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Sample records for activate inflammatory signaling

  1. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Wang, Minge; Ribeiro, Denise; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Cole, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. This study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on activation of nuclear factor (NF) -κB, a transcription factor that serves a critical role in the inflammatory signaling cascade. Methods In 14 healthy adults (7 females; 7 males), peripheral blood mononuclear cell NF-κB was repeatedly assessed, along with enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, in the morning after baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 h to 03:00 h), and recovery sleep. Results In the morning after a night of sleep loss, mononuclear cell NF-κB activation was significantly greater compared with morning levels following uninterrupted baseline or recovery sleep, in which the response was found in females but not in males. Conclusions These results identify NF-κB activation as a molecular pathway by which sleep disturbance may influence leukocyte inflammatory gene expression and the risk of inflammation-related disease. PMID:18561896

  2. Brazilian Red Propolis Attenuates Inflammatory Signaling Cascade in LPS-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Alencar, Severino M.; Rosalen, Pedro L.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies suggested an anti-inflammatory property of Brazilian red propolis (BRP), the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of BRP and its activity on macrophages were still not elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether BRP attenuates the inflammatory effect of LPS on macrophages and to investigate its underlying mechanisms. BRP was added to RAW 264.7 murine macrophages after activation with LPS. NO production, cell viability, cytokines profile were evaluated. Activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and macrophage polarization were determined by RT-qPCR and Western blot. BRP at 50 μg/ml inhibited NO production by 78% without affecting cell viability. Cd80 and Cd86 were upregulated whereas mrc1 was down regulated by BRP indicating macrophage polarization at M1. BRP attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-12, GM-CSF, IFN-Ɣ, IL-1β in cell supernatants although levels of TNF- α and IL-6 were slightly increased after BRP treatment. Levels of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β were also reduced by BRP. BRP significantly reduced the up-regulation promoted by LPS of transcription of genes in inflammatory signaling (Pdk1, Pak1, Nfkb1, Mtcp1, Gsk3b, Fos and Elk1) and of Il1β and Il1f9 (fold-change rate > 5), which were further confirmed by the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Furthermore, the upstream adaptor MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal), also known as TIRAP, involved in TLR2 and TLR4 signaling, was down- regulated in BRP treated LPS-activated macrophages. Given that BRP inhibited multiple signaling pathways in macrophages involved in the inflammatory process activated by LPS, our data indicated that BRP is a noteworthy food-source for the discovery of new bioactive compounds and a potential candidate to attenuate exhacerbated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26660901

  3. [Combination of two signals of danger--a principal cause of activation of chronic inflammatory processes].

    PubMed

    Lebedev, K A

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory processes have long current during which there is a change of remission by an aggravation of disease. Until recently was considered, that occurrence and activation of chronic inflammatory process is caused by one signal of danger. Most often it are served with microorganisms. The sum of our end literary data shows that activation is connected with accumulation in the center of an inflammation of macrophages and their hyperactivation as a result of action of two signals of danger--microorganisms and xenobiotics.

  4. Dung biomass smoke activates inflammatory signaling pathways in human small airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Claire E; Duffney, Parker F; Gelein, Robert; Thatcher, Thomas H; Elder, Alison; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2016-12-01

    Animal dung is a biomass fuel burned by vulnerable populations who cannot afford cleaner sources of energy, such as wood and gas, for cooking and heating their homes. Exposure to biomass smoke is the leading environmental risk for mortality, with over 4,000,000 deaths each year worldwide attributed to indoor air pollution from biomass smoke. Biomass smoke inhalation is epidemiologically associated with pulmonary diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and respiratory infections, especially in low and middle-income countries. Yet, few studies have examined the mechanisms of dung biomass smoke-induced inflammatory responses in human lung cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dung biomass smoke causes inflammatory responses in human lung cells through signaling pathways involved in acute and chronic lung inflammation. Primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) were exposed to dung smoke at the air-liquid interface using a newly developed, automated, and reproducible dung biomass smoke generation system. The examination of inflammatory signaling showed that dung biomass smoke increased the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in SAECs through activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. We propose that the inflammatory responses of lung cells exposed to dung biomass smoke contribute to the development of respiratory diseases.

  5. Reverse signaling initiated from GITRL induces NF-kappaB activation through ERK in the inflammatory activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun Mi; Kim, Won-Jung; Suk, Kyoungho; Kang, Young-Mo; Park, Jeong-Euy; Kim, Won Young; Choi, Eun Mi; Choi, Beom Kyu; Kwon, Byoung S; Lee, Won-Ha

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor family related protein ligand (GITRL) is known to interact with its cognate receptor GITR. In order to investigate the potential role of GITRL in the pro-inflammatory activation of macrophages and the signaling pathway induced by GITRL, we stimulated the macrophage cell line, THP-1, and primary macrophages with an anti-GITRL monoclonal antibody or a GITR:Fc fusion protein and analyzed the cellular responses. The stimulation of GITRL induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and up-regulated ICAM-1 expression levels, which was responsible for enhanced cellular aggregation and adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. The activation of these pro-inflammatory mediators required the activation of ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and negatively regulated by p38 MAPK and JNK. Immunofluorescence analysis detected nuclear translocation of the NF-kappaB p50 subunit and this was blocked by ERK inhibitor, indicating that GITRL stimulation induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and subsequent activation of NF-kappaB. Furthermore, the expression of GITRL and GITR was detected in macrophages in inflammatory disease specimens such as atherosclerotic plaques and synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis. These observations raise the possibility that the GITRL-mediated inflammatory activation of macrophages is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases.

  6. Greater inflammatory activity and blunted glucocorticoid signaling in monocytes of chronically stressed caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gregory E.; Murphy, Michael L.M.; Cashman, Rosemary; Ma, Roy; Ma, Jeffrey; Arevalo, Jesusa M.G.; Kobor, Michael S.; Cole, Steve W.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is associated with morbidity and mortality from numerous conditions, many of whose pathogenesis involves persistent inflammation. Here, we examine how chronic stress influences signaling pathways that regulate inflammation in monocytes. The sample consisted of 33 adults caring for a family member with glioblastoma and 47 controls whose lives were free of major stressors. The subjects were assessed four times over eight months. Relative to controls, caregivers’ monocytes showed increased expression of genes bearing response elements for nuclear-factor kappa B, a key pro-inflammatory transcription factor. Simultaneously, caregivers showed reduced expression of genes with response elements for the glucocorticoid receptor, a transcription factor that conveys cortisol’s anti-inflammatory signals to monocytes. Transcript origin analyses revealed that CD14+/CD16− cells, a population of immature monocytes, were the predominate source of inflammatory gene expression among caregivers. We considered hormonal, molecular, and functional explanations for caregivers’ decreased glucocorticoid-mediated transcription. Across twelve days, the groups displayed similar diurnal cortisol profiles, suggesting that differential adrenocortical activity was not involved. Moreover, the groups’ monocytes expressed similar amounts of glucocorticoid receptor protein, suggesting that differential receptor availability was not involved. In ex vivo studies, subjects’ monocytes were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, and caregivers showed greater production of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 relative to controls. However, no group differences in functional glucocorticoid sensitivity were apparent; hydrocortisone was equally effective at inhibiting cytokine production in caregivers and controls. These findings may help shed light on the mechanisms through which caregiving increases vulnerability to inflammation-related diseases. PMID:25242587

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity of flavonoids in Nepalese propolis is attributed to inhibition of the IL-33 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Okamoto, Kazuhi; Izumi, Rika; Tago, Kenji; Yanagisawa, Ken; Narukawa, Yuji; Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2015-03-01

    Propolis has been used in folk medicine to improve health and prevent inflammatory diseases; however, the components that exhibit its anti-inflammatory activity remain unknown. We herein investigated the effects of flavonoids isolated from Nepalese propolis on the IL-33 signaling pathway to clarify the anti-inflammatory mechanism involved. Of the 8 types of flavonoids isolated from Nepalese propolis, 4 types of compounds, such as 3',4'-dihydroxy-4-methoxydalbergione, 4-methoxydalbergion, cearoin, and chrysin, markedly inhibited the IL-33-induced mRNA expression of inflammatory genes including IL-6, TNFα and IL-13 in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC). These four flavonoids also inhibited the IL-33-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which was consistent with their inhibitory effects on cytokine expression. The effects of these flavonoids are attributed to inhibition of IL-33-induced activation of IKK, which leads to the degradation of IκBα and nuclear localization of NF-κB. On the other hand, other flavonoids isolated from Nepalese propolis, such as isoliquiritigenin, plathymenin, 7-hydroxyflavanone, and (+)-medicarpin, had no effect on the IL-33 signaling pathway or cytokine expression. Therefore, these results indicate that 3',4'-dihydroxy-4-methoxydalbergione, 4-methoxydalbergion, cearoin, and chrysin are the substances responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of Nepalese propolis.

  8. Sesamin inhibits IL-1β-stimulated inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kong, Pengyu; Chen, Guanghua; Jiang, Anlong; Wang, Yufu; Song, Chengchao; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Xi, Chunyang; Wang, Guangxi; Ji, Ye; Yan, Jinglong

    2016-12-13

    Sesamin, a bioactive component extracted from sesame, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes and investigated the possible mechanism. Results demonstrated that sesamin treatment significantly inhibited PGE2 and NO production induced by IL-1β. Sesamin inhibited MMP1, MMP3, and MMP13 production in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. Sesamin also inhibited IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα. Meanwhile, sesamin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. However, Nrf2 siRNA reversed the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin. In conclusion, our results suggested that sesamin showed anti-inflammatory effects in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  9. Parallels between immune driven-hematopoiesis and T cell activation: 3 signals that relay inflammatory stress to the bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Libregts, Sten F.W.M.; Nolte, Martijn A.

    2014-12-10

    Quiescence, self-renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) towards fully mature blood cells are a complex process that involves both intrinsic and extrinsic signals. During steady-state conditions, most hematopoietic signals are provided by various resident cells inside the bone marrow (BM), which establish the HSC micro-environment. However, upon infection, the hematopoietic process is also affected by pathogens and activated immune cells, which illustrates an effective feedback mechanism to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) via immune-mediated signals. Here, we review the impact of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines on the quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSCs and more committed progenitors. As modulation of HSPC function via these immune-mediated signals holds an interesting parallel with the “three-signal-model” described for the activation and differentiation of naïve T-cells, we propose a novel “three-signal” concept for immune-driven hematopoiesis. In this model, the recognition of PAMPs and DAMPs will activate HSCs and induce proliferation, while costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines confer a second and third signal, respectively, which further regulate expansion, lineage commitment and differentiation of HSPCs. We review the impact of inflammatory stress on hematopoiesis along these three signals and we discuss whether they act independently from each other or that concurrence of these signals is important for an adequate response of HSPCs upon infection. - Highlights: • Inflammation and infection have a direct impact on hematopoiesis in the bone marrow. • We draw a striking parallel between immune-driven hematopoiesis and T cell activation. • We review how PAMPs and DAMPs, costimulation and cytokines influence HSPC function.

  10. Signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule SLAMF1 augments mycobacteria BCG-induced inflammatory response and facilitates bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Song, Tengfei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis, which is caused by intracellular mycobacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the most serious global public health concerns. The mechanisms by which innate immunity regulates the inflammatory responses and affects mycobacterial infection remain unclear. In this study, signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule family 1 (SLAMF1) was significantly upregulated in Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected RAW264.7 cells. Overexpression of SLAMF1 significantly increased the production of inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as chemokine MCP-1, both in vitro and in vivo upon mycobacteria BCG infection. By contrast, knockdown of SLAMF1 significantly decreased the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MCP-1. Western blot analysis indicated that the NF-κB signaling pathway may contribute to the elevated inflammatory response promoted by SLAMF1, as evidenced by higher levels of phosphorylated p65 and IκBα detected with SLAMF1 overexpression. Furthermore, SLAMF1 upregulation facilitated bacterial clearance in infected RAW264.7 cells and in the lungs of infected mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BCG infection significantly upregulated SLAMF1, which enhanced inflammatory response by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway and facilitated bacterial clearance in BCG-infected RAW264.7 cells and mice.

  11. Violet/blue light activates Nrf2 signaling and modulates the inflammatory response of THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Trotter, L A; Patel, D; Dubin, S; Guerra, C; McCloud, V; Lockwood, P; Messer, R; Wataha, J C; Lewis, J B

    2017-04-05

    Several studies suggest that light in the UVA range (320-400 nm) activates signaling pathways that are anti-inflammatory and antioxidative. These effects have been attributed to Nrf2-mediated upregulation of "phase 2" genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) that neutralize oxidative stress and metabolize electrophiles. Proteomics analysis previously had shown that small doses of blue light (400-500 nm) increased levels of peroxiredoxin phase 2 proteins in THP-1 monocytes, which led to our hypothesis that blue light activates Nrf2 signaling and thus may serve as an anti-inflammatory agent. THP-1 monocytes were treated with doses of blue light with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inflammatory challenge. Cell lysates were tested for Nrf2 activation and HO-1 production. Treated cells were assessed for viability/mitochondrial activity via trypan blue exclusion and MTT assay, and secretion of two major pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin 8 (IL8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was measured using ELISA. Blue light activated the phase 2 response in cultured THP-1 cells and was protective against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. Light pre-treatment also significantly reduced cytokine secretion in response to 0.1 μg ml(-1) LPS, but had no anti-inflammatory effect at high LPS levels. This study is the first to report these effects using a light source that is approved for routine use on dental patients. Cellular responses to these light energies are worth further study and may provide therapeutic interventions for inflammation.

  12. A Novel Biological Role of α-Mangostin in Modulating Inflammatory Response Through the Activation of SIRT-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Franceschelli, Sara; Pesce, Mirko; Ferrone, Alessio; Patruno, Antonia; Pasqualone, Livia; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Ferrone, Vincenzo; Carlucci, Maura; de Lutiis, Maria Anna; Grilli, Alfredo; Felaco, Mario; Speranza, Lorenza

    2016-11-01

    Several studies have shown that xanthones obtained from Garcinia Mangostana (GM) have remarkable biological activities. α-mangostin (α-MG) is the main constituent of the fruit hull of the GM. Several findings have suggested that SIRT-1, a nuclear histone deacetylase, could influence cellular function by the inhibition of NF-kB signaling. ROS can inhibit SIRT-1 activity by initiating oxidative modifications on its cysteine residues, and suppression of SIRT-1 enhances the NF-κB signaling resulting in inflammatory responses. The goals of the present study were to evaluate the quantity of α-MG in the methanolic extract of GM (Vithagroup Spa) and to investigate the activity of this xanthone in U937 cell line and in human monocytes from responsive to inflammatory insult analyzing the possible changes on the activation of SIRT-1 protein via NF-Kb. Cells were treated with the methanolic extract of GM and/or LPS. The chromatographic separation of α-MG was performed by an HPLC analysis. EX 527, a specific SIRT-1 inhibitor, was used to determine if SIRT-1/NfkB signaling pathway might be involved in α-MG action on cells. Our results show that α-MG inhibits p65 acetylation and down-regulates the pro-inflammatory gene products as COX-2, iNOS via SIRT-1 activation. Cells treated with EX 527 showed an up-regulation of NFkB acetylation and an over expression of inducible enzymes and their product of catalysis (NO and PGE2). These results suggest that α-MG may be useful for the development of alternative pharmacological strategies aimed at reducing the inflammatory process. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2439-2451, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Hedgehog Signaling Non-Canonical Activated by Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqiong; Jin, Gang; Li, Quanjiang; Wang, Zhiping; Hu, Weimin; Li, Ping; Li, Shude; Wu, Hongyu; Kong, Xiangyu; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog(HH) pathway is found to be activated through a manner of canonical, or the non-canonical HH pathways. Distinct hyperplasia stroma around tumor cells is supposed to express pro-inflammatory cytokines abundantly, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), etc. in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. In this study we observed the effects of TNF-α and IL-1β on HH pathway activation in PDAC cells, and explored their activation manners. Our results showed that pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, could up-regulate the expression of GLI1 gene, increase its nuclear protein expression and promote malignant cell behaviors including migration, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and drug resistance as well. Moreover, GLI1 promoter-reporter assay in combination with blocking either NF-κB or Smoothened (SMO) suggested that TNF-α and IL-1β could transcriptionally up-regulate expression of GLI1 completely via NF-κB, whereas ablation of SMO could not completely attenuate the regulation effects of TNF-α and IL-1β on GLI1 expression. Collectively, our results indicated that TNF-α and IL-1β in hyperplasia stroma can promote the PDAC cell development by activating HH pathway, through both the canonical and non-canonical HH activation ways. PMID:27877222

  14. Folic Acid Is Able to Polarize the Inflammatory Response in LPS Activated Microglia by Regulating Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Rosaria; Porro, Chiara; Trotta, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of folic acid to modulate the inflammatory responses of LPS activated BV-2 microglia cells and the signal transduction pathways involved. To this aim, the BV-2 cell line was exposed to LPS as a proinflammatory response inducer, in presence or absence of various concentrations of folic acid. The production of nitric oxide (NO) was determined by the Griess test. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and IL-10 were determined by ELISA. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS), nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, MAPKs protein, and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and SOCS3 were analyzed by western blotting. TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as iNOS dependent NO production, resulted significantly inhibited by folic acid pretreatment in LPS-activated BV-2 cells. We also observed that folic acid dose-dependently upregulated both SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in BV-2 cells, leading to an increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Finally, p-IκBα, which indirectly reflects NF-κB complex activation, and JNK phosphorylation resulted dose-dependently downregulated by folic acid pretreatment of LPS-activated cells, whereas p38 MAPK phosphorylation resulted significantly upregulated by folic acid treatment. Overall, these results demonstrated that folic acid was able to modulate the inflammatory response in microglia cells, shifting proinflammatory versus anti-inflammatory responses through regulating multiple signaling pathways. PMID:27738387

  15. Aβ and Inflammatory Stimulus Activate Diverse Signaling Pathways in Monocytic Cells: Implications in Retaining Phagocytosis in Aβ-Laden Environment

    PubMed Central

    Savchenko, Ekaterina; Malm, Tarja; Konttinen, Henna; Hämäläinen, Riikka H.; Guerrero-Toro, Cindy; Wojciechowski, Sara; Giniatullin, Rashid; Koistinaho, Jari; Magga, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) is one of the main hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The enhancement of Aβ clearance may provide therapeutic means to restrict AD pathology. The cellular responses to different forms of Aβ in monocytic cells are poorly known. We aimed to study whether different forms of Aβ induce inflammatory responses in monocytic phagocytes and how Aβ may affect monocytic cell survival and function to retain phagocytosis in Aβ-laden environment. Methods: Monocytic cells were differentiated from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the presence of macrophage-colony stimulating factor. Monocytic cells were stimulated with synthetic Aβ42 and intracellular calcium responses were recorded with calcium imaging. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), secretion of cytokines and cell viability were also assessed. Finally, monocytic cells were introduced to native Aβ deposits ex vivo and the cellular responses in terms of cell viability, pro-inflammatory activation and phagocytosis were determined. The ability of monocytic cells to phagocytose Aβ plaques was determined after intrahippocampal transplantation in vivo. Results: Freshly solubilized Aβ induced calcium oscillations, which persisted after removal of the stimulus. After few hours of aggregation, Aβ was not able to induce oscillations in monocytic cells. Instead, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced calcium responses divergent from Aβ-induced response. Furthermore, while LPS induced massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, neither synthetic Aβ species nor native Aβ deposits were able to induce pro-inflammatory activation of monocytic cells, contrary to primary microglia. Finally, monocytic cells retained their viability in the presence of Aβ and exhibited phagocytic activity towards native fibrillar Aβ deposits and congophilic Aβ plaques. Conclusion: Monocytic cells carry diverse cellular responses to Aβ and inflammatory stimulus LPS. Even

  16. The oxytocin receptor antagonist, Atosiban, activates pro-inflammatory pathways in human amnion via G(αi) signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hye; MacIntyre, David A; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C; Blanks, Andrew M; Thornton, Steven; Bennett, Phillip R; Terzidou, Vasso

    2016-01-15

    Oxytocin (OT) plays an important role in the onset of human labour by stimulating uterine contractions and promoting prostaglandin/inflammatory cytokine synthesis in amnion via oxytocin receptor (OTR) coupling. The OTR-antagonist, Atosiban, is widely used as a tocolytic for the management of acute preterm labour. We found that in primary human amniocytes, Atosiban (10 μM) signals via PTX-sensitive Gαi to activate transcription factor NF-κB p65, ERK1/2, and p38 which subsequently drives upregulation of the prostaglandin synthesis enzymes, COX-2 and phospho-cPLA2 and excretion of prostaglandins (PGE2) (n = 6; p < 0.05, ANOVA). Moreover, Atosiban treatment increased expression and excretion of the inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and CCL5. We also showed that OT-simulated activation of NF-κB, ERK1/2, and p38 and subsequent prostaglandin and inflammatory cytokine synthesis is via Gαi-2 and Gαi-3 but not Gαq, and is not inhibited by Atosiban. Activation or exacerbation of inflammation is not a desirable effect of tocolytics. Therefore therapeutic modulation of the OT/OTR system for clinical management of term/preterm labour should consider the effects of differential G-protein coupling of the OTR and the role of OT or selective OTR agonists/antagonists in activating proinflammatory pathways.

  17. Unique Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation by NAMPT/PBEF Induces NFκB Signaling and Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Sara M.; Ceco, Ermelinda; Evenoski, Carrie L.; Danilov, Sergei M.; Zhou, Tong; Chiang, Eddie T.; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Mapes, Brandon; Zhao, Jieling; Gursoy, Gamze; Brown, Mary E.; Adyshev, Djanybek M.; Siddiqui, Shahid S.; Quijada, Hector; Sammani, Saad; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Saadat, Laleh; Yousef, Mohammed; Wang, Ting; Liang, Jie; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-induced inflammatory lung injury (VILI) is mechanistically linked to increased NAMPT transcription and circulating levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase (NAMPT/PBEF). Although VILI severity is attenuated by reduced NAMPT/PBEF bioavailability, the precise contribution of NAMPT/PBEF and excessive mechanical stress to VILI pathobiology is unknown. We now report that NAMPT/PBEF induces lung NFκB transcriptional activities and inflammatory injury via direct ligation of Toll–like receptor 4 (TLR4). Computational analysis demonstrated that NAMPT/PBEF and MD-2, a TLR4-binding protein essential for LPS-induced TLR4 activation, share ~30% sequence identity and exhibit striking structural similarity in loop regions critical for MD-2-TLR4 binding. Unlike MD-2, whose TLR4 binding alone is insufficient to initiate TLR4 signaling, NAMPT/PBEF alone produces robust TLR4 activation, likely via a protruding region of NAMPT/PBEF (S402-N412) with structural similarity to LPS. The identification of this unique mode of TLR4 activation by NAMPT/PBEF advances the understanding of innate immunity responses as well as the untoward events associated with mechanical stress-induced lung inflammation. PMID:26272519

  18. FLT1 signaling in metastasis-associated macrophages activates an inflammatory signature that promotes breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Jiufeng; He, Tianfang; Yeo, Eun-Jin; Soong, Daniel Y.H.; Carragher, Neil O.; Munro, Alison; Chang, Alvin; Bresnick, Anne R.; Lang, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the link between inflammation and cancer initiation is well established, its role in metastatic diseases, the primary cause of cancer deaths, has been poorly explored. Our previous studies identified a population of metastasis-associated macrophages (MAMs) recruited to the lung that promote tumor cell seeding and growth. Here we show that FMS-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt1, also known as VEGFR1) labels a subset of macrophages in human breast cancers that are significantly enriched in metastatic sites. In mouse models of breast cancer pulmonary metastasis, MAMs uniquely express FLT1. Using several genetic models, we show that macrophage FLT1 signaling is critical for metastasis. FLT1 inhibition does not affect MAM recruitment to metastatic lesions but regulates a set of inflammatory response genes, including colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), a central regulator of macrophage biology. Using a gain-of-function approach, we show that CSF1-mediated autocrine signaling in MAMs is downstream of FLT1 and can restore the tumor-promoting activity of FLT1-inhibited MAMs. Thus, CSF1 is epistatic to FLT1, establishing a link between FLT1 and inflammatory responses within breast tumor metastases. Importantly, FLT1 inhibition reduces tumor metastatic efficiency even after initial seeding, suggesting that these pathways represent therapeutic targets in metastatic disease. PMID:26261265

  19. Inflammatory Cyclooxygenase Activity and PGE2 Signaling in Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Jenny U.; Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Shi, Ju; Andreasson, Katrin I.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a fundamental driving force in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the setting of accumulating immunogenic Aß peptide assemblies, microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, generate a non-resolving immune response and fail to adequately clear accumulating Aß peptides, accelerating neuronal and synaptic injury. Pathological, biomarker, and imaging studies point to a prominent role of the innate immune response in AD development, and the molecular components of this response are beginning to be unraveled. The inflammatory cyclooxygenase-PGE2 pathway is implicated in pre-clinical development of AD, both in epidemiology of normal aging populations and in transgenic mouse models of Familial AD. The cyclooxygenase-PGE2 pathway modulates the inflammatory response to accumulating Aß peptides through actions of specific E-prostanoid G-protein coupled receptors.

  20. Regulation of PTEN activity by p38δ-PKD1 signaling in neutrophils confers inflammatory responses in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Ittner, Arne; Block, Helena; Reichel, Christoph A.; Varjosalo, Markku; Gehart, Helmuth; Sumara, Grzegorz; Gstaiger, Matthias; Krombach, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Despite their role in resolving inflammatory insults, neutrophils trigger inflammation-induced acute lung injury (ALI), culminating in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a frequent complication with high mortality in humans. Molecular mechanisms underlying recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that p38 MAP kinase p38δ is required for recruitment of neutrophils into inflammatory sites. Global and myeloid-restricted deletion of p38δ in mice results in decreased alveolar neutrophil accumulation and attenuation of ALI. p38δ counteracts the activity of its downstream target protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in neutrophils and myeloid-restricted inactivation of PKD1 leads to exacerbated lung inflammation. Importantly, p38δ and PKD1 conversely regulate PTEN activity in neutrophils, thereby controlling their extravasation and chemotaxis. PKD1 phosphorylates p85α to enhance its interaction with PTEN, leading to polarized PTEN activity, thereby regulating neutrophil migration. Thus, aberrant p38δ–PKD1 signaling in neutrophils may underlie development of ALI and life-threatening ARDS in humans. PMID:23129748

  1. Regulation of PTEN activity by p38δ-PKD1 signaling in neutrophils confers inflammatory responses in the lung.

    PubMed

    Ittner, Arne; Block, Helena; Reichel, Christoph A; Varjosalo, Markku; Gehart, Helmuth; Sumara, Grzegorz; Gstaiger, Matthias; Krombach, Fritz; Zarbock, Alexander; Ricci, Romeo

    2012-11-19

    Despite their role in resolving inflammatory insults, neutrophils trigger inflammation-induced acute lung injury (ALI), culminating in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a frequent complication with high mortality in humans. Molecular mechanisms underlying recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that p38 MAP kinase p38δ is required for recruitment of neutrophils into inflammatory sites. Global and myeloid-restricted deletion of p38δ in mice results in decreased alveolar neutrophil accumulation and attenuation of ALI. p38δ counteracts the activity of its downstream target protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in neutrophils and myeloid-restricted inactivation of PKD1 leads to exacerbated lung inflammation. Importantly, p38δ and PKD1 conversely regulate PTEN activity in neutrophils, thereby controlling their extravasation and chemotaxis. PKD1 phosphorylates p85α to enhance its interaction with PTEN, leading to polarized PTEN activity, thereby regulating neutrophil migration. Thus, aberrant p38δ-PKD1 signaling in neutrophils may underlie development of ALI and life-threatening ARDS in humans.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of xanthohumol involves heme oxygenase-1 induction via NRF2-ARE signaling in microglial BV2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ik-Soo; Lim, Juhee; Gal, Jiyeong; Kang, Jeen Chu; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Bok Yun; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2011-02-01

    Xanthohumol (2',4',4-trihydroxy-6'-methoxy-3'-prenylchalcone) is a major chalcone derivative isolated from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) commonly used in brewing due to its bitter flavors. Xanthohumol has anti-carcinogenic, free radical-scavenging, and anti-inflammatory activities, but its precise mechanisms are not clarified yet. The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein NRF2 is a key transcription factor mediating the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory responses in animals. Therefore, we tested whether xanthohumol exerts anti-inflammatory activity in mouse microglial BV2 cells via NRF2 signaling. Xanthohumol significantly inhibited the excessive production of inflammatory mediators NO, IL-1β, and TNF-α, and the activation of NF-κB signaling in LPS-induced stimulated BV2 cells. Xanthohumol up-regulated the transcription of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and increased the level of the endogenous antioxidant GSH. In addition, xanthohumol induced nuclear translocation of NRF2 and further activation of ARE promoter-related transcription. The anti-inflammatory response of xanthohumol was attenuated by transfection with NRF2 siRNA and in the presence of the HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, but not the NQO1 inhibitor, dicoumarol. Taken together, our study suggests that xanthohumol exerts anti-inflammatory activity through NRF2-ARE signaling and up-regulation of downstream HO-1, and could be an attractive candidate for the regulation of inflammatory responses in the brain.

  3. Homocysteine induces inflammatory transcriptional signaling in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shu; Ciment, Stephen; Jan, Michael; Tran, Tran; Pham, Hung; Cueto, Ramón; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study is to investigate transcriptional mechanism underlying homocysteine (Hcy)-induced and monocytes (MC)-derived inflammatory response. We identified 11 Hcy-induced genes, 17 anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10-induced, 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon γ (IFNγ)-induced and 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced genes through literature search. Binding frequency of 36 transcription factors (TFs) implicated in inflammation and MC differentiation were analyzed within core promoter regions of identified genes, and classified into 3 classes based on the significant binding frequency to the promoter of Hcy-induced genes. Class 1 TFs exert high significant binding frequency in Hcy-induced genes. Class 2 and 3 TFs have low and no significant binding frequency, respectively. Class 1 TF binding occurrence in Hcy-induced genes is similar to that in IFNγ-induced genes, but not that in TNFα-induced. We conclude that Hcy is a pro-inflammatory amino acid and induces inflammatory transcriptional signal pathways mediated by class 1 TF. We term class 1 TF, which includes heat shock factor, MC enhancer factor-2, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells and Krueppel-like factor 4, as putative Hcy-responsive TFs. PMID:23276953

  4. TRIM protein-mediated regulation of inflammatory and innate immune signaling and its association with antiretroviral activity.

    PubMed

    Uchil, Pradeep D; Hinz, Angelika; Siegel, Steven; Coenen-Stass, Anna; Pertel, Thomas; Luban, Jeremy; Mothes, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Members of the tripartite interaction motif (TRIM) family of E3 ligases are emerging as critical regulators of innate immunity. To identify new regulators, we carried out a screen of 43 human TRIM proteins for the ability to activate NF-κB, AP-1, and interferon, hallmarks of many innate immune signaling pathways. We identified 16 TRIM proteins that induced NF-κB and/or AP-1. We found that one of these, TRIM62, functions in the TRIF branch of the TLR4 signaling pathway. Knockdown of TRIM62 in primary macrophages led to a defect in TRIF-mediated late NF-κB, AP-1, and interferon production after lipopolysaccharide challenge. We also discovered a role for TRIM15 in the RIG-I-mediated interferon pathway upstream of MAVS. Knockdown of TRIM15 limited virus/RIG-I ligand-induced interferon production and enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus replication. In addition, most TRIM proteins previously identified to inhibit murine leukemia virus (MLV) demonstrated an ability to induce NF-κB/AP-1. Interfering with the NF-κB and AP-1 signaling induced by the antiretroviral TRIM1 and TRIM62 proteins rescued MLV release. In contrast, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression was increased by TRIM proteins that induce NF-κB. HIV-1 resistance to inflammatory TRIM proteins mapped to the NF-κB sites in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 and could be transferred to MLV. Thus, our work identifies new TRIM proteins involved in innate immune signaling and reinforces the striking ability of HIV-1 to exploit innate immune signaling for the purpose of viral replication.

  5. Resistin Enhances Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Coronary Artery Tissues by Activating the NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fang; Si, Feifei; Feng, Siqi; Liu, Ruixi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis and is a leading cause of coronary artery lesions (CALs) in childhood. Our previous study has shown higher levels of serum Resistin in KD patients with coronary aneurysm. This study aimed at examining the association of Resistin with inflammatory cytokine expression in mouse model of coronary arteritis and determining the potential mechanisms. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were injected with Lactobacillus cell wall extract (LCWE) to induce coronary arteritis. The relative levels of Resistin, TNF-α, IL-1β, and MMP-9 expression and inflammatory infiltrates in the coronary arteries were determined longitudinally by quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA, and histology. The effect of TLR4 and NF-κB activation on Resistin-induced TNF-α and IL-1β expression in human coronary artery endothelium cells (HCAECs) was examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results. Higher levels of Resistin, TNF-α, IL-1β, and MMP-9 expression were associated with the degrees of inflammatory infiltrates in the coronary artery walls of the LCWE-injected mice. Resistin enhanced TNF-α and IL-1β expression in HCAECs at 18 or 24 hours after stimulation. Pretreatment with anti-TLR4 attenuated Resistin-enhanced IL-1β, but not TNF-α, expression and pretreatment with parthenolide or QNZ demolished Resistin-enhanced TNF-α expression in HACECs. Pretreatment with parthenolide, but not QNZ, blocked Resistin-enhanced IL-1β expression in HCAECs. Conclusion. Resistin may enhance inflammation by cross-talking with TLR4/NF-κB signaling during the development of coronary arteritis in mice. PMID:27800490

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock proteins use diverse Toll-like receptor pathways to activate pro-inflammatory signals.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yonca; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Hayrapetian, Linda; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Spallek, Ralf; Singh, Mahavir; Arditi, Moshe

    2005-06-03

    Although the Toll-like receptors used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane and secreted factors are known, the pathways activated by M. tuberculosis heat shock proteins are not. An efficient immune response against the intracellular pathogen M. tuberculosis is critically dependent on rapid detection of the invading pathogen by the innate immune system and coordinated activation of the adaptive immune response. Macrophage phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis is accompanied by activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and secretion of inflammatory mediators that play an important role in granuloma formation and immune protection during M. tuberculosis infection. The interaction between M. tuberculosis and the various Toll-like receptors is complex, and it appears that distinct mycobacterial components may interact with different members of the Toll-like receptor family. Here we show that recombinant, purified, mycobacterial heat shock proteins 65 and 70 induce NF-kappaB activity in a dose-dependent manner in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that whereas mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 signals exclusively through Toll-like receptor 4, heat shock protein 70 also signals through Toll-like receptor 2. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65-induced NF-kappaB activation was MyD88-, TIRAP-, TRIF-, and TRAM-dependent and required the presence of MD-2. A better understanding of the recognition of mycobacterial heat shock proteins and their role in the host immune response to the pathogen may open the way to a better understanding of the immunological processes induced by this important human pathogen and the host-pathogen interactions and may help in the rational design of more effective vaccines or vaccine adjuvants.

  7. Saturated fatty acids activate TLR-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 were shown to be activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) but inhibited by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, one report (ATVB 11:1944, 2009) suggested that SFA-induced TLR activation in cell culture systems is due to contaminants in BSA used for conjugating f...

  8. Activation of TRESK channels by the inflammatory mediator lysophosphatidic acid balances nociceptive signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kollert, Sina; Dombert, Benjamin; Döring, Frank; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons TRESK channels constitute a major current component of the standing outward current IKSO. A prominent physiological role of TRESK has been attributed to pain sensation. During inflammation mediators of pain e.g. lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are released and modulate nociception. We demonstrate co-expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in DRG neurons. Heterologous expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in Xenopus oocytes revealed augmentation of basal K+ currents upon LPA application. In DRG neurons nociception can result from TRPV1 activation by capsaicin or LPA. Upon co-expression in Xenopus oocytes LPA simultaneously increased both depolarising TRPV1 and hyperpolarising TRESK currents. Patch-clamp recordings in cultured DRG neurons from TRESK[wt] mice displayed increased IKSO after application of LPA whereas under these conditions IKSO in neurons from TRESK[ko] mice remained unaltered. Under current-clamp conditions LPA application differentially modulated excitability in these genotypes upon depolarising pulses. Spike frequency was attenuated in TRESK[wt] neurons and, in contrast, augmented in TRESK[ko] neurons. Accordingly, excitation of nociceptive neurons by LPA is balanced by co-activation of TRESK channels. Hence excitation of sensory neurons is strongly controlled by the activity of TRESK channels, which therefore are good candidates for the treatment of pain disorders. PMID:26224542

  9. High glucose induces activation of NF-κB inflammatory signaling through IκBα sumoylation in rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Ling; Zhou, Xueqin; Gao, Chenlin; Yang, Maojun; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Jianhua; Jiang, Lan; Gan, Huakui; Gou, Fang; Feng, Hong; Peng, Juan; Xu, Yong

    2013-08-30

    could be mostly reversed by adding MG132 (p < 0.05). The present results support the hypothesis that high glucose may activate NF-κB inflammatory signaling through IκBα sumoylation and ubiquitination.

  10. Flavonoids Identified from Korean Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi Inhibit Inflammatory Signaling by Suppressing Activation of NF-κB and MAPK in RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Gyeong-Eun; Kim, Jin-A.; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Yumnam, Silvia; Lee, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Won-Sup; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyeon-Soo; Kim, Gon-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi has been used as traditional medicine for treating inflammatory diseases, hepatitis, tumors, and diarrhea in Asia. Hence, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect and determined the molecular mechanism of action of flavonoids isolated from Korean S. baicalensis G. in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed to examine cytotoxicity of the flavonoids at various concentrations of 10, 40, 70, and 100 µg/mL. No cytotoxicity was observed in RAW 264.7 cells at these concentrations. Furthermore, the flavonoids decreased production of inflammatory mediators such as inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha and inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Moreover, to identify the differentially expressed proteins in RAW 264.7 cells of the control, LPS-treated, and flavonoid-treated groups, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were conducted. The identified proteins were involved in the inflammatory response and included PRKA anchor protein and heat shock protein 70 kD. These findings suggest that the flavonoids isolated from S. baicalensis G. might have anti-inflammatory effects that regulate the expression of inflammatory mediators by inhibiting the NF-κB signaling pathway via the MAPK signaling pathway in RAW 264.7 cells. PMID:24348728

  11. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus jensenii elicits anti-inflammatory activity in porcine intestinal epithelial cells by modulating negative regulators of the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Villena, Julio; Tohno, Masanori; Fujie, Hitomi; Hosoya, Shoichi; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Suda, Yoshihito; Kawai, Yasushi; Saito, Tadao; Makino, Seiya; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    The effect of Lactobacillus jensenii TL2937 on the inflammatory immune response triggered by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a porcine intestinal epitheliocyte cell line (PIE cells) was evaluated. Challenges with ETEC or LPS elicited Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated inflammatory responses in cultured PIE cells, indicating that our cell line may be useful for studying inflammation in the guts of weaning piglets. In addition, we demonstrated that L. jensenii TL2937 attenuated the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines caused by ETEC or LPS challenge by downregulating TLR4-dependent nuclear factorκB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that L. jensenii TL2937 stimulation of PIE cells upregulated three negative regulators of TLRs: A20, Bcl-3, and MKP-1, deepening the understanding of an immunobiotic mechanism of action. L. jensenii TL2937-mediated induction of negative regulators of TLRs would have a substantial physiological impact on homeostasis in PIE cells, because excessive TLR inflammatory signaling would be downregulated. These results indicated that PIE cells can be used to study the mechanisms involved in the protective activity of immunobiotics against intestinal inflammatory damage and may provide useful information for the development of new immunologically functional feeds that help to prevent inflammatory intestinal disorders, including weaning-associated intestinal inflammation.

  12. A novel synthetic derivative of melatonin, 5-hydroxy-2’-isobutyl-streptochlorin (HIS), inhibits inflammatory responses via regulation of TRIF-dependent signaling and inflammasome activation

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Do-Wan; Shin, Hee Jae; Han, Ji-Won; Ji, Young-Eun; Jang, Cheol-Hun; Koppula, Sushruta; Kang, Tae-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-04-15

    Melatonin is substantially reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we synthesized a novel melatonin derivative, 5-hydroxy-2′-isobutyl-streptochlorin (HIS), which displayed superior anti-inflammatory properties to its parent compound. Further, we explored its underlying mechanisms in cellular and experimental animal models. Lipopolysaccharide was used to induce in vitro inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages. LPS-primed macrophages were pulsed with biologically unrelated toxic molecules to evaluate the role of HIS on inflammasome activation. In vivo verifications were carried out using acute lung injury (ALI) and Escherichia coli-induced septic shock mouse models. HIS inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators and cytokines such as nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase 2, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HIS suppressed the infiltration of immune cells into the lung and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid in the ALI mouse model. Mechanistic studies revealed that the inhibitory effects of HIS were mediated through the regulation of the TIR domain-containing, adaptor-inducing, interferon-β (TRIF)-dependent signaling pathway from toll-like receptors. Further, HIS attenuated IL-1β secretion via the inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation independent of mitochondrial ROS production. Furthermore, HIS suppressed IL-1β, IL-6 and interferon-β production in peritoneal lavage in the Escherichia coli-induced sepsis mouse model. In conclusion, HIS exerted potent anti-inflammatory effects via the regulation of TRIF-dependent signaling and inflammasome activation. Notably, the superior anti-inflammatory properties of this derivative compared with its parent compound could be a promising lead for treating various inflammatory-mediated diseases. - Highlights: • Νovel compound, 5-hydroxy-2′-isobutyl-streptochlorin (HIS) was

  13. Pinellia ternata lectin exerts a pro-inflammatory effect on macrophages by inducing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the activation of the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Li; Zhao, Teng-Fei; Wu, Hao; Pan, Yao-Zong; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Kui-Long; Zhang, Chen-Chao; Jin, Yang-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Pinellia ternata (PT) is a widely used traditional Chinese medicine. The raw material has a throat-irritating toxicity that is associated with the PT lectin (PTL). PTL is a monocot lectin isolated from the tubers of PT, which exhibits mouse peritoneal acute inflammatory effects in vivo. The present study aimed to investigate the pro-inflammatory effect of PTL on macrophages. PTL (50 µg/ml)‑stimulated macrophages enhanced the chemotactic activity of neutrophils. PTL (50, 100, 200 and 400 µg/ml) significantly elevated the production of cytokines [tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF-α) , interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6]. PTL (25, 50 and 100 µg/ml) induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. PTL also caused transfer of p65 from the macrophage cytoplasm to the nucleus and activated the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway. Scanning electron microscope images revealed severe cell swelling and membrane integrity defection of macrophages following PTL (100 µg/ml) stimulation, which was also associated with inflammation. PTL had pro‑inflammatory activity, involving induced neutrophil migration, cytokine release, ROS overproduction and the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which was associated with the activation of macrophages.

  14. Crocin Inhibits Oxidative Stress and Pro-inflammatory Response of Microglial Cells Associated with Diabetic Retinopathy Through the Activation of PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinguang; Huo, Fuquan; Liu, Bei; Liu, Jing; Chen, Tao; Li, Junping; Zhu, Zhongqiao; Lv, Bochang

    2017-02-25

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus that is closely associated with the degeneration and loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) caused by diabetic microangiopathy and subsequent oxidative stress and an inflammatory response. Microglial cells are classed as neurogliocytes and play a significant role in neurodegenerative diseases. Over-activated microglial cells may cause neurotoxicity and induce the death and apoptosis of RGCs. Crocin is one of the two most pharmacologically bioactive constituents in saffron. In the present study, we focused on the role of microglial cells in DR, suggesting that DR may cause the over-activation of microglial cells and induce oxidative stress and the release of pro-inflammatory factors. Microglial cells BV-2 and N9 were cultured, and high-glucose (HG) and free fatty acid (FFA) were used to simulate diabetes. The results showed that HG-FFA co-treatment caused the up-regulated expression of CD11b and Iba-1, indicating that BV-2 and N9 cells were over-activated. Moreover, oxidative stress markers and pro-inflammatory factors were significantly enhanced by HG-FFA treatment. We found that crocin prevented the oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory response induced by HG-FFA co-treatment. Moreover, using the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002, we revealed that PI3K/Akt signaling plays a significant role in blocking oxidative stress, suppressing the pro-inflammatory response, and maintaining the neuroprotective effects of crocin. In total, these results provide a new insight into DR and DR-induced oxidative stress and the inflammatory response, which provide a potential therapeutic target for neuronal damage, vision loss, and other DR-induced complications.

  15. Pro-inflammatory Signaling in a 3D Organotypic Skin Model after Low LET Irradiation—NF-κB, COX-2 Activation, and Impact on Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Acheva, Anna; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 85% of radiotherapy patients develop acute radiation dermatitis, which is an inflammatory reaction of the skin at the treatment field and in the surrounding area. The aims of this study were to unravel the mechanisms of radiation-induced inflammatory responses after localized irradiation in a human 3D organotypic skin culture model. This could provide possible inflammatory targets for reduction of skin side effects. 3D organotypic skin cultures were set up and locally irradiated with 225 kVp X-rays, using a combination of full exposure and partial shielding (50%) of the cultures. The secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the phenotype, and the differentiation markers expression of the cultures were assessed up to 10 days postirradiation. The pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathways have been studied. The results showed fast activation of NF-κB, most likely triggered by DNA damage in the irradiated cells, followed by upregulation of p38 MAPK and COX-2 in the irradiated and surrounding, non-irradiated, areas of the 3D cultures. The application of the COX-2 inhibitor sc-236 was effective at reducing the COX-2 mRNA levels 4 h postirradiation. The same inhibitor also suppressed the PGE2 secretion significantly 72 h after the treatment. The expression of a pro-inflammatory phenotype and abnormal differentiation markers of the cultures were also reduced. However, the use of an NF-κB inhibitor (Bay 11-7085) did not have the predicted positive effect on the cultures phenotype postirradiation. Radiation-induced pro-inflammatory responses have been observed in the 3D skin model. The activated signaling pathways involved NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. Further experiments aiming to suppress the inflammatory response via specific inhibitors showed that COX-2 is a suitable target for reduction of the normal skin inflammatory responses at radiotherapy, while NF

  16. Pro-inflammatory Signaling in a 3D Organotypic Skin Model after Low LET Irradiation-NF-κB, COX-2 Activation, and Impact on Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Acheva, Anna; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 85% of radiotherapy patients develop acute radiation dermatitis, which is an inflammatory reaction of the skin at the treatment field and in the surrounding area. The aims of this study were to unravel the mechanisms of radiation-induced inflammatory responses after localized irradiation in a human 3D organotypic skin culture model. This could provide possible inflammatory targets for reduction of skin side effects. 3D organotypic skin cultures were set up and locally irradiated with 225 kVp X-rays, using a combination of full exposure and partial shielding (50%) of the cultures. The secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the phenotype, and the differentiation markers expression of the cultures were assessed up to 10 days postirradiation. The pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathways have been studied. The results showed fast activation of NF-κB, most likely triggered by DNA damage in the irradiated cells, followed by upregulation of p38 MAPK and COX-2 in the irradiated and surrounding, non-irradiated, areas of the 3D cultures. The application of the COX-2 inhibitor sc-236 was effective at reducing the COX-2 mRNA levels 4 h postirradiation. The same inhibitor also suppressed the PGE2 secretion significantly 72 h after the treatment. The expression of a pro-inflammatory phenotype and abnormal differentiation markers of the cultures were also reduced. However, the use of an NF-κB inhibitor (Bay 11-7085) did not have the predicted positive effect on the cultures phenotype postirradiation. Radiation-induced pro-inflammatory responses have been observed in the 3D skin model. The activated signaling pathways involved NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. Further experiments aiming to suppress the inflammatory response via specific inhibitors showed that COX-2 is a suitable target for reduction of the normal skin inflammatory responses at radiotherapy, while NF

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Bee Venom in BV2 Microglial Cells: Mediation of MyD88-Dependent NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jung; Hong, Seung Bok; Park, Jin-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used as a traditional folk medicine in Korea. It has been reportedly used for the treatment of arthritis, cancer, and inflammation. Although its anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated inflammatory cells has been reported, the exact mechanism of its anti-inflammatory action has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of bee venom in BV2 microglial cells. We first investigated whether NO production in LPS-activated BV2 cells was inhibited by bee venom, and further iNOS mRNA and protein expressions were determined. The mRNA and protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines were examined using semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Moreover, modulation of the transcription factor NF-κB by bee venom was also investigated using a luciferase assay. LPS-induced NO production in BV2 microglial cells was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner upon pretreatment with bee venom. Bee venom markedly reduced the mRNA expression of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and suppressed LPS-induced activation of MyD88 and IRAK1 and phosphorylation of TAK1. Moreover, NF-κB translocation by IKKα/β phosphorylation and subsequent IκB-α degradation were also attenuated. Thus, collectively, these results indicate that bee venom exerts its anti-inflammatory activity via the IRAK1/TAK1/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27563334

  18. Mineralocorticoid Receptor (MR) trans-Activation of Inflammatory AP-1 Signaling: DEPENDENCE ON DNA SEQUENCE, MR CONFORMATION, AND AP-1 FAMILY MEMBER EXPRESSION.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Edward J; Elinoff, Jason M; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Hou, Angela; Cai, Rongman; Sun, Junfeng; Blaine, Kevin P; Wang, Shuibang; Danner, Robert L

    2016-11-04

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used to treat inflammatory disorders. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can tether to inflammatory transcription factor complexes, such as NFκB and AP-1, and trans-repress the transcription of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. In contrast, aldosterone and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) primarily promote cardiovascular inflammation by incompletely understood mechanisms. Although MR has been shown to weakly repress NFκB, its role in modulating AP-1 has not been established. Here, the effects of GR and MR on NFκB and AP-1 signaling were directly compared using a variety of ligands, two different AP-1 consensus sequences, GR and MR DNA-binding domain mutants, and siRNA knockdown or overexpression of core AP-1 family members. Both GR and MR repressed an NFκB reporter without influencing p65 or p50 binding to DNA. Likewise, neither GR nor MR affected AP-1 binding, but repression or activation of AP-1 reporters occurred in a ligand-, AP-1 consensus sequence-, and AP-1 family member-specific manner. Notably, aldosterone interactions with both GR and MR demonstrated a potential to activate AP-1. DNA-binding domain mutations that eliminated the ability of GR and MR to cis-activate a hormone response element-driven reporter variably affected the strength and polarity of these responses. Importantly, MR modulation of NFκB and AP-1 signaling was consistent with a trans-mechanism, and AP-1 effects were confirmed for specific gene targets in primary human cells. Steroid nuclear receptor trans-effects on inflammatory signaling are context-dependent and influenced by nuclear receptor conformation, DNA sequence, and the expression of heterologous binding partners. Aldosterone activation of AP-1 may contribute to its proinflammatory effects in the vasculature.

  19. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling.

    PubMed

    Londino, James D; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-12-25

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling.

  20. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Londino, James D.; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling. PMID:26534964

  1. The Nogo/Nogo Receptor (NgR) Signal Is Involved in Neuroinflammation through the Regulation of Microglial Inflammatory Activation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yinquan; Yan, Jun; Li, Chenhui; Zhou, Xiao; Yao, Lemeng; Pang, Tao; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Luyong; Mao, Lei; Liao, Hong

    2015-11-27

    Microglia have been proposed to play a pivotal role in the inflammation response of the CNS by expressing a range of proinflammatory enzymes and cytokines under pathological stimulus. Our previous study has confirmed that Nogo receptor (NgR), an axon outgrowth inhibition receptor, is also expressed on microglia and regulates cell adhesion and migration behavior in vitro. In the present study, we further investigated the proinflammatory effects and possible mechanisms of Nogo on microglia in vitro. In this study, Nogo peptide, Nogo-P4, a 25-amino acid core inhibitory peptide sequence of Nogo-66, was used. We found that Nogo-P4 was able to induce the expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, TNF-α, NO, and prostaglandin E2 in microglia, which could be reversed by NEP1-40 (Nogo-66(1-40) antagonist peptide), phosphatidylinositol-specificphospholipase C, or NgR siRNA treatment. After Nogo-P4 stimulated microglia, the phosphorylation levels of NF-κB and STAT3 were increased obviously, which further mediated microglia expressing proinflammatory factors induced by Nogo-P4. Taken together, we concluded that Nogo peptide could directly take part in CNS inflammatory process by influencing the expression of proinflammatory factors in microglia, which were related to the NF-κB and STAT3 signal pathways. Besides neurite outgrowth restriction, the Nogo/NgR signal might be involved in multiple processes in various inflammation-associated CNS diseases.

  2. Stress and Non-Stress Roles of Inflammatory Signals during HSC Emergence and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Clapes, Thomas; Lefkopoulos, Stylianos; Trompouki, Eirini

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare population that gives rise to almost all cells of the hematopoietic system, including immune cells. Until recently, it was thought that immune cells sense inflammatory signaling and HSCs respond only secondarily to these signals. However, it was later shown that adult HSCs could directly sense and respond to inflammatory signals, resulting in a higher output of immune cells. Recent studies demonstrated that inflammatory signaling is also vital for HSC ontogeny. These signals are thought to arise in the absence of pathogens, are active during development, and indispensable for HSC formation. In contrast, during times of stress and disease, inflammatory responses can be activated and can have devastating effects on HSCs. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about inflammatory signaling in HSC development and maintenance, as well as the endogenous molecular cues that can trigger inflammatory pathway activation. Finally, we comment of the role of inflammatory signaling in hematopoietic diseases. PMID:27872627

  3. Quercetin inhibits AMPK/TXNIP activation and reduces inflammatory lesions to improve insulin signaling defect in the hypothalamus of high fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Pan, Ying; Wang, Rong; Kang, Lin-Lin; Xue, Qiao-Chu; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2014-04-01

    Fructose is a nutritional composition of fruits and honey. Its excess consumption induces insulin resistance-associated metabolic diseases. Hypothalamic insulin signaling plays a pivotal role in controlling whole-body insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. Quercetin, a natural flavonoid, has been reported to ameliorate high fructose-induced rat insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated its regulatory effects on the hypothalamus of high fructose-fed rats. Rats were fed 10% fructose in drinking water for 10 weeks. After 4 weeks, these animals were orally treated with quercetin (50 and 100 mg/kg), allopurinol (5 mg/kg) and water daily for the next 6 weeks, respectively. Quercetin effectively restored high fructose-induced hypothalamic insulin signaling defect by up-regulating the phosphorylation of insulin receptor and protein kinase B. Furthermore, quercetin was found to reduce metabolic nutrient sensors adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) overexpression, as well as the glutamine-glutamate cycle dysfunction in the hypothalamus of high fructose-fed rats. Subsequently, it ameliorated high fructose-caused hypothalamic inflammatory lesions in rats by suppressing the activation of hypothalamic nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway and NOD-like receptor 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome with interleukin 1β maturation. Allopurinol had similar effects. These results provide in vivo evidence that quercetin-mediated down-regulation of AMPK/TXNIP and subsequent inhibition of NF-κB pathway/NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the hypothalamus of rats may be associated with the reduction of hypothalamic inflammatory lesions, contributing to the improvement of hypothalamic insulin signaling defect in this model. Thus, quercetin with the central activity may be a therapeutic for high fructose-induced insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia in humans.

  4. Inflammatory Signalings Involved in Airway and Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ta; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2013-01-01

    In respiratory diseases, there is an increased expression of multiple inflammatory proteins in the respiratory tract, including cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Chemokines have been shown to regulate inflammation and immune cell differentiation. Moreover, many of the known inflammatory target proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), are associated with airway and lung inflammation in response to various stimuli. Injuriously environmental stimuli can access the lung through either the airways or the pulmonary and systemic circulations. The time course and intensity of responses by resident and circulating cells may be regulated by various inflammatory signalings, including Src family kinases (SFKs), protein kinase C (PKC), growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)/reactive oxygen species (ROS), PI3K/Akt, MAPKs, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and other signaling molecules. These signaling molecules regulate both key inflammatory signaling transduction pathways and target proteins involved in airway and lung inflammation. Here, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the expression of inflammatory target proteins associated with the respiratory diseases. Knowledge of the mechanisms of inflammation regulation could lead to the pharmacological manipulation of anti-inflammatory drugs in the respiratory diseases. PMID:23690670

  5. Homocysteine induces inflammatory transcriptional signaling in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shu; Ciment, Stephen; Jan, Michael; Tran, Tran; Pham, Hung; Cueto, Ramon; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Here, we studied transcriptional regulation in homocysteine (Hcy)-induced gene expression in monocytes (MC). We identified 11 Hcy-induced genes, 17 anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10-induced, 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFN gamma)-induced and 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha)-induced genes through literature search. Binding frequency of 36 transcription factors (TFs) implicated in inflammation and MC differentiation were analyzed within core promoter regions of identified genes, and classified into 3 classes based on the significant binding frequency to the promoter of Hcy-induced genes. Class 1 TFs exert high significant binding frequency in Hcy-induced genes. Class 2 and 3 TFs have low and no significant binding frequency, respectively. Class 1 TF binding occurrence in Hcy-induced genes is similar to that in IFN gamma -induced genes, but not that in TNF alpha -induced. We conclude that Hcy is a pro-inflammatory amino acid and induces inflammatory transcriptional signal pathways mediated by class 1 TF. We term class 1 TF as putative Hcy-responsive TFs.

  6. Calcineurin inhibitors recruit protein kinases JAK2 and JNK, TLR signaling and the UPR to activate NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses in kidney tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Berzal, Sergio; Carrasco, Susana; Fernández-Fernández, Beatriz; and others

    2013-11-01

    The calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine (CsA) and tacrolimus are key drugs in current immunosuppressive regimes for solid organ transplantation. However, they are nephrotoxic and promote death and profibrotic responses in tubular cells. Moreover, renal inflammation is observed in CNI nephrotoxicity but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We have now studied molecular pathways leading to inflammation elicited by the CNIs in cultured and kidney tubular cells. Both CsA and tacrolimus elicited a proinflammatory response in tubular cells as evidenced by a transcriptomics approach. Transcriptomics also suggested several potential pathways leading to expression of proinflammatory genes. Validation and functional studies disclosed that in tubular cells, CNIs activated protein kinases such as the JAK2/STAT3 and TAK1/JNK/AP-1 pathways, TLR4/Myd88/IRAK signaling and the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) to promote NF-κB activation and proinflammatory gene expression. CNIs also activated an Nrf2/HO-1-dependent compensatory response and the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane inhibited JAK2 and JNK activation and inflammation. A murine model of CsA nephrotoxicity corroborated activation of the proinflammatory pathways identified in cell cultures. Human CNIs nephrotoxicity was also associated with NF-κB, STAT3 and IRE1α activation. In conclusion, CNIs recruit several intracellular pathways leading to previously non-described proinflammatory actions in renal tubular cells. Identification of these pathways provides novel clues for therapeutic intervention to limit CNIs nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Molecular mechanisms modulating CNI renal inflammation were investigated. • Kinases, immune receptors and ER stress mediate the inflammatory response to CNIs. • Several intracellular pathways activate NF-κB in CNIs-treated tubular cells. • A NF-κB-dependent cytokine profile characterizes CNIs-induced inflammation. • CNI nephrotoxicity was associated to inflammatory

  7. The Active Form of Vitamin D Transcriptionally Represses Smad7 Signaling and Activates Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) to Inhibit the Differentiation of a Inflammatory T Helper Cell Subset and Suppress Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Ravikanth; Mahajan, Sahil; Bhagyaraj, Ella; Sethi, Kanupriya; Kalra, Rashi; Chandra, Vemika; Gupta, Pawan

    2015-05-08

    The ability of the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), to transcriptionally modulate Smads to inhibit Th17 differentiation and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has not been adequately studied. This study reports modulation of Smad signaling by the specific binding of the VDR along with its heterodimeric partner RXR to the negative vitamin D response element on the promoter of Smad7, which leads to Smad7 gene repression. The vitamin D receptor-mediated increase in Smad3 expression partially explains the IL10 augmentation seen in Th17 cells. Furthermore, the VDR axis also modulates non-Smad signaling by activating ERK during differentiation of Th17 cells, which inhibits the Th17-specific genes il17a, il17f, il22, and il23r. In vivo EAE experiments revealed that, 1,25(OH)2D3 suppression of EAE correlates with the Smad7 expression in the spleen and lymph nodes. Furthermore, Smad7 expression also correlates well with IL17 and IFNγ expression in CNS infiltered inflammatory T cells. We also observed similar gene repression of Smad7 in in vitro differentiated Th1 cells when cultured in presence of 1,25(OH)2D3. The above canonical and non-canonical pathways in part address the ability of 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR to inhibit EAE.

  8. Down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB signaling is involved in rapamycin suppression of TLR2-induced inflammatory response in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruili; Zhang, Yi; Ma, Shijiang; Qi, Hengtian; Wang, Mingyong; Duan, Juhong; Ma, Shujun; Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Guancheng; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Tripalmitoyl-S-glycero-Cys-(Lys) 4 (Pam3CSK4) interacted with TLR2 induces inflammatory responses through the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signal pathway. Rapamycin can suppress TLR-induced inflammatory responses; however, the detailed molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, the mechanism by which rapamycin suppresses TLR2-induced inflammatory responses was investigated. It was found that Pam3CSK4-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels in THP-1 cells pre-treated with various concentrations of rapamycin. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase-B (PI3K/AKT) signaling did not suppress the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, indicating that the immunosuppression mediated by rapamycin in THP1 cells is independent of the PI3K/AKT pathway. RT-PCR showed that Erk and NF-κB signal pathways are related to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of Erk or NF-κB signaling significantly down-regulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, western blot showed that pre-treatment of THP-1 cells with rapamycin down-regulates MAPKs and NF-κB signaling induced by Pam3CSK4 stimulation, suggesting that rapamycin suppresses Pam3CSK4-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines via inhibition of TLR2 signaling. It was concluded that rapamycin suppresses TLR2-induced inflammatory responses by down-regulation of Erk and NF-κB signaling.

  9. ANKRD1 modulates inflammatory responses in C2C12 myoblasts through feedback inhibition of NF-κB signaling activity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2015-08-14

    Transcription factors of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) family play a pivotal role in inflammation, immunity and cell survival responses. Recent studies revealed that NF-κB also regulates the processes of muscle atrophy. NF-κB activity is regulated by various factors, including ankyrin repeat domain 2 (AnkrD2), which belongs to the muscle ankyrin repeat protein family. Another member of this family, AnkrD1 is also a transcriptional effector. The expression levels of AnkrD1 are highly upregulated in denervated skeletal muscle, suggesting an involvement of AnkrD1 in NF-κB mediated cellular responses to paralysis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactive role of AnkrD1 in NF-κB mediated cellular responses is not well understood. In the current study, we examined the effect of AnkrD1 on NF-κB activity and determined the interactions between AnkrD1 expression and NF-κB signaling induced by TNFα in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts. TNFα upregulated AnkrD1 mRNA and protein levels. AnkrD1-siRNA significantly increased TNFα-induced transcriptional activation of NF-κB, whereas overexpression of AnkrD1 inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AnkrD1 was able to bind p50 subunit of NF-κB and vice versa. Finally, CHIP assays revealed that AnkrD1 bound chromatin at a NF-κB binding site in the AnrkD2 promoter and required NF-κB to do so. These results provide evidence of signaling integration between AnkrD1 and NF-κB pathways, and suggest a novel anti-inflammatory role of AnkrD1 through feedback inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity by which AnkrD1 modulates the balance between physiological and pathological inflammatory responses in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • AnkrD1 is upregulated by TNFα and represses NF-κB-induced transcriptional activity. • AnkrD1 binds to p50 subunit of NF-κB and is recruited to NF-κB bound to chromatin. • AnkrD1 mediates a feed-back inhibitory loop

  10. ANKRD1 modulates inflammatory responses in C2C12 myoblasts through feedback inhibition of NF-κB signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher

    2015-08-14

    Transcription factors of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) family play a pivotal role in inflammation, immunity and cell survival responses. Recent studies revealed that NF-κB also regulates the processes of muscle atrophy. NF-κB activity is regulated by various factors, including ankyrin repeat domain 2 (AnkrD2), which belongs to the muscle ankyrin repeat protein family. Another member of this family, AnkrD1 is also a transcriptional effector. The expression levels of AnkrD1 are highly upregulated in denervated skeletal muscle, suggesting an involvement of AnkrD1 in NF-κB mediated cellular responses to paralysis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactive role of AnkrD1 in NF-κB mediated cellular responses is not well understood. In the current study, we examined the effect of AnkrD1 on NF-κB activity and determined the interactions between AnkrD1 expression and NF-κB signaling induced by TNFα in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts. TNFα upregulated AnkrD1 mRNA and protein levels. AnkrD1-siRNA significantly increased TNFα-induced transcriptional activation of NF-κB, whereas overexpression of AnkrD1 inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AnkrD1 was able to bind p50 subunit of NF-κB and vice versa. Finally, CHIP assays revealed that AnkrD1 bound chromatin at a NF-κB binding site in the AnrkD2 promoter and required NF-κB to do so. These results provide evidence of signaling integration between AnkrD1 and NF-κB pathways, and suggest a novel anti-inflammatory role of AnkrD1 through feedback inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity by which AnkrD1 modulates the balance between physiological and pathological inflammatory responses in skeletal muscle.

  11. Purinergic signaling in inflammatory cells: P2 receptor expression, functional effects, and modulation of inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Fenila; Pérez Novo, Claudina; Bachert, Claus; Van Crombruggen, Koen

    2013-09-01

    Extracellular ATP and related nucleotides promote a wide range of pathophysiological responses via activation of cell surface purinergic P2 receptors. Almost every cell type expresses P2 receptors and/or exhibit regulated release of ATP. In this review, we focus on the purinergic receptor distribution in inflammatory cells and their implication in diverse immune responses by providing an overview of the current knowledge in the literature related to purinergic signaling in neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and mast cells. The pathophysiological role of purinergic signaling in these cells include among others calcium mobilization, actin polymerization, chemotaxis, release of mediators, cell maturation, cytotoxicity, and cell death. We finally discuss the therapeutic potential of P2 receptor subtype selective drugs in inflammatory conditions.

  12. Phosphodiesterase 5a Inhibition with Adenoviral Short Hairpin RNA Benefits Infarcted Heart Partially through Activation of Akt Signaling Pathway and Reduction of Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhe; Zhang, Jian; Paul, Christian; Wang, Yigang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference therapy targeting phosphodiesterase 5a after myocardial infarction (MI) has been shown to mitigate post-MI heart failure. We investigated the mechanisms that underpin the beneficial effects of PDE5a inhibition through shRNA on post-MI heart failure. Methods An adenoviral vector with an shRNA sequence inserted was adopted for the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5a (Ad-shPDE5a) in vivo and in vitro. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in male C57BL/6J mice by left coronary artery ligation, and immediately after that, the Ad-shPDE5a was injected intramyocardially around the MI region and border areas. Results Four weeks post-MI, the Ad-shPDE5a-treated mice showed significant mitigation of the left ventricular (LV) dilatation and dysfunction compared to control mice. Infarction size and fibrosis were also significantly reduced in Ad-shPDE5a-treated mice. Additionally, Ad-shPDE5a treatment decreased the MI-induced inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β1, which was confirmed in vitro in Ad-shPDE5a transfected myofibroblasts cultured under oxygen glucose deprivation. Finally, Ad-shPDE5a treatment was found to activate the myocardial Akt signaling pathway in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Conclusion These findings indicate that PDE5a inhibition by Ad-shPDE5a via the Akt signal pathway could be of significant value in the design of future therapeutics for post-MI heart failure. PMID:26709517

  13. Intracellular Uptake of Curcumin-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Exhibit Anti-Inflammatory Activities Superior to Those of Curcumin Through the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Zhu, Rongrong; Sun, Dongmei; Sun, Xiaoyu; Geng, Zhengsong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shi-Long

    2015-03-01

    Curcumin (Cur) is a naturally derived, novel anti-inflammatory agent, but its poor solubility limits its clinical use. The aim of the present study was to encapsulate Cur into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to improve its anti-inflammatory activity. The Cur-loaded SLNs (Cur-SLNs) were prepared using emulsification and low-temperature solidification methods. In contrast to free Cur, the particles were well dispersed in aqueous medium, showing a narrow size distribution with a range of 55 : 1.2 nm, a zeta potential value of -26.2 ± 1.3 mV, and a high drug loading efficiency of 37% ± 2.5%. The sustained release of Cur was observed for up to 6 days. The particles displayed enhanced stability in phosphate-buffered saline by protecting the encapsulated Cur against hydrolysis and biotransformation, as well as increasing biocompatibility. Cur-SLNs were more effective than free Cur at reducing the expression levels of several pro- inflammatory mediators, including inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) and nitric oxide (NO), under in vitro conditions. By Western blotting, we found that Cur-SLNs were more active than free Cur in inhibiting the LPS-induced activation of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB through the suppression of IκB kinase activation. Compared to free Cur, Cur-SLNs had an increased intracellular uptake over time (observed after 24 h) in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, the Cur-SLNs (≥ 20 μM) significantly improved RAW264.7 cell viability by inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, these results demonstrated that SLNs could be used as potential anti-inflammatory drug carriers for the treatment of various chronic diseases.

  14. Suppression of Inflammatory Responses by Dihydromyricetin, a Flavonoid from Ampelopsis grossedentata, via Inhibiting the Activation of NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hou, X L; Tong, Q; Wang, W Q; Shi, C Y; Xiong, W; Chen, J; Liu, X; Fang, J G

    2015-07-24

    Ampelopsis grossedentata, an indigenous plant in southern China, has been used for treating pharyngitis in traditional Chinese medicine for hundreds of years. In this study, we explored the anti-inflammatory activity of dihydromyricetin (1), its major bioactive component, and the underlying mechanism of this action. We demonstrated that 1 suppressed the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as well as increased the level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice. Moreover, 1 was found to markedly inhibit the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, whereas it increased the level of IL-10 in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Compound 1 also reduced the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in macrophage cells. Furthermore, 1 suppressed the phosphorylation of NF-kappa B (NF-κB) and IκBα as well as the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK but not ERK1/2 in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, the present results suggest that 1 exerts its topical anti-inflammatory action through suppressing the activation of NF-κB and the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK. Thus, 1 may be a potentially useful therapeutic agent for inflammatory-related diseases.

  15. Altered glycolipid and glycerophospholipid signaling drive inflammatory cascades in adrenomyeloneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Montserrat; Jové, Mariona; Schlüter, Agatha; Casasnovas, Carlos; Villarroya, Francesc; Guilera, Cristina; Ortega, Francisco J; Naudí, Alba; Pamplona, Reinald; Gimeno, Ramón; Fourcade, Stéphane; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pujol, Aurora

    2015-12-15

    X-linked adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder caused by malfunction of the ABCD1 gene, characterized by slowly progressing spastic paraplegia affecting corticospinal tracts, and adrenal insufficiency. AMN is the most common phenotypic manifestation of adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). In some cases, an inflammatory cerebral demyelination occurs associated to poor prognosis in cerebral AMN (cAMN). Though ABCD1 codes for a peroxisomal transporter of very long-chain fatty acids, the molecular mechanisms that govern disease onset and progression, or its transformation to a cerebral, inflammatory demyelinating form, remain largely unknown. Here we used an integrated -omics approach to identify novel biomarkers and altered network dynamic characteristic of, and possibly driving, the disease. We combined an untargeted metabolome assay of plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of AMN patients, which used liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF), with a functional genomics analysis of spinal cords of Abcd1(-) mouse. The results uncovered altered nodes in lipid-driven proinflammatory cascades, such as glycosphingolipid and glycerophospholipid synthesis, governed by the β-1,4-galactosyltransferase (B4GALT6), the phospholipase 2γ (PLA2G4C) and the choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase (CEPT1) enzymes. Confirmatory investigations revealed a non-classic, inflammatory profile, consisting on the one hand of raised plasma levels of several eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid through PLA2G4C activity, together with also the proinflammatory cytokines IL6, IL8, MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In contrast, we detected a more protective, Th2-shifted response in PBMC. Thus, our findings illustrate a previously unreported connection between ABCD1 dysfunction, glyco- and glycerolipid-driven inflammatory signaling and a fine-tuned inflammatory response underlying a disease considered non-inflammatory.

  16. Individuals with increased inflammatory response to ozone demonstrate muted signaling of immune cell trafficking pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Exposure to ozone activates innate immune function and causes neutrophilic (PMN) airway inflammation that in some individuals is robustly elevated. The interplay between immunoinflammatory function and genomic signaling in those with heightened inflammatory responsive...

  17. NF-kappaB Signaling in Chronic Inflammatory Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuliga, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are obstructive airway disorders which differ in their underlying causes and phenotypes but overlap in patterns of pharmacological treatments. In both asthma and COPD, oxidative stress contributes to airway inflammation by inducing inflammatory gene expression. The redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB (NF-κB), is an important participant in a broad spectrum of inflammatory networks that regulate cytokine activity in airway pathology. The anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids (GCs), a mainstay treatment for asthma, involve inhibition of NF-κB induced gene transcription. Ligand bound GC receptors (GRs) bind NF-κB to suppress the transcription of NF-κB responsive genes (i.e., transrepression). However, in severe asthma and COPD, the transrepression of NF-κB by GCs is negated as a consequence of post-translational changes to GR and histones involved in chromatin remodeling. Therapeutics which target NF-κB activation, including inhibitors of IκB kinases (IKKs) are potential treatments for asthma and COPD. Furthermore, reversing GR/histone acetylation shows promise as a strategy to treat steroid refractory airway disease by augmenting NF-κB transrepression. This review examines NF-κB signaling in airway inflammation and its potential as target for treatment of asthma and COPD. PMID:26131974

  18. Involvement of MAPK/NF-κB Signaling in the Activation of the Cholinergic Anti-Inflammatory Pathway in Experimental Colitis by Chronic Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Zhou, Kewen; Wang, Sheng; Li, Ping; Chen, Sijuan; Lin, Guiping; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Tinghuai

    2013-01-01

    Background Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is implicated in the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Therapies that increase cardiovagal activity, such as Mind-Body interventions, are currently confirmed to be effective in clinical trials in IBD. However, a poor understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms limits the popularization of therapies in clinical practice. The aim of the present study was to explore the mechanisms of these therapies against 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats using a chronic vagus nerve stimulation model in vivo, as well as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2) by acetylcholine in vitro. Methods and Results Colitis was induced in rats with rectal instillation of TNBS, and the effect of chronic VNS (0.25 mA, 20 Hz, 500 ms) on colonic inflammation was evaluated. Inflammatory responses were assessed by disease activity index (DAI), histological scores, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TNF-α and IL-6 production. The expression of Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) family members, IκB-α, and nuclear NF-κB p65 were studied by immunoblotting. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis was also applied to assess the sympathetic-vagal balance. DAI, histological scores, MPO activity, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly decreased by chronic VNS. Moreover, both VNS and acetylcholine reduced the phosphorylation of MAPKs and prevented the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. Methyllycaconitine (MLA) only reversed the inhibitory effect on p-ERK and intranuclear NF-κB p65 expression by ACh in vitro, no significant change was observed in the expression of p-p38 MAPK or p-JNK by MLA. Conclusion Vagal activity modification contributes to the beneficial effects of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in IBD-related inflamed colonic mucosa based on the activation

  19. Xiang-Qi-Tang and its active components exhibit anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant properties by inhibiting MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in LPS-treated rat cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    He, Chang-Liang; Yi, Peng-Fei; Fan, Qiao-Jia; Shen, Hai-Qing; Jiang, Xiao-Lin; Qin, Qian-Qian; Song, Zhou; Zhang, Cui; Wu, Shuai-Cheng; Wei, Xu-Bin; Li, Ying-Lun; Fu, Ben-Dong

    2013-04-01

    Xiang-Qi-Tang (XQT) is a Chinese herbal formula containing Cyperus rotundus, Astragalus membranaceus and Andrographis paniculata. Alpha-Cyperone (CYP), astragaloside IV (AS-IV) and andrographolide (AND) are the three major active components in this formula. XQT may modulate the inflammatory or coagulant responses. We therefore assessed the effects of XQT on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory model of rat cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (RCMECs). XQT, CYP, AS-IV and AND inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and up-regulated the mRNA expression of Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). XQT and CYP inhibited the secretion of tissue factor (TF). To further explore the mechanism, we found that XQT, or its active components CYP, AS-IV and AND significantly inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 phosphorylation protein expression as well as decreased the phosphorylation levels of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 proteins in LPS-stimulated RCMECs. These results suggested that XQT and its active components inhibited the expression of inflammatory and coagulant mediators via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) and NF-κB signaling pathways. These findings may contribute to future research on the action mechanisms of this formula, as well as therapy for inflammation- or coagulation-related diseases.

  20. Potential of flavonoids as anti-inflammatory agents: modulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression and signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Tuñón, M J; García-Mediavilla, M V; Sánchez-Campos, S; González-Gallego, J

    2009-03-01

    Flavonoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds widely present in fruits, vegetables, and beverages derived from plants. Reports have suggested that these compounds might be useful for the prevention of a number of diseases, partly due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It has been demonstrated that flavonoids are able to inhibit expression of isoforms of inducible nitric oxide synthase, ciclooxygenase and lipooxygenase, which are responsible for the production of a great amount of nitric oxide, prostanoids and leukotrienes, as well as other mediators of the inflammatory process such as cytokines, chemokines or adhesion molecules. Modulation of the cascade of molecular events leading to the over-expression of those mediators include inhibition of transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, activator protein 1, signal transducers and activators of transcription, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein and others. Effects on the binding capacity of transcription factors may be regulated through the inhibition of protein kinases involved in signal transduction, such as mitogen activated protein kinases. Although the numerous studies published with in vitro approaches allow identifying molecular mechanisms of flavonoid effects, the limited bioavailability of these molecules makes necessary validation in humans. Whatever the case, the data available make clear the potential utility of dietary flavonoids or new flavonoid-based agents for the possible treatment of inflammatory diseases. The present review summarizes recent research data focusing on the modulation of the expression of different inflammatory mediators by flavonoids and the effects on cell signaling pathways responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity.

  1. Inflammatory signaling in Alzheimer disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Robert

    2011-08-01

    To help define the relationships among inflammation, Alzheimer disease, and depression, the Texas Alzheimer's Research Consortium analyzed an array of inflammatory biomarkers in a cohort of patients with Alzheimer disease and in controls. Inflammation severity was highly correlated with earlier age at onset of Alzheimer disease and was also associated with cognitive decline. The relationship between inflammation and depression was not as clear, and it varied with aspects of depression, gender, and the presence of Alzheimer disease.

  2. Intravital Microscopic Methods to Evaluate Anti-inflammatory Effects and Signaling Mechanisms Evoked by Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Exogenous application of H2S donors, administered either acutely during an inflammatory response or as an antecedent preconditioning intervention that invokes the activation of anti-inflammatory cell survival programs, effectively limits leukocyte rolling, adhesion and emigration, generation of reactive oxygen species, chemokine and cell adhesion molecule expression, endothelial barrier disruption,capillary perfusion deficits, and parenchymal cell dysfunction and injury. This chapter focuses on intravital microscopic methods that can be used to assess the anti-inflammatory effects exerted by H2S, as well as to explore the cellular signaling mechanisms by which this gaseous molecule limits the aforementioned inflammatory responses. Recent advances include use of intravital multiphoton microscopy and optical biosensor technology to explore signaling mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25747477

  3. Oryza sativa (Rice) Hull Extract Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response in RAW264.7 Macrophages by Suppressing Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase, c-Jun N-terminal Kinase, and Nuclear Factor-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang Keun; Sung, Jeehye; Choi, Inwook; Kim, Yoonsook

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rice (Oryza sativa) is a major cereal crop in many Asian countries and an important staple food source. Rice hulls have been reported to possess antioxidant activities. Materials and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the antiinflammatory effects of rice hull extract and associated signal transduction mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Results: We found that rice hull extract inhibited nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 by suppressing the expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, respectively. The release of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rice hull extract attenuated the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), as well as the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Conclusion: This suggests that rice hull extract decreases the production of inflammatory mediators by downregulating ERK and JNK and the NF-κB signal pathway in RAW 264.7 cells. SUMMARY Rice hull extract inhibits the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages.Rice hull extract inhibited nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 by suppressing the expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, respectively.Rice hull extract exerted anti-inflammatory effect through inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways.Rice hull extract may provide a potential therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases. Abbreviations used: COX-2: cyclooxygenase-2, ERK: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, IκB: inhibitory kappa B, IL-1β: interleukin-1β, iNOS: inducible NO synthase, JNK: c-Jun N-terminal kinase, LPS: lipopolysaccharide, MAPKs: mitogen-activated protein kinases, NF-κB: nuclear factor-κB, NO: nitric oxide, PGE2: prostaglandin

  4. Sevoflurane Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Inflammatory Lung Injury via Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xi Jia; Li, Xiao Qian; Wang, Xiao Long; Tan, Wen Fei; Wang, Jun Ke

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection is a common cause of acute lung injury (ALI). This study was aimed to explore whether Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) play a role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and potential mechanisms. Methods In vivo: A sensitizing dose of LPS (50 µg) was administered i.p. to female mice before anesthesia with either 3% sevoflurane or phenobarbital i.p. After stabilization, the mice were challenged with 5 µg of intratracheal LPS to mimic inflammatory attack. The effects of sevoflurane were assessed by measurement of airway responsiveness to methacholine, histological examination, and IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Protein and gene expression of TLR4 and NF-κB were also assessed. In vitro: After pre-sensitization of ASMCs and ASM segments for 24h, levels of TLR4 and NF-κB proteins in cultured ASMCs were measured after continuous LPS exposure for 1, 3, 5, 12 and 24h in presence or absence of sevoflurane. Constrictor and relaxant responsiveness of ASM was measured 24 h afterwards. Results The mRNA and protein levels of NF-κB and TLR4 in ASM were increased and maintained at high level after LPS challenge throughout 24h observation period, both in vivo and in vitro. Sevoflurane reduced LPS-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, lung inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokines release in BALF as well as maximal isometric contractile force of ASM segments to acetylcholine, but it increased maximal relaxation response to isoproterenol. Treatment with specific NF-κB inhibitor produced similar protections as sevoflurane, including decreased expressions of TLR4 and NF-κB in cultured ASMCs and improved pharmacodynamic responsiveness of ASM to ACh and isoproterenol. Conclusions This study demonstrates the crucial role of TLR4 activation in ASMCs during ALI in response to LPS. Sevoflurane exerts direct relaxant and anti-inflammatory effects in vivo

  5. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction-induced inflammatory signaling in brain pathology and epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Buckwalter, Marion; Soreq, Hermona; Vezzani, Annamaria; Kaufer, Daniela

    2012-11-01

    The protection of the brain from blood-borne toxins, proteins, and cells is critical to the brain's normal function. Accordingly, a compromise in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function accompanies many neurologic disorders, and is tightly associated with brain inflammatory processes initiated by both infiltrating leukocytes from the blood, and activation of glial cells. Those inflammatory processes contribute to determining the severity and prognosis of numerous neurologic disorders, and can both cause, and result from BBB dysfunction. In this review we examine the role of BBB and inflammatory responses, in particular activation of transforming grown factor β (TGFβ) signaling, in epilepsy, stroke, and Parkinson's disease.

  6. Kaurenoic acid from Sphagneticola trilobata Inhibits Inflammatory Pain: effect on cytokine production and activation of the NO-cyclic GMP-protein kinase G-ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Sandra S; Arakawa, Nilton S; Ambrosio, Sergio R; Zarpelon, Ana C; Casagrande, Rubia; Cunha, Thiago M; Ferreira, Sergio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2012-05-25

    Kaurenoic acid [ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (1)] is a diterpene present in several plants including Sphagneticola trilobata. The only documented evidence for its antinociceptive effect is that it inhibits the writhing response induced by acetic acid in mice. Therefore, the analgesic effect of 1 in different models of pain and its mechanisms in mice were investigated further. Intraperitoneal and oral treatment with 1 dose-dependently inhibited inflammatory nociception induced by acetic acid. Oral treatment with 1 also inhibited overt nociception-like behavior induced by phenyl-p-benzoquinone, complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and both phases of the formalin test. Compound 1 also inhibited acute carrageenin- and PGE(2)-induced and chronic CFA-induced inflammatory mechanical hyperalgesia. Mechanistically, 1 inhibited the production of the hyperalgesic cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. Furthermore, the analgesic effect of 1 was inhibited by l-NAME, ODQ, KT5823, and glybenclamide treatment, demonstrating that such activity also depends on activation of the NO-cyclic GMP-protein kinase G-ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway, respectively. These results demonstrate that 1 exhibits an analgesic effect in a consistent manner and that its mechanisms involve the inhibition of cytokine production and activation of the NO-cyclic GMP-protein kinase G-ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway.

  7. Graphene quantum dots induce apoptosis, autophagy, and inflammatory response via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB mediated signaling pathways in activated THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yiru; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Pan, Shu-Ting; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Duan, Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-02

    The biomedical application of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) is a new emerging area. However, their safety data are still in scarcity to date. Particularly, the effect of GQDs on the immune system remains unknown. This study aimed to elucidate the interaction of GQDs with macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that GQDs slightly affected the cell viability and membrane integrity of macrophages, whereas GQDs significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptotic and autophagic cell death with an increase in the expression level of Bax, Bad, caspase 3, caspase 9, beclin 1, and LC3-I/II and a decrease in that of Bcl-2. Furthermore, low concentrations of GQDs significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-8, whereas high concentrations of GQDs elicited opposite effects on the cytokines production. SB202190, a selective inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), abolished the cytokine-inducing effect of GQDs in macrophages. Moreover, GQDs significantly increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and p65, and promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Taken together, these results show that GQDs induce ROS generation, apoptosis, autophagy, and inflammatory response via p38MAPK and NF-κB mediated signaling pathways in THP-1 activated macrophages.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of electronic signal treatment.

    PubMed

    Odell, Robert H; Sorgnard, Richard E

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation often plays a key role in the perpetuation of pain. Chronic inflammatory conditions (e.g. osteoarthritis, immune system dysfunction, micro-circulatory disease, painful neuritis, and even heart disease) have increased as baby boomers age. Medicine's current anti-inflammatory choices are NSAIDs and steroids; the value in promoting cure and side effect risks of these medications are unclear and controversial, especially considering individual patient variations. Electricity has continuously been a powerful tool in medicine for thousands of years. All medical professionals are, to some degree, aware of electrotherapy; those who directly use electricity for treatment know of its anti-inflammatory effects. Electronic signal treatment (EST), as an extension of presently available technology, may reasonably have even more anti-inflammatory effects. EST is a digitally produced alternating current sinusoidal electronic signal with associated harmonics to produce theoretically reasonable and/or scientifically documented physiological effects when applied to the human body. These signals are produced by advanced electronics not possible even 10 to 15 years ago. The potential long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects of some electrical currents are based on basic physical and biochemical facts listed in the text below, namely that of stimulating and signaling effective and long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects in nerve and muscle cells. The safety of electrotherapeutic treatments in general and EST in particular has been established through extensive clinical use. The principles of physics have been largely de-emphasized in modern medicine in favor of chemistry. These electrical treatments, a familiar application of physics, thus represent powerful and appropriate elements of physicians' pain care armamentaria in the clinic and possibly for prescription for use at home to improve overall patient care and maintenance of quality of life via low-risk and potentially

  9. Inflammatory signaling in human Tuberculosis granulomas is spatially organized

    PubMed Central

    Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Raju, Ravikiran M.; Sharma, Kirti; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Prideaux, Brendan; Daudelin, Isaac B.; Chen, Pei-Yu; Booty, Matthew G.; Kim, Jin Hee; Eum, Seok Yong; Via, Laura E.; Behar, Samuel M.; Barry, Clifton E.; Mann, Matthias; Dartois, Véronique; Rubin, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Granulomas are the pathological hallmark of tuberculosis (TB). However, their function and mechanisms of formation remain poorly understood. To understand the role of granulomas in TB, we analyzed the proteomes of granulomas from subjects with tuberculosis in an unbiased fashion. Using laser capture microdissection, mass spectrometry and confocal microscopy, we generated detailed molecular maps of human granulomas. We found that the centers of granulomas possess a pro-inflammatory environment characterized by anti-microbial peptides, ROS and pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. Conversely, the tissue surrounding the caseum possesses a comparatively anti-inflammatory signature. These findings are consistent across a set of six subjects and in rabbits. While the balance between systemic pro- and anti-inflammatory signals is crucial to TB disease outcome, here we find that these signals are physically segregated within each granuloma. The protein and lipid snapshots of human and rabbit lesions analysed here suggest that the pathologic response to TB is shaped by the precise anatomical localization of these inflammatory pathways during the development of the granuloma. PMID:27043495

  10. Artemisia dracunculus L. extract ameliorates insulin sensitivity by attenuating inflammatory signalling in human skeletal muscle culture

    PubMed Central

    Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Haynie, Kimberly R.; Wicks, Shawna E.; Bermudez, Estrellita M.; Mendoza, Tamra M.; Ribnicky, David; Cefalu, William T.; Mynatt, Randall L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Bioactives of Artemisia dracunculus L. (termed PMI 5011) have been shown to improve insulin action by increasing insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. However, it has not known if PMI 5011’s effects are retained during an inflammatory condition. We examined the attenuation of insulin action and whether PMI 5011 enhances insulin signalling in the inflammatory environment with elevated cytokines. Methods Muscle cell cultures derived from lean, overweight and diabetic obese subjects were used. Expression of pro-inflammatory genes and inflammatory response of human myotubes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Insulin signalling and activation of inflammatory pathways in human myotubes were evaluated by Multiplex protein assays. Results We found increased gene expression of MCP1 and TNFα, and basal activity of the NFkB pathway in myotubes derived from diabetic-obese subjects as compared to myotubes derived from normal-lean subjects. In line with this, basal Akt phosphorylation (Ser473) was significantly higher, while insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) was lower in myotubes from normal-overweight and diabetic-obese subjects compared to normal-lean subjects. PMI 5011 treatment reduced basal phosphorylation of Akt and enhanced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt in the presence of cytokines in human myotubes. PMI 5011 treatment led to an inhibition of cytokine-induced activation of inflammatory signalling pathways such as Erk1/2 and IkBα-NFkB and moreover, NFkB target gene expression, possibly by preventing further propagation of the inflammatory response within muscle tissue. Conclusions PMI 5011 improved insulin sensitivity in diabetic-obese myotubes to the level of normal-lean myotubes despite the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24521217

  11. CARMA3/Bcl10/MALT1-dependent NF-κB activation mediates angiotensin II-responsive inflammatory signaling in nonimmune cells

    PubMed Central

    McAllister-Lucas, Linda M.; Ruland, Jürgen; Siu, Katy; Jin, Xiaohong; Gu, Shufang; Kim, David S. L.; Kuffa, Peter; Kohrt, Dawn; Mak, Tak W.; Nuñez, Gabriel; Lucas, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a peptide hormone that, like many cytokines, acts as a proinflammatory agent and growth factor. After injury to the liver, the hormone assists in tissue repair by stimulating hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells to synthesize extracellular matrix proteins and secrete secondary cytokines and by stimulating myofibroblasts to proliferate. However, under conditions of chronic liver injury, all of these effects conspire to promote pathologic liver fibrosis. Much of this effect of Ang II results from activation of the proinflammatory NF-κB transcription factor in response to stimulation of the type 1 Ang II receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Here, we characterize a previously undescribed signaling pathway mediating Ang II-dependent activation of NF-κB, which is composed of three principal proteins, CARMA3, Bcl10, and MALT1. Blocking the function of any of these proteins, through the use of either dominant-negative mutants, RNAi, or gene targeting, effectively abolishes Ang II-dependent NF-κB activation in hepatocytes. In addition, Bcl10−/− mice show defective hepatic cytokine production after Ang II treatment. Evidence also is presented that this pathway activates NF-κB through ubiquitination of IKKγ, the regulatory subunit of the IκB kinase complex. These results elucidate a concrete series of molecular events that link ligand activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor to stimulation of the NF-κB transcription factor. These findings also uncover a function of the CARMA, Bcl10, and MALT1 proteins in cells outside the immune system. PMID:17101977

  12. Neu1 sialidase and matrix metalloproteinase-9 cross-talk regulates nucleic acid-induced endosomal TOLL-like receptor-7 and -9 activation, cellular signaling and pro-inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Abdulkhalek, Samar; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2013-11-01

    The precise mechanism(s) by which intracellular TOLL-like receptors (TLRs) become activated by their ligands remains unclear. Here, we report a molecular organizational G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling platform to potentiate a novel mammalian neuraminidase-1 (Neu1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) cross-talk in alliance with neuromedin B GPCR, all of which form a tripartite complex with TLR-7 and -9. siRNA silencing Neu1, MMP-9 and neuromedin-B GPCR in RAW-blue macrophage cells significantly reduced TLR7 imiquimod- and TLR9 ODN1826-induced NF-κB (NF-κB-pSer(536)) activity. Tamiflu, specific MMP-9 inhibitor, neuromedin B receptor specific antagonist BIM23127, and the selective inhibitor of whole heterotrimeric G-protein complex BIM-46174 significantly block nucleic acid-induced TLR-7 and -9 MyD88 recruitment, NF-κB activation and proinflammatory TNFα and MCP-1 cytokine responses. For the first time, Neu1 clearly plays a central role in mediating nucleic acid-induced intracellular TLR activation, and the interactions involving NMBR-MMP9-Neu1 cross-talk constitute a novel intracellular TLR signaling platform that is essential for NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses.

  13. Rationale and Means to Target Pro-Inflammatory Interleukin-8 (CXCL8) Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Laura M.; Maxwell, Pamela J.; Waugh, David J.J.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that chronic inflammation underpins the development of a number of human cancers, with pro-inflammatory signaling within the tumor microenvironment contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. CXCL8 is an ELR+ pro-inflammatory CXC-chemokine which mediates its effects via signaling through two G protein-coupled receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2. Elevated CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling within the tumor microenvironment of numerous cancers is known to enhance tumor progression via activation of signaling pathways promoting proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, invasion and cell survival. This review provides an overview of established roles of CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling in cancer and subsequently, discusses the possible strategies of targeting CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling in cancer, covering indirect strategies (e.g., anti-inflammatories, NFκB inhibitors) and direct CXCL8 or CXCR1/2 inhibition (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, small molecule receptor antagonists, pepducin inhibitors and siRNA strategies). Reports of pre-clinical cancer studies and clinical trials using CXCL8-CXCR1/2-targeting strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diseases will be discussed. The future translational opportunities for use of such agents in oncology will be discussed, with emphasis on exploitation in stratified populations. PMID:24276377

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of natural dietary flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min-Hsiung; Lai, Ching-Shu; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2010-10-01

    Over the past few decades, inflammation has been recognized as a major risk factor for various human diseases. Acute inflammation is short-term, self-limiting and it's easy for host defenses to return the body to homeostasis. Chronic inflammatory responses are predispose to a pathological progression of chronic illnesses characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, excessive production of cytokines, dysregulation of cellular signaling and loss of barrier function. Targeting reduction of chronic inflammation is a beneficial strategy to combat several human diseases. Flavonoids are widely present in the average diet in such foods as fruits and vegetables, and have been demonstrated to exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities for human health including an anti-inflammatory property. Numerous studies have proposed that flavonoids act through a variety mechanisms to prevent and attenuate inflammatory responses and serve as possible cardioprotective, neuroprotective and chemopreventive agents. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and underlying mechanisms on anti-inflammatory activities of flavonoids and their implicated effects in the development of various chronic inflammatory diseases.

  15. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF DODONAEA VISCOSE

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, N.; Venkatesh, Sama; Suresh, B.

    1998-01-01

    Dodonaea viscose, Linn is a widely grown plant of Nilgiris district of Tamil and is commonly used by the tribals of Nilgiris as a traditional medicine for done fracture and joint sprains. Since it is generally believed tat fractures are accompanied by either some degree of injury or inflammations, it was felt desirable to carry our anti inflammatory activity of Dodonaea viscose. Anti-inflammatory activity of the plant was carried out by carrageenin induced paw edema method in Wister albino rats. PMID:22556883

  16. TSG attenuates LPC-induced endothelial cells inflammatory damage through notch signaling inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Song, Fan; Xu, Shouzhu; Nian, Lun; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Wang, Siwang

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) induces inflammation in endothelial cells (ECs) but the mechanism is not fully understood. The Notch signaling pathway is involved in chronic EC inflammation, but its functions in LPC-induced endothelial inflammatory damage and 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside's (TSG) protective effect during LPC-induced inflammatory damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) is largely unknown. We report that Notch signaling activation contributed to LPC-induced injury in HUVECs, and that TSG protected HUVECs from LPC-induced injury by antagonizing Notch signaling activation by LPC. γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT), a specific inhibitor of the Notch signaling pathway, and Notch1 siRNA were used to inhibit Notch activity. HUVECs were exposed to LPC in the presence or absence of TSG, DAPT, and Notch1 siRNA. LPC treatment of HUVECs resulted in reduced cell viability, and Notch1 and Hes1 upregulation. Either silencing of Notch1 by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of Notch signaling by DAPT prevented the loss of cell viability, and induction of apoptosis, and enhanced expression Notch1, Hes1 and MCP-1 by LPC in HUVECs. Similarly, TSG reduced LPC stimulation of Notch1, Hes1, and MCP-1 expression, prevented the release of IL-6 and CRP and rescued HUVECs from LPC-induced cell damage. Our data indicate that the Notch signaling pathway is a crucial mediator of endothelial inflammatory damage and that TSG protects against endothelial inflammatory damage by inhibiting the Notch signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that targeting Notch signaling by natural products such as TSG is a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation associated diseases, including atherosclerosis. © 2015 IUBMB Life, 68(1):37-50, 2016.

  17. Inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ju; Wang, Qian; Johansson, Jenny U.; Liang, Xibin; Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Priyam, Prachi; Loui, Taylor M.; Merchant, Milton; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Thomas J.; Andreasson, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Objective There is significant evidence for a central role of inflammation in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Epidemiological studies indicate that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of developing AD in healthy aging populations. As NSAIDs inhibit the enzymatic activity of the inflammatory cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2, these findings suggest that downstream prostaglandin signaling pathways function in the pre-clinical development of AD. Here, we investigate the function of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling through its EP3 receptor in the neuroinflammatory response to Aβ peptide. Methods The function of PGE2 signaling through its EP3 receptor was examined in vivo a model of subacute neuroinflammation induced by administration of Aβ42 peptides. Our findings were then confirmed in young adult APPSwe-PS1 ΔE9 transgenic mice. Results Deletion of the PGE2 EP3 receptor in a model of Aβ42 peptide-induced neuroinflammation reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression, cytokine production, and oxidative stress. In the APPSwe-PS1 ΔE9 model of Familial AD, deletion of the EP3 receptor blocked induction of pro-inflammatory gene and protein expression and lipid peroxidation. In addition, levels of Aβ peptides were significantly decreased, as were BACE-1 and β-CTF levels, suggesting that generation of Aβ peptides may be increased as a result of pro-inflammatory EP3 signaling. Finally, deletion of EP3 receptor significantly reversed the decline in pre-synaptic proteins seen in APPSwe-PS1 ΔE9 mice. Interpretation Our findings identify the PGE2 EP3 receptor as a novel pro-inflammatory, pro-amyloidogenic, and synaptotoxic signaling pathway, and suggest a role for COX-PGE2-EP3 signaling in the development of AD. PMID:22915243

  18. MicroRNA-130a alleviates human coronary artery endothelial cell injury and inflammatory responses by targeting PTEN via activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chun-Li; Liu, Bin; Shi, Yong-Feng; Liu, Ning; Yan, You-You; Zhang, Ji-Chang; Xue, Xin; Wang, Jin-Peng; Zhao, Zhuo; Liu, Jian-Gen; Li, Yang-Xue; Zhang, Xiao-Hao; Wu, Jun-Duo

    2016-01-01

    Our study aims to investigate the roles of microRNA-130a (miR-130a) in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) injury and inflammatory responses by targeting PTEN through the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. HCAECs were treated with 1.0 mmol/L homocysteine (HCY) and assigned into eight groups: the blank group, the negative control (NC) group, the miR-130a mimics group, the miR-130a inhibitors group, the si-PTEN group, the Wortmannin group, the miR-130a inhibitors + si-PTEN group and the miR-130a mimics + Wortmannin group. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to validate the relationship between miR-130a and PTEN. The expressions of miR-130a, PTEN and PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway-related proteins were detected by qRT-PCR assay and Western blotting. MTT assay and Hoechst 33258 staining were adopted to testify cell growth and apoptosis. The NO kit assay was used to detect the NO release. ELISA was conducted to measure serum cytokine levels. Luciferase reporter gene assay confirmed the target relationship between miR-130a and PTEN. Compared with the blank and NC groups, the miR-130a mimics and si-PTEN groups showed significant increases in the expressions of PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway-related proteins, cell viability and the NO release, while serum cytokine levels and cell apoptosis were decreased; by contrast, an opposite trend was observed in miR-130a inhibitors and Wortmannin groups. However, no significant difference was found in the miR-130a inhibitors + si-PTEN and miR-130a mimics + Wortmannin groups when compared with the blank group. These results indicate that miR-130a could alleviate HCAECs injury and inflammatory responses by down-regulating PTEN and activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:27713121

  19. JAK-STAT Signaling as a Target for Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases: Current and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shubhasree; Biehl, Ann; Gadina, Massimo; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Schwartz, Daniella M

    2017-04-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transduction and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Many cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases use JAKs and STATs to transduce intracellular signals. Mutations in JAK and STAT genes cause a number of immunodeficiency syndromes, and polymorphisms in these genes are associated with autoimmune diseases. The success of small-molecule JAK inhibitors (Jakinibs) in the treatment of rheumatologic disease demonstrates that intracellular signaling pathways can be targeted therapeutically to treat autoimmunity. Tofacitinib, the first rheumatologic Jakinib, is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is currently under investigation for other autoimmune diseases. Many other Jakinibs are in preclinical development or in various phases of clinical trials. This review describes the JAK-STAT pathway, outlines its role in autoimmunity, and explains the rationale/pre-clinical evidence for targeting JAK-STAT signaling. The safety and clinical efficacy of the Jakinibs are reviewed, starting with the FDA-approved Jakinib tofacitinib, and continuing on to next-generation Jakinibs. Recent and ongoing studies are emphasized, with a focus on emerging indications for JAK inhibition and novel mechanisms of JAK-STAT signaling blockade.

  20. Leonurine exerts anti-inflammatory effect by regulating inflammatory signaling pathways and cytokines in LPS-induced mouse mastitis.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Wang, Wei; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-02-01

    Bovine mastitis is defined as the inflammation of mammary gland and is the most multiple diseases in dairy cattle. There is still no effective treatment now. Leonurine, extracted from Leonurus cardiaca, has been proved to have anti-inflammatory effect. In the present study, we utilized a mouse mastitis model to study the effect of leonurine on LPS-induced mastitis. Leonurine was administered three times during the 24 h after inducing infection in the mammary gland. The results showed that leonurine significantly alleviated LPS-induced histopathological changes, downregulated the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), upregulated the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), and inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Further study revealed that leonurine inhibited the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and the phosphorylation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Therefore, the results demonstrated that leonurine could downregulate the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS, and COX-2 and upregulate the expression of IL-10 mainly by inhibiting the expression of TLR4 and the activation of NF-κB and the phosphorylation of p38, ERK, and JNK. Leonurine may be a potential agent for mastitis therapy.

  1. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  2. Differential role of Dok1 and Dok2 in TLR2-induced inflammatory signaling in glia.

    PubMed

    Downer, Eric J; Johnston, Daniel G W; Lynch, Marina A

    2013-09-01

    Accumulating evidence continues to underpin the role of the innate immune system in pathologies associated with neuroinflammation. Innate immunity is regulated by pattern recognition receptors that detect pathogens, and in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, binding of bacterial lipopeptides to toll-like receptor (TLR)2 is emerging as an important mechanism controlling glial cell activation. In the present study, we employed the use of the synthetic bacterial lipoprotein and a selective TLR2 agonist, Pam3CSK4, to induce inflammatory signaling in microglia and astrocytes. The adaptor proteins, downstream of kinase (Dok)1 and Dok2, are known to have a role in negatively regulating the Ras-ERK signaling cascade, with downstream consequences on pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Data presented herein demonstrate that TLR2 enhanced the tyrosine phosphorylation of Dok1 and Dok2 in astrocytes and microglia, and that knockdown of these adaptors using small interfering RNA robustly elevated TLR2-induced ERK activation. Importantly, TLR2-induced NF-κB activation, and IL-6 production was exacerbated in astrocytes transfected with Dok1 and Dok2 siRNA, indicating that both Dok proteins negatively regulate TLR2-induced inflammatory signaling in astrocytes. In contrast, Dok1 knockdown attenuated TLR2-induced NF-κB activation and IL-6 production in microglia, while Dok2 siRNA failed to affect TLR2-induced NF-κB activity and subsequent cytokine expression in this cell type. Overall, this indicates that Dok1 and Dok2 are novel adaptors for TLR2 in glial cells and importantly indicates that Dok1 and Dok2 differentially regulate TLR2-induced pro-inflammatory signaling in astrocytes and microglia.

  3. IL-17A Signaling in Colonic Epithelial Cells Inhibits Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Production by Enhancing the Activity of ERK and PI3K

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yan; Zhou, Tingting; Guo, Yueling; Wang, Renxi; Zhao, Zhi; Xiao, He; Hou, Chunmei; Ma, Lingyun; Lin, Yanhua; Lang, Xiaoling; Feng, Jiannan; Chen, Guojiang; Shen, Beifen; Han, Gencheng; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data suggested that IL-17A contributes to the inhibition of Th1 cell function in the gut. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that IL-17A signaling in colonic epithelial cells (CECs) increases TNF-α-induced PI3K-AKT and ERK phosphorylation and inhibits TNF-α induced expression of IL-12P35 and of a Th1 cell chemokine, CXCL11 at mRNA level. In a co-culture system using HT-29 cells and PBMCs, IL-17A inhibited TNF-ãinduced IL-12P35 expression by HT-29 cells and led to decreased expression of IFN-γ and T-bet by PBMCs. Finally, adoptive transfer of CECs from mice with Crohn's Disease (CD) led to an enhanced Th1 cell response and exacerbated colitis in CD mouse recipients. The pathogenic effect of CECs derived from CD mice was reversed by co-administration of recombinant IL-17A. Our data demonstrate a new IL-17A-mediated regulatory mechanism in CD. A better understanding of this pathway might shed new light on the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:24586980

  4. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Shiby M.; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  5. Resveratrol analog piceatannol restores the palmitic acid-induced impairment of insulin signaling and production of endothelial nitric oxide via activation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative heme oxygenase-1 in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Oh; Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Cheong, Yong-Kwan; Park, Seong Hoon; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the elevation of free fatty acids, including palmitic acid (PA), are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, which may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, characterized by the reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is important in the preservation of NO bioavailability. Piceatannol (Pic), with similar chemical structure to resveratrol, is suggested to possess similar protective effects as resveratrol. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), stimulated with PA, were used to examine the endothelial protective effects of Pic. Pic increased the expression of HO-1 via nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 activation in the HUVECs, and decreased the PA-induced secretions of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the formation of reactive oxygen species ROS via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Notably, following inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphryin-IX, Pic did not prevent cytokine secretion, ROS formation, and NF-κB activation in the PA-stimulated HUVECs. PA attenuated insulin-mediated insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to decreased glucose uptake, and phosphorylation of eNOS, leading to a reduction in the production of NO. Pic effectively mitigated the inhibitory effects of PA on the insulin-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 and eNOS, which was not observed following inhibition of HO‑1 activity. The results of the present study suggested that Pic may have the potential to prevent PA-induced impairment of insulin signaling and eNOS function, by inducing the expression of the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, HO-1.

  6. Interactions between Nitric Oxide and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Signaling Pathways in Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; van der Vliet, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Induction and activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthases (NOS) and excessive production of NO are common features of almost all diseases associated with infection and acute or chronic inflammation, although the contribution of NO to the pathophysiology of these diseases is highly multifactorial and often still a matter of controversy. Because of its direct impact on tissue oxygenation and cellular oxygen (O2) consumption and redistribution, the ability of NO to regulate various aspects of hypoxia-induced signaling has received widespread attention. Conditions of tissue hypoxia and the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) have been implicated in hypoxia or in cancer biology, but are also being increasingly recognized as important features of acute and chronic inflammation. Thus, the activation of HIF transcription factors has been increasingly implicated in inflammatory diseases, and recent studies have indicated its critical importance in regulating phagocyte function, inflammatory mediator production, and regulation of epithelial integrity and repair processes. Finally, HIF also appears to contribute to important features of tissue fibrosis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, processes that are associated with tissue remodeling in various non-malignant chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we briefly summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to the general mechanisms involved in HIF regulation and the impact of NO on HIF activation. Secondly, we will summarize the major recent findings demonstrating a role for HIF signaling in infection, inflammation, and tissue repair and remodeling, and will address the involvement of NO. The growing interest in hypoxia-induced signaling and its relation with NO biology is expected to lead to further insights into the complex roles of NO in acute or chronic inflammatory diseases and may point to the importance of HIF signaling as key feature of NO-mediated events during these disorders. PMID

  7. Disruption of inflammatory signals by cytokine-targeted therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Flavio; Caruso, Roberta; Sarra, Massimiliano; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Gut inflammation occurring in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is associated with an excessive immune response that is directed against constituents of the normal bacterial flora and results in the production of large amounts of inflammatory cytokines. Anti-cytokine compounds, such as the neutralizing TNF antibodies, have been employed with clinical success in patients with IBD. However, nearly half of IBD patients are refractory to such treatments, response can wane with time, and anti-TNF treatment can associate with severe side effects and/or development/exacerbation of extra-intestinal immune-mediated pathologies. These observations, and the demonstration that, in IBD, the pathological process is also characterized by defects in the production and/or activity of counter-regulatory cytokines, have boosted further studies aimed at delineating novel strategies to combat the IBD-associated tissue-damaging immune response. PMID:21806600

  8. Enhanced Gamma Oscillatory Activity in Rats with Chronic Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Jing; Xing, Guo-Gang; Li, Xiaoli; Wan, You

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that oscillatory gamma activity participates in brief acute pain and tonic ongoing pain. It is of great interest to determine whether the gamma activity is involved in chronic pain since chronic pain is a more severe pathological condition characterized by pain persistency. To investigate the oscillatory gamma activity in chronic pain, in the present study, we recorded spontaneous electrocorticogram (ECoG) signals during chronic pain development in rats with chronic inflammatory pain induced by monoarthritis. Power spectrum analysis of ECoG data showed that gamma power increased significantly at the late stage of chronic inflammatory pain. The increased gamma activity occurred mainly at electrodes over primary somatosensory cortices. In rats with chronic pain, the gamma power was positively correlated with the hyperalgesia measured by laser energy that elicited hindpaw withdrawal response. Furthermore, an increased coupling between the amplitude of gamma power and the phase of theta oscillations was observed in chronic inflammatory pain condition. These results indicate an enhanced spontaneous gamma activity in chronic pain and suggest a potential biomarker for the severity of chronic pain. PMID:27847461

  9. Expression of tak1 and tram induces synergistic pro-inflammatory signalling and adjuvants DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Karen Colbjørn; Spencer, Alexandra J; Goodman, Anna L; Gilchrist, Ashley; Furze, Julie; Rollier, Christine S; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Gilbert, Sarah C; Bregu, Migena; Soilleux, Elizabeth J; Hill, Adrian V S; Wyllie, David H

    2009-09-18

    Improving vaccine immunogenicity remains a major challenge in the fight against developing country diseases like malaria and AIDS. We describe a novel strategy to identify new DNA vaccine adjuvants. We have screened components of the Toll-like receptor signalling pathways for their ability to activate pro-inflammatory target genes in transient transfection assays and assessed in vivo adjuvant activity by expressing the activators from the DNA backbone of vaccines. We find that a robust increase in the immune response necessitates co-expression of two activators. Accordingly, the combination of tak1 and tram elicits synergistic reporter activation in transient transfection assays. In a mouse model this combination, but not the individual molecules, induced approximately twofold increases in CD8+ T-cell immune responses. These results indicate that optimal immunogenicity may require activation of distinct innate immune signalling pathways. Thus this strategy offers a novel route to the discovery of a new generation of adjuvants.

  10. TNFα induces sustained signaling and a prolonged and unremitting inflammatory response in synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Angela; Qiao, Yu; Grigoriev, Galina; Chen, Janice; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Sung Ho; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.; Kalliolias, George D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The non resolving character of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a conundrum. To identify the contribution of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) to the perpetuation of synovitis, we investigated the molecular mechanisms that govern the TNFα-driven inflammatory program in human FLS. Methods FLS obtained from synovial tissues of patients with RA or osteoarthritis were stimulated with TNFα and assayed for gene expression and cytokine production by qPCR and ELISA. NF-κB signaling was evaluated using Western blotting. Histone acetylation, chromatin accessibility, and NF-κB p65 and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy at the IL6 promoter were measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation and restriction enzyme accessibility assays. Results In FLS, TNFα induced prolonged transcription of IL6 and progressive accumulation of IL-6 protein over four days. Similarly, induction of CXCL8/IL-8, CCL5/RANTES, MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA after TNFα stimulation was sustained for several days. This contrasted with the macrophage response to TNFα, which characteristically involved a transient increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. In FLS, TNFα induced prolonged activation of NF-κB signaling and sustained transcriptional activity indicated by increased histone acetylation, chromatin accessibility, and p65 and Pol II occupancy at the IL6 promoter. Furthermore, FLS expressed low levels of the feedback inhibitors ABIN3, IRAK-M, SOCS3 and ATF3 that terminate inflammatory responses in macrophages. Conclusions TNFα signaling is not effectively terminated in FLS, leading to an uncontrolled inflammatory response. The results suggest that prolonged and sustained inflammatory responses by FLS, in response to synovial TNFα, contribute to the persistence of synovial inflammation in RA. PMID:23335080

  11. 15-Oxoeicosatetraenoic acid is a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-derived electrophilic mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Nathaniel W; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Gao, Yang; Blair, Ian A; Freeman, Bruce A; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2015-06-05

    Bioactive lipids govern cellular homeostasis and pathogenic inflammatory processes. Current dogma holds that bioactive lipids, such as prostaglandins and lipoxins, are inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH). In contrast, the present results reveal that catabolic "inactivation" of hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) yields electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives. These endogenously produced species are chemically reactive signaling mediators that induce tissue protective events. Electrophilic fatty acids diversify the proteome through post-translational alkylation of nucleophilic cysteines in key transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes that govern cellular metabolic and inflammatory homeostasis. 15PGDH regulates these processes as it is responsible for the formation of numerous electrophilic fatty acids including the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxoETE). Herein, the role of 15-oxoETE in regulating signaling responses is reported. In cell cultures, 15-oxoETE activates Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses (AR) and inhibits NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory responses via IKKβ inhibition. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases using ethacrynic acid incrementally increased the signaling capacity of 15-oxoETE by decreasing 15-oxoETE-GSH adduct formation. This work demonstrates that 15PGDH plays a role in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis via the production of electrophilic fatty acid signaling mediators.

  12. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  13. Convergence of Nitric Oxide and Lipid Signaling: Anti-Inflammatory Nitro-Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul R.S.; Schopfer, Francisco J.; O’Donnell, Valerie B.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The signaling mediators nitric oxide (·NO) and oxidized lipids, once viewed to transduce metabolic and inflammatory information via discrete and independent pathways, are now appreciated as interdependent regulators of immune response and metabolic homeostasis. The interactions between these two classes of mediators result in reciprocal control of mediator sythesis that is strongly influenced by the local chemical environment. The relationship between the two pathways extends beyond co-regulation of ·NO and eicosanoid formation to converge via the nitration of unsaturated fatty acids to yield nitro derivatives (NO2-FA). These pluripotent signaling molecules are generated in vivo as an adaptive response to oxidative inflammatory conditions and manifest predominantly anti-inflammatory signaling reactions. These actions of NO2-FA are diverse, with these species serving as a potential chemical reserve of ·NO, reacting with cellular nucleophiles to post-translationally modify protein structure, function and localization. In this regard these species act as potent endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ. Functional consequences of these signaling mechanisms have been shown in multiple model systems, including the inhibition of platelet and neutrophil functions, induction of heme oxygenase-1, inhibition of LPS-induced cytokine release in monocytes, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in adipocytes and relaxation of pre-constricted rat aortic segments. These observations have propelled further in vitro and in vivo studies of mechanisms of NO2-FA signaling and metabolism, highlighting the therapeutic potential of this class of molecules as anti-inflammatory drug candidates. PMID:19200454

  14. Acylcarnitines activate pro-inflammatory signaling pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incomplete beta-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria is a feature of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the resulting metabolic by-products, medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines are shown to be elevated. In preliminary studies, mixed isomers of C12- or C14-carnitine act...

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Sanghuangporus sanghuang Mycelium

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wang-Ching; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Chen, Chin-Chu; Lin, Wan-Rong; Lin, Hui-Yi; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2017-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by inflammation of the lung tissue and oxidative injury caused by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Studies have suggested that anti-inflammatory or antioxidant agents could be used for the treatment of ALI with a good outcome. Therefore, our study aimed to test whether the mycelium extract of Sanghuangporus sanghuang (SS-1), believed to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could be used against the excessive inflammatory response associated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced ALI in mice and to investigate its possible mechanism of action. The experimental results showed that the administration of SS-1 could inhibit LPS-induced inflammation. SS-1 could reduce the number of inflammatory cells, inhibit myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, regulate the TLR4/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and the signal transduction of NF-κB and MAPK pathways in the lung tissue, and inhibit high mobility group box-1 protein 1 (HNGB1) activity in BALF. In addition, SS-1 could affect the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) in the lung tissue and regulate signal transduction in the KRAB-associated protein-1 (KAP1)/nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor Nrf2/Kelch Like ECH associated Protein 1 (Keap1) pathway. Histological results showed that administration of SS-1 prior to induction could inhibit the large-scale LPS-induced neutrophil infiltration of the lung tissue. Therefore, based on all experimental results, we propose that SS-1 exhibits a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI in mice. The mycelium of S. sanghuang can potentially be used for the treatment or prevention of inflammation-related diseases. PMID:28178212

  16. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L.; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Uhlig, Holm H.; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  17. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E; Cuny, Gregory D; Uhlig, Holm H; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-09-17

    RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers.

  18. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John L.; Cripps, Allan W.; Smith, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1), a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture. PMID:26339274

  19. Neutrophils alter the inflammatory milieu by signal-dependent translation of constitutive messenger RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, Stephan W.; Yost, Christian C.; Denis, Melvin M.; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2004-05-01

    The mechanisms by which neutrophils, key effector cells of the innate immune system, express new gene products in inflammation are largely uncharacterized. We found that they rapidly translate constitutive mRNAs when activated, a previously unrecognized response. One of the proteins synthesized without a requirement for transcription is the soluble IL-6 receptor , which translocates to endothelial cells and induces a temporal switch to mononuclear leukocyte recruitment. Its synthesis is regulated by a specialized translational control pathway that is inhibited by rapamycin, a bacterial macrolide with therapeutic efficacy in transplantation, inflammatory syndromes, and neoplasia. Signal-dependent translation in activated neutrophils may be a critical mechanism for alteration of the inflammatory milieu and a therapeutic target.

  20. Pilose antler peptide protects osteoblasts from inflammatory and oxidative injury through EGF/EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Chunhui, Yang; Wenjun, Cai; Hui, Wen; Liquan, Sha; Changwei, Zhao; Tianzhu, Zhang; Wenhai, Zhao

    2017-02-16

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)/EFG receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in the osteoblastogenesis. The potential effects of pilose antler peptide (PAP) on osteoblast cell damages was investigated in our present study through EGF/EGFR signaling. In MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, PAP treatment significantly inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines by decreasing the levels of serum proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). PAP treatment also alleviated the oxidative responses as indicated by increased activities of catalase (SOD) and decreased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA). EGF inhibition, by siRNA knockdown, almost abolished PAP-induced osteoblast cytoprotection against inflammation and oxidant stress. Further, our results showed that PAP stimulated the nuclear erythroid factor 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)2/heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) signaling, and inhibited the activation of uclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway in MC3T3-E1 cells. On the other hand, EGF siRNA knockdown inhibited PAP-induced cytoprotection, which decreased the expression of Nrf-2, HO-1 and increased the level of p-NF-κBp65, p-IκBα in MC3T3-E1 cells. Thus, our research demonstrated that PAP protects osteoblasts from inflammatory and oxidative injury through EGF/EGFR signaling.

  1. Fractalkine mediates inflammatory pain through activation of satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Souza, Guilherme R; Talbot, Jhimmy; Lotufo, Celina M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Ferreira, Sérgio H

    2013-07-02

    The activation of the satellite glial cells (SGCs) surrounding the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons appears to play a role in pathological pain. We tested the hypothesis that fractalkine, which is constitutively expressed by primary nociceptive neurons, is the link between peripheral inflammation and the activation of SGCs and is thus responsible for the genesis of the inflammatory pain. The injection of carrageenin into the rat hind paw induced a decrease in the mechanical nociceptive threshold (hypernociception), which was associated with an increase in mRNA and GFAP protein expression in the DRG. Both events were inhibited by anti-fractalkine antibody administered directly into the DRG (L5) [intraganglionar (i.gl.)]. The administration of fractalkine into the DRG (L5) produced mechanical hypernociception in a dose-, time-, and CX3C receptor-1 (CX3CR1)-dependent manner. Fractalkine's hypernociceptive effect appears to be indirect, as it was reduced by local treatment with anti-TNF-α antibody, IL-1-receptor antagonist, or indomethacin. Accordingly, the in vitro incubation of isolated and cultured SGC with fractalkine induced the production/release of TNF-α, IL-1β, and prostaglandin E2. Finally, treatment with i.gl. fluorocitrate blocked fractalkine (i.gl.)- and carrageenin (paw)-induced hypernociception. Overall, these results suggest that, during peripheral inflammation, fractalkine is released in the DRG and contributes to the genesis of inflammatory hypernociception. Fractalkine's effect appears to be dependent on the activation of the SGCs, leading to the production of TNFα, IL-1β, and prostanoids, which are likely responsible for the maintenance of inflammatory pain. Thus, these results indicate that the inhibition of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling in SGCs may serve as a target to control inflammatory pain.

  2. Isorhamnetin ameliorates LPS-induced inflammatory response through downregulation of NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Chi, Gefu; Shen, Bingyu; Tian, Ye; Feng, Haihua

    2016-08-01

    Isorhamnetin, a flavonoid mainly found in Hippophae fhamnoides L. fruit, has been known for its antioxidant activity and its ability to regulate immune response. In this study, we investigated whether isorhamnetin exerts potent antiinflammatory effects in RAW264.7 cell and mouse model stimulated by LPS. The cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels were determined. In the mouse model of acute lung injury, the phosphorylation of NF-κB proteins was analyzed and inhibitor of NF-κB signaling (PDTC) was used on mice. Our results showed that isorhamnetin markedly decreased TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations and suppressed the activation of NF-κB signaling. Meanwhile, isorhamnetin reduced the amount of inflammatory cells, the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, protein leakage, and myeloperoxidase activity. Interference with specific inhibitor revealed that isorhamnetin-mediated suppression of cytokines and protein was via NF-κB signaling. So, it suggests that isorhamnetin might be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing inflammatory diseases.

  3. Protease-activated receptors and prostaglandins in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Terence; Henry, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G protein-coupled receptors. Signalling through PARs typically involves the cleavage of an extracellular region of the receptor by endogenous or exogenous proteases, which reveals a tethered ligand sequence capable of auto-activating the receptor. A considerable body of evidence has emerged over the past 20 years supporting a prominent role for PARs in a variety of human physiological and pathophysiological processes, and thus substantial attention has been directed towards developing drug-like molecules that activate or block PARs via non-proteolytic pathways. PARs are widely expressed within the respiratory tract, and their activation appears to exert significant modulatory influences on the level of bronchomotor tone, as well as on the inflammatory processes associated with a range of respiratory tract disorders. Nevertheless, there is debate as to whether the principal response to PAR activation is an augmentation or attenuation of airways inflammation. In this context, an important action of PAR activators may be to promote the generation and release of prostanoids, such as prostglandin E2, which have well-established anti-inflammatory effects in the lung. In this review, we primarily focus on the relationship between PARs, prostaglandins and inflammatory processes in the lung, and highlight their potential role in selected respiratory tract disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19845685

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hye-Jin; Kang, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Hyun-Joo; Kang, Young-Sook; Lim, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Myeong; Park, Eun-Hee

    2008-01-04

    Taraxacum officinale has been widely used as a folkloric medicine for the treatment of diverse diseases. The dried plant was extracted with 70% ethanol to generate its ethanol extract (TEE). For some experiments, ethyl acetate (EA), n-butanol (BuOH) and aqueous (Aq) fractions were prepared in succession from TEE. TEE showed a scavenging activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a diminishing effect on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and an anti-angiogenic activity in the chicken chorioallantoic (CAM) assay. In the carrageenan-induced air pouch model, TEE inhibited production of exudate, and significantly diminished nitric oxide (NO) and leukocyte levels in the exudate. It also possessed an inhibitory effect on acetic acid-induced vascular permeability and caused a dose-dependent inhibition on acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing in mice. Suppressive effects of TEE on the production of NO and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages were also assessed. Among the fractions, the n-butanol fraction (BuOH) was identified to be most effective in the CAM assay. Collectively, Taraxacum officinale contains anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities through its inhibition of NO production and COX-2 expression and/or its antioxidative activity.

  5. Retrograde inflammatory signaling from neutrophils to endothelial cells by soluble interleukin-6 receptor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Modur, V; Li, Y; Zimmerman, G A; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells initiate the inflammatory response by recruiting and activating leukocytes. IL-6 is not an agonist for this, but we found soluble IL-6 receptor alpha-subunit (IL-6Ralpha), with their constitutive IL-6 synthesis, stimulated endothelial cells to synthesize E-selectin, intracellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1, IL-6, and IL-8, and to bind neutrophils. Neutrophils express significant amounts of IL-6Ralpha and upon stimulation shed it: this material activates endothelial cells through a newly constituted IL-6 receptor. Retrograde signaling from PMN activated in the extravascular compartment to surrounding endothelial cells will recruit more and a wider variety of leukocytes. The limiting signal is a soluble receptor, not a cytokine. PMID:9389739

  6. NF-κβ signaling and chronic inflammatory diseases: exploring the potential of natural products to drive new therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Matthew J; Linder, Mark; Pontoniere, Paolo; Crea, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    Chronic inflammation has a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases that represent major public health and financial concerns, including heart failure (HF), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and arthritis. Nuclear factor kappa β (NF-κβ) is a central component of inflammation; owing to its upstream signaling position, it is considered an attractive target for new anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Hydroxytyrosol is an orally bioavailable polyphenol, obtained from olives, which inhibits NF-κβ activity and has elicited promising efficacy signals in several inflammatory diseases. Here, we further examine the role of NF-κβ in inflammation, provide an introduction to natural products and their anti-inflammatory effects and explore the potential of hydroxytyrosol as a new approach to combating the burden of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  7. Targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling in therapeutics: implications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Simon A; Beck, Paul L; MacDonald, Justin A

    2009-01-01

    In response to hypoxia, adaptive hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling events are activated to increase oxygen transport, anaerobic energy production and protective pathways to minimize ischemic tissue damage. Although the activation and subsequent induction of gene transcription by HIF-1 is normally associated with hypoxia, it is now established that HIF-1 signaling can be triggered under inflammatory conditions. HIF-1 has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, allergic asthma, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the gastrointestinal tract, HIF-1-regulated gene products, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, intestinal trefoil factor and CD73, have been shown to provide protection in animal models of intestinal inflammation. Given the importance of HIF-1 signaling in the aforementioned diseases, there exists considerable interest in the development of methods to modulate HIF-1 expression as well as down-stream signaling events. This review examines HIF-1 signaling with a special focus on the gastrointestinal tract. The patents pertaining to the modulation of HIF-1 signaling are summarized, and their relevance to the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease is discussed.

  8. Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk Receptor Signaling in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Colitis-associated Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rothlin, Carla V.; Leighton, Jonathan A.; Ghosh, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    Three receptor tyrosine kinases, Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk (TAM) and their ligands Gas6 and Protein S, have emerged as potent negative regulators of innate immune responses. A number of studies using genetic ablation of TAM loci in mice have elucidated the mechanism of TAM engagement and function during the immune response and removal of apoptotic cells. Following phagocytosis of apoptotic cells or the induction of T-cell dependent adaptive immune responses, ligand-induced TAM signaling dampens proinflammatory cytokine production and thus prevents exaggerated or prolonged inflammation. It is believed that the TAM pathway may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Suppression of inflammation and removal of apoptotic cells followed by tissue repair are essential processes for disease remission and the successful management of inflammatory bowel disease. In light of the key role of TAMs in controlling inflammatory responses, here, we review the recent advances on TAM research vis-à-vis the resolution of intestinal inflammation. Targeted activation of TAM receptor tyrosine kinases may represent a potent therapeutic opportunity in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24846720

  9. A New Approach to Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Signaling during Labour in Healthy Mothers and Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Castro, Javier; Florido, Jesus; Prados, Sonia; de Paco, Catalina; Ocon, Olga; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Ochoa, Julio J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate for the first time and simultaneously the oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling induced during the delivery in healthy mothers and their neonates. 56 mothers with normal gestational course and spontaneous delivery were selected. Blood samples were taken from mother (before and after delivery) both from vein and artery of umbilical cord. Lower antioxidant enzymes activities were observed in neonates compared with their mothers and lower oxidative stress in umbilical cord artery with respect to vein. There was an overexpression of inflammatory cytokines in the mother, such as IL-6 and TNF-α, and, in addition, PGE2 was also increased. Neonates showed lower levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and higher values of sTNF-RII and PGE2 in comparison with their mothers. Parturition increases oxidative damage in the mother, although the indicators of oxidative damage were lower in umbilical cord artery with respect to umbilical vein. The overexpression of inflammatory cytokines reveals that fetus suffers its own inflammatory process during parturition. PMID:25722791

  10. A new approach to oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling during labour in healthy mothers and neonates.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Castro, Javier; Florido, Jesus; Kajarabille, Naroa; Prados, Sonia; de Paco, Catalina; Ocon, Olga; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Ochoa, Julio J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate for the first time and simultaneously the oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling induced during the delivery in healthy mothers and their neonates. 56 mothers with normal gestational course and spontaneous delivery were selected. Blood samples were taken from mother (before and after delivery) both from vein and artery of umbilical cord. Lower antioxidant enzymes activities were observed in neonates compared with their mothers and lower oxidative stress in umbilical cord artery with respect to vein. There was an overexpression of inflammatory cytokines in the mother, such as IL-6 and TNF-α, and, in addition, PGE2 was also increased. Neonates showed lower levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and higher values of sTNF-RII and PGE2 in comparison with their mothers. Parturition increases oxidative damage in the mother, although the indicators of oxidative damage were lower in umbilical cord artery with respect to umbilical vein. The overexpression of inflammatory cytokines reveals that fetus suffers its own inflammatory process during parturition.

  11. Regulation of NF-κB-Induced Inflammatory Signaling by Lipid Peroxidation-Derived Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh C. S.; Ramana, Kota V.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases including cancer. This view has broadened significantly with the recent discoveries that reactive oxygen species initiated lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of potentially toxic lipid aldehyde species such as 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), acrolein, and malondialdehyde which activate various signaling intermediates that regulate cellular activity and dysfunction via a process called redox signaling. The lipid aldehyde species formed during synchronized enzymatic pathways result in the posttranslational modification of proteins and DNA leading to cytotoxicity and genotoxicty. Among the lipid aldehyde species, HNE has been widely accepted as a most toxic and abundant lipid aldehyde generated during lipid peroxidation. HNE and its glutathione conjugates have been shown to regulate redox-sensitive transcription factors such as NF-κB and AP-1 via signaling through various protein kinase cascades. Activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and their nuclear localization leads to transcriptional induction of several genes responsible for cell survival, differentiation, and death. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which the lipid aldehydes transduce activation of NF-κB signaling pathways that may help to develop therapeutic strategies for the prevention of a number of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23710287

  12. Comparative topical anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoids and cannabivarins.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, Aurelia; Giangaspero, Anna; Sosa, Silvio; Negri, Roberto; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Casano, Salvatore; Della Loggia, Roberto; Appendino, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    A selection of seven phytocannabinoids representative of the major structural types of classic cannabinoids and their corresponding cannabivarins was investigated for in vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity in the Croton oil mouse ear dermatitis assay. Differences in the terpenoid moiety were far more important for anti-inflammatory activity than those at the C-3 alkyl residue, suggesting the involvement not only of cannabinoid receptors, but also of other inflammatory end-points targeted by phytocannabinoids.

  13. Stem cells on fire: inflammatory signaling in HSC emergence.

    PubMed

    Veldman, Matthew B; Lin, Shuo

    2014-12-08

    Inflammatory pathways protect the body from infection and promote healing following injury. Recent reports demonstrate the surprising involvement of these pathways during hematopoietic stem cell emergence from the hemogenic endothelium in both zebrafish and mice.

  14. Danger signals in the initiation of the inflammatory response after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    de Haan, J J; Smeets, M B; Pasterkamp, G; Arslan, F

    2013-01-01

    During myocardial infarction, sterile inflammation occurs. The danger model is a solid theoretic framework that explains this inflammation as danger associated molecular patterns activate the immune system. The innate immune system can sense danger signals through different pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) such as toll-like receptors, nod-like receptors and receptors for advanced glycation endproducts. Activation of a PRR results in the production of cytokines and the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of injury. Due to tissue damage and necrosis of cardiac cells, danger signals such as extracellular matrix (ECM) breakdown products, mitochondrial DNA, heat shock proteins and high mobility box 1 are released. Matricellular proteins are non-structural proteins expressed in the ECM and are upregulated upon injury. Some members of the matricellular protein family (like tenascin-C, osteopontin, CCN1 and the galectins) have been implicated in the inflammatory and reparative responses following myocardial infarction and may function as danger signals. In a clinical setting, danger signals can function as prognostic and/or diagnostic biomarkers and for drug targeting. In this review we will provide an overview of the established knowledge on the role of danger signals in myocardial infarction and we will discuss areas of interest for future research.

  15. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hong; Wu, Xinyi

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  16. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Dunmyer, J; Herbert, B; Li, Q; Zinna, R; Martin, K; Yu, H; Kirkwood, K L

    2012-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative facultative capnophile involved in pathogenesis of aggressive forms of periodontal disease. In the present study, we interrogated the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to stimulate innate immune signaling and cytokine production and established that A. actinomycetemcomitans causes bone loss in a novel rat calvarial model. In vitro studies indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulated considerable production of soluble cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in both primary bone marrow-derived macrophages and NR8383 macrophages. Immunoblot analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans exhibits sustained activation of all major mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, as well as the negative regulator of MAPK signaling, MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), for at least 8 h. In a rat calvarial model of inflammatory bone loss, high and low doses of formalin-fixed A. actinomycetemcomitans were microinjected into the supraperiosteal calvarial space for 1-2 weeks. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography of rat calvariae revealed a significant increase of inflammatory and fibroblast infiltrate and increased bone resorption as measured by total lacunar pit formation. From these data, we provide new evidence that fixed whole cell A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation elicits a pro-inflammatory host response through sustained MAPK signaling, leading to enhanced bone resorption within the rat calvarial bone.

  17. Inflammatory and Immune Activation in Intestinal Myofibroblasts Is Developmentally Regulated

    PubMed Central

    Zawahir, Sharmila; Li, Guanghui; Banerjee, Aditi; Shiu, Jessica; Blanchard, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that intestinal myofibroblasts from immature tissue produce excessive IL-8 in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compared to cells from mature tissue. However, it is unknown whether other cytokines and TLR agonists contribute to this developmentally regulated response. The aim of this study was to further characterize differences in inflammatory signaling in human primary intestinal fibroblasts from fetal (FIF) and infant (IIF) tissue and examine their potential to activate the adaptive immune response in vitro. Cytokine profiles of LPS-stimulated FIF and IIF were assessed by cytokine profile array. IL-8, IL-6, and IL-10 production in response to TLR2, TLR2/6, TLR4, and TLR5 agonists was determined by quantitative ELISA. The potential of activated myofibroblasts to activate adaptive immunity was determined by measuring surface class II MHC expression using flow cytometry. LPS-stimulated FIF produced a distinct proinflammatory cytokine profile consisting of MCP-1, GRO-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8 expression. FIF produced significant IL-8 and IL-6 in response to TLR4 agonist. IIF produced significant levels of IL-8 and IL-6 in the presence of TLR5 and TLR2 agonists. IFN-γ-treated FIF expressed greater HLA-DR levels compared to unstimulated controls and IFN-γ- and LPS-treated IIF. Activated FIF produce a more diverse inflammatory cytokine profile and greater levels of IL-8 and IL-6 in response to TLR4 stimulation compared to IIF. FIF express class II MHC proteins associated with activation of the adaptive immune response. These data suggest that FIF may contribute to bacterial-associated gut inflammation in the immature intestine. PMID:26101946

  18. Anti-cancer small molecule JP-8g exhibits potent in vivo anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yulong; Liu, Jia; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Yao, Jia; Kai, Ming; Jiang, Xianxing; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Spirooxindoles are a class of compounds with diverse biological activity. Previously, we identified a series of spirooxindole-pyranopyrimidine compounds that exhibited broad-spectrum anti-cancer activity. In this study, we evaluated one of these compounds, JP-8g, on mouse models and found that it showed potent in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. Further investigation suggested that JP-8g may execute its anti-inflammatory activity through nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. Our results suggest that these spirooxindole-pyranopyrimidine class compounds have potential for not only cancer treatment but also inflammation therapy. PMID:24626153

  19. Eicosapentaenoic acid attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Han; Lin, An-Hsuan; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Peng, Ruo-Yun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes chronic lung inflammation that is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive pathways. Our previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke (CS) activates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling resulting in induction of lung inflammation. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a major type of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is present in significant amounts in marine-based fish and fish oil. EPA has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EPA has similar beneficial effects against CS-induced lung inflammation remains unclear. Using a murine model, we show that subchronic CS exposure for 4 weeks caused pulmonary inflammatory infiltration (total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), 11.0-fold increase), increased lung vascular permeability (protein level in BALF, 3.1-fold increase), elevated levels of chemokines (11.4–38.2-fold increase) and malondialdehyde (an oxidative stress biomarker; 2.0-fold increase) in the lungs, as well as lung inflammation; all of these CS-induced events were suppressed by daily supplementation with EPA. Using human bronchial epithelial cells, we further show that CS extract (CSE) sequentially activated NADPH oxidase (NADPH oxidase activity, 1.9-fold increase), increased intracellular levels of ROS (3.0-fold increase), activated both MAPKs and NF-κB, and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8; 8.2-fold increase); all these CSE-induced events were inhibited by pretreatment with EPA. Our findings suggest a novel role for EPA in alleviating the oxidative stress and lung inflammation induced by subchronic CS exposure in vivo and in suppressing the CSE-induced IL-8 in vitro via its antioxidant function and by inhibiting MAPKs/NF-κB signaling. PMID:25452730

  20. Keap1 regulates inflammatory signaling in Mycobacterium avium-infected human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Awuh, Jane Atesoh; Haug, Markus; Mildenberger, Jennifer; Marstad, Anne; Do, Chau Phuc Ngoc; Louet, Claire; Stenvik, Jørgen; Steigedal, Magnus; Damås, Jan Kristian; Halaas, Øyvind; Flo, Trude Helen

    2015-08-04

    Several mechanisms are involved in controlling intracellular survival of pathogenic mycobacteria in host macrophages, but how these mechanisms are regulated remains poorly understood. We report a role for Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), an oxidative stress sensor, in regulating inflammation induced by infection with Mycobacterium avium in human primary macrophages. By using confocal microscopy, we found that Keap1 associated with mycobacterial phagosomes in a time-dependent manner, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Keap1 increased M. avium-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs). We show evidence of a mechanism whereby Keap1, as part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex with Cul3 and Rbx1, facilitates ubiquitination and degradation of IκB kinase (IKK)-β thus terminating IKK activity. Keap1 knockdown led to increased nuclear translocation of transcription factors NF-κB, IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1, and IRF5 driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and IFN-β. Furthermore, knockdown of other members of the Cul3 ubiquitin ligase complex also led to increased cytokine expression, further implicating this ligase complex in the regulation of the IKK family. Finally, increased inflammatory responses in Keap1-silenced cells contributed to decreased intracellular growth of M. avium in primary human macrophages that was reconstituted with inhibitors of IKKβ or TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). Taken together, we propose that Keap1 acts as a negative regulator for the control of inflammatory signaling in M. avium-infected human primary macrophages. Although this might be important to avoid sustained or overwhelming inflammation, our data suggest that a negative consequence could be facilitated growth of pathogens like M. avium inside macrophages.

  1. Anti-inflammatory signaling: the point of convergence for medical gases in neuroprotection against ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-ying; Wang, Xin; Stetler, R. Anne; Chen, Jun; Yu, Wei-feng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a variety of medical gases confer neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia, extending function beyond their regular clinical applications. The mechanisms underlying ischemic neuroprotection afforded by medical gases have been intensively studied over the past two decades. A number of signaling pathways have been proposed, among which anti-inflammatory signaling has been proven to be critical. Pursuit of the role for anti-inflammatory signaling may shed new light on the translational application of medical gas-afforded neuroprotection. PMID:28217296

  2. Interaction between integrin α5 and PDE4D regulates endothelial inflammatory signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sanguk; Budatha, Madhusudhan; Dahlman, James E.; Coon, Brian G.; Cameron, Ryan T.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Baillie, George; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is primarily a disease of lipid metabolism and inflammation; however, it is also closely associated with endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling, with fibronectin accumulating in the laminin–collagen basement membrane. To investigate how fibronectin modulates inflammation in arteries, we replaced the cytoplasmic tail of the fibronectin receptor integrin α5 with that of the collagen/laminin receptor integrin α2. This chimaera suppressed inflammatory signalling in endothelial cells on fibronectin and in knock-in mice. Fibronectin promoted inflammation by suppressing anti-inflammatory cAMP. cAMP was activated through endothelial prostacyclin secretion; however, this was ECM-independent. Instead, cells on fibronectin suppressed cAMP via enhanced phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, through direct binding of integrin α5 to phosphodiesterase-4D5 (PDE4D5), which induced PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation of PDE4D5 on the inhibitory site Ser651. In vivo knockdown of PDE4D5 inhibited inflammation at athero-prone sites. These data elucidate a molecular mechanism linking ECM remodelling and inflammation, thereby identifying a new class of therapeutic targets. PMID:27595237

  3. Genetic variants associated with autoimmunity drive NFκB signaling and responses to inflammatory stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Housley, William J.; Fernandez, Salvador D.; Vera, Kenneth; Murikinati, Sasidhar R.; Grutzendler, Jaime; Cuerdon, Nicole; Glick, Laura; De Jager, Phillip L.; Mitrovic, Mitja; Cotsapas, Chris; Hafler, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NFκB is a central regulator of inflammation and genome-wide association studies in subjects with autoimmune disease have identified a number of variants within the NFκB signaling cascade. In addition, causal variant fine-mapping has demonstrated that autoimmune disease susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis (MS) and ulcerative colitis are strongly enriched within binding sites for NFkB. Here, we report that MS-associated variants proximal to NFκB1 and in an intron of TNFRSF1A (TNFR1) are associated with increased NFκB signaling after TNFα stimulation. Both variants result in increased degradation of IκBα, a negative regulator of NFκB, and nuclear translocation of p65 NFκB. The variant proximal to NFκB1 controls signaling responses by altering expression of NFκB itself, with the GG risk genotype expressing 20-fold more p50 NFκB and diminished expression of the negative regulators of the NFκB pathway TNFAIP3, BCL3, and CIAP1. Finally naïve CD4 T cells from patients with MS express enhanced activation of p65 NFκB. These results demonstrate that genetic variants associated with risk of developing MS alter NFκB signaling pathways, resulting in enhanced NFκB activation and greater responsiveness to inflammatory stimuli. As such, this suggests that rapid genetic screening for variants associated with NFκB signaling may identify individuals amenable to NFκB or cytokine blockade. PMID:26062845

  4. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Melanthera scandens

    PubMed Central

    Okokon, Jude E; Udoh, Anwanga E; Frank, Samuel G; Amazu, Louis U

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of leaf extract of Melanthera scandens (M. scandens). Methods The crude leaf extract (39–111 mg/kg) of M. scandens was investigated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using various experimental models. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carragenin, egg-albumin induced oedema models, while acetic acid, formalin-induced paw licking and thermal-induced pain models were used to evaluate the antinociceptive property. Results The extract caused a significant (P<0.05 – 0.001) dose-dependent reduction of inflammation and pains induced by different agents used. Conclusions The leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects which may be mediated through the phytochemical constituents of the plant. PMID:23569885

  5. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Li, Yuan; Johansson-Lindbom, Bengt; Coskun, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    An unmet medical need exists for the development of targeted therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with easily administered and stable oral drugs, particularly as most patients on biologics [i.e., tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors and anti-integrins] are either primary non-responders or lose responsiveness during maintenance treatment. A new class of small molecules, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators, has recently shown efficacy in IBD. Here we provide an overview of the mechanism of action of this novel treatment principle in the context of intestinal inflammation. The remarkable impact of therapeutic modulation of the S1P/S1P receptor axis reflects the complexity of the pathogenesis of IBD and the fact that S1P receptor modulation may be a logical therapeutic approach for the future management of IBD.

  6. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of berberine in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Geng, Ya-Na; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are proved to be critical for the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Berberine (BBR) is a natural compound isolated from plants such as Coptis chinensis and Hydrastis canadensis and with multiple pharmacological activities. Recent studies showed that BBR had antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, which contributed in part to its efficacy against diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarized the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR as well as their molecular basis. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR were noted with changes in oxidative stress markers, antioxidant enzymes, and proinflammatory cytokines after BBR administration in diabetic animals. BBR inhibited oxidative stress and inflammation in a variety of tissues including liver, adipose tissue, kidney and pancreas. Mechanisms of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR were complex, which involved multiple cellular kinases and signaling pathways, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) pathway, and nuclear factor- κ B (NF- κ B) pathway. Detailed mechanisms and pathways for the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of BBR still need further investigation. Clarification of these issues could help to understand the pharmacology of BBR in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and promote the development of antidiabetic natural products.

  7. Zinc transporter Slc39a14 regulates inflammatory signaling associated with hypertrophic adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Troche, Catalina; Beker Aydemir, Tolunay

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is a signaling molecule in numerous metabolic pathways, the coordination of which occurs through activity of zinc transporters. The expression of zinc transporter Zip14 (Slc39a14), a zinc importer of the solute carrier 39 family, is stimulated under proinflammatory conditions. Adipose tissue upregulates Zip14 during lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia. A null mutation of Zip14 (KO) revealed that phenotypic changes in adipose include increased cytokine production, increased plasma leptin, hypertrophied adipocytes, and dampened insulin signaling. Adipose tissue from KO mice had increased levels of preadipocyte markers, lower expression of the differentiation marker (PPARγ), and activation of NF-κB and STAT3 pathways. Our overall hypothesis was that ZIP14 would play a role in adipocyte differentiation and inflammatory obesity. Global Zip14 KO causes systemic endotoxemia. The observed metabolic changes in adipose metabolism were reversed when oral antibiotics were administrated, indicating that circulating levels of endotoxin were in part responsible for the adipose phenotype. To evaluate a mechanism, 3T3-L1 cells were differentiated into adipocytes and treated with siRNA to knock down Zip14. These cells had an impaired ability to mobilize zinc, which caused dysregulation of inflammatory pathways (JAK2/STAT3 and NF-κB). The Zip14 deletion may limit the availability of intracellular zinc, yielding the unique phenotype of inflammation coupled with hypertrophy. Taken together, these results suggest that aberrant zinc distribution observed with Zip14 ablation impacts adipose cytokine production and metabolism, ultimately increasing fat deposition when exposed to endotoxin. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation into the mechanistic role of ZIP14 in adipose tissue regulation and metabolism. PMID:26646099

  8. Adipocytokine orosomucoid integrates inflammatory and metabolic signals to preserve energy homeostasis by resolving immoderate inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Sok; Choi, Jin Woo; Hwang, Injae; Lee, Joo Won; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, A Young; Huh, Jin Young; Koh, Young Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Son, Hee Jung; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hotta, Kikuko; Alfadda, Assim A; Kim, Jae Bum

    2010-07-16

    Orosomucoid (ORM), also called alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, is an abundant plasma protein that is an immunomodulator induced by stressful conditions such as infections. In this study, we reveal that Orm is induced selectively in the adipose tissue of obese mice to suppress excess inflammation that otherwise disturbs energy homeostasis. Adipose Orm levels were elevated by metabolic signals, including insulin, high glucose, and free fatty acid, as well as by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which is found in increased levels in the adipose tissue of morbid obese subjects. In both adipocytes and macrophages, ORM suppressed proinflammatory gene expression and pathways such as NF-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalings and reactive oxygen species generation. Concomitantly, ORM relieved hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated lipolysis in adipocytes. Accordingly, ORM improved glucose and insulin tolerance in obese and diabetic db/db mice. Taken together, our results suggest that ORM integrates inflammatory and metabolic signals to modulate immune responses to protect adipose tissue from excessive inflammation and thereby from metabolic dysfunction.

  9. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  10. Acylcarnitines activate proinflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Knotts, Trina A; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D; McCoin, Colin S; Huang, Shurong; Schneider, Dina; Singh, Shamsher; Adams, Sean H; Hwang, Daniel H

    2014-06-15

    Incomplete β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria is a feature of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Previous studies revealed that plasma concentrations of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (by-products of incomplete β-oxidation) are elevated in T2DM and insulin resistance. In a previous study, we reported that mixed D,L isomers of C12- or C14-carnitine induced an NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting potential activation of proinflammatory pathways. Here, we determined whether the physiologically relevant L-acylcarnitines activate classical proinflammatory signaling pathways and if these outcomes involve pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-associated pathways. Acylcarnitines induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in a chain length-dependent manner in RAW 264.7 cells. L-C14 carnitine (5-25 μM), used as a representative acylcarnitine, stimulated the expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, L-C14 carnitine induced phosphorylation of JNK and ERK, common downstream components of many proinflammatory signaling pathways including PRRs. Knockdown of MyD88, a key cofactor in PRR signaling and inflammation, blunted the proinflammatory effects of acylcarnitine. While these results point to potential involvement of PRRs, L-C14 carnitine promoted IL-8 secretion from human epithelial cells (HCT-116) lacking Toll-like receptors (TLR)2 and -4, and did not activate reporter constructs in TLR overexpression cell models. Thus, acylcarnitines have the potential to activate inflammation, but the specific molecular and tissue target(s) involved remain to be identified.

  11. Acylcarnitines activate proinflammatory signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M.; Knotts, Trina A.; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D.; McCoin, Colin S.; Huang, Shurong; Schneider, Dina; Singh, Shamsher; Hwang, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Incomplete β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria is a feature of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Previous studies revealed that plasma concentrations of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (by-products of incomplete β-oxidation) are elevated in T2DM and insulin resistance. In a previous study, we reported that mixed d,l isomers of C12- or C14-carnitine induced an NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting potential activation of proinflammatory pathways. Here, we determined whether the physiologically relevant l-acylcarnitines activate classical proinflammatory signaling pathways and if these outcomes involve pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-associated pathways. Acylcarnitines induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in a chain length-dependent manner in RAW 264.7 cells. l-C14 carnitine (5–25 μM), used as a representative acylcarnitine, stimulated the expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, l-C14 carnitine induced phosphorylation of JNK and ERK, common downstream components of many proinflammatory signaling pathways including PRRs. Knockdown of MyD88, a key cofactor in PRR signaling and inflammation, blunted the proinflammatory effects of acylcarnitine. While these results point to potential involvement of PRRs, l-C14 carnitine promoted IL-8 secretion from human epithelial cells (HCT-116) lacking Toll-like receptors (TLR)2 and -4, and did not activate reporter constructs in TLR overexpression cell models. Thus, acylcarnitines have the potential to activate inflammation, but the specific molecular and tissue target(s) involved remain to be identified. PMID:24760988

  12. Metabolic signals and innate immune activation in obesity and exercise.

    PubMed

    Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a sedentary lifestyle and excess energy intake has led to an increased prevalence of obesity which constitutes a major risk factor for several co-morbidities including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research during the last two decades has revealed that a characteristic feature of obesity linking it to insulin resistance is the presence of chronic low-grade inflammation being indicative of activation of the innate immune system. Recent evidence suggests that activation of the innate immune system in the course of obesity is mediated by metabolic signals, such as free fatty acids (FFAs), being elevated in many obese subjects, through activation of pattern recognition receptors thereby leading to stimulation of critical inflammatory signaling cascades, like IκBα kinase/nuclear factor-κB (IKK/NF- κB), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) and NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway, that interfere with insulin signaling. Exercise is one of the main prescribed interventions in obesity management improving insulin sensitivity and reducing obesity- induced chronic inflammation. This review summarizes current knowledge of the cellular recognition mechanisms for FFAs, the inflammatory signaling pathways triggered by excess FFAs in obesity and the counteractive effects of both acute and chronic exercise on obesity-induced activation of inflammatory signaling pathways. A deeper understanding of the effects of exercise on inflammatory signaling pathways in obesity is useful to optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat the increasing incidence of obesity and its comorbidities.

  13. Interactions between NF-κB and SP3 connect inflammatory signaling with reduced FGF-10 expression.

    PubMed

    Carver, Billy J; Plosa, Erin J; Stinnett, Amanda M; Blackwell, Timothy S; Prince, Lawrence S

    2013-05-24

    Inflammation inhibits normal lung morphogenesis in preterm infants. Soluble inflammatory mediators present in the lungs of patients developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia disrupt expression of multiple genes critical for development. However, the mechanisms linking innate immune signaling and developmental programs are not clear. NF-κB activation inhibits expression of the critical morphogen FGF-10. Here, we show that interactions between the RELA subunit of NF-κB and SP3 suppress SP1-mediated FGF-10 expression. SP3 co-expression reduced SP1-mediated Fgf-10 promoter activity, suggesting antagonistic interactions between SP1 and SP3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of LPS-treated primary mouse fetal lung mesenchymal cells detected increased interactions between SP3, RELA, and the Fgf-10 promoter. Expression of a constitutively active IκB kinase β mutant not only decreased Fgf-10 promoter activity but also increased RELA-SP3 nuclear interactions. Expression of a dominant-negative IκB, which blocks NF-κB nuclear translocation, prevented inhibition of FGF-10 by SP3. The inhibitory functions of SP3 required sequences located in the N-terminal region of the protein. These data suggested that inhibition of FGF-10 by inflammatory signaling involves the NF-κB-dependent interactions between RELA, SP3, and the Fgf-10 promoter. NF-κB activation may therefore lead to reduced gene expression by recruiting inhibitory factors to specific gene promoters following exposure to inflammatory stimuli.

  14. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation.

  15. Adenosine signalling mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Maione, Francesco; Morello, Silvana; Lapucci, Andrea; Paccosi, Sara; Steckel, Bodo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Parenti, Astrid; Iuvone, Teresa; Schrader, Jürgen; Ialenti, Armando; Cicala, Carla

    2016-07-15

    Extracellular adenosine formation from ATP is controlled by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase/CD39) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (e-5NT/CD73); the latter converts AMP to adenosine and inorganic phosphate, representing the rate limiting step controlling the ratio between extracellular ATP and adenosine. Evidence that cellular expression and activity of CD39 and CD73 may be subject to changes under pathophysiological conditions has identified this pathway as an endogenous modulator in several diseases and was shown to be involved in the molecular mechanism of drugs, such as methotrexate, salicylates , interferon-β. We evaluated whether CD73/adenosine/A2A signalling pathway is involved in nimesulide anti-inflammatory effect, in vivo and in vitro. We found that the adenosine A2A agonist, 4-[2-[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzenepropanoic acid hydrochloride (CGS21680, 2mg/kg ip.), inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema and the effect was reversed by co-administration of the A2A antagonist -(2-[7-amino-2-[2-furyl][1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)phenol (ZM241385; 3mg/kg i.p.). Nimesulide (5mg/kg i.p.) anti-inflammatory effect was inhibited by pre-treatment with ZM241385 (3mg/kg i.p.) and by local administration of the CD73 inhibitor, adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene)diphosphate (APCP; 400μg/paw). Furthermore, we found increased activity of 5'-nucleotidase/CD73 in paws and plasma of nimesulide treated rats, 4h following oedema induction. In vitro, the inhibitory effect of nimesulide on nitrite and prostaglandin E2 production by lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 cell line was reversed by ZM241385 and APCP. Furthermore, nimesulide increased CD73 activity in J774 macrophages while it did not inhibit nitrite accumulation by lipopolysaccharide-activated SiRNA CD73 silenced J774 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effect of nimesulide in part is mediated by CD73

  16. CTGF Promotes Inflammatory Cell Infiltration of the Renal Interstitium by Activating NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rayego, Sandra; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Rodriguez, Javier Sánchez; Rodrigues-Díez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Carvajal, Gisselle; Aroeira, Luiz Stark; Selgas, Rafael; Mezzano, Sergio A.; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an important profibrotic factor in kidney diseases. Blockade of endogenous CTGF ameliorates experimental renal damage and inhibits synthesis of extracellular matrix in cultured renal cells. CTGF regulates several cellular responses, including adhesion, migration, proliferation, and synthesis of proinflammatory factors. Here, we investigated whether CTGF participates in the inflammatory process in the kidney by evaluating the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, a key signaling system that controls inflammation and immune responses. Systemic administration of CTGF to mice for 24 h induced marked infiltration of inflammatory cells in the renal interstitium (T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages) and led to elevated renal NF-κB activity. Administration of CTGF increased renal expression of chemokines (MCP-1 and RANTES) and cytokines (INF-γ, IL-6, and IL-4) that recruit immune cells and promote inflammation. Treatment with a NF-κB inhibitor, parthenolide, inhibited CTGF-induced renal inflammatory responses, including the up-regulation of chemokines and cytokines. In cultured murine tubuloepithelial cells, CTGF rapidly activated the NF-κB pathway and the cascade of mitogen-activated protein kinases, demonstrating crosstalk between these signaling pathways. CTGF, via mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB activation, increased proinflammatory gene expression. These data show that in addition to its profibrotic properties, CTGF contributes to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the kidney by activating the NF-κB pathway. PMID:19423687

  17. PTEN-β-Catenin Signaling Modulates Regulatory T Cells and Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Liver Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Li, Changyong; Wang, Kunpeng; Yue, Shi; Jiang, Longfeng; Ke, Michael; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Zhang, Feng; Lu, Ling; Ke, Bibo

    2017-02-02

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) plays an important role in regulating T cell activation during inflammatory response. Activation of β-catenin is crucial for maintaining immune homeostasis. This study investigates the functional roles and molecular mechanisms by which PTEN-β-catenin signaling promotes regulatory T cell (Treg) induction in a mouse model of liver ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI). We found that mice with myeloid specific PTEN knockout (PTEN(M-KO) ) exhibited reduced liver damage as evidenced by decreased levels of serum ALT, intrahepatic macrophage trafficking, and pro-inflammatory mediators compared to the PTEN-proficient (PTEN(FL/FL) ) controls. Disruption of myeloid PTEN activated β-catenin, which in turn promoted PPARγ-mediated Jagged-1/Notch signaling and induced Foxp3(+) Tregs while inhibiting Th17 cells. However, blocking of Notch signaling by inhibiting γ-secretase reversed myeloid PTEN deficiency-mediated protection in IR-triggered liver inflammation with reduced Foxp3(+) and increased RORγt-mediated IL-17A expression in ischemic livers. Moreover, knockdown of β-catenin or PPARγ in PTEN-deficient macrophages inhibited Jagged-1/Notch activation and reduced Foxp3(+) Treg induction, leading to increased proinflammatory mediators in macrophage/T cell co-cultures. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that PTEN-β-catenin signaling is a novel regulator involved in modulating Treg development and provides a potential therapeutic target in liver IRI. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleep disorders and inflammatory disease activity: chicken or the egg?

    PubMed

    Parekh, Parth J; Oldfield Iv, Edward C; Challapallisri, Vaishnavi; Ware, J Catsby; Johnson, David A

    2015-04-01

    Sleep dysfunction is a highly prevalent condition that has long been implicated in accelerating disease states characterized by having an inflammatory component such as systemic lupus erythematosus, HIV, and multiple sclerosis. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, debilitating disease that is characterized by waxing and waning symptoms, which are a direct result of increased circulating inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have demonstrated sleep dysfunction and the disruption of the circadian rhythm to result in an upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Not only does this pose a potential trigger for disease flares but also an increased risk of malignancy in this subset of patients. This begs to question whether or not there is a therapeutic role of sleep cycle and circadian rhythm optimization in the prevention of IBD flares. Further research is needed to clarify the role of sleep dysfunction and alterations of the circadian rhythm in modifying disease activity and also in reducing the risk of malignancy in patients suffering from IBD.

  19. AP-1/IRF-3 Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Andrographolide Isolated from Andrographis paniculata

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ting; Yang, Woo Seok; Sung, Gi-Ho; Rhee, Man Hee; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Kim, Jong Heon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide (AG) is an abundant component of plants of the genus Andrographis and has a number of beneficial properties including neuroprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic effects. Despite numerous pharmacological studies, the precise mechanism of AG is still ambiguous. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of AG and its target proteins as they pertain to anti-inflammatory responses. AG suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), as well as the mRNA abundance of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and interferon-beta (IFN-β) in a dose-dependent manner in both lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) activated RAW264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. AG also substantially ameliorated the symptoms of LPS-induced hepatitis and EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis in mice. Based on the results of luciferase reporter gene assays, kinase assays, and measurement of nuclear levels of transcription factors, the anti-inflammatory effects of AG were found to be clearly mediated by inhibition of both (1) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/activator protein (AP)-1 and (2) IκB kinase ε (IKKε)/interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 pathways. In conclusion, we detected a novel molecular signaling pathway by which AG can suppress inflammatory responses. Thus, AG is a promising anti-inflammatory drug with two pharmacological targets. PMID:23840248

  20. Anti-inflammatory signaling actions of electrophilic nitro-arachidonic acid in vascular cells and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Trostchansky, Andrés; Rubbo, Homero

    2017-03-01

    Nitrated derivatives of unsaturated fatty acids (nitro-fatty acids) are being formed and detected in human plasma, cell membranes and tissue, triggering signaling cascades via covalent and reversible post-translational modifications of nucleophilic amino acids in transcriptional regulatory proteins. Arachidonic acid (AA) represents a precursor of potent signaling molecules, i.e., prostaglandins and thromboxanes through enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidative pathways. Arachidonic acid can be nitrated by reactive nitrogen species leading to the formation of nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA). A critical issue is the influence of NO2-AA on prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases, modulating inflammatory processes through redirection of AA metabolism and signaling. In this prospective article, we describe the key chemical and biochemical actions of NO2-AA in vascular and astrocytes. This includes the ability of NO2-AA to mediate unique redox signaling anti-inflammatory actions along with its therapeutic potential.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Streptochlorin via TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathways in Cellular and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Do-Wan; Shin, Hee Jae; Han, Ji-Won; Shin, Woo-Young; Sun, Xiao; Shim, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Tack-Joong; Kang, Tae-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Streptochlorin, a small compound derived from marine actinomycete, has been shown to have anti-angiogenic, anti-tumor, and anti-allergic activities. However, the anti-inflammatory effects and underlying mechanisms have not yet been reported. In the present study, we investigated the effect of streptochlorin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Streptochlorin attenuated the production of proinflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase-2, pro-interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells through inhibition of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dependent signaling pathway. Furthermore, streptochlorin suppressed the infiltration of immune cells such as neutrophils into the lung and proinflammatory cytokine production such as IL-6 and TNF-α in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. Streptochlorin has potent anti-inflammatory effects through regulating TRIF-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting that streptochlorin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy in treating various inflammatory diseases. PMID:25822875

  2. Cerebral mTOR signal and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Alzheimer’s disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Li, Guang-Jian; Hu, Hai-Xia; Ma, Chi; Ma, Di-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a part of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) development the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to play a crucial role in regulating cognition and can be used as a neuronal marker. Neuro-inflammation is also a cause of the pathophysiological process in AD. Thus, we examined the protein expression levels of mTOR and its downstream pathways as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) in the brain of AD rats. We further examined the effects of blocking mTOR on PICs, namely IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Our results showed that the protein expression of p-mTOR, mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) pathways were amplified in the hippocampus of AD rats compared with controls. Blocking mTOR by using rapamycin selectively enhanced activities of IL-6 and TNF-α signaling pathways, which was accompanied with an increase of Caspase-3, indicating cellular apoptosis and worsened learning performance. In conclusion, our data for the first time revealed specific signaling pathways engaged in the development of AD, including a regulatory role by the activation of mTOR in PIC mechanisms. Stimulation of mTOR is likely to play a beneficial role in modulating neurological deficits in AD.Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present with new opportunities for treatment and clinical management of AD PMID:28123835

  3. Induction of Mincle by Helicobacter pylori and consequent anti-inflammatory signaling denote a bacterial survival strategy.

    PubMed

    Devi, Savita; Rajakumara, Eerappa; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2015-10-12

    Evasion of innate immune recognition is one of the key strategies for persistence of Helicobacter pylori, by virtue of its ability to modulate or escape the host innate immune receptors and signaling pathways. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) predominantly expressed by macrophages are pivotal in tailoring immune response against pathogens. The recognition of glyco or carbohydrate moieties by Mincle (Macrophage inducible C-type lectin) is emerging as a crucial element in anti-fungal and anti-mycobacterial immunity. Herein, we demonstrate the role of Mincle in modulation of innate immune response against H. pylori infection. Our results revealed an upregulated expression of Mincle which was independent of direct host cell contact. Upon computational modelling, Mincle was observed to interact with the Lewis antigens of H. pylori LPS and possibly activating an anti-inflammatory cytokine production, thereby maintaining a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knockdown of Mincle in human macrophages resulted in up regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and consequent down regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Collectively, our study demonstrates a novel mechanism employed by H. pylori to escape clearance by exploiting functional plasticity of Mincle to strike a balance between pro-and anti-inflammatory responses ensuring its persistence in the host.

  4. Distinct inflammatory properties of late-activated macrophages in inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rostasy, KM; Schmidt, J; Bahn, E; Pfander, T; Piepkorn, M; Wilichowski, E; Schulz-Schaeffer, J

    2008-01-01

    Summary Distinct mechanisms such as humeral immunity in dermatomyositis (DM) and T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in polymyositis (PM) contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. In addition, different subsets of macrophages are present in both diseases. Herein, the characteristics of 25F9-positive macrophages in skeletal muscle inflammation are outlined. Muscle biopsies of subjects with DM and PM were studied by immunohistochemical multi-labelling using the late-activation marker 25F9, together with markers characterizing macrophage function including IFN-γ, iNOS, and TGF-β. In PM, a robust expression of IFN-γ, iNOS, and TGF-β was observed in inflammatory cells. Double- and serial-labelling revealed that a subset of 25F9-positive macrophages in the vicinity of injured muscle fibres expressed iNOS and TGF-β, but not IFN-γ. In DM, IFN-γ, iNOS and TGF-β were also expressed in inflammatory cells in the endomysium. Double- and serial-labelling studies in DM indicated that 25F9-positive macrophages expressed TGF-β and to a lesser degree iNOS, but not IFN-γ. In conclusion, our data suggest that late-activated macrophages contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. PMID:19364061

  5. Distinct inflammatory properties of late-activated macrophages in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, K M; Schmidt, J; Bahn, E; Pfander, T; Piepkorn, M; Wilichowski, E; Schulz-Schaeffer, J

    2008-10-01

    Distinct mechanisms such as humeral immunity in dermatomyositis (DM) and T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in polymyositis (PM) contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. In addition, different subsets of macrophages are present in both diseases. Herein, the characteristics of 25F9-positive macrophages in skeletal muscle inflammation are outlined. Muscle biopsies of subjects with DM and PM were studied by immunohistochemical multi-labelling using the late-activation marker 25F9, together with markers characterizing macrophage function including IFN-gamma, iNOS, and TGF-beta. In PM, a robust expression of IFN-gamma, iNOS, and TGF-beta was observed in inflammatory cells. Double- and serial-labelling revealed that a subset of 25F9-positive macrophages in the vicinity of injured muscle fibres expressed iNOS and TGF-beta, but not IFN-gamma. In DM, IFN-gamma, iNOS and TGF-beta were also expressed in inflammatory cells in the endomysium. Double- and serial-labelling studies in DM indicated that 25F9-positive macrophages expressed TGF-beta and to a lesser degree iNOS, but not IFN-gamma. In conclusion, our data suggest that late-activated macrophages contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies.

  6. Erythropoietin acts as an anti-inflammatory signal on murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, Tanja; Ehrhardt, Stefanie; Cerny, Daniela; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Klein, Sabrina; Heeg, Klaus; Kubatzky, Katharina F

    2015-05-01

    Recently it was found that the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed on innate immune cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. We found that murine bone marrow-derived mast cells express the EpoR and that its expression is increased under hypoxic conditions. Interestingly, Epo stimulation of the cells did not activate signal transducer and activator of transcription molecules, nor did we find differences in the expression of typical STAT-dependent genes, the proliferation rate, and the ability to differentiate or to protect the cells from apoptosis. Instead, we demonstrate that stimulation of mast cells with Epo leads to phosphorylation of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-kit. We hypothesize that this is due to the formation of a receptor complex between the EpoR and c-kit. The common beta chain of the IL-3 receptor family, which was described as part of the tissue protective receptor (TPR) on other non-erythroid cells, however is not activated. To investigate whether the EpoR/c-kit complex has tissue protective properties, cells were treated with the Toll-like receptor ligand LPS. Combined Epo and LPS treatment downregulated the inflammatory response of the cells as detected by a decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α secretion.

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity of Bromelia hieronymi: comparison with bromelain.

    PubMed

    Errasti, María E; Caffini, Néstor O; Pelzer, Lilian E; Rotelli, Alejandra E

    2013-03-01

    Some plant proteases (e. g., papain, bromelain, ficin) have been used as anti-inflammatory agents for some years, and especially bromelain is still being used as alternative and/or complementary therapy to glucocorticoids, nonsteroidal antirheumatics, and immunomodulators. Bromelain is an extract rich in cysteine endopeptidases obtained from Ananas comosus. In this study the anti-inflammatory action of a partially purified extract of Bromelia hieronymi fruits, whose main components are cysteine endopeptidases, is presented. Different doses of a partially purified extract of B. hieronymi were assayed on carrageenan-induced and serotonine-induced rat paw edema, as well as in cotton pellet granuloma model. Doses with equal proteolytic activity of the partially purified extract and bromelain showed significantly similar anti-inflammatory responses. Treatment of the partially purified extract and bromelain with E-64 provoked loss of anti-inflammatory activity on carrageenan-induced paw edema, a fact which is consistent with the hypothesis that the proteolytic activity would be responsible for the anti-inflammatory action.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Anthraquinone-2-Carboxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Gwang; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Yong; Hong, Sungyoul; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Shi Hyung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinone compounds are one of the abundant polyphenols found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs. However, the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms of anthraquinones have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the activity of anthraquinones using acute inflammatory and nociceptive experimental conditions. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid, AQCA), one of the major anthraquinones identified from Brazilian taheebo, ameliorated various inflammatory and algesic symptoms in EtOH/HCl- and acetylsalicylic acid- (ASA-) induced gastritis, arachidonic acid-induced edema, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing without displaying toxic profiles in body and organ weight, gastric irritation, or serum parameters. In addition, AQCA suppressed the expression of inflammatory genes such as cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 in stomach tissues and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated RAW264.7 cells. According to reporter gene assay and immunoblotting analyses, AQCA inhibited activation of the nuclear factor- (NF-) κB and activator protein- (AP-) 1 pathways by suppression of upstream signaling involving interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK1), p38, Src, and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Our data strongly suggest that anthraquinones such as AQCA act as potent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive components in vivo, thus contributing to the immune regulatory role of fruits and herbs.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Anthraquinone-2-Carboxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Gwang; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Yong; Hong, Sungyoul; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Shi Hyung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinone compounds are one of the abundant polyphenols found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs. However, the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms of anthraquinones have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the activity of anthraquinones using acute inflammatory and nociceptive experimental conditions. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid, AQCA), one of the major anthraquinones identified from Brazilian taheebo, ameliorated various inflammatory and algesic symptoms in EtOH/HCl- and acetylsalicylic acid- (ASA-) induced gastritis, arachidonic acid-induced edema, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing without displaying toxic profiles in body and organ weight, gastric irritation, or serum parameters. In addition, AQCA suppressed the expression of inflammatory genes such as cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 in stomach tissues and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated RAW264.7 cells. According to reporter gene assay and immunoblotting analyses, AQCA inhibited activation of the nuclear factor- (NF-) κB and activator protein- (AP-) 1 pathways by suppression of upstream signaling involving interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK1), p38, Src, and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Our data strongly suggest that anthraquinones such as AQCA act as potent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive components in vivo, thus contributing to the immune regulatory role of fruits and herbs. PMID:27057092

  10. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, enhances the polarization of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Maria Ruweka; Reyes, Jose Luis; Iannuzzi, Jordan; Leung, Gabriella; McKay, Derek Mark

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are important innate immune cells that are associated with two distinct phenotypes: a pro-inflammatory (or classically activated) subset with prototypic macrophage functions such as inflammatory cytokine production and bactericidal activity, and an anti-inflammatory (or alternatively activated (AAM)) subset linked with wound healing and tissue repair processes. In this study, we examined the effect of interlukein-6 on human and murine macrophage polarization. The results indicate that despite being commonly associated with pro-inflammatory functions and being implicated in the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of numerous inflammatory diseases, interleukin-6 can enhance the polarization of AAMs, based on increased expression of hallmark markers: arginase-1, Ym1 and CD206; this effect required the AAM differentiating cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13. Co-treatment of AAMs with IL-6 resulted in spontaneous release of IL-10, suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide production and inhibited cytokine production by activated CD4+ T cells - immunoregulatory features not observed in the 'parent' IL-4+IL-13-induced AAM. The effect of IL-6 required signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3, was partially dependent on up-regulation of the IL4Rα chain, and was independent of autocrine IL-10. In the presence of IFNγ, IL-6 promoted the production of IL-1β and TNFα suggesting that this cytokine can enhance the phenotype to which a macrophage has committed. This finding may explain the pleiotrophic nature of IL-6, where it is associated with the perpetuation and enhancement of disease in inflammatory situations, but is also necessary for resolution of inflammation and adequate wound healing to occur in others. Thus, the potential benefit of IL-6 in promoting an AAM, with its' anti-inflammatory and wound healing ability, may need to be considered in immunotherapies aimed at in vivo modulation or inhibition of IL-6.

  11. Short communication: Camel milk ameliorates inflammatory responses and oxidative stress and downregulates mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Wei; Kong, Gui-Qing; Ma, Ming-Ming; Li, Yan; Huang, Xiao; Wang, Li-Peng; Peng, Zhen-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Xiang-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex syndrome disorder with high mortality rate. Camel milk (CM) contains antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties and protects against numerous diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate the function of CM in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS in rats. Camel milk reduced the lung wet:dry weight ratio and significantly reduced LPS-induced increases in neutrophil infiltration, interstitial and intra-alveolar edema, thickness of the alveolar wall, and lung injury scores of lung tissues. It also had antiinflammatory and antioxidant effects on LPS-induced ARDS. After LPS stimulation, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-10, and IL-1β) in serum and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, and total antioxidant capacity) in lung tissue were notably attenuated by CM. Camel milk also downregulated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Given these results, CM is a potential complementary food for ARDS treatment.

  12. Elevated granulocyte strontium in inflammatory arthritides is related to the inflammatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haellgren, R.; Svensson, K.; Johansson, E.; Lindh, U.

    1984-12-01

    Total cellular strontium and calcium were measured by the nuclear microprobe technique. Increased mass fraction of both elements was found in granulocytes isolated from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and other kinds of inflammatory arthritides. Increased granulocyte calcium but only marginally elevated granulocyte strontium was demonstrated in patients with scleroderma. The granulocyte accumulation of strontium and calcium seems to be linked to the degree of inflammatory activity, because the granulocyte content of both elements was positively correlated to the plasma concentration of acute-phase proteins. Corticosteroid therapy induced a marked reduction of granulocyte strontium but a more modest decrease of granulocyte calcium. The serum levels of strontium and calcium were within the normal ranges in all patients and were not significantly altered by corticosteroids. 21 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Interleukin-27 exhibited anti-inflammatory activity during Plasmodium berghei infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Fazalul Rahiman, S S; Basir, R; Talib, H; Tie, T H; Chuah, Y K; Jabbarzare, M; Chong, W C; Mohd Yusoff, M A; Nordin, N; Yam, M F; Abdullah, W O; Abdul Majid, R

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) has a pleiotropic role either as a pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory cytokine in inflammatory related diseases. The role and involvement of IL-27 during malaria was investigated and the effects of modulating its release on the production of major inflammatory cytokines and the histopathological consequences in major affected organs during the infection were evaluated. Results showed that IL-27 concentration was significantly elevated throughout the infection but no positive correlation with the parasitaemia development observed. Augmentation of IL-27 significantly elevated the release of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10 whereas antagonising and neutralising IL-27 produced the opposite. A significant elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-6) was also observed, both during augmentation and inhibition of IL-27. Thus, it is suggested that IL-27 exerts an anti-inflammatory activity in the Th1 type response by signalling the production of IL-10 during malaria. Histopathological examination showed sequestration of PRBC in the microvasculature of major organs in malarial mice. Other significant histopathological changes include hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the Kupffer cells in the liver, hyaline membrane formation in lung tissue, enlargement of the white and red pulp followed by the disappearance of germinal centre of the spleen, and tubular vacuolation of the kidney tissues. In conclusion, it is suggested that IL-27 may possibly acts as an anti-inflammatory cytokine during the infection. Modulation of its release produced a positive impact on inflammatory cytokine production during the infection, suggesting its potential in malaria immunotherapy, in which the host may benefit from its inhibition.

  14. Oscillation of p38 activity controls efficient pro-inflammatory gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Tomida, Taichiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Saito, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway controls inflammatory responses and is an important target of anti-inflammatory drugs. Although pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) appear to induce only transient activation of p38 (over ∼60 min), longer cytokine exposure is necessary to induce p38-dependent effector genes. Here we study the dynamics of p38 activation in individual cells using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based p38 activity reporter. We find that, after an initial burst of activity, p38 MAPK activity subsequently oscillates for more than 8 h under continuous IL-1β stimulation. However, as this oscillation is asynchronous, the measured p38 activity population average is only slightly higher than basal level. Mathematical modelling, which we have experimentally verified, indicates that the asynchronous oscillation of p38 is generated through a negative feedback loop involving the dual-specificity phosphatase MKP-1/DUSP1. We find that the oscillatory p38 activity is necessary for efficient expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as IL-6, IL-8 and COX-2. PMID:26399197

  15. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of Urera aurantiaca.

    PubMed

    Riedel, R; Marrassini, C; Anesini, C; Gorzalczany, S

    2015-01-01

    Urera aurantiaca Wedd. (Urticaceae) is a medicinal plant commonly used in traditional medicine to relieve pain in inflammatory processes. In the present study, the in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of U. aurantiaca methanolic extract and its possible mechanisms of action were investigated. The extract showed anti-inflammatory activity in the ear edema in mice test (34.3% inhibition), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was markedly reduced in animals administered with the extract: within 49.6% and 68.5%. In the histological analysis, intense dermal edema and intense cellular infiltration of inflammatory cells were markedly reduced in the ear tissue of the animals treated with the extract. In the carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in rats assay the extract provoked a significant inhibition of the inflammation (45.5%, 5 h after the treatment) and the MPO activity was markedly reduced (maximum inhibition 71.7%), The extract also exhibited significant and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the increased vascular permeability induced by acetic acid. The extract presented antioxidant activity in both 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azinobis 3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonic acid tests and its total phenol content was 35.4 ± 0.06 mg GAE/g of extract. Also, the extract produced significant inhibition on nociception induced by acetic acid (ED50 : 8.7 mg/kg, i.p.) administered intraperitoneally and orally. Naloxone significantly prevented this activity.

  16. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of Bursera copallifera

    PubMed Central

    Columba-Palomares, M. F. María C.; Villareal, Dra. María L.; Acevedo Quiroz, M. C. Macdiel E.; Marquina Bahena, M. C. Silvia; Álvarez Berber, Dra. Laura P.; Rodríguez-López, Dra. Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background: The plant species Bursera copallifera (DC) bullock is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation. The leaves of this plant can be prepared as an infusion to treat migraines, bronchitis, and dental pain Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of organic extracts from the stems, stem bark, and leaves of B. copallifera, which was selected based on the knowledge of its traditional use. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the ability of extracts to inhibit mouse ear inflammation in response to topical application of 12-O tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The extracts with anti-inflammatory activity were evaluated for their inhibition of pro-inflammatory enzymes. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxic activities of the organic extracts were evaluated using the sulforhodamine B assay. Results: The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems (HAS) exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity of 54.3% (0.5 mg/ear), whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the dichloromethane-methanol extract from the leaves (DMeL) was 55.4% at a dose of 0.1 mg/ear. Methanol extract from the leaves (MeL) showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity (IC50 = 4.4 μg/mL), hydroalcoholic extract of leaves, and DMeL also reduce the enzyme activity, (IC50 = 6.5 μg/mL, IC50 = 5.7 μg/mL), respectively, from stems HAS exhibit activity at the evaluated concentrations (IC50 =6.4 μg/mL). The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity against a breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7, IC50 = 0.90 μg/mL), whereas DMeL exhibited an IC50 value of 19.9 μg/mL. Conclusion: In conclusion, extracts from leaves and stems inhibited cyclooxygenase-1, which is the target enzyme for nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs, and some of these extracts demonstrated substantial antiproliferative effects against the MCF7 cell line. These results validate the traditional use of B. copallifera. PMID:26664022

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of arctigenin from Forsythiae Fructus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Sook; Lee, Ji Yun; Kim, Chang Jong

    2008-03-05

    Oleaceae Forsythiae Fructus has been used for anti-inflammatory, diuretics, antidote, and antibacterials in traditional herbal medicine. Our previous screening of medicinal plants showed that methanol (MeOH) extract of Forsythiae Fructus had significant anti-inflammatory activity, but the active ingredients remain unclear. For isolation of active ingredient of MeOH extract of Forsythiae Fructus, it was partitioned with n-hexane and ethylacetate (EtOAc), and arctigenin was isolated from EtOAc fraction by column chromatography with anti-inflammatory activity-guided separation. Its activity was evaluated in the animal models of inflammation including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activities in the edematous tissues homogenate, and silica-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the RAW 264.7 cell line. It was shown that arctigenin (100 mg/kg) had significantly decreased not only carrageenan-induced paw edema 3 and 4h after injection of carrageenan, arachidonic acid (AA)-induced ear edema at a painting dose of 0.1-1.0mg/ear, and acetic acid-induced writhing response and acetic acid-induced capillary permeability accentuation at an oral dose of 25-100, and 100 mg/kg, respectively, but also MPO and EPO activities at a painting dose of 0.1-1.0mg/ear in the AA-induced edematous tissues homogenate as indicators of neutrophils and eosinophils recruitment into the inflamed tissue. Further, arctigenin (0.1-10 microM) also significantly inhibited the intracellular ROS production by silica. These results indicate that arctigenin is a bioactive agent of Forsythiae Fructus having significant anti-inflammatory action by inhibition of the exudation, and leukocytes recruitment into the inflamed tissues. The pharmacologic mechanism of action of arctigenin may be due to the inhibition of release/production of inflammatory mediators such as AA metabolites and free radicals.

  18. Zinc modulates PPARgamma signaling and activation of porcine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Meerarani, Purushothaman; Reiterer, Gudrun; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2003-10-01

    Dietary zinc has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and is a critical component of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gene expression and regulation. To assess the protective mechanisms of PPARgamma in endothelial cell dysfunction and the role of zinc in the modulation of PPARgamma signaling, cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were exposed to the membrane-permeable zinc chelator N,N,N'N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylene diamine (TPEN), thiazolidinedione (TZD; PPARgamma agonist) or bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; PPARgamma antagonist). Subsequently, endothelial cells were activated by treatment with linoleic acid (90 micro mol/L) for 6 h. Zinc chelation by TPEN increased the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and activator protein (AP)-1, decreased PPARgamma expression and activation as well as up-regulated interleukin (IL)-6 expression and production. These effects were fully reversed by zinc supplementation. In addition, exposure to TZD down-regulated linoleic acid-induced DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1, whereas BADGE further induced activation of these oxidative stress-sensitive transcription factors. Most importantly, the TZD-mediated down-regulation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 and reduced inflammatory response were impaired during zinc chelation. These data suggest that zinc plays a critical role in PPARgamma signaling in linoleic acid-induced endothelial cell activation and indicate that PPARgamma signaling is impaired during zinc deficiency.

  19. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-su; Einhorn, Thomas A; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-02-11

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis.

  20. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-Su; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:26864916

  1. Reprogramming mitochondrial metabolism in macrophages as an anti-inflammatory signal.

    PubMed

    Mills, Evanna L; O'Neill, Luke A

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are master regulators of metabolism. Mitochondria generate ATP by oxidative phosphorylation using pyruvate (derived from glucose and glycolysis) and fatty acids (FAs), both of which are oxidized in the Krebs cycle, as fuel sources. Mitochondria are also an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), creating oxidative stress in various contexts, including in the response to bacterial infection. Recently, complex changes in mitochondrial metabolism have been characterized in mouse macrophages in response to varying stimuli in vitro. In LPS and IFN-γ-activated macrophages (M1 macrophages), there is decreased respiration and a broken Krebs cycle, leading to accumulation of succinate and citrate, which act as signals to alter immune function. In IL-4-activated macrophages (M2 macrophages), the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation are intact and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is also utilized. These metabolic alterations in response to the nature of the stimulus are proving to be determinants of the effector functions of M1 and M2 macrophages. Furthermore, reprogramming of macrophages from M1 to M2 can be achieved by targeting metabolic events. Here, we describe the role that metabolism plays in macrophage function in infection and immunity, and propose that reprogramming with metabolic inhibitors might be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  2. Metformin suppresses pancreatic tumor growth with inhibition of NFκB/STAT3 inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Bhattacharyya, Kalyan K.; Dutta, Shamit K.; Bamlet, William R.; Rabe, Kari G.; Wang, Enfeng; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Oberg, Ann L.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To further elucidate anti-cancer mechanisms of metformin again pancreatic cancer, we evaluated inhibitory effects of metformin on pancreatic tumorigenesis in a genetically-engineered mouse model, and investigated its possible anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenesis effects. Methods Six-week old LSL-KrasG12D/+;Trp53F2-10 mice (10 per group) were administered once daily intraperitoneally with saline (control) for one week or metformin (125 mg/kg) for one week (Met_1wk) or three weeks (Met_3wk) prior to tumor initiation. All mice continued with their respective injections for six weeks post-tumor initiation. Molecular changes were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Results At euthanasia, pancreatic tumor volume in Met_1wk (median, 181.8 mm3) and Met_3wk (median, 137.9 mm3) groups was significantly lower than the control group (median, 481.1 mm3) (P = 0.001 and 0.0009, respectively). No significant difference was observed between Met_1wk and Met_3wk groups (P = 0.51). These results were further confirmed using tumor weight and tumor burden measurements. Furthermore, metformin treatment decreased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) as well as the expression of Sp1 transcription factor and several NFκB-regulated genes. Conclusions Metformin may inhibit pancreatic tumorigenesis by modulating multiple molecular targets in inflammatory pathways. PMID:25875801

  3. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Barettin

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Karianne F.; Hansen, Espen; Østerud, Bjarne; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik; Bayer, Annette; Engqvist, Magnus; Leszczak, Kinga; Jørgensen, Trond Ø.; Andersen, Jeanette H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present novel bioactivity for barettin isolated from the marine sponge Geodia barretti. We found that barettin showed strong antioxidant activity in biochemical assays as well as in a lipid peroxidation cell assay. A de-brominated synthetic analogue of barettin did not show the same activity in the antioxidant cell assay, indicating that bromine is important for cellular activity. Barettin was also able to inhibit the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα from LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. This combination of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities could indicate that barettin has an atheroprotective effect and may therefore be an interesting product to prevent development of atherosclerosis. PMID:23880935

  4. Molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action of the flavonoid, tricin from Njavara rice (Oryza sativa L.) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: possible role in the inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Shalini, V; Bhaskar, Shobha; Kumar, Kavitha S; Mohanlal, Smitha; Jayalekshmy, Ananthasankaran; Helen, Antony

    2012-09-01

    Flavonoids are a group of natural substances that are located in sources of vegetal origin and are able to regulate acute and chronic inflammatory responses. The anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects corroborate with the preferential use of Njavara, a rice variety in indigenous medicine and the phytochemical investigations revealed the occurrence of a flavonoid, tricin at significantly higher levels compared to staple varieties. This study describes the new aspects of inflammatory suppression by the Njavara rice by evaluating the role of active constituent, tricin in the regulation of production of various pro-inflammatory markers by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Treatment with tricin resulted in significant down-regulation of LPS-elicited production of TNF-α, IL-6, PGE(2) and NO. Tricin was found to be a potential blocker of the expression of isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase and matrix metalloproteinases. Modulation of the cascade of molecular events in lipopolysaccharide signaling also includes inhibition of transcription factor NF-κB evidenced by the detection of enhanced p65 subunit in the nuclear extracts on tricin supplementation. The present study summarizes the role of the flavonoid, tricin in the modulation of the expression of different inflammatory mediators and revealed that the inhibitory effects on cell signaling pathways are responsible for its anti-inflammatory activity.

  5. Anti-inflammatory activities of isorhamnetin-3-O-galactoside against HMGB1-induced inflammatory responses in both HUVECs and CLP-induced septic mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2013-02-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a crucial nuclear cytokine that elicits severe vascular inflammatory diseases. Oenanthe javanica (water dropwort) extract has anti-arrhythmic, neuroprotective and anti-diabetic activity. However, isorhamnetin-3-O-galactoside (I3G), an active compound from O. javanica, is not researched well for its biological activity. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activities of I3G by monitoring the effects of I3G on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-mediated release of HMGB1 and HMGB1 or CLP-mediated modulation of inflammatory responses. I3G potently inhibited the release of HMGB1 and down-regulated HMGB1-dependent inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells. I3G also inhibited HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability and leukocyte migration in mice. Further studies revealed that I3G suppressed the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and activation of nuclear factor-κB by HMGB1. In addition, I3G reduced CLP-induced HMGB1 release and sepsis-related mortality. Given these results, I3G should be viewed as a candidate therapeutic agent for the treatment of severe vascular inflammatory diseases such as sepsis or septic shock via inhibition of the HMGB1 signaling pathway.

  6. Mechanisms of nerve growth factor signaling in bone nociceptors and in an animal model of inflammatory bone pain.

    PubMed

    Nencini, Sara; Ringuet, Mitchell; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chen, Yu-Jen; Greenhill, Claire; Ivanusic, Jason J

    2017-01-01

    Sequestration of nerve growth factor has been used successfully in the management of pain in animal models of bone disease and in human osteoarthritis. However, the mechanisms of nerve growth factor-induced bone pain and its role in modulating inflammatory bone pain remain to be determined. In this study, we show that nerve growth factor receptors (TrkA and p75) and some other nerve growth factor-signaling molecules (TRPV1 and Nav1.8, but not Nav1.9) are expressed in substantial proportions of rat bone nociceptors. We demonstrate that nerve growth factor injected directly into rat tibia rapidly activates and sensitizes bone nociceptors and produces acute behavioral responses with a similar time course. The nerve growth factor-induced changes in the activity and sensitivity of bone nociceptors we report are dependent on signaling through the TrkA receptor, but are not affected by mast cell stabilization. We failed to show evidence for longer term changes in expression of TrkA, TRPV1, Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 in the soma of bone nociceptors in a rat model of inflammatory bone pain. Thus, retrograde transport of NGF/TrkA and increased expression of some of the common nerve growth factor signaling molecules do not appear to be important for the maintenance of inflammatory bone pain. The findings are relevant to understand the basis of nerve growth factor sequestration and other therapies directed at nerve growth factor signaling, in managing pain in bone disease.

  7. Guanabenz Downregulates Inflammatory Responses via eIF2α Dependent and Independent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Takigawa, Shinya; Chen, Andy; Nishimura, Akinobu; Liu, Shengzhi; Li, Bai-Yan; Sudo, Akihiro; Yokota, Hiroki; Hamamura, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Integrated stress responses (ISR) may lead to cell death and tissue degeneration via eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 α (eIF2α)-mediated signaling. Alleviating ISR by modulating eIF2α phosphorylation can reduce the symptoms associated with various diseases. Guanabenz is known to elevate the phosphorylation level of eIF2α and reduce pro-inflammatory responses. However, the mechanism of its action is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway through which guanabenz induces anti-inflammatory effects in immune cells, in particular macrophages. Genome-wide mRNA profiling followed by principal component analysis predicted that colony stimulating factor 2 (Csf2, or GM-CSF as granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor) is involved in the responses to guanabenz. A partial silencing of Csf2 or eIF2α by RNA interference revealed that Interleukin-6 (IL6), Csf2, and Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2) are downregulated by guanabenz-driven phosphorylation of eIF2α. Although expression of IL1β and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα) was suppressed by guanabenz, their downregulation was not directly mediated by eIF2α signaling. Collectively, the result herein indicates that anti-inflammatory effects by guanabenz are mediated by not only eIF2α-dependent but also eIF2α-independent signaling. PMID:27164082

  8. Anti-inflammatory activities of essential oil isolated from the calyx of Hibiscus sabdariffa L.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Tian; Zhang, Wen-Li; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-12

    Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn., belonging to the family of Malvaceae, is considered to be a plant with health care applications in China. The main purpose of this study was to analyze the composition of its essential oil and assess its potential therapeutic effect on anti-inflammatory activity. A water steam distillation method was used to extract the essential oil from H. Sabdariffa. The essential oil components were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and a total of 18 volatile constituents were identified, the majority of which were fatty acids and ester compounds. Biological activity showed that the essential oil extracted from H. Sabdariffa exhibited excellent anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The nitric oxide (NO) inhibition rate reached 67.46% when the concentration of the essential oil was 200 μg mL(-1). Further analysis showed that the anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oil extracted from H. Sabdariffa might be exerted through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and MAPK (JNK and ERK1/2) signaling pathways to decrease NO and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS) production. Thus, the essential oil extracted from H. Sabdariffa is a good source of a natural product with a beneficial effect against inflammation, and it may be applied as a food supplement and/or functional ingredient.

  9. Flavone deglycosylation increases their anti-inflammatory activity and absorption

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Gregory; Riedl, Ken; Cardenas, Horacio; Diosa-Toro, Mayra; Arango, Daniel; Schwartz, Steven; Doseff, Andrea I.

    2014-01-01

    Scope Flavones have reported anti-inflammatory activities, but the ability of flavone-rich foods to reduce inflammation is unclear. Here, we report the effect of flavone glycosylation in the regulation of inflammatory mediators in vitro and the absorption of dietary flavones in vivo. Methods and results The anti-inflammatory activities of celery extracts, some rich in flavone aglycones and others rich in flavone glycosides, were tested on the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Pure flavone aglycones and aglycone-rich extracts effectively reduced TNF-α production and inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, while glycoside-rich extracts showed no significant effects. Deglycosylation of flavones increased cellular uptake and cytoplasmic localization as shown by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and microscopy using the flavonoid fluorescent dye diphenyl-boric acid 2-aminoethyl ester (DPBA). Celery diets with different glycoside or aglycone contents were formulated and absorption was evaluated in mice fed with 5 or 10% celery diets. Relative absorption in vivo was significantly higher in mice fed with aglycone-rich diets as determined by HPLC-MS/MS (where MS/MS is tandem mass spectrometry). Conclusion These results demonstrate that deglycosylation increases absorption of dietary flavones in vivo and modulates inflammation by reducing TNF-α and NF-κB, suggesting the potential use of functional foods rich in flavones for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:22351119

  10. Stellera chamaejasme and its constituents induce cutaneous wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lee, Hee Ju; Randy, Ahmad; Yun, Ji Ho; Oh, Sang-Rok; Nho, Chu Won

    2017-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae) is a perennial herb that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat tumours, tuberculosis and psoriasis. S. chamaejasme extract (SCE) possesses anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing activities; however, the effect of S. chamaejasme and its active compounds on cutaneous wound healing has not been investigated. We assessed full-thickness wounds of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and topically applied SCE for 2 weeks. In vitro studies were performed using HaCaT keratinocytes, Hs68 dermal fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophages to determine cell viability (MTT assay), cell migration, collagen expression, nitric oxide (NO) production, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, inflammatory cytokine expression and β-catenin activation. In vivo, wound size was reduced and epithelisation was improved in SCE-treated SD rats. In vitro, SCE and its active compounds induced keratinocyte migration by regulating the β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signalling pathways. Furthermore, SCE and its active compounds increased mRNA expression of type I and III collagen in Hs68 fibroblasts. SCE and chamechromone inhibited NO and PGE2 release and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages. SCE enhances the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes and improves cutaneous wound healing in SD rats. PMID:28220834

  11. Stellera chamaejasme and its constituents induce cutaneous wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lee, Hee Ju; Randy, Ahmad; Yun, Ji Ho; Oh, Sang-Rok; Nho, Chu Won

    2017-02-21

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae) is a perennial herb that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat tumours, tuberculosis and psoriasis. S. chamaejasme extract (SCE) possesses anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing activities; however, the effect of S. chamaejasme and its active compounds on cutaneous wound healing has not been investigated. We assessed full-thickness wounds of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and topically applied SCE for 2 weeks. In vitro studies were performed using HaCaT keratinocytes, Hs68 dermal fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophages to determine cell viability (MTT assay), cell migration, collagen expression, nitric oxide (NO) production, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, inflammatory cytokine expression and β-catenin activation. In vivo, wound size was reduced and epithelisation was improved in SCE-treated SD rats. In vitro, SCE and its active compounds induced keratinocyte migration by regulating the β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signalling pathways. Furthermore, SCE and its active compounds increased mRNA expression of type I and III collagen in Hs68 fibroblasts. SCE and chamechromone inhibited NO and PGE2 release and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages. SCE enhances the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes and improves cutaneous wound healing in SD rats.

  12. Persistent DNA damage signaling triggers senescence-associated inflammatory cytokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Francis; Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher K.; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke A. M.; Muñoz, Denise P.; Raza, Saba R.; Freund, Adam; Campeau, Eric; Davalos, Albert R.; Campisi, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by stably arresting the proliferation of damaged cells1. Paradoxically, senescent cells also secrete factors that alter tissue microenvironments2. The pathways regulating this secretion are unknown. We show that damaged human cells develop persistent chromatin lesions bearing hallmarks of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which initiate increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6). Cytokine secretion occurred only after establishment of persistent DNA damage signaling, usually associated with senescence, not after transient DNA damage responses (DDR). Initiation and maintenance of this cytokine response required the DDR proteins ATM, NBS1 and CHK2, but not the cell cycle arrest enforcers p53 and pRb. ATM was also essential for IL-6 secretion during oncogene-induced senescence and by damaged cells that bypass senescence. Further, DDR activity and IL-6 were elevated in human cancers, and ATM-depletion suppressed the ability of senescent cells to stimulate IL-6-dependent cancer cell invasiveness. Thus, in addition to orchestrating cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair, a novel and important role of the DDR is to allow damaged cells to communicate their compromised state to the surrounding tissue. PMID:19597488

  13. Boswellia carterii liquisolid systems with promoted anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Dina Mahmoud; Ammar, Nagwa Mohammed; Abd El-Alim, Sameh Hosam; Kassem, Ahmed Alaa; Hussein, Rehab Ali; Awad, Gamal; El-Awdan, Sally Abdul-Wanees

    2015-01-01

    Boswellia carterii (BC) Birdwood oleogum resin is an ancient remedy of inflammation processes known since Ancient Egyptian time. Of boswellic acids, 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) is the most potent anti-inflammatory active principle. Liquisolid systems of the biologically active fraction of BC oleogum resin were prepared for improving dissolution properties using low dose oral delivery to achieve enhanced anti-inflammatory activity, in comparison with the standard oral anti-inflammatory; Indomethacin. AKBA was assayed, employing an accurate and sensitive HPLC method. Detection was carried out at 210 nm using UV/Vis detector. A solubility study for the bioactive fraction was conducted. Microcrystalline cellulose and Aeroperl®300 Pharma were used as carrier and coating materials. Angle of slide, liquid load factor and Carr's flow index were estimated. Six systems were prepared using polyethylene glycol 400, solvent and two drug loading concentrations; 20 and 40 %. For each concentration, three carrier: coat ratios were dispensed; 20:1, 10:1, and 5:1. Dissolution study was performed and two systems were selected for characterization and in vivo evaluation by investigating upper GIT ulcerogenic effect and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Results indicate absence of ulcers and significantly higher and prolonged anti-inflammatory efficacy for formulations F1 and F2, with carrier: coat ratio, 5:1 and drug loads of 20 and 40 %, respectively, compared with standard oral indomethacin. We conclude higher efficacy of BC bioactive fraction liquisolids compared with Indomethacin with greater safety on GIT, longer duration of action and hence better patient compliance.

  14. Enhanced mesenchymal stromal cell recruitment via natural killer cells by incorporation of inflammatory signals in biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Catarina R.; Vasconcelos, Daniela P.; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2012-01-01

    An exacerbated inflammatory response questions biomaterial biocompatibility, but on the other hand, inflammation has a central role in the regulation of tissue regeneration. Therefore, it may be argued that an ‘ideal’ inflammatory response is crucial to achieve efficient tissue repair/regeneration. Natural killer (NK) cells, being one of the first populations arriving at an injury site, can have an important role in regulating bone repair/regeneration, particularly through interactions with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Here, we studied how biomaterials designed to incorporate inflammatory signals affected NK cell behaviour and NK cell–MSC interactions. Adsorption of the pro-inflammatory molecule fibrinogen (Fg) to chitosan films led to a 1.5-fold increase in adhesion of peripheral blood human NK cells, without an increase in cytokine secretion. Most importantly, it was found that NK cells are capable of stimulating a threefold increase in human bone marrow MSC invasion, a key event taking place in tissue repair, but did not affect the expression of the differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Of significant importance, this NK cell-mediated MSC recruitment was modulated by Fg adsorption. Designing novel biomaterials leading to rational modulation of the inflammatory response is proposed as an alternative to current bone regeneration strategies. PMID:21752807

  15. Type-1 interferon signaling mediates neuro-inflammatory events in models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Juliet M; Minter, Myles R; Newman, Andrew G; Zhang, Moses; Adlard, Paul A; Crack, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    A neuro-inflammatory response has been implicated in human patients and animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Type-1 interferons are pleiotropic cytokines involved in the initiation and regulation of the pro-inflammatory response; however, their role in AD is unknown. This study investigated the contribution of type-1 IFN signaling in the neuro-inflammatory response to amyloid-beta (Aβ) in vitro and in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed a 2-fold increase in IFNα in APP/PS1 brains compared with control brains. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction also identified increased IFNα and IFNβ expression in human pre-frontal cortex from AD patients. In vitro studies in primary neurons demonstrated Aβ-induced type-1 IFN expression preceded that of other classical pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1-β, and IL-6. Significantly, ablation of type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 expression in BE(2)M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary neurons afforded protection against Aβ-induced toxicity. This study supports a role for type-1 interferons in the pro-inflammatory response and neuronal cell death in AD and suggests that blocking type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 maybe a therapeutic target to limit the disease progression.

  16. Inflammatory signaling pathways in self-renewing breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hinohara, Kunihiko; Gotoh, Noriko

    2010-12-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which make up only a small proportion of heterogeneous tumor cells, may possess greater ability to maintain tumorigenesis than do other tumor cell types. Breast cancer tissue is reported to contain cancer stem-like cells. In order to eradicate tumor cells, various approaches have been taken to identify the critical molecules and signaling pathways in breast CSCs. Recent findings suggest that inflammatory signaling pathways are important for the maintenance of breast CSCs. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of inflammatory pathways in these cells and discuss future perspectives of the research on and the possibility of targeting the molecules involved in these pathways for developing treatments for breast cancer.

  17. Functional Roles of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanyan; Yu, Tao; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a natural host defensive process that is largely regulated by macrophages during the innate immune response. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are proline-directed serine and threonine protein kinases that regulate many physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. p38 MAPKs are key MAPKs involved in the production of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). p38 MAPK signaling plays an essential role in regulating cellular processes, especially inflammation. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of p38 signaling in macrophage-mediated inflammation. In addition, we discuss the potential of using inhibitors targeting p38 expression in macrophages to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:24771982

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity and composition of Senecio salignus Kunth.

    PubMed

    González, Cuauhtemoc Pérez; Vega, Roberto Serrano; González-Chávez, Marco; Sánchez, Miguel Angel Zavala; Gutiérrez, Salud Pérez

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Composition of Senecio salignus Kunth

    PubMed Central

    Pérez González, Cuauhtemoc; Serrano Vega, Roberto; González-Chávez, Marco; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h. PMID:23691512

  20. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF MIRABILIS JALAPA LINN. LEAVES

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Lekshmi. R.; Manjunath, K. P.; Savadi, R. V.; Akki, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    Mirabilis Jalapa Linn. is a widely used traditional medicine in many parts of the world for the treatment of various diseases viz. virus inhibitory activity, anti tumour activity. It is claimed in traditional medicine that the leaves of the plant are used in the treatment of inflammation. In the present study, the total alcoholic extract and successive petroleum ether fractions of leaves of Mirabilis Jalapa Linn were screened for its anti-inflammatory activity using carageenan induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet induced granuloma models. The total alcoholic extract at the dose of 300 mg/kg p.o and successive petroleum ether fraction at the dose of 200 mg/kg exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw edema model (p<0.01). In cotton pellet granuloma model, the total alcoholic extract at the dose of 300 mg/kg and successive petroleum ether fraction at the dose of 200 mg/kg inhibited granuloma formation significantly (p<0.05) indicating that both test samples inhibit the increase in number of fibroblasts and synthesis of collagen and mucopolysaccharides during granuloma tissue formation during the chronic inflammation. These experimental results have established a pharmacological evidence for the folklore claim of the drug to be used as an anti inflammatory agent. PMID:24825972

  1. Structural basis of the anti-inflammatory activity of melatonin.

    PubMed

    de la Rocha, Nadir; Rotelli, Alejandra; Aguilar, Carlos F; Pelzer, Lilian

    2007-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of melatonin (CAS 73-31-4) was examined, using the rat paw edema model, and compared with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indometacin (CAS 53-86-1) which exerts its effects by inhibition of prostaglandin production on acute inflammation. The experiments showed that melatonin has an important effect on acute inflammatory processes acting as an inhibitor in a similar manner to indometacin. The structural interactions of melatonin with cyclooxygenase (COX), the pharmacological target of NSAIDs, were investigated using computer graphics applications. The results indicated that melatonin has an excellent steric and electronic complementarity with COX. It was found, similarly to previously studied crystal structures of protein-inhibitor complexes, that almost all interactions were of the hydrophobic type but for the typical carboxylate or electronegative group interaction, at the mouth of the active site channel, with Arg 120 and Tyr 355. Therefore, it seems possible that melatonin might bind to the active site of COX-1 and COX-2 suggesting that it may act as a natural inhibitor of the functions of cyclooxygenase modulating in a natural manner the activity of this enzyme.

  2. OPN‐a induces muscle inflammation by increasing recruitment and activation of pro‐inflammatory macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Many, Gina M.; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Nghiem, Peter P.; Bello, Luca; Dadgar, Sherry; Yin, Ying; Damsker, Jesse M.; Cohen, Heather B.; Kornegay, Joe N.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Mosser, David M.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2016-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? What is the functional relevance of OPN isoform expression in muscle pathology? What is the main finding and its importance? The full‐length human OPN‐a isoform is the most pro‐inflammatory isoform in the muscle microenvironment, acting on macrophages and myoblasts in an RGD‐integrin‐dependent manner. OPN‐a upregulates expression of tenascin‐C (TNC), a known Toll‐like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist. Blocking TLR4 signalling inhibits the pro‐inflammatory effects of OPN‐a, suggesting that a potential mechanism of OPN action is by promoting TNC–TLR4 signalling. Although osteopontin (OPN) is an important mediator of muscle remodelling in health and disease, functional differences in human spliced OPN variants in the muscle microenvironment have not been characterized. We thus sought to define the pro‐inflammatory activities of human OPN isoforms (OPN‐a, OPN‐b and OPN‐c) on cells present in regenerating muscle. OPN transcripts were quantified in normal and dystrophic human and dog muscle. Human macrophages and myoblasts were stimulated with recombinant human OPN protein isoforms, and cytokine mRNA and protein induction was assayed. OPN isoforms were greatly increased in dystrophic human (OPN‐a > OPN‐b > OPN‐c) and dog muscle (OPN‐a = OPN‐c). In healthy human muscle, mechanical loading also upregulated OPN‐a expression (eightfold; P < 0.01), but did not significantly upregulate OPN‐c expression (twofold; P > 0.05). In vitro, OPN‐a displayed the most pronounced pro‐inflammatory activity among isoforms, acting on both macrophages and myoblasts. In vitro and in vivo data revealed that OPN‐a upregulated tenascin‐C (TNC), a known Toll‐like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist. Inhibition of TLR4 signalling attenuated OPN‐mediated macrophage cytokine production. In summary, OPN‐a is the most abundant and functionally active human spliced isoform in the skeletal muscle

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of Heliotropium strigosum in animal models.

    PubMed

    Khan, Haroon; Khan, Murad Ali; Gul, Farah; Hussain, Sajjid; Ashraf, Nadeem

    2015-12-01

    The current project was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of crude extract of Heliotropium strigosum and its subsequent solvent fractions in post carrageenan-induced edema and post xylene-induced ear edema at 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The results revealed marked attenuation of edema induced by carrageenan injection in a dose-dependent manner. The ethyl acetate fraction was most dominant with 73.33% inhibition followed by hexane fraction (70.66%). When the extracts were challenged against xylene-induced ear edema, again ethyl acetate and hexane fractions were most impressive with 38.21 and 35.77% inhibition, respectively. It is concluded that various extracts of H. strigosum possessed strong anti-inflammatory activity in animal models.

  4. Simultaneous Inhibition of PGE2 and PGI2 Signals Is Necessary to Suppress Hyperalgesia in Rat Inflammatory Pain Models

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is well known as a mediator of inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. In the present study, we evaluated the analgesic effect of our selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound I, 2-methyl-2-[cis-4-([1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl]carbonyl amino)cyclohexyl] propanoic acid, in rat yeast-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain models. Although this compound suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 selectively, no analgesic effect was shown in both inflammatory pain models. Prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays crucial roles in inflammatory pain, so we evaluated the involvement of PGI2 signaling in rat inflammatory pain models using prostacyclin receptor (IP) antagonist, RO3244019. RO3244019 showed no analgesic effect in inflammatory pain models, but concomitant administration of compound I and RO3244019 showed analgesic effects comparable to celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 inhibitor. Furthermore, coadministration of PGE2 receptor 4 (EP4) antagonist, CJ-023423, and RO3244019 also showed an analgesic effect. These findings suggest that both PGE2 signaling, especially through the EP4 receptor, and PGI2 signaling play critical roles in inflammatory pain and concurrent inhibition of both signals is important for suppression of inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:27478311

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanism of delphinidin 3-sambubioside, a Hibiscus anthocyanin.

    PubMed

    Sogo, Takayuki; Terahara, Norihiko; Hisanaga, Ayami; Kumamoto, Takuma; Yamashiro, Takaaki; Wu, Shusong; Sakao, Kozue; Hou, De-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Delphinidin 3-sambubioside (Dp3-Sam), a Hibiscus anthocyanin, was isolated from the dried calices of Hibiscus sabdariffa L, which has been used for folk beverages and herbal medicine although the molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. Based on the properties of Dp3-Sam and the information of inflammatory processes, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms in both cell and animal models in the present study. In the cell model, Dp3-Sam and Delphinidin (Dp) reduced the levels of inflammatory mediators including iNOS, NO, IL-6, MCP-1, and TNF-α induced by LPS. Cellular signaling analysis revealed that Dp3-Sam and Dp downregulated NF-κB pathway and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling. In animal model, Dp3-Sam and Dp reduced the production of IL-6, MCP-1 and TNF-α and attenuated mouse paw edema induced by LPS. Our in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated that Hibiscus Dp3-Sam possessed potential anti-inflammatory properties.

  6. Immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory activities of sinomenine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxing; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2011-03-01

    Sinomenine (SN), a pure compound extracted from the Sinomenium acutum plant, has been found to inhibit T- and B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation and function and to interfere with the differentiation, recruitment and function of several other cell types, such as dendritic cells (DC). SN has demonstrated its potential anti-inflammatory role for treating immune-related disorders in experimental animal models and in some clinical applications. This review will summarize its potential effects, mechanisms and applications.

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (<300 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced NO production. Among them, the chloroform extract from G. lucidum was the most effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 μg/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases.

  8. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activities of novel dihydropyranoaurone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Bae, Eun Ju; Han, Young Taek

    2017-04-10

    A novel series of dihydropyranoaurone derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Late-stage derivatization by versatile piperazine-catalyzed aldol reaction between dihydropyanobenzofuran intermediate 2 and diverse aldehydes readily afforded the novel dihydropyranoaurone analogs. Evaluation of the synthesized dihydropyranoaurone derivatives and related compounds regarding their inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitrite production of lipopolysaccaride-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells provided insight into the structure-activity relationship of aurone derivatives.

  9. Pathogenic Lifestyles of E. coli Pathotypes in a Standardized Epithelial Cell Model Influence Inflammatory Signaling Pathways and Cytokines Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villamil, Javier; Tapia-Pastrana, Gabriela; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    cytokine regulation; and (iii) the intracellular bacteria that induce the highest pathways activation and cytokines secretion by using different activation mechanisms. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of how the different pathogenesis schemes of E. coli pathotypes manipulate inflammatory signaling pathways, which leads to a specific proinflammatory cytokine secretion in a cell model infection that reproduce the hallmarks of infection of each pathotype. PMID:27774437

  10. Anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial activity, and cytotoxicity of halloysite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, José Ascención; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Ramírez-Apán, María Teresa

    2013-11-01

    Halloysite is a naturally-occurring nanomaterial occurring in the thousands of tons and that serves as biomaterial, with applications in the areas of biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and medical research. This study reports on the anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, and anti-oxidant activity of halloysite Jarrahdale (collected at ∼ 45 km SE of Perth, Western Australia; JA), Dragon Mine (provided by Natural Nano Inc., Rochester, New York; NA), and Kalgoorie Archean (collected at Siberia, ∼ 85km NW of Kalgoorlie, West Australia; PA). Prior to biological testing, halloysites were characterized by 27Al and 29Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, the anti-inflammatory activity was determined by (a) the mouse ear edema method, using 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as anti-inflammatory agent; and (b) the myeloperoxidase enzymatic activity method (MPO). Cell viability was determined using the MTT method. Sample characterization by NMR method showed similar symmetry and atomic environments, with no evidence of distortion(s) due to shiftings in atomic ordering or electron density. The anti-inflammatory activity followed the order: PA>JA>NA, and remained invariant with time. Prolonged anti-inflammatory activity related inversely to surface area and lumen space. The low extent of infiltration at shorter reaction times confirmed a limiting number of active surface sites. EPR intensity signals followed the order: JA>NA>PA. The poor stabilization of RO species in PA suspensions was explained by tube alignment provoking occlusion, thus limiting transfer of H(+) or e(-) from-and-to the surface, and decreases in acidity associated to Al(oct). Cell viability (%) varied from one surface to the other, PA(92.3 ± 6.0), JA(84.9 ± 7.8), and NA(78.0 ± 5.6), but related directly to SBET values.

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of fisetin in human gingival fibroblasts treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Sánchez, Anabel; Ventura-Arroyo, Jairo Agustín

    2014-10-01

    Fisetin is an anti-inflammatory flavonoid; however, its anti-inflammatory mechanism is not yet understood. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of fisetin and its association with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa-beta pathways in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis. The cell signaling, cell viability, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression of HGFs treated with various concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, and 15 μM) of fisetin were measured by cell viability assay (MTT), Western blotting, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis on COX-2. We found that fisetin significantly reduced the synthesis and expression of prostaglandin E2 in HGFs treated with LPS. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK was suppressed consistently by fisetin in HGFs treated with LPS. The data indicate that fisetin inhibits MAPK activation and COX-2 expression without affecting cell viability. These findings may be valuable for understanding the mechanism of the effect of fisetin on periodontal disease.

  12. Yoga reduces inflammatory signaling in fatigued breast cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Julienne E.; Greendale, Gail; Crosswell, Alexandra D.; Garet, Deborah; Sternlieb, Beth; Ganz, Patricia A.; Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Arevalo, Jesusa; Cole, Steve W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Yoga is a popular mind-body therapy that has demonstrated beneficial effects on psychological, behavioral, and functional outcomes. However, few studies have investigated effects on inflammatory processes. This study tested the hypothesis that an Iyengar yoga intervention specifically designed for fatigued breast cancer survivors would lead to decreases in inflammation-related gene expression and circulating markers of proinflammatory cytokine activity. Methods Breast cancer survivors with persistent cancer-related fatigue were randomized to a 12-week Iyengar yoga intervention (n = 16) or a 12-week health education control condition (n = 15). Blood samples were collected at baseline, post-intervention, and at a 3-month follow-up for genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic analyses. Plasma inflammatory markers and salivary cortisol were also assessed. Results In promoter-based bioinformatics analyses, the yoga group showed reduced activity of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), increased activity of the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid receptor, and reduced activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family transcription factors relative to controls (all ps < .05). There was also a significant intervention effect on the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (sTNF-RII), a marker of TNF activity; plasma levels of sTNF-RII remained stable in the yoga group, whereas levels of this marker increased in the health education group (p = .028). A similar, non-significant trend was observed for the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (p = .16). No significant changes in C reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), or diurnal cortisol measures were observed. Conclusions A 12-week restorative Iyengar yoga intervention reduced inflammation-related gene expression in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue. These findings suggest that a targeted yoga program may have beneficial effects

  13. Anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity of mulberry (Morus alba L.) root bark

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Root bark of mulberry (Morus alba L.) has been used in herbal medicine as anti-phlogistic, liver protective, kidney protective, hypotensive, diuretic, anti-cough and analgesic agent. However, the anti-cancer activity and the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of mulberry root bark have not been elucidated. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether mulberry root bark extract (MRBE) shows anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Methods In anti-inflammatory activity, NO was measured using the griess method. iNOS and proteins regulating NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling were analyzed by Western blot. In anti-cancer activity, cell growth was measured by MTT assay. Cleaved PARP, ATF3 and cyclin D1 were analyzed by Western blot. Results In anti-inflammatory effect, MRBE blocked NO production via suppressing iNOS over-expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, MRBE inhibited NF-κB activation through p65 nuclear translocation via blocking IκB-α degradation and ERK1/2 activation via its hyper-phosphorylation. In anti-cancer activity, MRBE deos-dependently induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells, SW480. MRBE treatment to SW480 cells activated ATF3 expression and down-regulated cyclin D1 level. We also observed that MRBE-induced ATF3 expression was dependent on ROS and GSK3β. Moreover, MRBE-induced cyclin D1 down-regulation was mediated from cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation, which was dependent on ROS. Conclusions These findings suggest that mulberry root bark exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. PMID:24962785

  14. Delphinidin, a specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses inflammatory signaling via prevention of NF-{kappa}B acetylation in fibroblast-like synoviocyte MH7A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Ah-Reum; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, KyungChul; Lee, Mee-Hee; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Jun, Woojin; Kim, Sunoh; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Delphinidin is a novel inhibitor of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase. {yields} Delphinidin prevents the hyperacetylation of p65 by inhibiting the HAT activity of p300/CBP. {yields} Delphinidin efficiently suppresses the expression of inflammatory cytokines in MH7A cells via hypoacetylation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} Delphinidin inhibits cytokine release in the Jurkat T lymphocyte cell line. -- Abstract: Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors (HATi) isolated from dietary compounds have been shown to suppress inflammatory signaling, which contributes to rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we identified a novel HATi in Punica granatum L. known as delphinidin (DP). DP did not affect the activity of other epigenetic enzymes (histone deacetylase, histone methyltransferase, or sirtuin1). DP specifically inhibited the HAT activities of p300/CBP. It also inhibited p65 acetylation in MH7A cells, a human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cell line. DP-induced hypoacetylation was accompanied by cytosolic accumulation of p65 and nuclear localization of IKB{alpha}. Accordingly, DP treatment inhibited TNF{alpha}-stimulated increases in NF-{kappa}B function and expression of NF-{kappa}B target genes in these cells. Importantly, DP suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Jurkat T lymphocytes, demonstrating that HATi efficiently suppresses cytokine-mediated immune responses. Together, these results show that the HATi activity of DP counters anti-inflammatory signaling by blocking p65 acetylation and that this compound may be useful in preventing inflammatory arthritis.

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanism of Oolong tea theasinensin.

    PubMed

    Hisanaga, Ayami; Ishida, Hisako; Sakao, Kozue; Sogo, Takayuki; Kumamoto, Takuma; Hashimoto, Fumio; Hou, De-Xing

    2014-08-01

    Oolong tea theasinensins are a group of tea polyphenols different from green tea catechins and black tea theaflavins, and they are considered as bioactive compounds in Oolong tea. In the present study, based on the properties of theasinensin and information about inflammatory processes, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms of theasinensin A (TSA) in both cell and animal models. In the cell model, TSA reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-12 (IL-12) (p70), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cellular signaling analysis revealed that TSA downregulated MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Pull-down assay and affinity data revealed that TSA might directly bind to MEK-ERK for the inhibitory action. In the animal model, TSA suppressed the production of IL-12 (p70), TNF-α, and MCP-1 and attenuated mouse paw edema induced by LPS.

  16. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators contributes to the anti-inflammatory activity of KYKZL-1 via MAPK and NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Lin; Du, Yi-Fang; Cheng, Jing; Huan, Lin; Chen, Shi-Cui; Wei, Shao-Hua; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Ao, Gui-Zhen

    2013-10-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the anti-inflammatory activity test focusing on its modulation of inflammatory mediators as well as intracellular MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In acute ear edema model, pretreatment with KYKZL-1 (p.o.) dose-dependently inhibited the xylene-induced ear edema in mice with a higher inhibition than diclofenac. In a three-day TPA-induced inflammation, KYKZL-1 also showed significant anti-inflammatory activity with inhibition ranging between 20% and 64%. In gastric lesion test, KYKZL-1 elicited markedly fewer stomach lesions with a low index of ulcer as compared to diclofenac in rats. In further studies, KYKZL-1 was found to significantly inhibit the production of NO, PGE2, LTB4 in LPS challenged RAW264.7, which is parallel to its attenuation of the expression of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX mRNAs or proteins and inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. Taken together, our data indicate that KYKZL-1 comprises dual inhibition of COX and 5-LOX and exerts an obvious anti-inflammatory activity with an enhanced gastric safety profile via simultaneous inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB.

  17. Regulatory effects of inflammatory and biomechanical signals on regenerative periodontal healing.

    PubMed

    Deschner, James; Nokhbehsaim, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with loss of periodontal attachment, collagen, and alveolar bone. Regeneration of periodontal tissues can be supported by the local application of enamel matrix derivative (EMD). However, periodontal regeneration remains a major and often unpredictable challenge as the result of a number of unknown factors. The authors' in vitro studies revealed that EMD stimulated the wound fill rate, proliferation, and adhesion of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. However, in the presence of an inflammatory environment or biomechanical loading, the beneficial effects of EMD decreased significantly. EMD also stimulated the synthesis of growth factors and collagen, as well as calcium deposition, in PDL cell cultures. These beneficial effects of EMD on PDL cells were also significantly diminished by inflammation and biomechanical forces, respectively. The findings suggest that critical PDL cell functions pertinent to periodontal regeneration are reduced in an inflammatory environment and under biomechanical loading. Therefore, effective anti-infectious and anti-inflammatory periodontal treatment before the application of EMD may be critical to ensure the full regenerative capacity of the PDL tissue. Furthermore, occlusal loading of EMD-treated teeth, at least immediately following surgery, should be minimized to obtain optimal regenerative healing results. A better understanding of the interactions of growth factors and biomechanical signals will result in more powerful regenerative therapeutic strategies.

  18. Terpenoids with anti-inflammatory activity from Abies chensiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian-Qian; Wang, Shu-Fang; Li, Ya; Song, Qiu-Yan; Gao, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The phytochemical investigation of Abies chensiensis led to the isolation and identification of nine new compounds including eight triterpenoids (1-8) and a new abietane-type diterpene (9), along with three known compounds (10-12). The absolute configuration of 9 was assigned by X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 1-11 were evaluated for the anti-inflammatory activity. Among the tested compounds, 1, 2, 5 and 6 exhibited potent inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 15.97, 18.73, 20.18 and 10.97μM, respectively.

  19. Natural Compound Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi): Synergy with Inflammatory Signaling Pathway Modulators and Clinical Applications in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Losson, Hélène; Schnekenburger, Michael; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2016-11-23

    The remarkable complexity of cancer involving multiple mechanisms of action and specific organs led researchers Hanahan and Weinberg to distinguish biological capabilities acquired by cancer cells during the multistep development of human tumors to simplify its understanding. These characteristic hallmarks include the abilities to sustain proliferative signaling, evade growth suppressors, resist cell death, enable replicative immortality, induce angiogenesis, activate invasion and metastasis, avoid immune destruction, and deregulate cellular energetics. Furthermore, two important characteristics of tumor cells that facilitate the acquisition of emerging hallmarks are tumor-promoting inflammation and genome instability. To treat a multifactorial disease such as cancer, a combination treatment strategy seems to be the best approach. Here we focus on natural histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), their clinical uses as well as synergies with modulators of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor signaling pathways.

  20. Estradiol inhibits vascular endothelial cells pro-inflammatory activation induced by C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Cossette, Émilie; Cloutier, Isabelle; Tardif, Kim; DonPierre, Geneviève; Tanguay, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    In addition of being an important inflammatory biomarker and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, much evidence indicates that the C-reactive protein (CRP) contributes to the atherosclerosis development process. This plasmatic protein synthesized by hepatocytes in response to inflammation and tissue injury induces pro-inflammatory molecules' expression by endothelial cells (ECs). Previous studies showed that the 17β-estradiol (E2) has beneficial effects on vascular cells by reducing in vitro pro-inflammatory molecules expressions in EC. Therefore, we hypothesize that E2 blocks or reduces CRP-mediated inflammatory responses by modulating endogenous production of CRP in EC and/or activation mechanisms. Using human aortic ECs (HAECs), we first evaluated CRP production by vascular EC and second demonstrated its self-induction. Indeed, recombinant human CRP stimulation induces a fivefold increase of CRP expression. A 1-h pre-treatment of E2 at a physiologic dose (10(-9 )M) leads to an important decrease of CRP production suggesting a partial blockage of its amplification loop mechanism. Furthermore, in HAEC, E2 reduces the secretion of the most potent agonist of CRP induction, the IL-6, by 21 %. E2 pre-treatment also decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules IL-8, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 induced by CRP and involved in leukocytes recruitment. In addition, we demonstrated that E2 could restore vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated EC migration response impaired by CRP suggesting another pro-angiogenic property of this hormone. These findings suggest that E2 can interfere with CRP pro-inflammatory effects via activation signals using its rapid, non-genomic pathway that may provide a new mechanism to improve vascular repair.

  1. AP-1-Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activities of the Nanostructured, Self-Assembling S5 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Woo Seok; Son, Young-Jin; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Soochan; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-based therapeutics have received increasing attention in medical research. However, the local delivery of such therapeutics poses unique challenges. Self-assembling peptides that use decorated nanofibers are one approach by which these therapeutics may be delivered. We previously found that the self-assembling K5 peptide affects the anti-inflammatory response. The aim of the present study was to investigate another self-assembling peptide, S5. Unlike the K5 peptide which has a positive charge, the S5 peptide has a free hydroxyl (-OH) group. We first examined whether the S5 peptide regulates the inflammatory response in primary cells and found that the S5 peptide reduced the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated bone marrow-derived macrophages. Moreover, the S5 peptide significantly downregulated cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, TNF-α, and interleukin- (IL-) 1β expression by blocking the nuclear translocation of c-Jun. Consistent with this finding, the S5 peptide diminished the activation of inflammatory signaling enzymes related to p38. The S5 peptide also inhibited the formation of the p38/c-Jun signaling complex in RAW264.7 cells. Similarly, p38 and MKK3/6 were inhibited by the S5 peptide in LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the S5 peptide could exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the c-Jun/p38 signaling pathway. PMID:26074678

  2. Relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity and inflammatory mediator's levels in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Varella, Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos; Santiago, Joselita Ferreira Carvalho; Carrete, Henrique; Higa, Elisa Mieko Suemitsu; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Castro Neto, Eduardo Ferreira de; Canzian, Mauro; Amado, Débora; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça

    2011-02-01

    We investigated a relationship between the FLAIR signal found in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and inflammation. Twenty nine patients were selected through clinical and MRI analysis and submitted to cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy to seizure control. Glutamate, TNFα, IL1, nitric oxide (NO) levels and immunostaining against IL1β and CD45 was performed. Control tissues (n=10) were obtained after autopsy of patients without neurological disorders. The glutamate was decreased in the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) -MTS group (p<0.001), suggesting increased release of this neurotransmitter. The IL1β and TNFα were increased in the hippocampus (p<0.05) demonstrating an active inflammatory process. A positive linear correlation between FLAIR signal and NO and IL1β levels and a negative linear correlation between FLAIR signal and glutamate concentration was found. Lymphocytes infiltrates were present in hippocampi of TLE patients. These data showed an association between hippocampal signal alteration and increased inflammatory markers in TLE-MTS.

  3. Macrophage activation and polarization modify P2X7 receptor secretome influencing the inflammatory process

    PubMed Central

    de Torre-Minguela, Carlos; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Gómez, Ana I.; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) on M1 polarized macrophages induces the assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome leading to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the establishment of the inflammatory response. However, P2X7R signaling to the NLRP3 inflammasome is uncoupled on M2 macrophages without changes on receptor activation. In this study, we analyzed P2X7R secretome in wild-type and P2X7R-deficient macrophages polarized either to M1 or M2 and proved that proteins released after P2X7R stimulation goes beyond caspase-1 secretome. The characterization of P2X7R-secretome reveals a new function of this receptor through a fine-tuning of protein release. We found that P2X7R stimulation in macrophages is able to release potent anti-inflammatory proteins, such as Annexin A1, independently of their polarization state suggesting for first time a potential role for P2X7R during resolution of the inflammation and not linked to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results are of prime importance for the development of therapeutics targeting P2X7R. PMID:26935289

  4. Oxidized Phospholipid OxPAPC Activates TRPA1 and Contributes to Chronic Inflammatory Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyi; Tai, Yan; Caceres, Ana I; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Shao, Xiaomei; Fang, Junfan; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation products of the naturally occurring phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (PAPC), which are known as OxPAPC, accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions and at other sites of inflammation in conditions such as septic inflammation and acute lung injury to exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. It is currently unknown whether OxPAPC also contributes to inflammatory pain and peripheral neuronal excitability in these conditions. Here, we observed that OxPAPC dose-dependently and selectively activated human TRPA1 nociceptive ion channels expressed in HEK293 cells in vitro, without any effect on other TRP channels, including TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPM8. OxPAPC agonist activity was dependent on essential cysteine and lysine residues within the N-terminus of the TRPA1 channel protein. OxPAPC activated calcium influx into a subset of mouse sensory neurons which were also sensitive to the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil. Neuronal OxPAPC responses were largely abolished in neurons isolated from TRPA1-deficient mice. Intraplantar injection of OxPAPC into the mouse hind paw induced acute pain and persistent mechanical hyperalgesia and this effect was attenuated by the TRPA1 inhibitor, HC-030031. More importantly, we found levels of OxPAPC to be significantly increased in inflamed tissue in a mouse model of chronic inflammatory pain, identified by the binding of an OxPAPC-specific antibody. These findings suggest that TRPA1 is a molecular target for OxPAPC and OxPAPC may contribute to chronic inflammatory pain through TRPA1 activation. Targeting against OxPAPC and TRPA1 signaling pathway may be promising in inflammatory pain treatment.

  5. Oxidized Phospholipid OxPAPC Activates TRPA1 and Contributes to Chronic Inflammatory Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boyi; Tai, Yan; Caceres, Ana I.; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Shao, Xiaomei; Fang, Junfan

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation products of the naturally occurring phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (PAPC), which are known as OxPAPC, accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions and at other sites of inflammation in conditions such as septic inflammation and acute lung injury to exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. It is currently unknown whether OxPAPC also contributes to inflammatory pain and peripheral neuronal excitability in these conditions. Here, we observed that OxPAPC dose-dependently and selectively activated human TRPA1 nociceptive ion channels expressed in HEK293 cells in vitro, without any effect on other TRP channels, including TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPM8. OxPAPC agonist activity was dependent on essential cysteine and lysine residues within the N-terminus of the TRPA1 channel protein. OxPAPC activated calcium influx into a subset of mouse sensory neurons which were also sensitive to the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil. Neuronal OxPAPC responses were largely abolished in neurons isolated from TRPA1-deficient mice. Intraplantar injection of OxPAPC into the mouse hind paw induced acute pain and persistent mechanical hyperalgesia and this effect was attenuated by the TRPA1 inhibitor, HC-030031. More importantly, we found levels of OxPAPC to be significantly increased in inflamed tissue in a mouse model of chronic inflammatory pain, identified by the binding of an OxPAPC-specific antibody. These findings suggest that TRPA1 is a molecular target for OxPAPC and OxPAPC may contribute to chronic inflammatory pain through TRPA1 activation. Targeting against OxPAPC and TRPA1 signaling pathway may be promising in inflammatory pain treatment. PMID:27812120

  6. MAPK/AP-1-Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Xanthium strumarium.

    PubMed

    Hossen, Muhammad Jahangir; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Xanthium strumarium L. (Asteraceae), a traditional Chinese medicine, is prescribed to treat arthritis, bronchitis, and rhinitis. Although the plant has been used for many years, the mechanism by which it ameliorates various inflammatory diseases is not yet fully understood. To explore the anti-inflammatory mechanism of methanol extracts of X. strumarium (Xs-ME) and its therapeutic potential, we used lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and human monocyte-like U937 cells as well as a LPS/D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced acute hepatitis mouse model. To find the target inflammatory pathway, we used holistic immunoblotting analysis, reporter gene assays, and mRNA analysis. Xs-ME significantly suppressed the up-regulation of both the activator protein (AP)-1-mediated luciferase activity and the production of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1[Formula: see text], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text]. Moreover, Xs-ME strongly inhibited the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 and U937 cells. Additionally, these results highlighted the hepatoprotective and curative effects of Xs-ME in a mouse model of LPS/D-GalN-induced acute liver injury, as assessed by elevated serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and histological damage. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that the ethnopharmacological roles of Xs-ME in hepatitis and other inflammatory diseases might result from its inhibitory activities on the inflammatory signaling of MAPK and AP-1.

  7. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  8. The Regulatory Role of Rolipram on Inflammatory Mediators and Cholinergic/Adrenergic Stimulation-Induced Signals in Isolated Primary Mouse Submandibular Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Un; Shin, Dong Min; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces inflammatory signals in salivary glands. We investigated the regulatory role of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram on inflammatory mediators and cholinergic/adrenergic stimulation-induced intracellular Ca2+ signaling in salivary acinar and ductal cells. Submandibular gland (SMG) expressed PDE4A through 4D mRNA and PDE4 was localized in the luminal membrane of SMG. LPS induced Ca2+ signaling and ROS production in SMG. Treatment with rolipram blocked LPS-induced Ca2+ increase and ROS production. The application of histamine evoked Ca2+ signals and ROS production, which were attenuated by rolipram in SMG cells. Moreover, LPS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome and cleaved caspase-1 were inhibited by rolipram. The inhibitory role of rolipram in ROS-induced Ca2+ signaling was mainly observed in acinar cells and not in ductal cells. Rolipram also protected SMG acinar but not ductal cells from LPS-induced cell membrane damage. In the case of cholinergic/adrenergic stimulation, carbachol/isoproterenol-induced Ca2+ signals were upregulated by the treatment of rolipram in SMG. In the case of cAMP-dependent ductal bicarbonate secretion by rolipram, no effect was observed on the modulation of ductal chloride/bicarbonate exchange activity. Rolipram could suppress the inflammatory signals and could be a potential therapeutic strategy against LPS-induced inflammation to protect the salivary gland cells. PMID:27143817

  9. CDPK Activation in PRR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Heike; Boudsocq, Marie; Romeis, Tina

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases undergo a rapid biochemical activation in response to an intracellular Ca increase induced by the PRR-dependent perception of a pathogen-related stimulus. Based on SDS gel resolution, the in-gel kinase assay allows the analysis of multiple in vivo protein samples in parallel, combining the advantage of protein separation according to molecular mass with the activity read-out of a protein kinase assay. It thus enables to follow the transient CDPK activation and inactivation in response to in vivo elicitation with a time-wise resolution. In addition, changes of CDPK phosphorylation activity often correlate with slight shifts in the enzyme's apparent molecular mass, indicating posttranslational modifications and a conformational change of the active enzyme compared to its inactive resting form. These band shifts can be detected by a simple immunoblotting to monitor CDPK activation.

  10. NLRP3 inflammasome: from a danger signal sensor to a regulatory node of oxidative stress and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Abderrazak, Amna; Syrovets, Tatiana; Couchie, Dominique; El Hadri, Khadija; Friguet, Bertrand; Simmet, Thomas; Rouis, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    IL-1β production is critically regulated by cytosolic molecular complexes, termed inflammasomes. Different inflammasome complexes have been described to date. While all inflammasomes recognize certain pathogens, it is the distinctive feature of NLRP3 inflammasome to be activated by many and diverse stimuli making NLRP3 the most versatile, and importantly also the most clinically implicated inflammasome. However, NLRP3 activation has remained the most enigmatic. It is not plausible that the intracellular NLRP3 receptor is able to detect all of its many and diverse triggers through direct interactions; instead, it is discussed that NLRP3 is responding to certain generic cellular stress-signals induced by the multitude of molecules that trigger its activation. An ever increasing number of studies link the sensing of cellular stress signals to a direct pathophysiological role of NLRP3 activation in a wide range of autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, and thus provide a novel mechanistic rational, on how molecules trigger and support sterile inflammatory diseases. A vast interest has created to unravel how NLRP3 becomes activated, since mechanistic insight is the prerequisite for a knowledge-based development of therapeutic intervention strategies that specifically target the NLRP3 triggered IL-1β production. In this review, we have updated knowledge on NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation and on the pyrin domain in NLRP3 that could represent a drug target to treat sterile inflammatory diseases. We have reported mutations in NLRP3 that were found to be associated with certain diseases. In addition, we have reviewed the functional link between NLRP3 inflammasome, the regulator of cellular redox status Trx/TXNIP complex, endoplasmic reticulum stress and the pathogenesis of diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Finally, we have provided data on NLRP3 inflammasome, as a critical regulator involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and cardiovascular diseases.

  11. NLRP3 inflammasome: From a danger signal sensor to a regulatory node of oxidative stress and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abderrazak, Amna; Syrovets, Tatiana; Couchie, Dominique; El Hadri, Khadija; Friguet, Bertrand; Simmet, Thomas; Rouis, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    IL-1β production is critically regulated by cytosolic molecular complexes, termed inflammasomes. Different inflammasome complexes have been described to date. While all inflammasomes recognize certain pathogens, it is the distinctive feature of NLRP3 inflammasome to be activated by many and diverse stimuli making NLRP3 the most versatile, and importantly also the most clinically implicated inflammasome. However, NLRP3 activation has remained the most enigmatic. It is not plausible that the intracellular NLRP3 receptor is able to detect all of its many and diverse triggers through direct interactions; instead, it is discussed that NLRP3 is responding to certain generic cellular stress-signals induced by the multitude of molecules that trigger its activation. An ever increasing number of studies link the sensing of cellular stress signals to a direct pathophysiological role of NLRP3 activation in a wide range of autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, and thus provide a novel mechanistic rational, on how molecules trigger and support sterile inflammatory diseases. A vast interest has created to unravel how NLRP3 becomes activated, since mechanistic insight is the prerequisite for a knowledge-based development of therapeutic intervention strategies that specifically target the NLRP3 triggered IL-1β production. In this review, we have updated knowledge on NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation and on the pyrin domain in NLRP3 that could represent a drug target to treat sterile inflammatory diseases. We have reported mutations in NLRP3 that were found to be associated with certain diseases. In addition, we have reviewed the functional link between NLRP3 inflammasome, the regulator of cellular redox status Trx/TXNIP complex, endoplasmic reticulum stress and the pathogenesis of diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Finally, we have provided data on NLRP3 inflammasome, as a critical regulator involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and cardiovascular diseases. PMID

  12. Anti-inflammatory action of insulin via induction of Gadd45-β transcription by the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bortoff, Katherine D; Keeton, Adam B; Franklin, J Lee; Messina, Joseph L

    2010-01-01

    Insulin regulates a large number of genes in a tissue-specific manner. We have previously identified genes modulated by insulin in the liver and in liver-derived cells that have not yet been characterized as insulin regulated, and results of these previous studies indicated that numerous genes are induced by insulin via the MEK-ERK pathway. We now describe new studies indicating that Gadd45-β can be induced by acute insulin treatment. Although other regulators of Gadd45-β expression may utilize the MEK-ERK pathway, the data indicate that insulin utilizes signaling pathways separate from either MEK-ERK, PI3-K, or p38 signaling pathways in the regulation of Gadd45-β transcription. Our findings show that activation of a downstream effector of multiple signaling pathways, mTOR, was required for insulin-induction of Gadd45-β gene transcription. Increased expression of Gadd45-β can inhibit c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Since TNFα is increased during inflammation, and acts, at least in part, via the JNK signaling pathway, insulin induction of Gadd45-β suggests a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory actions of insulin. PMID:21286247

  13. Molecular approaches toward targeted cancer prevention with some food plants and their products: inflammatory and other signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman; Das, Sreemanti; Saha, Santu Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in cancer prevention by food plants and their products. Although several plant parts have potentials for chemoprevention and other therapeutic use, their molecular mechanisms of action are not always well understood. Extensive research has identified several molecular targets that can potentially be used for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer. In this review, we accumulate evidences of modulating abilities of some dietary plants and their products on several signaling pathways, including the inflammatory and apoptotic ones, which may be targeted for cancer therapy. We have mainly focused on several phytochemicals like resveratrol (red grapes and peanuts), allicin (garlic), lycopene (tomato), indole-3-carbinol (cruciferous vegetables), vitamin C (citrus fruits), [6]-gingerol (ginger), emodin (aloe), natural antioxidant mixture (spinach), beta carotenoids (carrots), sulphoraphane (mustard), ellagic acid (pomegranate), myrecitin (cranberry), carnosol (rosemary), vanillin (vanilla) and eugenol (cloves). They act through one or more signaling pathways like nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, Akt, mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular regulated kinase, Bcl-2, caspases, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, matrix metalloproteinase 2/9, and cyclin D1. Critical knowledge on these compounds and their signaling pathways may help in formulation of effective anticancer drugs.

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of Chinese medicinal vine plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Rachel W; David Lin, G; Myers, Stephen P; Leach, David N

    2003-03-01

    Anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol extracts from nine vine plants used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat inflammatory conditions were evaluated against a panel of key enzymes relating to inflammation. The enzymes included cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO). The vine plants studied were: the stem of Spatholobus suberectus Dunn, the stem of Trachelospermum jasminoides Lem., the root from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f., the stem of Sinomenium acutum Rehder and Wilson, the stem of Piper kadsura (Choisy) Ohwi, the stem of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., the root and stem from Tinospora sagittata Gagnep., the root of Tinospora sinensis (Lour.) Merrill, and the stem of Clematis chinensis Osbeck. All of the plant extracts showed inhibitory activities against at least one of the enzymes in various percentages depending upon the concentrations. The extract from S. suberectus was found to be active against all enzymes except COX-2. Its IC(50) values were 158, 54, 31 and 35 microg/ml in COX-1, PLA(2), 5-LO and 12-LO assays, respectively. T. jasminoides showed potent inhibitory activities against both COX-1 (IC(50) 35 microg/ml) and PLA(2) (IC(50) 33 microg/ml). The most potent COX-1, COX-2 and 5-LO inhibition was observed in the extract of T. wilfordii with the IC(50) values of 27, 125 and 22 microg/ml, respectively. The findings of this study may partly explain the use of these vine plants in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  15. Anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities of some dietary cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dhara; Rawat, Indu; Goel, H C

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigated few dietary cucurbits for anticancer activity by monitoring cytotoxic (MTT and LDH assays), apoptotic (caspase-3 and annexin-V assays), and also their anti-inflammatory effects by IL-8 cytokine assay. Aqua-alcoholic (50:50) whole extracts of cucurbits [Lagenaria siceraria (Ls), Luffa cylindrica (Lc) and Cucurbita pepo (Cp)] were evaluated in colon cancer cells (HT-29 and HCT-15) and were compared with isolated biomolecule, cucurbitacin-B (Cbit-B). MTT and LDH assays revealed that the cucurbit extracts and Cbit-B, in a concentration dependent manner, decreased the viability of HT-29 and HCT-15 cells substantially. The viability of lymphocytes was, however, only marginally decreased, yielding a potential advantage over the tumor cells. Caspase-3 assay revealed maximum apoptosis with Ls while annexin V assay demonstrated maximum efficacy of Lc in this context. These cucurbits have also shown decreased secretion of IL-8, thereby revealing their anti-inflammatory capability. The results have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of dietary cucurbits in inhibiting cancer and inflammatory cytokine.

  16. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  17. Tart Cherry Extracts Reduce Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Signaling in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Kelly, Megan E.; Bielinski, Donna F.; Fisher, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Tart cherries contain an array of polyphenols that can decrease inflammation and oxidative stress (OS), which contribute to cognitive declines seen in aging populations. Previous studies have shown that polyphenols from dark-colored fruits can reduce stress-mediated signaling in BV-2 mouse microglial cells, leading to decreases in nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Thus, the present study sought to determine if tart cherries—which improved cognitive behavior in aged rats—would be efficacious in reducing inflammatory and OS signaling in HAPI rat microglial cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations (0–1.0 mg/mL) of Montmorency tart cherry powder for 1–4 h, then treated with 0 or 100 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) overnight. LPS application increased extracellular levels of NO and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and intracellular levels of iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Pretreatment with tart cherry decreased levels of NO, TNF-α, and COX-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner versus those without pretreatment; the optimal combination was between 0.125 and 0.25 mg/mL tart cherry for 2 h. Higher concentrations of tart cherry powder and longer exposure times negatively affected cell viability. Therefore, tart cherries (like other dark-colored fruits), may be effective in reducing inflammatory and OS-mediated signals. PMID:27669317

  18. Tart Cherry Extracts Reduce Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Signaling in Microglial Cells.

    PubMed

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Kelly, Megan E; Bielinski, Donna F; Fisher, Derek R

    2016-09-22

    Tart cherries contain an array of polyphenols that can decrease inflammation and oxidative stress (OS), which contribute to cognitive declines seen in aging populations. Previous studies have shown that polyphenols from dark-colored fruits can reduce stress-mediated signaling in BV-2 mouse microglial cells, leading to decreases in nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Thus, the present study sought to determine if tart cherries-which improved cognitive behavior in aged rats-would be efficacious in reducing inflammatory and OS signaling in HAPI rat microglial cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations (0-1.0 mg/mL) of Montmorency tart cherry powder for 1-4 h, then treated with 0 or 100 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) overnight. LPS application increased extracellular levels of NO and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and intracellular levels of iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Pretreatment with tart cherry decreased levels of NO, TNF-α, and COX-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner versus those without pretreatment; the optimal combination was between 0.125 and 0.25 mg/mL tart cherry for 2 h. Higher concentrations of tart cherry powder and longer exposure times negatively affected cell viability. Therefore, tart cherries (like other dark-colored fruits), may be effective in reducing inflammatory and OS-mediated signals.

  19. Activation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ in brain inhibits inflammatory pain, dorsal horn expression of Fos, and local edema

    PubMed Central

    Morgenweck, J.; Abdel-aleem, O.S.; McNamara, K.C.; Donahue, R.R.; Badr, M.Z.; Taylor, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic administration of thiazolidinediones reduces peripheral inflammation in vivo, presumably by acting at peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in peripheral tissues. Based on a rapidly growing body of literature indicating the CNS as a functional target of PPARγ actions, we postulated that brain PPARγ modulates peripheral edema and the processing of inflammatory pain signals in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. To test this in the plantar carrageenan model of inflammatory pain, we measured paw edema, heat hyperalgesia, and dorsal horn expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PPARγ ligands or vehicle. We found that ICV rosiglitazone (0.5–50 µg) or 15d-PGJ2 (50–200 µg), but not vehicle, dose-dependently reduced paw thickness, paw volume and behavioral withdrawal responses to noxious heat. These anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesia effects result from direct actions in the brain and not diffusion to other sites, because intraperitoneal and intrathecal administration of rosiglitazone (50 µg) and 15d-PGJ2 (200 µg) had no effect. PPARγ agonists changed neither overt behavior nor motor coordination, indicating that non-specific behavioral effects do not contribute to PPAR ligand-induced anti-hyperalgesia. ICV administration of structurally dissimilar PPARγ antagonists (either GW9662 or BADGE) reversed the anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic actions of both rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2. To evaluate the effects of PPARγ agonists on a classic marker of noxious stimulus-evoked gene expression, we quantified Fos protein expression in the dorsal horn. The number of carrageenan-induced Fos-like immunoreactive profiles was less in rosiglitazone-treated rats as compared to vehicle controls. We conclude that pharmacological activation of PPARγ in the brain rapidly inhibits local edema and the spinal transmission of noxious inflammatory signals. PMID:19891980

  20. Hyperosmolarity attenuates TNFα–mediated pro-inflammatory activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Anirban; Moore, Ernest E.; McLaughlin, Nathan J.; Lee, Luis; Jones, Wilbert L.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Nydam, Trevor L.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Firm neutrophil (PMN)-endothelial (EC) adhesion is crucial to the PMN-mediated hyperinflammation observed in acute lung injury. Hypertonic saline (HTS) used for resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock has been associated with a decreased incidence of PMN-mediated lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. We hypothesize that physiologically accessible hypertonic incubation (170mM vs. 140mM, osmolarity ranging from 360-300 mOsm/L) inhibits pro-inflammatory activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). Pro-inflammatory activation of HMVECs was investigated in response to TNFα including IL-8 release, ICAM-1 surface expression, PMN adhesion, and signaling mechanisms under both isotonic (control) and hypertonic conditions. Hyperosmolarity alone had no effect on either basal IL-8 release or ICAM-1 surface expression, but did lead to concentration-dependent decreases in TNFα–induced IL-8 release, ICAM-1 surface expression, and PMN:HMVEC adhesion. Conversely, HTS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and enhanced TNFα activation of p38 MAPK. Despite this basal activation, hyperosmolar incubation attenuated TNFα stimulated IL-8 release and ICAM-1 surface expression and subsequent PMN adherence, while p38 MAPK inhibition did not further influence the effects of hyperosmolar conditions on ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, TNFα induced NF-kB DNA binding, but HTS conditions attenuated this by 31% (p<0.01). In conclusion, HTS reduces PMN:HMVEC adhesion as well as TNFα-induced pro-inflammatory activation of primary HMVECs via attenuation of NF-kB signaling. PMID:23364439

  1. Otud7b facilitates T cell activation and inflammatory responses by regulating Zap70 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Yichuan; Jin, Jin; Chang, Jae-Hoon; Zou, Qiang; Xie, Xiaoping; Cheng, Xuhong; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-03-07

    Signal transduction from the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for T cell-mediated immune responses and, when deregulated, also contributes to the development of autoimmunity. How TCR signaling is regulated is incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism in which the deubiquitinase Otud7b has a crucial role in facilitating TCR signaling. Upon TCR ligation, Otud7b is rapidly recruited to the tyrosine kinase Zap70, a central mediator of TCR-proximal signaling. Otud7b deficiency attenuates the activation of Zap70 and its downstream pathways and impairs T cell activation and differentiation, rendering mice refractory to T cell-mediated autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Otud7b facilitated Zap70 activation by deubiquitinating Zap70, thus preventing the association of Zap70 with the negative-regulatory phosphatases Sts1 and Sts2. These findings establish Otud7b as a positive regulator of TCR-proximal signaling and T cell activation, highlighting the importance of deubiquitination in regulating Zap70 function.

  2. Otud7b facilitates T cell activation and inflammatory responses by regulating Zap70 ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Yichuan; Jin, Jin; Chang, Jae-Hoon; Zou, Qiang; Xie, Xiaoping; Cheng, Xuhong

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction from the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for T cell–mediated immune responses and, when deregulated, also contributes to the development of autoimmunity. How TCR signaling is regulated is incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism in which the deubiquitinase Otud7b has a crucial role in facilitating TCR signaling. Upon TCR ligation, Otud7b is rapidly recruited to the tyrosine kinase Zap70, a central mediator of TCR-proximal signaling. Otud7b deficiency attenuates the activation of Zap70 and its downstream pathways and impairs T cell activation and differentiation, rendering mice refractory to T cell–mediated autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Otud7b facilitated Zap70 activation by deubiquitinating Zap70, thus preventing the association of Zap70 with the negative-regulatory phosphatases Sts1 and Sts2. These findings establish Otud7b as a positive regulator of TCR-proximal signaling and T cell activation, highlighting the importance of deubiquitination in regulating Zap70 function. PMID:26903241

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca extract in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abo-dola, Marium A.; Lutfi, Mohamed F.

    2016-01-01

    Background There were no studies on the anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca, though it is commonly used by Sudanese herbalists in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Objectives To determine phytochemical constituents of Euphorbia aegyptiaca To investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca in rats. Methodology Plant material was extracted by ethanol and phytochemical screening was done according to standard methods. The thickness of Albino rats’ paws were measured before injection of 0.1 ml of 1% formalin in the sub planter region and then, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 24 hours after oral dose of ethanolic extract of Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a rate of 400mg/kg, 800mg/kg, indomethacin (5mg/kg) and normal saline (5ml/kg). Edema inhibition percentage (EI%) and mean paw thickness (MPT) were measured in the different groups and compared using appropriate statistical methods. Results The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, cumarins, flavonoids, tannins, sterols, triterpenes, and absence of alkaloids, anthraquinones glycosides and cyanogenic glycosides. The mean of EI% of rats treated with indomethacin at a dose of 5 mg/kg over different time intervals (64.0%) was significantly lower compared to those treated with Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a dose of 800 mg/kg (75.0%, P< 0.001), but higher compared to rats treated at higher dose of 400 mg/kg (57.4%, P< 0.001). In contrast, MPT of rats treated with indomethacin at a dose of 5 mg/kg (6.5±1.1 mm) was significantly higher compared to those treated with Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a dose of 800 mg/kg (6.1±.7 mm, P< 0.001) as well as 400 mg/kg (5.9±.5, P< 0.001). Conclusion Euphorbia aegyptiaca ethanolic extract has a sustained dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:27004059

  4. Repression of Esophageal Neoplasia and Inflammatory Signaling by Anti-miR-31 Delivery In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Taccioli, Cristian; Garofalo, Michela; Chen, Hongping; Jiang, Yubao; Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio Malagoli; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Alder, Hansjuerg; Fadda, Paolo; Middleton, Justin; Smalley, Karl J.; Selmi, Tommaso; Naidu, Srivatsava; Farber, John L.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Overexpression of microRNA-31 (miR-31) is implicated in the pathogenesis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a deadly disease associated with dietary zinc deficiency. Using a rat model that recapitulates features of human ESCC, the mechanism whereby Zn regulates miR-31 expression to promote ESCC is examined. Methods: To inhibit in vivo esophageal miR-31 overexpression in Zn-deficient rats (n = 12–20 per group), locked nucleic acid–modified anti-miR-31 oligonucleotides were administered over five weeks. miR-31 expression was determined by northern blotting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization. Physiological miR-31 targets were identified by microarray analysis and verified by luciferase reporter assay. Cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and expression of inflammation genes were determined by immunoblotting, caspase assays, and immunohistochemistry. The miR-31 promoter in Zn-deficient esophagus was identified by ChIP-seq using an antibody for histone mark H3K4me3. Data were analyzed with t test and analysis of variance. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: In vivo, anti-miR-31 reduced miR-31 overexpression (P = .002) and suppressed the esophageal preneoplasia in Zn-deficient rats. At the same time, the miR-31 target Stk40 was derepressed, thereby inhibiting the STK40-NF-κΒ–controlled inflammatory pathway, with resultant decreased cellular proliferation and activated apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activities, fold change = 10.7, P = .005). This same connection between miR-31 overexpression and STK40/NF-κΒ expression was also documented in human ESCC cell lines. In Zn-deficient esophagus, the miR-31 promoter region and NF-κΒ binding site were activated. Zn replenishment restored the regulation of this genomic region and a normal esophageal phenotype. Conclusions: The data define the in vivo signaling pathway underlying interaction of Zn deficiency and miR-31 overexpression in esophageal neoplasia and

  5. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 small interfering RNA were administered to alveolar macrophage-depleted mice via a jugular venous cannula 30 min before the start of the ventilation protocol. In some experiments, mice were ventilated in the absence and presence of autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (15 mg/kg ip) or trichostatin A (1 mg/kg ip). Mechanical ventilation with a high tidal volume caused rapid (within minutes) activation of autophagy in the lung. Conventional transmission electron microscopic examination of lung sections showed that mechanical ventilation-induced autophagy activation mainly occurred in lung macrophages. Autophagy activation in the lungs during mechanical ventilation was dramatically attenuated in alveolar macrophage-depleted mice. Selective silencing of autophagy-related protein 5 in lung macrophages abolished mechanical ventilation-induced nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation and lung inflammatory injury. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also significantly attenuated the inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. The activation of autophagy in macrophages mediates early lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation via NLRP3 inflammasome signaling. Inhibition of autophagy activation in lung macrophages may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury.

  6. A glycoprotein from Porphyra yezoensis produces anti-inflammatory effects in liposaccharide-stimulated macrophages via the TLR4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Soon; Hwang, Hye-Jung; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of a glycoprotein isolated from the alga Porphyra yezoensis in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. First, we extracted a novel material with antioxidant activity from P. yezoensis, confirmed by SDS-PAGE to be a glycoprotein, which we named P. yezoensis glycoprotein (PGP). PGP inhibited the production of NO and ROS and expression of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α and IL-1β, which are involved in the pathogenesis of many inflammation-associated human diseases, including septic shock, hemorrhagic shock and rheumatoid arthritis. Next, we determined the mechanisms behind the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of PGP. We focused on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway because it is well-known to induce the pro-inflammatory proteins that trigger MAPK and NF-κB activation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative events. PGP treatment reduced the formation of the TLR4-IRAK4 and TLR4-TRIF binding complexes in response to LPS. Moreover, it inhibited LPS-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB by abrogating IκB phosphorylation. PGP also suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that PGP exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by modulating TLR4 signaling and thus inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and MAP kinases.

  7. Activation of platelet-activating factor receptor in SZ95 sebocytes results in inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin E2 production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiwei; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2006-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a group of phosphocholines with various biological effects mediated by the PAF receptor (PAF-R). Activation of the epidermal PAF-R induces the expression of inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). The upregulation of COX-2 expression has been shown to be involved in sebocyte proliferation, sebaceous gland inflammation and carcinogenesis. The present study was designed to investigate whether PAF-R activation could induce the expression of COX-2 and production of PGE(2), as well as secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8), in the immortalized sebaceous gland cell line SZ95. Using calcium mobilization studies, we first confirmed that PAF can signal through PAF-R in SZ95 sebocytes. We then found that the production of IL-8 was induced following treatment with PAF-R agonist, however blocked by a specific PAF-R antagonist. Induction of COX-2 expression and increased PGE(2) production were observed in SZ95 sebocytes after PAF-R activation. Finally, it was demonstrated that the production of PGE(2), induced by PAF-R activation and mediated by COX-2 expression, was blocked following PAF-R antagonism in SZ95 sebocytes. These studies suggest that SZ95 sebocytes express functional PAF-Rs and PAF-Rs are involved in regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators, including COX-2, PGE(2) and IL-8.

  8. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation of mouse macrophages by inducing the expression of DUSP1.

    PubMed

    Köröskényi, Krisztina; Kiss, Beáta; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine is known to reduce inflammation by suppressing the activity of most immune cells. Previous studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated mouse macrophages produce adenosine, and the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling activated in an autocrine manner attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation. It has been suggested that A2AR signaling inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production through a unique cAMP-dependent, but PKA- and Epac-independent signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of inhibition was not identified so far. Here we report that LPS stimulation enhances A2AR expression in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages, and loss of A2ARs results in enhanced LPS-induced pro-inflammatory response. Loss of A2ARs in A2AR null macrophages did not alter the LPS-induced NF-κB activation, but an enhanced basal and LPS-induced phosphorylation of MAP kinases (especially that of JNKs) was detected in A2AR null cells. A2AR signaling did not alter the LPS-induced phosphorylation of their upstream kinases, but by regulating adenylate cyclase activity it enhanced the expression of dual specific phosphatase (DUSP)1, a negative regulator of MAP kinases. As a result, lower basal and LPS-induced DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels can be detected in A2AR null macrophages. Silencing of DUSP1 mRNA expression resulted in higher basal and LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation in wild type macrophages, but had no effect on that in A2AR null cells. Our data indicate that A2AR signaling regulates both basal and LPS-induced DUSP1 levels in macrophages via activating the adenylate cyclase pathway.

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of four Bolivian Baccharis species (Compositae).

    PubMed

    Abad, M J; Bessa, A L; Ballarin, B; Aragón, O; Gonzales, E; Bermejo, P

    2006-02-20

    Hexanic, dichloromethanic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts from Baccharis obtusifolia HBK, Baccharis latifolia (R. et P.) Pers., Baccharis pentlandii D.C. and Baccharis subulata Wedd., plants used in the traditional medicine of South America have been studied for their in vitro anti-inflammatory activity in cellular systems. Calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages were validated as a source of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) (prostaglandin E2, PGE2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) (leukotriene C4, LTC4), and mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used for testing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activity. Most of the extracts tested were active in all assays.

  10. Flavonoids from Anoectochilus annamensis and their Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Tran Minh; Thai, Tran Van; Ha, Chu Thi Thu; Anh, Ha Thi Van; Minh, Phan Xuan Binh; Dat, Nguyen Tien

    2016-05-01

    One new flavonol diglycoside, 4',5-dihydroxy-3,3',7-trimethoxyflavone 4'-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), and two known compounds (2-3) were isolated from the methanolic extract of Anoectochilus annamensis Aver. aerial parts. The effects were evaluated of all isolated compounds (1-3) on LPS-induced production of the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO) by RAW264.7 cells. 4',5-Dihydroxy-3,3',7-trimethoxyflavone (2) was the most active while the addition of a rutinoside at C4' (compound 1) decreased the inhibitory activity. This is the first report on the chemical composition and biological activity of A. annamensis.

  11. The effect of CD47 modified polymer surfaces on inflammatory cell attachment and activation

    PubMed Central

    Stachelek, Stanley J.; Finley, Matthew J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.; Wang, Fengxiang; Tsai, Richard; Eckells, Edward C.; Tomczyk, Nancy; Connolly, Jeanne M.; Discher, Dennis E.; Eckmann, David M.; Levy, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    CD47 is a transmembrane protein that is a marker of “self”. CD47 binding to its cognate receptor in leukocytes and macrophages, signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), causes inhibition of inflammatory cell attachment. We hypothesized that immobilization of recombinant CD47 on polymeric surfaces would reduce inflammation. Recombinant CD47 was appended to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or polyurethane (PU) surfaces via photoactivation chemistry. Cell culture studies showed that CD47 immobilization significantly reduced human neutrophil (HL-60) and human monocyte derived macrophage (MDM) (THP-1) attachment to PVC and PU respectively. A neutralizing antibody, directed against SIRPα, inhibited THP-1 and HL-60 binding to PU and PVC surfaces respectively. This antibody also increased the level of SIRPα tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby indicating a direct role for SIRPα mediated signaling in preventing inflammatory cell attachment. Studies using human blood in an ex vivo flow-loop showed that CD47 modified PVC tubing significantly reduced cell binding and neutrophil activation compared to unmodified tubing or poly-2-methoxy-ethylacrylate (PMEA) coated tubing. In ten-week rat subdermal implants, CD47 functionalized PU films showed a significant reduction in markers of MDM mediated oxidative degradation compared to unmodified PU. In conclusion, CD47 functionalized surfaces can resist inflammatory cell interactions both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21429575

  12. Increased matriptase zymogen activation in inflammatory skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Jueng; Wu, Bai-Yao; Tsao, Pai-In; Chen, Chi-Yung; Wu, Mei-Hsuan; Chan, Yee Lam E.; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Johnson, Michael D.; Eckert, Richard L.; Chen, Ya-Wen; Chou, Fengpai; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2011-01-01

    Matriptase, a type 2 transmembrane serine protease, and its inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 are required for normal epidermal barrier function, and matriptase activity is tightly regulated during this process. We therefore hypothesized that this protease system might be deregulated in skin disease. To test this, we examined the level and activation state of matriptase in examples of 23 human skin disorders. We first examined matriptase and HAI-1 protein distribution in normal epidermis. Matriptase was detected at high levels at cell-cell junctions in the basal layer and spinous layers but was present at minimal levels in the granular layer. HAI-1 was distributed in a similar pattern, except that high-level expression was retained in the granular layer. This pattern of expression was retained in most skin disorders. We next examined the distribution of activated matriptase. Although activated matriptase is not detected in normal epidermis, a dramatic increase is seen in keratinocytes at the site of inflammation in 16 different skin diseases. To gain further evidence that activation is associated with inflammatory stimuli, we challenged HaCaT cells with acidic pH or H2O2 and observed matriptase activation. These findings suggest that inflammation-associated reactive oxygen species and tissue acidity may enhance matriptase activation in some skin diseases. PMID:21123732

  13. Oxymatrine lightened the inflammatory response of LPS-induced mastitis in mice through affecting NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengtao; Yin, Ronglan; Cong, Yunfeng; Yang, Zhanqing; Zhou, Ershun; Wei, Zhengkai; Liu, Zhicheng; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-12-01

    Mastitis, an inflammatory reaction of the mammary gland, is recognized as one of the most costly diseases in dairy cattle. Oxymatrine, one of the alkaloids extracted from Chinese herb Sophora flavescens Ait, has been reported to have many biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-virus, and anti-hepatic fibrosis properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of oxymatrine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis in mice. The mouse mastitis was induced by 10 μg of LPS for 24 h. Oxymatrine was intraperitoneally administered with the dose of 30, 60, and 120 mg/kg 1 h before and 12 h after LPS induction. The results showed that oxymatrine significantly attenuated the damage of the mammary gland induced by LPS. Oxymatrine inhibited the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκB in NF-κB signal pathway and reduced the phosphorylation of p38, ERK, and JNK in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) signal pathway. The results showed that oxymatrine had a protective effect on LPS-induced mastitis, and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of oxymatrine was related to the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPKs signal pathways.

  14. Anti-allergic inflammatory activities of compounds of amomi fructus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Gyu; Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Geum Jin; Choi, Hyukjae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Kim Seung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Activity-guided isolation of compounds from the fruits of Amomum xanthioides resulted in the purification of fourteen phenolic compounds, 4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (1), 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (2), 3,5-dimethoxy-4-methylbenzaldehyde (3), syringic aldehyde (4), benzoic acid (5), 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (6), vanillic acid (7), 3-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzoic acid (8), o-vanillic acid (9), phenylacetic acid (10), tyrosol (11), pyrocatechol (12), 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (13), and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxybiphenyl-4,4'-diol (14). To evaluate the anti-allergic inflammatory activities of these compounds, we examined the inhibitory effects of the isolates (1-14) on histamine release and on the expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-ca and interleukin (IL)-6 genes by using human mast cells. Of the tested compounds, 9, 11, and 13 suppressed histamine release from mast cells, and all isolates attenuated the expressions of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6 genes in human mast cells.

  15. BDMC33, A Curcumin Derivative Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in Macrophage-Like Cellular System: Role of Inhibition in NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ka-Heng; Chow, Yuh-Lit; Sharmili, Vidyadaran; Abas, Faridah; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Shaari, Khozirah; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Lajis, Nordin Haji; Syahida, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Our preliminary screening has shown that curcumin derivative BDMC33 [2,6-bis(2,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)cyclohexanone] exerted promising nitric oxide inhibitory activity in activated macrophages. However, the molecular basis and mechanism for its pharmacological action is yet to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of BDMC33 and elucidate its underlying mechanism action in macrophage cells. Our current study demonstrated that BDMC33 inhibits the secretion of major pro-inflammatory mediators in stimulated macrophages, and includes NO, TNF-α and IL-1β through interference in both nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen activator protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade in IFN-γ/LPS-stimulated macrophages. Moreover, BDMC33 also interrupted LPS signaling through inhibiting the surface expression of CD-14 accessory molecules. In addition, the inhibitory action of BDMC33 not only restricted the macrophages cell (RAW264.7), but also inhibited the secretion of NO and TNF-α in IFN-γ/LPS-challenged microglial cells (BV-2). The experimental data suggests the inflammatory action of BDMC33 on activated macrophage-like cellular systems, which could be used as a future therapeutic agent in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22489138

  16. Pre-clinical studies of Notch signaling inhibitor RO4929097 in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Debeb, Bisrat G; Cohen, Evan N; Boley, Kimberly; Freiter, Erik M; Li, Li; Robertson, Fredika M; Reuben, James M; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Buchholz, Thomas A; Woodward, Wendy A

    2012-07-01

    Basal breast cancer, common among patients presenting with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), has been shown to be resistant to radiation and enriched in cancer stem cells. The Notch pathway plays an important role in self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells and contributes to inflammatory signaling which promotes the breast cancer stem cell phenotype. Herein, we inhibited Notch signaling using a gamma secretase inhibitor, RO4929097, in an in vitro model that enriches for cancer initiating cells (3D clonogenic assay) and conventional 2D clonogenic assay to compare the effect on radiosensitization of the SUM149 and SUM190 IBC cell lines. RO4929097 downregulated the Notch target genes Hes1, Hey1, and HeyL, and showed a significant reduction in anchorage independent growth in SUM190 and SUM149. However, the putative self-renewal assay mammosphere formation efficiency was increased with the drug. To assess radiosensitization of putative cancer stem cells, cells were exposed to increasing doses of radiation with or without 1 μM RO4929097 in their standard (2D) and self-renewal enriching (3D) culture conditions. In the conventional 2D clonogenic assay, RO4929097 significantly sensitized SUM190 cells to ionizing radiation and has a modest radiosensitization effect in SUM149 cells. In the 3D clonogenic assays, however, a radioprotective effect was seen in both SUM149 and SUM190 cells at higher doses. Both cell lines express IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines known to mediate the efficacy of Notch inhibition and to promote self-renewal of stem cells. We further showed that RO429097 inhibits normal T-cell synthesis of some inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, a potential mediator of IL-6 and IL-8 production in the microenvironment. These data suggest that additional targeting agents may be required to selectively target IBC stem cells through Notch inhibition, and that evaluation of microenvironmental influences may shed further light on the potential effects of this inhibitor.

  17. Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Activity by Inhibiting NF-κB Activation in BV-2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Ma, Shi-Xun; Ko, Yong-Hyun; Seo, Jee-Yeon; Lee, Bo-Ram; Lee, Taek Hwan; Kim, Sun Yeou; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. methanol extract (VBME) on microglial activation and to identify the underlying mechanisms of action of these effects. The anti-inflammatory properties of VBME were studied using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 microglial cells. We measured the production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as inflammatory parameters. We also examined the effect of VBME on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the activity of nuclear factor-kappa B p65 (NF-κB p65). VBME significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of NO and PGE2 and LPS-mediated upregulation of iNOS and COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner; importantly, VBME was not cytotoxic. VBME also significantly reduced the generation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. In addition, VBME significantly dampened intracellular ROS production and suppressed NF-κB p65 translocation by blocking IκB-α phosphorylation and degradation in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. Our findings indicate that VBME inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators in BV-2 microglial cells by suppressing NF-κB signaling. Thus, VBME may be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases due to its ability to inhibit inflammatory mediator production in activated BV-2 microglial cells. PMID:27169820

  18. Involvement of PKA and HO-1 signaling in anti-inflammatory effects of surfactin in BV-2 microglial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, YoungHee

    2013-04-01

    Surfactin, one of the most powerful biosurfactants, is a bacterial cyclic lipopeptide. Here, we investigated the anti-neuroinflammatory properties of surfactin in lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-stimulated BV-2 microglial cells. Surfactin significantly inhibited excessive production of the pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and suppressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that surfactin inhibited LTA-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) activation. However, surfactin increases the phosphorylation of the STAT-3, a component of the homeostatic mechanism causing anti-inflammatory events. We also demonstrated that surfactin induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and nuclear factor-regulated factor-2 (Nrf-2) activation, and that the anti-inflammatory effects of surfactin are abrogated by small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of HO-1 or Nrf-2. Interestingly, we found that surfactin increased the level of cAMP and induced phosphorylation of cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) in microglial cells. Furthermore, treatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H-89, blocked HO-1 induction by surfactin and abolished surfactin's suppressive effects on ROS and NO production. These results indicate that HO-1 and its upstream effector, PKA, play a pivotal role in the anti-neuroinflammatory response of surfactin in LTA-stimulated microglia. Therefore, surfactin might have therapeutic potential for neuroprotective agents to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: ► Surfactin inhibits proinflammatory mediator synthesis in LTA-activated BV-2 cells. ► Surfactin suppresses NF-κB and STAT-1, but potentiates

  19. Dietary Fish Oil Inhibits Pro-Inflammatory and ER Stress Signalling Pathways in the Liver of Sows during Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Denise K.; Gröne, Birthe; Couturier, Aline; Rosenbaum, Susann; Hillen, Sonja; Becker, Sabrina; Erhardt, Georg; Reiner, Gerald; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Lactating sows have been shown to develop typical signs of an inflammatory condition in the liver during the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Hepatic inflammation is considered critical due to the induction of an acute phase response and the activation of stress signaling pathways like the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR), both of which impair animal´s health and performance. Whether ER stress-induced UPR is also activated in the liver of lactating sows and whether dietary fish oil as a source of anti-inflammatory effects n-3 PUFA is able to attenuate hepatic inflammation and ER stress-induced UPR in the liver of sows is currently unknown. Based on this, two experiments with lactating sows were performed. The first experiment revealed that ER stress-induced UPR occurs also in the liver of sows during lactation. This was evident from the up-regulation of a set of genes regulated by the UPR and numerically increased phosphorylation of the ER stress-transducer PERK and PERK-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α and IκB. The second experiment showed that fish oil inhibits ER stress-induced UPR in the liver of lactating sows. This was demonstrated by decreased mRNA levels of a number of UPR-regulated genes and reduced phosphorylation of PERK and PERK-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α and IκB in the liver of the fish oil group. The mRNA levels of various nuclear factor-κB-regulated genes encoding inflammatory mediators and acute phase proteins in the liver of lactating sows were also reduced in the fish oil group. In line with this, the plasma levels of acute phase proteins were reduced in the fish oil group, although differences to the control group were not significant. In conclusion, ER stress-induced UPR is present in the liver of lactating sows and fish oil is able to inhibit inflammatory signaling pathways and ER stress-induced UPR in the liver. PMID:26351857

  20. Genetic inactivation of PERK signaling in mouse oligodendrocytes: normal developmental myelination with increased susceptibility to inflammatory demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hussien, Yassir; Cavener, Douglas R; Popko, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The immune-mediated central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurological disease in young adults. One important goal of MS research is to identify strategies that will preserve oligodendrocytes (OLs) in MS lesions. During active myelination and remyelination, OLs synthesize large quantities of membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which may result in ER stress. During ER stress, pancreatic ER kinase (PERK) phosphorylates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (elF2α), which activates the integrated stress response (ISR), resulting in a stress-resistant state. Previous studies have shown that PERK activity is increased in OLs within the demyelinating lesions of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS. Moreover, our laboratory has shown that PERK protects OLs from the adverse effects of interferon-γ, a key mediator of the CNS inflammatory response. Here, we have examined the role of PERK signaling in OLs during development and in response to EAE. We generated OL-specific PERK knockout (OL-PERK(ko/ko) ) mice that exhibited a lower level of phosphorylated elF2α in the CNS, indicating that the ISR is impaired in the OLs of these mice. Unexpectedly, OL-PERK(ko/ko) mice develop normally and show no myelination defects. Nevertheless, EAE is exacerbated in these mice, which is correlated with increased OL loss, demyelination, and axonal degeneration. These data indicate that although not needed for developmental myelination, PERK signaling provides protection to OLs against inflammatory demyelination and suggest that the ISR in OLs could be a valuable target for future MS therapeutics.

  1. Inflammatory cytokines IL-32 and IL-17 have common signaling intermediates despite differential dependence on TNF-receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Turner-Brannen, Emily; Choi, Ka-Yee Grace; Arsenault, Ryan; El-Gabalawy, Hani; Napper, Scott; Mookherjee, Neeloffer

    2011-06-15

    Cytokines IL-32 and IL-17 are emerging as critical players in the pathophysiology of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. It has been speculated that the molecular mechanisms governing IL-32- and IL-17-mediated cellular responses are differentially dependent on the TNF pathway. In this study, kinome analysis demonstrated that following stimulation with cytokine IL-32, but not IL-17, there was increased phosphorylation of a peptide target corresponding to TNF-R1. Consistent with this observation, blocking TNF-R1 resulted in a suppression of IL-32-induced downstream responses, indicating that IL-32-mediated activity may be dependent on TNF-R1. In contrast, blocking TNF-R1 did not affect IL-17-induced downstream responses. Kinome analysis also implicated p300 (transcriptional coactivator) and death-associated protein kinase-1 (DAPK-1) as signaling intermediates for both IL-32 and IL-17. Phosphorylation of p300 and DAPK-1 upon stimulation with either IL-32 or IL-17 was confirmed by immunoblots. The presence of common targets was supported by results demonstrating similar downstream responses induced in the presence of IL-32 and IL-17, such as transcriptional responses and the direct activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, knockdown of p300 and DAPK-1 altered downstream responses induced by IL-32 and IL-17, and impacted certain cellular responses induced by TNF-α and IL-1β. We hypothesize that p300 and DAPK-1 represent nodes where the inflammatory networks of IL-32 and IL-17 overlap, and that these proteins would affect both TNF-R1-dependent and -independent pathways. Therefore, p300 and DAPK-1 are viable potential therapeutic targets for chronic inflammatory diseases.

  2. Macrophage-specific TLR2 signaling mediates pathogen-induced TNF-dependent inflammatory oral bone loss.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, George; Weinberg, Ellen O; Massari, Paola; Gibson, Frank C; Wetzler, Lee M; Morgan, Elise F; Genco, Caroline A

    2013-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a primary etiological agent of chronic periodontal disease, an infection-driven chronic inflammatory disease that leads to the resorption of tooth-supporting alveolar bone. We previously reported that TLR2 is required for P. gingivalis-induced alveolar bone loss in vivo, and our in vitro work implicated TNF as a key downstream mediator. In this study, we show that TNF-deficient (Tnf(-/-)) mice are resistant to alveolar bone loss following oral infection with P. gingivalis, and thus establish a central role for TNF in experimental periodontal disease. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from wild-type and gene-specific knockout mice, we demonstrate that the initial inflammatory response to P. gingivalis in naive macrophages is MyD88 dependent and requires cooperative signaling of TLR2 and TLR4. The ability of P. gingivalis to activate cells via TLR2 or TLR4 was confirmed in TLR2- or TLR4-transformed human embryonic kidney cells. Additional studies using bacterial mutants demonstrated a role for fimbriae in the modulation of TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB. Whereas both TLR2 and TLR4 contributed to TNF production in naive macrophages, P. gingivalis preferentially exploited TLR2 in endotoxin-tolerant BMDM to trigger excessive TNF production. We found that TNF induced surface TLR2 expression and augmented TLR-induced cytokine production in P. gingivalis-stimulated BMDM, establishing a previously unidentified TNF-dependent feedback loop. Adoptive transfer of TLR2-expressing macrophages to TLR2-deficient mice restored the ability of P. gingivalis to induce alveolar bone loss in vivo. Collectively, our results identify a TLR2- and TNF-dependent macrophage-specific mechanism underlying pathogen-induced inflammatory bone loss in vivo.

  3. Macrophage-Specific TLR2 Signaling Mediates Pathogen-Induced TNF-Dependent Inflammatory Oral Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, George; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Massari, Paola; Gibson, Frank C.; Wetzler, Lee M.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a primary etiological agent of chronic periodontal disease, an infection-driven chronic inflammatory disease that leads to the resorption of tooth-supporting alveolar bone. We previously reported that TLR2 is required for P. gingivalis–induced alveolar bone loss in vivo, and our in vitro work implicated TNF as a key downstream mediator. In this study, we show that TNF-deficient (Tnf−/−) mice are resistant to alveolar bone loss following oral infection with P. gingivalis, and thus establish a central role for TNF in experimental periodontal disease. Using bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMDM) from wild-type and gene-specific knockout mice, we demonstrate that the initial inflammatory response to P. gingivalis in naive macrophages is MyD88 dependent and requires cooperative signaling of TLR2 and TLR4. The ability of P. gingivalis to activate cells via TLR2 or TLR4 was confirmed in TLR2- or TLR4-transformed human embryonic kidney cells. Additional studies using bacterial mutants demonstrated a role for fimbriae in the modulation of TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB. Whereas both TLR2 and TLR4 contributed to TNF production in naive macrophages, P. gingivalis preferentially exploited TLR2 in endotoxin-tolerant BMDM to trigger excessive TNF production. We found that TNF induced surface TLR2 expression and augmented TLR-induced cytokine production in P. gingivalis–stimulated BMDM, establishing a previously unidentified TNF-dependent feedback loop. Adoptive transfer of TLR2-expressing macrophages to TLR2-deficient mice restored the ability of P. gingivalis to induce alveolar bone loss in vivo. Collectively, our results identify a TLR2- and TNF-dependent macrophage-specific mechanism underlying pathogen-induced inflammatory bone loss in vivo. PMID:23264656

  4. Streptolysin S Promotes Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Inflammatory Signaling in Epithelial Keratinocytes during Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Rebecca A.; Puricelli, Jessica M.; Higashi, Dustin L.; Park, Claudia J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogen that causes a multitude of human diseases from pharyngitis to severe infections such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. One of the primary virulence factors produced by GAS is the peptide toxin streptolysin S (SLS). In addition to its well-recognized role as a cytolysin, recent evidence has indicated that SLS may influence host cell signaling pathways at sublytic concentrations during infection. We employed an antibody array-based approach to comprehensively identify global host cell changes in human epithelial keratinocytes in response to the SLS toxin. We identified key SLS-dependent host responses, including the initiation of specific programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades with concomitant downregulation of Akt-mediated cytoprotection. Significant signaling responses identified by our array analysis were confirmed using biochemical and protein identification methods. To further demonstrate that the observed SLS-dependent host signaling changes were mediated primarily by the secreted toxin, we designed a Transwell infection system in which direct bacterial attachment to host cells was prevented, while secreted factors were allowed access to host cells. The results using this approach were consistent with our direct infection studies and reveal that SLS is a bacterial toxin that does not require bacterial attachment to host cells for activity. In light of these findings, we propose that the production of SLS by GAS during skin infection promotes invasive outcomes by triggering programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades in host cells to breach the keratinocyte barrier for dissemination into deeper tissues. PMID:26238711

  5. Tumors induce a subset of inflammatory monocytes with immunosuppressive activity on CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Giovanna; Dolcetti, Luigi; Serafini, Paolo; De Santo, Carmela; Marigo, Ilaria; Colombo, Mario P; Basso, Giuseppe; Brombacher, Frank; Borrello, Ivan; Zanovello, Paola; Bicciato, Silvio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-10-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the efficacy of immune surveillance and immunotherapy. While tumor-recruited CD11b+ myeloid cells are known mediators of tumor-associated immune dysfunction, the true nature of these suppressive cells and the fine biochemical pathways governing their immunosuppressive activity remain elusive. Here we describe a population of circulating CD11b+IL-4 receptor alpha+ (CD11b+IL-4Ralpha+), inflammatory-type monocytes that is elicited by growing tumors and activated by IFN-gamma released from T lymphocytes. CD11b+IL-4Ralpha+ cells produced IL-13 and IFN-gamma and integrated the downstream signals of these cytokines to trigger the molecular pathways suppressing antigen-activated CD8+ T lymphocytes. Analogous immunosuppressive circuits were active in CD11b+ cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These suppressor cells challenge the current idea that tumor-conditioned immunosuppressive monocytes/macrophages are alternatively activated. Moreover, our data show how the inflammatory response elicited by tumors had detrimental effects on the adaptive immune system and suggest novel approaches for the treatment of tumor-induced immune dysfunctions.

  6. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  7. Inflammatory cytokines presented from polymer matrices differentially generate and activate DCs in situ

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Omar A.; Tayalia, Prakriti; Shvartsman, Dmitry; Lewin, Sarah; Mooney, David J.

    2014-01-01

    During infection, inflammatory cytokines mobilize and activate dendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for efficacious T cell priming and immune responses that clear the infection. Here we designed macroporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) matrices to release the inflammatory cytokines GM-CSF, Flt3L and CCL20, in order to mimic infection-induced DC recruitment. We then tested the ability of these infection mimics to function as cancer vaccines via induction of specific, anti-tumor T cell responses. All vaccine systems tested were able to confer specific anti-tumor T cell responses and longterm survival in a therapeutic, B16-F10 melanoma model. However, GM-CSF and Flt3L vaccines resulted in similar survival rates, and outperformed CCL20 loaded scaffolds, even though they had differential effects on DC recruitment and generation. GM-CSF signaling was identified as the most potent chemotactic factor for conventional DCs and significantly enhanced surface expression of MHC(II) and CD86(+), which are utilized for priming T cell immunity. In contrast, Flt3L vaccines led to greater numbers of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), correlating with increased levels of T cell priming cytokines that amplify T cell responses. These results demonstrate that 3D polymer matrices modified to present inflammatory cytokines may be utilized to effectively mobilize and activate different DC subsets in vivo for immunotherapy. PMID:24688455

  8. The complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18) agonist Leukadherin‐1 suppresses human innate inflammatory signalling

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, A. L.; Fürnrohr, B. G.; Vyse, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18) is a multi‐functional receptor expressed predominantly on myeloid and natural killer (NK) cells. The R77H variant of CD11b, encoded by the ITGAM rs1143679 polymorphism, is associated robustly with development of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and impairs CR3 function, including its regulatory role on monocyte immune signalling. The role of CR3 in NK cell function is unknown. Leukadherin‐1 is a specific small‐molecule CR3 agonist that has shown therapeutic promise in animal models of vascular injury and inflammation. We show that Leukadherin‐1 pretreatment reduces secretion of interferon (IFN)‐γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)‐1β by monokine‐stimulated NK cells. It was associated with a reduction in phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (pSTAT)‐5 following interleukin (IL)‐12 + IL‐15 stimulation (P < 0·02) and increased IL‐10 secretion following IL‐12 + IL‐18 stimulation (P < 0·001). Leukadherin‐1 pretreatment also reduces secretion of IL‐1β, IL‐6 and TNF by Toll‐like receptor (TLR)‐2 and TLR‐7/8‐stimulated monocytes (P < 0·01 for all). The R77H variant did not affect NK cell response to Leukadherin‐1 using ex‐vivo cells from homozygous donors; nor did the variant influence CR3 expression by these cell types, in contrast to a recent report. These data extend our understanding of CR3 biology by demonstrating that activation potently modifies innate immune inflammatory signalling, including a previously undocumented role in NK cell function. We discuss the potential relevance of this to the pathogenesis of SLE. Leukadherin‐1 appears to mediate its anti‐inflammatory effect irrespective of the SLE‐risk genotype of CR3, providing further evidence to support its evaluation of Leukadherin‐1 as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune disease. PMID:27118513

  9. Labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of TAK-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cuadrado, Irene; Estevez-Braun, Ana; Heras, Beatriz de las

    2012-01-01

    Labdane derivatives obtained from the diterpenoid labdanediol suppressed NO and PGE{sub 2} production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. However, mechanisms involved in these inhibitory effects are not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) in peritoneal macrophages and examined its therapeutic effect in a mouse endotoxic shock model. LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. This effect involved the inhibition of NOS-2 and COX-2 gene expression, acting at the transcription level. Examination of the effects of the diterpene on NF-κB signaling showed that LAME inhibits the phosphorylation of IκBα and IκBβ, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. Moreover, inhibition of MAPK signaling was also observed. A further experiment revealed that LAME inhibited the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), an upstream signaling molecule required for IKK and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were downregulated in the presence of this compound after stimulation with LPS. Additionally, LAME also improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia and reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α). In conclusion, these results indicate that labdane diterpene LAME significantly attenuates the pro-inflammatory response induced by LPS both in vivo and in vitro. Highlights: ► LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. ► IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were also inhibited by LAME. ► Inhibition of TAK-1 activation is the mechanism involved in this process. ► LAME improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia. ► LAME reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α).

  10. Pre-Clinical studies of Notch Signaling Inhibitor RO4929097 in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Debeb, Bisrat G.; Cohen, Evan N.; Boley, Kimberly; Freiter, Erik M.; Li, Li; Robertson, Fredika M.; Reuben, James M.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal breast cancer, common among patients presenting with inflammatory breast cancer, has been shown to be resistant to radiation and enriched in cancer stem cells. The Notch pathway plays an important role in self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells and contributes to inflammatory signaling that promotes the breast cancer stem cell phenotype. Herein we inhibited Notch signaling using a gamma secretase inhibitor, RO4929097, in an in vitro model that enriches for cancer initiating cells (3D clonogenic assay) and conventional 2D clonogenic assay to compare the effect on radiosensitization of the SUM149 and SUM190 inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines. RO4929097 downregulated the Notch target genes Hes1, Hey1 and HeyL and showed a significant reduction in anchorage independent growth in SUM190 and SUM149. However, the putative self-renewal assay mammosphere formation efficiency was increased with the drug. To assess radiosensitization of putative cancer stem cells, cells were exposed to increasing doses of radiation with or without 1uM RO4929097 in their standard (2D) and self-renewal enriching (3D) culture conditions. In the conventional 2D clonogenic assay, RO4929097 significantly sensitized SUM190 cells to ionizing radiation and has a modest radiosensitization effect in SUM149 cells. In the 3D clonogenic assays, however, a radioprotective effect was seen in both SUM149 and SUM190 cells at higher doses. Both cell lines express IL-6 and IL-8, cytokines known to mediate the efficacy of notch inhibition and to promote self-renewal of stem cells. We further showed that RO429097 inhibits normal T-cell synthesis of some inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, a potential mediator of IL-6 and IL-8 production in the microenvironment. These data suggest additional targeting agents may be required to selectively target IBC stem cells through notch inhibition, and that evaluation of microenvironmental influences may shed further light on the potential effects of this

  11. Scaffolds are 'active' regulators of signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Anita; Varga, János; Reményi, Attila

    2010-11-01

    Signaling cascades, in addition to proteins with obvious signaling-relevant activities (e.g. protein kinases or receptors), also employ dedicated 'inactive' proteins whose functions appear to be the organization of the former components into higher order complexes through protein-protein interactions. The core function of signaling adaptors, anchors and scaffolds is the recruitment of proteins into one macromolecular complex. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the recruiter and the recruited molecules mutually influence each other in a scaffolded complex. This yields fundamentally novel properties for the signaling complex as a whole. Because these are not merely additive to the properties of the individual components, scaffolded signaling complexes may behave as functionally distinct modules.

  12. A TLR4/MD2 fusion protein inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling in hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schnabl, Bernd Brandl, Katharina; Fink, Marina; Gross, Philipp; Taura, Kojiro; Gaebele, Erwin; Hellerbrand, Claus; Falk, Werner

    2008-10-17

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in hepatic fibrogenesis. In injured liver they are the main extracellular matrix protein producing cell type and further perpetuate hepatic injury by secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators. Since LPS-mediated signaling through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been identified as key fibrogenic signal in HSCs we aimed to test TLR4 as potential target of therapy via ligand-binding soluble receptors. Incubation of human HSCs with a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of TLR4 and MD2 which binds LPS inhibited LPS-induced NF{kappa}B and JNK activation. TLR4/MD2 abolished LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8, MCP1, and RANTES in HSCs. In addition, TLR4/MD2 fused to human IgG-Fc neutralized LPS activity. Since TLR4 mutant mice are resistant to liver fibrosis, the TLR4/MD2 soluble receptor might represent a new therapeutic molecule for liver fibrogenesis in vivo.

  13. Pro-proliferative and inflammatory signaling converge on FoxO1 transcription factor in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Savai, Rajkumar; Al-Tamari, Hamza M; Sedding, Daniel; Kojonazarov, Baktybek; Muecke, Christian; Teske, Rebecca; Capecchi, Mario R; Weissmann, Norbert; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai

    2014-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by increased proliferation and apoptosis resistance of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors are key regulators of cellular proliferation. Here we show that in pulmonary vessels and PASMCs of human and experimental PH lungs, FoxO1 expression is downregulated and FoxO1 is inactivated via phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion. These findings could be reproduced using ex vivo exposure of PASMCs to growth factors and inflammatory cytokines. Pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in smooth muscle cells reproduced PH features in vitro and in vivo. Either pharmacological reconstitution of FoxO1 activity using intravenous or inhaled paclitaxel, or reconstitution of the transcriptional activity of FoxO1 by gene therapy, restored the physiologically quiescent PASMC phenotype in vitro, linked to changes in cell cycle control and bone morphogenic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) signaling, and reversed vascular remodeling and right-heart hypertrophy in vivo. Thus, PASMC FoxO1 is a critical integrator of multiple signaling pathways driving PH, and reconstitution of FoxO1 activity offers a potential therapeutic option for PH.

  14. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide regulates inflammatory response by activating the ERK pathway in polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huili; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Bhatia, Madhav

    2008-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) up-regulates inflammatory response in several inflammatory diseases. However, to date, little is known about the molecular mechanism by which H(2)S provokes the inflammatory response in sepsis. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathway underlying the proinflammatory role of H(2)S in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis. Male Swiss mice were subjected to CLP and treated with dl-propargylglycine (PAG; 50 mg/kg i.p., an inhibitor of H(2)S formation), NaHS (10 mg/kg, i.p., an H(2)S donor), or saline. PAG was administered 1 h before CLP, whereas NaHS was given at the time of CLP. CLP-induced sepsis resulted in a time-dependent increase in the synthesis of endogenous H(2)S. Maximum phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and degradation of IkappaBalpha in lung and liver were observed 4 h after CLP. Inhibition of H(2)S formation by PAG significantly reduced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in lung and liver 4 h after CLP, coupled with decreased degradation of IkappaBalpha and activation of NF-kappaB. In contrast, injection of NaHS significantly enhanced the activation of ERK1/2 in lung and liver, therefore leading to a further rise in tissue NF-kappaB activity. As a result, pretreatment with PAG significantly reduced the production of cytokines and chemokines in sepsis, whereas exogenous H(2)S greatly increased it. In addition, pretreatment with PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK kinase (MEK-1), significantly prevented NaHS from aggravating systemic inflammation in sepsis. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that H(2)S may regulate systemic inflammatory response in sepsis via ERK pathway.

  15. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Ficus carica Linn. leaves.

    PubMed

    Ali, B; Mujeeb, M; Aeri, V; Mir, S R; Faiyazuddin, M; Shakeel, F

    2012-01-01

    Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) is commonly known as edible fig. The leaves, roots, fruits and latex of the plant are medicinally used in different diseases. The leaves are claimed to be effective in various inflammatory conditions like painful or swollen piles, insect sting and bites. However, there has been no report on anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of F. carica leaves. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of F. carica leaves. Our study validated the traditional claim with pharmacological data. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of the drug could be due to the presence of steroids and flavanoids, respectively, which are reported to be present in the drug. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory activity of the drug could be due to its free radical scavenging activity. Further work is also required to isolate and characterise the active constituents responsible for the anti-inflammatory activities.

  16. Protein Processing and Inflammatory Signaling in Cystic Fibrosis: Challenges and Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, C.N.; Vij, N.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that regulates epithelial surface fluid secretion in respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. The deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) in CFTR is the most common mutation that results in a temperature sensitive folding defect, retention of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. ER associated degradation (ERAD) is a major quality control pathway of the cell. The majority (99%) of the protein folding, ΔF508-, mutant of CFTR is known to be degraded by this pathway to cause CF. Recent studies have revealed that inhibition of ΔF508-CFTR ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation can increase its cell surface expression and may provide an approach to treat CF. The finely tuned balance of ER membrane interactions determine the cytosolic fate of newly synthesized CFTR. These ER membrane interactions induce ubiquitination and proteasomal targeting of ΔF508- over wild type- CFTR. We discuss here challenges and therapeutic strategies targeting protein processing of ΔF508-CFTR with the goal of rescuing functional ΔF508-CFTR to the cell surface. It is evident from recent studies that CFTR plays a critical role in inflammatory response in addition to its well-described ion transport function. Previous studies in CF have focused only on improving chloride efflux as a marker for promising treatment. We propose that methods quantifying the therapeutic efficacy and recovery from CF should not include only changes in chloride efflux, but also recovery of the chronic inflammatory signaling, as evidenced by positive changes in inflammatory markers (in vitro and ex vivo), lung function (pulmonary function tests, PFT), and chronic lung disease (state of the art molecular imaging, in vivo). This will provide novel therapeutics with greater opportunities of potentially

  17. The TSC-mTOR signaling pathway regulates the innate inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Weichhart, Thomas; Costantino, Giuseppina; Poglitsch, Marko; Rosner, Margit; Zeyda, Maximilian; Stuhlmeier, Karl M; Kolbe, Thomas; Stulnig, Thomas M; Hörl, Walter H; Hengstschläger, Markus; Müller, Mathias; Säemann, Marcus D

    2008-10-17

    The innate inflammatory immune response must be tightly controlled to avoid damage to the host. Here, we showed that the tuberous sclerosis complex-mammalian target of rapamycin (TSC-mTOR) pathway regulated inflammatory responses after bacterial stimulation in monocytes, macrophages, and primary dendritic cells. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin promoted production of proinflammatory cytokines via the transcription factor NF-kappaB but blocked the release of interleukin-10 via the transcription factor STAT3. Conversely, deletion of TSC2, the key negative regulator of mTOR, diminished NF-kappaB but enhanced STAT3 activity and reversed this proinflammatory cytokine shift. Rapamycin-hyperactivated monocytes displayed a strong T helper 1 (Th1) cell- and Th17 cell-polarizing potency. Inhibition of mTOR in vivo regulated the inflammatory response and protected genetically susceptible mice against lethal Listeria monocytogenes infection. These data identify the TSC2-mTOR pathway as a key regulator of innate immune homeostasis with broad clinical implications for infectious and autoimmune diseases, vaccination, cancer, and transplantation.

  18. Purinergic signaling modulates human visceral adipose inflammatory responses: implications in metabolically unhealthy obesity.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, J; Ferraro, A; Lerner, M; Serrano, J R; Dueck, A; Fainboim, L; Arruvito, L

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is accompanied by chronic inflammation of VAT, which promotes metabolic changes, and purinergic signaling has a key role in a wide range of inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we addressed whether fat inflammation could be differentially modulated by this signaling pathway in the MUO and in individuals who remain MHO. Our results show that the necrotized VAT of both groups released greater levels of ATP compared with lean donors. Interestingly, MUO tissue SVCs showed up-regulation and engagement of the purinergic P2X7R. The extracellular ATP concentration is regulated by an enzymatic process, in which CD39 converts ATP and ADP into AMP, and CD73 converts AMP into adenosine. In VAT, the CD73 ectoenzyme was widely distributed in immune and nonimmune cells, whereas CD39 expression was restricted to immune CD45PAN(+) SVCs. Although the MUO group expressed the highest levels of both ectoenzymes, no difference in ATP hydrolysis capacity was found between the groups. As expected, MUO exhibited the highest NLRP3 inflammasome expression and IL-1β production. MUO SVCs also displayed up-regulation of the A2AR, allowing extracellular adenosine to increase IL-1β local secretion. Additionally, we demonstrate that metabolic parameters and BMI are positively correlated with purinergic components in VAT. These findings indicate that purinergic signaling is a novel mechanism involved in the chronic inflammation of VAT underlying the metabolic changes in obesity. Finally, our study reveals a proinflammatory role for adenosine in sustaining IL-1β production in this tissue.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effect of Yu-Ping-Feng-San via TGF-β1 signaling suppression in rat model of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhong-Shan; Yan, Jin-Yuan; Han, Ni-Ping; Zhou, Wei; Cheng, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Li, Ning; Yuan, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Yu-Ping-Feng-San (YPFS) is a classical traditional Chinese medicine that is widely used for treatment of the diseases in respiratory systems, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recognized as chronic inflammatory disease. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we detected the factors involved in transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)/Smad2 signaling pathway and inflammatory cytokines, to clarify whether YPFS could attenuate inflammatory response dependent on TGF-β1/Smad2 signaling in COPD rats or cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-treated human bronchial epithelial (Beas-2B) cells. Materials and Methods: The COPD rat model was established by exposure to cigarette smoke and intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide, YPFS was administered to the animals. The efficacy of YPFS was evaluated by comparing the severity of pulmonary pathological damage, pro-inflammation cytokines, collagen related genes and the activation of TGF-β1/Smad2 signaling pathway. Furthermore, CSE-treated cells were employed to confirm whether the effect of YPFS was dependent on the TGF-β1/Smad2 signaling via knockdown Smad2 (Si-RNA), or pretreatment with the inhibitor of TGF-β1. Results: Administration of YPFS effectively alleviated injury of lung, suppressed releasing of pro-inflammatory cytokines and collagen deposition in COPD animals (P<0.05), whereas exogenous TGF-β1 promoted releasing of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα (P<0.05). Administration YPFS reduced inflammatory response significantly, also down-regulated TGF-β1/Smad2 signaling in vivo and in vitro. Unexpectedly, knockdown Smad2 or inhibition of TGF-β1 abolished anti-inflammatory effect of YPFS in CSE-treated cells. Conclusion: YPFS accomplished anti-inflammatory effects mainly by suppressing phosphorylation of Smad2, TGF-β1/Smad2 signaling pathway was required for YPFS-mediated anti-inflammation in COPD rats or CSE-treated Beas-2B cells. PMID:27803787

  20. Linking estrogen receptor β expression with inflammatory bowel disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Varano, Barbara; Barbati, Cristiana; Cesaro, Paola; Spada, Cristiano; Zullo, Angelo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Rosati, Marco; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Limiti, Maria Rosaria; Guidi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) whose pathogenesis is only poorly understood. Estrogens have a complex role in inflammation and growing evidence suggests that these hormones may impact IBD pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of estrogen receptor (ER)β expression in peripheral blood T lymphocytes from CD/UC patients with active disease (n = 27) as compared to those in remission (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 29). Accordingly, in a subgroup of CD/UC patients undergoing to anti-TNF-α therapy and responsive to treatment, ERβ expression was higher (p < 0.01) than that observed in not responsive patients and comparable to that of control subjects. Notably, ERβ expression was markedly decreased in colonic mucosa of CD/UC patients with active disease, reflecting the alterations observed in peripheral blood T cells. ERβ expression inversely correlated with interleukin (IL)-6 serum levels and exogenous exposure of both T lymphocytes and intestinal epithelial cells to this cytokine resulted in ERβ downregulation. These results demonstrate that the ER profile is altered in active IBD patients at both mucosal and systemic levels, at least in part due to IL-6 dysregulation, and highlight the potential exploitation of T cell-associated ERβ as a biomarker of endoscopic disease activity. PMID:26497217

  1. Src kinase-targeted anti-inflammatory activity of davallialactone from Inonotus xeranticus in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y G; Lee, W M; Kim, J Y; Lee, J Y; Lee, I-K; Yun, B-S; Rhee, M H; Cho, J Y

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mushrooms are popular both as food and as a source of natural compounds of biopharmaceutical interest. Some mushroom-derived compounds such as β-glucan have been shown to be immunostimulatory; this study explores the anti-inflammatory properties of hispidin analogues derived from the mushroom, Inonotus xeranticus. We sought to identify the molecular mechanism of action of these hispidin analogues by determining their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammatory responses in a macrophage cell line. Experimental approach: The production of inflammatory mediators was determined by Griess assay, reverse transcription-PCR and ELISA. The inhibitory effect of davalliactone on LPS-induced activation of signalling cascades was assessed by western blotting, immunoprecipitation and direct kinase assay. Key results: In activated RAW264.7 cells, davallialactone strongly downregulated LPS-mediated inflammatory responses, including NO production, prostaglandin E2 release, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cell surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Davallialactone treatment did not alter cell viability or morphology. Davallialactone was found to exert its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting a signalling cascade that activates nuclear factor kappa B via PI3K, Akt and IKK, but not mitogen-activated protein kinases. Treatment with davallialactone affected the phosphorylation of these signalling proteins, but not their level of expression. These inhibitory effects were not due to the interruption of toll-like receptor 4 binding to CD14. In particular, davallialactone strongly inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation and kinase activity of Src, implying that Src may be a potential pharmacological target of davallialactone. Conclusions and implications: Our data suggest that davallialactone, a small molecule found in edible mushrooms, has anti-inflammatory activity. Davallialactone can be developed as a pharmaceutically

  2. Inflammatory transcription factors as activation markers and functional readouts in immune-to-brain communication.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Immune-to-brain communication pathways involve humoral mediators, including cytokines, central modulation by neuronal afferents and immune cell trafficking to the brain. During systemic inflammation these pathways contribute to mediating brain-controlled sickness symptoms including fever. Experimentally, activation of these signaling pathways can be mimicked and studied when injecting animals with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPS). One central component of the brain inflammatory response, which leads, for example, to fever induction, is transcriptional activation of brain cells via cytokines and PAMPS. We and others have studied the spatiotemporal activation and the physiological significance of transcription factors for the induction of inflammation within the brain and the manifestation of fever. Evidence has revealed a role of nuclear factor (NF)κB in the initiation, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 in the maintenance and NF-interleukin (IL)6 in the maintenance or even termination of brain-inflammation and fever. Moreover, psychological stressors, such as exposure to a novel environment, leads to increased body core temperature and genomic NF-IL6-activation, suggesting a potential use of NF-IL6-immunohistochemistry as a multimodal brain cell activation marker and a role for NF-IL6 for differential brain activity. In addition, the nutritional status, as reflected by circulating levels of the cytokine-like hormone leptin, influence immune-to-brain communication and age-dependent changes in LPS-induced fever. Overall, transcription factors remain therapeutically important targets for the treatment of brain-inflammation and fever induction during infectious/non-infectious inflammatory and psychological stress. However, the exact physiological role and significance of these transcription factors requires to be further investigated.

  3. Role of Inflammatory Signaling in the Differential Effects of Saturated and Poly-unsaturated Fatty Acids on Peripheral Circadian Clocks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sam-Moon; Neuendorff, Nichole; Chapkin, Robert S; Earnest, David J

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory signaling may play a role in high-fat diet (HFD)-related circadian clock disturbances that contribute to systemic metabolic dysregulation. Therefore, palmitate, the prevalent proinflammatory saturated fatty acid (SFA) in HFD and the anti-inflammatory, poly-unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), were analyzed for effects on circadian timekeeping and inflammatory responses in peripheral clocks. Prolonged palmitate, but not DHA, exposure increased the period of fibroblast Bmal1-dLuc rhythms. Acute palmitate treatment produced phase shifts of the Bmal1-dLuc rhythm that were larger in amplitude as compared to DHA. These phase-shifting effects were time-dependent and contemporaneous with rhythmic changes in palmitate-induced inflammatory responses. Fibroblast and differentiated adipocyte clocks exhibited cell-specific differences in the time-dependent nature of palmitate-induced shifts and inflammation. DHA and other inhibitors of inflammatory signaling (AICAR, cardamonin) repressed palmitate-induced proinflammatory responses and phase shifts of the fibroblast clock, suggesting that SFA-mediated inflammatory signaling may feed back to modulate circadian timekeeping in peripheral clocks.

  4. Adenosine A1-Receptors Modulate mTOR Signaling to Regulate White Matter Inflammatory Lesions Induced by Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Zuo, Xuzheng; Ren, Yifei; Bai, Shunjie; Tang, Weiju; Chen, Xiuying; Wang, Gong; Wang, Haoxiang; Huang, Wen; Xie, Peng

    2016-12-01

    We sought to investigate the role of the adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) in white matter lesions under chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and explore the potential repair mechanisms by activation of the receptors. A right unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (rUCCAO) method was used to construct a CCH model. 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a specific agonist of A1ARs, was used to explore the biological mechanisms of repair in white matter lesions under CCH. The expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphorylation of mTOR (P-mTOR), myelin basic protein (MBP, a marker of white matter myelination) were detected by Western-blot. Pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels were determined by ELISA. Compared with the control groups on week 2, 4 and 6, in CCPA-treated groups, the ratio of P-mTOR/mTOR, expression of MBP and IL-10 increased markedly, while the expression of TNF-α reduced at week 6. In conclusion, A1ARs appears to reduce inflammation in white matter via the mTOR signaling pathway in the rUCCAO mice. Therefore, A1ARs may serve as a therapeutic target during the repair of white matter lesions under CCH.

  5. Polarization dictates iron handling by inflammatory and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Corna, Gianfranca; Campana, Lara; Pignatti, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Alessandra; Tagliafico, Enrico; Bosurgi, Lidia; Campanella, Alessandro; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Apostoli, Pietro; Silvestri, Laura; Camaschella, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a key role in iron homeostasis. In peripheral tissues, they are known to polarize into classically activated (or M1) macrophages and alternatively activated (or M2) macrophages. Little is known on whether the polarization program influences the ability of macrophages to store or recycle iron and the molecular machinery involved in the processes. Design and Methods Inflammatory/M1 and alternatively activated/M2 macrophages were propagated in vitro from mouse bone-marrow precursors and polarized in the presence of recombinant interferon-γ or interleukin-4. We characterized and compared their ability to handle radioactive iron, the characteristics of the intracellular iron pools and the expression of molecules involved in internalization, storage and export of the metal. Moreover we verified the influence of iron on the relative ability of polarized macrophages to activate antigen-specific T cells. Results M1 macrophages have low iron regulatory protein 1 and 2 binding activity, express high levels of ferritin H, low levels of transferrin receptor 1 and internalize – albeit with low efficiency -iron only when its extracellular concentration is high. In contrast, M2 macrophages have high iron regulatory protein binding activity, express low levels of ferritin H and high levels of transferrin receptor 1. M2 macrophages have a larger intracellular labile iron pool, effectively take up and spontaneously release iron at low concentrations and have limited storage ability. Iron export correlates with the expression of ferroportin, which is higher in M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells activate antigen-specific, MHC class II-restricted T cells. In the absence of the metal, only M1 macrophages are effective. Conclusions Cytokines that drive macrophage polarization ultimately control iron handling, leading to the differentiation of macrophages into a subset which has a relatively sealed intracellular iron content (M1) or into a subset endowed with

  6. Type I interferon signaling regulates the composition of inflammatory infiltrates upon infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Brzoza-Lewis, Kristina L.; Hoth, J. Jason; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Type I IFN is key to the immune response to viral pathogens, however its role in bacterial infections is less well understood. Mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR−/−) demonstrate enhanced resistance to infection with Listeria monocytogenes. We have now determined that following infection with Listeria, the composition of innate cells recruited to the peritoneal cavity of IFNAR−/− mice reflects an increase in the frequency of neutrophils and a decrease in monocyte frequency compared to WT controls. These differences in inflammatory infiltrates could not be attributed to distinct bone marrow composition prior to infection or to level of apoptosis. We also observed no differences in neutrophil oxidative burst. However, blocking CXCR2 prevented enhanced neutrophil influx and hampered bacterial clearance. Taken together, these studies highlight a novel mechanism by which type I interferon signaling regulates the immune response to Listeria, through negative regulation of chemokines driving neutrophil recruitment. PMID:22212606

  7. Phosphatidic acid signaling mediates lung cytokine expression and lung inflammatory injury after hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Bursten, S; Shenkar, R; Allbee, J; Tuder, R; Woodson, P; Guidot, D M; Rice, G; Singer, J W; Repine, J E

    1995-02-01

    Because phosphatidic acid (PA) pathway signaling may mediate many basic reactions involving cytokine-dependent responses, we investigated the effects of CT1501R, a functional inhibitor of the enzyme lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) which converts lysophosphatidic acid (Lyso-PA) to PA. We found that CT1501R treatment not only prevented hypoxia-induced PA increases and lyso-PA consumption in human neutrophils, but also prevented neutrophil chemotaxis and adherence in vitro, and lung injury and lung neutrophil accumulation in mice subjected to hemorrhage and resuscitation. In addition, CT1501R treatment prevented increases in mRNA levels and protein production of a variety of proinflammatory cytokines in multiple lung cell populations after blood loss and resuscitation. Our results indicate the fundamental role of PA metabolism in the development of acute inflammatory lung injury after blood loss.

  8. Pivotal Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Inflammatory Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Wang, Gang; Ye, Richard D.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) is exclusively regulated by p38 MAPK in vivo. Upon activation of p38 MAPK, MK2 binds with p38 MAPK, leading to phosphorylation of TTP, Hsp27, Akt and Cdc25 that are involved in regulation of various essential cellular functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of MK2 in regulation of TNF-α production, NADPH oxidase activation, neutrophil migration, and DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest which are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and non-small-cell lung cancer. Collectively current and emerging new information indicate that developing MK2 inhibitors and blocking MK2-mediated signal pathways is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases and lung cancer. PMID:26119506

  9. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators contributes to the anti-inflammatory activity of KYKZL-1 via MAPK and NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Lin; Du, Yi-Fang; Cheng, Jing; Huan, Lin; Chen, Shi-Cui; Wei, Shao-Hua; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Ao, Gui-Zhen

    2013-10-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the anti-inflammatory activity test focusing on its modulation of inflammatory mediators as well as intracellular MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In acute ear edema model, pretreatment with KYKZL-1 (p.o.) dose-dependently inhibited the xylene-induced ear edema in mice with a higher inhibition than diclofenac. In a three-day TPA-induced inflammation, KYKZL-1 also showed significant anti-inflammatory activity with inhibition ranging between 20% and 64%. In gastric lesion test, KYKZL-1 elicited markedly fewer stomach lesions with a low index of ulcer as compared to diclofenac in rats. In further studies, KYKZL-1 was found to significantly inhibit the production of NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} in LPS challenged RAW264.7, which is parallel to its attenuation of the expression of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX mRNAs or proteins and inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. Taken together, our data indicate that KYKZL-1 comprises dual inhibition of COX and 5-LOX and exerts an obvious anti-inflammatory activity with an enhanced gastric safety profile via simultaneous inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 inhibits NO, PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} and iNOS, COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNAs and MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inhibits phosphorylation of MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inactivates NF-κB pathway.

  10. BZ-26, a novel GW9662 derivate, attenuated inflammation by inhibiting the differentiation and activation of inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bei, Yuncheng; Chen, Jiajia; Zhou, Feifei; Huang, Yahong; Jiang, Nan; Tan, Renxiang; Shen, Pingping

    2016-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is considered to be an important transcriptional factor in regulation of macrophages differentiation and activation. We have synthesized a series of novel structural molecules based on GW9662's structure (named BZ-24, BZ-25 and BZ-26), and interaction activity was calculated by computational docking. BZ-26 had shown stronger interaction with PPARγ and had higher transcriptional inhibitory activity of PPARγ with lower dosage compared with GW9662. BZ-26 was proved to inhibit inflammatory macrophage differentiation. LPS-induced acute inflammation mouse model was applied to demonstrate its anti-inflammatory activity. And the results showed that BZ-26 administration attenuated plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion, which are vital cytokines in acute inflammation. The anti-inflammatory activity was examined in THP-1 cell line, and TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1, were significantly inhibited. The results of Western blot and luciferase reporter assay indicated that BZ-26 not only inhibited NF-κB transcriptional activity, but also abolished LPS-induce nuclear translocation of P65. We also test BZ-26 action in tumor-bearing chronic inflammation mouse model, and BZ-26 was able to alter macrophages phenotype, resulting in antitumor effect. All our data revealed that BZ-26 modulated LPS-induced acute inflammation via inhibiting inflammatory macrophages differentiation and activation, potentially via inhibition of NF-κB signal pathway.

  11. Peripheral inflammatory disease associated with centrally activated IL-1 system in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Lampa, Jon; Westman, Marie; Kadetoff, Diana; Agréus, Anna Nordenstedt; Le Maître, Erwan; Gillis-Haegerstrand, Caroline; Andersson, Magnus; Khademi, Mohsen; Corr, Maripat; Christianson, Christina A; Delaney, Ada; Yaksh, Tony L; Kosek, Eva; Svensson, Camilla I

    2012-07-31

    During peripheral immune activation caused by an infection or an inflammatory condition, the innate immune response signals to the brain and causes an up-regulation of central nervous system (CNS) cytokine production. Central actions of proinflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-1β, are pivotal for the induction of fever and fatigue. In the present study, the influence of peripheral chronic joint inflammatory disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on CNS inflammation was investigated. Intrathecal interleukin (IL)-1β concentrations were markedly elevated in RA patients compared with controls or with patients with multiple sclerosis. Conversely, the anti-inflammatory IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-4 were decreased in RA cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 levels in the CSF did not differ between patients and controls. Concerning IL-1β, CSF concentrations in RA patients were higher than in serum, indicating local production in the CNS, and there was a positive correlation between CSF IL-1β and fatigue assessments. Next, spinal inflammation in experimental arthritis was investigated. A marked increase of IL-1β, IL-18, and tumor necrosis factor, but not IL-6 mRNA production, in the spinal cord was observed, coinciding with increased arthritis scores in the KBxN serum transfer model. These data provide evidence that peripheral inflammation such as arthritis is associated with an immunological activation in the CNS in both humans and mice, suggesting a possible therapeutic target for centrally affecting conditions as fatigue in chronic inflammatory diseases, for which to date there are no specific treatments.

  12. Vegetable oil induced inflammatory response by altering TLR-NF-κB signalling, macrophages infiltration and polarization in adipose tissue of large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Tan, Peng; Dong, Xiaojing; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-12-01

    High level of vegetable oil (VO) in diets could induce strong inflammatory response, and thus decrease nonspecific immunity and disease resistance in most marine fish species. The present study was conducted to investigate whether dietary VO could exert these anti-immunological effects by altering TLR-NF-κB signalling, macrophages infiltration and polarization in adipose tissue of large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). Three iso-nitrogenous and iso-lipid diets with 0% (FO, fish oil, the control), 50% (FV, fish oil and vegetable oil mixed) and 100% (VO, vegetable oil) vegetable oil were fed to fish with three replicates for ten weeks. The results showed that activities of respiratory burst (RB) and alternative complement pathway (ACP), as well as disease resistance after immune challenge were significantly decreased in large yellow croaker fed VO diets compared to FO diets. Inflammatory response of experimental fish was markedly elevated by VO reflected by increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1β and TNFα) and decrease of anti-inflammatory cytokine (arginase I and IL10) genes expression. TLR-related genes expression, nucleus p65 protein, IKKα/β and IκBα phosphorylation were all significantly increased in the AT of large yellow croaker fed VO diets. Moreover, the expression of macrophage infiltration marker proteins (cluster of differentiation 68 [CD68] and colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor [CSF1R]) was significantly increased while the expression of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage polarization marker proteins (macrophage mannose receptor 1 [MRC1] and cluster of differentiation 209 [CD209]) was significantly decreased in the AT of large yellow croaker fed VO diets. In conclusion, VO could induce inflammatory responses by activating TLR-NF-κB signalling, increasing macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and polarization of macrophage in large yellow croaker.

  13. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs modulate cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesis by affecting EGFR and PI3K signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mozolewski, Paweł; Moskot, Marta; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Bocheńska, Katarzyna; Banecki, Bogdan; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    In this report, selected non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), indomethacin and nimesulide, and analgesics acetaminophen, alone, as well as in combination with isoflavone genistein as potential glycosaminoglycan (GAG) metabolism modulators were considered for the treatment of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) with neurological symptoms due to the effective blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration properties of these compounds. We found that indomethacin and nimesulide, but not acetaminophen, inhibited GAG synthesis in fibroblasts significantly, while the most pronounced impairment of glycosaminoglycan production was observed after exposure to the mixture of nimesulide and genistein. Phosphorylation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) was inhibited even more effective in the presence of indomethacin and nimesulide than in the presence of genistein. When examined the activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) production, we observed its most significant decrease in the case of fibroblast exposition to nimesulide, and afterwards to indomethacin and genistein mix, rather than indomethacin used alone. Some effects on expression of individual GAG metabolism-related and lysosomal function genes, and significant activity modulation of a number of genes involved in intracellular signal transduction pathways and metabolism of DNA and proteins were detected. This study documents that NSAIDs, and their mixtures with genistein modulate cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesis by affecting EGFR and PI3K signaling pathways. PMID:28240227

  14. Antihypernociceptive activity of anethole in experimental inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alessandra M V; Domiciano, Talita P; Verri, Waldiceu A; Zarpelon, Ana Carla; da Silva, Lorena G; Barbosa, Carmem P; Natali, Maria Raquel M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2013-04-01

    Anethole has been reported to have antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, antiinflammatory, and anesthetic properties. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of anethole in two pain models of inflammatory origin: acute inflammation induced by carrageenan and persistent inflammation induced by Complete Freund's adjuvant. We evaluated the effects of anethole (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) on the development of paw oedema and mechanical hypernociception. The liver was collected for histological analysis. Paw skin was collected to determine the levels of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-17 (IL-17), and myeloperoxidase activity. Blood was collected to assess alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). The chemical composition of star anise oil was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), showing a presence of anethole of 98.1%. Oral pretreatment with anethole in mice inhibited paw oedema, mechanical pernociception, myelopewroxidase activity, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-17 levels in acute and persistent inflammation models. Additionally, anethole treatment did not alter prostaglandin E2-induced mechanical hypernociception. Possible side effects were also examined. Seven-day anethole treatment did not alter plasma AST and ALT levels, and the histological profile of liver tissue was normal. The present study provides evidence of the antiinflammatory and analgesic activities of anethole in acute and persistent inflammation models.

  15. Inflammatory bowel diseases activity in patients undergoing pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seisen, Thomas; Klotz, Caroline; Mazeron, Renaud; Maroun, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Deutsch, Eric; Bossi, Alberto; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus; Blanchard, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies with contradictory results have been published on the safety of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods From 1989 to 2015, a single center retrospective analysis was performed including all IBD patients who received pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT) for a pelvic malignancy. Treatment characteristics, IBD activity and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were examined. Results Overall, 28 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) (n=13) or ulcerative colitis (n=15) were included in the present study. Median follow-up time after irradiation was 5.9 years. Regarding IBD activity, only one and two patients experienced a severe episode within and after 6 months of follow-up, respectively. Grade 3/4 acute GI toxicity occurred in 3 (11%) patients, whereas one (3.6%) patient experienced late grade 3/4 GI toxicity. Only patients with rectal IBD location (P=0.016) or low body mass index (BMI) (P=0.012) experienced more severe IBD activity within or after 6 months following RT, respectively. Conclusions We report an acceptable tolerance of RT in IBD patients with pelvic malignancies. Specifically, a low risk of uncontrolled flare-up was observed. PMID:28280621

  16. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of pinda thailam, a herbal gel formulation.

    PubMed

    Periyanayagam, K; Venkatarathnakumar, T; Nagaveni, A; Subitha, V G; Sundari, P; Vaijorohini, M; Umamaheswari, V

    2004-07-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the topical anti-inflammatory activity of "Pinda thailam", a herbal gel formulation containing aqueous extract of roots of Rubia cordifolia (Rubiaceae) and Hemidesmus indicus (Asclepiadaceae) which are known for their anti-inflammatory activity using the technique of carrageenin induced paw oedema in albino rats. The herbal gel formulation showed significant anti-inflammatory activity comparable to the reference standard Diclofenac sodium gel.

  17. Theophylline Regulates Inflammatory and Neurotrophic factor Signals in Functional Recovery after C2-Hemisection in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, LP; Devi, TS; Nantwi, KD

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of respiratory activity in an upper cervical hemisection model (C2H) of spinal cord injury (SCI) can be induced by systemic theophylline administration 24–48 h after injury. The objectives in the present study are (1) to identify pro-inflammatory and neurotrophic factors expressed after C2H and (2) molecular signals involved in functional recovery. Four groups of adult female rats classified as (i) sham (SH) controls, (ii) subjected to a left C2 hemisection (C2H) only, (iii) C2H rats administered theophylline for 3 consecutive days 2 days after C2H (C2H-T Day 5) and (iv) C2H rats treated with theophylline for 3 consecutive days 2 days after C2H and then weaned for 12 days (C2H-T Day 17) prior to assessment of respiratory function and molecular analysis were employed. Corresponding Sham controls, C2H untreated (vehicle only controls) and C2H treated (theophylline) rats were sacrificed, C3-C6 spinal cord segments quickly dissected and left (ipsilateral) hemi spinal cord and right (contralateral) hemi spinal cord were separately harvested 2 days post surgery. SHAM operated and C2H untreated-controls corresponding to C2H-T Day 5 and C2H-T Day 17 rats, respectively, were prepared similarly. Messenger RNA levels for pro-inflammatory genes (TXNIP, IL-1β, TNF-α and iNOS) and neurotrophic and survival factors (BDNF, GDNF, and Bcl2) were analyzed by real time quantitative PCR. Gene expression pattern was unaltered in SH rats. TXNIP, iNOS, BDNF, GDNF and Bcl2 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the ipsilateral hemi spinal cord in C2H rats. BDNF, GDNF and Bcl2 levels remained elevated in the ipsilateral hemi spinal cord in C2H-T Day 5 rats. In this same group, there was further enhancement in TXNIP and IL-1β while iNOS returned to basal levels. Theophylline increased DNA binding activity of transcription factors - cyclic AMP responsive element (CRE) binding protein (CREB) and pro-inflammatory NF-κB. Messenger RNA levels for all genes returned to basal

  18. Anticancer and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Standardized Dichloromethane Extract from Piper umbellatum L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Leilane Hespporte; Vendramini-Costa, Débora Barbosa; Monteiro, Paula Araújo; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Gois; Sousa, Ilza Maria de Oliveira; Foglio, Mary Ann; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in anticancer drug discovery field, the worldwide cancer incidence is remarkable, highlighting the need for new therapies focusing on both cancer cell and its microenvironment. The tumor microenvironment offers multiple targets for cancer therapy, including inflammation. Nowadays, almost 75% of the anticancer agents used in chemotherapy are derived from natural products, and plants are an important source of new promising therapies. Continuing our research on Piper umbellatum species, here we describe the anticancer (in vitro antiproliferative activity and in vivo Ehrlich solid tumor model) and anti-inflammatory (carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis models) activities of a standardized dichloromethane extract (SDE) from P. umbellatum leaves, containing 23.9% of 4-nerolidylcatechol. SDE showed in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity, reducing Ehrlich solid tumor growth by 38.7 and 52.2% when doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively, were administered daily by oral route. Daily treatments did not produce signals of toxicity. SDE also reduced paw edema and leukocyte migration on carrageenan-induced inflammation models, suggesting that the anticancer activity of SDE from Piper umbellatum leaves could involve antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects. These findings highlight P. umbellatum as a source of compounds against cancer and inflammation. PMID:25713595

  19. Anticancer and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Standardized Dichloromethane Extract from Piper umbellatum L. Leaves.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Leilane Hespporte; Vendramini-Costa, Débora Barbosa; Monteiro, Paula Araújo; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Gois; Sousa, Ilza Maria de Oliveira; Foglio, Mary Ann; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in anticancer drug discovery field, the worldwide cancer incidence is remarkable, highlighting the need for new therapies focusing on both cancer cell and its microenvironment. The tumor microenvironment offers multiple targets for cancer therapy, including inflammation. Nowadays, almost 75% of the anticancer agents used in chemotherapy are derived from natural products, and plants are an important source of new promising therapies. Continuing our research on Piper umbellatum species, here we describe the anticancer (in vitro antiproliferative activity and in vivo Ehrlich solid tumor model) and anti-inflammatory (carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis models) activities of a standardized dichloromethane extract (SDE) from P. umbellatum leaves, containing 23.9% of 4-nerolidylcatechol. SDE showed in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity, reducing Ehrlich solid tumor growth by 38.7 and 52.2% when doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively, were administered daily by oral route. Daily treatments did not produce signals of toxicity. SDE also reduced paw edema and leukocyte migration on carrageenan-induced inflammation models, suggesting that the anticancer activity of SDE from Piper umbellatum leaves could involve antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects. These findings highlight P. umbellatum as a source of compounds against cancer and inflammation.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecule homoserine lactone modulates inflammatory signaling through PERK and eI-F2α.

    PubMed

    Grabiner, Mark A; Fu, Zhu; Wu, Tara; Barry, Kevin C; Schwarzer, Christian; Machen, Terry E

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secrete N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (HSL-C12) as a quorum-sensing molecule to regulate bacterial gene expression. Because HSL-C12 is membrane permeant, multiple cell types in P. aeruginosa-infected airways may be exposed to HSL-C12, especially adjacent to biofilms where local (HSL-C12) may be high. Previous reports showed that HSL-C12 causes both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. To characterize HSL-C12's pro- and anti-inflammatory effects in host cells, we measured protein synthesis, NF-κB activation, and KC (mouse IL-8) and IL-6 mRNA and protein secretion in wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). To test the role of the endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer, PERK we compared these responses in PERK(-/-) and PERK-corrected PERK(-/-) MEF. During 4-h treatments of wild-type MEF, HSL-C12 potentially activated NF-κB p65 by preventing the resynthesis of IκB and increased transcription of KC and IL-6 genes (quantitative PCR). HSL-C12 also inhibited secretion of KC and/or IL-6 into the media (ELISA) both in control conditions and also during stimulation by TNF-α. HSL-C12 also activated PERK (as shown by increased phosphorylation of eI-F2α) and inhibited protein synthesis (as measured by incorporation of [(35)S]methionine by MEF). Comparisons of PERK(-/-) and PERK-corrected MEF showed that HSL-C12's effects were explained in part by activation of PERK→phosphorylation of eI-F2α→inhibition of protein synthesis→reduced IκBα production→activation of NF-κB→increased transcription of the KC gene but reduced translation and secretion of KC. HSL-C12 may be an important modulator of early (up to 4 h) inflammatory signaling in P. aeruginosa infections.

  1. Hydrocortisone supresses inflammatory activity of metalloproteinase - 8 in carotid plaque

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Sthefano Atique; Antonangelo, Leila; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Beteli, Camila Baumann; de Camargo Júnior, Otacílio; de Aquino, José Luis Braga; Caffaro, Roberto Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Matrix metalloproteinases are inflammatory biomarkers involved in carotid plaque instability. Our objective was to analyze the inflammatory activity of plasma and carotid plaque MMP-8 and MMP-9 after intravenous administration of hydrocortisone. Methods The study included 22 patients with stenosis ≥ 70% in the carotid artery (11 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic) who underwent carotid endarterectomy. The patients were divided into two groups: Control Group - hydrocortisone was not administered, and Group 1 - 500 mg intravenous hydrocortisone was administered during anesthetic induction. Plasma levels of MMP-8 and MMP-9 were measured preoperatively (24 hours before carotid endarterectomy) and at 1 hour, 6 hours and 24 hours after carotid endarterectomy. In carotid plaque, tissue levels of MMP-8 and MMP-9 were measured. Results Group 1 showed increased serum levels of MMP- 8 (994.28 pg/ml and 408.54 pg/ml, respectively; P=0.045) and MMP-9 (106,656.34 and 42,807.69 respectively; P=0.014) at 1 hour after carotid endarterectomy compared to the control group. Symptomatic patients in Group 1 exhibited lower tissue concentration of MMP-8 in comparison to the control group (143.89 pg/ml and 1317.36 respectively; P=0.003). There was a correlation between preoperative MMP-9 levels and tissue concentrations of MMP-8 (P=0.042) and MMP-9 (P=0.019) between symptomatic patients in the control group. Conclusion Hydrocortisone reduces the concentration of MMP- 8 in carotid plaque, especially in symptomatic patients. There was an association between systemic and tissue inflammation. PMID:26313719

  2. Oligodendrocyte-specific activation of PERK signaling protects mice against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Lin, Yifeng; Li, Jin; Fenstermaker, Ali G; Way, Sharon W; Clayton, Benjamin; Jamison, Stephanie; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2013-04-03

    There is compelling evidence that oligodendrocyte apoptosis, in response to CNS inflammation, contributes significantly to the development of the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, approaches designed to protect oligodendrocytes would likely have therapeutic value. Activation of pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress increases cell survival under various cytotoxic conditions. Moreover, there is evidence that PERK signaling is activated in oligodendrocytes within demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis and EAE. Our previous study demonstrated that CNS delivery of the inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ before EAE onset protected mice against EAE, and this protection was dependent on PERK signaling. In our current study, we sought to elucidate the role of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes during EAE. We generated transgenic mice that allow for temporally controlled activation of PERK signaling, in the absence of ER stress, specifically in oligodendrocytes. We demonstrated that persistent activation of PERK signaling was not deleterious to oligodendrocyte viability or the myelin of adult animals. Importantly, we found that enhanced activation of PERK signaling specifically in oligodendrocytes significantly attenuated EAE disease severity, which was associated with reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, demyelination, and axonal degeneration. This effect was not the result of an altered degree of the inflammatory response in EAE mice. Our results provide direct evidence that activation of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes is cytoprotective, protecting mice against EAE.

  3. Resveratrol modulates the inflammatory response via an estrogen receptor-signal integration network

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Srinivasan, Sathish; Bruno, Nelson E; Parent, Alexander A; Hughes, Travis S; Pollock, Julie A; Gjyshi, Olsi; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D; Houtman, René; Griffin, Patrick R; Kojetin, Douglas J; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Conkright, Michael D; Nettles, Kendall W

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has beneficial effects on aging, inflammation and metabolism, which are thought to result from activation of the lysine deacetylase, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the cAMP pathway, or AMP-activated protein kinase. In this study, we report that resveratrol acts as a pathway-selective estrogen receptor-α (ERα) ligand to modulate the inflammatory response but not cell proliferation. A crystal structure of the ERα ligand-binding domain (LBD) as a complex with resveratrol revealed a unique perturbation of the coactivator-binding surface, consistent with an altered coregulator recruitment profile. Gene expression analyses revealed significant overlap of TNFα genes modulated by resveratrol and estradiol. Furthermore, the ability of resveratrol to suppress interleukin-6 transcription was shown to require ERα and several ERα coregulators, suggesting that ERα functions as a primary conduit for resveratrol activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02057.001 PMID:24771768

  4. Dexmedetomidine attenuates inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice by activating cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yueping; Wang, Yaoqi; Ning, Qiaoqing; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Chunzhi; Zhao, Wenxiang; Jing, Guangjian; Wang, Qianqian

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Dex) is a highly selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that is widely used for sedation in intensive care units and in clinical anesthesia. Dex has also been shown to possess anti-inflammatory benefits. However, the underlying mechanism by which Dex relieves the inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protective effects and possible mechanism of Dex on the sepsis-induced lung inflammatory response in mice. Sepsis was induced in mice models through the intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The preemptive administration of Dex substantially abated sepsis-induced pulmonary edema, pulmonary histopathological changes, and NF-κB p65 activity. The production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) at both the mRNA and protein levels was also reduced. Moreover, these effects were significantly blocked by the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt). α-Bgt aggravated pulmonary edema and pulmonary histopathological changes, as well as increased NF-κB p65 activity and TNF-α and IL-6 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The overall results demonstrate that Dex inhibits the LPS-induced inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice partly through the α7nAChR-dependent cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  5. Geranyl flavonoid derivatives from the fresh leaves of Artocarpus communis and their anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Lin; Chang, Fang-Rong; Tseng, Pei-Yu; Chen, Yi-Fen; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Du, Ying-Chi; Fang, Song-Chwan

    2012-06-01

    Breadfruit (Artocarpus communis) is a widely distributed crop in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. It is used in Southeast Asia and India to treat several inflammatory disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of anti-inflammatory flavonoids in A. communis leaves. Three new geranyl flavonoids, arcommunol C (1), arcommunol D (3), and 5'-geranyl-3,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxychalcone (5), together with four known compounds, prostratol (2), arcommunol E (4), 3'-geranyl-3,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxydihydrochalcone (6), and 3'-geranyl-3,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxychalcone (7), were isolated from the leaves of A. communis. Compound 4 was isolated for the first time from natural sources. The anti-inflammatory activity of the isolated compounds (1-7) was evaluated by determining their inhibitory activity on the production of proinflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. Compounds 2, 3, and 4 suppressed the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW 264.7 cells with IC50 values of 8.13 ± 0.17, 18.45 ± 2.15, and 22.74 ± 1.74 µM, respectively. Furthermore, 2 decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated induction of protein expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in RAW 264.7 cells. It was also found that 2 suppressed LPS-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling.

  6. Enhanced natural killer activity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice selected for high acute inflammatory response (AIRmax).

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Lindsey; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Filho, Orlando Garcia Ribeiro; Romagnoli, Graziela Gorete; Ibañez, Olga Célia Martinez; Kaneno, Ramon

    2007-03-01

    Strains of mice with maximal and minimal acute inflammatory responsiveness (AIRmax and AIRmin, respectively) were developed through selective breeding based on their high- or low-acute inflammatory responsiveness. Previous reports have shown that AIRmax mice are more resistant to the development of a variety of tumours than AIRmin mice, including spontaneous metastasis of murine melanoma. Natural killer activity is involved in immunosurveillance against tumour development, so we analysed the number and activity of natural killer cells (CD49b(+)), T-lymphocyte subsets and in vitro cytokine production by spleen cells of normal AIRmax and AIRmin mice. Analysis of lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry showed that AIRmax mice had a higher relative number of CD49b(+) cells than AIRmin mice, as well as cytolytic activity against Yac.1 target cells. The number of CD3(+) CD8(+) cells was also higher in AIRmax mice. These findings were associated with the ability of spleen cells from AIRmax mice in vitro to produce higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12p40 and interferon-gamma but not the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. Taken together, our data suggest that the selective breeding to achieve the AIRmax and AIRmin strains was able to polarize the genes associated with cytotoxic activity, which can be responsible for the antitumour resistance observed in AIRmax mice.

  7. Proteinases, their receptors and inflammatory signalling: the Oxford South Parks Road connection*

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, M D

    2015-01-01

    In keeping with the aim of the Paton Memorial Lecture to ‘facilitate the historical study of pharmacology’, this overview, which is my distinct honour to write, represents a ‘Janus-like’ personal perspective looking both backwards and forwards at the birth and growth of ‘receptor molecular pharmacology’ with special relevance to inflammatory diseases. The overview begins in the Oxford Department of Pharmacology in the mid-1960s and then goes on to provide a current perspective of signalling by proteinases. Looking backwards, the synopsis describes the fruitful Oxford Pharmacology Department infrastructure that Bill Paton generated in keeping with the blueprint begun by his predecessor, J H Burn. Looking forwards, the overview illustrates the legacy of that environment in generating some of the first receptor ligand-binding data and providing the inspiration and vision for those like me who were training in the department at the same time. With apologies, I mention only in passing a number of individuals who benefitted from the ‘South Parks Road connection’ using myself as one of the ‘outcome study’ examples. It is also by looking forward that I can meet the complementary aim of summarizing the lecture presented at a ‘BPS 2014 Focused Meeting on Cell Signalling’ to provide an overview of the role of proteinases and their signalling mechanisms in the setting of inflammation. PMID:25521749

  8. Anthrapyrazolone analogues intercept inflammatory JNK signals to moderate endotoxin induced septic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Karothu Durga; Trinath, Jamma; Biswas, Ansuman; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Balaji, Kithiganahalli N.; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2014-11-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is one of the rising causes for mortality worldwide representing nearly 10% of intensive care unit admissions. Susceptibility to sepsis is identified to be mediated by innate pattern recognition receptors and responsive signaling pathways of the host. The c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-mediated signaling events play critical role in bacterial infection triggered multi-organ failure, cardiac dysfunction and mortality. In the context of kinase specificities, an extensive library of anthrapyrazolone analogues has been investigated for the selective inhibition of c-JNK and thereby to gain control over the inflammation associated risks. In our comprehensive biochemical characterization, it is observed that alkyl and halogen substitution on the periphery of anthrapyrazolone increases the binding potency of the inhibitors specifically towards JNK. Further, it is demonstrated that hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions generated by these small molecules effectively block endotoxin-induced inflammatory genes expression in in vitro and septic shock in vivo, in a mouse model, with remarkable efficacies. Altogether, the obtained results rationalize the significance of the diversity oriented synthesis of small molecules for selective inhibition of JNK and their potential in the treatment of severe sepsis.

  9. The O-methylation of chrysin markedly improves its intestinal anti-inflammatory properties: Structure-activity relationships of flavones.

    PubMed

    During, Alexandrine; Larondelle, Yvan

    2013-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether methoxylated flavones versus their unmethylated analogs can modulate the intestinal inflammatory response. Flavone effects were assessed on soluble pro-inflammatory mediator (IL-8, IL-6, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived PGE2) production and on nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in 3d-confluent and 21d-differentiated Caco-2 cells stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1β. Chrysin (CHRY) showed anti-inflammatory properties by decreasing COX-2-derived PGE2 and reducing NF-κB activation. Compared to CHRY, the dimethoxylated form (CHRY-DM) significantly reduced the secretion of all pro-inflammatory mediators, except IL-8, at both cellular stages (P<0.05); these effects being dose-dependent in 3d-cells. The reduction of NF-κB activation was significantly more pronounced with CHRY-DM. By evaluating other flavones, it was established that several structural dispositions of flavones seemed to be determinant in order to attenuate the intestinal inflammatory response, such as methoxylation of the 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups on the A-ring, non-methoxylation of the 3'-hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, and methoxylation of the 3-hydroxyl group on the C-ring. Of all flavones examined, CHRY-DM exhibited the strongest anti-inflammatory activity. These data indicate that, in the Caco-2 cell model, methoxylation of CHRY greatly improves its anti-inflammatory properties, probably through a more pronounced inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Nevertheless, methoxylation of other flavones was not systematically beneficial.

  10. Icariin inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ induced inflammatory response via inhibition of the substance P and p38-MAPK signaling pathway in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingwen; Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Jia; Luo, Qingli; Zhang, Hongying; Liu, Baojun; Xu, Fei; Pang, Qi; Liu, Yingchao; Dong, Jingcheng

    2015-12-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in the etiology of atopic dermatitis. We demonstrated that Herba Epimedii has anti-inflammatory potential in an atopic dermatitis mouse model; however, limited research has been conducted on the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of icariin, the major active ingredient in Herba Epimedii, in human keratinocytes. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory potential and mechanisms of icariin in the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced inflammatory response in human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) by observing these cells in the presence or absence of icariin. We measured IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, MCP-1 and GRO-α production by ELISA; IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and tachykinin receptor 1 (TACR1) mRNA expression by real-time PCR; and P38-MAPK, P-ERK and P-JNK signaling expression by western blot in TNF-α/IFN-γ-stimulated HaCaT cells before and after icariin treatment. The expression of TNF-α-R1 and IFN-γ-R1 during the stimulation of the cell models was also evaluated before and after icariin treatment. We investigated the effect of icariin on these pro-inflammatory cytokines and detected whether this effect occurred via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways. We further specifically inhibited the activity of two kinases with 20μM SB203580 (a p38 kinase inhibitor) and 50μM PD98059 (an ERK1/2 kinase inhibitor) to determine the roles of the two signal pathways involved in the inflammatory response. We found that icariin inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and MCP-1 production in a dose-dependent manner; meanwhile, the icariin treatment inhibited the gene expression of IL-8, IL-1β, ICAM-1 and TACR1 in HaCaT cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Icariin treatment resulted in a reduced expression of p-P38 and p-ERK signal activation induced by TNF-α/IFN-γ; however, only SB203580, the p38 alpha

  11. Macelignan inhibits histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in activated rat basophilic leukemia mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Sun; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-10-01

    Type I allergy is characterized by the release of granule-associated mediators, lipid-derived substances, cytokines, and chemokines by activated mast cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt., we determined its ability to inhibit calcium (Ca(2+)) influx, degranulation, and inflammatory mediator production in RBL-2 H3 cells stimulated with A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macelignan inhibited Ca(2+) influx and the secretion of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, prostaglandin E(2), and leukotriene C(4); decreased mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results indicate the potential of macelignan as a type I allergy treatment.

  12. SIRT1 expression is refractory to hypoxia and inflammatory cytokines in nucleus pulposus cells: Novel regulation by HIF-1α and NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Li, Hongjian; Xu, Kang; Zhu, Haipeng; Peng, Yan; Liang, Anjing; Li, Chunhai; Huang, Dongsheng; Ye, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia and a marked increase in inflammatory cytokines are common hallmarks of intervertebral disc degeneration; these events disrupt the normal balance between extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and synthesis in degenerative intervertebral discs. SIRT1, one of the NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylases, controls cellular processes and is regulated by hypoxia and inflammatory cytokines in a cell-type-dependent manner. SIRT1 protects degenerative human nucleus pulposus cells against apoptosis. However, the role of SIRT1 in inflammation in intervertebral discs is still unclear. The current study showed that in rat NP cells, as in other cells, SIRT1 suppressed the induction of the mRNA expression of proteases that degrade ECM induced by TNF-α. Moreover, real-time PCR, transfection, and loss- and gain-of-function experiments revealed that SIRT1 mRNA and protein expression were refractory to hypoxia and HIF-1α. Additionally, SIRT1 mRNA and protein expression and the activity of the SIRT1 promoter were not affected by inflammatory cytokines but were sustained by NF-κB signaling in the presence or absence of TNF-α. In summary, the present study suggested that SIRT1 is not affected by hypoxia and inflammatory cytokines in rat intervertebral discs. Moreover, not HIF-1α but NF-κB signaling is critical for the maintenance of SIRT1 expression in NP cells under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions.

  13. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Ganoderma Lucidum Triterpenoid in Human Crohn’s Disease Associated with Down-Regulation of NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changda; Dunkin, David; Lai, Joanne; Song, Ying; Ceballos, Clare; Benkov, Keith; Li, Xiu-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Current medications have potentially serious side effects. Hence there is increasing interest in alternative therapies. We previously demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of FAHF-2 in-vitro on PBMCs and mucosa from CD subjects. Here we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of a bioactive compound isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum), a key herbal constituent of FAHF-2, in CD in vitro. Methods Triterpene ganoderic acid C1 (GAC1) was isolated from G. lucidum. Stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with GAC1. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and colonic biopsies were obtained from children with CD and cultured with or without GAC1. TNF-α and other pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were measured in the culture supernatant. NF-κB signaling was investigated in PBMCs and colonic mucosa treated with GAC1 by In-Cell Western and western blot analysis. Results GAC1 decreased TNF-α production by macrophages and PBMCs from CD subjects. GAC1 significantly decreased TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-17A production by inflamed colonic biopsies from CD subjects. These effects were due to down-regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Conclusions GAC1 inhibited production of TNF-α and other pro-inflammatory cytokines by PBMCs and inflamed CD colonic mucosa due to blockage of NF-κB activation. GAC1 is a key beneficial constituent in G. lucidum and the FAHF-2 formula in suppressing the inflammatory cytokines found in CD and warrants clinical investigation for the treatment of CD. PMID:25993687

  14. Chloroquine Inhibits HMGB1 Inflammatory Signaling and Protects Mice from Lethal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghua; Cao, Lizhi; Xie, Min; Yu, Yan; Kang, Rui; Yang, Liangchun; Zhao, Mingyi; Tang, Daolin

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is caused by an overwhelming immune response to bacterial infection. The discovery of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) as a late mediator of lethal sepsis has prompted investigation into the development of new therapeutics which specifically target this protein. Here, we show that chloroquine, an anti-malarial drug, prevents lethality in mice with established endotoxemia or sepsis. This effect is still observed even if administration of chloroquine is delayed. The protective effects of chloroquine were mediated through inhibition of HMGB1 release in macrophages, monocytes, and endothelial cells, thereby preventing its cytokine-like activities. As an inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine specifically inhibited HMGB1-induced Iκ-B degradation and NF-κB activation. These findings define a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effects of chloroquine and also suggest a new potential clinical use for this drug in the setting of sepsis. PMID:23707973

  15. Metformin activation of AMPK suppresses AGE-induced inflammatory response in hNSCs.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ming-Min; Nicol, Christopher J; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Chen, Yen-Lin; Pei, Dee; Lin, Chien-Hung; Shih, Yi-Nuo; Yen, Chia-Hui; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun; Huang, Rong-Nan; Chiang, Ming-Chang

    2017-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the precise mechanisms remain unclear, T2DM may exacerbate neurodegenerative processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling is an evolutionary preserved pathway that is important during homeostatic energy biogenesis responses at both the cellular and whole-body levels. Metformin, a ubiquitously prescribed anti-diabetic drug, exerts its effects by AMPK activation. However, while the roles of AMPK as a metabolic mediator are generally well understood, its performance in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration are not yet well defined. Given hyperglycemia is accompanied by an accelerated rate of advanced glycosylation end product (AGE) formation, which is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic neuronal impairment and, inflammatory response, clarification of the role of AMPK signaling in these processes is needed. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that metformin, an AMPK activator, protects against diabetic AGE induced neuronal impairment in human neural stem cells (hNSCs). In the present study, hNSCs exposed to AGE had significantly reduced cell viability, which correlated with elevated inflammatory cytokine expression, such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α. Co-treatment with metformin significantly abrogated the AGE-mediated effects in hNSCs. In addition, metformin rescued the transcript and protein expression levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and inhibitory kappa B kinase (IKK) in AGE-treated hNSCs. NF-κB is a transcription factor with a key role in the expression of a variety of genes involved in inflammatory responses, and metformin did prevent the AGE-mediated increase in NF-κB mRNA and protein levels in the hNSCs exposed to AGE. Indeed, co-treatment with metformin significantly restored inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels in AGE-treated h

  16. A novel anti-inflammatory activity of lysozyme: modulation of serum complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ogundele, M O

    1998-01-01

    Lysozyme is an ubiquitous enzyme found in most biological secretions and leukocytes. This study was aimed at investigating its interaction with other inflammatory mediators on mucosa surfaces, particularly the complement system. Lysozyme has been shown in our present study, to inhibit the haemolytic activity of serum complement in a dose-dependent fashion, when tested within the levels present in normal and inflamed breast-milk samples, and other mucosal secretions. This represents a new anti-inflammatory action of lysozyme in relation to the serum complement, and the exact mode of the interaction need further studies. PMID:9883972

  17. Stereoselective synthesis and anti-inflammatory activities of 6- and 7-membered dioxacycloalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Keli; Bi, Lanrong; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Chao; Dolan, Cheryl; Kao, Michael C; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Peng, Shiqi

    2006-03-01

    A class of 5-trifluoroacetylamino-1,3-dioxacycloalkanes, 5-benzoylamino-1,3-dioxacycloalkanes, and 5-amino-1,3-dioxacycloalkane compounds were stereoselectively synthesized as potential anti-inflammatory drug candidates. The anti-inflammatory activities of these compounds were tested using the xylene-induced mouse ear edema model, from which multiple compounds possessing anti-inflammatory properties which surpass aspirin were identified; these compounds were then compared to establish structure-activity relationships.

  18. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion from monocytes/macrophages through suppression of intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Chao, Louis Kuoping; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Cheng, Sen-Sung; Lin, I-Fan; Chen, Chia-Jung; Chen, Shui-Tein; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of Cinnamaldehyde, a cytokine production inhibitor isolated from an essential oil produced from the leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kaneh, and its mechanism of action. Although Cinnamaldehyde has been reported to have contact sensitizing properties at high concentration (mM), we found that low concentration of Cinnamaldehyde (muM) inhibited the secretion of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha within lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) stimulated murine J774A.1 macrophages. Cinnamaldehyde also suppressed the production of these cytokines from LPS stimulated human blood monocytes derived primary macrophages and human THP-1 monocytes. Furthermore, Cinnamaldehyde also inhibited the production of prointerleukin-1beta within LPS or LTA stimulated human THP-1 monocytes. Reactive oxygen species release from LPS stimulated J774A.1 macrophages was reduced by Cinnamaldehyde. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 induced by LPS was also inhibited by Cinnamaldehyde; however, Cinnamaldehyde neither antagonize the binding of LPS to the cells nor alter the cell surface expression of toll-like receptor 4 and CD14. In addition, we also noted that Cinnamaldehyde appeared to elicit no cytotoxic effect upon J774A.1 macrophages under our experimental conditions, although Cinnamaldehyde reduced J774A.1 macrophages proliferation as analysed by MTT assay. Our current results have demonstrated the anti-oxidation and anti-inflammatory properties of Cinnamaldehyde that could provide the possibility for Cinnamaldehyde's future pharmaceutical application in the realm of immuno-modulation.

  19. Anxiety, not anger, induces inflammatory activity: An avoidance/approach model of immune system activation.

    PubMed

    Moons, Wesley G; Shields, Grant S

    2015-08-01

    Psychological stressors reliably trigger systemic inflammatory activity as indexed by levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This experiment demonstrates that one's specific emotional reaction to a stressor may be a significant determinant of whether an inflammatory reaction occurs in response to that stressor. Based on extant correlational evidence and theory, a causal approach was used to determine whether an avoidant emotion (anxiety) triggers more inflammatory activity than an approach emotion (anger). In an experimental design (N = 40), a 3-way Emotion Condition × Time × Analyte interaction revealed that a writing-based anxiety induction, but not a writing-based anger induction, increased mean levels of interferon-γ (IFN- γ) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), but not interleukin-6 (IL-6) in oral mucous, F(2, 54) = 4.64, p = .01, ηp(²) = .15. Further, self-reported state anxiety predicted elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, all ΔR(²) >.06, ps <.04, but self-reported state anger did not. These results constitute the first evidence to our knowledge that specific negative emotions can differentially cause inflammatory activity and support a theoretical model explaining these effects based on the avoidance or approach motivations associated with emotions.

  20. Naringenin Inhibits Superoxide Anion-Induced Inflammatory Pain: Role of Oxidative Stress, Cytokines, Nrf-2 and the NO−cGMP−PKG−KATPChannel Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Manchope, Marília F.; Calixto-Campos, Cássia; Coelho-Silva, Letícia; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Georgetti, Sandra R.; Baracat, Marcela M.; Casagrande, Rúbia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the effect and mechanism of action of the flavonoid naringenin were evaluated in superoxide anion donor (KO2)-induced inflammatory pain in mice. Naringenin reduced KO2-induced overt-pain like behavior, mechanical hyperalgesia, and thermal hyperalgesia. The analgesic effect of naringenin depended on the activation of the NO−cGMP−PKG−ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) signaling pathway. Naringenin also reduced KO2-induced neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity), tissue oxidative stress, and cytokine production. Furthermore, naringenin downregulated KO2-induced mRNA expression of gp91phox, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and preproendothelin-1. Besides, naringenin upregulated KO2-reduced nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) mRNA expression coupled with enhanced heme oxygenase (HO-1) mRNA expression. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the use of naringenin represents a potential therapeutic approach reducing superoxide anion-driven inflammatory pain. The antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects are mediated via activation of the NO−cGMP−PKG−KATP channel signaling involving the induction of Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:27045367

  1. Lung carcinogenesis from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and contribution of signal transducers and lung stem cells in the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuo; Hata, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are closely related. The annual incidence of lung cancer arising from COPD has been reported to be 0.8-1.7 %. Treatment of lung cancer from COPD is very difficult due to low cardiopulmonary function, rapid tumor growth, and resistance to molecularly targeted therapies. Chronic inflammation caused by toxic gases can induce COPD and lung cancer. Carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment occurs during cycles of tissue injury and repair. Cellular damage can induce induction of necrotic cell death and loss of tissue integrity. Quiescent normal stem cells or differentiated progenitor cells are introduced to repair injured tissues. However, inflammatory mediators may promote the growth of bronchioalveolar stem cells, and activation of NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) play crucial roles in the development of lung cancer from COPD. Many of the protumorgenic effects of NF-κB and STAT3 activation in immune cells are mediated through paracrine signaling. NF-κB and STAT3 also contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To improve lung cancer treatment outcomes, lung cancer from COPD must be overcome. In this article, we review the characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment. We also propose the necessity of identifying the mechanisms underlying progression of COPD to lung cancer, and comment on the clinical implications with respect to lung cancer prevention, screening, and therapy.

  2. Noninvasive Markers of Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Sunanda

    2014-01-01

    It is often difficult to assess disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Noninvasive biomarkers are a means of quantifying often nebulous symptoms without subjecting patients to endoscopy or radiation. This paper highlights markers present in feces, serum, or urine that have all been compared with the gold standard, histologic analysis of endoscopically collected specimens. Two categories of markers are featured: well-researched markers of mucosal inflammation with high sensitivity and specificity (calprotectin, lactoferrin, and S100A12) and novel promising markers, some of which are already clinically employed for reasons unrelated to IBD (interleukin [IL]-17, IL-33/ST2, adenosine deaminase, polymorphonuclear elastase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, neopterin, serum M30, and fecal immunohistochemistry). The data pertaining to the more-established markers are intended to highlight recent clinical applications for these markers (ie, assessing disease outside of the colon or in the pediatric population as well as being a cost-saving alternative to colonoscopy to screen for IBD). As there is no evidence to date that a specific marker will accurately be able to represent the entire IBD patient population, it is likely that a combination of the existing markers will be most clinically relevant to the practicing gastroenterologist attempting to evaluate disease severity in a specific patient. Familiarity with the most promising emerging markers will allow a better understanding of new studies and their impact on patient care. PMID:27551251

  3. Oleoylethanolamide exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-induced THP-1 cells by enhancing PPARα signaling and inhibiting the NF-κB and ERK1/2/AP-1/STAT3 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichao; Guo, Han; Li, Ying; Meng, Xianglan; Yan, Lu; Dan Zhang; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Hao; Peng, Lu; Xie, Qiang; Jin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory actions of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced THP-1 cells. The cells were stimulated with LPS (1 μg/ml) in the presence or absence of OEA (10, 20 and 40 μM). The pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated by qRT-PCR and ELISA. The THP-1 cells were transiently transfected with PPARα small-interfering RNA, and TLR4 activity was determined with a blocking test using anti-TLR4 antibody. Additionally, a special inhibitor was used to analyse the intracellular signaling pathway. OEA exerted a potent anti-inflammatory effect by reducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TLR4 expression, and by enhancing PPARα expression. The modulatory effects of OEA on LPS-induced inflammation depended on PPARα and TLR4. Importantly, OEA inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation, IκBα degradation, expression of AP-1, and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and STAT3. In summary, our results demonstrated that OEA exerts anti-inflammatory effects by enhancing PPARα signaling, inhibiting the TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, and interfering with the ERK1/2-dependent signaling cascade (TLR4/ERK1/2/AP-1/STAT3), which suggests that OEA may be a therapeutic agent for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27721381

  4. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases.

  5. In-vitro anti- inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, V.R.; Dhanamani, M.; Sudhamani, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (lour.) Spreng, which is traditionally used in the treatment of cough and cold was screened for its anti- inflammatory activity by HRBC membrane stabilisation model. Aqueous extract (500 mcg/ml) showed significant anti-inflammatory activity as compared to that of hydrocortisone sodium. PMID:22557324

  6. In-vitro anti- inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, V R; Dhanamani, M; Sudhamani, T

    2009-04-01

    Aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (lour.) Spreng, which is traditionally used in the treatment of cough and cold was screened for its anti- inflammatory activity by HRBC membrane stabilisation model. Aqueous extract (500 mcg/ml) showed significant anti-inflammatory activity as compared to that of hydrocortisone sodium.

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity of IFN-beta in carrageenan-induced pleurisy in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiara, P; Bartalini, M; Tagliabue, A; Boraschi, D

    1986-01-01

    The effect of IFN-beta on the development of the inflammatory reaction was studied in an experimental animal model, carrageenan-induced pleurisy in the mouse. Intrapleural inoculation of IFN-beta at the same time as carrageenan administration inhibited both migration of inflammatory cells and exudate formation in the pleural cavity in a dose-dependent fashion. Similarly, IFN-beta decreased the presence of the arachidonate metabolites PGI2, TXA2 and PGE2 (highly active molecules involved in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction) in inflammatory exudates. A marked inhibition of the inflammatory response to carrageenan was also evident when IFN-beta was administered several hours after the inflammatory challenge. In contrast, administration of IFN-gamma did not modify significantly any of the inflammatory parameters considered. PMID:3105936

  8. Exploring the anti-inflammatory activity of a novel 2-phenylquinazoline analog with protection against inflammatory injury.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nabanita; Das, Subhadip; Bose, Dipayan; Banerjee, Somenath; Das, Sujata; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Saha, Krishna Das

    2012-10-15

    Inflammation is a protective immune response against harmful stimuli whose long time continuation results in host disease. Quinazolinones are nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds with wide spectrum of biological activities. The anticancer effect of a 3-(arylideneamino)-phenylquinazoline-4(3H)-one derivative was reported earlier. The anti-inflammatory effect of these quinazolinone derivatives has now been examined in endotoxin stimulated macrophages and in different in vivo models of inflammation by measuring the proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), mediators NO and NF-κB (by ELISA and western blot), and translocation of the nuclear factor kB (by immunocytochemical analysis). To elucidate the in vivo effect, mice endotoxin model was and the various levels of edema, inflammatory pain and vascular permeability were studied. One of the quinazolinone derivatives showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in stimulated macrophage cells by inhibiting the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2, p-IκB and NF-κBp65. Significant (P<0.01) improvement was observed in the mortality of endotoxemic mice. The carrageenan and formalin-induced paw edema thicknesses were found to be reduced significantly (P<0.01) along with the reduction of pain, vascular permeability and edema induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (P<0.01). These findings indicate that 3-(arylideneamino)-phenylquinazoline-4(3H)-one derivative as a potential anti-inflammatory agent.

  9. Acid sphingomyelinase is activated in sickle cell erythrocytes and contributes to inflammatory microparticle generation in SCD.

    PubMed

    Awojoodu, Anthony O; Keegan, Philip M; Lane, Alicia R; Zhang, Yuying; Lynch, Kevin R; Platt, Manu O; Botchwey, Edward A

    2014-09-18

    Sphingolipids are a class of lipids containing a backbone of sphingoid bases that can be produced de novo through the reaction of palmitate and serine and further metabolized through the activity of various enzymes to produce intermediates with diverse roles in cellular processes and signal transduction. One of these intermediates, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), is stored at high concentrations (1 μM) in red blood cells (RBCs) and directs a wide array of cellular processes mediated by 5 known G-protein coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5). In this study, we show that RBC membrane alterations in sickle cell disease enhance the activation acid sphingomyelinase by 13%, resulting in increased production and storage of sphingosine (2.6-fold) and S1P (3.5-fold). We also show that acid sphingomyelinase enhances RBC-derived microparticle (MP) generation. These MPs are internalized by myeloid cells and promote proinflammatory cytokine secretion and endothelial cell adhesion, suggesting that potential crosstalk between circulating inflammatory cells and MPs may contribute to the inflammation-rooted pathogenesis of the disease. Treatment with amitriptyline reduces MP generation in vitro and in vivo and might be used to mitigate inflammatory processes in sickle cell disease.

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chun-Hua; Hsu, Pei-Chien; Sun, Yu-Yo; Huang, Yu-Jie; Zhuo, Jiun-Horng; Wang, Chen-Yu; Gan, Yu-Ling; Hung, Chia-Chi; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Shie, Feng-Shiun

    2015-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates peripheral immunity; but its role in microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the brain remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AhR mediates both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia. Activation of AhR by its ligands, formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) or 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), attenuated LPS-induced microglial immune responses. AhR also showed proinflammatory effects, as evidenced by the findings that genetic silence of AhR ameliorated the LPS-induced microglial immune responses and LPS-activated microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. Similarly, LPS-induced expressions of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were reduced in the cerebral cortex of AhR-deficient mice. Intriguingly, LPS upregulated and activated AhR in the absence of AhR ligands via the MEK1/2 signaling pathway, which effects were associated with a transient inhibition of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). Although AhR ligands synergistically enhance LPS-induced AhR activation, leading to suppression of LPS-induced microglial immune responses, they cannot do so on their own in microglia. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results further revealed that LPS-FICZ co-treatment, but not LPS alone, not only resulted in co-recruitment of both AhR and NFκB onto the κB site of TNFα gene promoter but also reduced LPS-induced AhR binding to the DRE site of iNOS gene promoter. Together, we provide evidence showing that microglial AhR, which can be activated by LPS, exerts bi-directional effects on the regulation of LPS-induced neuroinflammation, depending on the availability of external AhR ligands. These findings confer further insights into the potential link between environmental factors and the inflammatory brain disorders.

  11. Monocyte Subsets Coregulate Inflammatory Responses by Integrated Signaling through TNF and IL-6 at the Endothelial Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Chimen, Myriam; Yates, Clara M.; McGettrick, Helen M.; Ward, Lewis S. C.; Harrison, Matthew J.; Apta, Bonita; Dib, Lea H.; Imhof, Beat A.; Harrison, Paul; Nash, Gerard B.

    2017-01-01

    Two major monocyte subsets, CD14+CD16− (classical) and CD14+/dimCD16+ (nonclassical/intermediate), have been described. Each has different functions ascribed in its interactions with vascular endothelial cells (EC), including migration and promoting inflammation. Although monocyte subpopulations have been studied in isolated systems, their influence on EC and on the course of inflammation has been ignored. In this study, using unstimulated or cytokine-activated EC, we observed significant differences in the recruitment, migration, and reverse migration of human monocyte subsets. Associated with this, and based on their patterns of cytokine secretion, there was a difference in their capacity to activate EC and support the secondary recruitment of flowing neutrophils. High levels of TNF were detected in cocultures with nonclassical/intermediate monocytes, the blockade of which significantly reduced neutrophil recruitment. In contrast, classical monocytes secreted high levels of IL-6, the blockade of which resulted in increased neutrophil recruitment. When cocultures contained both monocyte subsets, or when conditioned supernatant from classical monocytes cocultures (IL-6hi) was added to nonclassical/intermediate monocyte cocultures (TNFhi), the activating effects of TNF were dramatically reduced, implying that when present, the anti-inflammatory activities of IL-6 were dominant over the proinflammatory activities of TNF. These changes in neutrophil recruitment could be explained by regulation of E-selectin on the cocultured EC. This study suggests that recruited human monocyte subsets trigger a regulatory pathway of cytokine-mediated signaling at the EC interface, and we propose that this is a mechanism for limiting the phlogistic activity of newly recruited monocytes. PMID:28193827

  12. Anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity of fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio-; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Ronquillo de Jesús, Elba

    2015-05-01

    Produced worldwide at 1.2m tons per year, fibrous clays are used in the production of pet litter, animal feed stuff to roof parcels, construction and rheological additives, and other applications needing to replace long-fiber length asbestos. To the authors' knowledge, however, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity by sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejon El Rubio, Spain). The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) methods. Histological cuts were obtained for quantifying leukocytes found in the epidermis. Palygorkite and sepiolite caused edema inhibition and migration of neutrophils ca. 68.64 and 45.54%, and 80 and 65%, respectively. Fibrous clays yielded high rates of infiltration, explained by cleavage of polysomes and exposure of silanol groups. Also, fibrous clays showed high inhibition of myeloperoxidase contents shortly after exposure, but decreased sharply afterwards. In contrast, tubular clays caused an increasing inhibition of myeloperoxidase with time. Thus, clay structure restricted the kinetics and mechanism of myeloperoxidase inhibition. Fibrous clays were screened in vitro against human cancer cell lines. Cytotoxicity was determined using the protein-binding dye sulforhodamine B (SRB). Exposing cancer human cells to sepiolite or palygorskite showed growth inhibition varying with cell line. This study shows that fibrous clays served as an effective anti-inflammatory, limited by chemical transfer and cellular-level signals responding exclusively to an early exposure to clay, and cell viability decreasing significantly only after exposure to high concentrations of sepiolite.

  13. Thymoquinone: An IRAK1 inhibitor with in vivo and in vitro anti-inflammatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Hossen, Muhammad Jahangir; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Daewon; Aravinthan, Adithan; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2017-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a bioactive component of black seed (Nigella sativa) volatile oil and has been shown to have anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanisms that underlie the anti-inflammatory effect of TQ and its target proteins using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 and human monocyte-like U937 cells, together with LPS/D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced acute hepatitis and HCl/EtOH-induced gastritis mouse models. TQ strongly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and repressed NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)−2, interleukin (IL)−6, and IL-1β expression in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. Treatment of LPS/D-GalN–induced hepatitis and EtOH/HCl–induced gastritis mouse models with TQ significantly ameliorated disease symptoms. Using luciferase reporter gene assays, we also showed that the nuclear levels of transcription factors and phosphorylation patterns of signaling proteins, activator protein (AP)−1, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways were all affected by TQ treatment. Finally, we used additional kinase and luciferase validation assays with interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) to show that IRAK1 is directly suppressed by TQ treatment. Together, these findings strongly suggest that the anti-inflammatory actions of TQ are caused by suppression of IRAK-linked AP-1/NF-κB pathways. PMID:28216638

  14. Friedelane-type triterpenoids as selective anti-inflammatory agents by regulation of differential signaling pathways in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Villar-Lorenzo, Andrea; Ardiles, Alejandro E; Arroba, Ana I; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Pardo, Virginia; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Bazzocchi, Isabel L; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Valverde, Ángela M

    2016-12-15

    A series of 31 pentacyclic triterpenoids isolated from the root barks of Celastrus vulcanicola and Maytenus jelskii were tested for cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Compounds 18 (C18) and 25 (C25) exhibited significant inhibition of LPS-induced NO release at 50 and 25μM concentrations, respectively, and decreased mRNAs of pro-inflammatory cytokines. At the molecular level, C18 neither inhibited LPS-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) nor nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NFκB). Instead, C18 enhanced and prolonged nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and increased the expression of its target genes including hemeoxigenase 1 (HO1). C25 efficiently inhibited LPS-mediated phosphorylation of JNK, p38 and ERK, without affecting NFκB or Nrf2 signaling pathways. Both compounds reduced LPS-mediated processing of caspase-1 and the cleavage of interleukin 1β (IL1β) proform, reflecting their ability to target the inflammasome. C25 also counteracted LPS effects on iNOS expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA levels in Bv-2 microglial cells. The anti-inflammatory effect of both compounds was also assessed in human macrophages. Our results suggest that triterpenoids C18 and C25 possess anti-inflammatory effects, which may be therapeutically relevant for diseases linked to inflammation.

  15. Astragalin suppresses inflammatory responses via down-regulation of NF-κB signaling pathway in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengyang; Liang, Dejie; Yang, Zhengtao; Wang, Tiancheng; Wang, Wei; Song, Xiaojing; Guo, Mengyao; Zhou, Ershun; Li, Depeng; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2013-10-01

    Mastitis is a prevalent and economic disease around the world and defined as infection and inflammation of the mammary gland. Astragalin, a bioactive component isolated from persimmon or Rosa agrestis, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of astragalin in mastitis, a murine model of mastitis was induced by administration of LPS in mammary gland. Astragalin was applied 1h before and 12h after LPS treatment. The results showed that astragalin attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blotting results showed that astragalin efficiently blunt decreased nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation by inhibiting the degradation and phosphorylation of IκBα and the nuclear translocation of p65. These results suggested that astragalin exerts anti-inflammatory properties in LPS-mediated mastitis, possibly through inhibiting inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which mediates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Astragalin may be a potential therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  16. Role of Cytokine-Induced Glycosylation Changes in Regulating Cell Interactions and Cell Signaling in Inflammatory Diseases and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dewald, Justine H.; Colomb, Florent; Bobowski-Gerard, Marie; Groux-Degroote, Sophie; Delannoy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most important modifications of proteins and lipids, and cell surface glycoconjugates are thought to play important roles in a variety of biological functions including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, bacterial adhesion, cell immunogenicity and cell signaling. Alterations of glycosylation are observed in number of diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. In that context, pro-inflammatory cytokines have been shown to modulate cell surface glycosylation by regulating the expression of glycosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of carbohydrate chains. These changes in cell surface glycosylation are also known to regulate cell signaling and could contribute to disease pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the glycosylation changes induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines, with a particular focus on cancer and cystic fibrosis, and their consequences on cell interactions and signaling. PMID:27916834

  17. Dietary Fructose Activates Insulin Signaling and Inflammation in Adipose Tissue: Modulatory Role of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Pektas, Mehmet Bilgehan; Koca, Halit Bugra; Sadi, Gokhan; Akar, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    The effects of high-fructose diet on adipose tissue insulin signaling and inflammatory process have been poorly documented. In this study, we examined the influences of long-term fructose intake and resveratrol supplementation on the expression of genes involved in insulin signaling and the levels of inflammatory cytokines and sex hormones in the white adipose tissues of male and female rats. Consumption of high-fructose diet for 24 weeks increased the expression of genes involved in insulin signaling including IR, IRS-1, IRS-2, Akt, PI3K, eNOS, mTOR, and PPARγ, despite induction of proinflammatory markers, iNOS, TNFα, IL-1β, IL-18, MDA, and ALT, as well as anti-inflammatory factors, IL-10 and Nrf2 in adipose tissues from males and females. Total and free testosterone concentrations of adipose tissues were impaired in males but increased in females, although there were no changes in their blood levels. Resveratrol supplementation markedly restored the levels of MDA, IL6, IL-10, and IL-18, as well as iNOS, Nrf2, and PI3K mRNA, in adipose tissues of both genders. Dietary fructose activates both insulin signaling and inflammatory pathway in the adipose tissues of male and female rats proposing no correlation between the tissue insulin signaling and inflammation. Resveratrol has partly modulatory effects on fructose-induced changes. PMID:27066503

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Cumin Essential Oil by Blocking JNK, ERK, and NF-κB Signaling Pathways in LPS-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Zhang, Xitong; Bi, Yang; Miao, Ruidong; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Hailan

    2015-01-01

    Cumin seeds (Cuminum cyminum L.) have been commonly used in food flavoring and perfumery. In this study, cumin essential oil (CuEO) extracted from seeds was employed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and the underlying mechanisms. A total of 26 volatile constituents were identified in CuEO by GC-MS, and the most abundant constituent was cuminaldehyde (48.773%). Mitochondrial-respiration-dependent 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay demonstrated that CuEO did not exhibit any cytotoxic effect at the employed concentrations (0.0005-0.01%). Real-time PCR tests showed that CuEO significantly inhibited the mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), interleukin- (IL-) 1, and IL-6. Moreover, western blotting analysis revealed that CuEO blocked LPS-induced transcriptional activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). These results suggested that CuEO exerted anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells via inhibition of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and JNK signaling; the chemical could be used as a source of anti-inflammatory agents as well as dietary complement for health promotion.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Cumin Essential Oil by Blocking JNK, ERK, and NF-κB Signaling Pathways in LPS-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Juan; Zhang, Xitong; Bi, Yang; Miao, Ruidong; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Hailan

    2015-01-01

    Cumin seeds (Cuminum cyminum L.) have been commonly used in food flavoring and perfumery. In this study, cumin essential oil (CuEO) extracted from seeds was employed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and the underlying mechanisms. A total of 26 volatile constituents were identified in CuEO by GC-MS, and the most abundant constituent was cuminaldehyde (48.773%). Mitochondrial-respiration-dependent 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay demonstrated that CuEO did not exhibit any cytotoxic effect at the employed concentrations (0.0005–0.01%). Real-time PCR tests showed that CuEO significantly inhibited the mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), interleukin- (IL-) 1, and IL-6. Moreover, western blotting analysis revealed that CuEO blocked LPS-induced transcriptional activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). These results suggested that CuEO exerted anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells via inhibition of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and JNK signaling; the chemical could be used as a source of anti-inflammatory agents as well as dietary complement for health promotion. PMID:26425131

  20. HIV–tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is characterized by Toll-like receptor and inflammasome signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Rachel P. J.; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Graham, Christine M.; Marais, Suzaan; Van der Plas, Helen; Deffur, Armin; Schutz, Charlotte; Bloom, Chloe; Munagala, Indira; Anguiano, Esperanza; Goliath, Rene; Maartens, Gary; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; O'Garra, Anne; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) may develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS). No biomarkers for TB-IRIS have been identified and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we perform transcriptomic profiling of the blood samples of patients with HIV-associated TB. We identify differentially abundant transcripts as early as week 0.5 post ART initiation that predict downstream activation of proinflammatory cytokines in patients who progress to TB-IRIS. At the characteristic time of TB-IRIS onset (week 2), the signature is characterized by over-representation of innate immune mediators including TLR signalling and TREM-1 activation of the inflammasome. In keeping with the transcriptional data, concentrations of plasma cytokines and caspase-1/5 are elevated in TB-IRIS. Inhibition of MyD88 adaptor and group 1 caspases reduces secretion of cytokines including IL-1 in TB-IRIS patients. These data provide insight on the pathogenesis of TB-IRIS and may assist the development of specific therapies. PMID:26399326

  1. MicroRNA-16 suppresses the activation of inflammatory macrophages in atherosclerosis by targeting PDCD4

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, XUE; XU, ZHAO; YUAN, MENG; ZHANG, YUE; ZHAO, BO; WANG, JUNQIAN; ZHANG, AIXUE; LI, GUANGPING

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is involved in a number of bioprocesses, such as apoptosis and inflammation. However, its regulatory mechanisms in atherosclerosis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role and mechanisms of action of PDCD4 in high-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis in mice and in foam cells (characteristic pathological cells in atherosclerotic lesions) derived from ox-LDL-stimulated macrophages. MicroRNA (miR)-16 was predicted to bind PDCD4 by bioinformatics analysis. In the mice with atherosclerosis and in the foam cells, PDCD4 protein expression (but not the mRNA expression) was enhanced, while that of miR-16 was reduced. Transfection with miR-16 mimic decreased the activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of PDCD4 in the macrophage-derived foam cells. Conversely, treatment with miR-16 inhibitor enhanced the luciferase activity. However, by introducing mutations in the predicted binding site located in the 3′UTR of PDCD4, the miR-16 mimic and inhibitor were unable to alter the level of PDCD4, suggesting that miR-16 is a direct negative regulator of PDCD4 in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, transfection wtih miR-16 mimic and siRNA targeting PDCD4 suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas it enhanced the secretion and mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory factor, IL-10. Treatment with miR-16 inhibitor exerted the opposite effects. In addition, the phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression were altered by miR-16. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the targeting of PDCD4 by miR-16 may suppress the activation of inflammatory macrophages though mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB signaling in atherosclerosis; thus, PDCD4 may prove to be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of

  2. Autonomic regulation of anti-inflammatory activities from salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Mathison, Ronald D; Davison, Joseph S; St Laurent, Chris D; Befus, A Dean

    2012-01-01

    The cervical sympathetic nerves which innervate the medial basal hypothalamus-hypophyseal complex, primary and secondary lymph organs, and numerous glands, such as the pineal, thyroid, parathyroid and salivary glands form a relevant neuroimmunoendocrine structure that is involved in the regulation of systemic homeostasis. The superior cervical ganglia and the submandibular glands form a 'neuroendocrine axis' called the cervical sympathetic trunk submandibular gland (CST-SMG) axis. The identification of this axis usurps the traditional view of salivary glands as accessory digestive structures and reinforces the view that they are important sources of systemically active immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory factors whose release is intimately controlled by the autonomic nervous system, and in particular the sympathetic branch. An end component of the CST-SMG axis is the synthesis, processing and release of submandibular rat-1 protein (SMR1), a prohormone, that generates several different peptides, one from near its N-terminus called sialorphin and another from its C-terminus called - submandibular gland peptide-T (SGP-T). SGP-T formed the template for tripeptide fragment (FEG) and its metabolically stable D-isomeric peptide feG, which are potent inhibitors of allergy and asthma (IgE-mediated allergic reactions) and several non-IgE-mediated inflammations. The translation from rat genetics and proteomics to humans has yielded structural and functional correlates that hopefully will lead to the development of new medications and therapeutic approaches for difficult to treat disorders. Although the CST-SMG axis has barely been explored in humans recognition of the importance of this axis could facilitate an understanding and improved management of periodontal disease, and other diseases with a more systemic and nervous system basis such as asthma, autoimmunity, graft-versus-host disease and even Parkinson's disease.

  3. Determination of Teloschistes flavicans (sw) norm anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Eugênia C.; da Silva, Nicácio H.; Santos, Renata Almeida; Sudário, Ana Patrícia Paiva; Rodrigues e Silva, Antonio Alfredo; de Sousa Maia, Maria Bernadete

    2010-01-01

    Background: Lichens produce a variety of substances that possesses pharmacological actions. However, rare products are submitted to rigorous scientific tests or have the risk potential or side effects evaluated. The lack of medical and sanitary control, absence of accurate botanical identification or purity certification, founded in diverse natural products, may represent great danger to population health. This work aimed to evaluate toxic effects and anti-inflammatory action in vivo of Teloschistes flavicans (Sw.) Norm. (TFN) unrefined extracts, as well as determinate its main constituents. Methods: The carrageenan induced paw edema and cotton pellet implant induced granuloma methods were utilized, besides a classic acute toxicity test. TFN acetone extract inhibited carrageenan paw edema on 60, 120, and 180 min (inhibition percentiles of 45.03%, 60.59% and 41.72%). Results: TFN ethereal (inhibition percentiles of 23.95% and 29.01%) and chloroform (inhibition percentiles of 28.8% and 22.04%) extracts inhibited edema on 120 and 180 min. None of the extract inhibited the granuloma development. None of the extract caused death or other acute toxicity signs. Vicanicine (60.26% in ethereal extract and 51.17% in acetone extract), parietine (9.60% in ethereal extract and 15.38% on second), falacinol (0.78% in ether and 14.95% in acetone) and very low concentration of falacinal (0.15% in ethereal extract and 3.32% in acetone extract) were detected in the medicine. Conclusions: The tested extracts have antiedematogenic activity, but are not effective on subchronic inflammation. The extracts do not present toxic effects in administered doses. PMID:21808568

  4. Heparin activates Wnt signaling for neuronal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Colombres, Marcela; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Reig, Germán F; Scheu, Jessica; Calderón, Rosario; Alvarez, Alejandra; Brandan, Enrique; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2008-09-01

    Wnt factors are secreted ligands that affect different aspects of the nervous system behavior like neurodevelopment, synaptogenesis and neurodegeneration. In different model systems, Wnt signaling has been demonstrated to be regulated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Whether HSPGs modulate Wnt signaling in the context of neuronal behavior is currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that activation of Wnt signaling with the endogenous ligand Wnt-7a results in an increased of neurite outgrowth in the neuroblastoma N2a cell line. Interestingly, heparin induces glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) inhibition, beta-catenin stabilization and morphological differentiation in both N2a cells and in rat primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. We also show that heparin modulates Wnt-3a-induced stabilization of beta-catenin. Several extracellular matrix and membrane-attached HSPGs were found to be expressed in both in vitro neuronal models. Changes in the expression of specific HSPGs were observed upon differentiation of N2a cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that HSPGs may modulate canonical Wnt signaling for neuronal morphogenesis.

  5. Anti-inflammatory and anti-itch activity of sertaconazole nitrate.

    PubMed

    Liebel, Frank; Lyte, Peter; Garay, Michelle; Babad, Jeffrey; Southall, Michael D

    2006-09-01

    Cutaneous fungal infections are frequently associated with an inflammatory component including irritated skin, itching and stinging/burning. Therapeutic anti-fungal agents that have anti-inflammatory activity have the potential to provide clinical benefit beyond fungus eradication. Recently, certain anti-fungal agents have been shown to have intrinsic anti-inflammatory activity, therefore we sought to determine the extent of the anti-inflammatory activity of these compounds. The anti-inflammatory activities of eight anti-fungal agents (butoconazole, ciclopirox olamine, fluconazole, miconazole nitrate, sertaconazole nitrate, terconazole, tioconazole and ketoconazole) were compared in a number of preclinical models of dermal inflammation and pruritus. While butoconazole, ciclopirox olamine, fluconazole, and miconazole nitrate were all found to have anti-inflammatory activity, only sertaconazole nitrate reduced the release of cytokines from activated lymphocytes and mitigated inflammation in animal models of irritant contact dermatitis and neurogenic inflammation. In addition, sertaconazole nitrate inhibited contact hypersensitivity and scratching responses in a murine model of pruritus. Furthermore, the in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of sertaconazole nitrate was found to be greater than other topical anti-fungal agents examined. These studies demonstrate that topical administration of clinically relevant concentrations of sertaconazole nitrate resulted in an efficacious anti-inflammatory activity against a broad spectrum of dermal inflammation models and itch. The anti-inflammatory properties of sertaconazole may contribute to the efficacy of the drug in the treatment of cutaneous fungal conditions and provide greater anti-inflammatory activity compared with other anti-fungal agents.

  6. Pathogen- and Host-Directed Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Macrolide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Helen C.; Theron, Annette J.; Cockeran, Riana; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics possess several, beneficial, secondary properties which complement their primary antimicrobial activity. In addition to high levels of tissue penetration, which may counteract seemingly macrolide-resistant bacterial pathogens, these agents also possess anti-inflammatory properties, unrelated to their primary antimicrobial activity. Macrolides target cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as structural cells, and are beneficial in controlling harmful inflammatory responses during acute and chronic bacterial infection. These secondary anti-inflammatory activities of macrolides appear to be particularly effective in attenuating neutrophil-mediated inflammation. This, in turn, may contribute to the usefulness of these agents in the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders of both microbial and nonmicrobial origin, predominantly of the airways. This paper is focused on the various mechanisms of macrolide-mediated anti-inflammatory activity which target both microbial pathogens and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, with emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22778497

  7. Quercetin-3-O-(2″-galloyl)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside inhibits TNF-α-activated NF-κB-induced inflammatory mediator production by suppressing ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung Soo; Jeong, Eun Byul; Kim, Yun Jeong; Lee, Min Sung; Seo, Seong Jun; Park, Kwan Hee; Lee, Min Won

    2013-08-01

    Quercetin and its derivatives have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. However, the effect of quercetin-3-O-(2″-galloyl)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (QGR), a new quercetin derivative, on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes is unclear. In addition, the effect of QGR on the ERK and NF-κB-mediated inflammatory process has not been studied. In human keratinocyte HaCat cells, we investigated the effect of QGR on the TNF-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in relation to the nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which regulates the transcription genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. QGR inhibited the TNF-α-stimulated production of cytokines and chemokines in HaCaT cells. QGR, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A, Bay 11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation) and cell signaling ERK inhibitor attenuated the TNF-α-induced formation of inflammatory mediators and activation of the NF-κB and ERK. Unlike other compounds, dexamethasone and cyclosporine A did not reduce formation of reactive oxygen species. The results show that QGR may attenuate TNF-α-stimulated inflammatory mediator production in HaCaT cells by suppressing the activation of the ERK-mediated NF-κB pathway that is mediated by reactive oxygen species. Additionally, QGR may exhibit a preventive effect against the proinflammatory mediator-induced skin diseases by inhibiting the activation of the ERK and NF-κB pathways.

  8. Downhill Running-Based Overtraining Protocol Improves Hepatic Insulin Signaling Pathway without Concomitant Decrease of Inflammatory Proteins.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Alisson L; Pereira, Bruno C; Pauli, José R; Cintra, Dennys E; de Souza, Claudio T; Ropelle, Eduardo R; da Silva, Adelino S R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of overtraining (OT) on insulin, inflammatory and gluconeogenesis signaling pathways in the livers of mice. Rodents were divided into control (CT), overtrained by downhill running (OTR/down), overtrained by uphill running (OTR/up) and overtrained by running without inclination (OTR). Rotarod, incremental load, exhaustive and grip force tests were used to evaluate performance. Thirty-six hours after a grip force test, the livers were extracted for subsequent protein analyses. The phosphorylation of insulin receptor beta (pIRbeta), glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (pGSK3beta) and forkhead box O1 (pFoxo1) increased in OTR/down versus CT. pGSK3beta was higher in OTR/up versus CT, and pFoxo1 was higher in OTR/up and OTR versus CT. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B (pAkt) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (pIRS-1) were higher in OTR/up versus CT and OTR/down. The phosphorylation of IκB kinase alpha and beta (pIKKalpha/beta) was higher in all OT protocols versus CT, and the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinases/Jun amino-terminal kinases (pSAPK-JNK) was higher in OTR/down versus CT. Protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) were higher in OTR versus CT. In summary, OTR/down improved the major proteins of insulin signaling pathway but up-regulated TRB3, an Akt inhibitor, and its association with Akt.

  9. An efficient total synthesis of a potent anti-inflammatory agent, benzocamphorin F, and its anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ren; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Liang, Jun-Weil; Shen, Yuh-Chiang; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2012-01-01

    A naturally occurring enynyl-benzenoid, benzocamphorin F (1), from the edible fungus Taiwanofungus camphoratus (Antrodia camphorata) was characterized by comprehensive spectral analysis. It displays anti-inflammatory bioactivity and is valuable for further biological studies. The present study is the first total synthesis of benzocamphorin F and the developed strategy described is a more efficient procedure that allowe the large-scale production of benzocamphorin F for further research of the biological activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. An Efficient Total Synthesis of a Potent Anti-Inflammatory Agent, Benzocamphorin F, and Its Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yu-Ren; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Liang, Jun-Weil; Shen, Yuh-Chiang; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2012-01-01

    A naturally occurring enynyl-benzenoid, benzocamphorin F (1), from the edible fungus Taiwanofungus camphoratus (Antrodia camphorata) was characterized by comprehensive spectral analysis. It displays anti-inflammatory bioactivity and is valuable for further biological studies. The present study is the first total synthesis of benzocamphorin F and the developed strategy described is a more efficient procedure that allowe the large-scale production of benzocamphorin F for further research of the biological activity both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22949872

  11. Coagulation factor V mediates inhibition of tissue factor signaling by activated protein C in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hai Po H.; Kerschen, Edward J.; Basu, Sreemanti; Hernandez, Irene; Zogg, Mark; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J.; Toso, Raffaella; Rezaie, Alireza R.; Fernández, José A.; Camire, Rodney M.; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The key effector molecule of the natural protein C pathway, activated protein C (aPC), exerts pleiotropic effects on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. Coagulation-independent cell signaling by aPC appears to be the predominant mechanism underlying its highly reproducible therapeutic efficacy in most animal models of injury and infection. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we demonstrate marked disease stage–specific effects of the anticoagulant and cell signaling functions of aPC. aPC resistance of factor (f)V due to the R506Q Leiden mutation protected against detrimental anticoagulant effects of aPC therapy but also abrogated the anti-inflammatory and mortality-reducing effects of the signaling-selective 5A-aPC variant that has minimal anticoagulant function. We found that procofactor V (cleaved by aPC at R506) and protein S were necessary cofactors for the aPC-mediated inhibition of inflammatory tissue-factor signaling. The anti-inflammatory cofactor function of fV involved the same structural features that govern its cofactor function for the anticoagulant effects of aPC, yet its anti-inflammatory activities did not involve proteolysis of activated coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. These findings reveal a novel biological function and mechanism of the protein C pathway in which protein S and the aPC-cleaved form of fV are cofactors for anti-inflammatory cell signaling by aPC in the context of endotoxemia and infection. PMID:26341257

  12. Activation of proinflammatory signaling by 4-hydroxynonenal-Src adducts in aged kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonggi; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Ki Wung; Moon, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Min Jo; An, Hye Jin; Jeong, Ji Won; Kim, Ye Ra; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, reactive 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) was shown to activate Src (a non-receptor tyrosine kinase) by forming an adduct on binding with a specific residue of Src, leading to the activation of proinflammatory signaling pathways in cultured cells. However, to date, the deleterious roles of 4-HNE in inflammatory signaling activation in kidneys during aging have not been explored. The purpose of the present study was to document the mechanisms by which 4-HNE induces inflammation in the kidney during aging. Initial experiments revealed that activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression was caused by 4-HNE activation, which suppressed transcriptional activity in the aged kidney. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 4-HNE revealed that Src caused senescence via NF-κB activation. Furthermore, our immunohistochemistry data showed that 4-HNE-adducted Src significantly increased in aged kidney tissues. The data showed age-related upregulation of downstream signaling molecules such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), activator protein-1 (AP-1), NF-κB, and COX-2 in a cell culture cell system. Taken together, the results of this study show that the formation of adducts between 4-HNE and Src activates inflammatory signaling pathways in the aged kidney, contributing to age-related nephropathy. PMID:27472463

  13. Macrophages from the synovium of active rheumatoid arthritis exhibit an activin A-dependent pro-inflammatory profile.

    PubMed

    Soler Palacios, Blanca; Estrada-Capetillo, Lizbeth; Izquierdo, Elena; Criado, Gabriel; Nieto, Concha; Municio, Cristina; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Pablos, Jose Luis; Corbí, Angel L; Puig-Kröger, Amaya

    2015-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease whose pathogenesis and severity correlates with the presence of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines within the inflamed synovium. Macrophage-derived cytokines fuel the pathological processes in RA and are targets of clinically successful therapies. However, although macrophage polarization determines cytokine production, the polarization state of macrophages in RA joints remains poorly defined. To dissect the molecular basis for the tissue-damaging effects of macrophages in RA joints, we undertook the phenotypic and transcriptomic characterization of ex vivo isolated CD14(+) RA synovial fluid (RA-SF) macrophages. Flow cytometry and gene profiling indicated that RA-SF macrophages express pro-inflammatory polarization markers (MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2), lack expression of markers associated with homeostatic and anti-inflammatory polarization (IGF1, HTR2B) and exhibit a transcriptomic profile that resembles the activin A-dependent gene signature of pro-inflammatory in vitro-generated macrophages. In fact, high levels of Smad-activating activin A were found in RA-SF and, accordingly, the Smad signalling pathway was activated in ex vivo-isolated RA-SF macrophages. In vitro experiments on monocytes and macrophages indicated that RA-SF promoted the acquisition of pro-inflammatory markers (INHBA, MMP12, EGLN3, CCR2) but led to a significant reduction in the expression of genes associated with homeostasis and inflammation resolution (FOLR2, SERPINB2, IGF1, CD36), thus confirming the pro-inflammatory polarization ability of RA-SF. Importantly, the macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF was inhibited by an anti-activin A-neutralizing antibody, thus demonstrating that activin A mediates the pro-inflammatory macrophage-polarizing ability of RA-SF. Moreover, and in line with these findings, multicolour immunofluorescence evidenced that macrophages within RA synovial membranes (RA-SM) also express pro-inflammatory

  14. In vivo and In vitro Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Indazole and Its Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Muniappan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The inflammatory response is closely intertwined with the process of repair. However in some diseases the inflammatory response may be exaggerated and sustained without apparent benefit and even with severe adverse complications. For decades, we have been primarily relying upon Nonsteroidal (NSAID) and Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory agents for management of various inflammatory conditions. However, adverse effects of these drugs are severe which often leads to patient’s non-compliance with inadequate relief. Therefore, there has been a constant pursuit to develop newer anti - inflammatory treatment with fewer side effects. Aim The study was designed to investigate the possible anti- inflammatory activity of indazole, its derivatives and to further investigate the possible cellular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effect. Materials and Methods Carrageenan induced hind paw oedema in rats was employed to study the acute anti-inflammatory activity of indazole and its derivatives. Further, the role of cyclooxygenase – 2, pro-inflammatory cytokines like Tumour Necrosis Factor – α, Interleukin – 1β and free radical scavenging activity (LPO, DPPH and NO) in the action of indazole and its derivatives was investigated using in vitro assays. Results SPSS version 16.0 software was used for analyse the anti-inflamatory data. The IC50 values of indazole and its derivatives obtained in in vitro experiments were calculated by linear regression analysis. Indazole and its derivatives significantly, dose dependently and time dependently inhibited carrageenan induced hind paw oedema. In addition, the test compounds inhibited cyclooxygenase–2, pro-inflammatory cytokines and free radicals in a concentration dependent manner. Conclusion The results of the present study revealed the potential anti-inflammatory action of investigated indazoles. The inhibition of cyclooxygenase -2, cytokines and free radicals may contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of

  15. Carbon monoxide alleviates ethanol-induced oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanyan; Gao, Chao; Shi, Yanru; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liang; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Xing, Mingyou; Liu, Liegang; Yao, Ping

    2013-11-15

    Stress-inducible protein heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is well-appreciative to counteract oxidative damage and inflammatory stress involving the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). The potential role and signaling pathways of HO-1 metabolite carbon monoxide (CO), however, still remained unclear. To explore the precise mechanisms, ethanol-dosed adult male Balb/c mice (5.0 g/kg.bw.) or ethanol-incubated primary rat hepatocytes (100 mmol/L) were pretreated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimmer (CORM-2, 8 mg/kg for mice or 20 μmol/L for hepatocytes), as well as other pharmacological reagents. Our data showed that CO released from HO-1 induction by quercetin prevented ethanol-derived oxidative injury, which was abolished by CO scavenger hemoglobin. The protection was mimicked by CORM-2 with the attenuation of GSH depletion, SOD inactivation, MDA overproduction, and the leakage of AST, ALT or LDH in serum and culture medium induced by ethanol. Moreover, CORM-2 injection or incubation stimulated p38 phosphorylation and suppressed abnormal Tnfa and IL-6, accompanying the alleviation of redox imbalance induced by ethanol and aggravated by inflammatory factors. The protective role of CORM-2 was abolished by SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) but not by PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Thus, HO-1 released CO prevented ethanol-elicited hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of gaseous signal molecule on ALD induced by naturally occurring phytochemicals. - Highlights: • CO alleviated ethanol-derived liver oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice. • CO eased ethanol and inflammatory factor-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. • The p38 MAPK is a key signaling mechanism for the protective function of CO in ALD.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of iridoid and catechol derivatives from Eucommia ulmoides Oliver.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Or, Terry C T; Yang, Cindy L H; Lau, Allan S Y

    2014-09-17

    Neuroinflammation and pro-inflammatory mediators play key roles in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including stroke, which account for a significant burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently, the unsatisfactory pharmacotherapy and side effects of the drugs led to the development of alternative medicine for treating these diseases. Du Zhong (DZ), Eucommia ulmoides Oliver leaves, is a commonly used herb in the therapy of stroke in China. We hypothesize that the components from DZ inhibit neuroinflammation. In this study, DZ was extracted and the bioactive fractions with inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production in BV-2 microglial cells were further separated using chromatography. Two purified bioactive compounds, genipin (compound C) and 4-(1,2-dimethoxyethyl)benzene-1,2-diol (compound F), were isolated and identified after spectroscopic analysis. The results showed that they inhibited LPS-stimulated NO and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production. Genipin exerted its anti-inflammatory effects through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, whereas compound F inhibited phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In conclusion, genipin and compound F have potential for developing into new drugs for treating neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbria-dependent activation of inflammatory genes in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Hua; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Davey, Michael; Takahashi, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Takanari; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological and pathological studies have suggested that infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can potentiate atherosclerosis and human coronary heart disease. Furthermore, infection with invasive, but not noninvasive P. gingivalis has been demonstrated to accelerate atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and to accelerate local inflammatory responses in aortic tissue. In the present study, using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays, we have defined the gene expression profile of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) after infection with invasive and noninvasive P. gingivalis. After infection of HAEC with invasive P. gingivalis strain 381, we observed the upregulation of 68 genes. Genes coding for the cytokines Gro2 and Gro3; the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and ELAM-1 (E-selectin); the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8); and the proinflammatory molecules IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 were among the most highly upregulated genes in P. gingivalis 381-infected HAEC compared to uninfected HAEC control. Increased mRNA levels for signaling molecules, transcriptional regulators, and cell surface receptors were also observed. Of note, only 4 of these 68 genes were also upregulated in HAEC infected with the noninvasive P. gingivalis fimA mutant. Reverse transcription-PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-/P-selectins, IL-6, and IL-8 in HAEC infected with invasive P. gingivalis. We also demonstrated that increased expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in aortic tissue of ApoE(-/-) mice orally challenged with invasive P. gingivalis but not with the noninvasive P. gingivalis fimA mutant by immunohistochemical analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that P. gingivalis fimbria-mediated invasion upregulates inflammatory gene expression in HAEC and in aortic

  18. Telmisartan mediates anti-inflammatory and not cognitive function through PPAR-γ agonism via SARM and MyD88 signaling.

    PubMed

    Prathab Balaji, S; Vijay Chand, C; Justin, A; Ramanathan, M

    2015-10-01

    Telmisartan (TM), an angiotensin II receptor I (AT1) blocker, has been reported to have agonist property with respect to PPAR-γ. Activation of PPAR-γ receptor by TM attenuated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated TLR4 central downstream inflammatory responses. However, the missing link between PPAR-γ and TLR4 signaling with TM stimulation has not been clarified. Hence, the present study has been designed to evaluate the molecular mechanism involving PPARγ-TLR4 signaling with TM stimulation in LPS induced inflammatory model. LPS was administered in rats through ICV and the rats were treated with either PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (GW) or TM or both. After 14days of LPS administration, the rats were subjected to behavioral tests and their brains were isolated for blotting techniques. The protein study includes NF-κB, PPAR-γ receptors, and their downstream proteins (MyD88 & SARM). The pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) levels were measured by ELISA and cresyl violet staining in the hippocampus region to measure the neuroprotective activity. Results have shown that TM significantly increased the motor co-ordination, cognitive functions, and activated SARM and PPAR-γ protein levels. Also, TM treatment decreased the NF-κB, MyD88 activation, and cytokines release in LPS rats. The co-administration of GW attenuated the TM responses in the parameters studied except cognitive functions. TM (10mg/kg) has significantly reduced the LPS mediated inflammatory responses. This resulted in effective regeneration of hippocampal neurons as observed by cresyl violet staining. It can be concluded that the activation of PPAR-γ receptors may increase the SARM and decrease the MyD88 and NF-κB expression. This negative regulation of SARM dependent inflammation control could be a possible mechanism for TM anti-neuroinflammatory activity. This study of TM in neuro-inflammatory model may further confirm the dual activities of TM that controls hypertension and cognition

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity of Dalbergia lanceolaria bark ethanol extract in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Kale, Mrudula; Misar, A V; Dave, Vivek; Joshi, Maruti; Mujumdar, A M

    2007-06-13

    Topical anti-inflammatory activity of Dalbergia lanceolaria Linn. bark ethanol extract was demonstrated in albino mice using TPA-, EPP- and AA-induced ear edema models. The systemic activity of extract was confirmed using acute and sub-acute anti-inflammatory models in albino rats. The ethanol extract exhibited significant systemic anti-inflammatory activity in Carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, by inhibition of histamine and prostaglandin phases of acute inflammation. The extract also showed significant activity against turpentine-induced exudative changes and no activity against granular tissue formation in cotton pellet-induced granuloma in albino rats. Thus, resultant anti-inflammatory activity might be due to effects on several mediators involving cyclo-oxygenase pathway resulting in prostaglandin formation and leukocyte migration from the vessels.

  20. Germline NLRP1 Mutations Cause Skin Inflammatory and Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes via Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Franklin L; Mamaï, Ons; Sborgi, Lorenzo; Boussofara, Lobna; Hopkins, Richard; Robinson, Kim; Szeverényi, Ildikó; Takeichi, Takuya; Balaji, Reshmaa; Lau, Aristotle; Tye, Hazel; Roy, Keya; Bonnard, Carine; Ahl, Patricia J; Jones, Leigh Ann; Baker, Paul; Lacina, Lukas; Otsuka, Atsushi; Fournie, Pierre R; Malecaze, François; Lane, E Birgitte; Akiyama, Masashi; Kabashima, Kenji; Connolly, John E; Masters, Seth L; Soler, Vincent J; Omar, Salma Samir; McGrath, John A; Nedelcu, Roxana; Gribaa, Moez; Denguezli, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Hiller, Sebastian; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-09-22

    Inflammasome complexes function as key innate immune effectors that trigger inflammation in response to pathogen- and danger-associated signals. Here, we report that germline mutations in the inflammasome sensor NLRP1 cause two overlapping skin disorders: multiple self-healing palmoplantar carcinoma (MSPC) and familial keratosis lichenoides chronica (FKLC). We find that NLRP1 is the most prominent inflammasome sensor in human skin, and all pathogenic NLRP1 mutations are gain-of-function alleles that predispose to inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, NLRP1 mutations lead to increased self-oligomerization by disrupting the PYD and LRR domains, which are essential in maintaining NLRP1 as an inactive monomer. Primary keratinocytes from patients experience spontaneous inflammasome activation and paracrine IL-1 signaling, which is sufficient to cause skin inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. Our findings establish a group of non-fever inflammasome disorders, uncover an unexpected auto-inhibitory function for the pyrin domain, and provide the first genetic evidence linking NLRP1 to skin inflammatory syndromes and skin cancer predisposition.

  1. α1-Antitrypsin Activates Protein Phosphatase 2A to Counter Lung Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Patrick; Eden, Edward; Pillai, Manju; Campos, Michael; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: α1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) was identified as a plasma protease inhibitor; however, it is now recognized as a multifunctional protein that modulates immunity, inflammation, proteostasis, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Like A1AT, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine-threonine phosphatase, regulates similar biologic processes and plays a key role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: Given their common effects, this study investigated whether A1AT acts via PP2A to alter tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling, inflammation, and proteolytic responses in this disease. Methods: PP2A activity was measured in peripheral blood neutrophils from A1AT-deficient (PiZZ) and healthy (PiMM) individuals and in alveolar macrophages from normal (60 mg/kg) and high-dose (120 mg/kg) A1AT-treated PiZZ subjects. PP2A activation was assessed in human neutrophils, airway epithelial cells, and peripheral blood monocytes treated with plasma purified A1AT protein. Similarly, lung PP2A activity was measured in mice administered intranasal A1AT. PP2A was silenced in lung epithelial cells treated with A1AT and matrix metalloproteinase and cytokine production was then measured following TNF-α stimulation. Measurements and Main Results: PP2A was significantly lower in neutrophils isolated from PiZZ compared with PiMM subjects. A1AT protein activated PP2A in human alveolar macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils, airway epithelial cells, and in mouse lungs. This activation required functionally active A1AT protein and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression. A1AT treatment acted via PP2A to prevent p38 and IκBα phosphorylation and matrix metalloproteinase and cytokine induction in TNF-α–stimulated epithelial cells. Conclusions: Together, these data indicate that A1AT modulates PP2A to counter inflammatory and proteolytic responses induced by TNF signaling in the lung. PMID:25341065

  2. Defining the therapeutic time window for suppressing the inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling after status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yifeng; Kemper, Timothy; Qiu, Jiange; Jiang, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a common feature in nearly all neurological and some psychiatric disorders. Resembling its extraneural counterpart, neuroinflammation can be both beneficial and detrimental depending on the responding molecules. The overall effect of inflammation on disease progression is highly dependent on the extent of inflammatory mediator production and the duration of inflammatory induction. The time-dependent aspect of inflammatory responses suggests that the therapeutic time window for quelling neuroinflammation might vary with molecular targets and injury types. Therefore, it is important to define the therapeutic time window for anti-inflammatory therapeutics, as contradicting or negative results might arise when different treatment regimens are utilized even in similar animal models. Herein, we discuss a few critical factors that can help define the therapeutic time window and optimize treatment paradigm for suppressing the cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin-mediated inflammation after status epilepticus. These determinants should also be relevant to other anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies for the CNS diseases. PMID:26689339

  3. A novel compound DSC suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses by inhibition of Akt/NF-κB signalling in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Pan, Li-Long; Jia, Yao-Ling; Wu, Dan; Xiong, Qing-Hui; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2013-05-15

    A novel compound [4-(2-acetoxy-3-((R)-3-(benzylthio)-1-methoxy-1-oxopropan-2-ylamino)-3-oxopropyl)-1,2-phenylene diacetate (DSC)], derived from Danshensu, exerted cytoprotective effects by anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities in vitro. Herein, we reported the protective effects of DSC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. We showed that DSC concentration-dependently attenuated nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression with less cytotoxicity. Signal transduction studies indicated that DSC significantly inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of Akt, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, p38, or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Meanwhile, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 was decreased by DSC. Furthermore, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, iNOS expression, and NO production, which was also mimicked by pretreatment with DSC. These results suggested that DSC attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory response in macrophages, at least in part, through suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling and NF-κB activation.

  4. FFAR4 (GPR120) Signaling Is Not Required for Anti-Inflammatory and Insulin-Sensitizing Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Pærregaard, Simone Isling; Agerholm, Marianne; Serup, Annette Karen; Kiens, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor-4 (FFAR4), also known as GPR120, has been reported to mediate the beneficial effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs) by inducing an anti-inflammatory immune response. Thus, activation of FFAR4 has been reported to ameliorate chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance accompanying obesity. However, conflicting reports on the role of FFAR4 in mediating the effects of ω3-PUFAs are emerging, suggesting that FFAR4 may not be the sole effector. Hence analyses of the importance of this receptor in relation to other signaling pathways and prominent effects of ω3-PUFAs remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we used Ffar4 knockouts (KO) and heterozygous (HET) mice fed either low fat, low sucrose reference diet; high fat, high sucrose ω3-PUFA; or high fat, high sucrose ω6-PUFA diet for 36 weeks. We demonstrate that both KO and HET mice fed ω3-PUFAs were protected against obesity, hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation, and whole-body insulin resistance. Moreover, ω3-PUFA fed mice had increased circulating protein levels of the anti-inflammatory adipokine, adiponectin, decreased fasting insulin levels, and decreased mRNA expression of several proinflammatory molecules within visceral adipose tissue. In conclusion, we find that FFAR4 signaling is not required for the reported anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects mediated by ω3-PUFAs. PMID:27999451

  5. [In vitro anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activities of flavans from Ilex centrochinensis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-jun; Yu, Li-juan; Li, Yan-ci; Liu, Meng-yuan; Wu, Zheng-zhi

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activities of flavans from flex centrochinensis S. Y. Hu in vitro and their structure-activity relationship. LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage was used as inflammatory model. MTT assay for cell availability, Griess reaction for nitric oxide (NO) production, the content of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and PGE, were detected with ELISA kits; DPPH, superoxide anion and hydroxyl free radicals scavenging activities were also investigated. According to the result, all flavans tested exhibited anti-inflammatory effect in different levels. Among them, compounds 1, 3, 4 and 6 showed potent anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of NO, TNF-alpha, IL-lp and IL-6, of which 1 was the most effective inhibitor, however, 2 and 5 were relatively weak or inactive. The order of free radical scavenging activities was similar to that of anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, these results suggest that 3, 4 and 6, especially of 1, were,in part responsible for the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activity of Ilex centrochinensis. Hydroxyl group at 4'-position of B-ring plays an important role in the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging capacities.

  6. Bergenin Plays an Anti-Inflammatory Role via the Modulation of MAPK and NF-κB Signaling Pathways in a Mouse Model of LPS-Induced Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-jiao; Guo, Meng-yao; Zhang, Ze-cai; Wang, Tian-cheng; Cao, Yong-guo; Zhang, Nai-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis is a major disease in humans and other animals and is characterized by mammary gland inflammation. It is a major disease of the dairy industry. Bergenin is an active constituent of the plants of genus Bergenia. Research indicates that bergenin has multiple biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effects and mechanism of bergenin on the mammary glands during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis. In this study, mice were treated with LPS to induce mammary gland mastitis as a model for the disease. Bergenin treatment was initiated after LPS stimulation for 24 h. The results indicated that bergenin attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased the concentration of NO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, which were increased in LPS-induced mouse mastitis. Furthermore, bergenin downregulated the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway proteins in mammary glands with mastitis. In conclusion, bergenin reduced the expression of NO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 proinflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the activation of the NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, and it may represent a novel treatment strategy for mastitis.

  7. Exploring the anti-inflammatory activity of a novel 2-phenylquinazoline analog with protection against inflammatory injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Nabanita; Das, Subhadip; Bose, Dipayan; Banerjee, Somenath; Das, Sujata; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Saha, Krishna Das

    2012-10-15

    Inflammation is a protective immune response against harmful stimuli whose long time continuation results in host disease. Quinazolinones are nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds with wide spectrum of biological activities. The anticancer effect of a 3-(arylideneamino)‐phenylquinazoline-4(3H)-one derivative was reported earlier. The anti-inflammatory effect of these quinazolinone derivatives has now been examined in endotoxin stimulated macrophages and in different in vivo models of inflammation by measuring the proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), mediators NO and NF-κB (by ELISA and western blot), and translocation of the nuclear factor kB (by immunocytochemical analysis). To elucidate the in vivo effect, mice endotoxin model was and the various levels of edema, inflammatory pain and vascular permeability were studied. One of the quinazolinone derivatives showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in stimulated macrophage cells by inhibiting the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2, p-IκB and NF-κBp65. Significant (P < 0.01) improvement was observed in the mortality of endotoxemic mice. The carrageenan and formalin-induced paw edema thicknesses were found to be reduced significantly (P < 0.01) along with the reduction of pain, vascular permeability and edema induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (P < 0.01). These findings indicate that 3-(arylideneamino)‐phenylquinazoline-4(3H)-one derivative as a potential anti-inflammatory agent. -- Highlights: ► 2-phenylquinazoline analog suppresses the cytokines in stimulated macrophages. ► 2-phenylquinazoline analog down regulated NF-kB P65 translocation. ► Role of 2-phenylquinazoline analog in endotoximia and peripheral inflammations.

  8. Estrogen alters baseline and inflammatory-induced cytokine levels independent from hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity.

    PubMed

    Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Amador, Nicole; Abrams, Lisa; Hunter, Deirtra; Jenab, Shirzad; Quiñones-Jenab, Vanya

    2015-04-01

    Although estrogen reduces inflammatory-mediated pain responses, the mechanisms behind its effects are unclear. This study investigated if estrogen modulates inflammatory signaling by reducing baseline or inflammation-induced cytokine levels in the injury-site, serum, dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and/or spinal cord. We further tested whether estrogen effects on cytokine levels are in part mediated through hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation. Lumbar DRG, spinal cord, serum, and hind paw tissue were analyzed for cytokine levels in 17β-estradiol-(20%) or vehicle-(100% cholesterol) treated female rats following ovariectomy/sham adrenalectomy (OVX), adrenalectomy/sham ovariectomy (ADX) or ADX+OVX operation at baseline and post formalin injection. Formalin significantly increased pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 levels in the paw, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in the DRG, spinal cord and serum in comparison to naïve conditions. Estrogen replacement significantly increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in the DRG. Centrally, estradiol significantly decreased pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β levels, as well as IL-10 levels, in the spinal cord in comparison to cholesterol treatment. At both sites, most estradiol modulatory effects occurred irrespective of pain or surgical condition. Estradiol alone had no influence on cytokine release in the paw or serum, indicating that estrogen effects were site-specific. Although cytokine levels were altered between surgical conditions at baseline and following formalin administration, ADX operation did not significantly reverse estradiol's modulation of cytokine levels. These results suggest that estrogen directly regulates cytokines independent of HPA axis activity in vivo, in part by reducing cytokine levels in the spinal cord.

  9. GYF-17, a chloride substituted 2-(2-phenethyl)-chromone, suppresses LPS-induced inflammatory mediator production in RAW264.7 cells by inhibiting STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhixiang; Gu, Yufan; Zhao, Yunfang; Song, Yuelin; Li, Jun; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-06-01

    GYF-17, a 2-(2-phenethyl)-chromone derivative, was isolated from agarwood and showed superior activity of inhibiting NO production of RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS in our preliminary pharmacodynamic screening. In order to develop novel therapeutic drug for acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, the anti-inflammatory activity and underlying mechanism of GYF-17 were investigated in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells. The results showed that GYF-17 could reduce LPS-induced expression of iNOS and then result in the decrement of NO production. More meaningful, the expression and secretion of key pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, were intensively inhibited by GYF-17. Furthermore, GYF-17 also down regulated the expression of COX2 and the production of PGE2 which plays important role in causing algesthesia during inflammatory response. In mechanism study, GYF-17 selectively suppressed phosphorylation of STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 during the activation of NF-κB, MAPK and STAT signaling pathways induced by LPS. Collectively, GYF-17 can intensively suppress the production of LPS-induced inflammatory mediators in RAW264.7 cells by inhibiting STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and thereby shows great potential to be developed into therapeutic drug for inflammatory diseases.

  10. Selective amplification of glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory activity through synergistic multi-target action of a combination drug

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Grant R; Avery, William; Finelli, Alyce L; Farwell, Melissa; Fraser, Christopher C; Borisy, Alexis A

    2009-01-01

    observed in the cellular network of corticotroph AtT-20/D16v-F2 cells in vitro, as measured by pro-opiomelanocortin expression and adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion. Conclusions These data suggest that the multi-target mechanism of low-dose prednisolone and dipyridamole creates a dissociated activity profile with an increased therapeutic window through cellular network selective amplification of glucocorticoid-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling. PMID:19171052

  11. Activated platelets signal chemokine synthesis by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; Elstad, M R; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Morrissey, J H; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1996-01-01

    Human blood monocytes adhere rapidly and for prolonged periods to activated platelets that display P-selectin, an adhesion protein that recognizes a specific ligand on leukocytes, P-selectin glycoprotein-1. We previously demonstrated that P-selectin regulates expression and secretion of cytokines by stimulated monocytes when it is presented in a purified, immobilized form or by transfected cells. Here we show that thrombin-activated platelets induce the expression and secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and IL-8 by monocytes. Enhanced monokine synthesis requires engagement of P-selectin glycoprotein-1 on the leukocyte by P-selectin on the platelet. Secretion of the chemokines is not, however, directly signaled by P-selectin; instead, tethering of the monocytes by P-selectin is required for their activation by RANTES (regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed presumed secreted), a platelet chemokine not previously known to induce immediate-early gene products in monocytes. Adhesion of monocytes to activated platelets results in nuclear translocation of p65 (RelA), a component of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors that binds kappaB sequences in the regulatory regions of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-8, and other immediate-early genes. However, expression of tissue factor, a coagulation protein that also has a kappaB sequence in the 5' regulatory region of its gene, is not induced in monocytes adherent to activated platelets. Thus, contact of monocytes with activated platelets differentially affects the expression of monocyte products. These experiments suggest that activated platelets regulate chemokine secretion by monocytes in inflammatory lesions in vivo and provide a model for the study of gene regulation in cell-cell interactions. PMID:8617886

  12. CpGB DNA activates dermal macrophages and specifically recruits inflammatory monocytes into the skin.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Allison L; Rice, Lisa; Affandi, Alsya J; DiMarzio, Michael; Rifkin, Ian R; Stifano, Giuseppina; Christmann, Romy B; Lafyatis, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) drives innate immune responses after recognition of foreign or endogenous DNA containing unmethylated CpG motifs. DNA-mediated TLR9 activation is highly implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune skin diseases, yet its contribution to the inflammation seen in these diseases remains unclear. In this study, TLR9 ligand, CpGB DNA, was administered to mice via a subcutaneous osmotic pump with treatment lasting 1 or 4 weeks. Gene expression and immunofluorescence analyses were used to determine chemokine expression and cell recruitment in the skin surrounding the pump outlet. CpGB DNA skin treatment dramatically induced a marked influx of CD11b+ F4/80+ macrophages, increasing over 4 weeks of treatment, and induction of IFNγ and TNFα expression. Chemokines, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were highly induced in CpGB DNA-treated skin, although abrogation of these signalling pathways individually did not alter macrophage accumulation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that TLR9 activation in the skin increased circulating CD11b+ CD115+ Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes following 1 week of CpGB DNA treatment. Additionally, skin-resident CD11b+ cells were found to initially take up subcutaneous CpGB DNA and propagate the subsequent immune response. Using diphtheria toxin-induced monocyte depletion mouse model, gene expression analysis demonstrated that CD11b+ cells are responsible for the CpGB DNA-induced cytokine and chemokine response. Overall, these data demonstrate that chronic TLR9 activation induces a specific inflammatory response, ultimately leading to a striking and selective accumulation of macrophages in the skin.

  13. Theacrine, a purine alkaloid with anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xiaorong; Zheng, Xinqiang; Li, Jing; Ye, Chuangxing; Song, Xiaohong

    2010-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of theacrine (1, 3, 7, 9-tetramethyluric acid), a purine alkaloid which is abundantly present in Camellia kucha, were investigated. Xylene-induced ear edema, acetic acid-induced vascular permeability and lambda-carrageenan-induced paw edema were used to investigate anti-inflammatory activity, and acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate tests were used to determine analgesic effect. Oral administration of theacrine (8-32 mg/kg) induced dose-related anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. On the other hand, oral caffeine administration (8-32 mg/kg) did not show an inhibitory effect on the inhibition of inflammatory response or cause analgesia. Additionally, the result of the acute toxicity test showed that the LD(50) of theacrine was 810.6 mg/kg (769.5-858.0mg/kg). The data obtained suggest theacrine possessed analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities.

  14. Antimicrobial, Antiparasitic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Lopezia racemosa

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Paredes, Carla; Bolívar Balbás, Paulina; Juárez, Zaida Nelly; Sánchez Arreola, Eugenio; Hernández, Luis Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential benefits of the Mexican medicinal plant Lopezia racemosa (Onagraceae). Extracts and fractions from aerial parts of this plant were assessed to determine their antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities in vitro. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with various solvents and fractionated accordingly. Extracts and fractions were tested against a panel of nine bacterial and four fungal species. The antiparasitic activity was tested against Leishmania donovani, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was determined by measuring the secretion of interleukin-6 from human-derived macrophages. The same macrophage cell line was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of the compounds. Various extracts and fractions showed antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, and anti-inflammatory activities. The hexanic fraction HF 11-14b was the most interesting fraction with antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activities. The benefit of L. racemosa as a traditional medicinal plant was confirmed as shown by its antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the biological activities of L. racemosa, including antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:23843731

  15. Constituents from Vigna vexillata and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Yann-Lii; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Liou, Kun-Pei; Huang, Bow-Shin; Chen, Guo-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The seeds of Vigna genus are important food resources and there have already been many reports regarding their bioactivities. In our preliminary bioassay, the chloroform layer of methanol extracts of V. vexillata demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory bioactivity. Therefore, the present research is aimed to purify and identify the anti-inflammatory principles of V. vexillata. One new sterol (1) and two new isoflavones (2,3) were reported from the natural sources for the first time and their chemical structures were determined by the spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analyses. In addition, 37 known compounds were identified by comparison of their physical and spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature. Among the isolates, daidzein (23), abscisic acid (25), and quercetin (40) displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. PMID:22949828

  16. NF-κB activation primes cells to a pro-inflammatory polarized response to a TLR7 agonist

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongdae; Hayashi, Masaaki; Lo, Jeng-Fan; Fearns, Colleen; Chu, Wen-Ming; Luo, Yunping; Xiang, Rong; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) mediates anti-viral immunity by recognizing ssRNA viruses. Small molecular weight TLR7 agonists have been approved, or are being evaluated, for treatment of cancers or infectious diseases. Although TLR7 is predominantly expressed in a restricted set of immune cell types including plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), it is also expressed in non-native expressing cells (e.g., hepatocytes) under certain circumstances. To elucidate the molecular basis of TLR7 induction by pro-inflammatory stimulation and the subsequent cellular responses in these non-native TLR7-expressing cell types, we firstly cloned and characterized the 5′-promoter region of TLR7. The proximal region of this promoter drives the transcription of the TLR7 gene. Pro-inflammatory stimuli activated TLR7 transcription via a NF-κB binding motif in this region, and this activation could be blocked by mutation of the NF-κB binding site or addition of NF-κB inhibitors. Further studies showed that pretreatment of the Hep3B hepatocytes with TNF-α or IL-1 rendered them responsive to TLR7 activation by a TLR7 agonist. However, distinct from TLR7 activation in pDCs, which respond to stimulation with Th1 polarized cytokine production, TLR7 induction by pro-inflammatory signals in hepatocytes reconstitutes the NF-κB-dependent cascade but not the IRF7-dependent cascade, resulting in a pro-inflammatory polarized response rather than a Th1 polarized response. These results indicate that inflammatory stimulation is capable of priming cells to respond to TLR7 agonist with an immune response that differs from that in native TLR7-expressing cells. PMID:19426145

  17. Shizukaol B, an active sesquiterpene from Chloranthus henryi, attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory responses in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li-Long; Xu, Peng; Luo, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Si-Yu; Zhu, Yi-Zhun; Hu, Jin-Feng; Liu, Xin-Hua

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of shizukaol B, a lindenane-type dimeric sesquiterpene isolated from the whole plant of Chloranthus henryi, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of BV2 microglial cells in vitro. Our data showed that shizukaol B concentration-dependently suppressed expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia. Meanwhile, shizukaol B concentration- and time-dependently inhibited LPS-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK) activation, but had little effect on extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 or p38 phosphorylation. Furthermore, shizukaol B significantly blocked LPS-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, evidenced by reduced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of c-Jun and DNA binding activity of AP-1. Taken together, our findings suggest that shizukaol B exerts anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-activated microglia partly by modulating JNK-AP-1 signaling pathway.

  18. Amelioration of Inflammatory Cytokines Mix Stimulation: A Pretreatment of CD137 Signaling Study on VSMC

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Xiao Yang; Wang, Zhong Qun; Shao, Chen; Wang, Cui Ping; Chen, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed little CD137 expressed in normal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and it is important to find a valid way to elevate it before studying its function. The level of CD137 was detected by RT-PCR, western blot, and flow cytometry, respectively. CD137 signaling activation was activated by agonist antibody and measured through phenotype transformation indicators and cell functions. Proteins in supernatants were detected by ELISA. The total CD137 elevates under different concentrations of CM treatment. Among these, 25 ng/ml CM treatment increases the CD137 expression mostly. However, flow cytometry demonstrates that 10 ng/ml CM elevates surface CD137 more significantly than other concentrations and reaches the peak at 36 h. At 10 ng/ml, but not 25 ng/ml CM pretreatment, the levels of phenotype related proteins such as SM-MHC, α-SMA, and calponin decrease while vimentin and NFATc1 increase, suggesting that VSMCs undergo phenotype transformation. Transwell, CCK-8 assay, and ELISA showed that the ability of VSMCs viability, migration, and IL-2 and IL-6 secretion induced by CD137 signaling was significantly enhanced by the pretreatment of 10 ng/ml CM. This research suggested that 10 ng/ml CM pretreatment is more reasonable than other concentrations when exploring CD137 function in VSMCs. PMID:28280290

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of short chain fatty acids in IFN-gamma-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells: involvement of NF-kappaB and ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Jae-Chul; Kim, Won-Ki; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2007-01-01

    The overactivation of macrophages causes abnormal cell death and chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the modulation of macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity is expected to become a new therapeutic strategy for various inflammatory diseases. In this study, three types of short chain fatty acids (sodium butyrate (NaB), sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPB), sodium phenylacetate (NaPA)) were found to have anti-inflammatory effects in IFN-gamma-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. They inhibited the expression of iNOS, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 induced by IFN-gamma, while they enhanced the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. Their potency as anti-inflammatory agents was in the order of NaB>NaPB>NaPA. Further mechanistic studies revealed these three agents to repress the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of NF-kappaB, which is an important modulator of inflammation. In addition, these agents repressed the IFN-gamma-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation without affecting the Jak/STAT activities. The potency of NF-kappaB and ERK inhibition was also in the order of NaB>NaPB>NaPA. The results suggest that the NF-kappaB and ERK signaling pathways are at least in part involved in the anti-inflammatory activities of these SCFAs. Considering that SCFAs are normally present in the body and have few side effects, they might be promising agents for the prevention and/or treatment of various inflammatory diseases.

  20. Evidence for contributions of interactions of constituents to the anti-inflammatory activity of Hypericum perforatum.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Kimberly D P; Birt, Diane F

    2014-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum (Hp) extracts contain many different classes of constituents including flavonoids and biflavonoids, phloroglucinols, naphthodianthrones, caffeic acid derivatives, and unknown and/or unidentified compounds. Many constituents may be responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of Hp including quercetin and derivatives, hyperforin, pseudohypericin, and amentoflavone. In line with antidepressant data, it appears that the interactions of constituents may be important for the anti-inflammatory activity of Hp. Interactions of constituents, tested in bioavailability models, may explain why synergistic mechanisms have been found to be important for antidepressant and antiproliferative bioactivities. This review highlights the relationship among individual constituents and the anti-inflammatory activity of Hp extracts and proposes that interactions of constituents may be important for the anti-inflammatory activity of botanical extracts, although the exact mechanisms of the interactions are still unclear.

  1. Microscopic features for initial diagnosis and disease activity evaluation in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, Aude; Geboes, Karel; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by 2 major entities: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). In clinical practice, separation of UC and CD has been based on a variety of clinical features, symptoms, endoscopic and radiological, gross and microscopic characteristics. The microscopic diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease is based on a combination of 2 types of lesions: architectural abnormalities and inflammatory features. However, microscopic distinction between these 2 entities can be difficult and often results in an interim diagnosis of "indeterminate colitis." Recommendations are made to encourage pathologists to give an indication of the activity of the disease: in UC, biopsies are used to discriminate between quiescent disease, inactive disease, and different grades of activity; in CD, evaluation of disease activity is limited and inactivity in the biopsy may not reflect inactivity in the patient. The aim of this review was to summarize microscopic features of inflammatory bowel disease for initial diagnosis and evaluation of disease activity in both CD and UC.

  2. Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T-cells drives epigenetic imprinting of pro-inflammatory properties and promotes colitis and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keerthivasan, Shilpa; Aghajani, Katayoun; Dose, Marei; Molinero, Luciana; Khan, Mohammad W.; Venkatesvaran, Vysak; Weber, Christopher; Emmanuel, Akinola Olumide; Sun, Tianjao; Ramos, Elena M.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Mulcahy, Mary; Blatner, Nichole; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Gounari, Fotini

    2014-01-01

    The density and type of lymphocytes that infiltrate colon tumors are predictive of the clinical outcome of colon cancer. High densities of TH17 cells and inflammation predict poor outcome, while infiltration by Tregs that naturally suppress inflammation is associated with longer patient survival. However, the role of Tregs in cancer remains controversial. We recently reported that Tregs in colon cancer patients can become pro-inflammatory and tumor promoting. These properties were directly linked with their expression of RORγt, the signature transcription factor of TH17 cells. Here, we report that Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T-cells promotes expression of RORγt. Expression of β-catenin was elevated in T-cells and Tregs of patients with colitis and colon cancer. Genetically engineered activation of β-catenin in mouse T-cells resulted in enhanced chromatin accessibility in the proximity of Tcf-1 binding sites genome-wide, induced expression of TH17 signature genes including RORγt, and promoted TH17-mediated inflammation. Strikingly, the mice had inflammation of intestine and colon and developed lesions indistinguishable from colitis-induced cancer. Activation of β-catenin only in Tregs was sufficient to produce inflammation and initiate cancer. Based on these findings we conclude that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T-cells and/or Tregs is causatively linked with the imprinting of pro-inflammatory properties and the promotion of colon cancer. PMID:24574339

  3. Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Physalis Alkekengi var. franchetii and Its Main Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zunpeng; Xing, Na; Wang, Qiuhong; Li, Xinli; Xu, Bingqing; Li, Zhenyu; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether the 50% EtOH fraction from AB-8 macroporous resin fractionation of a 70% EtOH extract of P. Alkekengi (50-EFP) has antibacterial and/or anti-inflammatory activity both in vivo and in vitro and to investigate the mechanism of 50-EFP anti-inflammatory activity. Additionally, this study sought to define the chemical composition of 50-EFP. Results indicated that 50-EFP showed significant antibacterial activity in vitro and efficacy in vivo. Moreover, 50-EFP significantly reduced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) production in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated THP-1 cells. Nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (examined at the protein level) in THP-1 cells were suppressed by 50-EFP, which inhibited nuclear translocation of p65. Consistent with this anti-inflammatory activity in vitro, 50-EFP reduced inflammation in both animal models. Finally, seventeen compounds (8 physalins and 9 flavones) were isolated as major components of 50-EFP. Our data demonstrate that 50-EFP has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities both in vitro and in vivo. The anti-inflammatory effect appears to occur, at least in part, through the inhibition of nuclear translocation of p65. Moreover, physalins and flavones are probably the active components in 50-EFP that exert antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27057196

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of AP-SF, a ginsenoside-enriched fraction, from Korean ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kwang-Soo; Hong, Yong Deog; Kim, Yong; Sung, Nak Yoon; Yang, Sungjae; Lee, Kyoung Min; Park, Joo Yong; Park, Jun Seong; Rho, Ho Sik; Shin, Song Seok; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    Background Korean ginseng is an ethnopharmacologically valuable herbal plant with various biological properties including anticancer, antiatherosclerosis, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Since there is currently no drug or therapeutic remedy derived from Korean ginseng, we developed a ginsenoside-enriched fraction (AP-SF) for prevention of various inflammatory symptoms. Methods The anti-inflammatory efficacy of AP-SF was tested under in vitro inflammatory conditions including nitric oxide (NO) production and inflammatory gene expression. The molecular events of inflammatory responses were explored by immunoblot analysis. Results AP-SF led to a significant suppression of NO production compared with a conventional Korean ginseng saponin fraction, induced by both lipopolysaccharide and zymosan A. Interestingly, AP-SF strongly downregulated the mRNA levels of genes for inducible NO synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, and cyclooxygenase) without affecting cell viability. In agreement with these observations, AP-SF blocked the nuclear translocation of c-Jun at 2 h and also reduced phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and TAK-1, all of which are important for c-Jun translocation. Conclusion Our results suggest that AP-SF inhibits activation of c-Jun-dependent inflammatory events. Thus, AP-SF may be useful as a novel anti-inflammatory remedy. PMID:26045689

  5. Polysaccharide Constituents of Three Types of Sea Urchin Shells and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activities.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Heng; Shang, Xiaohui; Dong, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Heng; Lu, Xiaoling

    2015-09-16

    As a source of potent anti-inflammatory traditional medicines, the quantitative chromatographic fingerprints of sea urchin shell polysaccharides were well established via pre-column derivatization high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Based on the quantitative results, the content of fucose and glucose could be used as preliminary distinguishing indicators among three sea urchin shell species. Besides, the anti-inflammatory activities of the polysaccharides from sea urchin shells and their gonads were also determined. The gonad polysaccharide of Anthocidaris crassispina showed the most potent anti-inflammatory activity among all samples tested.

  6. Polysaccharide Constituents of Three Types of Sea Urchin Shells and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Heng; Shang, Xiaohui; Dong, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Heng; Lu, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    As a source of potent anti-inflammatory traditional medicines, the quantitative chromatographic fingerprints of sea urchin shell polysaccharides were well established via pre-column derivatization high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Based on the quantitative results, the content of fucose and glucose could be used as preliminary distinguishing indicators among three sea urchin shell species. Besides, the anti-inflammatory activities of the polysaccharides from sea urchin shells and their gonads were also determined. The gonad polysaccharide of Anthocidaris crassispina showed the most potent anti-inflammatory activity among all samples tested. PMID:26389925

  7. Endogenous hepatic glucocorticoid receptor signaling coordinates sex-biased inflammatory gene expression.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Matthew A; Cidlowski, John A

    2016-02-01

    An individual's sex affects gene expression and many inflammatory diseases present in a sex-biased manner. Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are regulators of inflammatory genes, but their role in sex-specific responses is unclear. Our goal was to evaluate whether GR differentially regulates inflammatory gene expression in male and female mouse liver. Twenty-five percent of the 251 genes assayed by nanostring analysis were influenced by sex. Of these baseline sexually dimorphic inflammatory genes, 82% was expressed higher in female liver. Pathway analyses defined pattern-recognition receptors as the most sexually dimorphic pathway. We next exposed male and female mice to the proinflammatory stimulus LPS. Female mice had 177 genes regulated by treatment with LPS, whereas males had 149, with only 66% of LPS-regulated genes common between the sexes. To determine the contribution of GR to sexually dimorphic inflammatory genes we performed nanostring analysis on liver-specific GR knockout (LGRKO) mice in the presence or absence of LPS. Comparing LGRKO to GR(flox/flox) revealed that 36 genes required GR for sexually dimorphic expression, whereas 24 genes became sexually dimorphic in LGRKO. Fifteen percent of LPS-regulated genes in GR(flox/flox) were not regulated in male and female LGRKO mice treated with LPS. Thus, GR action is influenced by sex to regulate inflammatory gene expression.

  8. Discovery of a New Inhibitor of Myeloid Differentiation 2 from Cinnamamide Derivatives with Anti-Inflammatory Activity in Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gaozhi; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Xing; Fang, Qilu; Wang, Zhe; Fu, Lili; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yunjie; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-24

    Acute inflammatory diseases, including acute lung injury and sepsis, remain the most common life-threatening illness in intensive care units worldwide. Cinnamamide has been incorporated in several synthetic compounds with therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the possible mechanism and direct molecular target of cinnamamides for their anti-inflammatory effects were rarely investigated. In this study, we synthesized a series of cinnamamides and evaluated their anti-inflammatory activities. The most active compound, 2i, was found to block LPS-induced MD2/TLR4 pro-inflammatory signaling activation in vitro and to attenuate LPS-caused sepsis and acute lung injury in vivo. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that 2i exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by directly targeting and binding MD2 in Arg90 and Tyr102 residues and inhibiting MD2/TLR4 complex formation. Taken together, this work presents a novel MD2 inhibitor, 2i, which has the potential to be developed as a candidate for the treatment of sepsis, and provides a new lead structure for the development of anti-inflammatory agents targeting MD2.

  9. Serum Inflammatory Mediators as Markers of Human Lyme Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soloski, Mark J.; Crowder, Lauren A.; Lahey, Lauren J.; Wagner, Catriona A.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and cytokines are key signaling molecules that orchestrate the trafficking of immune cells, direct them to sites of tissue injury and inflammation and modulate their states of activation and effector cell function. We have measured, using a multiplex-based approach, the levels of 58 immune mediators and 7 acute phase markers in sera derived from of a cohort of patients diagnosed with acute Lyme disease and matched controls. This analysis identified a cytokine signature associated with the early stages of infection and allowed us to identify two subsets (mediator-high and mediator-low) of acute Lyme patients with distinct cytokine signatures that also differed significantly (p<0.0005) in symptom presentation. In particular, the T cell chemokines CXCL9 (MIG), CXCL10 (IP-10) and CCL19 (MIP3B) were coordinately increased in the mediator-high group and levels of these chemokines could be associated with seroconversion status and elevated liver function tests (p = 0.027 and p = 0.021 respectively). There was also upregulation of acute phase proteins including CRP and serum amyloid A. Consistent with the role of CXCL9/CXCL10 in attracting immune cells to the site of infection, CXCR3+ CD4 T cells are reduced in the blood of early acute Lyme disease (p = 0.01) and the decrease correlates with chemokine levels (p = 0.0375). The levels of CXCL9/10 did not relate to the size or number of skin lesions but elevated levels of serum CXCL9/CXCL10 were associated with elevated liver enzymes levels. Collectively these results indicate that the levels of serum chemokines and the levels of expression of their respective chemokine receptors on T cell subsets may prove to be informative biomarkers for Lyme disease and related to specific disease manifestations. PMID:24740099

  10. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: II. Activity against periopathogenic biofilms and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Scott, R W; Diamond, G

    2010-12-01

    Whereas periodontal disease is ultimately of bacterial etiology, from multispecies biofilms of gram-negative anaerobic microorganisms, much of the deleterious effects are caused by the resultant epithelial inflammatory response. Hence, development of a treatment that combines anti-biofilm antibiotic activity with anti-inflammatory activity would be of great utility. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) such as defensins are naturally occurring peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum activity as well as a variety of immunomodulatory activities. Furthermore, bacteria do not readily develop resistance to these agents. However, clinical studies have suggested that they do not represent optimal candidates for exogenous therapeutic agents. Small-molecule mimetics of these AMPs exhibit similar activities to the parent peptides, in addition to having low toxicity, high stability and low cost. To determine whether AMP mimetics have the potential for treatment of periodontal disease, we examined the activity of one mimetic, mPE, against biofilm cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Metabolic assays as well as culture and biomass measurement assays demonstrated that mPE exhibits potent activity against biofilm cultures of both species. Furthermore, as little as 2 μg ml(-1) mPE was sufficient to inhibit interleukin-1β-induced secretion of interleukin-8 in both gingival epithelial cells and THP-1 cells. This anti-inflammatory activity is associated with a reduction in activation of nuclear factor-κB, suggesting that mPE can act both as an anti-biofilm agent in an anaerobic environment and as an anti-inflammatory agent in infected tissues.

  11. Geniposide plays an anti-inflammatory role via regulating TLR4 and downstream signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojing; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Tiancheng; Jiang, Haichao; Zhang, Zecai; Fu, Yunhe; Yang, Zhengtao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Geniposide is a medicine isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, which is a traditional Chinese herb that is widely used in Asia for the treatment of inflammation, brain diseases, and hepatic disorders. Mastitis is a highly prevalent and important infectious disease. In this study, we used a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse mastitis model and LPS-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMECs) to explore the anti-inflammatory effect and the mechanism of action of geniposide. Using intraductal injection of LPS as a mouse model of mastitis, we found that geniposide significantly reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). To further investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism, we used LPS-stimulated mMECs as an in vitro mastitis model. The results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that geniposide inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that geniposide could suppress the phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Geniposide also inhibited the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the LPS-stimulated mMECs. In conclusion, geniposide exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by regulating TLR4 expression, which affected the downstream NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thus, geniposide may be a potential drug for mastitis therapy.

  12. ACTIVATION OF COMMON ANTIVIRAL PATHWAYS CAN POTENTIATE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES TO SEPTIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, Lesley A.; Carlton, Stacey; Galen, Benjamin; Cooma-Ramberan, Indranie; Chung, Chung-Shiang; Ayala, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Induction of the antiviral cytokine interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) is common in many viral infections. The impact of ongoing antiviral responses on subsequent bacterial infection is not well understood. In human disease, bacterial superinfection complicating a viral infection can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We injected mice with polyinosinic-polycytidylic (PIC) acid, a TLR3 ligand and known IFN-α/β inducer as well as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activator to simulate very early antiviral pathways. We then challenged mice with an in vivo septic shock model characterized by slowly evolving bacterial infection to simulate bacterial superinfection early during a viral infection. Our data demonstrated robust induction of IFN-α in serum within 24 h of PIC injection with IFN-α/β–dependent major histocompatibility antigen class II up-regulation on peritoneal macrophages. PIC pretreatment before septic shock resulted in augmented tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukins 6 and 10 and heightened lethality compared with septic shock alone. Intact IFN-α/β signaling was necessary for augmentation of the inflammatory response to in vivo septic shock and to both TLR2 and TLR4 agonists in vitro. To assess the NF-κB contribution to PIC-modulated inflammatory responses to septic shock, we treated with parthenolide an NF-κB inhibitor before PIC and septic shock. Parthenolide did not inhibit IFN-α induction by PIC. Inhibition of NF-κB by parthenolide did reduce IFN-α–mediated potentiation of the cytokine response and lethality from septic shock. Our data demonstrate that pathways activated early during many viral infections can have a detrimental impact on the outcome of subsequent bacterial infection. These pathways may be critical to understanding the heightened morbidity and mortality from bacterial superinfection after viral infection in human disease. PMID:16878028

  13. Impact of physical activity on inflammation: effects on cardiovascular disease risk and other inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Arrigo

    2012-01-01

    Since the 19th century, many studies have enlightened the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis, changing our perception of “vessel plaque due to oxidized lipoproteins”, similar to a “rusted pipe”, towards a disease with involvement of many cell types and cytokines with more complex mechanisms. Although “physical activity” and “physical exercise” are two terms with some differences in meaning, compared to sedentary lifestyle, active people have lower cardiovascular risk and lower inflammatory markers. Activities of skeletal muscle reveal “myokines” which have roles in both the immune system and adipose tissue metabolism. In vitro and ex-vivo studies have shown beneficial effects of exercise on inflammation markers. Meanwhile in clinical studies, some conflicting results suggested that type of activity, exercise duration, body composition, gender, race and age may modulate anti-inflammatory effects of physical exercise. Medical data on patients with inflammatory diseases have shown beneficial effects of exercise on disease activity scores, patient well-being and inflammatory markers. Although the most beneficial type of activity and the most relevant patient group for anti-inflammatory benefits are still not clear, studies in elderly and adult people generally support anti-inflammatory effects of physical activity and moderate exercise could be advised to patients with cardiovascular risk such as patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:23185187

  14. Euglena gracilis paramylon activates human lymphocytes by upregulating pro-inflammatory factors.

    PubMed

    Russo, Rossella; Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valter; Frassanito, Anna M; Longo, Vincenzo; Pucci, Laura; Penno, Giuseppe; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the activation details and products of human lymphomonocytes, stimulated by different β-glucans, that is Euglena paramylon, MacroGard(®), and lipopolysaccharide. We investigated the gene expression of inflammation-related cytokines and mediators, transactivation of relevant transcription factors, and phagocytosis role in cell-glucan interactions, by means of RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and colorimetric assay. Our results show that sonicated and alkalized paramylon upregulates pro-inflammatory factors (NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and COX-2) in lymphomonocytes. A clear demonstration of this upregulation is the increased transactivation of NF-kB visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Phagocytosis assay showed that internalization is not a mandatory step for signaling cascade to be triggered, since immune activity is not present in the lymphomonocytes that have internalized paramylon granules and particulate MacroGard(®). Moreover, the response of Euglena β-glucan-activated lymphomonocytes is much greater than that induced by commercially used β-glucans such as MacroGard(®). Our in vitro results indicate that linear fibrous Euglena β-glucan, obtained by sonication and alkaline treatment can act as safe and effective coadjutant of the innate immune system response.

  15. Targeting glycoprotein VI and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Stegner, David; Haining, Elizabeth J; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery thrombosis and ischemic stroke are often initiated by the disruption of an atherosclerotic plaque and consequent intravascular platelet activation. Thus, antiplatelet drugs are central in the treatment and prevention of the initial, and subsequent, vascular events. However, novel pharmacological targets for platelet inhibition remain an important goal of cardiovascular research because of the negative effect of existing antiplatelet drugs on primary hemostasis. One promising target is the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI. Blockade or antibody-mediated depletion of this receptor in circulating platelets is beneficial in experimental models of thrombosis and thrombo-inflammatory diseases, such as stroke, without impairing hemostasis. In this review, we summarize the importance of glycoprotein VI and (hem)immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombo-inflammatory processes and discuss the targeting strategies currently under development for inhibiting glycoprotein VI and its signaling.

  16. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  17. Increased intrathecal inflammatory activity in frontotemporal dementia: pathophysiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Sjogren, M; Folkesson, S; Blennow, K; Tarkowski, E

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Immunological mechanisms may be part of the pathophysiological mechanisms in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but hitherto only vague evidence of such mechanisms has been presented. The aim of this study was to compare the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1ß and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)-ß in patients with FTD and normal controls. Furthermore, serum levels of TNF-α, TGF-ß, and IL-1ß were measured in FTD patients. Methods: The CSF levels of IL-1ß, TNFα, and TGF-ß were measured using ELISA in 19 patients with FTD and 24 sex and age matched healthy controls. Results: The CSF levels of TNF-α (FTD 0.6 pg/mL (median: lower, upper quartile 0.3, 0.7); controls: 0.0 pg/mL (0.0, 0.0); p = 0.008) and TGF-ß (FTD 266 pg/mL (157, 371), controls: 147 pg/mL (119, 156); p = 0.0001) were significantly increased in FTD patients compared with controls. No correlations were found between CSF and serum levels of the cytokines. In the controls, but not in the FTD patients, a positive correlation was found between the CSF levels of TGF-ß and age (r = 0.42, p<0.05). No correlation was found between any of the cytokines and degree of brain atrophy or white matter changes. No differences between the groups were found for age, gender, or CSF/serum albumin ratio. Conclusions: The results suggest an increased intrathecal production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in FTD. As no correlations were found with the albumin ratio, and no correlations between CSF and serum levels of the cytokines were found, these changes in the CSF cannot be explained by a systemic overproduction of cytokines. PMID:15258209

  18. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms (Bromeliaceae) fruit extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Errasti, María E; Caffini, Néstor O; Pelzer, Lilian E; Rotelli, Alejandra E

    2013-01-01

    Several species of the family Bromeliaceae are characterized by the production of proteases in unusual amounts, especially in fruits. Bromelain, an extract rich in cysteine endopeptidases obtained from Ananas comosus L., and a few other proteases have been used as anti-inflammatory agents for some years, but bromelain is still mainly being used as alternative and/or complementary therapy to the treatment with glucocorticoids, nonsteroidal antirheumatics, and immunomodulators. In this study, the anti-inflammatory action of a partially purified extract from Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms fruits (PPE(Pm)) is presented, whose main components are cysteine endopeptidases. The effect of PPE(Pm) was assessed in carrageenan-induced and serotonin-induced rat paw edema, as well as in the cotton pellet granuloma model. Doses with equal proteolytic activity of PPE(Pm) and bromelain produced significantly similar anti-inflammatory responses in the acute inflammatory models assayed, supporting the hypothesis that proteolytic activity could be responsible for the anti-inflammatory action. On the contrary, comparable anti-inflammatory effects of PPE(Pm) and bromelain in the chronic inflammatory assay required a much lower proteolytic activity content of PPE(Pm), which could be due to a differential affinity for the protein target involved in this process.

  19. Glutathione S-transferase pi modulates NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jane T.; Qian, Xi; van der Velden, Jos L.J.; Chia, Shi Biao; McMillan, David H.; Flemer, Stevenson; Hoffman, Sidra M.; Lahue, Karolyn G.; Schneider, Robert W.; Nolin, James D.; Anathy, Vikas; van der Vliet, Albert; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a transcription factor family critical in the activation of pro- inflammatory responses. The NF-κB pathway is regulated by oxidant-induced post-translational modifications. Protein S-glutathionylation, or the conjugation of the antioxidant molecule, glutathione to reactive cysteines inhibits the activity of inhibitory kappa B kinase beta (IKKβ), among other NF-κB proteins. Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP) is an enzyme that has been shown to catalyze protein S-glutathionylation (PSSG) under conditions of oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to determine whether GSTP regulates NF-κB signaling, S-glutathionylation of IKK, and subsequent pro-inflammatory signaling. We demonstrated that, in unstimulated cells, GSTP associated with the inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBα. However, exposure to LPS resulted in a rapid loss of association between IκBα and GSTP, and instead led to a protracted association between IKKβ and GSTP. LPS exposure also led to increases in the S-glutathionylation of IKKβ. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of GSTP decreased IKKβ-SSG, and enhanced NF-κB nuclear translocation, transcriptional activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TLK117, an isotype-selective inhibitor of GSTP, also enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting that the catalytic activity of GSTP is important in repressing NF-κB activation. Expression of both wild-type and catalytically-inactive Y7F mutant GSTP significantly attenuated LPS- or IKKβ-induced production of GM-CSF. These studies indicate a complex role for GSTP in modulating NF-κB, which may involve S-glutathionylation of IKK proteins, and interaction with NF-κB family members. Our findings suggest that targeting GSTP is a potential avenue for regulating the activity of this prominent pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory transcription factor. PMID:27058114

  20. TIFA, an inflammatory signaling adaptor, is tumor suppressive for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, W; Chang, A; Wang, J; Zhou, W; Gao, R; Li, J; Xu, Y; Luo, X; Xiang, R; Luo, N; Stupack, D G

    2015-10-26

    TIFA (TNF receptor associated factor (TRAF)-interacting protein with a Forkhead-associated (FHA) domain), also called T2BP, was first identified using a yeast two-hybrid screening. TIFA contains a FHA domain, which directly binds phosphothreonine and phosphoserine, and a consensus TRAF6-binding motif. TIFA-mediated oligomerization and poly-ubiquitinylation of TRAF6 mediates signaling downstream of the Tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor 1 (TNFaR-I) and interleukin-1/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways. Examining TIFA expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues microarrays, we noted marked decreases TIFA reactivity in tumor versus control samples. In agreement, we found that HCC cell lines show reduced TIFA expression levels versus normal liver controls. Reconstituting TIFA expression in HCC cell lines promoted two independent apoptosis signaling pathways: the induction of p53 and cell cycle arrest, and the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. In contrast, the expression of a non-oligomerizing mutant of TIFA impacted cells minimally, and suppression of TIFA expression protected cells from apoptosis. Mice bearing TIFA overexpression hepatocellular xenografts develop smaller tumors versus TIFA mutant tumors; terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining demonstrates increased cell apoptosis, and decreased proliferation, reflecting cell cycle arrest. Interestingly, p53 has a greater role in decreased proliferation than cell death, as it appeared dispensable for TIFA-induced cell killing. The findings demonstrate a novel suppressive role of TIFA in HCC progression via promotion of cell death independent of p53.

  1. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    1998-12-11

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical ''signatures'' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration, the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can detect, recognize, and

  2. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activities of Salvia fruticosa: An HPLC Determination of Phenolic Contents.

    PubMed

    Boukhary, Rima; Raafat, Karim; Ghoneim, Asser I; Aboul-Ela, Maha; El-Lakany, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Salvia fruticosa Mill. (S. fruticosa) is widely used in folk medicine. Accordingly, the present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of S. fruticosa, and to determine the phenolic constituents of its extracts. Methods. The antioxidant activity was determined using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl assay. Total phenolic contents were estimated using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, and high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to identify phenolic constituents. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema was determined plethysmographically. Key Findings. Different plant extracts demonstrated strong radical scavenging activity, where the ethyl acetate extract had the highest value in the roots and the lowest in the aerial parts. This antioxidant activity was correlated to the total phenolic content of different extracts, where rutin and luteolin were the most abundant constituents. Interestingly, both the roots and aerial parts revealed a significant anti-inflammatory activity comparable to diclofenac. Conclusions. This study is the first to demonstrate pharmacologic evidence of the potential anti-inflammatory activity of S. fruticosa. This activity may partly be due to the radical scavenging effects of its polyphenolic contents. These findings warrant the popular use of the East Mediterranean sage and highlight the potential of its active constituents in the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs.

  3. TC1(C8orf4) is a novel endothelial inflammatory regulator enhancing NF-kappaB activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Yunlim; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Kim, Dong Wook; Ha, Yunhi; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Inchul; Song, Kyuyoung

    2009-09-15

    Endothelial inflammation is regulated by a complex molecular mechanism. TC1(C8orf4) is a novel regulator implicated in cancer and inflammation. It is a small protein conserved well among vertebrates. In zebrafish embryos, it is mostly expressed in angio-hematopoietic system and the overexpression induces edema. In human aortic endothelial cells and umbilical vein endothelial cells, TC1 transfection up-regulates key inflammatory cytokines, enzymes, and adhesion proteins including IL-6, IL-1alpha, COX-2, CXCL1, CCL5, CCL2, IL-8, ICAM1, VCAM1, and E-selectin, while TC1 knockdown down-regulates them. TC1 also enhances inflammatory parameters such as monocyte-endothelial adhesion and endothelial monolayer permeability. TC1 is up-regulated by IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, LPS, and phorbol ester, and the up-regulation is inhibited by I-kappaB-kinase inhibitors. TC1, in turn, enhances the nuclear translocation of RelA and the DNA binding activity, suggesting a biological role of amplifying NF-kappaB signaling via a positive feedback. Our findings suggest that TC1 is a novel endothelial inflammatory regulator that might be implicated in inflammatory vascular diseases.

  4. Resveratrol modulates phorbol ester-induced pro-inflammatory signal transduction pathways in mouse skin in vivo: NF-kappaB and AP-1 as prime targets.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Shin, Young Kee; Surh, Young-Joon

    2006-11-30

    Functional abnormalities of intracellular signaling network cause the disruption in homeostasis maintained by critical cellular components, thereby accelerating premalignant and malignant transformation. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that an elevated expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is causally linked to tumorigenesis. The exposure to oxidative/pro-inflammatory stimuli turns on signaling arrays mediated by diverse classes of kinases and transcription factors, which may lead to aberrant expression of COX-2. We have attempted to unravel the signal transduction pathways involved in elevated COX-2 expression in mouse skin stimulated with a prototype tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and its modulation by resveratrol, a phytoalexin known to exert potential chemopreventive effects. Our study revealed that topical application of TPA induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin via activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which is regulated by upstream IkappaB kinase (IKK) or differentially by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Besides NF-kappaB, the p38 MAP kinase-mediated activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) has also been attributed to TPA-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. Among the MAP kinases, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 MAP kinase have been shown to regulate TPA-induced NF-kappaB activation, while p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase are preferentially involved in TPA-induced activation of AP-1 in mouse skin in vivo. This commentary focuses on resveratrol modulation of intracellular signaling pathways involved in aberrant COX-2 expression in TPA-stimulated mouse skin to delineate molecular mechanisms underlying antitumor promoting effects of resveratrol.

  5. Sucrose esters from Physalis peruviana calyces with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis A; Ocampo, Yanet C; Gómez, Harold A; De la Puerta, Rocío; Espartero, José L; Ospina, Luis F

    2014-11-01

    Physalis peruviana is a native plant from the South American Andes and is widely used in traditional Colombian medicine of as an anti-inflammatory medicinal plant, specifically the leaves, calyces, and small stems in poultice form. Previous studies performed by our group on P. peruviana calyces showed potent anti-inflammatory activity in an enriched fraction obtained from an ether total extract. The objective of the present study was to obtain and elucidate the active compounds from this fraction and evaluate their anti-inflammatory activity in vivo and in vitro. The enriched fraction of P. peruviana was purified by several chromatographic methods to obtain an inseparable mixture of two new sucrose esters named peruviose A (1) and peruviose B (2). Structures of the new compounds were elucidated using spectroscopic methods and chemical transformations. The anti-inflammatory activity of the peruvioses mixture was evaluated using λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and lipopolysaccharide-activated peritoneal macrophages. Results showed that the peruvioses did not produce side effects on the liver and kidneys and significantly attenuated the inflammation induced by λ-carrageenan in a dosage-dependent manner, probably due to an inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2, which was demonstrated in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of sucrose esters in P. peruviana that showed a potent anti-inflammatory effect. These results suggest the potential of sucrose esters from the Physalis genus as a novel natural alternative to treat inflammatory diseases.

  6. Attenuation of the macrophage inflammatory activity by TiO₂ nanotubes via inhibition of MAPK and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Patricia; Mazare, Anca; Schmuki, Patrik; Cimpean, Anisoara

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial implantation in a living tissue triggers the activation of macrophages in inflammatory events, promoting the transcription of pro-inflammatory mediator genes. The initiation of macrophage inflammatory processes is mainly regulated by signaling proteins of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and by nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways. We have previously shown that titania nanotubes modified Ti surfaces (Ti/TiO2) mitigate the immune response, compared with flat Ti surfaces; however, little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) by which this nanotopography attenuates the inflammatory activity of macrophages. Thus, we analyzed the effects of TiO2 nanotubes on the activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in standard and lipopolysaccharide-evoked conditions. Results showed that the Ti/TiO2 significantly reduce the expression levels of the phosphorylated forms of p38, ERK1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), IKKβ, and IkB-α. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the p65 nuclear accumulation on the nanotubular surface was remarked. Following, by using specific MAPK inhibitors, we observed that lipopolysaccharide-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and nitric oxide was significantly inhibited on the Ti/TiO2 surface via p38 and ERK1/2, but not via JNK. However, the selective inhibitor for JNK signaling pathway (SP600125) was effective in reducing tumor necrosis factor alpha release as well as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and nitric oxide production. Altogether, these data suggest that titania nanotubes can attenuate the macrophage inflammatory response via suppression of MAPK and NF-κB pathways providing a potential mechanism for their anti-inflammatory activity.

  7. Attenuation of the macrophage inflammatory activity by TiO2 nanotubes via inhibition of MAPK and NF-κB pathways

    PubMed Central

    Neacsu, Patricia; Mazare, Anca; Schmuki, Patrik; Cimpean, Anisoara

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial implantation in a living tissue triggers the activation of macrophages in inflammatory events, promoting the transcription of pro-inflammatory mediator genes. The initiation of macrophage inflammatory processes is mainly regulated by signaling proteins of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and by nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways. We have previously shown that titania nanotubes modified Ti surfaces (Ti/TiO2) mitigate the immune response, compared with flat Ti surfaces; however, little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) by which this nanotopography attenuates the inflammatory activity of macrophages. Thus, we analyzed the effects of TiO2 nanotubes on the activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in standard and lipopolysaccharide-evoked conditions. Results showed that the Ti/TiO2 significantly reduce the expression levels of the phosphorylated forms of p38, ERK1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), IKKβ, and IkB-α. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the p65 nuclear accumulation on the nanotubular surface was remarked. Following, by using specific MAPK inhibitors, we observed that lipopolysaccharide-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and nitric oxide was significantly inhibited on the Ti/TiO2 surface via p38 and ERK1/2, but not via JNK. However, the selective inhibitor for JNK signaling pathway (SP600125) was effective in reducing tumor necrosis factor alpha release as well as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and nitric oxide production. Altogether, these data suggest that titania nanotubes can attenuate the macrophage inflammatory response via suppression of MAPK and NF-κB pathways providing a potential mechanism for their anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26491301

  8. Estrogen receptor alpha signaling in inflammatory leukocytes is dispensable for 17beta-estradiol-mediated inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Garidou, Lucile; Laffont, Sophie; Douin-Echinard, Victorine; Coureau, Christiane; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Guéry, Jean-Charles

    2004-08-15

    Estrogen treatment has been shown to exert a protective effect on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and is under clinical trial for multiple sclerosis. Although it is commonly assumed that estrogens exert their effect by modulating immune functions, we show in this study that 17beta-estradiol (E2) treatment can inhibit mouse EAE without affecting autoantigen-specific T cell responsiveness and type 1 cytokine production. Using mutant mice in which estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) has been unambiguously inactivated, we found that ERalpha was responsible for the E2-mediated inhibition of EAE. We next generated irradiation bone marrow chimeras in which ERalpha expression was selectively impaired in inflammatory T lymphocytes or was limited to the radiosensitive hemopoietic compartment. Our data show that the protective effect of E2 on clinical EAE and CNS inflammation was not dependent on ERalpha signaling in inflammatory T cells. Likewise, EAE development was not prevented by E2 treatment in chimeric mice that selectively expressed ERalpha in the systemic immune compartment. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the beneficial effect of E2 on this autoimmune disease does not involve ERalpha signaling in blood-derived inflammatory cells, and indicate that ERalpha expressed in other tissues, such as CNS-resident microglia or endothelial cells, mediates this effect.

  9. Inhibitory effects of diallyl disulfide on the production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-activated BV2 microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye Young; Kim, Nam Deuk; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung-Woo; Kim, Wun Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2012-07-15

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a main organosulfur component responsible for the diverse biological effects of garlic, displays a wide variety of internal biological activities. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying DADS' anti-inflammatory activity remain poorly understood. In this study, therefore, the anti-inflammatory effects of DADS were studied to investigate its potential therapeutic effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. We found that pretreatment with DADS prior to treatment with LPS significantly inhibited excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was associated with down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. DADS also attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by suppressing the expression of mRNAs for these proteins. The mechanism underlying this protective effect might be related to the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB, Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway activation in LPS-stimulated microglial cells. These findings indicated that DADS is potentially a novel therapeutic candidate for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. -- Highlights: ► DADS attenuates production of NO and PGE2 in LPS-activated BV2 microglia. ► DADS downregulates levels of iNOS and COX-2. ► DADS inhibits production and expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. ► DADS exhibits these effects by suppression of NF-κB, PI3K/Akt and MAPKs pathways.

  10. Upregulated LINE-1 Activity in the Fanconi Anemia Cancer Susceptibility Syndrome Leads to Spontaneous Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Brégnard, Christelle; Guerra, Jessica; Déjardin, Stéphanie; Passalacqua, Frank; Benkirane, Monsef; Laguette, Nadine

    2016-06-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by elevated cancer susceptibility and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Using SLX4(FANCP) deficiency as a working model, we questioned the trigger for chronic inflammation in FA. We found that absence of SLX4 caused cytoplasmic DNA accumulation, including sequences deriving from active Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1), triggering the cGAS-STING pathway to elicit interferon (IFN) expression. In agreement, absence of SLX4 leads to upregulated LINE-1 retrotransposition. Importantly, similar results were obtained with the FANCD2 upstream activator of SLX4. Furthermore, treatment of FA cells with the Tenofovir reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTi), that prevents endogenous retrotransposition, decreased both accumulation of cytoplasmic DNA and pro-inflammatory signaling. Collectively, our data suggest a contribution of endogenous RT activities to the generation of immunogenic cytoplasmic nucleic acids responsible for inflammation in FA. The additional observation that RTi decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine production induced by DNA replication stress-inducing drugs further demonstrates the contribution of endogenous RTs to sustaining chronic inflammation. Altogether, our data open perspectives in the prevention of adverse effects of chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis.

  11. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-06-20

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%-8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions.

  12. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway as a Discovery Target in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Nan, Guangxian

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases are critical modulators of a variety of intracellular and extracellular signal transduction pathways, and abnormal phosphorylation events can contribute to disease progression in a variety of diseases. As a result, protein kinases have emerged as important new drug targets for small molecule therapeutics. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway transmits signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to a variety of different stimuli. Because this pathway controls a broad spectrum of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and stress responses, it is accepted as a therapeutic target for cancer and peripheral inflammatory disorders. There is also increasing evidence that MAPK is an important regulator of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral vascular disease, raising the possibility that it might be a drug discovery target for stroke. In this review, we discuss the MAPK signaling pathway in association with its activation in stroke-induced brain injury.

  13. Topical Anti-inflammatory Activity of New Hybrid Molecules of Terpenes and Synthetic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Theoduloz, Cristina; Delporte, Carla; Valenzuela-Barra, Gabriela; Silva, Ximena; Cádiz, Solange; Bustamante, Fernanda; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2015-06-18

    The aim of the study was to assess changes in the activity of anti-inflammatory terpenes from Chilean medicinal plants after the formation of derivatives incorporating synthetic anti-inflammatory agents. Ten new hybrid molecules were synthesized combining terpenes (ferruginol (1), imbricatolic acid (2) and oleanolic acid (3)) with ibuprofen (4) or naproxen (5). The topical anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was assessed in mice by the arachidonic acid (AA) and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) induced ear edema assays. Basal cytotoxicity was determined towards human lung fibroblasts, gastric epithelial cells and hepatocytes. At 1.4 µmol/mouse, a strong anti-inflammatory effect in the TPA assay was observed for oleanoyl ibuprofenate 12 (79.9%) and oleanoyl ibuprofenate methyl ester 15 (80.0%). In the AA assay, the best activity was observed for 12 at 3.2 µmol/mouse, with 56.8% reduction of inflammation, in the same range as nimesulide (48.9%). All the terpenyl-synthetic anti-inflammatory hybrids showed better effects in the TPA assay, with best activity for 6, 12 and 15. The cytotoxicity of the compounds 8 and 10 with a free COOH, was higher than that of 2. The derivatives from 3 were less toxic than the triterpene. Several of the new compounds presented better anti-inflammatory effect and lower cytotoxicity than the parent terpenes.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Edgeworthia chrysantha and its effective chemical constituents.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Jia; Jin, Hui-Zi; Xu, Wen-Zheng; Chen, Ming; Liu, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Su, Juan; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2008-09-01

    The barks and roots of Edgeworthia chrysantha LINDL., which have been used as the folk medicine "Zhu shima" in southern China due to their detumescence and acesodyne effects, were investigated for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using a xylene-induced ear edema assay in mice and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced paw edema as inflammation models, and the acetic acid-induced writhing test as an analgesic model. Fractions effective in terms of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities were obtained from E. chrysantha. The chloroform-soluble fraction (CHF) showed significant anti-inflammatory (p<0.01-0.001) and analgesic (p<0.01) effects. On further purification by silica gel, three major coumarins, edgeworin (EdN), edgeworosides A and C (EdeA and EdeC), were isolated from the chloroform fraction and both anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities were evaluated. EdN and EdeA had anti-inflammatory (p<0.05-0.01) and analgesic (p<0.001) effects, while EdeC only showed an analgesic effect. The results of this study thus demonstrated that the coumarins EdN, EdeA and EdeC in this plant may be active constituents that contribute to the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects.

  15. In vitro antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory activity of seven common oats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Wise, Mitchell L; Gulvady, Apeksha A; Chang, Tony; Kendra, David F; Jan-Willem van Klinken, B; Shi, Yuhui; O'Shea, Marianne

    2013-08-15

    Oats are gaining increasing scientific and public interest for their purported antioxidant-associated health benefits. Most reported studies focused on specific oat extracts or particular oat components, such as β-glucans, tocols (vitamin E), or avenanthramides. Studies on whole oats with respect to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities are still lacking. Here the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities from whole oat groats of seven common varieties were evaluated. All oat varieties had very similar oxygen radical absorption capacity compared with other whole grains. In an anti-inflammatory assay, oat variety CDC Dancer inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α induced nuclear factor-kappa B activation by 27.5% at 2 mg/ml, whereas variety Deiter showed 13.7% inhibition at a comparable dose. Avenanthramide levels did not correlate with the observed antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Further investigations are needed to pinpoint the specific antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds, and potential synergistic and/or matrix effects that may help explain the mechanisms of oat's anti-inflammatory actions.

  16. Anti-oxidative assays as markers for anti-inflammatory activity of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Chanput, Wasaporn; Krueyos, Narumol; Ritthiruangdej, Pitiporn

    2016-11-01

    The complexity of in vitro anti-inflammatory assays, the cost and time consumed, and the necessary skills can be a hurdle to apply to promising compounds in a high throughput setting. In this study, several antioxidative assays i.e. DPPH, ABTS, ORAC and xanthine oxidase (XO) were used to examine the antioxidative activity of three sub groups of flavonoids: (i) flavonol: quercetin, myricetin, (ii) flavanone: eriodictyol, naringenin (iii) flavone: luteolin, apigenin. A range of flavonoid concentrations was tested for their antioxidative activities and were found to be dose-dependent. However, the flavonoid concentrations over 50ppm were found to be toxic to the THP-1 monocytes. Therefore, 10, 20 and 50ppm of flavonoid concentrations were tested for their anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated THP-1 monocytes. Expression of inflammatory genes, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α was found to be sequentially decreased when flavonoid concentration increased. Principle component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate the relationship between the data sets of antioxidative assays and the expression of inflammatory genes. The results showed that DPPH, ABTS and ORAC assays have an opposite correlation with the reduction of inflammatory genes. Pearson correlation exhibited a relationship between the ABTS assay and the expression of three out of five analyzed genes; IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Our findings indicate that ABTS assay can potentially be an assay marker for anti-inflammatory activity of flavonoids.

  17. [Vaccines and preventive activities in patients with inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Casals-Sánchez, J L; Casals Vázquez, C; Vázquez Sánchez, M Á; Giménez Basallote, S

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis and eligible for immunosuppressive therapy account for more than 1% of general population, and represents a significant workload on family doctors. They are prone to other comorbidities, with an increased cardiovascular risk and a higher incidence of infections than the general population, especially skin infections and pneumonitis. This comorbidity can be considered vulnerable to a prevention program-prevention of cardiovascular risk, cancer screening, vaccination schedule for adults. As for prevention through vaccination, importance should be given to pneumococcal infection - significant in adults aged 50 or over, especially amongst immunosuppressed patients. The 13-valent conjugate vaccine, which has been recently approved for adults, must be considered. An attempt has been made to write a simple, applicable document on preventive measures that should be implemented both at primary and secondary care level for those adults.

  18. Ginsenoside Metabolite Compound K Promotes Recovery of Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis and Inhibits Inflammatory Responses by Suppressing NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Zhong, Wei; Wang, Weiwei; Hu, Shaoping; Yuan, Jiahui; Zhang, Bing; Hu, Tianhui; Song, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Phytogenic compounds with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, such as ginsenoside metabolite compound K (CK) or berberine (BBR), are currently discussed as promising complementary agents in the prevention and treatment of cancer and inflammation. The latest study showed that ginsenoside Rb1 and its metabolites could inhibit TNBS-induced colitis injury. However, the functional mechanisms of anti-inflammation effects of ginsenoside, particularly its metabolite CK are still not clear. Here, using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, clinical parameters, intestinal integrity, pro-inflammatory cytokines production, and signaling pathways in colonic tissues were determined. In mild and sever colitis mice, CK and BBR (as a positive agent) alleviated colitis histopathology injury, ameliorated myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines production, such as, IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in both mice colon tissues and blood. Nevertheless, the results revealed that CK and BBR inhibited NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, downregulated p-IκBα and upregulated IκBα, indicating that CK, as well as BBR, suppressed the activation of the NF-κB pathway in the progression of colitis with immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis. Furthermore, CK inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokines production in LPS-activated macrophages via down-regulation of NF-κB signaling pathway. Taken together, our results not only reveal that CK promotes the recovery of the progression of colitis and inhibits the inflammatory responses by suppressing NF-κB activation, but also suggest that CK downregulates intestinal inflammation through regulating the activation of macrophages and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. PMID:24504372

  19. CCN1, a Pro-Inflammatory Factor, Aggravates Psoriasis Skin Lesions by Promoting Keratinocyte Activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Zhou; Wu, Pinru; Huo, Rongfen; Wang, Beiqing; Shen, Zhengyu; Li, Huidan; Zhai, Tianhang; Shen, Baihua; Chen, Xiangdong; Li, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic skin disease characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is multifactorial and is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that CCN1 (also called Cyr61, which is short for cysteine-rich 61), an extracellular matrix protein that is also considered a pro-inflammatory factor, is highly expressed in the lesional skin of psoriasis patients, as well as in that of imiquimod (IMQ)- and IL-23-treated psoriasis-like mice. Then we show that blocking CCN1 function in vivo attenuates epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation in psoriasis-like mice. Further, in primary cultured normal human keratinocytes and HaCaT (human keratinocyte cell line) cells, CCN1 promotes keratinocyte activation, including the proliferation and expression of immune-related molecules. Finally, we observe that integrin α6β1 is the receptor of CCN1 in keratinocytes, and CCN1 stimulation activates the downstream phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal that CCN1 has a critical role in psoriasis pathogenesis. Moreover, as CCN1 is a secreted extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, our study also provides evidence that ECM, which is involved in psoriatic pathogenesis, could be a potent target for psoriasis treatment.

  20. Lymphocyte signaling and activation by the CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 signalosome.

    PubMed

    Meininger, Isabel; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) signalosome triggers canonical NF-κB signaling and lymphocyte activation upon antigen-receptor stimulation. Genetic studies in mice and the analysis of human immune pathologies unveiled a critical role of the CBM complex in adaptive immune responses. Great progress has been made in elucidating the fundamental mechanisms that dictate CBM assembly and disassembly. By bridging proximal antigen-receptor signaling to downstream signaling pathways, the CBM complex exerts a crucial scaffolding function. Moreover, the MALT1 subunit confers a unique proteolytic activity that is key for lymphocyte activation. Deregulated 'chronic' CBM signaling drives constitutive NF-κB signaling and MALT1 activation, which contribute to the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases as well as lymphomagenesis. Thus, the processes that govern CBM activation and function are promising targets for the treatment of immune disorders. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the functions and mechanisms of CBM signaling in lymphocytes and how CBM deregulations contribute to aberrant signaling in malignant lymphomas.

  1. Purinergic signaling in early inflammatory events of the foreign body response: modulating extracellular ATP as an enabling technology for engineered implants and tissues.

    PubMed

    Rhett, J Matthew; Fann, Stephen A; Yost, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Purinergic signaling is a ubiquitous and vital aspect of mammalian biology in which purines--mainly adenosine triphosphate (ATP)--are released from cells through loss of membrane integrity (cell death), exocytosis, or transport/diffusion across membrane channels, and exert paracrine or autocrine signaling effects through three subclasses of well-characterized receptors: the P1 adenosine receptors, the P2X ionotropic nucleotide receptors, and the P2Y metabotropic receptors. ATP and its metabolites are released by damaged and stressed cells in injured tissues. The early events of wound healing, hemostasis, and inflammation are highly regulated by these signals through activation of purinergic receptors on platelets and neutrophils. Recent data have demonstrated that ATP signaling is of particular importance to targeting leukocytes to sites of injury. This is particularly relevant to the subject of implanted medical devices, engineered tissues, and grafts as all these technologies elicit a wound healing response with varying degrees of encapsulation, rejection, extrusion, or destruction of the tissue or device. Here, we review the biology of purinergic signaling and focus on ATP release and response mechanisms that pertain to the early inflammatory phase of wound healing. Finally, therapeutic options are explored, including a new class of peptidomimetic drugs based on the ATP-conductive channel connexin43.

  2. Synthesis of some novel chalcones, flavanones and flavones and evaluation of their anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Bano, Sameena; Javed, Kalim; Ahmad, Shamim; Rathish, I G; Singh, Surender; Chaitanya, M; Arunasree, K M; Alam, M S

    2013-07-01

    A novel series of synthetic 2'-hydroxychalcones (1a-h), 2'-methoxychalcones (2a-l), flavanones (3a-k) and flavones (4a-f) have been synthesized and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw oedema model. Compounds 1a, 1e-g, 2e-g, 3j, and 4f showed potent anti-inflammatory activity comparable to the reference drug indomethacin with insignificant ulceration. Compound 1f showed mild inhibition against the enzymatic activity of ovine COX-1 and COX-2 (in-vitro). Compound 1f also exhibited inhibitory activity in LPS induced TNF-α production.

  3. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of phenolic rich extracts from white and red common beans.

    PubMed

    García-Lafuente, Ana; Moro, Carlos; Manchón, Noelia; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia; Villares, Ana; Guillamón, Eva; Rostagno, Mauricio; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura

    2014-10-15

    According to epidemiological evidence, diets rich in fruits and vegetables can reduce the incidence of several chronic diseases that share an inflammatory component. These protective effects are attributed, in part, to the occurrence of different antioxidant components, mainly phenolic compounds. Our aim was to characterise phenolic composition, and to determine antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of phenolic rich extracts obtained from two kinds of common beans, white kidney beans (WKB) and round purple beans (RPB). Phenolic acids were the predominant component in WKB extracts, whereas RPB extracts presented higher concentrations of phenolic compounds, mainly catechin derivatives, proanthocyanidins and catechin glucoside. In addition, RPB extracts showed higher antioxidant capacity and higher anti-inflammatory activity by the reduction of NO production and cytokine mRNA expression of LPS stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that common bean extracts may be used as a source of anti-inflammatory agents as well as a dietary complement for health promotion.

  4. Uric Acid Induces Endothelial Dysfunction by Activating the HMGB1/RAGE Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Duan, Xi-Mei; Liu, Ying; Yu, Jiao; Tang, Yun-Liang; Liu, Ze-Lin; Jiang, Shan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Liu, Jian-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction, a process in which inflammation may play an important role. UA increases high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) expression and extracellular release in endothelial cells. HMGB1 is an inflammatory cytokine that interacts with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inducing an oxidative stress and inflammatory response, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with a high concentration of UA (20 mg/dL) after which endothelial function and the expression of HMGB1, RAGE, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules were evaluated. UA inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVECs, increased intracellular HMGB1 expression and extracellular HMGB1 secretion, and upregulated RAGE expression. UA also activated NF-κB and increased the level of inflammatory cytokines. Blocking RAGE significantly suppressed the upregulation of RAGE and HMGB1 and prevented the increase in DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. It also blocked the decrease in eNOS expression and NO production induced by UA. Our results suggest that high concentrations of UA cause endothelial dysfunction via the HMGB1/RAGE signaling pathway. PMID:28116308

  5. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory responses by suppressing TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Gao, Ruifeng; Cao, Yongguo; Guo, Mengyao; Wei, Zhengkai; Zhou, Ershun; Li, Yimeng; Yao, Minjun; Yang, Zhengtao; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-05-01

    Curcumin, the main constituent of the spice turmeric, has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of curcumin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mice mastitis has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether curcumin could ameliorate the inflammation response in LPS-induced mice mastitis and to clarify the possible mechanism. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by injection of LPS through the duct of the mammary gland. Curcumin was applied 1h before and 12h after LPS treatment. The results showed that curcumin attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blotting results showed that curcumin inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65 and the expression of TLR4. These results indicated that curcumin has protective effect on mice mastitis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of curcumin on LPS-induced mastitis in mice may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. Curcumin may be a potential therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  6. Alpinetin attenuates inflammatory responses by interfering toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijin; Mo, Xiaodong; Yu, Jinlong; Huang, Zonghai

    2013-09-01

    Alpinetin, a novel plant flavonoid derived from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of alpinetin on mastitis has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of alpinetin against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis and to clarify the possible mechanism. In the present study, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells and an LPS-induced mouse mastitis model were used to investigate the effect of alpinetin on mastitis and the possible mechanism. In vivo, we observed that alpinetin significantly attenuated the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, and the activation of myeloperoxidase; down-regulated the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6; inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α, NF-κB p65 and the expression of TLR4, caused by LPS. In vitro, we also observed that alpinetin inhibited the expression of TLR4 and the production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells. However, alpinetin could not inhibit the production of IL-1β and IL-6 in TNF-α-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of alpinetin against LPS-induced mastitis may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. Alpinetin may be a promising potential therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment.

  7. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of calyces from Physalis peruviana.

    PubMed

    Toro, Reina M; Aragón, Diana M; Ospina, Luis F; Ramos, Freddy A; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    Physalis peruviana calyces are used extensively in folk medicine. The crude ethanolic extract and some fractions of calyces were evaluated in order to explore antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by the TPA-induced ear edema model. The antioxidant in vitro activity was measured by means of the superoxide and nitric oxide scavenging activity of the extracts and fractions. The butanolic fraction was found to be promising due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Therefore, a bio-assay guided approach was employed to isolate and identify rutin (1) and nicotoflorin (2) from their NMR spectroscopic and MS data. The identification of rutin in calyces of P. peruviana supports the possible use of this waste material for phytotherapeutic, nutraceutical and cosmetic preparations.

  8. TIFA, an inflammatory signaling adaptor, is tumor suppressive for liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W; Chang, A; Wang, J; Zhou, W; Gao, R; Li, J; Xu, Y; Luo, X; Xiang, R; Luo, N; Stupack, D G

    2015-01-01

    TIFA (TNF receptor associated factor (TRAF)-interacting protein with a Forkhead-associated (FHA) domain), also called T2BP, was first identified using a yeast two-hybrid screening. TIFA contains a FHA domain, which directly binds phosphothreonine and phosphoserine, and a consensus TRAF6-binding motif. TIFA-mediated oligomerization and poly-ubiquitinylation of TRAF6 mediates signaling downstream of the Tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor 1 (TNFaR-I) and interleukin-1/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways. Examining TIFA expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues microarrays, we noted marked decreases TIFA reactivity in tumor versus control samples. In agreement, we found that HCC cell lines show reduced TIFA expression levels versus normal liver controls. Reconstituting TIFA expression in HCC cell lines promoted two independent apoptosis signaling pathways: the induction of p53 and cell cycle arrest, and the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. In contrast, the expression of a non-oligomerizing mutant of TIFA impacted cells minimally, and suppression of TIFA expression protected cells from apoptosis. Mice bearing TIFA overexpression hepatocellular xenografts develop smaller tumors versus TIFA mutant tumors; terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining demonstrates increased cell apoptosis, and decreased proliferation, reflecting cell cycle arrest. Interestingly, p53 has a greater role in decreased proliferation than cell death, as it appeared dispensable for TIFA-induced cell killing. The findings demonstrate a novel suppressive role of TIFA in HCC progression via promotion of cell death independent of p53. PMID:26501855

  9. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Chaenomeles speciosa fractions in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Yang, Y-B; Yang, Q; Sun, L-N; Chen, W-S

    2009-10-01

    The prescription of current existing anti-inflammatory drugs is hampered by their adverse effects over time. Botanical extracts are thought to be a potential source of a natural anti-inflammatory property with fewer adverse effects. Chaenomeles speciosa has long been used as an herbal medicine for treatment of various diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, prosopalgia, and hepatitis. Until now there have been no reports on the specific anti-inflammatory fractions of extract of C. speciosa (ECS). In the present study the anti-inflammatory activities of different fractions of ECS were evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The 10% ethanol fraction (C3) was found to have stronger anti-inflammatory effects compared with other fractions at the same dose. We also found that chlorogenic acid was one of the active constituents responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect using bioassay-guided fractionation by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. Compared with controls, fraction C3 demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory activity in the xylene-induced ear edema test (P < .01), acetic acid-induced peritoneal capillary permeability test, and the cotton pellet granuloma test in mice or rats (P < .01); it also showed marked analgesic activity in the acetic acid-induced abdominal contraction test and formalin-induced paw licking test in mice and rats (P < .05 or .01). However, fraction C3 showed no significant effect in the hot plate test in mice. These findings justify the use of the C. speciosa for treating pain and inflammation. These results support the proposal of C. speciosa fraction C3 as a potential anti-inflammatory agent.

  10. Ceftiofur impairs pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion through the inhibition of the activation of NF-{kappa}B and MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Ci Xinxin; Song Yu; Zeng Fanqin; Zhang Xuemei; Li Hongyu; Wang Xinrui; Cui Junqing Deng Xuming

    2008-07-18

    Ceftiofur is a new broad-spectrum, third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic for veterinary use. Immunopharmacological studies can provide new information on the immunomodulatory activities of some drugs, including their effect on cytokine productions. For this reason, we investigated the effect of ceftiofur on cytokine productions in vitro. We found that ceftiofur can downregulate tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but did not affect interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. We further investigated signal transduction mechanisms to determine how ceftiofur affects. RAW 264.7 cells were pretreated with 1, 5, or 10 mg/L of ceftiofur 1 h prior to treatment with 1 mg/L of LPS. Thirty minutes later, cells were harvested and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation was measured by Western blot. Alternatively, cells were fixed and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activation was measured using immunocytochemical analysis. Signal transduction studies showed that ceftiofur significantly inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation protein expression. Ceftiofur also inhibited p65-NF-{kappa}B translocation into the nucleus. Therefore, ceftiofur may inhibit LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by blocking NF-{kappa}B and MAPKs signaling in RAW264.7 cells.

  11. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide production by gene silencing attenuates inflammatory activity by downregulation of NF-κB and MAP kinase activity in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Badiei, Alireza; Muniraj, Nethaji; Chambers, Stephen; Bhatia, Madhav

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an endogenous inflammatory mediator produced by the activity of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) in macrophages. The objective of this study was to explore the mechanism by which hydrogen sulfide acts as an inflammatory mediator in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced macrophages. In this study, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to inhibit CSE expression in macrophages. We found that CSE silencing siRNA could reduce the LPS-induced activation of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) significantly. Phosphorylation and activation of extra cellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) increased in LPS-induced macrophages. We showed that phosphorylation of ERK in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells reached a peak 30 min after activation. Our findings show that silencing CSE gene by siRNA reduces phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2 in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. These findings suggest that siRNA reduces the inflammatory effects of hydrogen sulfide through the ERK-NF-κB signalling pathway and hydrogen sulfide plays its inflammatory role through ERK-NF-κB pathway in these cells.

  12. Baicalein attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and relieves the inflammatory response in P. aeruginosa-infected macrophages by downregulating the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Kong, Jin-liang; Dong, Bi-ying; Huang, Hong; Wang, Ke; Wu, Li-hong; Hou, Chang-chun; Liang, Yue; Li, Bing; Chen, Yi-qiang

    2016-01-01

    Burgeoning antibiotic resistance and unfavorable outcomes of inflammatory injury after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection have necessitated the development of novel agents that not only target quorum sensing (QS) but also combat inflammatory injury with the least risk of resistance. This study aimed to assess the anti-QS and anti-inflammatory activities of baicalein, a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used in the People’s Republic of China, against P. aeruginosa infection. We found that subminimum inhibitory concentrations of baicalein efficiently interfered with the QS-signaling pathway of P. aeruginosa via downregulation of the transcription of QS-regulated genes and the translation of QS-signaling molecules. This interference resulted in the global attenuation of QS-controlled virulence factors, such as motility and biofilm formation, and the secretion into the culture supernatant of extracellular virulence factors, including pyocyanin, LasA protease, LasB elastase, and rhamnolipids. Moreover, we examined the anti-inflammatory activity of baicalein and its mode of action via a P. aeruginosa-infected macrophage model to address its therapeutic effect. Baicalein reduced the P. aeruginosa-induced secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα. In addition, baicalein suppressed P. aeruginosa-induced activation of the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways in cocultured macrophages; this may be the mechanism by which baicalein inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, our study demonstrates that baicalein represents a potential treatment for P. aeruginosa infection because it clearly exhibits both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26792984

  13. Therapeutic aspects of c-MYC signaling in inflammatory and cancerous colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Ferenc; Firneisz, Gábor; Műzes, Györgyi

    2016-01-01

    Colonic inflammation is required to heal infections, wounds, and maintain tissue homeostasis. As the seventh hallmark of cancer, however, it may affect all phases of tumor development, including tumor initiation, promotion, invasion and metastatic dissemination, and also evasion immune surveillance. Inflammation acts as a cellular stressor and may trigger DNA damage or genetic instability, and, further, chronic inflammation can provoke genetic mutations and epigenetic mechanisms that promote malignant cell transformation. Both sporadical and colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis are multi-step, complex processes arising from the uncontrolled proliferation and spreading of malignantly transformed cell clones with the obvious ability to evade the host’s protective immunity. In cells upon DNA damage several proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC are activated in parelell with the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. The target genes of the c-MYC protein participate in different cellular functions, including cell cycle, survival, protein synthesis, cell adhesion, and micro-RNA expression. The transcriptional program regulated by c-MYC is context dependent, therefore the final cellular response to elevated c-MYC levels may range from increased proliferation to augmented apoptosis. Considering physiological intestinal homeostasis, c-MYC displays a fundamental role in the regulation of cell proliferation and crypt cell number. However, c-MYC gene is frequently deregulated in inflammation, and overexpressed in both sporadic and colitis-associated colon adenocarcinomas. Recent results demonstrated that endogenous c-MYC is essential for efficient induction of p53-dependent apoptosis following DNA damage, but c-MYC function is also involved in and regulated by autophagy-related mechanisms, while its expression is affected by DNA-methylation, or histone acetylation. Molecules directly targeting c-MYC, or agents acting on other genes involved in the c-MYC pathway could be

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of Urera baccifera (Urticaceae) in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Badilla, B; Mora, G; Lapa, A J; Emim, J A

    1999-09-01

    On a preliminary test, anti-inflammatory and analgesic dose-related activities on rats were observed for the aqueous fraction of Urera baccifera; this extract was bioassay-guided fractionated and the final aqueous fraction was used according the ethnobotanical use. Carrageenan-induced edema (n = 6), was used as an assay in the fractionating process. The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of the final aqueous fraction were studied using in vivo models. For the anti-inflammatory activity rat paw edema (n = 6), pleurisy induced by carrageenan (n = 6) and ear edema induced by topical croton oil (n = 6) models were used, and tail-flick test (n = 6), abdominal constrictions induced by acetic acid (n = 6), and formalin test (n = 6), were used for the antinociceptive activity. The tests performed showed an inhibition effect on leukocyte migration, and a reduction on pleural exudate, as well as dose-dependant peripheral analgesic activity, at a range of 25-100 mg/kg i.p. The final aqueous fraction contains most of the anti-inflammatory activity of the plant U. baccifera. A possible mechanism of action is discussed and based on the results we conclude that this plant has a potential for both anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity at the clinical level.

  15. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Grains of Paradise (Aframomum melegueta Schum) Extract

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ethanolic extract of grains of paradise (Aframomum melegueta Schum, Zingiberaceae) has been evaluated for inhibitory activity on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, in vivo for the anti-inflammatory activity and expression of several pro-inflammatory genes. Bioactivity-guided fractionation showed that the most active COX-2 inhibitory compound in the extract was [6]-paradol. [6]-Shogaol, another compound from the extract, was the most active inhibitory compound in pro-inflammatory gene expression assays. In a rat paw edema model, the whole extract reduced inflammation by 49% at 1000 mg/kg. Major gingerols from the extract [6]-paradol, [6]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol reduced inflammation by 20, 25 and 38%. respectively when administered individually at a dose of 150 mg/kg. [6]-Shogaol efficacy was at the level of aspirin, used as a positive control. Grains of paradise extract has demonstrated an anti-inflammatory activity, which is in part due to the inhibition of COX-2 enzyme activity and expression of pro-inflammatory genes. PMID:25293633

  16. Bacteroides fragilis Lipopolysaccharide and Inflammatory Signaling in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukiw, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome consists of ~3.8 × 1013 symbiotic microorganisms that form a highly complex and dynamic ecosystem: the gastrointestinal (GI) tract constitutes the largest repository of the human microbiome by far, and its impact on human neurological health and disease is becoming increasingly appreciated. Bacteroidetes, the largest phylum of Gram-negative bacteria in the GI tract microbiome, while generally beneficial to the host when confined to the GI tract, have potential to secrete a remarkably complex array of pro-inflammatory neurotoxins that include surface lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and toxic proteolytic peptides. The deleterious effects of these bacterial exudates appear to become more important as GI tract and blood-brain barriers alter or increase their permeability with aging and disease. For example, presence of the unique LPSs of the abundant Bacteroidetes species Bacteroides fragilis (BF-LPS) in the serum represents a major contributing factor to systemic inflammation. BF-LPS is further recognized by TLR2, TLR4, and/or CD14 microglial cell receptors as are the pro-inflammatory 42 amino acid amyloid-beta (Aβ42) peptides that characterize Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain. Here we provide the first evidence that BF-LPS exposure to human primary brain cells is an exceptionally potent inducer of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-kB (p50/p65) complex, a known trigger in the expression of pathogenic pathways involved in inflammatory neurodegeneration. This ‘Perspectives communication’ will in addition highlight work from recent studies that advance novel and emerging concepts on the potential contribution of microbiome-generated factors, such as BF-LPS, in driving pro-inflammatory degenerative neuropathology in the AD brain. PMID:27725817

  17. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress the inflammatory responses of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse microglia by activating SIRT1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Masuda, Shinya; Ohue-Kitano, Ryuji; Yamakage, Hajime; Muranaka, Kazuya; Wada, Hiromichi; Kusakabe, Toru; Shimatsu, Akira; Hasegawa, Koji; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko

    2017-02-22

    Obesity and diabetes are known risk factors for dementia, and it is speculated that chronic neuroinflammation contributes to this increased risk. Microglia are brain-resident immune cells modulating the neuroinflammatory state. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of fish oil, exhibit various effects, which include shifting microglia to the anti-inflammatory phenotype. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved, we examined the impact of EPA, DHA, and EPA+DHA on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine profiles and the associated signaling pathways in the mouse microglial line MG6. Both EPA and DHA suppressed the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 by LPS-stimulated MG6 cells, and this was also observed in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells, the other microglial line. Moreover, the EPA+DHA mixture activated SIRT1 signaling by enhancing mRNA level of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), cellular NAD(+) level, SIRT1 protein deacetylase activity, and SIRT1 mRNA levels in LPS-stimulated MG6. EPA+DHA also inhibited phosphorylation of the stress-associated transcription factor NF-κB subunit p65 at Ser536, which is known to enhance NF-κB nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, including cytokine gene activation. Further, EPA+DHA increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, an indicator of autophagy. Suppression of TNF-α and IL-6 production, inhibition of p65 phosphorylation, and autophagy induction were abrogated by a SIRT1 inhibitor. On the other hand, NAMPT inhibition reversed TNF-α suppression but not IL-6 suppression. Accordingly, these ω-3 PUFAs may suppress neuroinflammation through SIRT1-mediated inhibition of the microglial NF-κB stress response and ensue pro-inflammatory cytokine release, which is implicated in NAMPT-related and -unrelated pathways.

  18. Binding model for eriodictyol to Jun-N terminal kinase and its anti-inflammatory signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Shin, Areum; Jin, Bonghwan; Jnawali, Hum Nath; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Lee, Jee-Young; Heo, Yong-Seok; Kim, Yangmee

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of eriodictyol and its mode of action were investigated. Eriodictyol suppressed tumor necrosis factor (mTNF)-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (miNOS), interleukin (mIL)-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (mMIP)-1, and mMIP-2 cytokine release in LPS-stimulated macrophages. We found that the anti-inflammatory cascade of eriodictyol is mediated through the Toll-like Receptor (TLR)4/CD14, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), extracellular-signalregulated kinase (ERK), Jun-N terminal kinase (JNK), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 pathway. Fluorescence quenching and saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments showed that eriodictyol exhibits good binding affinity to JNK, 8.79 × 105 M-1. Based on a docking study, we propose a model of eriodictyol and JNK binding, in which eriodictyol forms 3 hydrogen bonds with the side chains of Lys55, Met111, and Asp169 in JNK, and in which the hydroxyl groups of the B ring play key roles in binding interactions with JNK. Therefore, eriodictyol may be a potent anti-inflammatory inhibitor of JNK. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(12): 594-599] PMID:24195792

  19. Anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of UNIM-301 (a polyherbal unani formulation) in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surender; Kumar, Rohit; Jain, Hitesh; Gupta, Y. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: UNIM-301 is a polyherbal formulation used in the Unani system of medicine for the treatment of joint pain and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objective: The objective was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of UNIM-301 in carrageenan-induced paw edema and complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of UNIM-301 was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema and CFA induced animal arthritis models, respectively, in doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg body weight. Anti-inflammatory activity of UNIM-301 was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema model using a digital plethysmometer. Anti-arthritic activity was evaluated using CFA induced arthritis, and joint sizes were measured at regular intervals using a micrometer screw gauge. Serum was collected and subjected to estimation of pro-inflammatory cytokine. Indomethacin 3 mg/kg body weight) was used as a standard drug in both the models. The acute and chronic toxicity study was carried out to evaluate the safety of the test drug. Results: UNIM-301 treatment produced a dose-dependent reduction in paw edema and paw thickness in carrageenan-induced paw edema and CFA-induced arthritis, respectively, as compared to control. UNIM 301 also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory mediator in a dose-dependent manner as compared to control. Conclusion: The result of the present study suggests that anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of UNIM-301, which might be accredited to inhibitory activity on pro-inflammatory cytokines to its various individual constituents. PMID:25829793

  20. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Rosa taiwanensis Nakai in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Der-Shiang; Huang, Mei-Hsuen; Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Shuang; Chiu, Yung-Jia; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of a 70% e