV-229E infection may have an impact on the early control of viral dissemination and on the establishment of long-lasting immune memory, since people can be reinfected multiple times by HCoV-229E.

  15. Secondary Lymphoid Organ Homing Phenotype of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Disrupted by an Intracellular Oral Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Zakhary, Ibrahim; El-Awady, Ahmed; Scisci, Elizabeth; Carrion, Julio; O'Neill, John C.; Rawlings, Aaron; Stern, J. Kobi; Susin, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    Several intracellular pathogens, including a key etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, infect blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs). This infection results in pathogen dissemination to distant inflammatory sites (i.e., pathogen trafficking). The alteration in chemokine-chemokine receptor expression that contributes to this pathogen trafficking function, particularly toward sites of neovascularization in humans, is unclear. To investigate this, we utilized human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and primary endothelial cells in vitro, combined with ex vivo-isolated blood mDCs and serum from chronic periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. Our results, using conditional fimbria mutants of P. gingivalis, show that P. gingivalis infection of MoDCs induces an angiogenic migratory profile. This profile is enhanced by expression of DC-SIGN on MoDCs and minor mfa-1 fimbriae on P. gingivalis and is evidenced by robust upregulation of CXCR4, but not secondary lymphoid organ (SLO)-homing CCR7. This disruption of SLO-homing capacity in response to respective chemokines closely matches surface expression of CXCR4 and CCR7 and is consistent with directed MoDC migration through an endothelial monolayer. Ex vivo-isolated mDCs from the blood of chronic periodontitis subjects, but not healthy controls, expressed a similar migratory profile; moreover, sera from chronic periodontitis subjects expressed elevated levels of CXCL12. Overall, we conclude that P. gingivalis actively “commandeers” DCs by reprogramming the chemokine receptor profile, thus disrupting SLO homing, while driving migration toward inflammatory vascular sites. PMID:24126519

  16. A Human Coronavirus Responsible for the Common Cold Massively Kills Dendritic Cells but Not Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Millet, Jean; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Law, Helen; Vabret, Astrid; Lorin, Valérie; Escriou, Nicolas; Albert, Matthew L.; Nal, Béatrice

    2012-01-01

    Human coronaviruses are associated with upper respiratory tract infections that occasionally spread to the lungs and other organs. Although airway epithelial cells represent an important target for infection, the respiratory epithelium is also composed of an elaborate network of dendritic cells (DCs) that are essential sentinels of the immune system, sensing pathogens and presenting foreign antigens to T lymphocytes. In this report, we show that in vitro infection by human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) induces massive cytopathic effects in DCs, including the formation of large syncytia and cell death within only few hours. In contrast, monocytes are much more resistant to infection and cytopathic effects despite similar expression levels of CD13, the membrane receptor for HCoV-229E. While the differentiation of monocytes into DCs in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 requires 5 days, only 24 h are sufficient for these cytokines to sensitize monocytes to cell death and cytopathic effects when infected by HCoV-229E. Cell death induced by HCoV-229E is independent of TRAIL, FasL, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and caspase activity, indicating that viral replication is directly responsible for the observed cytopathic effects. The consequence of DC death at the early stage of HCoV-229E infection may have an impact on the early control of viral dissemination and on the establishment of long-lasting immune memory, since people can be reinfected multiple times by HCoV-229E. PMID:22553325

  17. Human tolerogenic dendritic cells produce IL-35 in the absence of other IL-12 family members.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Karen O; van der Kooij, Sandra W; Vignali, Dario A A; van Kooten, Cees

    2015-06-01

    IL-35 is a cytokine of the IL-12 family, existing as a heterodimer of IL-12p35 and Ebi3. IL-35 has anti-inflammatory properties and is produced by regulatory T cells in humans and mice, where it is required for optimal suppression of immune responses. Distinct from other IL-12 cytokines, the expression of IL-35 has not been described in antigen-presenting cells. In view of the immune-regulatory properties of IL-35, we investigated the expression, regulation, and function of IL-12p35 and Ebi3 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs). These tolDCs do not produce IL-12p70 or the homodimer IL-12p40. We demonstrate that tolDCs completely lack transcriptional expression of IL-12p40. However, tolDCs maintain mRNA expression of IL-12p35 and Ebi3. Using intracellular flow cytometry and Western blot analysis, we show that tolDCs produce Ebi3 and IL-12p35, and both can be enhanced upon stimulation with IFN-γ, LPS, or CD40L. tolDCs supernatants have the capacity to suppress T-cell activation. Using IL12A silencing, we demonstrate that IL-12p35 is required for tolDCs to reach their full suppressive potential. Taken together, our results indicate that tolDCs produce IL-35, providing an additional novel mechanism by which tolDCs elicit their tolerogenic potential. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Downregulation of transient K+ channels in dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by activation of PKA and PKC.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D A; Johnston, D

    1998-05-15

    We have reported recently a high density of transient A-type K+ channels located in the distal dendrites of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons and shown that these channels shape EPSPs, limit the back-propagation of action potentials, and prevent dendritic action potential initiation (). Because of the importance of these channels in dendritic signal propagation, their modulation by protein kinases would be of significant interest. We investigated the effects of activators of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the Ca2+-dependent phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase (PKC) on K+ channels in cell-attached patches from the distal dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Inclusion of the membrane-permeant PKA activators 8-bromo-cAMP (8-br-cAMP) or forskolin in the dendritic patch pipette resulted in a depolarizing shift in the activation curve for the transient channels of approximately 15 mV. Activation of PKC by either of two phorbol esters also resulted in a 15 mV depolarizing shift of the activation curve. Neither PKA nor PKC activation affected the sustained or slowly inactivating component of the total outward current. This downregulation of transient K+ channels in the distal dendrites may be responsible for some of the frequently reported increases in cell excitability found after PKA and PKC activation. In support of this hypothesis, we found that activation of either PKA or PKC significantly increased the amplitude of back-propagating action potentials in distal dendrites.

  19. The pseudokinase CaMKv is required for the activity-dependent maintenance of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhuoyi; Zhan, Yi; Shen, Yang; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Yates, John R.; Plattner, Florian; Lai, Kwok-On; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spine stabilization depends on afferent synaptic input and requires changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics and protein synthesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we report the identification of ‘calmodulin kinase-like vesicle-associated' (CaMKv), a pseudokinase of the CaMK family with unknown function, as a synaptic protein crucial for dendritic spine maintenance. CaMKv mRNA localizes at dendrites, and its protein synthesis is regulated by neuronal activity. CaMKv function is inhibited upon phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) at Thr345. Furthermore, CaMKv knockdown in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons impairs synaptic transmission and plasticity in vivo, resulting in hyperactivity and spatial memory impairment. These findings collectively indicate that the precise regulation of CaMKv through activity-dependent synthesis and post-translational phosphorylation is critical for dendritic spine maintenance, revealing an unusual signalling pathway in the regulation of synaptic transmission and brain function that involves a pseudokinase. PMID:27796283

  20. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL–6, TNFα and IL–12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  1. Dendritic cell type-specific HIV-1 activation in effector T cells: implications for latent HIV-1 reservoir establishment.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Renée M; van Capel, Toni M M; Speijer, Dave; Sanders, Rogier W; Berkhout, Ben; de Jong, Esther C; Jeeninga, Rienk E; van Montfort, Thijs

    2015-06-01

    Latent HIV type I (HIV-1) infections can frequently occur in short-lived proliferating effector T lymphocytes. These latently infected cells could revert into resting T lymphocytes and thereby contribute to the establishment of the long-lived viral reservoir. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells can revert latency in effector T cells in vitro. Here we investigated the latency activation properties of tissue-specific immune cells, including a large panel of dendritic cell subsets, to explore in which body compartments effector T cells are most likely to maintain latent HIV-1 provirus and thus potentially contribute to the long-lived reservoir. Our results demonstrate that blood or genital tract dendritic cells do not activate latent provirus in effector T cells, whereas gut or lymphoid dendritic cells induce virus production from latently infected effector T cells in our in-vitro model for latency. Toll-like receptor 3-induced interferon production by myeloid dendritic cells abolished the dendritic cells' ability to induce viral gene expression. In this study, we show that HIV-1 provirus residing in effector T cells is activated from latency by tissue-specific dendritic cell subsets and other immune cells with remarkably different efficiencies.Our new assay system points to an important, neglected aspect of HIV-1 research: the ability of other immune cells, especially dendritic cells, to differentially affect latency establishment as well as virus reactivation.

  2. Novel Immunomodulators from Hard Ticks Selectively Reprogramme Human Dendritic Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Stephen G.; Majtán, Juraj; Kouremenou, Chrisoula; Rysnik, Oliwia; Burger, Lena F.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; Chiong Guzman, Maylin; Nunn, Miles A.; Paesen, Guido C.; Nuttall, Patricia A.; Austyn, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Hard ticks subvert the immune responses of their vertebrate hosts in order to feed for much longer periods than other blood-feeding ectoparasites; this may be one reason why they transmit perhaps the greatest diversity of pathogens of any arthropod vector. Tick-induced immunomodulation is mediated by salivary components, some of which neutralise elements of innate immunity or inhibit the development of adaptive immunity. As dendritic cells (DC) trigger and help to regulate adaptive immunity, they are an ideal target for immunomodulation. However, previously described immunoactive components of tick saliva are either highly promiscuous in their cellular and molecular targets or have limited effects on DC. Here we address the question of whether the largest and globally most important group of ticks (the ixodid metastriates) produce salivary molecules that specifically modulate DC activity. We used chromatography to isolate a salivary gland protein (Japanin) from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks. Japanin was cloned, and recombinant protein was produced in a baculoviral expression system. We found that Japanin specifically reprogrammes DC responses to a wide variety of stimuli in vitro, radically altering their expression of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory transmembrane molecules (measured by flow cytometry) and their secretion of pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and T cell polarising cytokines (assessed by Luminex multiplex assays); it also inhibits the differentiation of DC from monocytes. Sequence alignments and enzymatic deglycosylation revealed Japanin to be a 17.7 kDa, N-glycosylated lipocalin. Using molecular cloning and database searches, we have identified a group of homologous proteins in R. appendiculatus and related species, three of which we have expressed and shown to possess DC-modulatory activity. All data were obtained using DC generated from at least four human blood donors, with rigorous statistical analysis. Our results suggest a previously

  3. Sirtuin 1 is a key regulator of the interleukin-12 p70/interleukin-23 balance in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Mario; Municio, Cristina; Hugo, Etzel; Alonso, Sara; Ibarrola, Nieves; Fernández, Nieves; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez

    2012-10-12

    Stimulation of human dendritic cells with the fungal surrogate zymosan produces IL-23 and a low amount of IL-12 p70. Trans-repression of il12a transcription, which encodes IL-12 p35 chain, by proteins of the Notch family and lysine deacetylation reactions have been reported as the underlying mechanisms, but a number of questions remain to be addressed. Zymosan produced the location of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) to the nucleus, enhanced its association with the il12a promoter, increased the nuclear concentration of the SIRT1 co-substrate NAD(+), and decreased chromatin accessibility in the nucleosome-1 of il12a, which contains a κB-site. The involvement of deacetylation reactions in the inhibition of il12a transcription was supported by the absence of Ac-Lys-14-histone H3 in dendritic cells treated with zymosan upon coimmunoprecipitation of transducin-like enhancer of split. In contrast, we did not obtain evidence of a possible effect of SIRT1 through the deacetylation of c-Rel, the central element of the NF-κB family involved in il12a regulation. These data indicate that an enhancement of SIRT1 activity in response to phagocytic stimuli may reduce the accessibility of c-Rel to the il12a promoter and its transcriptional activation, thus regulating the IL-12 p70/IL-23 balance and modulating the ongoing immune response.

  4. Sirtuin 1 Is a Key Regulator of the Interleukin-12 p70/Interleukin-23 Balance in Human Dendritic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Mario; Municio, Cristina; Hugo, Etzel; Alonso, Sara; Ibarrola, Nieves; Fernández, Nieves; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of human dendritic cells with the fungal surrogate zymosan produces IL-23 and a low amount of IL-12 p70. Trans-repression of il12a transcription, which encodes IL-12 p35 chain, by proteins of the Notch family and lysine deacetylation reactions have been reported as the underlying mechanisms, but a number of questions remain to be addressed. Zymosan produced the location of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) to the nucleus, enhanced its association with the il12a promoter, increased the nuclear concentration of the SIRT1 co-substrate NAD+, and decreased chromatin accessibility in the nucleosome-1 of il12a, which contains a κB-site. The involvement of deacetylation reactions in the inhibition of il12a transcription was supported by the absence of Ac-Lys-14-histone H3 in dendritic cells treated with zymosan upon coimmunoprecipitation of transducin-like enhancer of split. In contrast, we did not obtain evidence of a possible effect of SIRT1 through the deacetylation of c-Rel, the central element of the NF-κB family involved in il12a regulation. These data indicate that an enhancement of SIRT1 activity in response to phagocytic stimuli may reduce the accessibility of c-Rel to the il12a promoter and its transcriptional activation, thus regulating the IL-12 p70/IL-23 balance and modulating the ongoing immune response. PMID:22893703

  5. Comparative study of clinical grade human tolerogenic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of tolerogenic DCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for transplantation and autoimmune disorders. Immunomodulatory DCs are primarily generated from monocytes (MDDCs) for in vitro experiments following protocols that fail to fulfil the strict regulatory rules of clinically applicable products. Here, we compared the efficacy of three different tolerance-inducing agents, dexamethasone, rapamycin and vitamin D3, on DC biology using GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) or clinical grade reagents with the aim of defining their use for human cell therapy. Methods Tolerogenic MDDCs were generated by adding tolerogenic agents prior to the induction of maturation using TNF-α, IL-β and PGE2. We evaluated the effects of each agent on viability, efficiency of differentiation, phenotype, cytokine secretion and stability, the stimulatory capacity of tol-DCs and the T-cell profiles induced. Results Differences relevant to therapeutic applicability were observed with the cellular products that were obtained. VitD3-induced tol-DCs exhibited a slightly reduced viability and yield compared to Dexa-and Rapa-tol-DCs. Phenotypically, while Dexa-and VitD3-tol-DCs were similar to immature DCs, Rapa-tol-DCs were not distinguishable from mature DCs. In addition, only Dexa-and moderately VitD3-tol-DCs exhibited IL-10 production. Interestingly, in all cases, the cytokine secretion profiles of tol-DCs were not modified by a subsequent TLR stimulation with LPS, indicating that all products had stable phenotypes. Functionally, clearly reduced alloantigen T cell proliferation was induced by tol-DCs obtained using any of these agent. Also, total interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) secretion by T cells stimulated with allogeneic tol-DCs was reduced in all three cases, but only T cells co-cultured with Rapa-tol-DCs showed impaired intracellular IFN-γ production. In addition, Rapa-DCs promoted CD4+ CD127 low/negative CD25high and Foxp3+ T cells. Conclusions Our results demonstrate

  6. Natural mannosylation of HIV-1 gp120 imposes no immunoregulatory effects in primary human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Vinner, Lasse; Brix, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a vital role in activation of anti-HIV-1 immunity, and suppression of pDCs might mitigate immune responses against HIV-1. HIV-1 gp120 high-mannose has been attributed immunosuppressive roles in human myeloid DCs, but no receptors for high-mannose have so far been reported on human pDCs. Here we show that upon activation with HIV-1 or by a synthetic compound triggering the same receptor in human pDCs as single-stranded RNA, human pDCs upregulate the mannose receptor (MR, CD206). To examine the functional outcome of this upregulation, inactivated intact or viable HIV-1 particles with various degrees of mannosylation were cultured with pDCs. Activation of pDCs was determined by assaying secretion of IFN-alpha, viability, and upregulation of several pDC-activation markers: CD40, CD86, HLA-DR, CCR7, and PD-L1. The level of activation negatively correlated with degree of mannosylation, however, subsequent reduction in the original mannosylation level had no effect on the pDC phenotype. Furthermore, two of the infectious HIV-1 strains induced profound necrosis in pDCs, also in a mannose-independent manner. We therefore conclude that natural mannosylation of HIV-1 is not involved in HIV-1-mediated immune suppression of pDCs.

  7. Sustained rhythmic activity in gap-junctionally coupled networks of model neurons depends on the diameter of coupled dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Gansert, Juliane; Golowasch, Jorge; Nadim, Farzan

    2008-01-01

    Gap junctions are known to be important for many network functions such as synchronization of activity and the generation of waves and oscillations. Gap junctions have also been proposed to be essential for the generation of early embryonic activity. We have previously shown that the amplitude of electrical signals propagating across gap-junctionally coupled passive cables is maximized at a unique diameter. This suggests that threshold-dependent signals may propagate through gap junctions for a finite range of diameters around this optimal value. Here we examine the diameter dependence of action potential propagation across model networks of dendro-dendritically coupled neurons. The neurons in these models have passive soma and dendrites and an action potential generating axon. We show that propagation of action potentials across gap junctions occurs only over a finite range of dendritic diameters and that propagation delay depends on this diameter. Additionally, in networks of gap-junctionally coupled neurons, rhythmic activity can emerge when closed loops (re-entrant paths) occur but again only for a finite range of dendrite diameters. The frequency of such rhythmic activity depends on the length of the path and the dendrite diameter. For large networks of randomly coupled neurons, we find that the re-entrant paths that underlie rhythmic activity also depend on dendrite diameter. These results underline the potential importance of dendrite diameter as a determinant of network activity in gap-junctionally coupled networks, such as network rhythms that are observed during early nervous system development. PMID:17913989

  8. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease.

  9. CCL-34, a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 activator, modulates differentiation and maturation of myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Liu, Sheng-Hung; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2016-03-08

    CCL-34, a synthetic α-galactosylceramide analog, has been reported as an activator of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages. TLR4 is highly expressed in dendritic cell (DC) and several TLR4 agonists are known to trigger DC maturation. We herein evaluated the effect of CCL-34 on DC maturation. Human CD14+ monocyte-derived immature DC were treated with CCL-34, its inactive structural analog CCL-44, or LPS to assess the DC maturation. CCL-34 induced DC maturation according to their characteristically dendrite-forming morphology, CD83 expression and IL-12p70 production. The allostimulatory activity of DC on proliferation of naive CD4+CD45+RA+ T cells and their secretion of interferon-γ was increased by CCL-34. Phagocytosis, an important function of immature DC, was reduced after CCL-34 treatment. All these effects related to DC maturation were evidently induced by positive control LPS but not by CCL-44 treatment. TLR4 neutralization impaired human DC maturation triggered by CCL-34. The induction of IL-12, a hallmark of DC maturation, by CCL-34 and LPS was only evident in TLR4-competent C3H/HeN, but not in TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice. CCL-34 could further elicit the antigen presentation capability in mice inoculated with doxorubicin-treated colorectal cancer cells. In summary, CCL-34 triggers DC maturation via a TLR4-dependent manner, which supports its potential application as an immunostimulator.

  10. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast-CEA) as a potent activator of murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Michael B; Chakraborty, Mala; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Guo, Zhimin; Franzusoff, Alex; Mostböck, Sven; Sabzevari, Helen; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2008-01-24

    Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) represents a unique and attractive vehicle to deliver antigens in vaccine immunotherapy protocols for cancer or infectious disease, in that it has been shown to be extremely safe and can be administered multiple times to hosts. In the studies reported here, we describe the effects of treatment with recombinant yeast on murine immature dendritic cells (DCs). Yeast expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a model antigen was studied. Injection of mice subcutaneously with yeast-CEA resulted in rapid increases in MHC class II(+) cells and total antigen-presenting cells in draining lymph nodes. Post-treatment with yeast-CEA, DCs rapidly elevated both MHC class I and class II, numerous costimulatory molecules and other DC maturation markers, and secreted a range of Type I inflammatory cytokines. Gene expression arrays also revealed the rapid up-regulation of numerous cytokine and chemokine mRNAs, as well as genes involved in signal transduction and antigen uptake. Functional studies demonstrated enhanced allospecific reactivity of DCs following treatment with yeast-CEA or control yeast. Additionally, treatment of DCs with yeast-CEA resulted in specific activation of CEA-specific CD8(+) T cells in an MHC-restricted manner in vitro. Lastly, vaccination of CEA-transgenic mice with yeast-CEA elicited antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) immune responses in vivo. Thus, these studies taken together form a scientific rationale for the use of recombinant yeast in vaccination protocols for cancer or infectious diseases.

  11. Imaging ERK and PKA Activation in Single Dendritic Spines during Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shen; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2017-03-22

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase A (PKA) play important roles in LTP and spine structural plasticity. While fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors for these kinases had previously been developed, they did not provide sufficient sensitivity for imaging small neuronal compartments, such as single dendritic spines in brain slices. Here we improved the sensitivity of FRET-based kinase sensors for monitoring kinase activity under two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2pFLIM). Using these improved sensors, we succeeded in imaging ERK and PKA activation in single dendritic spines during structural long-term potentiation (sLTP) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, revealing that the activation of these kinases spreads widely with length constants of more than 10 μm. The strategy for improvement of sensors used here should be applicable for developing highly sensitive biosensors for various protein kinases. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  12. Dendritic cells for active anti-cancer immunotherapy: targeting activation pathways through genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2009-12-01

    Tumour immunotherapy has become a treatment modality for cancer, harnessing the immune system to recognize and eradicate tumour cells specifically. It is based on the expression of tumour associated antigens (TAA) by the tumour cells and aims at the induction of TAA-specific effector T cell responses, whilst overruling various mechanisms that can hamper the anti-tumour immune response, e.g. regulatory T cells (Treg). (Re-) activation of effector T cells requires the completion of a carefully orchestrated series of specific steps. Particularly important is the provision of TAA presentation and strong stimulatory signals, delivered by co-stimulatory surface molecules and cytokines. These can only be delivered by professional antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, DC need to be loaded with TAA and appropriately activated. It is not surprising that an extensive part of DC research has focused on the delivery of both TAA and activation signals to DC, developing a one step approach to obtain potent stimulatory DC. The simultaneous delivery of TAA and activation signals is therefore the topic of this review, emphasizing the role of DC in mediating T cell activation and how we can manipulate DC for the pill-pose of enhancing tumour immunotherapy. As we gain a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate induction of TAA-specific T cells, rational approaches for the activation of T cell responses can be developed for the treatment of cancer.

  13. Dendritic Cells for Active Anti-Cancer Immunotherapy: Targeting Activation Pathways Through Genetic Modification

    PubMed Central

    Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2009-01-01

    Tumour immunotherapy has become a treatment modality for cancer, harnessing the immune system to recognize and eradicate tumour cells specifically. It is based on the expression of tumour associated antigens (TAA) by the tumour cells and aims at the induction of TAA-specific effector T cell responses, whilst overruling various mechanisms that can hamper the anti-tumour immune response, e.g. regulatory T cells (Treg). (Re-) activation of effector T cells requires the completion of a carefully orchestrated series of specific steps. Particularly important is the provision of TAA presentation and strong stimulatory signals, delivered by co-stimulatory surface molecules and cytokines. These can only be delivered by professional antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, DC need to be loaded with TAA and appropriately activated. It is not surprising that an extensive part of DC research has focused on the delivery of both TAA and activation signals to DC, developing a one step approach to obtain potent stimulatory DC. The simultaneous delivery of TAA and activation signals is therefore the topic of this review, emphasizing the role of DC in mediating T cell activation and how we can manipulate DC for the pill-pose of enhancing tumour immunotherapy. As we gain a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate induction of TAA-specific T cells, rational approaches for the activation of T cell responses can be developed for the treatment of cancer. PMID:19857199

  14. Sorafenib induces autophagy in human myeloid dendritic cells and prolongs survival of skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiunn-Chang; Huang, Wei-Pang; Liu, Chien-Liang; Lee, Jie-Jen; Liu, Tsang-Pai; Ko, Wen-Chin; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2013-03-27

    Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, has been reported inhibitory on the function of dendritic cells. This study was aimed to determine the effects of sorafenib on inducing autophagy and immunomodulatory activity and its implication on graft rejection. Cell viability and surface antigens were examined by 7-amino-actinomycin D and flow cytometric analysis. Autophagy was characterized using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for morphology, Western blotting for LC3B-I lipidation and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling molecules, and immunofluorescence staining for endogenous LC3B, GFP-LC3 transfection, and acidic component vacuoles. Skin allograft in mice was used as an experimental transplantation rejection model. Soluble factors contained in culture medium and serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that sorafenib inhibited the viability of dendritic cells accompanied by morphologic changes characteristic of autophagy and immature differentiation. This autophagic effect induced by sorafenib was validated by LC3B-I lipidation and autophagosome accumulation. Sorafenib treatment was associated with the down-regulation of phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream substrate p70S6K. We next performed skin graft model to testify the role of sorafenib-induced immature and autophagic dendritic cells. Intriguingly, sorafenib prolonged the survival of skin allograft without major toxicity. Blockade of autophagic flux by chloroquine partially diminished the protective effect of sorafenib, indicating an autophagy-related mechanism in vivo. This study suggests that sorafenib, in addition to being an anticancer agent, may have potential to be developed as a new category of immunosuppressant drugs acting via autophagy induction of dendritic cells.

  15. Controlling T-Cell Activation with Synthetic Dendritic Cells Using the Multivalency Effect

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have recently gained a lot of attention. They efficiently activate T cells and serve as powerful replacements for dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy. Focusing on a specific class of polymer-based aAPCs, so-called synthetic dendritic cells (sDCs), we have investigated the importance of multivalent binding on T-cell activation. Using antibody-functionalized sDCs, we have tested the influence of polymer length and antibody density. Increasing the multivalent character of the antibody-functionalized polymer lowered the effective concentration required for T-cell activation. This was evidenced for both early and late stages of activation. The most important effect observed was the significantly prolonged activation of the stimulated T cells, indicating that multivalent sDCs sustain T-cell signaling. Our results highlight the importance of multivalency for the design of aAPCs and will ultimately allow for better mimics of natural dendritic cells that can be used as vaccines in cancer treatment. PMID:28393131

  16. Controlling T-Cell Activation with Synthetic Dendritic Cells Using the Multivalency Effect.

    PubMed

    Hammink, Roel; Mandal, Subhra; Eggermont, Loek J; Nooteboom, Marco; Willems, Peter H G M; Tel, Jurjen; Rowan, Alan E; Figdor, Carl G; Blank, Kerstin G

    2017-03-31

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have recently gained a lot of attention. They efficiently activate T cells and serve as powerful replacements for dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy. Focusing on a specific class of polymer-based aAPCs, so-called synthetic dendritic cells (sDCs), we have investigated the importance of multivalent binding on T-cell activation. Using antibody-functionalized sDCs, we have tested the influence of polymer length and antibody density. Increasing the multivalent character of the antibody-functionalized polymer lowered the effective concentration required for T-cell activation. This was evidenced for both early and late stages of activation. The most important effect observed was the significantly prolonged activation of the stimulated T cells, indicating that multivalent sDCs sustain T-cell signaling. Our results highlight the importance of multivalency for the design of aAPCs and will ultimately allow for better mimics of natural dendritic cells that can be used as vaccines in cancer treatment.

  17. Role of dendritic cells in immunopathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, D; Fauci, A S

    1997-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DC) in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease has been a subject of considerable interest for several years. Initial studies focused on the infection, dysfunction, and depletion of DC in HIV-infected individuals. More recent studies have begun to identify the functional role of DC in the initiation and propagation of viral replication in T cells in HIV-infected individuals. This review discusses recent data regarding the role of DC in HIV disease with the aim of delineating basic immunopathogenic principles of infection and the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:9105759

  18. Immune Modulatory Effects of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin on Dendritic Cells Supporting Fetal Survival in Murine Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dauven, Dominique; Ehrentraut, Stefanie; Langwisch, Stefanie; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Schumacher, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critically involved in the determination of immunity vs. tolerance. Hence, DCs are key regulators of immune responses either favoring or disfavoring fetal survival. Several factors were proposed to modulate DC phenotype and function during pregnancy. Here, we studied whether the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is involved in DC regulation. In vitro, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were stimulated in the presence or absence of urine-purified or recombinant hCG (rhCG) preparations. Subsequently, BMDC maturation was assessed. Cytokine secretion of activated BMDCs and their capability to enforce TH1, TH2, TH17, or Treg cell differentiation was determined after rhCG treatment. Moreover, the in vivo potential of hCG-modulated BMDCs to influence pregnancy outcome, Treg cell number, and local cytokine expression was evaluated after adoptive transfer in a murine abortion-prone model before and after conception. Both hCG preparations impaired the maturation process of BMDCs. rhCG treatment did neither alter cytokine secretion by BMDCs nor their ability to drive TH1, TH2, or TH17 differentiation. rhCG-treated BMDCs augmented the number of Treg cells within the T cell population. Adoptive transfer of rhCG-treated BMDCs after conception did not influence pregnancy outcome. However, transfer of hCG-treated BMDCs prior to mating had a protective effect on pregnancy. This positive effect was accompanied by increased Treg cell numbers and decidual IL-10 and TGF-β expression. Our results unveil the importance of hCG in retaining DCs in a tolerogenic state, thereby promoting Treg cell increment and supporting fetal survival. PMID:27895621

  19. Differential responses of human dendritic cells to metabolites from the oral/airway microbiome.

    PubMed

    Whiteson, K; Agrawal, S; Agrawal, A

    2017-02-14

    Small molecule metabolites that are produced or altered by host-associated microbial communities are emerging as significant immune response modifiers. However, there is a key gap in our knowledge of how oral microbial metabolites affect the immune response. Here, we examined the effects of metabolites from five bacterial strains found commonly in the oral/airway microbial communities of humans. The five strains, each isolated from cystic fibrosis patient sputum, were Pseudomonas aeruginosa FLR01 non-mucoid (P1) and FLR02 mucoid (P2) forms, Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp), S. salivarius (Ss) and Rothia mucilaginosa (Rm). The effect of bacterial metabolites on dendritic cell (DC) activation, T cell priming and cytokine secretion was determined by exposing DCs to bacterial supernatants and individual metabolites of interest. Supernatants from P1 and P2 induced high levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-6 from DCs and primed T cells to secrete interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-22 compared to supernatants from Sp, Ss and Rm. Investigations into the composition of supernatants using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed signature metabolites for each of the strains. Supernatants from P1 and P2 contained high levels of putrescine and glucose, while Sp and Ss contained high levels of 2,3-butanediol. The individual metabolites replicated the results of whole supernatants, although the magnitudes of their effects were reduced significantly. Altogether, our data demonstrate for the first time that the signature metabolites produced by different bacteria have different effects on DC functions. The identification of signature metabolites and their effects on the host immune system can provide mechanistic insights into diseases and may also be developed as biomarkers.

  20. AIRE is not essential for the induction of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Katherine L; Abinun, Mario; Arkwright, Peter D; Cheetham, Timothy D; Pearce, Simon H; Hilkens, Catharien M U; Lilic, Desa

    2016-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene results in organ-specific autoimmunity and disease Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy type 1 (APS1)/Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED). The AIRE protein is crucial in the induction of central tolerance, promoting ectopic expression of tissue-specific antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells and enabling removal of self-reactive T-cells. AIRE expression has recently been detected in myeloid dendritic cells (DC), suggesting AIRE may have a significant role in peripheral tolerance. DC stimulation of T-cells is critical in determining the initiation or lack of an immune response, depending on the pattern of costimulation and cytokine production by DCs, defining immunogenic/inflammatory (inflDC) and tolerogenic (tolDC) DC. In AIRE-deficient patients and healthy controls, we validated the role of AIRE in the generation and function of monocyte-derived inflDC and tolDCs by determining mRNA and protein expression of AIRE and comparing activation markers (HLA-DR/DP/DQ,CD83,CD86,CD274(PDL-1),TLR-2), cytokine production (IL-12p70,IL-10,IL-6,TNF-α,IFN-γ) and T-cell stimulatory capacity (mixed lymphocyte reaction) of AIRE+ and AIRE- DCs. We show for the first time that: (1) tolDCs from healthy individuals express AIRE; (2) AIRE expression is not significantly higher in tolDC compared to inflDC; (3) tolDC can be generated from APECED patient monocytes and (4) tolDCs lacking AIRE retain the same phenotype and reduced T-cell stimulatory function. Our findings suggest that AIRE does not have a role in the induction and function of monocyte-derived tolerogenic DC in humans, but these findings do not exclude a role for AIRE in peripheral tolerance mediated by other cell types.

  1. Non-Ionotropic NMDA Receptor Signaling Drives Activity-Induced Dendritic Spine Shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ivar S; Gray, John A; Zito, Karen

    2015-09-02

    The elimination of dendritic spine synapses is a critical step in the refinement of neuronal circuits during development of the cerebral cortex. Several studies have shown that activity-induced shrinkage and retraction of dendritic spines depend on activation of the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which leads to influx of extracellular calcium ions and activation of calcium-dependent phosphatases that modify regulators of the spine cytoskeleton, suggesting that influx of extracellular calcium ions drives spine shrinkage. Intriguingly, a recent report revealed a novel non-ionotropic function of the NMDAR in the regulation of synaptic strength, which relies on glutamate binding but is independent of ion flux through the receptor (Nabavi et al., 2013). Here, we tested whether non-ionotropic NMDAR signaling could also play a role in driving structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging and time-lapse imaging of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, we show that low-frequency glutamatergic stimulation results in shrinkage of dendritic spines even in the presence of the NMDAR d-serine/glycine binding site antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7CK), which fully blocks NMDAR-mediated currents and Ca(2+) transients. Notably, application of 7CK or MK-801 also converts spine enlargement resulting from a high-frequency uncaging stimulus into spine shrinkage, demonstrating that strong Ca(2+) influx through the NMDAR normally overcomes a non-ionotropic shrinkage signal to drive spine growth. Our results support a model in which NMDAR signaling, independent of ion flux, drives structural shrinkage at spiny synapses. Dendritic spine elimination is vital for the refinement of neural circuits during development and has been linked to improvements in behavioral performance in the adult. Spine shrinkage and elimination have been widely accepted to depend on Ca(2+) influx through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in conjunction with long-term depression

  2. Antiphospholipid antibodies induce translocation of TLR7 and TLR8 to the endosome in human monocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Nadine; Clemens, Natascha; Strand, Dennis; Pütz, Inge; Lorenz, Mareike; Daiber, Andreas; Stein, Pamela; Degreif, Adriana; Radsak, Markus; Schild, Hansjörg; Bauer, Stefan; von Landenberg, Philipp; Lackner, Karl J

    2011-08-25

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by thromboembolic events and/or fetal loss in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs). The mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of aPLs are still poorly understood. Here we show that 3 human monoclonal aPLs as well as IgG fractions from patients with the APS increase mRNA expression of the intracellular toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 in plasmacytoid dendritic cells and TLR8 in monocytes. Simultaneously they induce the translocation of TLR7 or TLR8 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the endosome. These effects depend on the uptake of aPLs into the endosome, subsequent activation of endosomal NADPH oxidase, and generation of superoxide. As a consequence cells are dramatically sensitized to ligands for TLR7 and TLR8. This observation delineates a novel signal transduction pathway in innate immunity originating from the endosome. Because the overexpression of TLR7 can also be detected in plasmacytoid dendritic cells from patients with the APS ex vivo, our results provide an explanation for proinflammatory and procoagulant effects of aPLs. Because inappropriate expression of TLR7 has been implicated in the development of systemic autoimmunity, these findings may also be relevant for the understanding of autoimmunity.

  3. Role of the cytokine environment and cytokine receptor expression on the generation of functionally distinct dendritic cells from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Conti, Lucia; Cardone, Marco; Varano, Barbara; Puddu, Patrizia; Belardelli, Filippo; Gessani, Sandra

    2008-03-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages evolve from a common precursor. However, factors controlling monocyte differentiation toward DC or macrophages are poorly defined. We report that the surface density of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) alpha subunit in human peripheral blood monocytes varies among donors. Although no correlation was found between the extent of GM-CSFR and monocyte differentiation into DC driven by GM-CSF and IL-4, GM-CSFR expression strongly influenced the generation of CD1a(+) dendritic-like cells in the absence of IL-4. CD1a(+) cells generated in the presence of GM-CSF express CD40, CD80, MHC class I and II, DC-SIGN, MR, CCR5, and partially retain CD14 expression. Interestingly, they spontaneously induce the expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) allogeneic T lymphocytes producing IFN-gamma, and migrate toward CCL4 and CCL19. Upon stimulation with TLR ligands, they acquire the phenotypic features of mature DC. In contrast, the allostimulatory capacity is not further increased upon LPS activation. However, by blocking LPS-induced IL-10, a higher T cell proliferative response and IL-12 production were observed. Interestingly, IL-23 secretion was not affected by endogenous IL-10. These results highlight the importance of GM-CSFR expression in monocytes for cytokine-induced DC generation and point to GM-CSF as a direct player in the generation of functionally distinct DC.

  4. A novel, rapid strategy to form dendritomas from human dendritic cells and hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HCCLM3 cells using mature dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood CD14+ monocytes within 48 hours of in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Peng, Ji-Run; Yuan, Lan; Wang, Hui; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2004-12-15

    Dendritomas formed by fusing cancer cells to dendritic cells have already been applied to clinical treatment trial of several types of cancers. Dendritic cells for the fusion in most trials and experiments were from blood monocytes in standard 7-d protocol culture, which requires 5-7 d of culture with granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), followed by 2-3 d of activation with a combination of proinflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). One study showed that mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells could be obtained within 48 h of in vitro culture with the same protocol as standard 7-d culture and referred to as FastDCs. Here we aimed to fuse human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HCCLM3 cells with mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells within 48 h of in vitro culture (FastDC). HCCLM3 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 with 150 mL/L fetal calf serum (FCS). CD14+monocytes from healthy human peripheral blood were purified with MACS CD14 isolation kit and cultured in six-well plates in fresh complete DC medium containing RPMI-1640, 20 mL/L heat inactivated human AB serum, 2 mmol/L L-glutamine, 100 microg/mL gentamicin, 1 000 U/mL GM-CSF and 500 U/mL IL-4 for 24 h, then proinflammatory mediators such as TNFalpha (1 000 U/mL), IL-1beta (10 ng/mL), IL-6 (10 ng/mL) and PGE(2) (1 microg/mL) were supplemented for another 24 h, and thus mature FastDCs were generated. HCCLM3 cells and FastDCs were labeled with red fluorescent dye PKH26-GL and green fluorescent dye PKH67-GL respectively. After the red fluorescent-stained HCCLM3 cells were irradiated with 50 Gy, FastDCs and irradiated HCCLM3 cells were fused in 500 mL/L polyethylene glycol(PEG)+100 mL/L dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to generate novel dendritomas. The FastDCs and novel dendritomas were immunostained with anti-CD80, anti-CD86, anti-CD83, anti-HLA-DR mAbs and

  5. Human spleen contains phenotypic subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells that occupy discrete microanatomic locations.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, P. J.; Smith, M. R.; Braverman, M. F.; Dickson, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    Macrophages (M phi s) are an important component of the immune response and mediate numerous other functions. Phenotypic and functional subsets of circulating monocytes have been described, but few similar studies have analyzed M phi s in human tissues. By use of immunohistochemical techniques and a large number of monoclonal antibodies, the presence and distribution of phenotypic subpopulations of M phi s and dendritic cells in human spleen were assessed. The results of this study show that different subsets of M phi s and dendritic cells are present in the spleen and that some of these occupy discrete microanatomic locations. In the red pulp (RP) certain groups of antigens are expressed by different proportions of uniformly distributed M phi s in the cords. On the other hand, some antigens are present on M phi s that form clusters of variable size within the red pulp. M phi s in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) share some antigens with red pulp M phi s, but in addition express CR3, Mo-2, 61D3, and 63D3. These antigens are found on only a few RP M phi s. MZ cells expressing one antigen shared with RP M phi s (Leu-3a,b) and one present largely on the MZ cells (63D3) form clusters around small vessels; these structures resemble the so-called splenic ellipsoids that may play a role in the trapping of circulating antigens. Phagocytic M phi s (tingible body M phi s) of the white pulp follicular germinal centers were also shown to differ from RP and MZ cels with respect to the expression of the antigens detected by anti-FcR, Leu-M3, Mo-2, 25F9, and anti-CR3. The unique topographical and surface antigenic features of dendritic cells were confirmed by this study. Furthermore, these cells were found to share a number of antigens with RP, MZ, and white pulp M phi s, which suggests that they may be derived from a common progenitor. The presence of phenotypic subpopulations and variation in distribution among human splenic phagocytic cells and dendritic cells may be indicative

  6. Modulation of the development of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Yang, Yi-Yuan; Shih, Neng-Yao; Ho, Chia-Chen; Wu, Yu-Chen; Huang, Tze-Sing; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Shen, Winston W; Leu, Sy-Jye

    2011-02-01

    Lithium has been used or explored to treat psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases that are frequently associated with an abnormal immune status. It is likely that lithium may work through modulation of immune responses in these patients. Because dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in regulating immune responses, this study investigated the influence of lithium chloride (LiCl) on the development and function of DC. Exposure to LiCl during the differentiation of human monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC) enhances CD86 and CD83 expression and increases the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α. However, the presence of LiCl during LPS-induced maturation of iDC has the opposite effect. During iDC differentiation, LiCl suppresses the activity of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, and activates PI3K and MEK. In addition, LiCl activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) during iDC differentiation, a pathway not described before. Each of these signaling pathways appears to have distinct impact on the differentiating iDC. The enhanced CD86 expression by LiCl involves the PI3K/AKT and GSK-3β pathway. LiCl modulates the expression of CD83 in iDC mainly through MEK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and PPARγ pathways, while the increased production of IL-1β and TNF-α mainly involves the MEK/ERK pathway. The effect of LiCl on IL-6/IL-8/IL-10 secretion in iDC is mediated through inhibition of GSK-3β. We have also demonstrated that PPARγ is downstream of GSK-3β and is responsible for the LiCl-mediated modulation of CD86/83 and CD1 expression, but not IL-6/8/10 secretion. The combined influence of these molecular signaling pathways may account for certain clinical effect of lithium.

  7. Gastric cancer-derived heat shock protein-gp96 peptide complex enhances dendritic cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Hong; Li, You-Ming; Ji, Feng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of heat shock protein (HSP)-glycoprotein (gp)96 in dendritic cells (DCs) and lymphocytes induction in gastric cancer (GC). METHODS Human GC cell lines KATOIII, MKN-28 and SGC-7901 were infected with adenovirus gp96 at a multiplicity of infection of 100. gp96-GC antigen peptide complexes were purified. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine allo-reactive T cell stimulation, natural killer (NK) cell activity and expression of cytokines (such as interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α), respectively. Effect of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) on DCs incubated with HSP-gp96 was also evaluated by LDH release. All assays were performed in triplicate and the average values were reported. Comparison between groups was conducted using Student’s t test. RESULTS T cells incubated with HSP-gp96 exhibited a marked increase in proliferation in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). NK cell activity after gp96-GC peptide complex treatment was significantly higher than that after antigen peptide treatment (P < 0.05). The activity of CTLs incubated with DCs from three GC cells lines was obviously higher than that stimulated by GC antigen at ratios of 50: 1, 25: 1, 10: 1, and 5: 1 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the secretion of TNF-α, IL-10, IL-12 (P70) and IFN-γ markedly increased after incubation with HSP-gp96 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION HSP-gp96 promotes T cell response, enhances DC antigen presentation and induces cytokine secretion, as well. HSP-gp96 has potential as immunotherapy for elimination of residual GC cells. PMID:28706421

  8. Induction of Dendritic Cell Maturation and Activation by a Potential Adjuvant, 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) is a chemically modified cyclic oligosaccharide produced from starch that is commonly used as an excipient. Although HP-β-CD has been suggested as a potential adjuvant for vaccines, its immunological properties and mechanism of action have yet to be characterized. In the present study, we investigated the maturation and activation of human dendritic cells (DCs) treated with HP-β-CD. We found that DCs stimulated with HP-β-CD exhibited a remarkable upregulation of costimulatory molecules, MHC proteins, and PD-L1/L2. In addition, the production of cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10, was modestly increased in DCs when treated with HP-β-CD. Furthermore, HP-β-CD-sensitized DCs markedly induced the proliferation and activation of autologous T lymphocytes. HP-β-CD also induced a lipid raft formation in DCs. In contrast, filipin, a lipid raft inhibitor, attenuated HP-β-CD-induced DC maturation, the cytokine expression, and the T lymphocyte-stimulating activities. To determine the in vivo relevance of the results, we investigated the adjuvanticity of HP-β-CD and the modulation of DCs in a mouse footpad immunization model. When mice were immunized with ovalbumin in the presence of HP-β-CD through a hind footpad, serum ovalbumin-specific antibodies were markedly elevated. Concomitantly, DC populations expressing CD11c and MHC class II were increased in the draining lymph nodes, and the expression of costimulatory molecules was upregulated. Collectively, our data suggest that HP-β-CD induces phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs mainly mediated through lipid raft formation, which might mediate the adjuvanticity of HP-β-CD. PMID:27812358

  9. Comparative analysis of signature genes in PRRSV-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these c...

  10. Clinical Trials Using Adenoviral Transduced hIL-12-expressing Autologous Dendritic Cells INXN-3001 Plus Activator Ligand INXN-1001

    Cancer.gov

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying adenoviral transduced hil-12-expressing autologous dendritic cells inxn-3001 plus activator ligand inxn-1001.

  11. The Gα o Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα o signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα o subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  12. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα(o) signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα(o) subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  13. Intravenous immunoglobulin ameliorates ITP via activating Fc gamma receptors on dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Siragam, Vinayakumar; Crow, Andrew R; Brinc, Davor; Song, Seng; Freedman, John; Lazarus, Alan H

    2006-06-01

    Despite a more than 20-year experience of therapeutic benefit, the relevant molecular and cellular targets of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in autoimmune disease remain unclear. Contrary to the prevailing theories of IVIg action in autoimmunity, we show that IVIg drives signaling through activating Fc gamma receptors (Fc gammaR) in the amelioration of mouse immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The actual administration of IVIg was unnecessary because as few as 10(5) IVIg-treated cells could, upon adoptive transfer, ameliorate ITP. IVIg did not interact with the inhibitory Fc gammaRIIB on the initiator cell, although Fc gammaRIIB does have a role in the late phase of IVIg action. Notably, only IVIg-treated CD11c+ dendritic cells could mediate these effects. We hypothesize that IVIg forms soluble immune complexes in vivo that prime dendritic-cell regulatory activity. In conclusion, the clinical effects of IVIg in ameliorating ITP seem to involve the acute interaction of IVIg with activating Fc gammaR on dendritic cells.

  14. Human dendritic cells and macrophages. In situ immunophenotypic definition of subsets that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Turner, R. R.; Shiurba, R. A.; Eng, L.; Warnke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and antisera in situ, the authors have defined subsets of human dendritic cells and macrophages that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics. All subsets contained cells that reacted with antibodies directed against HLA-A,B,C, HLA-Dr, leukocyte common, Leu-M3, and Leu-3(T4) antigens. R4/23 and anti-S100 defined three major subsets. R4/23+, S100- cells constituted the B-cell-related follicular dendritic cells, which were identified only within the germinal center/mantle microenvironment of lymphoid follicles. R4/23-, S100+ cells constituted the T-cell-related dendritic cell subset. Anti-Leu-6(T6) further subdivided this group into Leu-6(T6)- interdigitating cells within the T-cell microenvironments of lymphoid organs and Leu-6(T6)+ Langerhans cells found predominantly in epithelial microenvironments, especially the skin. R4/23-, S100- cells constituted the nondendritic tissue macrophage subset which was widely distributed, primarily outside of dendritic-cell microenvironments. These data indicate that although dendritic cells and macrophages share several common antigenic features, morphologically and microenvironmentally distinct subsets express distinct immunologic phenotypes. Such data may provide insight into the ontogeny and function of these subsets and constitute a basis for the comparison of normal dendritic cells and macrophages to various histiocytic proliferative disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p78-c Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3985124

  15. Studies on the 3-dimensional architecture of dendritic spines and varicosities in human cortex by confocal laser scanning microscopy and Lucifer yellow microinjections.

    PubMed

    Belichenko, P V; Dahlström, A

    1995-03-01

    A method for 3-dimensional (3-D) visualization of dendritic spines and varicosities in human cortical neurons is described. Intracellular microinjection of Lucifer Yellow was used to display the morphology of dendrites on pyramidal and non-pyramidal neurons. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used for imaging, and 3-D reconstructions and analysis of spines and varicosities were performed. The frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortices, and hippocampus in normal and pathological human brains were studied. Using this technique spines can be visualized from both sides of dendrites, which are 'hidden' in 2-D representations, and therefore not usually included in the extimation of dendritic spine density/total spine numbers. In patients with Rett's syndrome and some epilepsy patients, a regional loss of dendritic spines ('naked' dendrites) was found. These results will be included in the Human Brain Mapping Project.

  16. Induction of JAM-A during differentiation of human THP-1 dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Noriko; Kojima, Takashi; Go, Mitsuru; Fuchimoto, Jun; Kamekura, Ryuta; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Himi, Tetsuo; Sawada, Norimasa

    2009-11-20

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A is not only localized at tight junctions of endothelial and epithelial cells but is also expressed on circulating leukocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). In the present study, to investigate the regulation of JAM-A in DCs, mature DCs were differentiated from the human monocytic cell THP-1 by treatment with IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, and ionomycin, and some cells were pretreated with the PPAR-gamma agonists. In the THP-1 monocytes, mRNAs of tight junction molecules, occludin, tricellulin, JAM-A, ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-4, -7, -8, and -9 were detected by RT-PCR. In mature DCs that had elongated dendrites, mRNA and protein of JAM-A were significantly increased compared to the monocytes. PPAR-gamma agonists prevented the elongation of dentrites but not upregulation of JAM-A in mature DCs. These findings indicated that the induction of JAM-A occurred during differentiation of human THP-1 DCs and was independent of PPAR-gamma and the p38 MAPK pathway.

  17. Synaptic activation of ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation occurs locally in activated dendritic domains.

    PubMed

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6) locally near active synapses. Using antibodies specific for phosphorylation at different sites (ser235/236 versus ser240/244), we show that strong synaptic activation led to dramatic increases in immunostaining throughout postsynaptic neurons with selectively higher staining for p-ser235/236 in the activated dendritic lamina. Following LTP induction, phosphorylation at ser235/236 was detectable by 5 min, peaked at 30 min, and was maintained for hours. Phosphorylation at both sites was completely blocked by local infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist, APV. Despite robust induction of p-rpS6 following high frequency stimulation, assessment of protein synthesis by autoradiography revealed no detectable increases. Exploration of a novel environment led to increases in the number of p-rpS6-positive neurons throughout the forebrain in a pattern reminiscent of immediate early gene induction and many individual neurons that were p-rpS6-positive coexpressed Arc protein. Our results constrain hypotheses about the possible role of rpS6 phosphorylation in regulating postsynaptic protein synthesis during induction of synaptic plasticity.

  18. DlgR2 knockdown boosts dendritic cell activity and inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma tumor in-situ growth.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen; Xia, Yun-Hong; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Wen-Ting; Ding, Lu; Hu, Li-Xia; Bi, Jin-Ling; Jiang, Guo-Lin

    2017-08-15

    Tumor-specific hepatic stellate cells (tHSCs) positively participate in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumorigenesis and progression. Our previous studies have shown that tHSCs co-culture with dendritic cells (DCs) induced DIgR2 (dendritic cell-derived immunoglobulin receptor 2) expression. The latter is a member of IgSF inhibitory receptor suppressing DCs-initiated antigen-specific T-cell responses. In the current study, we show that hepatic artery injection of DlgR2 siRNA significantly inhibited in-situ HCC xenograft growth in rat livers. Further, 5-FU-medied inhibition of in-situ HCC growth was dramatically sensitized with DlgR2 silence. DlgR2 siRNA injection indeed downregulated DlgR2 in ex-vivo cultured tumor-derived DCs (tDCs). More importantly, tDCs activity was boosted following DlgR2 siRNA. These cells presented with upregulated CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. Production of interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α was also increased in the DlgR2-silenced tDCs. We propose that DlgR2 knockdown likely boosts the activity of tumor-associated DCs, and inhibits growth of in-situ HCC xenografts.

  19. Activity-dependent dendritic release of BDNF and biological consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kuczewski, Nicola; Porcher, Christophe; Lessmann, Volkmar; Medina, Igor; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Network construction and reorganization is modulated by the level and pattern of synaptic activity generated in the nervous system. During the past decades, neurotrophins, and in particular brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), have emerged as attractive candidates for linking synaptic activity and brain plasticity. Thus, neurotrophin expression and secretion are under the control of activity-dependent mechanisms and, besides their classical role in supporting neuronal survival neurotrophins, modulate nearly all key steps of network construction from neuronal migration to experience-dependent refinement of local connections. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent findings showing that BDNF can serve as a target-derived messenger for activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and development at the single cell level. PMID:19156544

  20. Activity-dependent expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in dendrites: facts and open questions.

    PubMed

    Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2008-08-01

    Long-lasting synaptic changes in transmission and morphology at the basis of memory storage, require delivery of newly synthesized proteins to affected synapses. Although many of these proteins are generated in the cell body, several key molecules for plasticity can be delivered in the form of silent mRNAs at synapses in extra somatic compartments where they are locally translated. One of such mRNAs encodes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key molecule in neuronal development, learning and memory. A single BDNF protein is produced from several splice variants having a different 5' untranslated region. These mRNA variants have a different subcellular localization (soma, proximal or distal dendritic compartment) and may represent a spatial code for a local control of BDNF availability. This review will highlight current knowledge on the mechanisms of spatial and temporal regulation of activity-dependent BDNF mRNA localization in dendrites in relation with synaptic plasticity.

  1. Defective Dendrite Elongation but Normal Fertility in Mice Lacking the Rho-Like GTPase Activator Dbl

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Emilio; Pozzato, Michela; Vercelli, Alessandro; Barberis, Laura; Azzolino, Ornella; Russo, Chiara; Vanni, Cristina; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Altruda, Fiorella

    2002-01-01

    Dbl is the prototype of a large family of GDP-GTP exchange factors for small GTPases of the Rho family. In vitro, Dbl is known to activate Rho and Cdc42 and to induce a transformed phenotype. Dbl is specifically expressed in brain and gonads, but its in vivo functions are largely unknown. To assess its role in neurogenesis and gametogenesis, targeted deletion of the murine Dbl gene was accomplished in embryonic stem cells. Dbl-null mice are viable and did not show either decreased reproductive performances or obvious neurological defects. Histological analysis of mutant testis showed normal morphology and unaltered proliferation and survival of spermatogonia. Dbl-null brains indicated a correct disposition of the major neural structures. Analysis of cortical stratification indicated that Dbl is not crucial for neuronal migration. However, in distinct populations of Dbl-null cortical pyramidal neurons, the length of dendrites was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for Dbl in dendrite elongation. PMID:11940671

  2. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength.

    PubMed

    Araya, Roberto; Vogels, Tim P; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-15

    Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compartmentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input-specific synaptic plasticity, providing a raison d'etre for spines. However, recent results indicate that the spine can experience a membrane potential different from that in the parent dendrite, as though the spine neck electrically isolated the spine. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging of mouse neocortical pyramidal neurons to analyze the correlation between the morphologies of spines activated under minimal synaptic stimulation and the excitatory postsynaptic potentials they generate. We find that excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitudes are inversely correlated with spine neck lengths. Furthermore, a spike timing-dependent plasticity protocol, in which two-photon glutamate uncaging over a spine is paired with postsynaptic spikes, produces rapid shrinkage of the spine neck and concomitant increases in the amplitude of the evoked spine potentials. Using numerical simulations, we explore the parameter regimes for the spine neck resistance and synaptic conductance changes necessary to explain our observations. Our data, directly correlating synaptic and morphological plasticity, imply that long-necked spines have small or negligible somatic voltage contributions, but that, upon synaptic stimulation paired with postsynaptic activity, they can shorten their necks and increase synaptic efficacy, thus changing the input/output gain of pyramidal neurons.

  3. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto; Vogels, Tim P.; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compartmentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input-specific synaptic plasticity, providing a raison d’etre for spines. However, recent results indicate that the spine can experience a membrane potential different from that in the parent dendrite, as though the spine neck electrically isolated the spine. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging of mouse neocortical pyramidal neurons to analyze the correlation between the morphologies of spines activated under minimal synaptic stimulation and the excitatory postsynaptic potentials they generate. We find that excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitudes are inversely correlated with spine neck lengths. Furthermore, a spike timing-dependent plasticity protocol, in which two-photon glutamate uncaging over a spine is paired with postsynaptic spikes, produces rapid shrinkage of the spine neck and concomitant increases in the amplitude of the evoked spine potentials. Using numerical simulations, we explore the parameter regimes for the spine neck resistance and synaptic conductance changes necessary to explain our observations. Our data, directly correlating synaptic and morphological plasticity, imply that long-necked spines have small or negligible somatic voltage contributions, but that, upon synaptic stimulation paired with postsynaptic activity, they can shorten their necks and increase synaptic efficacy, thus changing the input/output gain of pyramidal neurons. PMID:24982196

  4. Tenascin-C aggravates autoimmune myocarditis via dendritic cell activation and Th17 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Machino-Ohtsuka, Tomoko; Tajiri, Kazuko; Kimura, Taizo; Sakai, Satoshi; Sato, Akira; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Hiroe, Michiaki; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko

    2014-11-05

    Tenascin-C (TN-C), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein, appears at several important steps of cardiac development in the embryo, but is sparse in the normal adult heart. TN-C re-expresses under pathological conditions including myocarditis, and is closely associated with tissue injury and inflammation in both experimental and clinical settings. However, the pathophysiological role of TN-C in the development of myocarditis is not clear. We examined how TN-C affects the initiation of experimental autoimmune myocarditis, immunologically. A model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis was established in BALB/c mice by immunization with murine α-myosin heavy chains. We found that TN-C knockout mice were protected from severe myocarditis compared to wild-type mice. TN-C induced synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-6, in dendritic cells via activation of a Toll-like receptor 4, which led to T-helper (Th)17 cell differentiation and exacerbated the myocardial inflammation. In the transfer experiment, dendritic cells loaded with cardiac myosin peptide acquired the functional capacity to induce myocarditis when stimulated with TN-C; however, TN-C-stimulated dendritic cells generated from Toll-like receptor 4 knockout mice did not induce myocarditis in recipients. Our results demonstrated that TN-C aggravates autoimmune myocarditis by driving the dendritic cell activation and Th17 differentiation via Toll-like receptor 4. The blockade of Toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling to inhibit the proinflammatory effects of TN-C could be a promising therapeutic strategy against autoimmune myocarditis. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins with Different N-Glycan Patterns Activate Dendritic Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Chun; Lin, Yu-Li; Spearman, Maureen; Cheng, Pei-Yun; Butler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) N-glycans play important regulatory roles in the control of virus virulence, antigenicity, receptor-binding specificity, and viral escape from the immune response. Considered essential for controlling innate and adaptive immune responses against influenza virus infections, dendritic cells (DCs) trigger proinflammatory and adaptive immune responses in hosts. In this study, we engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing recombinant HA from pandemic H1, H5, and H7 influenza viruses. rH1HA, rH5HA, and rH7HA were obtained as wild-type proteins or in the presence of kifunensine (KIF) or further with endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase-treated KIF (KIF+E) to generate single-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) N-glycans consisting of (i) terminally sialylated complex-type N-glycans, (ii) high-mannose-type N-glycans, and (iii) single-GlcNAc-type N-glycans. Our results show that high-mannose-type and single-GlcNAc-type N-glycans, but not complex-type N-glycans, are capable of inducing more active hIL12 p40, hIL12 p70, and hIL-10 production in human DCs. Significantly higher HLA-DR, CD40, CD83, and CD86 expression levels, as well reduced endocytotic capacity in human DCs, were noted in the high-mannose-type rH1HA and single-GlcNAc-type rH1HA groups than in the complex-type N-glycan rH1HA group. Our data indicate that native avian rHA proteins (H5N1 and H7N9) are more immunostimulatory than human rHA protein (pH1N1). The high-mannose-type or single-GlcNAc-type N-glycans of both avian and human HA types are more stimulatory than the complex-type N-glycans. HA-stimulated DC activation was accomplished partially through a mannose receptor(s). These results provide more understanding of the contribution of glycosylation of viral proteins to the immune responses and may have implications for vaccine development. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses trigger seasonal epidemics or pandemics with mild-to-severe consequences for human and

  6. Chains, Rings, and Dendrites of Active Colloidal Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    In order to better understand active polymeric matter, colloidal polymers are imaged, in situ in real time, obtaining not only temporal and spatial information about each ``monomer'' in these living polymers but also about the time-dependent and orientation-dependent correlations between them. Our reversible colloidal polymer system is assembled from self-propelled monomeric Janus particles with dynamic ``plug and play'' self-assembly and programmed direction-specific interactions between the particles. Enabling this, AC voltage induces dipoles on the monomeric Janus particles that link them into chains while also generating active phoretic motility. Unique features of this system relative to conventional Brownian polymers are emphasized.

  7. IL-27 in human secondary lymphoid organs attracts myeloid dendritic cells and impairs HLA class I-restricted antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Di Carlo, Emma; Ferrone, Soldano; Petretto, Andrea; Pistoia, Vito; Airoldi, Irma

    2014-03-15

    Different cytokines play crucial roles in inflammation and in polarizing immune responses, including IL-27 that exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. Although the activity of IL-27 is well characterized in murine immune cells, only limited information is available regarding the natural cellular sources of IL-27 in humans and its effects on human immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional APCs that in the immature state are positioned throughout peripheral tissues by acting as sentinels, sensing the presence of Ags. Activated DCs migrate into the lymph nodes and direct Ag-specific T cell responses, thus acting as key players in both adaptive and innate immunity. In this study we asked whether IL-27 is produced by human secondary lymphoid organs and what is its functional role on human DCs. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that 1) in lymph nodes, macrophages are the major source for IL-27; 2) immature and mature human DCs express functional IL-27R; 3) IL-27 exerts immunosuppressive activity by crippling the Ag processing machinery in immature DCs under steady-state conditions and after pulsing with a viral Ag; and 4) IL-27 is chemotactic for human DCs. Our findings highlight novel mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive activity of IL-27, suggesting that this cytokine may function as a homeostatic cytokine in secondary lymphoid organs by limiting duration and/or intensity of ongoing adaptive immune responses. The results presented in this study pave the way to future studies aimed at investigating whether dysregulation of IL-27 expression and function may be involved in pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

  8. Dendritic cell-derived VEGF-A plays a role in inflammatory angiogenesis of human secondary lymphoid organs and is driven by the coordinated activation of multiple transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Valentina; Vermi, William; Gianello, Veronica; Lonardi, Silvia; Gagliostro, Vincenzo; Naldini, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Lymph node expansion during inflammation is essential to establish immune responses and relies on the development of blood and lymph vessels. Previous work in mice has shown that this process depends on the presence of VEGF-A produced by B cells, macrophages and stromal cells. In humans, however, the cell types and the mechanisms regulating the intranodal production of VEGF-A remain elusive. Here we show that CD11c+ cells represent the main VEGF-A-producing cell population in human reactive secondary lymphoid organs. In addition we find that three transcription factors, namely CREB, HIF-1α and STAT3, regulate the expression of VEGF-A in inflamed DCs. Both HIF-1α and STAT3 are activated by inflammatory agonists. Conversely, CREB phosphorylation represents the critical contribution of endogenous or exogenous PGE2. Taken together, these results propose a crucial role for DCs in lymph node inflammatory angiogenesis and identify novel potential cellular and molecular targets to limit inflammation in chronic diseases and tumors. PMID:27256980

  9. Dendritic cell-derived VEGF-A plays a role in inflammatory angiogenesis of human secondary lymphoid organs and is driven by the coordinated activation of multiple transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Valentina; Vermi, William; Gianello, Veronica; Lonardi, Silvia; Gagliostro, Vincenzo; Naldini, Antonella; Sozzani, Silvano; Bosisio, Daniela

    2016-06-28

    Lymph node expansion during inflammation is essential to establish immune responses and relies on the development of blood and lymph vessels. Previous work in mice has shown that this process depends on the presence of VEGF-A produced by B cells, macrophages and stromal cells. In humans, however, the cell types and the mechanisms regulating the intranodal production of VEGF-A remain elusive. Here we show that CD11c+ cells represent the main VEGF-A-producing cell population in human reactive secondary lymphoid organs. In addition we find that three transcription factors, namely CREB, HIF-1α and STAT3, regulate the expression of VEGF-A in inflamed DCs. Both HIF-1α and STAT3 are activated by inflammatory agonists. Conversely, CREB phosphorylation represents the critical contribution of endogenous or exogenous PGE2. Taken together, these results propose a crucial role for DCs in lymph node inflammatory angiogenesis and identify novel potential cellular and molecular targets to limit inflammation in chronic diseases and tumors.

  10. Effects of mesenchymal stromal cells on human myeloid dendritic cell differentiation and maturation in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Yanfei; Womer, Karl L

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have shown promise as cellular therapy in allogeneic transplantation, although the precise mechanisms underlying their benefit in clinical trials are difficult to study. We previously demonstrated that MSCs exert immunoregulatory effects in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (DC) culture. Since mouse studies do not reliably reproduce human events, we used a humanized mouse model to study the immunomodulatory effects of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology. Humanized mice were established by injection of cord blood CD34(+) cells into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl/SzJ) (NOD scid gamma, NSG) mice. Human cells were detected in the mouse bone marrow, blood, and spleen 12weeks after transplantation. Human DCs were differentiated from humanized mouse bone marrow cells during human MSC co-culture. MSCs inhibited DC differentiation and kept DCs in an immature state as demonstrated by phenotype and function. In conclusion, humanized mouse models represent a useful method to study the function of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology.

  11. Role of DC-SIGN in Lassa Virus Entry into Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Ana-Rita; Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pasquato, Antonella; Helenius, Ari; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    The arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans. Antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DCs), are early and preferred targets of LASV, and their productive infection contributes to the virus-induced immunosuppression observed in fatal disease. Here, we characterized the role of the C-type lectin DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in LASV entry into primary human DCs using a chimera of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) expressing the LASV glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP). We found that differentiation of human primary monocytes into DCs enhanced virus attachment and entry, concomitant with the upregulation of DC-SIGN. LASV and rLCMV-LASVGP bound to DC-SIGN via mannose sugars located on the N-terminal GP1 subunit of LASVGP. We provide evidence that DC-SIGN serves as an attachment factor for rLCMV-LASVGP in monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (MDDC) and can accelerate the capture of free virus. However, in contrast to the phlebovirus Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), which uses DC-SIGN as an authentic entry receptor, productive infection with rLCMV-LASVGP was less dependent on DC-SIGN. In contrast to the DC-SIGN-mediated cell entry of UUKV, entry of rLCMV-LASVGP in MDDC was remarkably slow and depended on actin, indicating the use of different endocytotic pathways. In sum, our data reveal that DC-SIGN can facilitate cell entry of LASV in human MDDC but that its role seems distinct from the function as an authentic entry receptor reported for phleboviruses. PMID:23966408

  12. Role of DC-SIGN in Lassa virus entry into human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Ana-Rita; Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pasquato, Antonella; Helenius, Ari; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    The arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans. Antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DCs), are early and preferred targets of LASV, and their productive infection contributes to the virus-induced immunosuppression observed in fatal disease. Here, we characterized the role of the C-type lectin DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in LASV entry into primary human DCs using a chimera of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) expressing the LASV glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP). We found that differentiation of human primary monocytes into DCs enhanced virus attachment and entry, concomitant with the upregulation of DC-SIGN. LASV and rLCMV-LASVGP bound to DC-SIGN via mannose sugars located on the N-terminal GP1 subunit of LASVGP. We provide evidence that DC-SIGN serves as an attachment factor for rLCMV-LASVGP in monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (MDDC) and can accelerate the capture of free virus. However, in contrast to the phlebovirus Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), which uses DC-SIGN as an authentic entry receptor, productive infection with rLCMV-LASVGP was less dependent on DC-SIGN. In contrast to the DC-SIGN-mediated cell entry of UUKV, entry of rLCMV-LASVGP in MDDC was remarkably slow and depended on actin, indicating the use of different endocytotic pathways. In sum, our data reveal that DC-SIGN can facilitate cell entry of LASV in human MDDC but that its role seems distinct from the function as an authentic entry receptor reported for phleboviruses.

  13. Loss of Melanopsin-Expressing Ganglion Cell Subtypes and Dendritic Degeneration in the Aging Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Esquiva, Gema; Lax, Pedro; Pérez-Santonja, Juan J.; García-Fernández, José M.; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are, among other things, involved in several non-image-forming visual functions, including light entrainment of circadian rhythms. Considering the profound impact of aging on visual function and ophthalmic diseases, here we evaluate changes in mRGCs throughout the life span in humans. In 24 post-mortem retinas from anonymous human donors aged 10–81 years, we assessed the distribution, number and morphology of mRGCs by immunostaining vertical retinal sections and whole-mount retinas with antibodies against melanopsin. Human retinas showed melanopsin immunoreactivity in the cell body, axon and dendrites of a subset of ganglion cells at all ages tested. Nearly half of the mRGCs (51%) were located within the ganglion cell layer (GCL), and stratified in the outer (M1, 12%) or inner (M2, 16%) margin of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) or in both plexuses (M3, 23%). M1 and M2 cells conformed fairly irregular mosaics, while M3 cell distribution was slightly more regular. The rest of the mRGCs were more regularly arranged in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and stratified in the outer margin of the IPL (M1d, 49%). The quantity of each cell type decrease after age 70, when the total number of mRGCs was 31% lower than in donors aged 30–50 years. Moreover, in retinas with an age greater than 50 years, mRGCs evidenced a decrease in the dendritic area that was both progressive and age-dependent, as well as fewer branch points and terminal neurite tips per cell and a smaller Sholl area. After 70 years of age, the distribution profile of the mRGCs was closer to a random pattern than was observed in younger retinas. We conclude that advanced age is associated with a loss in density and dendritic arborization of the mRGCs in human retinas, possibly accounting for the more frequent occurrence of circadian rhythm disorders in elderly persons. PMID:28420980

  14. Loss of Melanopsin-Expressing Ganglion Cell Subtypes and Dendritic Degeneration in the Aging Human Retina.

    PubMed

    Esquiva, Gema; Lax, Pedro; Pérez-Santonja, Juan J; García-Fernández, José M; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are, among other things, involved in several non-image-forming visual functions, including light entrainment of circadian rhythms. Considering the profound impact of aging on visual function and ophthalmic diseases, here we evaluate changes in mRGCs throughout the life span in humans. In 24 post-mortem retinas from anonymous human donors aged 10-81 years, we assessed the distribution, number and morphology of mRGCs by immunostaining vertical retinal sections and whole-mount retinas with antibodies against melanopsin. Human retinas showed melanopsin immunoreactivity in the cell body, axon and dendrites of a subset of ganglion cells at all ages tested. Nearly half of the mRGCs (51%) were located within the ganglion cell layer (GCL), and stratified in the outer (M1, 12%) or inner (M2, 16%) margin of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) or in both plexuses (M3, 23%). M1 and M2 cells conformed fairly irregular mosaics, while M3 cell distribution was slightly more regular. The rest of the mRGCs were more regularly arranged in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and stratified in the outer margin of the IPL (M1d, 49%). The quantity of each cell type decrease after age 70, when the total number of mRGCs was 31% lower than in donors aged 30-50 years. Moreover, in retinas with an age greater than 50 years, mRGCs evidenced a decrease in the dendritic area that was both progressive and age-dependent, as well as fewer branch points and terminal neurite tips per cell and a smaller Sholl area. After 70 years of age, the distribution profile of the mRGCs was closer to a random pattern than was observed in younger retinas. We conclude that advanced age is associated with a loss in density and dendritic arborization of the mRGCs in human retinas, possibly accounting for the more frequent occurrence of circadian rhythm disorders in elderly persons.

  15. High-surface step density on dendritic pd leads to exceptional catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Patra, S; Viswanath, B; Barai, K; Ravishankar, N; Munichandraiah, N

    2010-11-01

    Dendritic Pd with corrugated surfaces, obtained by a novel AC technique, exhibits an exceptionally high catalytic activity for the oxidation of formic acid because of the presence of a high density of surface steps. The formation of twinned dendrites leads to a predominance of exposed 111 facets with a high density of surface steps as evident from high resolution electron microscopy investigations. These surface sites provide active sites for the adsorption of the formic acid molecules, thereby enhancing the reaction rate. Control experiments by varying the time of deposition reveal the formation of partially grown dendrites at shorter times indicating that the dendrites were formed by growth rather than particle attachment. Our deposition method opens up interesting possibilities to produce anisotropic nanostructures with corrugated surfaces by exploiting the perturbations involved in the growth process.

  16. Human B cells induce dendritic cell maturation and favour Th2 polarization by inducing OX-40 ligand

    PubMed Central

    Maddur, Mohan S.; Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Pulendran, Bali; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in immune homeostasis by regulating the functions of various immune cells, including T and B cells. Notably, DCs also undergo education on reciprocal signalling by these immune cells and environmental factors. Various reports demonstrated that B cells have profound regulatory functions, although only few reports have explored the regulation of human DCs by B cells. Here we demonstrate that activated but not resting B cells induce maturation of DCs with distinct features to polarize Th2 cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-5, IL-4 and IL-13. B-cell-induced maturation of DCs is contact dependent and implicates signalling of B-cell activation molecules CD69, B-cell-activating factor receptor, and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor. Mechanistically, differentiation of Th2 cells by B-cell-matured DCs is dependent on OX-40 ligand. Collectively, our results suggest that B cells have the ability to control their own effector functions by enhancing the ability of human DCs to mediate Th2 differentiation. PMID:24910129

  17. Chemokine-like receptor 1 expression and chemerin-directed chemotaxis distinguish plasmacytoid from myeloid dendritic cells in human blood.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Brian A; Silverio, Amanda M; Butcher, Eugene C

    2005-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are versatile cells of the immune response, secreting type I IFNs and differentiating into potent immunogenic or tolerogenic APCs. pDCs can express adhesion and chemokine receptors for lymphoid tissues, but are also recruited by unknown mechanisms during tissue inflammation. We use a novel mAb specific for serpentine chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) to evaluate its expression by circulating leukocytes in humans. We show that CMKLR1 is expressed by circulating pDCs in human blood, whereas myeloid DCs (mDCs) as well as lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils are negative. We identify a major serum agonist activity for CMKLR1 as chemerin, a proteolytically activated attractant and the sole known ligand for CMKLR1, and we show that chemerin is activated during blood coagulation and attracts pDC but not mDC in ex vivo chemotaxis assays. We conclude that CMKLR1 expression and chemerin-mediated chemotaxis distinguish circulating pDCs from mDCs, providing a potential mechanism for their differential contribution to or regulation of immune responses at sites of bleeding or inflammatory protease activity.

  18. Human dendritic cells induce the differentiation of interleukin-21-producing T follicular helper-like cells through interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Morita, Rimpei; Bourdery, Laure; Bentebibel, Salah Eddine; Zurawski, Sandra M; Banchereau, Jacques; Ueno, Hideki

    2009-07-17

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help development of antibody responses via interleukin-21 (IL-21). Here we show that activated human dendritic cells (DCs) induced naive CD4(+) T cells to become IL-21-producing Tfh-like cells through IL-12. CD4(+) T cells primed with IL-12 induced B cells to produce immunoglobulins in a fashion dependent on IL-21 and inducible costimulator (ICOS), thus sharing fundamental characteristics with Tfh cells. The induction of Tfh-like cells by activated DCs was inhibited by neutralizing IL-12. IL-12 induced two different IL-21-producers: IL-21(+)IFN-gamma(+)T-bet(+) Th1 cells and IL-21(+)IFN-gamma(-)T-bet(-) non-Th1 cells, in a manner dependent on signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4). IL-12 also regulated IL-21 secretion by memory CD4(+) T cells. Thus, IL-12 produced by activated DCs regulates antibody responses via developing IL-21-producing Tfh-like cells and inducing IL-21 secretion from memory CD4(+) T cells. These data suggest that the developmental pathway of Tfh cells differs between mice and humans, which have considerable implications for vaccine development.

  19. The human syndrome of dendritic cell, monocyte, B and NK lymphoid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Venetia; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Doulatov, Sergei; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Rachel; McGovern, Naomi; Jardine, Laura; Pagan, Sarah; Dimmick, Ian; Chua, Ignatius; Wallis, Jonathan; Lordan, Jim; Morgan, Cliff; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S.; Doffinger, Rainer; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques; Cant, Andrew; Dick, John E.; Hambleton, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Congenital or acquired cellular deficiencies in humans have the potential to reveal much about normal hematopoiesis and immune function. We show that a recently described syndrome of monocytopenia, B and NK lymphoid deficiency additionally includes the near absence of dendritic cells. Four subjects showed severe depletion of the peripheral blood HLA-DR+ lineage− compartment, with virtually no CD123+ or CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and very few CD14+ or CD16+ monocytes. The only remaining HLA-DR+ lineage− cells were circulating CD34+ progenitor cells. Dermal CD14+ and CD1a+ DC were also absent, consistent with their dependence on blood-derived precursors. In contrast, epidermal Langerhans cells and tissue macrophages were largely preserved. Combined loss of peripheral DCs, monocytes, and B and NK lymphocytes was mirrored in the bone marrow by complete absence of multilymphoid progenitors and depletion of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. Depletion of the HLA-DR+ peripheral blood compartment was associated with elevated serum fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand and reduced circulating CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ T cells, supporting a role for DC in T reg cell homeostasis. PMID:21242295

  20. Active immunotherapy for cancer patients using tumor lysate pulsed dendritic cell vaccine: a safety study.

    PubMed

    Ovali, E; Dikmen, T; Sonmez, M; Yilmaz, M; Unal, A; Dalbasti, T; Kuzeyli, K; Erturk, M; Omay, S B

    2007-06-01

    Cancer vaccine therapy represents a promising therapeutical option. Consistently, with these new treatment strategies, the use of dendritic cell vaccines is becoming increasingly widespread and currently in the forefront for cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccine in patients with advanced cancers. For this purpose, eighteen patients with relapsed or refractory cancer were vaccinated with peripheral monocyte-derived DCs generated with GM-CSF and IL-4, and pulsed consequently with 100 microg/ml of tumor lysate before maturation in culture in the presence of IL-1beta, PGE2 and TNF alpha for two days. The first two vaccinations were given intradermally every two weeks while further injections were given monthly. Tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell injections were well-tolerated in all patients with no more than grade 1 injection-related toxicity. Local inflammatory response was mainly erythematous which subsided in 48 hrs time. No end organ toxicity or autoimmune toxicity was identified. Clinical responses observed in our study were satisfactory for a phase I clinical study. We observed 4 (22%) objective clinical responses. These responses are significantly correlated with delayed type hypersensitivity testing (DTH) (p < 0.01). The results showed that this active immunotherapy is feasible, safe, and may be capable of eliciting immune responses against cancer.

  1. T lymphocytes and dendritic cells are activated by the deletion of peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) gene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Yi; Noh, Young-Wook; Han, Ying-Hao; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Jin-Man; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2006-02-15

    Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) is a member of antioxidant enzyme family and it plays a protective role against oxidative damage. Constitutive production of endogenous reactive oxygen species was detected in spleen and bone marrow cells lacking Prx II. Here, we investigated the role of Prx II in immune responses. The total number of splenocytes (especially, the population of S-phase cells and CD3(+) T cells) was significantly higher in Prx II(-/-) mice than in wild type. Number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in Prx II(-/-) mice was also higher than wild type. Differentiation of Prx II(-/-) mouse bone marrow cells into CD11c-positive dendritic cells was greater than that of wild type. Transplantation of Prx II(-/-) bone marrow cells into wild type mice increased PBMCs in blood and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Prx II deletion enhances concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenocyte proliferation and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) activity of bone marrow-derived CD11c-positive dendritic cells to stimulate recipient splenocytes. Collectively, these data suggest that Prx II inhibits the immune cell responsiveness, which may be regulated by scavenging the low amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  2. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  3. Activation of dendritic cell function by soypeptide lunasin as a novel vaccine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Yu; Lewis, David E; Han, Ling; Jaja, Morayo; Yao, Shuyu; Li, Fang; Robertson, Michael J; Zhou, Baohua; Sun, Jie; Chang, Hua-Chen

    2014-09-22

    The addition of an appropriate adjuvant that activates the innate immunity is essential to subsequent development of the adaptive immunity specific to the vaccine antigens. Thus, any innovation capable of improving the immune responses may lead to a more efficacious vaccine. We recently identified a novel immune modulator using a naturally occurring seed peptide called lunasin. Lunasin was originally isolated from soybeans, and it is a small peptide containing 43 amino acids. Our studies revealed stimulatory effects of lunasin on innate immune cells by regulating expression of a number of genes that are important for immune responses. The objective was to define the effectiveness of lunasin as an adjuvant that enhances immune responses. The immune modulating functions of lunasin were characterized in dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Lunasin-treated conventional DCs (cDCs) not only expressed elevated levels of co-stimulatory molecules (CD86, CD40) but also exhibited up-regulation of cytokines (IL1B, IL6) and chemokines (CCL3, CCL4). Lunasin-treated cDCs induced higher proliferation of allogeneic CD4+ T cells when comparing with medium control treatment in the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). Immunization of mice with ovalbumin (OVA) and lunasin inhibited the growth of OVA-expressing A20 B-lymphomas, which was correlated with OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. In addition, lunasin was an effective adjuvant for immunization with OVA, which together improved animal survival against lethal challenge with influenza virus expressing the MHC class I OVA peptide SIINFEKL (PR8-OTI). These results suggest that lunasin may function as a vaccine adjuvant by promoting DC maturation, which in turn enhances the development of protective immune responses to the vaccine antigens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on the functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Li; Liang, Yu-Chih; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Wu, Wen-Mein; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2009-01-01

    Background Propolis, an ancient herbal medicine, has been reported the beneficial effect both in asthma patients and murine model of asthma, but the mechanism was not clearly understood. In this study, the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), the most extensively studied components in propolis, on the functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) was investigated. Results CAPE significantly inhibited IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, IL-10 protein expression in mature healthy human MoDCs stimulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and IL-12 p40, IL-10, IP-10 stimulated by crude mite extract. CAPE significantly inhibited IL-10 and IP-10 but not IL-12 expression in allergic patients' MoDCs stimulated by crude mite extract. In contrast, the upregulation of costimulatory molecules in mature MoDCs was not suppressed by CAPE. Further, the antigen presenting ability of DCs was not inhibited by CAPE. CAPE inhibited IκBα phosphorylation and NF-κB activation but not mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation in human MoDCs. Conclusion These results indicated that CAPE inhibited cytokine and chemokine production by MoDCs which might be related to the NF-κB signaling pathway. This study provided a new insight into the mechanism of CAPE in immune response and the rationale for propolis in the treatment of asthma and other allergic disorders. PMID:19604415

  5. Identification of Genes Responsive to Solar Simulated UV Radiation in Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Hortensia; Lamana, Amalia; Mittelbrunn, María; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Gonzalez, Salvador; García-Diez, Amaro; Vega, Miguel; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has profound effects on the skin and the systemic immune system. Several effects of UV radiation on Dendritic cells (DCs) functions have been described. However, gene expression changes induced by UV radiation in DCs have not been addressed before. In this report, we irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs with solar-simulated UVA/UVB and analyzed regulated genes on human whole genome arrays. Results were validated by RT-PCR and further analyzed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Solar-simulated UV radiation up-regulated expression of genes involved in cellular stress and inflammation, and down-regulated genes involved in chemotaxis, vesicular transport and RNA processing. Twenty four genes were selected for comparison by RT-PCR with similarly treated human primary keratinocytes and human melanocytes. Several genes involved in the regulation of the immune response were differentially regulated in UVA/UVB irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs, such as protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type E (PTPRE), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL), galectins, Src-like adapter protein (SLA), IL-10 and CCR7. These results indicate that UV-exposure triggers the regulation of a complex gene repertoire involved in human-DC–mediated immune responses. PMID:19707549

  6. Murine Cytomegalovirus Abortively Infects Human Dendritic Cells, Leading to Expression and Presentation of Virally Vectored Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuqing; Messerle, Martin; Sapinoro, Ramil; Santos, Kathlyn; Hocknell, Peter K.; Jin, Xia; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells that play a crucial role in antigen-specific immune responses. Thus, the targeting of exogenous antigens to DC has become a popular approach for cancer immunotherapy and vaccine development. In this report, we studied the interplay between murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and human monocyte-derived DC. The results showed that an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-encoding, replication-competent MCMV vector underwent abortive infection in human DC; this was accompanied by the efficient expression of EGFP. Infection of human DC by this vector resulted in a modest increase in the expression of cell surface proteins associated with DC maturation and has no significant effect on the immunostimulatory function of the cells, as reflected by their ability to support T-cell proliferation in a mixed-lymphocyte reaction. Finally, an MCMV vector encoding the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope glycoprotein was constructed and used to infect cultured human DC. The infected DC were shown to be capable of stimulating the expansion of autologous, gp120-specific, class I-restricted T lymphocytes from an HIV-1-negative donor, as determined by tetramer staining and enzyme-linked immunospot analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that MCMV may have potential utility as a vector for human vaccine development. PMID:12805417

  7. Altered human gut dendritic cell properties in ulcerative colitis are reversed by Lactobacillus plantarum extracellular encrypted peptide STp.

    PubMed

    Al-Hassi, Hafid O; Mann, Elizabeth R; Sanchez, Borja; English, Nicholas R; Peake, Simon T C; Landy, Jonathan; Man, Ripple; Urdaci, Maria; Hart, Ailsa L; Fernandez-Salazar, Luis; Lee, Gui Han; Garrote, Jose A; Arranz, Eduardo; Margolles, Abelardo; Stagg, Andrew J; Knight, Stella C; Bernardo, David

    2014-05-01

    The human/microbiota cross-talk is partially mediated by bacteria-derived peptides like Serine-Threonine peptide (STp), which is resistant to gut proteolysis, is found in the human healthy colon and induces regulatory properties on gut dendritic cells (DCs); here we characterized human gut DC in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and studied the effect of STp on their properties. Human colonic DC from healthy controls and UC patients were isolated, conditioned for 24 h +/- STp and characterized by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Expression of immature DC markers DC-SIGN and ILT3, and Toll-like receptors were increased on gut UC-DC. Langerin (involved in phagocytosis), lymph node homing marker CCR7, and activation markers CD40/CD80/CD86 were decreased in UC. Gut DC had restricted stimulatory capacity for T-cells in UC. Conditioning of DC with STp in vitro reduced Toll-like receptor expression, increased CD40 and CD80 expression, and restored their stimulatory capacity. Colonic DCs display an abnormal immature phenotype in UC, which was partially restored following STp treatment. Bacteria-derived metabolites, like STp, seem to have a role in gut homeostasis that is missing in UC so they might lead a new era of probiotic products setting the basis for nondrug dietary therapy in inflammatory bowel disease. © 2013 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA Weinheim.

  8. High-risk human papilloma virus infection decreases the frequency of dendritic Langerhans' cells in the human female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Mendez-Cruz, Rene; Ojeda-Ortiz, Jorge; Muñoz-Molina, Rebeca; Balderas-Carrillo, Oscar; de la Luz Diaz-Soberanes, Maria; Lebecque, Serge; Saeland, Sem; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are often arranged in planar layers in tissues with high antigenic exposure, such as skin and mucosae. Providing an en face view, this arrangement optimizes in situ analysis regarding morphology (even of individual dendrites), topographic distribution (regular/clustered) and quantification. The few reports on human genital DC usually utilize single markers and conventional sections, restricting immunolabelling only to cell parts sectioned by the cut. To better assess DC in situ, we labelled epithelial sheets, prepared from fresh cervix biopsies, with antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-CII, CD1a and Langerin, revealing (with each of these markers) a dense DC network in a planar-like, regular distribution. Using the hybrid capture system to detect the high-risk mucotropic human papilloma virus (HPV) group, 16 positive and five negative women were studied and the results were compared between these groups. DC frequency per area was substantially reduced (to ≈ 50% for the three markers) in samples from all HPV-infected patients compared with samples from controls. Unlike HPV– samples, Langerin+ DC in HPV+ cervix exhibited a highly accentuated dendritic appearance. We believe this to be the first study using these three DC-restricted markers (Langerin, CD1a and MHC-CII) in cervical epithelial sheets from high-risk HPV+ donors and also the first study to demonstrate the morphological and quantitative changes triggered by high-risk HPV infection. Cervical DC reduction in early, premalignant high-risk HPV infection might represent viral subversion strategies interfering with efficient antigen handling by the immune system's peripheral sentinels, the DC, perhaps hampering appropriate recruitment and subsequent development of effector (cytotoxic) T cells. PMID:16423058

  9. Constitutively active G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ channels in dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xixi; Johnston, Daniel

    2005-04-13

    A diversity of ion channels contributes to the active properties of neuronal dendrites. From the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, we recorded inwardly rectifying K+ channels with a single-channel conductance of 33 pS. The inwardly rectifying K+ channels were constitutively active at the resting membrane potential. The amount of constitutive channel activity was significantly larger in the apical dendrites than in the soma. Activities of these inwardly rectifying K+ channels were inhibited by Ba2+ (200 microM) and tertiapin (10 nM), both of which are believed to block G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels. Intracellularly applied GTPgammaS (20 microM) during dual dendritic recordings significantly increased constitutive channel activity. Baclofen (20 microM), an agonist for the G-protein-coupled GABA(B) receptor, also significantly increased the level of channel activity. Therefore, these channels are GIRK channels, which are constitutively active at rest in the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons and can be further activated via G-protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors.

  10. Synthesis and mannose receptor-mediated uptake of clustered glycomimetics by human dendritic cells: effect of charge.

    PubMed

    Angyalosi, Gerhild; Grandjean, Cyrille; Lamirand, Mélanie; Auriault, Claude; Gras-Masse, Hélène; Melnyk, Oleg

    2002-10-07

    Effect of charge and shape of multivalent lysine-based cluster glycomimetics on their mannose receptor-mediated uptake by human dendritic cells has been evaluated: The capture is strongly affected by the shape of the ligands. The effect of charge is less pronounced although positive charges on the ligands seem to favor non-specific endocytosis capture.

  11. Liposomes containing NY‑ESO‑1/tetanus toxoid and adjuvant peptides targeted to human dendritic cells via the Fc receptor for cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luis J; Rueda, Felix; Simón, Lorena; Cordobilla, Begoña; Albericio, Fernando; Domingo, Joan C

    2014-04-01

    To improve the immunological response against tumors, a vaccine based on nanoliposomes targeted to the Fcg-receptor was developed to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Using human dendritic cells in vitro, a fragment of the TAA NY-ESO-1 combined with a T-helper peptide from the tetanus toxoid encapsulated in nanoliposomes was evaluated. In addition, peptides Palm-IL-1 and MAP-IFN-g were coadministered as adjuvants to enhance the immunological response. Coadministration of Palm-IL-1 or MAP-IFN-g peptide adjuvants and the hybrid NY-ESO-1-tetanus toxoid (soluble or encapsulated in nanoliposomes without targeting) increased immunogenicity. However, the most potent immunological response was obtained when the peptide adjuvants were encapsulated in liposomes targeted to human dendritic cells via the Fc receptor. This targeted vaccine strategy is a promising tool to activate and deliver antigens to dendritic cells, thus improving immunotherapeutic response in situations in which the immune system is frequently compromised, as in advanced cancers.

  12. Differential activation of dendritic cells by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Noga, O; Peiser, M; Altenähr, M; Knieling, H; Wanner, R; Hanf, G; Grosse, R; Suttorp, N

    2007-11-01

    Neurotrophins are involved in inflammatory reactions influencing several cells in health and disease including allergy and asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in the induction of inflammatory processes with an increasing role in allergic diseases as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neurotrophins on DC function. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells were generated from allergic and non-allergic donors. Neurotrophin receptors were demonstrated by western blotting, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Activation of small GTPases was evaluated by pull-down assays. DCs were incubated with nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and supernatants were collected for measurement of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta. Receptor proteins were detectable by western blot, fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis and fluorescence microscopy. Signalling after neurotrophin stimulation occurred in a ligand-specific pattern. NGF led to decreased RhoA and increased Rac activation, while BDNF affected RhoA and Rac activity in a reciprocal fashion. Cells of allergics released a significantly increased amount of IL-6, while for healthy subjects a significantly higher amount of IL-10 was found. These data indicate that DCs are activated by the neurotrophins NGF and BDNF by different pathways in a receptor-dependant manner. These cells then may initiate inflammatory responses based on allergic sensitization releasing preferred cytokines inducing tolerance or a T-helper type 2 response.

  13. Transition metal sensing by Toll-like receptor-4: next to nickel, cobalt and palladium are potent human dendritic cell stimulators.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Bontkes, Hetty J; Verstege, Marleen I; Muris, Joris; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2013-06-01

    Nickel was recently identified as a potent activator of dendritic cells through ligating with human Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. Here, we studied an extended panel of transition metals neighbouring nickel in the periodic table of elements, for their capacity to activate human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). The panel included chromium, cobalt, and palladium, all of which are known to be frequent clinical sensitizers. MoDC activation was monitored by assessment of release of the pro-inflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-8, a major downstream result of TLR ligation. Results The data obtained in the present study show that cobalt and palladium also have potent MoDC-activating capacities, whereas copper and zinc, but not iron and chromium, have low but distinct MoDC-activating potential. Involvement of endotoxin contamination in MoDC activation was excluded by Limulus assays and consistent stimulation in the presence of polymyxin B. The critical role of TLR4 in nickel-induced, cobalt-induced and palladium-induced activation was confirmed by essentially similar stimulatory patterns obtained in an HEK293 TLR4/MD2 transfectant cell line. Given the adjuvant role of costimulatory danger signals, the development of contact allergies to the stimulatory metals may be facilitated by signals from direct TLR4 ligation, whereas other metal sensitizers, such as chromium, may rather depend on microbial or tissue-derived cofactors to induce clinical sensitization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Activation of β2-adrenergic receptor promotes dendrite ramification and spine generation in APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Chai, Gao-Shang; Wang, Yang-Yang; Zhu, Dan; Yasheng, Amina; Zhao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, and currently there is no effective cure for this devastating disease. Decreases in the levels of β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) and norepinephrine have been reported in several regions of AD brains. The activation of β2AR can prevent the amyloid β (Aβ)-mediated inhibition of LTP (Long-term potentiation), but the mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we used APP/PS1 mice to study whether the activation of β2AR could remodel synaptic and/or dendritic plasticity. We found that the activation of β2AR by Clenbuterol (Clen) ameliorated memory deficits and promoted dendrite ramification and spine generation in hippocampal CA1 neurons, which was accompanied by the upregulation of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), synapsin 1 and synaptophysin. Conversely, the inhibition of β2AR by a siRNA blocked the Clen-induced increase in dendrite ramification and dendritic spines in primary hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the activation of β2AR decreased cerebral amyloid plaques through the up-regulation of α-secretase activity and by decreasing the phosphorylation of APP at Thr668. Based on the roles of β2AR in dendrite ramification and spine generation, memory deficits and AD pathogenesis, compounds designed to activate β2AR might shed light on the cure of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CCL-34, a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 activator, modulates differentiation and maturation of myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Liu, Sheng-Hung; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    CCL-34, a synthetic α-galactosylceramide analog, has been reported as an activator of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages. TLR4 is highly expressed in dendritic cell (DC) and several TLR4 agonists are known to trigger DC maturation. We herein evaluated the effect of CCL-34 on DC maturation. Human CD14+ monocyte-derived immature DC were treated with CCL-34, its inactive structural analog CCL-44, or LPS to assess the DC maturation. CCL-34 induced DC maturation according to their characteristically dendrite-forming morphology, CD83 expression and IL-12p70 production. The allostimulatory activity of DC on proliferation of naive CD4+CD45+RA+ T cells and their secretion of interferon-γ was increased by CCL-34. Phagocytosis, an important function of immature DC, was reduced after CCL-34 treatment. All these effects related to DC maturation were evidently induced by positive control LPS but not by CCL-44 treatment. TLR4 neutralization impaired human DC maturation triggered by CCL-34. The induction of IL-12, a hallmark of DC maturation, by CCL-34 and LPS was only evident in TLR4-competent C3H/HeN, but not in TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice. CCL-34 could further elicit the antigen presentation capability in mice inoculated with doxorubicin-treated colorectal cancer cells. In summary, CCL-34 triggers DC maturation via a TLR4-dependent manner, which supports its potential application as an immunostimulator. PMID:26883191

  16. Chimeric Vaccine Stimulation of Human Dendritic Cell Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase Occurs via the Non-Canonical NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nan-Sun; Mbongue, Jacques C; Nicholas, Dequina A; Esebanmen, Grace E; Unternaehrer, Juli J; Firek, Anthony F; Langridge, William H R

    2016-01-01

    A chimeric protein vaccine composed of the cholera toxin B subunit fused to proinsulin (CTB-INS) was shown to suppress type 1 diabetes onset in NOD mice and upregulate biosynthesis of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in human dendritic cells (DCs). Here we demonstrate siRNA inhibition of the NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) suppresses vaccine-induced IDO1 biosynthesis as well as IKKα phosphorylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of CTB-INS inoculated DCs showed that RelB bound to NF-κB consensus sequences in the IDO1 promoter, suggesting vaccine stimulation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway activates IDO1 expression in vivo. The addition of Tumor Necrosis Factor Associated Factors (TRAF) TRAF 2, 3 and TRAF6 blocking peptides to vaccine inoculated DCs was shown to inhibit IDO1 biosynthesis. This experimental outcome suggests vaccine activation of the TNFR super-family receptor pathway leads to upregulation of IDO1 biosynthesis in CTB-INS inoculated dendritic cells. Together, our experimental data suggest the CTB-INS vaccine uses a TNFR-dependent signaling pathway of the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathway resulting in suppression of dendritic cell mediated type 1 diabetes autoimmunity.

  17. Th17 Cells and Activated Dendritic Cells Are Increased in Vitiligo Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Moussai, Dariush; Gulati, Nicholas; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Cohen, Jules A.; Krueger, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a common skin disorder, characterized by progressive skin de-pigmentation due to the loss of cutaneous melanocytes. The exact cause of melanocyte loss remains unclear, but a large number of observations have pointed to the important role of cellular immunity in vitiligo pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we characterized T cell and inflammation-related dermal dendritic cell (DC) subsets in pigmented non-lesional, leading edge and depigmented lesional vitiligo skin. By immunohistochemistry staining, we observed enhanced populations of CD11c+ myeloid dermal DCs and CD207+ Langerhans cells in leading edge vitiligo biopsies. DC-LAMP+ and CD1c+ sub-populations of dermal DCs expanded significantly in leading edge and lesional vitiligo skin. We also detected elevated tissue mRNA levels of IL-17A in leading edge skin biopsies of vitiligo patients, as well as IL-17A positive T cells by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Langerhans cells with activated inflammasomes were also noted in lesional vitiligo skin, along with increased IL-1ß mRNA, which suggest the potential of Langerhans cells to drive Th17 activation in vitiligo. Conclusions/Significance These studies provided direct tissue evidence that implicates active Th17 cells in vitiligo skin lesions. We characterized new cellular immune elements, in the active margins of vitiligo lesions (e.g. populations of epidermal and dermal dendritic cells subsets), which could potentially drive the inflammatory responses. PMID:21541348

  18. Design of a Novel Integration-deficient Lentivector Technology That Incorporates Genetic and Posttranslational Elements to Target Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tareen, Semih U; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Nicolai, Christopher J; Cassiano, Linda A; Nelson, Lisa T; Slough, Megan M; Vin, Chintan D; Odegard, Jared M; Sloan, Derek D; Van Hoeven, Neal; Allen, James M; Dubensky, Thomas W; Robbins, Scott H

    2014-01-01

    As sentinels of the immune system, dendritic cells (DCs) play an essential role in regulating cellular immune responses. One of the main challenges of developing DC-targeted therapies includes the delivery of antigen to DCs in order to promote the activation of antigen-specific effector CD8 T cells. With the goal of creating antigen-directed immunotherapeutics that can be safely administered directly to patients, Immune Design has developed a platform of novel integration-deficient lentiviral vectors that target and deliver antigen-encoding nucleic acids to human DCs. This platform, termed ID-VP02, utilizes a novel genetic variant of a Sindbis virus envelope glycoprotein with posttranslational carbohydrate modifications in combination with Vpx, a SIVmac viral accessory protein, to achieve efficient targeting and transduction of human DCs. In addition, ID-VP02 incorporates safety features in its design that include two redundant mechanisms to render ID-VP02 integration-deficient. Here, we describe the characteristics that allow ID-VP02 to specifically transduce human DCs, and the advances that ID-VP02 brings to conventional third-generation lentiviral vector design as well as demonstrate upstream production yields that will enable manufacturing feasibility studies to be conducted. PMID:24419083

  19. Interferon-α-inducible Dendritic Cells Matured with OK-432 Exhibit TRAIL and Fas Ligand Pathway-mediated Killer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Terutsugu; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Higuchi, Yumiko; Sano, Kenji; Shimodaira, Shigetaka

    2017-01-01

    Active human dendritic cells (DCs), which efficiently induce immune responses through their functions as antigen-presenting cells, exhibit direct anti-tumour killing activity in response to some pathogens and cytokines. These antigen-presenting and tumour killing abilities may provide a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy. However, the mechanisms underlying this killer DC activity have not been fully proven, despite the establishment of interferon-α (IFN-α)-generated killer DCs (IFN-DCs). Here mature IFN-DCs (mIFN-DCs), generated from IFN-DCs primed with OK-432 (streptococcal preparation), exhibited elevated expression of CD86 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (minimum criteria for DC vaccine clinical trials) as well as antigen-presenting abilities comparable with those of mature IL-4-DCs (mIL-4-DCs). Interestingly, the killing activity of mIFN-DCs, which correlated with the expression of CD56 (natural killer cell marker) and was activated via the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand pathway, was stronger than that of IFN-DCs and remarkably stronger than that of mIL-4-DCs. Therefore, mIFN-DCs exhibit great potential as an anti-cancer vaccine that would promote both acquired immunity and direct tumour killing. PMID:28191816

  20. Activation of Fc gamma RI on monocytes triggers differentiation into immature dendritic cells that induce autoreactive T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motoyuki; Krutzik, Stephan R; Sieling, Peter A; Lee, Delphine J; Rea, Thomas H; Modlin, Robert L

    2009-08-15

    The formation of immune complexes results in activation of the innate immune system and subsequent induction of host inflammatory responses. In particular, the binding of IgG immune complexes to FcgammaR on monocytes triggers potent inflammatory responses leading to tissue injury in disease. We investigated whether activation of monocytes via FcgammaR induced cell differentiation, imparting specific inflammatory functions of the innate immune response. Human IgG alone induced monocytes to differentiate into cells with an immature dendritic cell (iDC) phenotype, including up-regulation of CD1b, CD80, CD86, and CD206. Differentiation into CD1b(+) iDC was dependent on activation via CD64 (FcgammaRI) and induction of GM-CSF. The human IgG-differentiated iDC were phenotypically different from GM-CSF-derived iDC at the same level of CD1b expression, with higher cell surface CD86, but lower MHC class II, CD32, CD206, and CD14. Finally, in comparison to GM-CSF-derived iDC, IgG-differentiated iDC were more efficient in activating T cells in both autologous and allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions but less efficient at presenting microbial Ag to T cells. Therefore, activation of FcgammaRI on monocytes triggers differentiation into specialized iDC with the capacity to expand autoreactive T cells that may contribute to the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated tissue injury.

  1. Expression of CD86 on human marrow CD34(+) cells identifies immunocompetent committed precursors of macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ryncarz, R E; Anasetti, C

    1998-05-15

    Macrophages and dendritic cells derive from a hematopoietic stem cell and the existence of a common committed progenitor has been hypothesized. We have recently found in normal human marrow a subset of CD34(+) cells that constitutively expresses HLA-DR and low levels of CD86, a natural ligand for the T cell costimulation receptor CD28. This CD34(+) subset can elicit responses from allogeneic T cells. In this study, we show that CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells can also present tetanus toxoid antigen to memory CD4(+) T cells. CD86 is expressed at low levels in macrophages and high levels in dendritic cells. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells are the common precursors of both macrophages and dendritic cells. CD34(+)/CD86(+) marrow cells cultured in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-generated macrophages. In contrast, CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells cultured in GM-CSF generated a predominant population of granulocytes. CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells cultured in GM-CSF plus tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) generated almost exclusively CD1a+/CD83(+) dendritic cells. In contrast, CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells cultured in GM-CSF plus TNF-alpha generated a variety of cell types, including a small population of dendritic cells. In addition, CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells cultured in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor failed to generate CD15(+) granulocytes. Therefore, CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells are committed precursors of both macrophages and dendritic cells. The ontogeny of dendritic cells was recapitulated by stimulation of CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells with TNF-alpha that induced expression of CD86. Subsequent costimulation of CD86(+) cells with GM-CSF plus TNF-alpha lead to expression of CD83 and produced terminal dendritic cell differentiation. Thus, expression of CD86 on hematopoietic progenitor cells is regulated by TNF-alpha and denotes differentiation towards the macrophage or dendritic cell lineages.

  2. Human natural killer cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived antigens by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Deauvieau, Florence; Ollion, Vincent; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Achard, Carole; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Verronese, Estelle; Durand, Isabelle; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Marvel, Jacqueline; Dezutter-Dambuyant, Colette; Walzer, Thierry; Vie, Henri; Perrot, Ivan; Goutagny, Nadège; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) cross-present antigen (Ag) to initiate T-cell immunity against most infections and tumors. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate cytolytic lymphocytes that have emerged as key modulators of multiple DC functions. Here, we show that human NK cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived Ag by DC leading to Ag-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation. Surprisingly, cytotoxic function of NK cells was not required. Instead, we highlight a critical and nonredundant role for IFN-γ and TNF-α production by NK cells to enhance cross-presentation by DC using two different Ag models. Importantly, we observed that NK cells promote cell-associated Ag cross-presentation selectively by monocytes-derived DC (Mo-DC) and CD34-derived CD11b(neg) CD141(high) DC subsets but not by myeloid CD11b(+) DC. Moreover, we demonstrate that triggering NK cell activation by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)-coated tumor cells leads to efficient DC cross-presentation, supporting the concept that NK cells can contribute to therapeutic mAbs efficiency by inducing downstream adaptive immunity. Taken together, our findings point toward a novel role of human NK cells bridging innate and adaptive immunity through selective induction of cell-associated Ag cross-presentation by CD141(high) DC, a process that could be exploited to better harness Ag-specific cellular immunity in immunotherapy. © 2014 UICC.

  3. β-Glucan Size Controls Dectin-1-Mediated Immune Responses in Human Dendritic Cells by Regulating IL-1β Production

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Matthew J.; Webster, Steve J.; Chee, Ronnie; Williams, David L.; Hill Gaston, J. S.; Goodall, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    Dectin-1/CLEC7A is a pattern recognition receptor that recognizes β-1,3 glucans, and its stimulation initiates signaling events characterized by the production of inflammatory cytokines from human dendritic cells (DCs) required for antifungal immunity. β-glucans differ greatly in size, structure, and ability to activate effector immune responses from DC; as such, small particulate β-glucans are thought to be poor activators of innate immunity. We show that β-glucan particle size is a critical factor contributing to the secretion of cytokines from human DC; large β-glucan-stimulated DC generate significantly more IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 compared to those stimulated with the smaller β-glucans. In marked contrast, the secretion of TSLP and CCL22 were found to be insensitive to β-glucan particle size. Furthermore, we show that the capacity to induce phagocytosis, and the relative IL-1β production determined by β-glucan size, regulates the composition of the cytokine milieu generated from DC. This suggests that β-glucan particle size is critically important in orchestrating the nature of the immune response to fungi. PMID:28736555

  4. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  5. Efficient internalization of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes by primary human macrophages and dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzmann, Andrea; Andersson, Britta; Vogt, Carmen; Feliu, Neus; Ye Fei; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Laurent, Sophie; Vahter, Marie; Krug, Harald; Muhammed, Mamoun; Scheynius, Annika; Fadeel, Bengt

    2011-06-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are being considered for a wide range of biomedical applications, from magnetic resonance imaging to 'smart' drug delivery systems. The development of novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications must be accompanied by careful scrutiny of their biocompatibility. In this regard, particular attention should be paid to the possible interactions between nanoparticles and cells of the immune system, our primary defense system against foreign invasion. On the other hand, labeling of immune cells serves as an ideal tool for visualization, diagnosis or treatment of inflammatory processes, which requires the efficient internalization of the nanoparticles into the cells of interest. Here, we compare novel monodispersed silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with commercially available dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles displayed excellent magnetic properties. Furthermore, they were non-toxic to primary human monocyte-derived macrophages at all doses tested whereas dose-dependent toxicity of the smaller silica-coated nanoparticles (30 nm and 50 nm) was observed for primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not for the similarly small dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. No macrophage or dendritic cell secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed upon administration of nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were taken up to a significantly higher degree when compared to the dextran-coated nanoparticles, irrespective of size. Cellular internalization of the silica-coated nanoparticles was through an active, actin cytoskeleton-dependent process. We conclude that these novel silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising materials for medical imaging, cell tracking and other biomedical applications.

  6. PPARγ controls CD1d expression by turning on retinoic acid synthesis in developing human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Szatmari, Istvan; Pap, Attila; Rühl, Ralph; Ma, Jiang-Xing; Illarionov, Petr A.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Dezso, Balazs; Nagy, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) expressing CD1d, a molecule responsible for lipid antigen presentation, are capable of enhancing natural killer T (iNKT) cell proliferation. The signals controlling CD1 expression and lipid antigen presentation are poorly defined. We have shown previously that stimulation of the lipid-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, indirectly regulates CD1d expression. Here we demonstrate that PPARγ, turns on retinoic acid synthesis by inducing the expression of retinol and retinal metabolizing enzymes such as retinol dehydrogenase 10 and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (RALDH2). PPARγ-regulated expression of these enzymes leads to an increase in the intracellular generation of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) from retinol. ATRA regulates gene expression via the activation of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)α in human DCs, and RARα acutely regulates CD1d expression. The retinoic acid–induced elevated expression of CD1d is coupled to enhanced iNKT cell activation. Furthermore, in vivo relevant lipids such as oxidized low-density lipoprotein can also elicit retinoid signaling leading to CD1d up-regulation. These data show that regulation of retinoid metabolism and signaling is part of the PPARγ-controlled transcriptional events in DCs. The uncovered mechanisms allow the DCs to respond to altered lipid homeostasis by changing CD1 gene expression. PMID:16982809

  7. Cytotoxic activity of interferon alpha induced dendritic cells as a biomarker of glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishinov, S. V.; Stupak, V. V.; Tyrinova, T. V.; Leplina, O. Yu.; Ostanin, A. A.; Chernykh, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells that can play direct role in anti-tumor immune response as killer cells. DC tumoricidal activity can be stimulated greatly by type I IFN (IFNα and IFNβ). In the present study, we examined cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of monocyte-derived IFNα-induced DCs generated from patients with brain glioma and evaluated the potential use of these parameters in diagnostics of high-grade gliomas. Herein, we demonstrated that patient DCs do not possess the ability to inhibit the growth of tumor HEp-2 cell line but low-grade and high-grade glioma patients do not differ significantly in DC cytostatic activity. However, glioma patient DCs are characterized by reduced cytotoxic activity against HEp-2 cells. The impairment of DC cytotoxic function is observed mainly in glioblastoma patients. The cytotoxic activity of DCs against HEp-2 cells below 9% is an informative marker for glioblastomas.

  8. Human skin dendritic cell fate is differentially regulated by the monocyte identity factor Kruppel-like factor 4 during steady state and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jurkin, Jennifer; Krump, Corinna; Köffel, René; Fieber, Christina; Schuster, Christopher; Brunner, Patrick M; Borek, Izabela; Eisenwort, Gregor; Lim, Clarice; Mages, Jörg; Lang, Roland; Bauer, Wolfgang; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid; Stingl, Georg; Strobl, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Langerhans cell (LC) networks play key roles in immunity and tolerance at body surfaces. LCs are established prenatally and can be replenished from blood monocytes. Unlike skin-resident dermal DCs (dDCs)/interstitial-type DCs and inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells appearing in dermatitis/eczema lesions, LCs lack key monocyte-affiliated markers. Inversely, LCs express various epithelial genes critical for their long-term peripheral tissue residency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are functionally involved in inflammatory diseases; however, the mechanisms remained poorly understood. In vitro differentiation models of human DCs, gene profiling, gene transduction, and immunohistology were used to identify molecules involved in DC subset specification. Here we identified the monocyte/macrophage lineage identity transcription factor Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) to be inhibited during LC differentiation from human blood monocytes. Conversely, KLF4 is maintained or induced during dermal DC and monocyte-derived dendritic cell/inflammatory dendritic epidermal cell differentiation. We showed that in monocytic cells KLF4 has to be repressed to allow their differentiation into LCs. Moreover, respective KLF4 levels in DC subsets positively correlate with proinflammatory characteristics. We identified epithelial Notch signaling to repress KLF4 in monocytes undergoing LC commitment. Loss of KLF4 in monocytes transcriptionally derepresses Runt-related transcription factor 3 in response to TGF-β1, thereby allowing LC differentiation marked by a low cytokine expression profile. Monocyte differentiation into LCs depends on activation of Notch signaling and the concomitant loss of KLF4. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Experimental study on activating antileukemic T cells by vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with survivin].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Xia, Ling-Hui; Liu, Zhong-Ping; Wei, Wen-Ning; Hu, Yu; Song, Shan-Jun

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with survivin antigen on activation of antileukemic T cells, and inhibiting proliferation of leukemic cells. The expression of survivin on acute leukemic cells were detected by cofocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation-Western blot. DCs collected from peripheral blood mononuclear cells were pulsed with survivin purified proteins. Stimulation index (SI) and antileukemia CTL induction were analyzed with (3)H-TdR incorporation and (51)Cr releasing assay, respectively. The phenotype of T cells and DCs were identified by flow cytometry. By immunofluorescence of bone marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, survivin expression was detected in 16 out of 19 AML cases (84.2%). The results showed that survivin fluorescence distribution was in cytoplasm. DCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells were successfully induced, with typical DC morphologic characteristic. The vaccination with dendritic cells pulsed with survivin antigen dramatically stimulated the proliferation of T cells. The DCs loading survivin activated T cells with higher CD4(+) T(H) ratio as compared with DCs group, T cells activated with DCs expressed CD8 and CD56. Survivin DCs significantly inhibited the growth of leukemic cells in vitro. In conclusion, survivin antigen expressed in the cytoplasm of leukemic cells, leukemic vaccination with DCs pulsed with survivin antigen in vitro inhibited the proliferation of leukemic cells, that may be a pathway for therapy of leukemia.

  10. Tolerogenic versus Inflammatory Activity of Peripheral Blood Monocytes and Dendritic Cells Subpopulations in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalheiro, Tiago; Rodrigues, Ana; Lopes, Ana; Inês, Luís; Velada, Isabel; Ribeiro, Andreia; Martinho, António; Silva, José A. P.; Pais, Maria L.; Paiva, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Abnormalities in monocytes and in peripheral blood dendritic cells (DC) subsets have been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aim to clarify the tolerogenic or inflammatory role of these cells based on ICOSL or IFN-α and chemokine mRNA expression, respectively, after cell purification. The study included 18 SLE patients with active disease (ASLE), 25 with inactive disease (ISLE), and 30 healthy controls (HG). In purified plasmacytoid DC (pDC) was observed a lower ICOSL mRNA expression in ASLE and an increase in ISLE; similarly, a lower ICOSL mRNA expression in monocytes of ALSE patients was found. However, a higher ICOSL mRNA expression was observed in ASLE compared to HG in myeloid DCs. Interestingly, clinical parameters seem to be related with ICOSL mRNA expression. Regarding the inflammatory activity it was observed in purified monocytes and CD14−/low CD16+ DCs an increase of CCL2, CXCL9, and CXCL10 mRNA expression in ASLE compared to HG. In myeloid DC no differences were observed regarding chemokines, and IFN-α mRNA expression. In pDC, a higher IFN-α mRNA expression was observed in ASLE. Deviations in ICOSL, chemokine, and IFN-α mRNA expression in peripheral blood monocytes and dendritic cells subpopulations in SLE appear to be related to disease activity. PMID:22969819

  11. Active processing of spatio-temporal input patterns in silicon dendrites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingxue; Liu, Shih-Chii

    2013-06-01

    Capturing the functionality of active dendritic processing into abstract mathematical models will help us to understand the role of complex biophysical neurons in neuronal computation and to build future useful neuromorphic analog Very Large Scale Integrated (aVLSI) neuronal devices. Previous work based on an aVLSI multi-compartmental neuron model demonstrates that the compartmental response in the presence of either of two widely studied classes of active mechanisms, is a nonlinear sigmoidal function of the degree of either input temporal synchrony OR input clustering level. Using the same silicon model, this work expounds the interaction between both active mechanisms in a compartment receiving input patterns of varying temporal AND spatial clustering structure and demonstrates that this compartmental response can be captured by a combined sigmoid and radial-basis function over both input dimensions. This paper further shows that the response to input spatio-temporal patterns in a one-dimensional multi-compartmental dendrite, can be described by a radial-basis like function of the degree of temporal synchrony between the inter-compartmental inputs.

  12. Configuration of human dendritic cell cytoskeleton by Rho GTPases, the WAS protein, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burns, S; Thrasher, A J; Blundell, M P; Machesky, L; Jones, G E

    2001-08-15

    The cellular mechanisms that configure the cytoskeleton during migration of dendritic cells (DCs) are poorly understood. Immature DCs assemble specialized adhesion structures known as podosomes at their leading edge; these are associated with the localized recruitment of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp) and the actin organizing actin-related protein 2/3 complex. In immature DCs lacking WASp, podosomes are absent, residual dysmorphic lamellipodia and filopodia are nonpolarized, and migration is severely compromised. Microinjection studies indicate that podosome assembly and polarization require concerted action of Cdc42, Rac, and Rho, thereby providing a link between sequential protrusive and adhesive activity. Formation of podosomes is restricted to cells with an immature phenotype, indicating a specific role for these structures during the early migratory phase. (Blood. 2001;98:1142-1149)

  13. Chemokines as relay signals in human dendritic cell migration: serum amyloid A kicks off chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sozzani, Silvano; Del Prete, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is a response highly conserved in evolution. Chemotactic factors secreted in injured and inflamed tissues generate a concentration-based, chemotactic gradient that directs leukocytes from the blood compartment into tissue. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Gouwy et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 101-112] show that the SAA1α isoform of serum amyloid A (SAA), which is an acute phase protein upregulated in inflammation and shown to chemoattract some leukocyte subsets, is also able to chemoattract monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (DCs). The authors also show that the chemotactic activity of SAA1α for monocytes and DCs is indirectly mediated by rapid chemokine induction, providing evidence that proposes a new level of regulation of leukocyte migration.

  14. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence. PMID:26623250

  15. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence.

  16. TLR7/8 agonists stimulate plasmacytoid dendritic cells to initiate a Th17-deviated acute contact dermatitis in humans.

    PubMed

    Garzorz-Stark, Natalie; Lauffer, Felix; Krause, Linda; Thomas, Jenny; Atenhan, Anne; Franz, Regina; Roenneberg, Sophie; Boehner, Alexander; Jargosch, Manja; Batra, Richa; Mueller, Nikola S; Haak, Stefan; Groß, Christina; Groß, Olaf; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Theis, Fabian J; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Biedermann, Tilo; Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian

    2017-09-18

    A standardized human model to study early pathogenic events in psoriasis is missing. Activation of Toll-like receptor 7/8 by topical application of imiquimod is the most commonly used mouse model of psoriasis. To investigate the potential of a human imiquimod patch test model to resemble human psoriasis. Imiquimod (Aldara® 5% cream) was applied twice a week onto the back of volunteers (n=18) and the development of skin lesions was monitored over a time period of four weeks. Consecutive biopsies were taken for whole genome expression analysis, histology and T cell isolation. pDC were isolated from whole blood, stimulated with TLR7 agonist and analysed by extracellular flux analysis and real time PCR. We demonstrate imiquimod induces a monomorphic and self-limited inflammatory response in healthy individuals as well as psoriasis or eczema patients, respectively. The clinical and histologic phenotype as well as transcriptome of imiquimod-induced inflammation in human skin resembles an acute contact dermatitis rather than psoriasis. Nevertheless, the imiquimod model mimics hallmarks of psoriasis. Namely, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are primary sensors of imiquimod, responding with production of pro-inflammatory and Th17-skewing cytokines. This results in a Th17 immune response with IL-23 as a key driver. In a proof-of-concept setting, systemic treatment with ustekinumab diminished the imiquimod-induced inflammation. In humans, imiquimod induces contact dermatitis with the distinctive feature that pDC are the primary sensors, leading to an IL-23/Th17 deviation. Despite these shortcomings, the human imiquimod model might be useful to investigate early pathogenic events and prove molecular concepts in psoriasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Visualization of early influenza A virus trafficking in human dendritic cells using STED microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Oliver S.; Lepzien, Rico; Mellman, Ira; Chalouni, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) primarily target respiratory epithelial cells, but can also replicate in immune cells, including human dendritic cells (DCs). Super-resolution microscopy provides a novel method of visualizing viral trafficking by overcoming the resolution limit imposed by conventional light microscopy, without the laborious sample preparation of electron microscopy. Using three-color Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy, we visualized input IAV nucleoprotein (NP), early and late endosomal compartments (EEA1 and LAMP1 respectively), and HLA-DR (DC membrane/cytosol) by immunofluorescence in human DCs. Surface bound IAV were internalized within 5 min of infection. The association of virus particles with early endosomes peaked at 5 min when 50% of NP+ signals were also EEA1+. Peak association with late endosomes occurred at 15 min when 60% of NP+ signals were LAMP1+. At 30 min of infection, the majority of NP signals were in the nucleus. Our findings illustrate that early IAV trafficking in human DCs proceeds via the classical endocytic pathway. PMID:28591131

  18. [Surface markers and functions of human dendritic cells exposed to mobile phone 1800 MHz electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-dong; Zeng, Qun-li; Zheng, Yun; Zhang, Jian-bin; Chen, Hai-yang; Lu, De-qiang; Shao, Chuan-sen; Xia, Da-jing

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effects of mobile phone 1800 MHz electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the surface markers and the functions of human dendritic cells (DC). Human DCs were exposed to intermittent 5 min on/10 min off EMF with specific absorption rates (SAR) 4 W/kg for 0 h, 1 h, 12 h or 24 h, respectively. FACS analysis was used to detect the positive percentage of DC surface markers including HLA-DR and co-stimulatory molecules such as CD80, CD86, CD40 and CD11c. CCK-8 kit was adopted to examine the function of allo-mixed lymphocyte reaction (allo-MLR) of DC, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to identify the levels of IL-12p70 and TNF-alpha secreted by DC. Compared with the sham radiation group, after exposure to the electromagnetic fields for 1 h, 12 h, or 24 h, HLA-DR, CD80,CD86 and CD40 were all declined except CD11c. The ability of DC allo-MLR in each exposure group was decreased significantly (P<0.05), especially in the 24 h exposure group. However, the secreted levels of IL-12p70 and TNF-alpha of DC in each exposure group remained no changed. The study showed that EMF exposure could down-regulate the surface molecules and stimulation ability of human DC.

  19. Visualization of early influenza A virus trafficking in human dendritic cells using STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Oliver S; Lepzien, Rico; Mellman, Ira; Chalouni, Cécile; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) primarily target respiratory epithelial cells, but can also replicate in immune cells, including human dendritic cells (DCs). Super-resolution microscopy provides a novel method of visualizing viral trafficking by overcoming the resolution limit imposed by conventional light microscopy, without the laborious sample preparation of electron microscopy. Using three-color Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy, we visualized input IAV nucleoprotein (NP), early and late endosomal compartments (EEA1 and LAMP1 respectively), and HLA-DR (DC membrane/cytosol) by immunofluorescence in human DCs. Surface bound IAV were internalized within 5 min of infection. The association of virus particles with early endosomes peaked at 5 min when 50% of NP+ signals were also EEA1+. Peak association with late endosomes occurred at 15 min when 60% of NP+ signals were LAMP1+. At 30 min of infection, the majority of NP signals were in the nucleus. Our findings illustrate that early IAV trafficking in human DCs proceeds via the classical endocytic pathway.

  20. Comparison between Sendai virus and adenovirus vectors to transduce HIV-1 genes into human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriaki; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Shioda, Tatsuo; Odawara, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Kano, Munehide; Kato, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2008-03-01

    Immuno-genetherapy using dendritic cells (DCs) can be applied to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Sendai virus (SeV) has unique features such as cytoplasmic replication and high protein expression as a vector for genetic manipulation. In this study, we compared the efficiency of inducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and HIV-1 gene expression in human monocyte-derived DCs between SeV and adenovirus (AdV). Human monocyte-derived DCs infected with SeV showed the maximum gene expression 24 hr after infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 2. Although SeV vector showed higher cytopathic effect on DCs than AdV, SeV vector induced maximum gene expression earlier and at much lower MOI. In terms of cell surface phenotype, both SeV and AdV vectors induced DC maturation. DCs infected with SeV as well as AdV elicited HIV-1 specific T-cell responses detected by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot (Elispot). Our data suggest that SeV could be one of the reliable vectors for immuno-genetherapy for HIV-1 infected patients.

  1. Quantitative analysis of basal dendritic tree of layer III pyramidal neurons in different areas of adult human frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Zeba, Martina; Jovanov-Milosević, Natasa; Petanjek, Zdravko

    2008-01-01

    Large long projecting (cortico-cortical) layer IIIc pyramidal neurons were recently disclosed to be in the basis of cognitive processing in primates. Therefore, we quantitatively examined the basal dendritic morphology of these neurons by using rapid Golgi and Golgi Cox impregnation methods among three distinct Brodmann areas (BA) of an adult human frontal cortex: the primary motor BA4 and the associative magnopyramidal BA9 from left hemisphere and the Broca's speech BA45 from both hemispheres. There was no statistically significant difference in basal dendritic length or complexity, as dendritic spine number or their density between analyzed BA's. In addition, we analyzed each of these BA's immunocytochemically for distribution of SMI-32, a marker of largest long distance projecting neurons. Within layer IIIc, the highest density of SMI-32 immunopositive pyramidal neurons was observed in associative BA9, while in primary BA4 they were sparse. Taken together, these data suggest that an increase in the complexity of cortico-cortical network within human frontal areas of different functional order may be principally based on the increase in density of large, SMI-32 immunopositive layer IIIc neurons, rather than by further increase in complexity of their dendritic tree and synaptic network.

  2. Genomics and proteomics of immune modulatory effects of a butanol fraction of echinacea purpurea in human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chien-Yu; Staniforth, Vanisree; Chiao, Ming-Tsang; Hou, Chia-Chung; Wu, Han-Ming; Yeh, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Chun-Houh; Hwang, Pei-Ing; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2008-01-01

    Background Echinacea spp. extracts and the derived phytocompounds have been shown to induce specific immune cell activities and are popularly used as food supplements or nutraceuticals for immuno-modulatory functions. Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cells, play an important role in both innate and adaptive immunities. In this study, we investigated the specific and differential gene expression in human immature DCs (iDCs) in response to treatment with a butanol fraction containing defined bioactive phytocompounds extracted from stems and leaves of Echinacea purpurea, that we denoted [BF/S+L/Ep]. Results Affymetrix DNA microarray results showed significant up regulation of specific genes for cytokines (IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-18) and chemokines (CXCL 2, CCL 5, and CCL 2) within 4 h after [BF/S+L/Ep] treatment of iDCs. Bioinformatics analysis of genes expressed in [BF/S+L/Ep]-treated DCs revealed a key-signaling network involving a number of immune-modulatory molecules leading to the activation of a downstream molecule, adenylate cyclase 8. Proteomic analysis showed increased expression of antioxidant and cytoskeletal proteins after treatment with [BF/S+L/Ep] and cichoric acid. Conclusion This study provides information on candidate target molecules and molecular signaling mechanisms for future systematic research into the immune-modulatory activities of an important traditional medicinal herb and its derived phytocompounds. PMID:18847511

  3. Opposing roles of TGF-β in prostaglandin production by human follicular dendritic cell-like cells.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jongseon; Park, Jihoon; Lee, Seungkoo; Kim, Young-Myeong; Jeoung, Dooil

    2016-08-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are recognized as important immune regulators. Using human follicular dendritic cell (FDC)-like HK cells, we have investigated the immunoregulatory role of PGs and their production mechanisms. The present study was aimed at determining the role of TGF-β in IL-1β-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression by immunoblotting. COX-2 is the key enzyme responsible for PG production in HK cells. TGF-β, when added simultaneously with IL-1β, gave rise to an additive effect on COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. However, TGF-β inhibited IL-1β-stimulated COX-2 expression when it was added at least 12h before IL-1β addition. The inhibitory effect of TGF-β was specific to IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression in HK cells. The stimulating and inhibitory effects of TGF-β were reproduced in IL-1β-stimulated PG production. Based on our previous results of the essential requirement of ERK and p38 MAPKs in TGF-β-induced COX-2 expression, we examined whether the differential activation of these MAPKs would underlie the opposing activities of TGF-β. The phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPKs was indeed enhanced or suppressed by the simultaneous treatment or pre-treatment, respectively. These results suggest that TGF-β exerts opposing effects on IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression in HK cells by differentially regulating activation of ERK and p38 MAPKs.

  4. Human BDCA2+CD123+CD56+ dendritic cells (DCs) related to blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm represent a unique myeloid DC subset.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haisheng; Zhang, Peng; Yin, Xiangyun; Yin, Zhao; Shi, Quanxing; Cui, Ya; Liu, Guanyuan; Wang, Shouli; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Jiang, Taijiao; Zhang, Liguo

    2015-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise two functionally distinct subsets: plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and myeloid DCs (mDCs). pDCs are specialized in rapid and massive secretion of type I interferon (IFN-I) in response to nucleic acids through Toll like receptor (TLR)-7 or TLR-9. In this report, we characterized a CD56(+) DC population that express typical pDC markers including CD123 and BDCA2 but produce much less IFN-I comparing with pDCs. In addition, CD56(+) DCs cluster together with mDCs but not pDCs by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Accordingly, CD56(+) DCs functionally resemble mDCs by producing IL-12 upon TLR4 stimulation and priming naïve T cells without prior activation. These data suggest that the CD56(+) DCs represent a novel mDC subset mixed with some pDC features. A CD4(+)CD56(+) hematological malignancy was classified as blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) due to its expression of characteristic molecules of pDCs. However, we demonstrated that BPDCN is closer to CD56(+) DCs than pDCs by global gene-expression profiling. Thus, we propose that the CD4(+)CD56(+) neoplasm may be a tumor counterpart of CD56(+) mDCs but not pDCs.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Eric J G; Crusz, Shanika A; Diggle, Stephen P

    2015-12-18

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term 'comets', which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet 'tail'; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions.

  6. Targeted antigen delivery and activation of dendritic cells in vivo: steps towards cost effective vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tacken, Paul J; Figdor, Carl G

    2011-02-01

    During the past decade, the immunotherapeutic potential of ex vivo generated professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) has been explored in the clinic. Albeit safe, clinical results have thus far been limited. A major disadvantage of current cell-based dendritic cell (DC) therapies, preventing universal implementation of this form of immunotherapy, is the requirement that vaccines need to be tailor made for each individual. Targeted delivery of antigens to DC surface receptors in vivo would circumvent this laborious and expensive ex vivo culturing steps involved with these cell-based therapies. In addition, the opportunity to target natural and often rare DC subsets in vivo might have advantages over loading more artificial ex vivo cultured DCs. Preclinical studies show targeting antigens to DCs effectively induces humoral responses, while cellular responses are induced provided a DC maturation or activation stimulus is co-administered. Here, we discuss strategies to target antigens to distinct DC subsets and to simultaneously employ adjuvants to activate these cells to induce immunity.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Eric J. G.; Crusz, Shanika A.; Diggle, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term ‘comets’, which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet ‘tail’; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  8. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning

    PubMed Central

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  9. The 40-year history of modeling active dendrites in cerebellar Purkinje cells: emergence of the first single cell "community model".

    PubMed

    Bower, James M

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the effects of the active properties of the Purkinje cell dendrite on neuronal function has been an active subject of study for more than 40 years. Somewhat unusually, some of these investigations, from the outset have involved an interacting combination of experimental and model-based techniques. This article recounts that 40-year history, and the view of the functional significance of the active properties of the Purkinje cell dendrite that has emerged. It specifically considers the emergence from these efforts of what is arguably the first single cell "community" model in neuroscience. The article also considers the implications of the development of this model for future studies of the complex properties of neuronal dendrites.

  10. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are recruited to the colorectum and contribute to immune activation during pathogenic SIV infection in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kwa, Suefen; Kannanganat, Sunil; Nigam, Pragati; Siddiqui, Mariam; Shetty, Ravi Dyavar; Armstrong, Wendy; Ansari, Aftab; Bosinger, Steven E.; Silvestri, Guido

    2011-01-01

    In SIV/HIV infection, the gastrointestinal tissue dominates as an important site because of the impact of massive mucosal CD4 depletion and immune activation-induced tissue pathology. Unlike AIDS-susceptible rhesus macaques, natural hosts do not progress to AIDS and resolve immune activation earlier. Here, we examine the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in mediating immune activation and disease progression. We demonstrate that plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the blood up-regulate β7-integrin and are rapidly recruited to the colorectum after a pathogenic SIV infection in rhesus macaques. These pDCs were capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines and primed a T cytotoxic 1 response in vitro. Consistent with the up-regulation of β7-integrin on pDCs, in vivo blockade of α4β7-integrin dampened pDC recruitment to the colorectum and resulted in reduced immune activation. The up-regulation of β7-integrin expression on pDCs in the blood also was observed in HIV-infected humans but not in chronically SIV-infected sooty mangabeys that show low levels of immune activation. Our results uncover a new mechanism by which pDCs influence immune activation in colorectal tissue after pathogenic immunodeficiency virus infections. PMID:21693759

  11. Deletion of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K. S.; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Worth, Austen J.; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P. A.; Snapper, Scott B.; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C. I.; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O.; Forsell, Mattias N. E.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8+ T cells at the expense of CD4+ T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  12. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  13. Surface layer proteins from Clostridium difficile induce inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in human monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ausiello, Clara Maria; Cerquetti, Marina; Fedele, Giorgio; Spensieri, Fabiana; Palazzo, Raffaella; Nasso, Maria; Frezza, Simona; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2006-09-01

    Clostridium difficile, an etiological agent of most cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, exerts its pathological action mainly by the activity of toxin A and toxin B. Less known is the role that S-layer proteins (SLPs), predominant surface components of the bacterium, may play in pathogenesis. Here, we evaluate the ability of SLPs to modulate the function of human monocytes and dendritic cells (DC) and to induce inflammatory and regulatory cytokines, influencing the natural and adaptive immune response. To this aim, SLPs were extracted from the clinical isolate C253 and characterized for their effects on immune cells. SLPs induced the release of elevated amounts of interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines by resting monocytes, induced maturation of human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC), and enhanced proliferation of allogeneic T cells. C253-SLP-treated MDDC also secreted large amounts of IL-10 and IL-12p70 and induced a mixed Th1/Th2 orientation of immune response in naïve CD4 T cells. In conclusion, C. difficile SLPs may contribute to the pathogenicity of the bacterium by perturbing the fine balance of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. These data are of interest also in the light of the possible use of SLPs in a multicomponent vaccine against C. difficile infections for high-risk patients.

  14. Soluble CD100 functions on human monocytes and immature dendritic cells require plexin C1 and plexin B1, respectively.

    PubMed

    Chabbert-de Ponnat, Isabelle; Marie-Cardine, Anne; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Schiavon, Valérie; Tamagnone, Luca; Thomasset, Nicole; Bensussan, Armand; Boumsell, Laurence

    2005-04-01

    CD100 represents the first semaphorin described in the immune system. It is expressed as a 300-kDa homodimer at the surface of most hematopoietic cells, but is also found in a soluble form following a proteolytic cleavage upon cell activation. We herein established that soluble CD100 (sCD100) impaired the migration of human monocytes and immature dendritic cells (DCs), but not of mature DCs. Performing competition assays, we identified plexin C1 (VESPR/CD232) as being involved in sCD100-mediated effects on human monocytes. Interestingly, we observed a complete down-regulation of plexin C1 expression during the in vitro differentiation process of monocytes to immature DCs, while concomitantly the surface expression of plexin B1 was induced. The latter receptor then binds sCD100 on immature DCs, mediating its inhibitory effect on cell migration. Finally, we showed that sCD100 modulated the cytokine production from monocytes and immature DCs. Together these results suggest that sCD100 plays a critical role in the regulation of antigen-presenting cell migration and functions via a tightly regulated process of receptor expression.

  15. Divergent signaling pathways regulate IL-12 production induced by different species of Lactobacilli in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Amar, Yacine; Rizzello, Valeria; Cavaliere, Riccardo; Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Barberi, Chiara; Oliveri, Daniela; Pezzino, Gaetana; Costa, Gregorio; Meddah, Aicha Tirtouil; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that different strains of Lactobacilli differ in their ability to regulate IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs), as some strains are stronger inducer of IL-12 while other are not and can even inhibit IL-12 production stimulated by IL-12-inducer Lactobacilli. In this report we demonstrate that Lactobacillus reuteri 5289, as previously described for other strains of L. reuteri, can inhibit DC production of IL-12 induced by Lactobacilllus acidophilus NCFM. Remarkably, L. reuteri 5289 was able to inhibit IL-12 production induced not only by Lactobacilli, as so far reported, but also by bacteria of different genera, including pathogens. We investigated in human DCs the signal transduction pathways involved in the inhibition of IL-12 production induced by L. reuteri 5289, showing that this potential anti-inflammatory activity, which is also accompanied by an elevated IL-10 production, is associated to a prolonged phosphorilation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Improved understanding of the immune regulatory mechanisms exerted by Lactobacilli is crucial for a more precise employment of these commensal bacteria as probiotics in human immune-mediated pathologies, such as allergies or inflammatory bowel diseases.

  16. Human dendritic cells adenovirally-engineered to express three defined tumor antigens promote broad adaptive and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Leeann T; Landsberg, Jennifer; Messmer, Michelle; Shi, Jian; Pardee, Angela D; Haskell, Ronald; Vujanovic, Lazar; Kirkwood, John M; Butterfield, Lisa H

    2012-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has shown a promising ability to promote anti-tumor immunity in vitro and in vivo. Many trials have tested single epitopes and single antigens to activate single T cell specificities, and often CD8(+) T cells only. We previously found that determinant spreading and breadth of antitumor immunity correlates with improved clinical response. Therefore, to promote activation and expansion of polyclonal, multiple antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as provide cognate help from antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, we have created an adenovirus encoding three full length melanoma tumor antigens (tyrosinase, MART-1 and MAGE-A6, "AdVTMM"). We previously showed that adenovirus (AdV)-mediated antigen engineering of human DC is superior to peptide pulsing for T cell activation, and has positive biological effects on the DC, allowing for efficient activation of not only antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, but also NK cells. Here we describe the cloning and testing of "AdVTMM2," an E1/E3-deleted AdV encoding the three melanoma antigens. This novel three-antigen virus expresses mRNA and protein for all antigens, and AdVTMM-transduced DC activate both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells which recognize melanoma tumor cells more efficiently than single antigen AdV. Addition of physiological levels of interferon-α (IFNα) further amplifies melanoma antigen-specific T cell activation. NK cells are also activated, and show cytotoxic activity. Vaccination with multi-antigen engineered DC may provide for superior adaptive and innate immunity and ultimately, improved antitumor responses.

  17. Human dendritic cells adenovirally-engineered to express three defined tumor antigens promote broad adaptive and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Landsberg, Jennifer; Messmer, Michelle; Shi, Jian; Pardee, Angela D.; Haskell, Ronald; Vujanovic, Lazar; Kirkwood, John M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has shown a promising ability to promote anti-tumor immunity in vitro and in vivo. Many trials have tested single epitopes and single antigens to activate single T cell specificities, and often CD8+ T cells only. We previously found that determinant spreading and breadth of antitumor immunity correlates with improved clinical response. Therefore, to promote activation and expansion of polyclonal, multiple antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, as well as provide cognate help from antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, we have created an adenovirus encoding three full length melanoma tumor antigens (tyrosinase, MART-1 and MAGE-A6, “AdVTMM”). We previously showed that adenovirus (AdV)-mediated antigen engineering of human DC is superior to peptide pulsing for T cell activation, and has positive biological effects on the DC, allowing for efficient activation of not only antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, but also NK cells. Here we describe the cloning and testing of “AdVTMM2,” an E1/E3-deleted AdV encoding the three melanoma antigens. This novel three-antigen virus expresses mRNA and protein for all antigens, and AdVTMM-transduced DC activate both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells which recognize melanoma tumor cells more efficiently than single antigen AdV. Addition of physiological levels of interferon-α (IFNα) further amplifies melanoma antigen-specific T cell activation. NK cells are also activated, and show cytotoxic activity. Vaccination with multi-antigen engineered DC may provide for superior adaptive and innate immunity and ultimately, improved antitumor responses. PMID:22737604

  18. In Vitro Generation of Human XCR1(+) Dendritic Cells from CD34(+) Hematopoietic Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Balan, Sreekumar; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells which play a key role in orchestrating immune defenses. Most of the information gained on human DC biology was derived from studies conducted with DCs generated in vitro from peripheral blood CD14(+) monocytes (MoDCs) or from CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. Recent advances in the field revealed that these types of in vitro-derived DCs strikingly differ from the DC subsets that are naturally present in human lymphoid organs, in terms of global gene expression, of specialization in the sensing of different types of danger signals, and of the ability to polarize T lymphocytes toward different functions. Major efforts are being made to better characterize the biology and the functions of lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets in humans, as an essential step for designing innovative DC-based vaccines against infections or cancers. However, this line of research is hampered by the low frequency of certain DC subsets in most tissues, their fragility, and the complexity of the procedures necessary for their purification. Hence, there is a need for robust procedures allowing large-scale in vitro generation of human DC subsets, under conditions allowing their genetic or pharmacological manipulation, to decipher their functions and their molecular regulation. Human CD141(+)CLEC9A(+)XCR1(+) DCs constitute a very interesting DC subset for the design of immunotherapeutic treatments against infections by intracellular pathogens or against cancer, because these cells resemble mouse professional cross-presenting CD8α(+)Clec9a(+)Xcr1(+) DCs. Human XCR1(+) DCs have indeed been reported by several teams to be more efficient than other human DC subsets for cross-presentation, in particular of cell-associated antigens but also of soluble antigens especially when delivered into late endosomes or lysosomes. However, human XCR1(+) DCs are the rarest and perhaps the most fragile of the human DC

  19. I kappa B kinase alpha (IKKα) activity is required for functional maturation of dendritic cells and acquired immunity to infection.

    PubMed

    Mancino, Alessandra; Habbeddine, Mohamed; Johnson, Ella; Luron, Lionel; Bebien, Magali; Memet, Sylvie; Fong, Carol; Bajenoff, Marc; Wu, Xuefeng; Karin, Michael; Caamano, Jorge; Chi, Hongbo; Seed, Michael; Lawrence, Toby

    2013-03-20

    Dendritic cells (DC) are required for priming antigen-specific T cells and acquired immunity to many important human pathogens, including Mycobacteriuim tuberculosis (TB) and influenza. However, inappropriate priming of auto-reactive T cells is linked with autoimmune disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the priming and activation of naïve T cells is critical for development of new improved vaccines and understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The serine/threonine kinase IKKα (CHUK) has previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity and inhibit innate immunity. Here, we show that IKKα is required in DC for priming antigen-specific T cells and acquired immunity to the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We describe a new role for IKKα in regulation of IRF3 activity and the functional maturation of DC. This presents a unique role for IKKα in dampening inflammation while simultaneously promoting adaptive immunity that could have important implications for the development of new vaccine adjuvants and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  20. Yeast Modulation of Human Dendritic Cell Cytokine Secretion: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ida M.; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  1. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  2. Human Flt3L generates dendritic cells from canine peripheral blood precursors: implications for a dog glioma clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Weidong; Candolfi, Marianela; Liu, Chunyan; Muhammad, A K M Ghulam; Yagiz, Kader; Puntel, Mariana; Moore, Peter F; Avalos, Julie; Young, John D; Khan, Dorothy; Donelson, Randy; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Ohlfest, John R; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2010-06-11

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and carries a dismal prognosis. We have developed a conditional cytotoxic/immunotherapeutic approach using adenoviral vectors (Ads) encoding the immunostimulatory cytokine, human soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (hsFlt3L) and the conditional cytotoxic molecule, i.e., Herpes Simplex Type 1- thymide kinase (TK). This therapy triggers an anti-tumor immune response that leads to tumor regression and anti-tumor immunological memory in intracranial rodent cancer models. We aim to test the efficacy of this immunotherapy in dogs bearing spontaneous GBM. In view of the controversy regarding the effect of human cytokines on dog immune cells, and considering that the efficacy of this treatment depends on hsFlt3L-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), in the present work we tested the ability of Ad-encoded hsFlt3L to generate DCs from dog peripheral blood and compared its effects with canine IL-4 and GM-CSF. Our results demonstrate that hsFlT3L expressed form an Ad vector, generated DCs from peripheral blood cultures with very similar morphological and phenotypic characteristics to canine IL-4 and GM-CSF-cultured DCs. These include phagocytic activity and expression of CD11c, MHCII, CD80 and CD14. Maturation of DCs cultured under both conditions resulted in increased secretion of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. Importantly, hsFlt3L-derived antigen presenting cells showed allostimulatory potential highlighting their ability to present antigen to T cells and elicit their proliferation. These results demonstrate that hsFlt3L induces the proliferation of canine DCs and support its use in upcoming clinical trials for canine GBM. Our data further support the translation of hsFlt3L to be used for dendritic cells' vaccination and gene therapeutic approaches from rodent models to canine patients and its future implementation in human clinical trials.

  3. Human Flt3L Generates Dendritic Cells from Canine Peripheral Blood Precursors: Implications for a Dog Glioma Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyan; Muhammad, A. K. M. Ghulam; Yagiz, Kader; Puntel, Mariana; Moore, Peter F.; Avalos, Julie; Young, John D.; Khan, Dorothy; Donelson, Randy; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Ohlfest, John R.; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and carries a dismal prognosis. We have developed a conditional cytotoxic/immunotherapeutic approach using adenoviral vectors (Ads) encoding the immunostimulatory cytokine, human soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (hsFlt3L) and the conditional cytotoxic molecule, i.e., Herpes Simplex Type 1- thymide kinase (TK). This therapy triggers an anti-tumor immune response that leads to tumor regression and anti-tumor immunological memory in intracranial rodent cancer models. We aim to test the efficacy of this immunotherapy in dogs bearing spontaneous GBM. In view of the controversy regarding the effect of human cytokines on dog immune cells, and considering that the efficacy of this treatment depends on hsFlt3L-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), in the present work we tested the ability of Ad-encoded hsFlt3L to generate DCs from dog peripheral blood and compared its effects with canine IL-4 and GM-CSF. Methodology/Principal Findings Our results demonstrate that hsFlT3L expressed form an Ad vector, generated DCs from peripheral blood cultures with very similar morphological and phenotypic characteristics to canine IL-4 and GM-CSF-cultured DCs. These include phagocytic activity and expression of CD11c, MHCII, CD80 and CD14. Maturation of DCs cultured under both conditions resulted in increased secretion of IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ. Importantly, hsFlt3L-derived antigen presenting cells showed allostimulatory potential highlighting their ability to present antigen to T cells and elicit their proliferation. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that hsFlt3L induces the proliferation of canine DCs and support its use in upcoming clinical trials for canine GBM. Our data further support the translation of hsFlt3L to be used for dendritic cells' vaccination and gene therapeutic approaches from rodent models to canine patients and its future implementation in human clinical

  4. Human dendritic cell maturation and cytokine secretion upon stimulation with Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Dirix, Violette; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Willery, Eve; Alonso, Sylvie; Versheure, Virginie; Mascart, Françoise; Locht, Camille

    2014-07-01

    In addition to antibodies, Th1-type T cell responses are also important for long-lasting protection against pertussis. However, upon immunization with the current acellular vaccines, many children fail to induce Th1-type responses, potentially due to immunomodulatory effects of some vaccine antigens, such as filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA). We therefore analysed the ability of FHA to modulate immune functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). FHA was purified from pertussis toxin (PTX)-deficient or from PTX- and adenylate cyclase-deficient Bordetella pertussis strains, and residual endotoxin was neutralized with polymyxin B. FHA from both strains induced phenotypic maturation of human MDDC and cytokine secretion (IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-23 and IL-6). To identify the FHA domains responsible for MDDC immunomodulation, MDDC were stimulated with FHA containing a Gly→Ala substitution at its RGD site (FHA-RAD) or with an 80-kDa N-terminal moiety of FHA (Fha44), containing its heparin-binding site. Whereas FHA-RAD induced maturation and cytokine production comparable to those of FHA, Fha44 did not induce IL-10 production, but maturated MDDC at least partially. Nevertheless, Fha44 induced the secretion of IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-23 and IL-6 by MDDC, albeit at lower levels than FHA. Thus, FHA can modulate MDDC responses in multiple ways, and IL-10 induction can be dissociated from the induction of other cytokines.

  5. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize mass spectrometry coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilisation and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilisation and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than by 10% TCA/acetone, allowing greater than 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone-wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate in the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6-11% more distinct peptides and 14-19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  6. Bruton's tyrosine kinase regulates TLR9 but not TLR7 signaling in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingming; Lau, Kai-Yeung; Jung, Jimmy; Ravindran, Palanikumar; Barrat, Franck J

    2014-04-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) represent a key cell type for both innate and adaptive immunity. PDCs express both TLR7 and TLR9 and the recognition of nucleic acids by these two receptors triggers the production of a large amount of type-I IFN and the induction of PDC maturation into APCs. This unique feature of PDCs is at the basis of clinical development of both TLR7 and TLR9 agonists for infectious diseases, allergy, cancer, and asthma. However, TLR7 and TLR9 recognition of self-nucleic acids is linked to many autoimmune diseases including lupus, and a better understanding of the signaling pathways of these two receptors in PDCs is thus important. We have identified Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) as an important player for TLR9 but not TLR7 signaling in human PDCs. Blocking Btk using a specific inhibitor leads to the reduction of all TLR9-induced responses in PDCs, including cytokine production and expression of costimulatory molecules, while this has no impact on the TLR7 response. This identifies Btk as a key molecule in TLR9 signaling in PDCs and is the first demonstration that the TLR7 and TLR9 pathways can be dissociated in human PDCs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Hericium erinaceum induces maturation of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Son, Chang Gue; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Hericium erinaceum, a medicinal mushroom, has long been used as a therapeutic due to its immuno-regulating potentials eliciting anticarcinogenic and antimicrobial efficacies. Since maturation of dendritic cells (DC) is an important process in the initiation and regulation of immune responses, the ability of water-soluble components from H. erinaceum (WEHE) to regulate DC maturation was investigated. Immature DC were prepared by differentiating human peripheral blood CD14-positive cells with GM-CSF and IL-4. DC were stimulated with WEHE at 2-20 microg/mL for 48 h and subjected to flow cytometric analysis to determine the expression of indicative maturation markers. The endocytic capacity of WEHE-stimulated DC was examined by a Dextran-FITC uptake assay. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to examine the secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-12p40. DC stimulated with WEHE showed representative features upon DC maturation: enhanced expression of CD80, CD83 and CD86, and both MHC class I and II molecules, decreased endocytic capacity of DC, increased expression of CD205, and decreased expression of CD206. However, interestingly, WEHE could not induce the production of TNF-alpha and IL-12p40, whereas lipopolysaccharide substantially increased the production of both cytokines. Collectively, these results suggest that H. erinaceum induces the maturation of human DC, which might reinforce the host innate immune system.

  8. Distinct dendritic spine and nuclear phases of calcineurin activation after exposure to Amyloid β revealed by a novel FRET assay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai-Yan; Hudry, Eloise; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Uemura, Kengo; Fan, Zhan-Yun; Berezovska, Oksana; Grosskreutz, Cynthia L.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Hyman, Bradley T

    2012-01-01

    Calcineurin (CaN) activation is critically involved in the regulation of spine morphology in response to oligomeric amyloid β (Aβ) as well as in synaptic plasticity in normal memory, but no existing techniques can monitor the spatiotemporal pattern of CaN activity. Here we use a spectral Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) approach to monitor CaN activation dynamics in real time with subcellular resolution. When oligomeric Aβ derived from Tg2576 murine transgenic neurons or human AD brains were applied to wild-type murine primary cortical neurons, we observe a dynamic progression of CaN activation within minutes, first in dendritic spines, then in the cytoplasm and, in hours, in the nucleus. CaN activation in spines leads to rapid but reversible morphological changes in spines and in postsynaptic proteins; longer exposure leads to NFAT translocation to the nucleus and frank spine loss. These results provide a framework for understanding calcineurin’s role in synaptic alterations associated with AD pathogenesis. PMID:22496575

  9. Lentivirally engineered dendritic cells activate AFP-specific T cells which inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2011-07-01

    α-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the anti-tumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered Dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and anti-tumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DCs. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DCs vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DCs-based vaccines.

  10. Human dendritic cells differentiated in hypoxia down-modulate antigen uptake and change their chemokine expression profile.

    PubMed

    Elia, Angela Rita; Cappello, Paola; Puppo, Maura; Fraone, Tiziana; Vanni, Cristina; Eva, Alessandra; Musso, Tiziana; Novelli, Francesco; Varesio, Luigi; Giovarelli, Mirella

    2008-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and fine-tune the immune response. We have investigated hypoxia's effects on the differentiation and maturation of DCs from human monocytes in vitro, and have shown that it affects DC functions. Hypoxic immature DCs (H-iDCs) significantly fail to capture antigens through down-modulation of the RhoA/Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin pathway and the expression of CD206. Moreover, H-iDCs released higher levels of CXCL1, VEGF, CCL20, CXCL8, and CXCL10 but decreased levels of CCL2 and CCL18, which predict a different ability to recruit neutrophils rather than monocytes and create a proinflammatory and proangiogenic environment. By contrast, hypoxia has no effect on DC maturation. Hypoxic mature DCs display a mature phenotype and activate both allogeneic and specific T cells like normoxic mDCs. This study provides the first demonstration that hypoxia inhibits antigen uptake by DCs and profoundly changes the DC chemokine expression profile and may have a critical role in DC differentiation, adaptation, and activation in inflamed tissues.

  11. Lipooligosaccharide from Bordetella pertussis induces mature human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drives a Th2 biased response.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Giorgio; Celestino, Ignacio; Spensieri, Fabiana; Frasca, Loredana; Nasso, Maria; Watanabe, Mineo; Remoli, Maria Elena; Coccia, Eliana Marina; Altieri, Fabio; Ausiello, Clara Maria

    2007-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis has a distinctive cell wall lipooligosaccharide (LOS) that is released from the bacterium during bacterial division and killing. LOS directly participates in host-bacterial interactions, in particular influencing the dendritic cells' (DC) immune regulatory ability. We analyze LOS mediated toll-like receptor (TLR) activation and dissect the role played by LOS on human monocyte-derived (MD)DC functions and polarization of the host T cell response. LOS activates TLR4-dependent signaling and induces mature MDDC able to secrete IL-10. LOS-matured MDDC enhance allogeneic presentation and skew T helper (Th) cell polarization towards a Th2 phenotype. LOS protects MDDC from undergoing apoptosis, prolonging their longevity and their functions. Compared to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the classical DC maturation stimulus, LOS was a less efficient inducer of TLR4 signaling, MDDC maturation, IL-10 secretion and allogeneic T cell proliferation and it was not able to induce IL-12p70 production in MDDC. However, the MDDC apoptosis protection exerted by LOS and LPS were comparable. In conclusion, LOS treated MDDC are able to perform antigen presentation in a context that promotes licensing of Th2 effectors. Considering these properties, the use of LOS in the formulation of acellular pertussis vaccines to potentiate protective and adjuvant capacity should be taken into consideration.

  12. GILZ expression in human dendritic cells redirects their maturation and prevents antigen-specific T lymphocyte response.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nicolas; Mouly, Enguerran; Hamdi, Haifa; Maillot, Marie-Christine; Pallardy, Marc; Godot, Véronique; Capel, Francis; Balian, Axel; Naveau, Sylvie; Galanaud, Pierre; Lemoine, François M; Emilie, Dominique

    2006-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 and glucocorticoids (GCs) inhibit the ability of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) to stimulate T lymphocytes. We show that induction of GILZ (GC-induced leucine zipper) is involved in this phenomenon. IL-10, dexamethasone (DEX), and transforming growth factor (TGF)beta stimulate GILZ production in human immature DCs derived from monocytes and from CD34+ cells. GILZ is necessary and sufficient for DEX, IL-10, and TGFbeta modulation of CD80, CD83, CD86, immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT)-3, and B7-H1 expression by DCs, and alteration of DC functions. GILZ stimulates the production of IL-10 by immature DCs and prevents the production of inflammatory chemokines by CD40L-activated DCs. In contrast, GILZ does not prevent CD40 ligand-mediated inhibition of phagocytosis, indicating that it affects some but not all aspects of DC maturation. GILZ prevents DCs from activating antigen-specific T lymphocyte responses. Administration of GCs to patients stimulates GILZ expression in their circulating antigen-presenting cells, and this contributes to the weak lymphocyte responses of GC-treated patients. Thus, regulation of GILZ expression is an important factor determining the decision of DCs whether or not to stimulate T lymphocytes, and IL-10, GCs, and TGFbeta share this mechanism for influencing DC functions and the balance between immune response and tolerance.

  13. Oligonucleotide motifs that disappear during the evolution of influenza virus in humans increase alpha interferon secretion by plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Baranda, Sonia; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Manches, Olivier; Handler, Jesse; Rabadán, Raúl; Levine, Arnold; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2011-04-01

    CpG motifs in an A/U context have been preferentially eliminated from classical H1N1 influenza virus genomes during virus evolution in humans. The hypothesis of the current work is that CpG motifs in a uracil context represent sequence patterns with the capacity to induce an immune response, and the avoidance of this immunostimulatory signal is the reason for the observed preferential decline. To analyze the immunogenicity of these domains, we used plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). pDCs express pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), which recognizes guanosine- and uridine-rich viral single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), including influenza virus ssRNA. The signaling through TLR7 results in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon (IFN-I), an essential process for the induction of specific adaptive immune responses and for mounting a robust antiviral response mediated by IFN-α. Secretion of IFN-α is also linked to the activation of other immune cells, potentially amplifying the effect of an initial IFN-α secretion. We therefore also examined the role of IFN-α-driven activation of NK cells as another source of selective pressure on the viral genome. We found direct evidence that CpG RNA motifs in a U-rich context control pDC activation and IFN-α-driven activation of NK cells, likely through TLR7. These data provide a potential explanation for the loss of CpG motifs from avian influenza viruses as they adapt to mammalian hosts. The selective decrease of CpG motifs surrounded by U/A may be a viral strategy to avoid immune recognition, a strategy likely shared by highly expressed human immune genes.

  14. Interleukin-4 inhibits cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 production by human mature dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Teloni, Raffaela; Giannoni, Federico; Rossi, Paolo; Nisini, Roberto; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is considered the key cytokine for inducing T helper type 2 (Th2) cell differentiation, while interferon-γ and IL-12 are pivotal cytokines for Th1 immune responses. Paradoxically, IL-4 has also been demonstrated to enhance IL-12 production by dendritic cells, suggesting an IL-4-dependent regulatory feedback of the Th1/Th2 system. In addition, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a lipid mediator of inflammation, has been implicated in the enhancement of Th2-type responses acting directly on T and B lymphocytes. PGE2 synthesis is dependent on the serial engagement of various enzymes, among which the inducible cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) exerts a critical role in monocytes and dendritic cells. In this study we demonstrate that IL-4 inhibits COX-2 gene expression and consequently prevents secretion of PGE2 by mature human dendritic cells. We also show that PGE2 does not regulate IL-12 and IL-10 production by dendritic cells in an autocrine fashion. Hence, we suggest that IL-4 may exploit an IL-12-independent regulatory feedback of the Th1/Th2 system through PGE2 inhibition. PMID:17059508

  15. Dendritic Cells in the Context of Human Tumors: Biology and Experimental Tools.

    PubMed

    Volovitz, Ilan; Melzer, Susanne; Amar, Sarah; Bocsi, József; Bloch, Merav; Efroni, Sol; Ram, Zvi; Tárnok, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent and versatile antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. DC have an exceptional ability to comprehend the immune context of a captured antigen based on molecular signals identified from its vicinity. The analyzed information is then conveyed to other immune effector cells. Such capability enables DC to play a pivotal role in mediating either an immunogenic response or immune tolerance towards an acquired antigen. This review summarizes current knowledge on DC in the context of human tumors. It covers the basics of human DC biology, elaborating on the different markers, morphology and function of the different subsets of human DC. Human blood-borne DC are comprised of at least three subsets consisting of one plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two to three myeloid DC (mDC) subsets. Some tissues have unique DC. Each subset has a different phenotype and function and may induce pro-tumoral or anti-tumoral effects. The review also discusses two methods fundamental to the research of DC on the single-cell level: multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry (IC). These methods, along with new genomics and proteomics tools, can provide high-resolution information on specific DC subsets and on immune and tumor cells with which they interact. The different layers of collected biological data may then be integrated using Immune-Cytomics modeling approaches. Such novel integrated approaches may help unravel the complex network of cellular interactions that DC carry out within tumors, and may help harness this complex immunological information into the development of more effective treatments for cancer.

  16. Porous Dendritic Platinum Nanotubes with Extremely High Activity and Stability for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaixia; Sun, Shuhui; Cai, Mei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Porous dendritic Pt nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a facile, cost-effective aqueous solution method at room temperature in large scale. These unique structures are porous, hollow, hierarchical, and single crystalline, which not only gives them a large surface area with high catalyst utilization, but also improves mass transport and gas diffusion. These novel Pt structures exhibited significantly improved catalytic activity (4.4 fold) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and greatly enhanced durability (6.1 fold) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. This work provides a promising approach to the design of highly efficient next-generation electrocatalysts. PMID:23524665

  17. Targeted delivery of CpG ODN to CD32 on human and monkey plasmacytoid dendritic cells augments IFNα secretion.

    PubMed

    Tel, Jurjen; Beenhakker, Niels; Koopman, Gerrit; Hart, Bert't; Mudde, Geert C; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2012-10-01

    Atopic diseases are characterized by the presence of Th2 cells. Recent studies, in mice and man, demonstrated that allergen-specific Th2 responses can be shifted to Th0/Th1 responses. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) produce large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) after stimulation of Toll Like Receptor 9 (TLR9) and are likely to play an important role in the reorientation of these Th2 cells. The expression of CD32a on the cell surface of pDCs makes this cell type attractive for targeted delivery of antigen and TLR agonists to revert Th2 responses. Therefore we sought to determine the efficacy of targeted delivery of CpG-C ODN to CD32a on the ability of human and monkey pDCs to secrete inflammatory cytokines. Here we demonstrate that targeted delivery of 3'-biotinylated CpG-C to CD32a on pDC induced phenotypical maturation as determined by CD80, CD83 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, targeting both monkey and human pDCs strongly augmented the secretion of IFNα compared to the delivery of CpG-C in an untargeted fashion (p<0.001). TLR9 induced activation hampers the ability of human pDCs to internalize CD32a. Therefore we opted for targeted delivery of CpG-ODNs to CD32a, which reduces the risk of undesired side effects of systemic TLR treatment and in addition delivers a superior signal for the activation of pDCs. This approach opens new treatment principles for allergic patients.

  18. Tumor-derived heat shock protein 70 peptide complexes are cross-presented by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Noessner, Elfriede; Gastpar, Robert; Milani, Valeria; Brandl, Anna; Hutzler, Peter J S; Kuppner, Maria C; Roos, Miriam; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Asea, Alexzander; Calderwood, Stuart K; Issels, Rolf D

    2002-11-15

    Our study demonstrates that tumor-derived heat shock protein (HSP)70 chaperones a tyrosinase peptide and mediates its transfer to human immature dendritic cells (DCs) by receptor-dependent uptake. Human tumor-derived HSP70 peptide complexes (HSP70-PC) thus have the immunogenic potential to instruct DCs to cross-present endogenously expressed, nonmutated, and tumor antigenic peptides that are shared among tumors of the melanocytic lineage for T cell recognition. T cell stimulation by HSP70-instructed DCs is dependent on the Ag bound to HSP70 in that only DCs incubated with HSP70-PC purified from tyrosinase-positive (HSP70-PC/tyr(+)) but not from tyrosinase-negative (HSP70-PC/tyr(-)) melanoma cells resulted in the specific activation of the HLA-A*0201-restricted tyrosinase peptide-specific cytotoxic T cell clone. HSP70-PC-mediated T cell stimulation is very efficient, delivering the tyrosinase peptide at concentrations as low as 30 ng/ml of HSP70-PC for T cell recognition. Receptor-dependent binding of HSP70-PC and active cell metabolism are prerequisites for MHC class I-restricted cross-presentation and T cell stimulation. T cell stimulation does not require external DC maturation signals (e.g., exogenously added TNF-alpha), suggesting that signaling DC maturation is an intrinsic property of the HSP70-PC itself and related to receptor-mediated binding. The cross-presentation of a shared human tumor Ag together with the exquisite efficacy are important new aspects for HSP70-based immunotherapy in clinical anti-cancer vaccination strategies, and suggest a potential extension of HSP70-based vaccination protocols from a patient-individual treatment modality to its use in an allogeneic setting.

  19. The active translation of MHCII mRNA during dendritic cells maturation supplies new molecules to the cell surface pool.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; Barba, Pasquale; Harris, Paul E; Maffei, Antonella; Del Pozzo, Giovanna

    2007-04-01

    The transition of human dendritic cells (DCs) from the immature to the mature phenotype is characterized by an increased density of MHC class II (MHCII) molecules on the plasma membrane, a key requirement of their competence as professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). MHCII molecules on the cell surface derive from newly synthesized as well as from preexisting proteins. So far, all the studies done on DCs during maturation, to establish the relative contribution of newly synthesized MHCII molecules to the cell surface pool did not produced a clear, unified scenario. We report that, in human DCs stimulated ex vivo with LPS, the changes in the RNA accumulation specific for at least two MHCII genes (HLA-DRA and HLA-DQA1) due to transcriptional upregulation, is associated with the active translation at high rate of these transcripts. Our finding reveals that, across the 24h of the maturation process in human DCs, newly synthesized MHCII proteins are supplied to the APCs cell surface pool.

  20. Effects of Filovirus Interferon Antagonists on Responses of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells to RNA Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cells (DCs) are major targets of filovirus infection in vivo. Previous studies have shown that the filoviruses Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) suppress DC maturation in vitro. Both viruses also encode innate immune evasion functions. The EBOV VP35 (eVP35) and the MARV VP35 (mVP35) proteins each can block RIG-I-like receptor signaling and alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) production. The EBOV VP24 (eVP24) and MARV VP40 (mVP40) proteins each inhibit the production of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) by blocking Jak-STAT signaling; however, this occurs by different mechanisms, with eVP24 blocking nuclear import of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 and mVP40 blocking Jak1 function. MARV VP24 (mVP24) has been demonstrated to modulate host cell antioxidant responses. Previous studies demonstrated that eVP35 is sufficient to strongly impair primary human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) responses upon stimulation induced through the RIG-I-like receptor pathways. We demonstrate that mVP35, like eVP35, suppresses not only IFN-α/β production but also proinflammatory responses after stimulation of MDDCs with RIG-I activators. In contrast, eVP24 and mVP40, despite suppressing ISG production upon RIG-I activation, failed to block upregulation of maturation markers or T cell activation. mVP24, although able to stimulate expression of antioxidant response genes, had no measurable impact of DC function. These data are consistent with a model where filoviral VP35 proteins are the major suppressors of DC maturation during filovirus infection, whereas the filoviral VP24 proteins and mVP40 are insufficient to prevent DC maturation. IMPORTANCE The ability to suppress the function of dendritic cells (DCs) likely contributes to the pathogenesis of disease caused by the filoviruses Ebola virus and Marburg virus. To clarify the basis for this DC suppression, we assessed the effect of filovirus proteins known to antagonize innate immune signaling pathways, including Ebola

  1. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease.

  2. Protein kinase CK2 controls T-cell polarization through dendritic cell activation in response to contact sensitizers.

    PubMed

    de Bourayne, Marie; Gallais, Yann; El Ali, Zeina; Rousseau, Philippe; Damiens, Marie-Hélène; Cochet, Claude; Filhol, Odile; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia

    2017-03-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) represents a severe health problem with increasing worldwide prevalence. It is a T-cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease caused by chemicals present in the daily or professional environment. NiSO4 and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) are 2 chemicals involved in ACD. These contact sensitizers are known to induce an up-regulation of phenotypic markers and cytokine secretion in dendritic cells (DCs; professional APCs), leading to the generation of CD8(+) Tc1/Tc17 and CD4(+) Th1/Th17 effector T cells. In the present study, using a peptide array approach, we identified protein kinase CK2 as a novel kinase involved in the activation of human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) in response to NiSO4 and DNCB. Inhibition of CK2 activity in MoDCs led to an altered mature phenotype with lower expression of CD54, PDL-1, CD86, and CD40 in response to NiSO4 or DNCB. CK2 activity also regulated proinflammatory cytokine production, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-23 in MoDCs. Moreover, in a DC/T cell coculture model in an allogeneic setup, CK2 activity in MoDCs played a major role in Th1 polarization in response to NiSO4 and DNCB. CK2 inhibition in MoDCs led to an enhanced Th2 polarization in the absence of contact sensitizer stimulation.

  3. The Effect of Noise on CaMKII Activation in a Dendritic Spine During LTP Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shangyou

    2010-01-01

    Activation of calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) during induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is a series of complicated stochastic processes that are affected by noise. There are two main sources of noise affecting CaMKII activation within a dendritic spine. One is the noise associated with stochastic opening of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels and the other is the noise associated with the stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics leading to CaMKII activation. Many models have been developed to simulate CaMKII activation, but there is no fully stochastic model that studies the effect of noise on CaMKII activation. Here we construct a fully stochastic model to study these effects. Our results show that noise has important effects on CaMKII activation variability, with the effect from stochastic opening of NMDA receptor channels being 5–10 times more significant than that from stochastic reactions involving CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII activation levels and the variability of activation are greatly affected by small changes in NMDA receptor chan