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Sample records for activate inkt cells

  1. Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui, E-mail: hzhang@wsu.edu; Zhang, Faya; Zhu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-15

    Alcohol consumption exhibits diverse effects on different types of immune cells. NKT cells are a unique T cell population and play important immunoregulatory roles in different types of immune responses. The effects of chronic alcohol consumption on NKT cells remain to be elucidated. Using a mouse model of chronic alcohol consumption, we found that alcohol increases the percentage of NKT cells, especially iNKT cells in the thymus and liver, but not in the spleen or blood. Alcohol consumption decreases the percentage of NK1.1{sup −} iNKT cells in the total iNKT cell population in all of the tissues and organs examined.more » In the thymus, alcohol consumption increases the number of NK1.1{sup +}CD44{sup hi} mature iNKT cells but does not alter the number of NK1.1{sup −} immature iNKT cells. A BrdU incorporation assay shows that alcohol consumption increases the proliferation of thymic NK1.1{sup −} iNKT cells, especially the NK1.1{sup −}CD44{sup lo} Stage I iNKT cells. The percentage of NKG2A{sup +} iNKT cells increases in all of the tissues and organs examined; whereas CXCR3{sup +} iNKT cells only increases in the thymus of alcohol-consuming mice. Chronic alcohol consumption increases the percentage of IFN-γ-producing iNKT cells and increases the blood concentration of IFN-γ and IL-12 after in vivo α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation. Consistent with the increased cytokine production, the in vivo activation of iNKT cells also enhances the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and NK, B, and T cells in the alcohol-consuming mice. Taken together the data indicate that chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation, which favors the Th1 immune response. - Highlights: • Chronic alcohol consumption increases iNKT cells in the thymus and liver • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances thymic Stage I iNKT cell proliferation • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation in thymus and periphery • Chronic alcohol

  2. Activation of iNKT cells by a distinct constituent of the endogenous glucosylceramide fraction

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patrick J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Heiss, Christian; Watts, Gerald F. M.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Veerapen, Natacha; Cox, Liam R.; Azadi, Parastoo; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialized T-cell subset that recognizes lipids as antigens, contributing to immune responses in diverse disease processes. Experimental data suggests that iNKT cells can recognize both microbial and endogenous lipid antigens. Several candidate endogenous lipid antigens have been proposed, although the contextual role of specific antigens during immune responses remains largely unknown. We have previously reported that mammalian glucosylceramides (GlcCers) activate iNKT cells. GlcCers are found in most mammalian tissues, and exist in variable molecular forms that differ mainly in N-acyl fatty acid chain use. In this report, we purified, characterized, and tested the GlcCer fractions from multiple animal species. Although activity was broadly identified in these GlcCer fractions from mammalian sources, we also found activity properties that could not be reconciled by differences in fatty acid chain use. Enzymatic digestion of β-GlcCer and a chromatographic separation method demonstrated that the activity in the GlcCer fraction was limited to a rare component of this fraction, and was not contained within the bulk of β-GlcCer molecular species. Our data suggest that a minor lipid species that copurifies with β-GlcCer in mammals functions as a lipid self antigen for iNKT cells. PMID:25197085

  3. Hiding lipid presentation: viral interference with CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell activation.

    PubMed

    Horst, Daniëlle; Geerdink, Ruben J; Gram, Anna M; Stoppelenburg, Arie J; Ressing, Maaike E

    2012-10-23

    The immune system plays a major role in protecting the host against viral infection. Rapid initial protection is conveyed by innate immune cells, while adaptive immunity (including T lymphocytes) requires several days to develop, yet provides high specificity and long-lasting memory. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are an unusual subset of T lymphocytes, expressing a semi-invariant T cell receptor together with markers of the innate NK cell lineage. Activated iNKT cells can exert direct cytolysis and can rapidly release a variety of immune-polarizing cytokines, thereby regulating the ensuing adaptive immune response. iNKT cells recognize lipids in the context of the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Intriguingly, CD1d-restricted iNKT cells appear to play a critical role in anti-viral defense: increased susceptibility to disseminated viral infections is observed both in patients with iNKT cell deficiency as well as in CD1d- and iNKT cell-deficient mice. Moreover, viruses have recently been found to use sophisticated strategies to withstand iNKT cell-mediated elimination. This review focuses on CD1d-restricted lipid presentation and the strategies viruses deploy to subvert this pathway.

  4. Hiding Lipid Presentation: Viral Interference with CD1d-Restricted Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Daniëlle; Geerdink, Ruben J.; Gram, Anna M.; Stoppelenburg, Arie J.; Ressing, Maaike E.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system plays a major role in protecting the host against viral infection. Rapid initial protection is conveyed by innate immune cells, while adaptive immunity (including T lymphocytes) requires several days to develop, yet provides high specificity and long-lasting memory. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are an unusual subset of T lymphocytes, expressing a semi-invariant T cell receptor together with markers of the innate NK cell lineage. Activated iNKT cells can exert direct cytolysis and can rapidly release a variety of immune-polarizing cytokines, thereby regulating the ensuing adaptive immune response. iNKT cells recognize lipids in the context of the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Intriguingly, CD1d-restricted iNKT cells appear to play a critical role in anti-viral defense: increased susceptibility to disseminated viral infections is observed both in patients with iNKT cell deficiency as well as in CD1d- and iNKT cell-deficient mice. Moreover, viruses have recently been found to use sophisticated strategies to withstand iNKT cell-mediated elimination. This review focuses on CD1d-restricted lipid presentation and the strategies viruses deploy to subvert this pathway. PMID:23202469

  5. The actin cytoskeleton modulates the activation of iNKT cells by segregating CD1d nanoclusters on antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Salio, Mariolina; Aichinger, Michael C.; Oddone, Anna; Lakadamyali, Melike; Shepherd, Dawn; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize endogenous and exogenous lipid antigens presented in the context of CD1d molecules. The ability of iNKT cells to recognize endogenous antigens represents a distinct immune recognition strategy, which underscores the constitutive memory phenotype of iNKT cells and their activation during inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms regulating such “tonic” activation of iNKT cells remain unclear. Here, we show that the spatiotemporal distribution of CD1d molecules on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) modulates activation of iNKT cells. By using superresolution microscopy, we show that CD1d molecules form nanoclusters at the cell surface of APCs, and their size and density are constrained by the actin cytoskeleton. Dual-color single-particle tracking revealed that diffusing CD1d nanoclusters are actively arrested by the actin cytoskeleton, preventing their further coalescence. Formation of larger nanoclusters occurs in the absence of interactions between CD1d cytosolic tail and the actin cytoskeleton and correlates with enhanced iNKT cell activation. Importantly and consistently with iNKT cell activation during inflammatory conditions, exposure of APCs to the Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist R848 increases nanocluster density and iNKT cell activation. Overall, these results define a previously unidentified mechanism that modulates iNKT cell autoreactivity based on the tight control by the APC cytoskeleton of the sizes and densities of endogenous antigen-loaded CD1d nanoclusters. PMID:26798067

  6. A rapid fluorescence-based assay for classification of iNKT cell activating glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Baena, Andres; Bricard, Gabriel; Li, Qian; Veerapen, Natacha; Ndonye, Rachel; Park, Jeong Ju; Lee, Ji Hyung; Seo, Kyung-Chang; Howell, Amy R; Chang, Young-Tae; Illarionov, Petr A; Besra, Gurdyal S; Chung, Sung-Kee; Porcelli, Steven A

    2011-04-13

    Structural variants of α-galactosylceramide (αGC) that activate invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are being developed as potential immunomodulatory agents for a variety of applications. Identification of specific forms of these glycolipids that bias responses to favor production of proinflammatory vs anti-inflammatory cytokines is central to current efforts, but this goal has been hampered by the lack of in vitro screening assays that reliably predict the in vivo biological activity of these compounds. Here we describe a fluorescence-based assay to identify functionally distinct αGC analogues. Our assay is based on recent findings showing that presentation of glycolipid antigens by CD1d molecules localized to plasma membrane detergent-resistant microdomains (lipid rafts) is correlated with induction of interferon-γ secretion and Th1-biased cytokine responses. Using an assay that measures lipid raft residency of CD1d molecules loaded with αGC, we screened a library of ∼200 synthetic αGC analogues and identified 19 agonists with potential Th1-biasing activity. Analysis of a subset of these novel candidate Th1 type agonists in vivo in mice confirmed their ability to induce systemic cytokine responses consistent with a Th1 type bias. These results demonstrate the predictive value of this novel in vitro assay for assessing the in vivo functionality of glycolipid agonists and provide the basis for a relatively simple high-throughput assay for identification and functional classification of iNKT cell activating glycolipids. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Tissue-Specific Phenotype and Activation of iNKT Cells in Morbidly Obese Subjects: Interaction with Adipocytes and Effect of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    López, Soledad; García-Serrano, Sara; Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Ho-Plagaro, Ailec; Santiago-Fernandez, Concepción; Alba, Gonzalo; Cejudo-Guillen, Marta; Rodríguez-Cañete, Alberto; Valdes, Sergio; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Pozo, David; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2018-04-04

    The immune response of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in obesity, in particular the role of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, has not yet been fully elucidated. To characterize iNKT cells and its activation status in VAT and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in morbidly obese subjects (MO), and to analyze their association with metabolic parameters. Twenty non-obese and 20 MO subjects underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and were studied before and 6 months after RYGB. VAT and PBMC were obtained. A decrease in VAT iNKT cells from MO was found, however, not in PBMC. Visceral adipocytes from MO presented increased CD1d expression (p = 0.032). MO presented an increase in early activated CD69+ iNKT cells in PBMC before RYGB (p < 0.001), but not after RYGB nor in VAT, and an increase in later activated CD25+ iNKT in VAT (p = 0.046), without differences in PBMC. The co-expression of early and later markers (CD69+CD25+) in iNKT cells was increased in MO in VAT (p = 0.050) and PBMC (p = 0.006), decreasing after RYGB (p = 0.050). CD69+ iNKT and CD69+CD25+ iNKT cells in PBMC after RYGB correlated negatively with glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance levels. There is a tissue-specific phenotype and activation of iNKT cells in VAT in morbid obesity, which could be involved in VAT immunometabolism dysregulation. Also, the increase in CD1d expression could be to offset the lack of VAT iNKT cells.

  8. Activation of iNKT Cells Prevents Salmonella-Enterocolitis and Salmonella-Induced Reactive Arthritis by Downregulating IL-17-Producing γδT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noto Llana, Mariángeles; Sarnacki, Sebastián H.; Morales, Andrea L.; Aya Castañeda, María del R.; Giacomodonato, Mónica N.; Blanco, Guillermo; Cerquetti, María C.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an inflammatory condition of the joints that arises following an infection. Salmonella enterocolitis is one of the most common infections leading to ReA. Although the pathogenesis remains unclear, it is known that IL-17 plays a pivotal role in the development of ReA. IL-17-producers cells are mainly Th17, iNKT, and γδT lymphocytes. It is known that iNKT cells regulate the development of Th17 lineage. Whether iNKT cells also regulate γδT lymphocytes differentiation is unknown. We found that iNKT cells play a protective role in ReA. BALB/c Jα18−/− mice suffered a severe Salmonella enterocolitis, a 3.5-fold increase in IL-17 expression and aggravated inflammation of the synovial membrane. On the other hand, activation of iNKT cells with α-GalCer abrogated IL-17 response to Salmonella enterocolitis and prevented intestinal and joint tissue damage. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect of α-GalCer was related to a drop in the proportion of IL-17-producing γδT lymphocytes (IL17-γδTcells) rather than to a decrease in Th17 cells. In summary, we here show that iNKT cells play a protective role against Salmonella-enterocolitis and Salmonella-induced ReA by downregulating IL17-γδTcells. PMID:28944217

  9. Role of SHIP1 in iNKT cell development and functions1

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Leon E.; Reilly, Emma C.; Fugère, Céline; Srivastava, Neetu; Kerr, William G.; Brossay, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    SH2-containing inositol phosphatase-1 (SHIP1) is a 5' inositol phosphatase known to negatively regulate the signaling product of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3). SHIP1 is recruited to a large number of inhibitory receptors expressed on invariant natural killer (iNKT) cells. We hypothesized that SHIP1 deletion would have major effects on iNKT cell development by altering the thresholds for positive and negative selection. Germline SHIP1 deletion has been shown to affect T cells, as well as other immune cell populations. However, the role of SHIP1 on T cell function has been controversial and its participation on iNKT cell development and function has not been examined. We evaluated the consequences of SHIP1 deletion on iNKT cells using germline-deficient mice, chimeric mice, and conditionally deficient mice. We found that T cell and iNKT cell development are impaired in germline-deficient animals. However, this phenotype can be rescued by extrinsic expression of SHIP1. In contrast, SHIP1 is required cell autonomously for optimal iNKT cell cytokine secretion. This suggests that SHIP1 calibrates the threshold of iNKT cell reactivity. These data further our understanding of how iNKT cell activation is regulated and provide insights into the biology of this unique cell lineage. PMID:26232432

  10. Tim-3 blockade promotes iNKT cell function to inhibit HBV replication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Wang, Zehua; Du, Xianhong; Liu, Yuan; Song, Xiaojia; Wang, Tixiao; Tan, Siyu; Liang, Xiaohong; Gao, Lifen; Ma, Chunhong

    2018-03-30

    Increased expression of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells is reported in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, whether Tim-3 regulates iNKT cells in chronic HBV condition remains unclear. In this study, our results showed that the expression of Tim-3 was up-regulated on hepatic iNKT cells from HBV-transgenic (Tg) mice or iNKT cells stimulated with α-galactosylceramide (α-Galcer). Compared with Tim-3 - iNKT cells, Tim-3 + iNKT cells expressed more IFN-γ, IL-4 and CD107a, indicating a strong relationship between Tim-3 and iNKT cell activation. Constantly, treatment of Tim-3 blocking antibodies significantly enhanced the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and CD107a in iNKT cells both in vivo and in vitro. This Tim-3 - mediated suppression of iNKT cells was further confirmed in Tim-3 knockout (KO) mice. Moreover, Tim-3 blockade promoted α-Galcer-triggered inhibition of HBV replication, displaying as the decreased HBV DNA and HBsAg level in serum, and down-regulated pgRNA expression in liver tissues. Collectively, our data, for the first time, demonstrated the potential role of Tim-3 blockade in promoting iNKT cell-mediated HBV inhibition. Therefore, combination of α-Galcer with Tim-3 blockade might be a promising approach in chronic hepatitis B therapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. iNKT cells in microbial immunity: recognition of microbial glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Yuki; Ueno, Keigo

    2011-07-01

    Natural killer T cells expressing an invariant T cell antigen receptor (iNKT cells) are cells of the innate immune system. After recognizing glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d molecules on antigen presenting cells (APCs), iNKT cells rapidly produce large quantities of cytokines, thereby stimulating many types of cells. Recent studies have described several mechanisms of iNKT cell activation and the contribution of these cells to antimicrobial responses. iNKT cells can be activated by endogenous antigens and/or inflammatory cytokines from APCs. However, iNKT cells also recognize certain microbial glycolipids by their invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR), and they contribute to pathogen clearance in certain microbial infections. These findings indicate that the iNKT TCR is useful for detecting certain microbial pathogens. Moreover, recent studies suggest that iNKT cell glycolipid antigens may be useful in antimicrobial therapy and vaccines. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Thymic and peripheral microenvironments differentially mediate development and maturation of iNKT cells by IL-15 transpresentation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Eliseo F.; Acero, Luis F.; Stonier, Spencer W.; Zhou, Dapeng

    2010-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are an innate type of T cells, which respond rapidly on activation. iNKT cells acquire these innate-like abilities during development; however, the signals driving development and functional maturation remain only partially understood. Because interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for iNKT development and is delivered by transpresentation, we set out to identify the cell types providing IL-15 to developing iNKT cells and determine their role at the various states of development and maturation. We report here that transpresentation of IL-15 by parenchymal cells was crucial for generating normal number of iNKTs in the thymus, whereas both hematopoietic and parenchymal cells regulated iNKT cell numbers in the periphery, particularly in the liver. Specifically, dendritic cells contributed to peripheral iNKT cell numbers by up-regulating Bcl-2 expression and promoting extrathymic iNKT cell ex-pansion and their homeostatic proliferation. Whether IL-15 affects functional maturation of iNKT cells was also examined. In IL-15Rα−/− mice, CD44HighNK1.1+ iNKT cells displayed decreased T-bet expression and in response to α-galactosylceramide, had deficient interferon-γ expression. Such defects could be reversed by exogenous IL-15 signals. Overall, these studies identify stage-specific functions of IL-15, which are determined by the tissue microenvironment and elucidate the importance of IL-15 in functional maturation. PMID:20581314

  13. NKAP regulates iNKT cell proliferation and differentiation into ROR-γt expressing NKT17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Puspa; Chen, Meibo W.; McWilliams, Douglas C.; Belmonte, Paul; Constans, Megan; Sant’Angelo, Derek B.; Shapiro, Virginia Smith

    2016-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a unique lineage with characteristics of both adaptive and innate lymphocytes, and recognize glycolipid presented by an MHC Class I-like CD1d molecule. During thymic development, iNKT cells also differentiate into NKT1, NKT2 and NKT17 functional subsets that preferentially produce cytokines IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-17, respectively, upon activation. Newly selected iNKT cells undergo a burst of proliferation, which is defective in mice with a specific deletion of NKAP in the iNKT cell lineage, leading to severe reductions in thymic and peripheral iNKT cell numbers. The decreased cell number is not due to defective homeostasis or increased apoptosis, and is not rescued by Bcl-xL overexpression. NKAP is also required for differentiation into NKT17 cells, but NKT1 and NKT2 cell development and function are unaffected. This failure in NKT17 development is rescued by transgenic expression of PLZF; however, the PLZF transgene does not restore iNKT cell numbers or the block in positive selection into the iNKT cell lineage in CD4-cre NKAP cKO mice. Therefore, NKAP regulates multiple steps in iNKT cell development and differentiation. PMID:27183586

  14. Reduced iNKT cells numbers in type 1 diabetes patients and their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Beristain-Covarrubias, Nonantzin; Canche-Pool, Elsy; Gomez-Diaz, Rita; Sanchez-Torres, Luvia E; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by the specific destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been associated with development of T1D. Class I MHC-restricted T cell-associated molecule (CRTAM) is expressed on activated iNKT, CD8(+), and CD4(+) T cells, and it is associated with the pro-inflammatory profiles of these cells. Crtam gene expression in CD3(+) lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice is associated with T1D onset. However, expression of CRTAM on T cells from patients with T1D has not yet been evaluated. We compared iNKT cell (CD3(+)Vα24(+)Vβ11(+)) numbers and CRTAM expression in a Mexican population with recent-onset T1D and their first-degree relatives with control families. Remarkably, we found lower iNKT cell numbers in T1D families, and we identified two iNKT cell populations in some of the families. One iNKT cell population expressed high iTCR levels (iNKT(hi)), whereas another expressed low levels (iNKT(lo)) and also expressed CRTAM. These findings support a probable genetic determinant of iNKT cell numbers and a possible role for these cells in T1D development. This study also suggests that CRTAM identifies recently activated iNKT lymphocytes.

  15. The role of iNKT cells on the phenotypes of allergic airways in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Lennart K A; Gülec, Nazey; Poynter, Matthew E; DeVault, Victoria L; Dienz, Oliver; Boyson, Jonathan E; Daphtary, Nirav; Aliyeva, Minara; Ather, Jennifer L; Scheuplein, Felix; Schaub, Robert

    2017-08-01

    iNKT cells and mast cells have both been implicated in the syndrome of allergic asthma through their activation-induced release of Th2 type cytokines and secretion of histamine and other mediators, respectively, which can promote airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to agents such as methacholine. However, a mechanistic link between iNKT cells and mast cell recruitment or activation has never been explored. Our objective was to determine whether iNKT cells are necessary for the recruitment of mast cells and if iNKT cells can influence the acute allergen induced bronchoconstriction (AIB) caused by mast cell mediator release. To do so, we pharmacologically eliminated iNKT cells using a specific antibody (NKT-14) and examined its impact on airway inflammation and physiological phenotype. In mice treated with NKT-14, the elimination of iNKT cells was sufficient to prevent AHR and pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation elicited by administration of the iNKT cell agonist αGalCer. In mice treated with NKT-14 and then sensitized and challenged with house dust mite extract (HDM), eliminating the iNKT cells significantly reduced both AHR and AIB but did not affect pulmonary inflammation, the mast cell population, nor the release of the mast cell mediators mast cell protease-1 and prostaglandin D2. We conclude that while iNKT cells contribute to the phenotype of allergic airways disease through the manifestation of AIB and AHR, their presence is not required for mast cell recruitment and activation, or to generate the characteristic inflammatory response subsequent to allergen challenge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of genetically engineered iNKT cells expressing TCRs specific for the M. tuberculosis 38-kDa antigen.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhen-Min; Luo, Wei; Wen, Qian; Liu, Su-Dong; Hao, Pei-Pei; Zhou, Chao-Ying; Zhou, Ming-Qian; Ma, Li

    2015-05-07

    The invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell has been shown to play a central role in early stages immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, which become nonresponsive (anergic) and fails to control the growth of Mtb in patients with active tuberculosis. Enhancement of iNKT cell responses to Mtb antigens can help to resist infection. In the present study, an Mtb 38-kDa antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) was isolated from human CD8(+) T cells stimulated by 38-kDa antigen in vitro, and then transduced into primary iNKT cells by retrovirus vector. The TCR gene-modified iNKT cells are endowed with new features to behave as a conventional MHC class I restricted CD8(+) T lymphocyte by displaying specific antigen recognition and anti-Mtb antigen activity in vitro. At the same time, the engineered iNKT cells retaining its original capacity to be stimulated proliferation by non-protein antigens α-Gal-Cer. This work is the first attempt to engineer iNKT cells by exogenous TCR genes and demonstrated that iNKT cell, as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, can be genetically engineered to confer them a defined and alternative specificity, which provides new insights into TCR gene therapy for tuberculosis patients, especially those infected with drug-resistant Mtb.

  17. iNKT cells ameliorate human autoimmunity: Lessons from alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Ghraieb, Amal; Keren, Aviad; Ginzburg, Alex; Ullmann, Yehuda; Schrum, Adam G; Paus, Ralf; Gilhar, Amos

    2018-04-18

    Alopecia areata (AA) is understood to be a CD8+/NKG2D+ T cell-dependent autoimmune disease. Here, we demonstrate that human AA pathogenesis of is also affected by iNKT10 cells, an unconventional T cell subtype whose number is significantly increased in AA compared to healthy human skin. AA lesions can be rapidly induced in healthy human scalp skin xenotransplants on Beige-SCID mice by intradermal injections of autologous healthy-donor PBMCs pre-activated with IL-2. We show that in this in vivo model, the development of AA lesions is prevented by recognized the iNKT cell activator, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), which stimulates iNKT cells to expand and produce IL-10. Moreover, in pre-established humanized mouse AA lesions, hair regrowth is promoted by α-GalCer treatment through a process requiring both effector-memory iNKT cells, which can interact directly with CD8+/NKG2D+ T cells, and IL-10. This provides the first in vivo evidence in a humanized model of autoimmune disease that iNKT10 cells are key disease-protective lymphocytes. Since these regulatory NKT cells can both prevent the development of AA lesions and promote hair re-growth in established AA lesions, targeting iNKT10 cells may have preventive and therapeutic potential also in other autoimmune disorders related to AA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Human iNKT and MAIT cells exhibit a PLZF-dependent proapoptotic propensity that is counterbalanced by XIAP.

    PubMed

    Gérart, Stéphane; Sibéril, Sophie; Martin, Emmanuel; Lenoir, Christelle; Aguilar, Claire; Picard, Capucine; Lantz, Olivier; Fischer, Alain; Latour, Sylvain

    2013-01-24

    Invariant natural killer (iNKT) T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent peculiar T-lymphocyte subpopulations with innate-like properties that differ from conventional T cells. iNKT are reduced in the primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP). By studying the mechanism of this depletion, we herein report that iNKT cells exhibit a high susceptibility to apoptosis that is not observed with conventional T cells. Elevated expression of caspases 3 and 7 accounts for the proapoptotic phenotype of iNKT cells, which is inhibited by XIAP although it exerts a moderate effect in conventional T cells. Similarly, MAIT cells exhibit a proapoptotic propensity with elevated expression of activated caspases and are decreased in XIAP-deficient individuals. Knockdown of the transcription factor PLZF/ZBTB-16, which is involved in the effector program of iNKT cells, diminishes their proapoptotic phenotype. Conversely, overexpression of PLZF/ZBTB-16 in conventional T cells leads to a proapoptotic phenotype. Our findings identify a previously unknown pathway of regulation of innate-like T-cell homeostasis depending on XIAP and PLZF. The proapoptotic feature of iNKT cells also gives a reliable explanation of their exhaustion observed in different human conditions including the XIAP immunodeficiency.

  19. The differentiation of ROR-γt expressing iNKT17 cells is orchestrated by Runx1.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Puspa; Manso, Bryce; Chung, Ji Young; Romera Arocha, Sinibaldo; Xue, Hai-Hui; Angelo, Derek B Sant'; Shapiro, Virginia Smith

    2017-08-01

    iNKT cells are a unique lineage of T cells that recognize glycolipid presented by CD1d. In the thymus, they differentiate into iNKT1, iNKT2 and iNKT17 effector subsets, characterized by preferential expression of Tbet, Gata3 and ROR-γt and production of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-17, respectively. We demonstrate that the transcriptional regulator Runx1 is essential for the generation of ROR-γt expressing iNKT17 cells. PLZF-cre Runx1 cKO mice lack iNKT17 cells in the thymus, spleen and liver. Runx1-deficient iNKT cells have altered expression of several genes important for iNKT17 differentiation, including decreased expression of IL-7Rα, BATF and c-Maf and increased expression of Bcl11b and Lef1. However, reduction of Lef1 expression or introduction of an IL-7Rα transgene is not sufficient to correct the defect in iNKT17 differentiation, demonstrating that Runx1 is a key regulator of several genes required for iNKT17 differentiation. Loss of Runx1 leads to a severe decrease in iNKT cell numbers in the thymus, spleen and liver. The decrease in cell number is due to a combined decrease in proliferation at Stage 1 during thymic development and increased apoptosis. Thus, we describe a novel role of Runx1 in iNKT cell development and differentiation, particularly in orchestrating iNKT17 differentiation.

  20. Lack of PD-L1 Expression by iNKT Cells Improves the Course of Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Speak, Anneliese O.; Lombardi, Vincent; Lam, Jonathan; Khoo, Bryant; Inn, Kyung Soo; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Jung, Jae U.; Akbari, Omid

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence indicating that invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells play an important role in defense against influenza A virus (IAV). However, the effect of inhibitory receptor, programmed death-1 (PD-1), and its ligands, programmed death ligand (PD-L) 1 and 2 on iNKT cells in protection against IAV remains to be elucidated. Here we investigated the effects of these co-stimulatory molecules on iNKT cells in the response to influenza. We discovered that compare to the wild type, PD-L1 deficient mice show reduced sensitivity to IAV infection as evident by reduced weight loss, decreased pulmonary inflammation and cellular infiltration. In contrast, PD-L2 deficient mice showed augmented weight loss, pulmonary inflammation and cellular infiltration compare to the wild type mice after influenza infection. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells from wild type, PD-L1 or PD-L2 deficient mice into iNKT cell deficient mice recapitulated these findings. Interestingly, in our transfer system PD-L1−/−-derived iNKT cells produced high levels of interferon-gamma whereas PD-L2−/−-derived iNKT cells produced high amounts of interleukin-4 and 13 suggesting a role for these cytokines in sensitivity to influenza. We identified that PD-L1 negatively regulates the frequency of iNKT cell subsets in the lungs of IAV infected mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that lack of PD-L1 expression by iNKT cells reduces the sensitivity to IAV and that the presence of PD-L2 is important for dampening the deleterious inflammatory responses after IAV infection. Our findings potentially have clinical implications for developing new therapies for influenza. PMID:23555047

  1. GPR65 inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through CD4+T cell independent mechanisms that include effects on iNKT cells.

    PubMed

    Wirasinha, Rushika C; Vijayan, Dipti; Smith, Nicola J; Parnell, Grant P; Swarbrick, Alexander; Brink, Robert; King, Cecile; Stewart, Graeme; Booth, David R; Batten, Marcel

    2018-02-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) gene has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). GPR65 is predominantly expressed in lymphoid organs and is activated by extracellular protons. In this study, we tested whether GPR65 plays a functional role in demyelinating autoimmune disease. Using a murine model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we found that Gpr65-deficient mice develop exacerbated disease. CD4 + helper T cells are key drivers of EAE pathogenesis, however, Gpr65 deficiency in these cells did not contribute to the observed exacerbated disease. Instead, Gpr65 expression levels were found to be highest on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. EAE severity in Gpr65-deficient mice was normalized in the absence of iNKT cells (CD1d-deficient mice), suggesting that GPR65 signals in iNKT cells are important for suppressing autoimmune disease. These findings provide functional support for the genetic association of GPR65 with MS and demonstrate GPR65 signals suppress autoimmune activity in EAE. © 2017 Australasian Society for Immunology Inc.

  2. Costimulatory activation of murine invariant natural killer T cells by toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Raveendra R; Villanueva, Alexander Ian; Elawadli, Inas; Jayanth, Preethi; Read, Leah R; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; Sharif, Shayan

    2012-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are glycolipid-reactive lymphocytes with anti-microbial properties. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-primed antigen-presenting cells are known to activate iNKT cells, however, the expression and function of TLRs in iNKT cells remain largely unknown. Here, we show that TCR-activation of murine iNKT cells by α-GalactosylCeramide (α-GalCer) or anti-CD3 antibodies can result in increased expression of TLR genes. TLR3, 5 and 9-mediated costimulation of TCR-preactivated iNKT cells resulted in enhancement of iNKT cell activation, as determined by their cytokine production. Expression of TLR3 and 9 at protein level was also confirmed in TCR-activated iNKT cells. Furthermore, TCR-preactivation followed by TLR9-costimulation of iNKT cells increased their ability to induce maturation of dendritic cells. Thus, our findings show that iNKT cells can up-regulate their TLR expression upon TCR activation and a subsequent TLR-signaling in these cells can lead to their enhanced activation, suggesting a new possible mode of iNKT cell activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CD1d-unrestricted NKT cells are endowed with a hybrid function far superior than that of iNKT cells.

    PubMed

    Farr, Alexander R; Wu, Weisheng; Choi, Bongkum; Cavalcoli, James D; Laouar, Yasmina

    2014-09-02

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to date represent the best example of cells known to have a hybrid function, representing both innate and adaptive immunity. Shared phenotypic similarities with NK cells together with a rapid response to a cytokine stimulus and a productive TCR engagement are the features that underline the hybrid nature of iNKT cells. Using these criteria, we provide molecular and functional evidence demonstrating that CD1d-independent (CD1d(ind)) NKT cells, a population of CD1d-unrestricted NKT cells, are endowed with a hybrid function far superior to that of iNKT cells: (i) an extensive shared program with NK cells, (ii) a closer Euclidian distance with NK cells, and (iii) the ability to respond to innate stimuli (Poly:IC) with cytotoxic potential in the same manner as NK cells identify a hybrid feature in CD1d(ind)NKT cells that truly fulfills the dual function of an NK and a T cell. Our finding that CD1d(ind)NKT cells are programmed to act like NK cells in response to innate signals while being capable of adaptive responses is unprecedented, and thus might reemphasize CD1d-unrestricted NKT cells as a subset of lymphocytes that could affect biological processes of antimicrobial and tumor immunity in a unique way.

  4. Circulating Myeloid Dendritic Cells of Advanced Cancer Patients Result in Reduced Activation and a Biased Cytokine Profile in Invariant NKT Cells1

    PubMed Central

    van der Vliet, Hans J. J.; Wang, Ruojie; Yue, Simon C.; Koon, Henry B.; Balk, Steven P.; Exley, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells play important regulatory roles in various immune responses, including antitumor immune responses. Previous studies have demonstrated quantitative and qualitative defects in iNKT cells of cancer patients, and these defects are clinically relevant as they are associated with poor prognosis. In this study we demonstrate that defects in the iNKT cell population can, at least in part, be attributed to defective interactions between iNKT cells and CD1d-expressing circulating myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), as mDC of patients with advanced melanoma and renal cell cancer reduced the activation and Th1 cytokine production of healthy donor-derived iNKT cells. Interestingly, this reduced activation of iNKT cells was restricted to patients with low circulating iNKT cell numbers and could be reversed by IL-12 and in part by the neutralization of TGF-β, but it was further reduced by the neutralization of IL-10 in vitro. Additional experiments revealed discordant roles for TGF-β and IL-10 on human iNKT cells, because TGF-β suppressed iNKT cell activation and proliferation and IFN-γ production while IL-10 was identified as a cytokine involved in stimulating the activation and expansion of iNKT cells that could subsequently suppress NK cell and T cell responses. PMID:18490728

  5. Skewed Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) Cells, Impaired iNKT:B Cell Help and Decreased SAP Expression in Blood Lymphocytes from Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Erazo-Borrás, L V; Álvarez-Álvarez, J A; Perez-Romero, C A; Orrego-Arango, J C; Franco-Restrepo, J L; Trujillo-Vargas, C M

    2017-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a syndrome with predominantly defective B cell function. However, abnormalities in the number and function of other lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood (PB) have been described in most patients. We have analysed the distribution of iNKT cell subpopulations in the PB of CVID patients and the ability of these cells to provide in vitro cognate B cell help. The total of iNKT cells was reduced in the PB of CVID patients, especially CD4+, CD4-/CD8- and CCR5+/CXCR3+. These findings were associated with an enrichment of memory-like and a tendency towards a reduction in TNF-α-expressing effector iNKT cells in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of CVID patients. Moreover, an accumulation of follicular helper iNKT cells in the PB of CVID patients was demonstrated. CVID αGalCer-pulsed iNKT cells are not able to induce autologous B cell proliferation although they do induce proliferation to healthy donor B cells. Interestingly, autologous and heterologous co-cultures did not differ in the amount of immunoglobulin secreted by B cells in vitro. Finally, reduced intracellular SAP expression in iNKT cells and other lymphocytes in the blood from CVID patients was observed. These results provide further insights into the immunological mechanisms underlying the iNKT cell defects and the potential targets to improve B cell help in CVID. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  6. Boosting the Immune Response: The Use of iNKT cell ligands as vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Priyanka; Webb, Tonya J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells comprise a small, but important T cell subset and are thought to bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses. The discovery of NKT cells and extensive research on their activating ligands have paved the way for modulation of these potent immunoregulatory cells in order to improve the outcome of various clinical conditions. Efforts to modulate NKT cell effector functions have ranged from therapy for influenza to anti-tumor immunotherapy. These approaches have also led to the use of NKT cell agonists such as α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and its analogs as vaccine adjuvants, an approach that is aimed at boosting specific B and T cell responses to a vaccine candidate by concomitant activation of NKT cells. In this review we will provide a comprehensive overview of the efforts made in using α-GalCer and its analogs as vaccine adjuvants. The diverse array of vaccination strategies used, as well as the role of NKT cell activating adjuvants will be discussed, with focus on vaccines against malaria, HIV, influenza and tumor vaccines. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the efficacy of NKT cell-specific agonists as adjuvants and further suggest that these compounds warrant serious consideration during the development of vaccination strategies. PMID:23264781

  7. Relationships between Th1 or Th2 iNKT Cell Activity and Structures of CD1d-Antigen Complexes: Meta-analysis of CD1d-Glycolipids Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Xavier; Renault, Nicolas; Farce, Amaury; Chavatte, Philippe; Hénon, Eric

    2014-01-01

    A number of potentially bioactive molecules can be found in nature. In particular, marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds. The activity of an α-galactosylceramide was first discovered in 1993 via screening of a Japanese marine sponge (Agelas mauritanius). Very rapidly, a synthetic glycololipid analogue of this natural molecule was discovered, called KRN7000. Associated with the CD1d protein, this α-galactosylceramide 1 (KRN7000) interacts with the T-cell antigen receptor to form a ternary complex that yields T helper (Th) 1 and Th2 responses with opposing effects. In our work, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations (11.5 µs in total) involving eight different ligands (conducted in triplicate) in an effort to find out correlation at the molecular level, if any, between chemical modulation of 1 and the orientation of the known biological response, Th1 or Th2. Comparative investigations of human versus mouse and Th1 versus Th2 data have been carried out. A large set of analysis tools was employed including free energy landscapes. One major result is the identification of a specific conformational state of the sugar polar head, which could be correlated, in the present study, to the biological Th2 biased response. These theoretical tools provide a structural basis for predicting the very different dynamical behaviors of α-glycosphingolipids in CD1d and might aid in the future design of new analogues of 1. PMID:25376021

  8. Activation of decidual invariant natural killer T cells promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Yao; Tu, Jiaoqin; Schust, Danny J

    2015-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are crucial for host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens, but the underlying mechanisms of iNKT cells activation by microbes are not fully explained. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of iNKT cell activation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated preterm birth using an adoptive transfer system and diverse neutralizing antibodies (Abs) and inhibitors. We found that adoptive transfer of decidual iNKT cells to LPS-stimulated iNKT cell deficient Jα18(-/-) mice that lack invariant Vα14Jα281T cell receptor (TCR) expression significantly decreased the time to delivery and increased the percentage of decidual iNKT cells. Neutralizing Abs against Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), CD1d, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18, and inhibitors blocking the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly reduced in vivo percentages of decidual iNKT cells, their intracellular interferon (IFN)-γ production and surface CD69 expression. In vitro, in the presence of the same Abs and inhibitors used as in vivo, decidual iNKT cells co-cultured with LPS-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) showed significantly decreased extracellular and intracellular IFN-γ secretion and surface CD69 expression. Our data demonstrate that the activation of decidual iNKT cells plays an important role in inflammation-induced preterm birth. Activation of decidual iNKT cells also requires TLR4-mediated NF-κB, MAPK p38 and ERK pathways, the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18, and endogenous glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Maternal low protein diet leads to dysregulation of placental iNKT cells and M1/M2 macrophage ratio, body weight loss in male, neonate Sprague-Dawley rats and increased UCP-1 mediated thermogenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Placental immune cells provide cytokines and growth factors that are necessary for placenta development and function. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate cells specific for glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule and secrete Th1 cytokines in the placenta, suggesting an imm...

  10. Modulation of human natural killer T cell ligands on TLR-mediated antigen-presenting cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Speak, Anneliese O.; Shepherd, Dawn; Polzella, Paolo; Illarionov, Petr A.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Platt, Frances M.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of nonconventional T cells recognizing endogenous and/or exogenous glycolipid antigens in the context of CD1d molecules. It remains unclear whether innate stimuli can modify the profile of endogenous lipids recognized by iNKT cells on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We report that activation of human APCs by Toll-like receptor ligands (TLR-L) modulates the lipid biosynthetic pathway, resulting in enhanced recognition of CD1d-associated lipids by iNKT cells, as defined by IFN-γ secretion. APC-derived soluble factors further increase CD1d-restricted iNKT cell activation. Finally, using soluble tetrameric iNKT T cell receptors (TCR) as a staining reagent, we demonstrate specific up-regulation of CD1d-bound ligand(s) on TLR-mediated APC maturation. The ability of innate stimuli to modulate the lipid profile of APCs resulting in iNKT cell activation and APC maturation underscores the role of iNKT cells in assisting priming of antigen-specific immune responses. PMID:18077358

  11. Activation of murine invariant NKT cells promotes susceptibility to candidiasis by IL-10 induced modulation of phagocyte antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Norihiro; Kikuchi, Norihiro; Morishima, Yuko; Matsuyama, Masashi; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Shibuya, Akira; Shibuya, Kazuko; Taniguchi, Masaru; Ishii, Yukio

    2016-07-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells play an important role in a variety of antimicrobial immune responses due to their ability to produce high levels of immune-modulating cytokines. Here, we investigated the role of iNKT cells in host defense against candidiasis using Jα18-deficient mice (Jα18(-/-) ), which lack iNKT cells. Jα18(-/-) mice were more resistant to the development of lethal candidiasis than wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, treatment of WT mice with the iNKT cell activating ligand α-galactosylceramide markedly enhanced their mortality after infection with Candida albicans. Serum IL-10 levels were significantly elevated in WT mice in response to infection with C. albicans. Futhermore, IL-10 production increased after in vitro coculture of peritoneal macrophages with iNKT cells and C. albicans. The numbers of peritoneal macrophages, the production of IL-1β and IL-18, and caspase-1 activity were also significantly elevated in Jα18(-/-) mice after infection with C. albicans. The adoptive transfer of iNKT cells or exogenous administration of IL-10 into Jα18(-/-) reversed susceptibility to candidiasis to the level of WT mice. These results suggest that activation of iNKT cells increases the initial severity of C. albicans infection, most likely mediated by IL-10 induced modulation of macrophage antifungal activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamaladasa, A.; Wickramasinghe, N.; Adikari, T. N.; Gomes, L.; Shyamali, N. L. A.; Salio, M.; Cerundolo, V.; Ogg, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)‐γ and interleukin (IL)−4 ex‐vivo enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha‐galactosyl‐ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4+ subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus‐specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl‐6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl‐6 and inducible T cell co‐stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4+ iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  13. Turned on by danger: activation of CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Victoria

    2012-09-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells bear characteristics of innate and adaptive lymphocytes, which allow them to bridge the two halves of the immune response and play roles in many disease settings. Recent work has characterized precisely how their activation is initiated and regulated. Novel antigens from important pathogens have been identified, as has an abundant self-antigen, β-glucopyranosylcaramide, capable of mediating an iNKT-cell response. Studies of the iNKT T-cell receptor (TCR)-antigen-CD1d complex show how docking between CD1d-antigen and iNKT TCR is highly conserved, and how small sequence differences in the TCR establish intrinsic variation in iNKT TCR affinity. The sequence of the TCR CDR3β loop determines iNKT TCR affinity for ligand-CD1d, independent of ligand identity. CD1d ligands can promote T helper type 1 (Th1) or Th2 biased cytokine responses, depending on the composition of their lipid tails. Ligands loaded into CD1d on the cell surface promote Th2 responses, whereas ligands with long hydrophobic tails are loaded endosomally and promote Th1 responses. This information is informing the design of synthetic iNKT-cell antigens. The iNKT cells may be activated by exogenous antigen, or by a combination of dendritic cell-derived interleukin-12 and iNKT TCR-self-antigen-CD1d engagement. The iNKT-cell activation is further modulated by recent foreign or self-antigen encounter. Activation of dendritic cells through pattern recognition receptors alters their antigen presentation and cytokine production, strongly influencing iNKT-cell activation. In a range of bacterial infections, dendritic cell-dependent innate activation of iNKT cells through interleukin-12 is the dominant influence on their activity. © 2012 Prolmmune Ltd. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Targeted delivery of lipid antigen to macrophages via the CD169/sialoadhesin endocytic pathway induces robust invariant natural killer T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Norihito; Vela, Jose Luis; Nycholat, Corwin M; Rademacher, Christoph; Khurana, Archana; van Rooijen, Nico; Crocker, Paul R; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Paulson, James C

    2013-05-07

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells induce a protective immune response triggered by foreign glycolipid antigens bound to CD1d on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). A limitation of using glycolipid antigens to stimulate immune responses in human patients has been the inability to target them to the most effective APCs. Recent studies have implicated phagocytic CD169(+) macrophages as major APCs in lymph nodes for priming iNKT cells in mice immunized with glycolipid antigen in particulate form. CD169 is known as sialoadhesin (Sn), a macrophage-specific adhesion and endocytic receptor of the siglec family that recognizes sialic acid containing glycans as ligands. We have recently developed liposomes decorated with glycan ligands for CD169/Sn suitable for targeted delivery to macrophages via CD169/Sn-mediated endocytosis. Here we show that targeted delivery of a lipid antigen to CD169(+) macrophages in vivo results in robust iNKT cell activation in liver and spleen using nanogram amounts of antigen. Activation of iNKT cells is abrogated in Cd169(-/-) mice and is macrophage-dependent, demonstrating that targeting CD169(+) macrophages is sufficient for systemic activation of iNKT cells. When pulsed with targeted liposomes, human monocyte-derived dendritic cells expressing CD169/Sn activated human iNKT cells, demonstrating the conservation of the CD169/Sn endocytic pathway capable of presenting lipid antigens to iNKT cells.

  15. A closer look at CD1d molecules: new horizons in studying NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Stronge, Victoria S; Salio, Mariolina; Jones, E Yvonne; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2007-10-01

    Recent findings have highlighted the ability of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to recognize microbe-derived glycolipids and have demonstrated the role of these cells in several disease states, from autoimmune disease to cancer. It has also become clear that iNKT cells can rapidly mature dendritic cells and licence them to prime antigen-specific T- and B-cell responses. The use of CD1d tetramers to monitor iNKT cell frequency and phenotype has moved the field forward at a fast pace. To harness iNKT cells for therapeutic purposes and to understand their role in vivo, it is essential to characterize the molecular events that contribute to iNKT cell activation. Here we review new reagents and novel protocols that are facilitating a closer look at lipid presentation by CD1d molecules and their recognition by iNKT cells.

  16. Activation of invariant natural killer T cells by lipid excess promotes tissue inflammation, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan; Parekh, Vrajesh V; Gabriel, Curtis L; Bracy, Deanna P; Marks-Shulman, Pamela A; Tamboli, Robyn A; Kim, Sungjune; Mendez-Fernandez, Yanice V; Besra, Gurdyal S; Lomenick, Jefferson P; Williams, Brandon; Wasserman, David H; Van Kaer, Luc

    2012-05-08

    Obesity triggers a low-grade systemic inflammation, which plays an important role in the development of obesity-associated metabolic diseases. In searching for links between lipid accumulation and chronic inflammation, we examined invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that react with lipids and regulate inflammatory responses. We show that iNKT cells respond to dietary lipid excess and become activated before or at the time of tissue recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes, and that these cells progressively increase proinflammatory cytokine production in obese mice. Such iNKT cells skew other leukocytes toward proinflammatory cytokine production and induce an imbalanced proinflammatory cytokine environment in multiple tissues. Further, iNKT cell deficiency ameliorates tissue inflammation and provides protection against obesity-induced insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Conversely, chronic iNKT cell stimulation using a canonical iNKT cell agonist exacerbates tissue inflammation and obesity-associated metabolic disease. These findings place iNKT cells into the complex network linking lipid excess to inflammation in obesity and suggest new therapeutic avenues for obesity-associated metabolic disorders.

  17. Negative modulation of invariant natural killer T cell responses to glycolipid antigens by p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Jason K; Bisch, Steven P; Leon-Ponte, Matilde; Hayatsu, Jin; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Maleki Vareki, Saman; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2010-09-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are CD1d-restricted, glycolipid-reactive lymphocytes with potent immunoregulatory characteristics. Although recent years have witnessed intensified interest in iNKT cells, little is known about intracellular signaling pathways that control iNKT cell responses, including those mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). We employed selective inhibitors of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 to examine the importance of these MAPKs in iNKT cell responses to the prototype glycolipid antigen alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha GC). Activation of DN32.D3 iNKT cells in the presence of PD98059 led to decreased interleukin (IL)-2 production, indicating a role for ERK in mouse iNKT cell responses. In contrast, addition of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 to cultures did not significantly affect cytokine production, suggesting that JNK is not critically needed for iNKT cell responses. Interestingly, selective inhibition of p38 by either SB203580 or SK&F 86002 resulted in augmented IL-2 production by DN32.D3 cells after stimulation with alpha GC. This was also evident when iNKT cells were stimulated with an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody thus bypassing the requirement for CD1d-mediated antigen presentation, indicating that p38 inhibition affects signal transduction downstream of iNKT cells' T cell receptors. Primary splenic iNKT cells similarly exhibited enhanced cytokine response to alpha GC when cultured in the presence of p38 inhibitors. Importantly, in vivo administration of SB203580 resulted in higher IL-4 and interferon-gamma secretion in alpha GC-treated mice. These results demonstrate that MAPKs play distinct signaling roles in iNKT cells and that both in vitro and in vivo iNKT cell responses to glycolipid antigens can be negatively modulated by p38. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative iNKT repertoire associations with disease susceptibility and outcome in macaque tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Andrew; White, Andrew; Tocheva, Anna S; Fenn, Joe R; Dennis, Mike; Tezera, Liku; Singhania, Akul; Elliott, Tim; Tebruegge, Marc; Elkington, Paul; Gadola, Stephan; Sharpe, Sally; Mansour, Salah

    2017-07-01

    Correlates of immune protection that reliably predict vaccine efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection are urgently needed. Invariant NKT cells (iNKTs) are CD1d-dependent innate T cells that augment host antimicrobial immunity through production of cytokines, including interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We determined peripheral blood iNKT numbers, their proliferative responses and iNKT subset proportions after in vitro antigen expansion by α-galactosylceramide (αGC) in a large cohort of mycobacteria-naïve non-human primates, and macaques from Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine and Mtb challenge studies. Animals studied included four genetically distinct groups of macaques within cynomolgus and rhesus species that differ in their susceptibility to Mtb infection. We demonstrate significant differences in ex vivo iNKT frequency between groups, which trends towards an association with susceptibility to Mtb, but no significant difference in overall iNKT proliferative responses. Susceptible animals exhibited a skewed CD4 + /CD8 + iNKT subset ratio in comparison to more Mtb-resistant groups. Correlation of iNKT subsets post BCG vaccination with clinical disease manifestations following Mtb challenge in the Chinese cynomolgus and Indian rhesus macaques identified a consistent trend linking increased CD8 + iNKTs with favourable disease outcome. Finally, a similar iNKT profile was conferred by BCG vaccination in rhesus macaques. Our study provides the first detailed characterisation of iNKT cells in macaque tuberculosis infection, suggesting that iNKT repertoire differences may impact on disease outcome, which warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthetic glycolipid activators of natural killer T cells as immunotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Leandro J; Saavedra-Ávila, Noemí A; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Certain types of glycolipids have been found to have remarkable immunomodulatory properties as a result of their ability to activate specific T lymphocyte populations with an extremely wide range of immune effector properties. The most extensively studied glycolipid reactive T cells are known as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. The antigen receptors of these cells specifically recognize certain glycolipids, most notably glycosphingolipids with α-anomeric monosaccharides, presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule CD1d. Once activated, iNKT cells can secrete a very diverse array of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, glycolipid-mediated activation of iNKT cells has been explored for immunotherapy in a variety of disease states, including cancer and a range of infections. In this review, we discuss the design of synthetic glycolipid activators for iNKT cells, their impact on adaptive immune responses and their use to modulate iNKT cell responses to improve immunity against infections and cancer. Current challenges in translating results from preclinical animal studies to humans are also discussed. PMID:27195112

  20. Dual Modifications of α-Galactosylceramide Synergize to Promote Activation of Human Invariant Natural Killer T Cells and Stimulate Anti-tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chennamadhavuni, Divya; Saavedra-Avila, Noemi Alejandra; Carreño, Leandro J; Guberman-Pfeffer, Matthew J; Arora, Pooja; Yongqing, Tang; Koay, Hui-Fern; Godfrey, Dale I; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Richardson, Stewart K; Sundararaj, Srinivasan; Lo, Jae Ho; Wen, Xiangshu; Gascón, José A; Yuan, Weiming; Rossjohn, Jamie; Le Nours, Jérôme; Porcelli, Steven A; Howell, Amy R

    2018-03-09

    Glycosylceramides that activate CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have potential therapeutic applications for augmenting immune responses against cancer and infections. Previous studies using mouse models identified sphinganine variants of α-galactosylceramide as promising iNKT cell activators that stimulate cytokine responses with a strongly proinflammatory bias. However, the activities of sphinganine variants in mice have generally not translated well to studies of human iNKT cell responses. Here, we show that strongly proinflammatory and anti-tumor iNKT cell responses were achieved in mice by a variant of α-galactosylceramide that combines a sphinganine base with a hydrocinnamoyl ester on C6″ of the sugar. Importantly, the activities observed with this variant were largely preserved for human iNKT cell responses. Structural and in silico modeling studies provided a mechanistic basis for these findings and suggested basic principles for capturing useful properties of sphinganine analogs of synthetic iNKT cell activators in the design of immunotherapeutic agents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. West Nile virus‐infected human dendritic cells fail to fully activate invariant natural killer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Turner, S.; Simmons, A.; Powe, T.; Chakravarty, E.; Alberola‐Ila, J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary West Nile virus (WNV) infection is a mosquito‐borne zoonosis with increasing prevalence in the United States. WNV infection begins in the skin, and the virus replicates initially in keratinocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). In the skin and cutaneous lymph nodes, infected DCs are likely to interact with invariant natural killer T cells (iNKTs). Bidirectional interactions between DCs and iNKTs amplify the innate immune response to viral infections, thus controlling viral load and regulating adaptive immunity. iNKTs are stimulated by CD1d‐bound lipid antigens or activated indirectly by inflammatory cytokines. We exposed human monocyte‐derived DCs to WNV Kunjin and determined their ability to activate isolated blood iNKTs. DCs became infected as judged by synthesis of viral mRNA and Envelope and NS‐1 proteins, but did not undergo significant apoptosis. Infected DCs up‐regulated the co‐stimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, but showed decreased expression of CD1d. WNV infection induced DC secretion of type I interferon (IFN), but no or minimal interleukin (IL)−12, IL‐23, IL‐18 or IL‐10. Unexpectedly, we found that the WNV‐infected DCs stimulated human iNKTs to up‐regulate CD69 and produce low amounts of IL‐10, but not proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN‐γ or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)‐α. Both CD1d and IFNAR blockade partially abrogated this iNKT response, suggesting involvement of a T cell receptor (TCR)–CD1d interaction and type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) signalling. Thus, WNV infection interferes with DC–iNKT interactions by preventing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. iNKTs may be a source of IL‐10 observed in human flavivirus infections and initiate an anti‐inflammatory innate response that limits adaptive immunity and immune pathology upon WNV infection. PMID:27513522

  2. Invariant NKT cells reduce the immunosuppressive activity of influenza A virus–induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    De Santo, Carmela; Salio, Mariolina; Masri, S. Hajar; Lee, Laurel Yong-Hwa; Dong, Tao; Speak, Anneliese O.; Porubsky, Stefan; Booth, Sarah; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Platt, Frances M.; Zambon, Maria; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) presents a substantial threat to public health worldwide, with young, elderly, and immunodeficient individuals being particularly susceptible. Inflammatory responses play an important role in the fatal outcome of IAV infection, but the mechanism remains unclear. We demonstrate here that the absence of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in mice during IAV infection resulted in the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which suppressed IAV-specific immune responses through the expression of both arginase and NOS, resulting in high IAV titer and increased mortality. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells abolished the suppressive activity of MDSCs, restored IAV-specific immune responses, reduced IAV titer, and increased survival rate. The crosstalk between iNKT and MDSCs was CD1d- and CD40-dependent. Furthermore, IAV infection and exposure to TLR agonists relieved the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Finally, we extended these results to humans by demonstrating the presence of myeloid cells with suppressive activity in the PBLs of individuals infected with IAV and showed that their suppressive activity is substantially reduced by iNKT cell activation. These findings identify what we believe to be a novel immunomodulatory role of iNKT cells, which we suggest could be harnessed to abolish the immunosuppressive activity of MDSCs during IAV infection. PMID:19033672

  3. Effects of Invariant NKT Cells on Parasite Infections and Hygiene Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are unique subset of innate-like T cells recognizing glycolipids. iNKT cells can rapidly produce copious amounts of cytokines upon antigen stimulation and exert potent immunomodulatory activities for a wide variety of immune responses and diseases. We have revealed the regulatory effect of iNKT cells on autoimmunity with a serial of publications. On the other hand, the role of iNKT cells in parasitic infections, especially in recently attractive topic “hygiene hypothesis,” has not been clearly defined yet. Bacterial and parasitic cell wall is a cellular structure highly enriched in a variety of glycolipids and lipoproteins, some of which may serve as natural ligands of iNKT cells. In this review, we mainly summarized the recent findings on the roles and underlying mechanisms of iNKT cells in parasite infections and their cross-talk with Th1, Th2, Th17, Treg, and innate lymphoid cells. In most cases, iNKT cells exert regulatory or direct cytotoxic roles to protect hosts against parasite infections. We put particular emphasis as well on the identification of the natural ligands from parasites and the involvement of iNKT cells in the hygiene hypothesis. PMID:27563682

  4. Autoreactivity to Sulfatide by Human Invariant NKT Cells.

    PubMed

    Stax, Annelein M; Tuengel, Jessica; Girardi, Enrico; Kitano, Naoki; Allan, Lenka L; Liu, Victor; Zheng, Dongjun; Panenka, William J; Guillaume, Joren; Wong, Chi-Huey; van Calenbergh, Serge; Zajonc, Dirk M; van den Elzen, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that recognize lipid Ags presented by CD1d. The prototypical Ag, α-galactosylceramide, strongly activates human and mouse iNKT cells, leading to the assumption that iNKT cell physiology in human and mouse is similar. In this article, we report the surprising finding that human, but not mouse, iNKT cells directly recognize myelin-derived sulfatide presented by CD1d. We propose that sulfatide is recognized only by human iNKT cells because of the unique positioning of the 3- O -sulfated β-galactose headgroup. Surface plasmon resonance shows that the affinity of human CD1d-sulfatide for the iNKT cell receptor is relatively low compared with CD1d-α-galactosylceramide ( K D of 19-26 μM versus 1 μM). Apolipoprotein E isolated from human cerebrospinal fluid carries sulfatide that can be captured by APCs and presented by CD1d to iNKT cells. APCs from patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy, who accumulate sulfatides due to a deficiency in arylsulfatase-A, directly activate iNKT cells. Thus, we have identified sulfatide as a self-lipid recognized by human iNKT cells and propose that sulfatide recognition by innate T cells may be an important pathologic feature of neuroinflammatory disease and that sulfatide in APCs may contribute to the endogenous pathway of iNKT cell activation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. CD1d-independent activation of invariant natural killer T cells by staphylococcal enterotoxin B through major histocompatibility complex class II/T cell receptor interaction results in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2011-08-01

    There are two important mechanisms of activation of invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) by microbes: direct activation of the invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) by microbial glycolipids presented by CD1d and indirect activation, mediated by the responses of antigen-presenting cells to microbes. In this study, we provide evidence for a novel CD1d-independent direct activation of iNKT cells involving a microbial protein superantigen presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), which plays a critical role in pathogenesis, thereby redefining the role of iNKT cells. Intranasal exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in C57BL/6 wild-type mice caused acute lung injury (ALI) characterized by vascular leak, cytokine storm, and infiltration of mononuclear cells in the lungs. In contrast, the vascular leak and inflammation were decreased by ~50% in NKT cell-deficient Jα18(-/-) and CD1d(-/-) mice following SEB exposure, which was reversed following adoptive transfer of iNKT cells into CD1d(-/-) mice. In vitro, SEB could directly stimulate iNKT cells in a CD1d-independent manner via MHC-II/TCR interaction, specifically involving Vβ8. These studies not only demonstrate that iNKT cells can be activated directly by a bacterial protein superantigen independent of CD1d but also indicate that in addition to the conventional T cells, iNKT cells play a critical role in SEB-mediated ALI.

  6. Invariant NKT cell activation induces neutrophil accumulation and hepatitis: oppositely regulated by IL-4 and IFN-γ

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Feng, Dechun; Park, Ogyi; Yin, Shi; Gao, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-Galactosylceramide (α-Galcer), a specific agonist for invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, is being evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of viral hepatitis and liver cancer. However, the results from α-Galcer treatment are mixed, partially because of the variety of cytokines produced by activated iNKT cells that have an unknown synergistic effect on the progression of liver disease. It is well documented that injection of α-Galcer induces mild hepatitis with a rapid elevation in the levels of IL-4 and a delayed elevation in the levels of IFN-γ, and both of these cytokines are thought to mediate many functions of iNKT cells. Surprisingly, genetic deletion of both IL-4 and IFN-γ aggravated, rather than abolished, α-Galcer-induced iNKT hepatitis. Moreover, genetic ablation of IL-4, the IL-4 receptor, or its downstream signaling molecule STAT6 ameliorated α-Galcer-induced neutrophil infiltration, liver injury, and hepatitis. In contrast, genetic deletion of IFN-γ, the IFN-γ receptor, or its downstream signaling molecule STAT1 enhanced liver neutrophil accumulation, thereby exacerbating liver injury and hepatitis. Moreover, depletion of neutrophils eradicated α-Galcer-induced liver injury in wild-type, IL-4 knockout, and IFN-γ knockout mice. Conclusions Our results propose a model in which activated iNKT cells rapidly release IL-4, which promotes neutrophil survival and hepatitis but also sequentially produce IFN-γ, which acts in a negative feedback loop to ameliorate iNKT hepatitis by inducing neutrophil apoptosis. Thus, modification of iNKT production of IL-4 and IFN-γ may have the potential to improve the efficacy of α-Galcer in the treatment of liver disease. PMID:23686838

  7. Retinoic acid induction of CD1d expression primes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells for killing by CD8+ invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Ghnewa, Yasmeen G; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Vandenberghe, Elisabeth; Browne, Paul V; McElligott, Anthony M; Doherty, Derek G

    2017-10-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are cytotoxic T cells that respond to glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. Therapeutic activation of iNKT cells with α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) can prevent and reverse tumor growth in mice and clinical trials involving α-GalCer-stimulated iNKT cells are ongoing in humans. B cells express CD1d, however, we show that CD1d expression is reduced on B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). B cells from CLL patients pulsed with α-GalCer failed to stimulate cytolytic degranulation by iNKT cell lines, but could present the more potent glycolipid analogue, 7DW8-5. Retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α) agonists induced CD1d expression by CLL B cells, restoring their ability to present α-GalCer to CD8α + iNKT cells, resulting in cytolytic degranulation. Thus, RAR-α agonists can augment the anti-tumor activities of iNKT cells against CLL cells in vitro. Their inclusion in iNKT cell-based therapies may benefit patients with CLL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Critical role of ROR-γt in a new thymic pathway leading to IL-17-producing invariant NKT cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Michel, Marie-Laure; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella; Keller, Alexandre Castro; Lochner, Matthias; Schneider, Elke; Dy, Michel; Eberl, Gérard; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria C

    2008-12-16

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells constitute a subpopulation of T cells that recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d molecules. They are characterized by their prompt production of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which enables them to modulate diverse immune responses. Recently, we enlarged this concept by identifying a distinct IL-17-producing iNKT cell subset, named iNKT17 cells. The mechanisms leading to the acquisition of this new iNKT cell activity are unknown. Herein we show that IL-17-producing iNKT cells are already present in the thymus, predominantly among a subset regarded so far as an immature stage of thymic iNKT cell development, the CD1d tetramer(pos)CD44(pos)NK1.1(neg)CD4(neg) cells. Using EGFP reporter mice, we demonstrate that the transcription factor ROR-gammat is critical for the thymic differentiation of this subset because only ROR-gammat(pos) iNKT cells are capable of massively secreting IL-17. Moreover, IL-17-producing CD1d tetramer(pos)CD44(pos)NK1.1(neg)CD4(neg) thymic iNKT cells have reached a mature differentiation stage because they fail to generate other cell subsets in fetal thymic organ culture. Conversely, thymic ROR-gammat(neg) iNKT cell precursors give rise to progeny, but acquire neither ROR-gammat expression nor the ability to secrete IL-17. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate an alternative thymic pathway leading to the development of iNKT17 cells that requires ROR-gammat expression.

  9. The Role of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Dendritic Cell Licensing, Cross-Priming, and Memory CD8+ T Cell Generation

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Catherine; Mettke, Elisabeth; Kurts, Christian

    2015-01-01

    New vaccination strategies focus on achieving CD8+ T cell (CTL) immunity rather than on induction of protective antibody responses. While the requirement of CD4+ T (Th) cell help in dendritic cell (DC) activation and licensing, and in CTL memory induction has been described in several disease models, CTL responses may occur in a Th cell help-independent manner. Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) can substitute for Th cell help and license DC as well. iNKT cells produce a broad spectrum of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, thereby inducing a similar set of costimulatory molecules and cytokines in DC. This form of licensing differs from Th cell help by inducing other chemokines, while Th cell-licensed DCs produce CCR5 ligands, iNKT cell-licensed DCs produce CCL17, which attracts CCR4+ CD8+ T cells for subsequent activation. It has recently been shown that iNKT cells do not only enhance immune responses against bacterial pathogens or parasites but also play a role in viral infections. The inclusion of iNKT cell ligands in influenza virus vaccines enhanced memory CTL generation and protective immunity in a mouse model. This review will focus on the role of iNKT cells in the cross-talk with cross-priming DC and memory CD8+ T cell formation. PMID:26284065

  10. TLR3 signaling in macrophages is indispensable for the protective immunity of invariant natural killer T cells against enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Yang, Juhao; Luo, Kaiming; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Na; Xu, Ruifeng; Chen, Jianxia; Jin, Mingfei; Xu, Bin; Guo, Nining; Wang, Jianrong; Chen, Zuolong; Cui, Ying; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Yan; Deng, Chaoyang; Bai, Li; Ge, Baoxue; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Shen, Hao; Yang, Chun-Fu; Leng, Qibin

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the most virulent pathogen among enteroviruses that cause hand, foot and mouth disease in children but rarely in adults. The mechanisms that determine the age-dependent susceptibility remain largely unclear. Here, we found that the paucity of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells together with immaturity of the immune system was related to the susceptibility of neonatal mice to EV71 infection. iNKT cells were crucial antiviral effector cells to protect young mice from EV71 infection before their adaptive immune systems were fully mature. EV71 infection led to activation of iNKT cells depending on signaling through TLR3 but not other TLRs. Surprisingly, iNKT cell activation during EV71 infection required TLR3 signaling in macrophages, but not in dendritic cells (DCs). Mechanistically, interleukin (IL)-12 and endogenous CD1d-restricted antigens were both required for full activation of iNKT cells. Furthermore, CD1d-deficiency led to dramatically increased viral loads in central nervous system and more severe disease in EV71-infected mice. Altogether, our results suggest that iNKT cells may be involved in controlling EV71 infection in children when their adaptive immune systems are not fully developed, and also imply that iNKT cells might be an intervention target for treating EV71-infected patients.

  11. TLR3 Signaling in Macrophages Is Indispensable for the Protective Immunity of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells against Enterovirus 71 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Yang, Juhao; Luo, Kaiming; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Na; Xu, Ruifeng; Chen, Jianxia; Jin, Mingfei; Xu, Bin; Guo, Nining; Wang, Jianrong; Chen, Zuolong; Cui, Ying; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Yan; Deng, Chaoyang; Bai, Li; Ge, Baoxue; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Shen, Hao; Yang, Chun-Fu; Leng, Qibin

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the most virulent pathogen among enteroviruses that cause hand, foot and mouth disease in children but rarely in adults. The mechanisms that determine the age-dependent susceptibility remain largely unclear. Here, we found that the paucity of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells together with immaturity of the immune system was related to the susceptibility of neonatal mice to EV71 infection. iNKT cells were crucial antiviral effector cells to protect young mice from EV71 infection before their adaptive immune systems were fully mature. EV71 infection led to activation of iNKT cells depending on signaling through TLR3 but not other TLRs. Surprisingly, iNKT cell activation during EV71 infection required TLR3 signaling in macrophages, but not in dendritic cells (DCs). Mechanistically, interleukin (IL)-12 and endogenous CD1d-restricted antigens were both required for full activation of iNKT cells. Furthermore, CD1d-deficiency led to dramatically increased viral loads in central nervous system and more severe disease in EV71-infected mice. Altogether, our results suggest that iNKT cells may be involved in controlling EV71 infection in children when their adaptive immune systems are not fully developed, and also imply that iNKT cells might be an intervention target for treating EV71-infected patients. PMID:25615690

  12. NKT Cell Hyporesponsiveness Leads to Unrestrained Accumulation of Marginal Zone B Cells in Hypercholesterolemic Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Soh, Serena Ying; Faveeuw, Christelle; Thiam, Chung Hwee; Khoo, Lawrence Han Boon; Yeo, Kim Pin; Lim, Sheau Yng; Lim, Hwee Ying; Ng, Jun Xiang; Angeli, Veronique

    2016-11-15

    Recently, the role of B cells in atherosclerosis has gained more attention but studies have mainly focused on B1 and follicular B cell subsets. Therefore, the contribution of marginal zone (MZ) B cells in experimental atherosclerosis remains elusive. In the current study, we examined the MZ B cell compartment in atherosclerotic apoE-deficient (apoE -/- ) mice and found that hypercholesterolemia in these mice was associated with an increased number and percentage of MZ B cells. This aberrant accumulation of MZ B cells was not associated with alterations in their development or increased proliferation but was due to decreased apoptotic cell death. This decrease in MZ B cell death in apoE -/- mice was associated with the reduced capacity of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells to produce IFN-γ and IL-4 after activation. Lowering cholesterol plasma levels with ezetimibe in apoE -/- mice reversed iNKT function and MZ B cell accumulation. To elucidate the mechanism whereby iNKT cells control MZ B cell accumulation in apoE -/- mice, we performed an adoptive transfer of iNKT cells and found that only wild-type iNKT cells but not IFN-γ -/- iNKT cells reversed MZ B cell accumulation in apoE -/- recipient mice. Our findings reveal that lipid changes associated with atherosclerotic disease induce decreased production of IFN-γ by iNKT, which in turn leads to aberrant accumulation of MZ B cells. This study further extends the importance of iNKT cells in regulating MZ B cell compartment. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Invariant NKT Cell Response to Dengue Virus Infection in Human

    PubMed Central

    Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Chan-in, Wilawan; Opasawaschai, Anunya; Pongchaikul, Pisut; Tangthawornchaikul, Nattaya; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue viral infection is a global health threat without vaccine or specific treatment. The clinical outcome varies from asymptomatic, mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). While adaptive immune responses were found to be detrimental in the dengue pathogenesis, the roles of earlier innate events remain largely uninvestigated. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells represent innate-like T cells that could dictate subsequent adaptive response but their role in human dengue virus infection is not known. We hypothesized that iNKT cells play a role in human dengue infection. Methods Blood samples from a well-characterized cohort of children with DF, DHF, in comparison to non-dengue febrile illness (OFI) and healthy controls at various time points were studied. iNKT cells activation were analyzed by the expression of CD69 by flow cytometry. Their cytokine production was then analyzed after α-GalCer stimulation. Further, the CD1d expression on monocytes, and CD69 expression on conventional T cells were measured. Results iNKT cells were activated during acute dengue infection. The level of iNKT cell activation associates with the disease severity. Furthermore, these iNKT cells had altered functional response to subsequent ex vivo stimulation with α-GalCer. Moreover, during acute dengue infection, monocytic CD1d expression was also upregulated and conventional T cells also became activated. Conclusion iNKT cells might play an early and critical role in the pathogenesis of severe dengue viral infection in human. Targeting iNKT cells and CD1d serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for severe dengue infection in the future. PMID:24945350

  14. Id Proteins Suppress E2A-Driven Invariant Natural Killer T Cell Development prior to TCR Selection.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sumedha; Moore, Amanda J; Love, Cassandra; Reddy, Anupama; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Dave, Sandeep S; Li, Leping; Murre, Cornelis; Zhuang, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    A family of transcription factors known as E proteins, and their antagonists, Id proteins, regulate T cell differentiation at critical developmental checkpoints. Id proteins promote the differentiation of conventional αβ T cells and suppress the expansion of innate-like αβ T cells known as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. However, it remains to be determined whether Id proteins differentially regulate these distinct lineage choices in early stages of T cell development. In this manuscript, we report that in Id-deficient mice, uninhibited activity of the E protein family member E2A mediates activation of genes that support iNKT cell development and function. There is also biased rearrangement in Id-deficient DP cells that promotes selection into the iNKT lineage in these mice. The observed expansion of iNKT cells is not abrogated by blocking pre-TCR signaling, which is required for conventional αβ T cell development. Finally, E2A is found to be a key transcriptional regulator of both iNKT and γδNKT lineages, which appear to have shared lineage history. Therefore, our study reveals a previously unappreciated role of E2A in coordinating the development of the iNKT lineage at an early stage, prior to their TCR-mediated selection alongside conventional αβ T cells.

  15. Optimizing NKT cell ligands as vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Leandro J; Kharkwal, Shalu Sharma; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    NKT cells are a subpopulation of T lymphocytes with phenotypic properties of both T and NK cells and a wide range of immune effector properties. In particular, one subset of these cells, known as invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells), has attracted substantial attention because of their ability to be specifically activated by glycolipid antigens presented by a cell surface protein called CD1d. The development of synthetic α-galactosylceramides as a family of powerful glycolipid agonists for iNKT cells has led to approaches for augmenting a wide variety of immune responses, including those involved in vaccination against infections and cancers. Here, we review basic, preclinical and clinical observations supporting approaches to improving immune responses through the use of iNKT cell-activating glycolipids. Results from preclinical animal studies and preliminary clinical studies in humans identify many promising applications for this approach in the development of vaccines and novel immunotherapies. PMID:24762075

  16. Diverse Endogenous Antigens for Mouse Natural Killer T Cells: Self-Antigens That Are Not Glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bo; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Butters, Terry; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer T cells with an invariant antigen receptor (iNKT cells) represent a highly conserved and unique subset of T lymphocytes having properties of innate and adaptive immune cells. They have been reported to regulate a variety of immune responses, including the response to cancers and the development of autoimmunity. The development and activation of iNKT cells is dependent on self-antigens presented by the CD1d antigen-presenting molecule. It is widely believed that these self-antigens are glycosphingolipids (GSLs), molecules that contain ceramide as the lipid backbone. Here we used a variety of methods to show that mammalian antigens for mouse iNKT cells need not be GSLs, including the use of cell lines deficient in GSL biosynthesis and an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis. Presentation of these antigens required the expression of CD1d molecules that could traffic to late endosomes, the site where self-antigen is acquired. Extracts of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) contain a self-antigen that could stimulate iNKT cells when added to plates coated with soluble, recombinant CD1d molecules. The antigen(s) in these extracts are resistant to sphingolipid-specific hydrolase digestion, consistent with the results using live APCs. Lyosphosphatidylcholine, a potential self-antigen that activated human iNKT cell lines, did not activate mouse iNKT cell hybridomas. Our data indicate that there may be more than one type of self-antigen for iNKT cells, that the self-antigens comparing mouse and human may not be conserved, and that the search to identify these molecules should not be confined to GSLs. PMID:21191069

  17. Targeted delivery of α-galactosylceramide to CD8α+ dendritic cells optimizes type I NKT cell-based antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Macho-Fernandez, Elodie; Cruz, Luis Javier; Ghinnagow, Reem; Fontaine, Josette; Bialecki, Emilie; Frisch, Benoit; Trottein, François; Faveeuw, Christelle

    2014-07-15

    Immunotherapy aiming at enhancing innate and acquired host immunity is a promising approach for cancer treatment. The invariant NKT (iNKT) cell ligand α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) holds great promise in cancer therapy, although several concerns limit its use in clinics, including the uncontrolled response it promotes when delivered in a nonvectorized form. Therefore, development of delivery systems to in vivo target immune cells might be a valuable option to optimize iNKT cell-based antitumor responses. Using dendritic cell (DC)-depleted mice, DC transfer experiments, and in vivo active cell targeting, we show that presentation of α-GalCer by DCs not only triggers optimal primary iNKT cell stimulation, but also maintains secondary iNKT cell activation after challenge. Furthermore, targeted delivery of α-GalCer to CD8α(+) DCs, by means of anti-DEC205 decorated nanoparticles, enhances iNKT cell-based transactivation of NK cells, DCs, and γδ T cells. We report that codelivery of α-GalCer and protein Ag to CD8α(+) DCs triggers optimal Ag-specific Ab and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell responses. Finally, we show that targeting nanoparticles containing α-GalCer and Ag to CD8α(+) DCs promotes potent antitumor responses, both in prophylactic and in therapeutic settings. Our data may have important implications in tumor immunotherapy and vaccine development. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Invariant NKT cells are required for airway inflammation induced by environmental antigens

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Gerhard; Rogers, Paul; Batzer, Glenda; Lee, Myung Steve; Bai, Dong; Pei, Bo; Khurana, Archana

    2011-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions. In this study, we report that a majority of sterile house dust extracts (HDEs) tested contained antigens capable of activating mouse and human iNKT cells. HDEs had adjuvant-like properties in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model, which were dependent on Vα14i NKT cells, as vaccinated animals deficient for iNKT cells displayed significantly attenuated immune responses and airway inflammation. Furthermore, the administration of HDEs together with OVA mutually augmented the synthesis of cytokines by Vα14i NKT cells and by conventional CD4+ T cells in the lung, demonstrating a profound immune response synergy for both Th2 cytokines and IL-17A. These data demonstrate that iNKT cell antigens are far more widely dispersed in the environment than previously anticipated. Furthermore, as the antigenic activity in different houses varied greatly, they further suggest that iNKT cell responses to ambient antigens, particular to certain environments, might promote sensitization to conventional respiratory allergens. PMID:21624935

  19. Invariant NKT cells are required for airway inflammation induced by environmental antigens.

    PubMed

    Wingender, Gerhard; Rogers, Paul; Batzer, Glenda; Lee, Myung Steve; Bai, Dong; Pei, Bo; Khurana, Archana; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Horner, Anthony A

    2011-06-06

    Invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions. In this study, we report that a majority of sterile house dust extracts (HDEs) tested contained antigens capable of activating mouse and human iNKT cells. HDEs had adjuvant-like properties in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model, which were dependent on Vα14i NKT cells, as vaccinated animals deficient for iNKT cells displayed significantly attenuated immune responses and airway inflammation. Furthermore, the administration of HDEs together with OVA mutually augmented the synthesis of cytokines by Vα14i NKT cells and by conventional CD4(+) T cells in the lung, demonstrating a profound immune response synergy for both Th2 cytokines and IL-17A. These data demonstrate that iNKT cell antigens are far more widely dispersed in the environment than previously anticipated. Furthermore, as the antigenic activity in different houses varied greatly, they further suggest that iNKT cell responses to ambient antigens, particular to certain environments, might promote sensitization to conventional respiratory allergens.

  20. Innate-like recognition of microbes by invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Kinjo, Yuki

    2009-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) express a restricted T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire and they respond rapidly to glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. These glycolipid antigens have hexose sugars in alpha-linkage to two types of lipids that can bind to CD1d. Recent work has shown that the responses of iNKT cells to antigen-bearing microbes can have a profound impact on the development of inflammatory diseases. iNKT cells overcome the limitation of their limited TCR diversity by also responding in a foreign antigen-independent fashion to some infectious agents, similar to NK cells. Recent results demonstrate several mechanisms for the indirect activation of iNKT cells by viruses or TLR ligands, dependent on self-antigen recognition and/or different cytokines produced by antigen presenting cells. The means by which iNKT cells influence other cell types and overall host defense are likewise diverse, illustrating the flexibility and functional diversity of this T lymphocyte sublineage.

  1. Development of Asthma in Inner-City Children: Possible Roles of MAIT Cells and Variation in the Home Environment.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Shilpi; Wingender, Gerhard; Greenbaum, Jason A; Khurana, Archana; Gholami, Amin M; Ganesan, Anusha-Preethi; Rosenbach, Michael; Jaffee, Katy; Gern, James E; Wood, Robert; O'Connor, George; Sandel, Megan; Kattan, Meyer; Bacharier, Leonard; Togias, Alkis; Horner, Anthony A; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2018-03-15

    Humans have populations of innate-like T lymphocytes with an invariant TCR α-chain that recognize nonpeptide Ags, including invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. iNKT cell involvement in human asthma is controversial, whereas there has been little analysis of MAIT cells. Using peripheral blood cells from 110 participants from the Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma (URECA) birth cohort study, these cells were analyzed for number and function. We determined whether iNKT cell or MAIT cell frequency at 1 y is correlated with the cytokine polarization of mainstream CD4 + T cells and/or the development of asthma by age 7 y. Dust samples from 300 houses were tested for iNKT cell antigenic activity. Our results show that a higher MAIT cell frequency at 1 y of age was associated with a decreased risk of asthma by age 7 y. The frequency of MAIT cells was associated with increased production of IFN-γ by activated CD4 + T cells from the URECA cohort. iNKT cell antigenic activity in bedroom dust samples was associated with higher endotoxin concentration and also with reduced risk of asthma. In conclusion, MAIT cell frequency at 1 y may reflect the tendency of the immune system toward Th1 responses and is associated with protection from asthma. Additionally, iNKT cell antigenic activity may be a marker of houses with increased microbial exposures and therefore also with protection from asthma. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Larger number of invariant natural killer T cells in PBSC allografts correlates with improved GVHD-free and progression-free survival.

    PubMed

    Malard, Florent; Labopin, Myriam; Chevallier, Patrice; Guillaume, Thierry; Duquesne, Alix; Rialland, Fanny; Derenne, Sophie; Peterlin, Pierre; Leauté, Anne-Gaelle; Brissot, Eolia; Gregoire, Marc; Moreau, Philippe; Saas, Philippe; Gaugler, Béatrice; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-04-07

    We studied the impact of a set of immune cells contained within granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell grafts (naïve and memory T-cell subsets, B cells, regulatory T cells, invariant natural killer T cells [iNKTs], NK cells, and dendritic cell subsets) in patients (n = 80) undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), using the composite end point of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-free and progression-free survival (GPFS) as the primary end point. We observed that GPFS incidences in patients receiving iNKT doses above and below the median were 49% vs 22%, respectively (P= .007). In multivariate analysis, the iNKT dose was the only parameter with a significant impact on GPFS (hazard ratio = 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-0.85;P= .01). The incidences of severe grade III to IV acute GVHD and National Institutes of Health grade 2 to 3 chronic GVHD (12% and 16%, respectively) were low and associated with the use of antithymocyte globulin in 91% of patients. No difference in GVHD incidence was reported according to the iNKT dose. In conclusion, a higher dose of iNKTs within the graft is associated with an improved GPFS. These data may pave the way for prospective and active interventions aiming to manipulate the graft content to improve allo-SCT outcome. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Implications for invariant natural killer T cell ligands due to the restricted presence of isoglobotrihexosylceramide in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Speak, Anneliese O.; Salio, Mariolina; Neville, David C. A.; Fontaine, Josette; Priestman, David A.; Platt, Nick; Heare, Tanya; Butters, Terry D.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Trottein, Francois; Exley, Mark A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M.

    2007-01-01

    Development of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells requires the presentation of lipid ligand(s) by CD1d molecules in the thymus. The glycosphingolipid (GSL) isoglobotrihexosylceramide (iGb3) has been proposed as the natural iNKT cell-selecting ligand in the thymus and to be involved in peripheral activation of iNKT cells by dendritic cells (DCs). However, there is no direct biochemical evidence for the presence of iGb3 in mouse or human thymus or DCs. Using a highly sensitive HPLC assay, the only tissue where iGb3 could be detected in mouse was the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). iGb3 was not detected in other mouse or any human tissues analyzed, including thymus and DCs. Even in mutant mice that store isoglobo-series GSLs in the DRG, we were still unable to detect these GSLs in the thymus. iGb3 is therefore unlikely to be a physiologically relevant iNKT cell-selecting ligand in mouse and humans. A detailed study is now warranted to better understand the nature of iNKT cell-selecting ligand(s) in vivo. PMID:17372214

  4. Flagellin Modulates the Function of Invariant NKT Cells From Patients With Asthma via Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Uoong; Rhee, Joon-Haeng; Jeong, Ji-Ung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of asthma. We previously reported the association between circulating Th2-like iNKT cells and lung function in asthma patients and the suppressive effect of Toll-like receptor 5 ligand flagellin B (FlaB) on asthmatic in a mouse model. Thus, we investigated whether FlaB modulates the function of circulating iNKT cells in asthmatic patients. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with FlaB, and the secreted and intracellular cytokines of iNKT cells were evaluated by using ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively, following stimulation with α-galactosylceramide. Foxp3+ iNKT cells were also measured. To determine the effect of FlaB-treated dendritic cells (DCs) on iNKT cells, we co-cultured CD14+ monocyte-derived DCs and T cells from patients with house dust mite-sensitive asthma and analyzed intracellular cytokines in iNKT cells. Results A reduction of IL-4 and IL-17 production by iNKT cells in PBMCs after FlaB treatment was alleviated following blocking of IL-10 signaling. A decrease in the frequencies of IL-4+ and IL-17+ iNKT cells by FlaB-treated DCs was reversed after blocking of IL-10 signaling. Simultaneously, an increase in Foxp3+ iNKT cells induced by FlaB treatment disappeared after blocking of IL-10. Conclusions FlaB may inhibit Th2- and Th17-like iNKT cells and induce Foxp3+ iNKT cells by DCs via an IL-10-dependent mechanism in asthmatic patients. In patients with a specific asthma phenotype associated with iNKT cells, FlaB may be an effective immunomodulator for iNKT cell-targeted immunotherapy. PMID:26922930

  5. Innate Invariant NKT Cell Recognition of HIV-1-Infected Dendritic Cells Is an Early Detection Mechanism Targeted by Viral Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Gibbs, Anna; Bächle, Susanna M; Checa, Antonio; Introini, Andrea; Leeansyah, Edwin; Wheelock, Craig E; Nixon, Douglas F; Broliden, Kristina; Tjernlund, Annelie; Moll, Markus; Sandberg, Johan K

    2016-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are innate-like T cells that respond rapidly with a broad range of effector functions upon recognition of glycolipid Ags presented by CD1d. HIV-1 carries Nef- and Vpu-dependent mechanisms to interfere with CD1d surface expression, indirectly suggesting a role for iNKT cells in control of HIV-1 infection. In this study, we investigated whether iNKT cells can participate in the innate cell-mediated immune response to HIV-1. Infection of dendritic cells (DCs) with Nef- and Vpu-deficient HIV-1 induced upregulation of CD1d in a TLR7-dependent manner. Infection of DCs caused modulation of enzymes in the sphingolipid pathway and enhanced expression of the endogenous glucosylceramide Ag. Importantly, iNKT cells responded specifically to rare DCs productively infected with Nef- and Vpu-defective HIV-1. Transmitted founder viral isolates differed in their CD1d downregulation capacity, suggesting that diverse strains may be differentially successful in inhibiting this pathway. Furthermore, both iNKT cells and DCs expressing CD1d and HIV receptors resided in the female genital mucosa, a site where HIV-1 transmission occurs. Taken together, these findings suggest that innate iNKT cell sensing of HIV-1 infection in DCs is an early immune detection mechanism, which is independent of priming and adaptive recognition of viral Ag, and is actively targeted by Nef- and Vpu-dependent viral immune evasion mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Contribution of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells to Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Ritsu, Masae; Kanno, Emi; Suzuki, Aiko; Kamimatsuno, Rina; Takagi, Naoyuki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Imai, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we determined the contribution of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to the skin wound healing process. In iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18KO) mice lacking iNKT cells, wound closure was significantly delayed compared with wild-type mice. Collagen deposition, expression of α-smooth muscle actin and CD31, and wound breaking strength were significantly attenuated in Jα18KO mice. The adoptive transfer of liver mononuclear cells from wild-type but not from Jα18KO or interferon (IFN)-γ gene-disrupted (IFN-γKO) mice resulted in the reversal of this impaired wound healing in Jα18KO mice. IFN-γ expression was induced in the wounded tissues, which was significantly decreased at 6, 12, and 24 hours, but increased on day 3 after wounding in Jα18KO mice. The main source of the late-phase IFN-γ production in Jα18KO mice were neutrophils rather than NK cells and T cells. Administration of α-galactosylceramide, an activator of iNKT cells, resulted in the acceleration of wound healing on day 3 in wild-type mice. This effect was not observed in IFN-γKO mice. These results indicate that iNKT cells play important roles in wound healing. The iNKT cell-induced IFN-γ production may regulate the wound healing process in the early phase. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Harnessing Invariant NKT Cells to Improve Influenza Vaccines: A Pig Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guan; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2017-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are an “innate-like” T cell lineage that recognize glycolipid rather than peptide antigens by their semi-invariant T cell receptors. Because iNKT cells can stimulate an extensive array of immune responses, there is considerable interest in targeting these cells to enhance human vaccines against a wide range of microbial pathogens. However, long overlooked is the potential to harness iNKT cell antigens as vaccine adjuvants for domestic animal species that express the iNKT cell–CD1d system. In this review, we discuss the prospect of targeting porcine iNKT cells as a strategy to enhance the efficiency of swine influenza vaccines. In addition, we compare the phenotype and tissue distribution of porcine iNKT cells. Finally, we discuss the challenges that must be overcome before iNKT cell agonists can be contemplated for veterinary use in livestock. PMID:29280974

  8. Design of a potent CD1d-binding NKT cell ligand as a vaccine adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangming; Fujio, Masakazu; Imamura, Masakazu; Wu, Douglass; Vasan, Sandhya; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ho, David D.; Tsuji, Moriya

    2010-01-01

    The glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to bind CD1d molecules to activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, and subsequently induce activation of various immune-competent cells, including dendritic cells, thereby providing a significant adjuvant effect for various vaccines. However, in phase I clinical trials, α-GalCer was shown to display only marginal biological activity. In our search for a glycolipid that can exert more potent stimulatory activity against iNKT cells and dendritic cells and produce an adjuvant effect superior to α-GalCer, we performed step-wise screening assays on a focused library of 25 α-GalCer analogues. Assays included quantification of the magnitude of stimulatory activity against human iNKT cells in vitro, binding affinity to human and murine CD1d molecules, and binding affinity to the invariant t cell receptor of human iNKT cells. Through this rigorous and iterative screening process, we have identified a lead candidate glycolipid, 7DW8-5, that exhibits a superior adjuvant effect than α-GalCer on HIV and malaria vaccines in mice. PMID:20616071

  9. Design of a potent CD1d-binding NKT cell ligand as a vaccine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangming; Fujio, Masakazu; Imamura, Masakazu; Wu, Douglass; Vasan, Sandhya; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ho, David D; Tsuji, Moriya

    2010-07-20

    The glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) has been shown to bind CD1d molecules to activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, and subsequently induce activation of various immune-competent cells, including dendritic cells, thereby providing a significant adjuvant effect for various vaccines. However, in phase I clinical trials, alpha-GalCer was shown to display only marginal biological activity. In our search for a glycolipid that can exert more potent stimulatory activity against iNKT cells and dendritic cells and produce an adjuvant effect superior to alpha-GalCer, we performed step-wise screening assays on a focused library of 25 alpha-GalCer analogues. Assays included quantification of the magnitude of stimulatory activity against human iNKT cells in vitro, binding affinity to human and murine CD1d molecules, and binding affinity to the invariant t cell receptor of human iNKT cells. Through this rigorous and iterative screening process, we have identified a lead candidate glycolipid, 7DW8-5, that exhibits a superior adjuvant effect than alpha-GalCer on HIV and malaria vaccines in mice.

  10. Liver Injury After Invariant NKT Cell Activation by Free Alpha-galactosylceramide and Alpha-galactosylceramide-loaded Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Otsubo, Dai; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Both free alpha-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) and αGalCer-loaded dendritic cells (DCG) activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to varying degrees, with αGalCer inducing liver injury. We sought to evaluate liver injury by these two pathways. Mice were injected with αGalCer or DCG followed by analysis of serum alanine transaminase (ALT) activity levels, mortality and liver function. While ALT levels were elevated after DCG in a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-dependent manner, DCG did not cause lethal injury. More serious injury of liver CD31-positive endothelial cells (CD31(+) EC) was observed in mice treated with αGalCer than with DCG. Furthermore, liver CD31(+) EC of αGalCer-treated mice induced naïve liver lymphocytes to produce TNF-α. DCG treatment did not induce lethal liver injury. CD31(+) EC may play an antigen-presenting role to iNKT cells after αGalCer treatment and may be a cause of lethal injury. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Pathogen-expanded CD11b+ invariant NKT cells feedback inhibit T cell proliferation via membrane-bound TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanmei; Jiang, Zhengping; Chen, Zhubo; Gu, Yan; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xiang; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-04-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) are effector cells, but also regulator of immune response, which either promote or suppress immune response through production of different cytokines. However, the subsets of NKT cells with definite phenotype and regulatory function need to be further identified. Furthermore, the mechanisms for NKT cells to regulate immune response remain to be fully elucidated. Here we identified CD11b(+) invariant NKT (CD11b(+) iNKT) cells as a new subset of regulatory NKT cells in mouse models with infection. αGalCer:CD1d complex(+)TCRβ(+)NK1.1(+) NKT cells could be categorized to CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) subsets. NKT cells are enriched in liver. During Listeria monocytogenes infection, hepatic CD11b(+) iNKT cells were significantly induced and expanded, with peak expansion on day 8. CD11b(+) iNKT cells were also expanded significantly in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. As compared to CD11b(-) iNKT cells, CD11b(+) iNKT cells expressed higher levels of CD27, FasL, B7H1, CD69, and particularly higher level of membrane-bound TGF-β1 (mTGF-β1), but produced less IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Hepatic CD11b(+) iNKT cells suppressed antigen-nonspecific and OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation through mTGF-β1 both in vitro and in vivo, meanwhile, they did not interfere with activation of CD4 T cells and cytotoxicity of the activated CD8 T cells. Thus, we have identified a new subset of pathogen-expanded CD11b(+) invariant NKT cells which can feedback inhibit T cell response through cell-to-cell contact via cell surface (membrane-bound) TGF-β1, especially at the late stage of immune response against infection. CD11b(+) regulatory iNKT cells may contribute to protect host from pathological injure by preventing immune overactivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Excessive interferon-α signaling in autoimmunity alters glycosphingolipid processing in B cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andy Hee-Meng; Sanny, Arleen; Ng, Sze-Wai; Ho, Ying-Swan; Basri, Nurhidayah; Lee, Alison Ping; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2018-05-01

    Excessive interferon-α (IFN-α) production by innate immune cells is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases. What other cell type secretes IFN-α and how IFN-α affects immune cell metabolism and homeostasis in autoimmunity are largely unclear. Here, we report that autoimmune B cells, arising from two different B cell-specific genetic lesions in mice, secrete IFN-α. In addition, IFN-α, found in abundance in autoimmunity, elicited profound changes in the B cell lipidome, increasing their expression of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) and leading to their CD1d-mediated depletion of iNKT cells in vitro and in vivo. IFN-α receptor blockade could reverse the loss of iNKT cells. Excessive stimulation of B cells with IFN-α altered the expression of enzymes that catalyze critical steps in GSL processing, increasing the expressions of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) and globotrihexosylceramide synthase (Gb3S) but decreasing that of α-galactosidase A (α-galA). Inhibiting GCS or restoring α-galA expression prevented iNKT depletion by IFN-α-activated B cells. Taken together, our work indicated that excessive IFN-α perturbs GSL metabolism in B cells which in turn adversely affects iNKT homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Normal development and function of invariant natural killer T cells in mice with isoglobotrihexosylceramide (iGb3) deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Porubsky, Stefan; Speak, Anneliese O.; Luckow, Bruno; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2007-01-01

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells, expressing the invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR) chain encoded by Vα14-Jα18 gene segments in mice and Vα24-Jα18 in humans [invariant NKT (iNKT) cells], contribute to immunoregulatory processes, such as tolerance, host defense, and tumor surveillance. iNKT cells are positively selected in the thymus by CD1d molecules expressed by CD4+/CD8+ cortical thymocytes. However, the identity of the endogenous lipid(s) responsible for positive selection of iNKT cells remains unclear. One candidate lipid proposed to play a role in positive selection is isoglobotrihexosylceramide (iGb3). However, no direct evidence for its physiological role has been provided. Therefore, to directly investigate the role of iGb3 in iNKT cell selection, we have generated mice deficient in iGb3 synthase [iGb3S, also known as α1–3galactosyltransferase 2 (A3galt2)]. These mice developed, grew, and reproduced normally and exhibited no overt behavioral abnormalities. Consistent with the notion that iGb3 is synthesized only by iGb3S, lack of iGb3 in the dorsal root ganglia of iGb3S-deficient mice (iGb3S−/−), as compared with iGb3S+/− mice, was confirmed. iGb3S−/− mice showed normal numbers of iNKT cells in the thymus, spleen, and liver with selected TCR Vβ chains identical to controls. Upon administration of α-galactosylceramide, activation of iNKT and dendritic cells was similar in iGb3S−/− and iGb3S+/− mice, as measured by up-regulation of CD69 as well as intracellular IL-4 and IFN-γ in iNKT cells, up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells, and rise in serum concentrations of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and Ccl2/MCP-1. Our results strongly suggest that iGb3 is unlikely to be an endogenous CD1d lipid ligand determining thymic iNKT selection. PMID:17372206

  14. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells to generate invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Drake J; Liu, Siyuan; Ji, Sunjong; Li, Bo; McLaughlin, Jami; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N; Yang, Lili

    2015-02-03

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a small population of αβ T lymphocytes. They bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems and mediate strong and rapid responses to many diseases, including cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmunity. However, the study of iNKT cell biology and the therapeutic applications of these cells are greatly limited by their small numbers in vivo (∼0.01-1% in mouse and human blood). Here, we report a new method to generate large numbers of iNKT cells in mice through T-cell receptor (TCR) gene engineering of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We showed that iNKT TCR-engineered HSCs could generate a clonal population of iNKT cells. These HSC-engineered iNKT cells displayed the typical iNKT cell phenotype and functionality. They followed a two-stage developmental path, first in thymus and then in the periphery, resembling that of endogenous iNKT cells. When tested in a mouse melanoma lung metastasis model, the HSC-engineered iNKT cells effectively protected mice from tumor metastasis. This method provides a powerful and high-throughput tool to investigate the in vivo development and functionality of clonal iNKT cells in mice. More importantly, this method takes advantage of the self-renewal and longevity of HSCs to generate a long-term supply of engineered iNKT cells, thus opening up a new avenue for iNKT cell-based immunotherapy.

  15. In vivo activation of invariant natural killer T cells induces systemic and local alterations in T-cell subsets prior to preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lopez, N; Romero, R; Arenas-Hernandez, M; Schwenkel, G; St Louis, D; Hassan, S S; Mial, T N

    2017-08-01

    Preterm birth, the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide, is frequently preceded by spontaneous preterm labour, a syndrome of multiple aetiologies. Pathological inflammation is causally linked to spontaneous preterm labour. Indeed, direct activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells via α-galactosylceramide induces preterm labour/birth largely by initiating systemic and local (i.e. decidua and myometrium) innate immune responses. Herein, we investigated whether iNKT-cell activation altered local and systemic T-cell subsets. Administration of α-galactosylceramide induced an expansion of activated CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in the decidua and a reduction in the number of: (1) total T cells (conventional CD4 + and CD8 + T cells) through the down-regulation of the CD3ɛ molecule in the peripheral circulation, spleen, uterine-draining lymph nodes (ULNs), decidua and/or myometrium; (2) CD4 + regulatory T cells in the spleen, ULNs and decidua; (3) T helper type 17 (Th17) cells in the ULNs but an increase in the number of decidual Th17 cells; (4) CD8 + regulatory T cells in the spleen and ULNs; and (5) CD4 + and CD8 + forkhead box protein 3 negative (Foxp3 - ) responder T cells in the spleen and ULNs. As treatment with rosiglitazone prevents iNKT-cell activation-induced preterm labour/birth, we also explored whether the administration of this peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist would restore the number of T cells. Treating α-galactosylceramide-injected mice with rosiglitazone partially restored the number of T cells in the spleen but not in the decidua. In summary, iNKT-cell activation altered the systemic and local T-cell subsets prior to preterm labour/birth; however, treatment with rosiglitazone partially reversed such effects. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Characterization of human invariant natural killer T subsets in health and disease using a novel invariant natural killer T cell-clonotypic monoclonal antibody, 6B11

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Carlos J; Pollard, David; Martinson, Jeffrey; Kumari, Kumud; Wasserfall, Clive; Mulder, Candice B; Rugeles, Maria T; Atkinson, Mark A; Landay, Alan L; Wilson, S Brian

    2007-01-01

    Identification of human CD1d-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR)-invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells has been dependent on utilizing combinations of monoclonal antibodies or CD1d tetramers, which do not allow for the most specific analysis of this T-cell subpopulation. A novel monoclonal antibody (clone 6B11), specific for the invariant CDR3 loop of human canonical Vα24Jα18 TCR α chain, was developed and used to specifically characterize iNKT cells. In healthy individuals studied for up to 1 year, a wide but stable frequency of circulating iNKT cells (range: 0·01–0·92%) was observed, with no differences in frequency by gender. Four stable iNKT cell subsets were characterized in peripheral blood based on the expression of CD4 and CD8, with CD8+ iNKT cells being a phenotypic and functionally different subset from CD4+ and double negative iNKT cells; in particular, LAG-3 was preferentially expressed on CD8+ iNKT cells. In addition, a strong negative linear correlation between the frequency of total iNKT cells and percentage of the CD4+ subset was observed. In terms of their potential association with disease, patients at risk for type 1 diabetes had significantly expanded frequencies of double negative iNKT cells when compared to matched controls and first-degree relatives. Moreover, peripheral blood CD4+ iNKT cells were the highest producers of interleukin-4, while the production of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α was similar amongst all iNKT cell subsets. These differences in iNKT cell subsets suggest that in humans the relative ratio of iNKT cell subsets may influence susceptibility vs. resistance to immune-mediated diseases. PMID:17662044

  17. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Discrete TCR Binding Kinetics Control Invariant NKT Cell Selection and Central Priming.

    PubMed

    Cruz Tleugabulova, Mayra; Escalante, Nichole K; Deng, Shenglou; Fieve, Stephanie; Ereño-Orbea, June; Savage, Paul B; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Mallevaey, Thierry

    2016-11-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells develop and differentiate in the thymus, segregating into iNKT1/2/17 subsets akin to Th1/2/17 classical CD4 + T cells; however, iNKT TCRs recognize Ags in a fundamentally different way. How the biophysical parameters of iNKT TCRs influence signal strength in vivo and how such signals affect the development and differentiation of these cells are unknown. In this study, we manipulated TCRs in vivo to generate clonotypic iNKT cells using TCR retrogenic chimeras. We report that the biophysical properties of CD1d-lipid-TCR interactions differentially impacted the development and effector differentiation of iNKT cells. Whereas selection efficiency strongly correlated with TCR avidity, TCR signaling, cell-cell conjugate formation, and iNKT effector differentiation correlated with the half-life of CD1d-lipid-TCR interactions. TCR binding properties, however, did not modulate Ag-induced iNKT cytokine production. Our work establishes that discrete TCR interaction kinetics influence iNKT cell development and central priming. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Dendritic cells combined with tumor cells and α-galactosylceramide induce a potent, therapeutic and NK-cell dependent antitumor immunity in B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Escribà-Garcia, Laura; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Sierra, Jorge; Briones, Javier

    2017-05-26

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a small population of lymphocytes with unique specificity for glycolipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d receptor on dendritic cells (DCs). iNKT cells play a central role in tumor immunology since they are implicated in the coordination of innate and adaptive immune responses. These cells can be activated with the prototypic lipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), stimulating interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production and cytokine secretion, which contribute to the enhancement of T cell activation. We evaluated the antitumor effect of a combination of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells with the iNKT cell agonist α-GalCer in a therapeutic model of B cell lymphoma. iNKT, NK and T cell phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. Serum cytokines were analyzed by Luminex technology. Significant differences between survival curves were assessed by the log-rank test. For all other data, Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze the differences between groups. This vaccine induced a potent (100% survival), long-lasting and tumor-specific antitumor immune response, that was associated with an increase of both Th1 cytokines and IFN-γ secreting iNKT cells (4.59 ± 0.41% vs. 0.92 ± 0.12% in control group; p = 0.01) and T cells (CD4 IFN-γ + : 3.75 ± 0.59% vs. 0.66 ± 0.18% p = 0.02; CD8 IFN-γ + : 10.61 ± 0.84% vs. 0.47 ± 0.03% p = 0.002). Importantly, natural killer (NK) cells played a critical role in the antitumor effect observed after vaccination. This study provides clinically relevant data for the development of iNKT-cell based immunotherapy treatments for patients with B cell malignancies.

  20. Invariant NKT Cells Regulate the CD8 T Cell Response during Theiler's Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Lennart T.; Mas, Magali; Beaudoin, Lucie; Bauer, Jan; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Lehuen, Agnès; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Liblau, Roland S.

    2014-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are innate lymphocytes with a broad tissue distribution. Here we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the central nervous system (CNS) in the absence of inflammation. Their presence in the CNS dramatically augments following inoculation of C57Bl/6 mice with the neurotropic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). At the peak of inflammation the cellular infiltrate comprises 45 000 iNKT cells for 1 250 CD8 T cells specific for the immunodominant TMEV epitope. To study the interaction between these two T cell subsets, we infected both iNKT cell deficient Jα18-/- mice and iNKT cell enriched Vα14 transgenic mice with TMEV. The CD8 T cell response readily cleared TMEV infection in the iNKT cell deficient mice. However, in the iNKT cell enriched mice TMEV infection persisted and was associated with significant mortality. This was caused by the inhibition of the CD8 T cell response in the cervical lymph nodes and spleen after T cell priming. Taken together we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the CNS in the absence of inflammation and that their enrichment is associated with the inhibition of the anti-viral CD8 T cell response and an augmented mortality during acute encephalomyelitis. PMID:24498175

  1. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 orchestrates invariant NKT cell differentiation and effector function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianjun; Tschumi, Benjamin O; Corgnac, Stéphanie; Rüegg, Markus A; Hall, Michael N; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Romero, Pedro; Donda, Alena

    2014-08-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells play critical roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity. The Raptor containing mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) has been well documented to control peripheral CD4 or CD8 T cell effector or memory differentiation. However, the role of mTORC1 in iNKT cell development and function remains largely unknown. By using mice with T cell-restricted deletion of Raptor, we show that mTORC1 is selectively required for iNKT but not for conventional T cell development. Indeed, Raptor-deficient iNKT cells are mostly blocked at thymic stage 1-2, resulting in a dramatic decrease of terminal differentiation into stage 3 and severe reduction of peripheral iNKT cells. Moreover, residual iNKT cells in Raptor knockout mice are impaired in their rapid cytokine production upon αGalcer challenge. Bone marrow chimera studies demonstrate that mTORC1 controls iNKT differentiation in a cell-intrinsic manner. Collectively, our data provide the genetic evidence that iNKT cell development and effector functions are under the control of mTORC1 signaling. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. A novel glycolipid antigen for NKT cells that preferentially induces IFN-γ production

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Alysia M.; Girardi, Enrico; Wingender, Gerhard; Khurana, Archana; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Meng; Zahner, Sonja; Illarionov, Petr A.; Wen, Xiangshu; Li, Michelle; Yuan, Weiming; Porcelli, Steven A.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Here we characterize a novel Ag for invariant natural killer T-cells (iNKT cells) capable of producing an especially robust Th1 response. This glycosphingolipid (GSL), DB06-1, is similar in chemical structure to the well-studied α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), the only change being in a single atom, the substitution of a carbonyl oxygen with a sulfur atom. Although DB06-1 is not a more effective Ag in vitro, the small chemical change has a marked impact on the ability of this lipid Ag to stimulate iNKT cells in vivo, with increased IFN-γ production at 24 h compared to αGalCer, increased IL-12, and increased activation of NK cells to produce IFN-γ. These changes are correlated with an enhanced ability of DB06-1 to load in the CD1d molecules expressed by DCs in vivo. Moreover, structural studies suggest a tighter fit into the CD1d binding groove by DB061 compared to αGalCer. Surprisingly, when iNKT cells previously exposed to DB06-1 are restimulated weeks later, they have greatly increased IL-10 production. Our data are therefore consistent with a model whereby augmented and or prolonged presentation of a glycolipid Ag leads to increased activation of NK cells and a Th1-skewed immune response, which may result in part from enhanced loading into CD1d. Furthermore, our data suggest that strong antigenic stimulation in vivo may lead to the expansion of IL-10 producing iNKT cells, which could counteract the benefits of increased, early IFN-γ production. PMID:26078271

  3. Suppression of murine tumour growth through CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes via activated DEC-205+ dendritic cells by sequential administration of α-galactosylceramide in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kogo, Hideki; Shimizu, Masumi; Negishi, Yasuyuki; Uchida, Eiji; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2017-07-01

    Cancer immunity is mediated through the effective priming and activation of tumour-specific class I MHC molecule-restricted CD8 + cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). DEC-205 + dendritic cells (DCs) can cross-present the epitope(s) of captured tumour antigens associated with class I MHC molecules alongside co-stimulatory molecules to prime and activate tumour-specific CD8 + CTLs. Immunosuppressive tolerogenic DCs with reduced co-stimulatory molecules may be a cause of impaired CTL induction. Hepa1-6-1 cells were established from the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa1-6; these cells grow continuously after subcutaneous implantation into syngeneic C57BL/6 (B6) mice and do not prime CD8 + CTLs. In this study, we show that the growth of ongoing tumours was suppressed by activated CD8 + CTLs with tumour-specific cytotoxicity through the administration of the glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), which is a compound known to stimulate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and selectively activate DEC-205 + DCs. Moreover, we demonstrated that sequential repetitive intraperitoneal inoculation with α-GalCer every 48 hr appeared to convert tolerogenic DEC-205 + DCs into immunogenic DCs with a higher expression of co-stimulatory molecules and a stronger cross-presentation capacity, which primed CTL precursors and induced tumour-specific CD8 + CTLs within the tumour environment without activating iNKT cells. These findings provide a new basis for cancer immunotherapy to convert tolerogenic DEC-205 + DCs within tumours into immunogenic DCs through the sequential administration of an immuno-potent lipid/glycolipid, and then activated immunogenic DCs with sufficient expression of co-stimulatory molecules prime and activate tumour-specific CD8 + CTLs within the tumour to control tumour growth. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. An efferocytosis-induced, IL-4-dependent macrophage-iNKT cell circuit suppresses sterile inflammation and is defective in murine CGD.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Melody Yue; Pham, Duy; Bagaitkar, Juhi; Liu, Jianyun; Otero, Karel; Shan, Ming; Wynn, Thomas A; Brombacher, Frank; Brutkiewicz, Randy R; Kaplan, Mark H; Dinauer, Mary C

    2013-04-25

    Efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages following tissue injury is fundamental to the resolution of inflammation and initiation of tissue repair. Using a sterile peritonitis model in mice, we identified interleukin (IL)-4-producing efferocytosing macrophages in the peritoneum that activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to produce cytokines including IL-4, IL-13, and interferon-γ. Importantly, IL-4 from macrophages contributes to alternative activation of peritoneal exudate macrophages and augments type 2 cytokine production from NKT cells to suppress inflammation. The increased peritonitis in mice deficient in IL-4, NKT cells, or IL-4Rα expression on myeloid cells suggested that each is a key component for resolution of sterile inflammation. The reduced NAD phosphate oxidase is also critical for this model, because in mice with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) that lack oxidase subunits, activation of iNKT cells by X-CGD peritoneal exudate macrophages was impaired during sterile peritonitis, resulting in enhanced and prolonged inflammation in these mice. Therefore, efferocytosis-induced IL-4 production and activation of IL-4-producing iNKT cells by macrophages are immunomodulatory events in an innate immune circuit required to resolve sterile inflammation and promote tissue repair.

  5. An efferocytosis-induced, IL-4–dependent macrophage-iNKT cell circuit suppresses sterile inflammation and is defective in murine CGD

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Melody Yue; Pham, Duy; Bagaitkar, Juhi; Liu, Jianyun; Otero, Karel; Shan, Ming; Wynn, Thomas A.; Brombacher, Frank; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages following tissue injury is fundamental to the resolution of inflammation and initiation of tissue repair. Using a sterile peritonitis model in mice, we identified interleukin (IL)-4–producing efferocytosing macrophages in the peritoneum that activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to produce cytokines including IL-4, IL-13, and interferon-γ. Importantly, IL-4 from macrophages contributes to alternative activation of peritoneal exudate macrophages and augments type 2 cytokine production from NKT cells to suppress inflammation. The increased peritonitis in mice deficient in IL-4, NKT cells, or IL-4Rα expression on myeloid cells suggested that each is a key component for resolution of sterile inflammation. The reduced NAD phosphate oxidase is also critical for this model, because in mice with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) that lack oxidase subunits, activation of iNKT cells by X-CGD peritoneal exudate macrophages was impaired during sterile peritonitis, resulting in enhanced and prolonged inflammation in these mice. Therefore, efferocytosis-induced IL-4 production and activation of IL-4–producing iNKT cells by macrophages are immunomodulatory events in an innate immune circuit required to resolve sterile inflammation and promote tissue repair. PMID:23426944

  6. Unique invariant natural killer T cells promote intestinal polyps by suppressing TH1 immunity and promoting regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Sedimbi, Saikiran; Löfbom, Linda; Singh, Avadhesh K; Porcelli, Steven A; Cardell, Susanna L

    2017-01-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are known as potent early regulatory cells of immune responses. Besides the established roles in the regulation of inflammation and autoimmune disease, studies have shown that iNKT cells have important roles in tumor surveillance and the control of tumor metastasis. Here we found that absence of iNKT cells dramatically decreased the total number of intestinal polyps in APCMin/+ mice, a model for colorectal cancer. Polyp iNKT cells were enriched for IL-10 and IL-17 producing cells, showed a distinct phenotype being CD4+, NK1.1− CD44int and PD-1lo, and they were negative for the NKT cell transcription factor PLZF. Absence of iNKT cells was associated with a reduced frequency of Treg cells and lower expression levels of FoxP3 protein and transcript uniquely in the polyps, and a switch to an inflammatory macrophage phenotype. Moreover, in iNKT cell deficient APCMin/+ mice, expression of T helper (TH) 1-associated genes, such as IFN-γ and Nos2, was increased in polyps, concomitantly with elevated frequencies of conventional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in this tissue. The results suggest that a population of regulatory iNKT cells locally promote intestinal polyp formation by enhancing Treg cells and immunosuppression of anti-tumor TH1-immunity. PMID:28401935

  7. Murine CD8+Invariant Natural Killer T Cells are Negatively Selected by CD1d Expressed on Thymic Epithelial Cells and Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sejin; Lee, Hyunji; Shin, Jung Hoon; Hong, Changwan; Park, Se-Ho

    2018-01-01

    CD1d-dependent invariant natural killer (iNKT) cells are found as either CD4 single positive (SP) or CD4/CD8 double negative (DN) cells in mice. The size of the CD8 + iNKT population is extremely small. It is known that CD1d expression on developing thymocytes is sufficient for iNKT development and co-receptor choice, which is driven by Th-POK expression. This study aimed to examine the factors involved in the CD4/CD8 co-receptor choice of iNKT cells in addition to Th-POK-driven silencing of CD8 expression. In this study, we compared iNKT cells of wild-type (WT) mice with those of transgenic mice in which CD1d expression is restricted to developing thymocytes by the proximal Lck (pLCK) promoter. CD8 positive iNKT cell population were analyzed by flow cytometry. We found that there was a substantial population of CD8 + iNKT cells in the thymus and spleen of transgenic mice, and these cells are negatively selected in between Stage 2 and Stage 3 of their developmental program by the CD1d expressed on Thymic epithelial cell (TEC) and Dendritic cells in WT mice. We conclude that TEC expression of CD1d in the murine thymus contributed to co-receptor choice of iNKT cells, in addition to Th-POK-driven silencing of CD8. Therefore, mostly CD4 SP and DN iNKT cells are produced under normal physiological conditions in mice.

  8. Endocytic pH regulates cell surface localization of glycolipid antigen loaded CD1d complexes

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Ng, Tony W.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Saini, Neeraj K.; Johndrow, Christopher T.; Chang, Young-tae; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d, an antigen presenting protein structurally similar to MHC class I. Stimulation of iNKT cells by glycolipid antigens can induce strong immune responses in vivo, with rapid production of a wide variety of cytokines including those classically associated with either T helper type 1 (Th1) or type 2 (Th2) responses. Alterations in the lipid tails or other portions of CD1d–presented glycolipid ligands can bias the iNKT response towards production of predominantly Th1 or Th2 associated cytokines. However, the mechanism accounting for this structure-activity relationship remains controversial. The Th1-biasing glycolipids have been found to consistently form complexes with CD1d that preferentially localize to plasma membrane cholesterol rich microdomains (lipid rafts), whereas CD1d complexes formed with Th2-biasing ligands are excluded from these microdomains. Here we show that neutralization of endosomal pH enhanced localization of CD1d complexes containing Th2-biasing glycolipids to plasma membrane lipid rafts of antigen presenting cells (APC). Transfer of APCs presenting these “stabilized” CD1d/αGC complexes into mice resulted in immune responses with a more prominent Th1-like bias, characterized by increased NK cell transactivation and interferon-γ production. These findings support a model in which low endosomal pH controls stability and lipid raft localization of CD1d–glycolipid complexes to regulate the outcome of iNKT cell mediated responses. PMID:26306469

  9. Invariant Natural Killer T cells are not affected by lysosomal storage in patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C

    PubMed Central

    Speak, Anneliese O; Platt, Nicholas; Salio, Mariolina; te Vruchte, Danielle Taylor; Smith, David A; Shepherd, Dawn; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Simmons, Louise; Imrie, Jackie; Wraith, James E.; Lachmann, Robin; Hartung, Ralf; Runz, Heiko; Mengel, Eugen; Beck, Michael; Hendriksz, Christian J; Porter, Forbes D; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M

    2012-01-01

    Summary Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialised subset of T cells that are restricted to the MHC class I like molecule, CD1d. The ligands for iNKT cells are lipids, with the canonical superagonist being α-galactosylceramide, a non-mammalian glycosphingolipid. Trafficking of CD1d through the lysosome is required for the development of murine iNKT cells. Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by dysfunction in either of two lysosomal proteins, NPC1 or NPC2, resulting in the storage of multiple lipids, including glycosphingolipids. In the NPC1 mouse model iNKT cells are virtually undetectable, which is likely due to the inability of CD1d to be loaded with the selecting ligand due to defective lysosomal function and/or CD1d trafficking. However, in this study we have found that in NPC1 patients iNKT cells are present in normal frequencies phenotype and functional response to stimulation. In addition, antigen-presenting cells derived from NPC1 patients are functionally competent to present several different CD1d/iNKT cell ligands. This further supports the hypothesis that there are different trafficking requirements for the development of murine and human iNKT cells and a functional lysosomal/late-endosomal compartment is not required for human iNKT cell development. PMID:22585405

  10. Unraveling Natural Killer T-Cells Development.

    PubMed

    Bennstein, Sabrina Bianca

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T-cells are a subset of innate-like T-cells with the ability to bridge innate and adaptive immunity. There is great interest in harnessing these cells to improve tumor therapy; however, greater understanding of invariant NKT (iNKT) cell biology is needed. The first step is to learn more about NKT development within the thymus. Recent studies suggest lineage separation of murine iNKT cells into iNKT1, iNKT2, and iNKT17 cells instead of shared developmental stages. This review will focus on these new studies and will discuss the evidence for lineage separation in contrast to shared developmental stages. The author will also highlight the classifications of murine iNKT cells according to identified transcription factors and cytokine production, and will discuss transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations, and the role of mammalian target of rapamycin. Finally, the importance of these findings for human cancer therapy will be briefly discussed.

  11. Unraveling Natural Killer T-Cells Development

    PubMed Central

    Bennstein, Sabrina Bianca

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T-cells are a subset of innate-like T-cells with the ability to bridge innate and adaptive immunity. There is great interest in harnessing these cells to improve tumor therapy; however, greater understanding of invariant NKT (iNKT) cell biology is needed. The first step is to learn more about NKT development within the thymus. Recent studies suggest lineage separation of murine iNKT cells into iNKT1, iNKT2, and iNKT17 cells instead of shared developmental stages. This review will focus on these new studies and will discuss the evidence for lineage separation in contrast to shared developmental stages. The author will also highlight the classifications of murine iNKT cells according to identified transcription factors and cytokine production, and will discuss transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations, and the role of mammalian target of rapamycin. Finally, the importance of these findings for human cancer therapy will be briefly discussed. PMID:29375573

  12. Interleukins 15 and 12 in combination expand the selective loss of natural killer T cells in HIV infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Parasa, Venkata Ramanarao; Selvaraj, Anbalagan; Sikhamani, Rajasekaran; Raja, Alamelu

    2015-05-01

    The present study evaluated the frequency and receptor expression pattern of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Further, the effect of IL-15 + IL-12 stimulation on iNKT cells was also assessed. The study included 15 individuals each from normal healthy subjects, pulmonary tuberculosis patients, HIV-infected individuals, and patients with HIV and tuberculosis coinfection (HIV-TB). The frequency of iNKT cells and the expression of phenotype, cytotoxic and chemokine receptors were studied by flow cytometry. The number of iNKT cells was significantly depleted in HIV and HIV-TB patients, which upon IL-15 + IL-12 stimulation expanded in HIV. The constitutively expressed natural cytotoxicity receptor, NKp46 was increased in HIV and HIV-TB, which might be the host's response to HIV replication. The distinct expression patterns of chemokine and adhesion receptors suggest that iNKT subsets might traffic to different microenvironment and tissues. High expression of chemokine receptor CCR5 by most iNKT cells suggests that these cells might be more favorable targets of HIV infection. Our results show that IL-15 and IL-12 combination has the ability to expand the selective depletion of iNKT cells in vitro in HIV-infected individuals, but of limited value when coinfected with TB.

  13. Role of NKT cells in the digestive system. I. Invariant NKT cells and liver diseases: is there strength in numbers?

    PubMed

    Ajuebor, Maureen N

    2007-10-01

    Information regarding the functional role of the innate immune T cell, invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, in the pathophysiology of liver diseases continues to emerge. Results from animal studies suggest that iNKT cells can have divergent roles by specifically promoting the development of proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses in liver diseases. In this themes article, I discuss the critical evidence from animal models that demonstrate a vital role for iNKT cells in the pathophysiology of liver diseases with emphasis on viral, autoimmune, and toxin-induced liver diseases. Furthermore, I discuss the controversial issues (including iNKT cell apoptosis) that typify some of these studies. Finally, I highlight areas that require additional investigation.

  14. Human Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Respond to Antigen-Presenting Cells Exposed to Lipids from Olea europaea Pollen.

    PubMed

    Abos Gracia, Beatriz; López Relaño, Juan; Revilla, Ana; Castro, Lourdes; Villalba, Mayte; Martín Adrados, Beatriz; Regueiro, Jose Ramon; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Martínez Naves, Eduardo; Gómez Del Moral, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Allergic sensitization might be influenced by the lipids present in allergens, which can be recognized by natural killer T (NKT) cells on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of olive pollen lipids in human APCs, including monocytes as well as monocyte-derived macrophages (Mϕ) and dendritic cells (DCs). Lipids were extracted from olive (Olea europaea) pollen grains. Invariant (i)NKT cells, monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs were obtained from buffy coats of healthy blood donors, and their cell phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. iNKT cytotoxicity was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. Gene expression of CD1A and CD1D was performed by RT-PCR, and the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α cytokines by monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that monocytes and monocyte-derived Mϕ treated with olive pollen lipids strongly activate iNKT cells. We observed several phenotypic modifications in the APCs upon exposure to pollen-derived lipids. Both Mϕ and monocytes treated with olive pollen lipids showed an increase in CD1D gene expression, whereas upregulation of cell surface CD1d protein occurred only in Mϕ. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of human serum enhance their surface CD1d expression when exposed to olive pollen lipids. Finally, olive pollen lipids were able to stimulate the production of IL-6 but downregulated the production of lipopolysaccharide- induced IL-10 by Mϕ. Olive pollen lipids alter the phenotype of monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs, resulting in the activation of NKT cells, which have the potential to influence allergic immune responses. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. iNKT-CELL ACTIVATION INDUCES LATE PRETERM BIRTH THAT IS ATTENUATED BY ROSIGLITAZONE1

    PubMed Central

    St Louis, Derek; Romero, Roberto; Plazyo, Olesya; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia; Panaitescu, Bogdan; Xu, Yi; Milovic, Tatjana; Xu, Zhonghui; Bhatti, Gaurav; Qing-Sheng, Mi; Drewlo, Sascha; Tarca, Adi L.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality; however, its non-infection-related mechanisms are poorly understood. Herein, we show that the expansion of activated CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in the third trimester by administration of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) induces late PTB and neonatal mortality. In vivo imaging revealed that fetuses from mice that underwent α-GalCer-induced late PTB had bradycardia and died shortly after delivery. Yet, administration of α-GalCer in the second trimester did not cause pregnancy loss. PPARγ activation, through rosiglitazone treatment, reduced the rate of α-GalCer-induced late PTB and improved neonatal survival. Administration of α-GalCer in the third trimester suppressed PPARγ activation as shown by the down-regulation of Fabp4 and Fatp4 in myometrial and decidual tissues, respectively; this suppression was rescued by rosiglitazone treatment. Administration of α-GalCer in the third trimester induced an increase in the activation of conventional CD4+ T cells in myometrial tissues and the infiltration of activated macrophages, neutrophils and mature DCs to myometrial and/or decidual tissues. All of these effects were blunted after rosiglitazone treatment. Administration of α-GalCer also up-regulated the expression of inflammatory genes at the maternal-fetal interface and systemically, and rosiglitazone treatment partially attenuated these responses. Finally, an increased infiltration of activated iNKT-like cells in human decidual tissues is associated with non-infection-related preterm labor/birth. Collectively, these results demonstrate that iNKT-cell activation in vivo leads to late PTB by initiating innate and adaptive immune responses and suggest that the PPARγ pathway has potential as a target for prevention of this syndrome. PMID:26740111

  16. Natural killer T cells and the regulation of asthma.

    PubMed

    Matangkasombut, P; Pichavant, M; Dekruyff, R H; Umetsu, D T

    2009-09-01

    A crucial role has been suggested for invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) in regulating the development of asthma, a complex and heterogeneous disease characterized by airway inflammation and airway hyperreactivity (AHR). iNKT cells constitute a unique subset of T cells responding to endogenous and exogenous lipid antigens, rapidly secreting a large amount of cytokines, which amplify both innate and adaptive immunity. Herein, we review recent studies showing a requirement for iNKT cells in various models of asthma in mice and monkeys as well as studies in human patients. Surprisingly, in several different murine models of asthma, distinct subsets of iNKT cells were required, suggesting that iNKT cells serve as a common critical pathogenic element for many different forms of asthma. The importance of iNKT cells in both allergic and non-allergic forms of asthma, which are independent of adaptive immunity and associated with airway neutrophils, may explain situations previously found to be incompatible with the Th2 paradigm of asthma.

  17. The frequency of invariant natural killer T cells correlates with the severity of myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinggang; Li, Minghui; Xie, Yeqing; Yu, Ying; Liu, Guijian; Yu, Yong; Yang, Xiangdong; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo; Chen, Ruizhen

    2014-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) perform different functions in different diseases. The cells were reported to protect myocarditis. However, the detail relationships between iNKT and Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis remain unclear. In order to investigate the correlation between the severity of CVB3-induced inflammation infiltration and the proportion of iNKT in the spleen and circulating blood, BALB/c mice were grouped into three groups according to the inflammation infiltration area of heart sections. The proportion of iNKT in CD3-positive cells in the spleen correlated negatively with the inflammation area (linear fit; R(2)=0.93) and virus capsid protein VP1 (linear fit; R(2)=0.84) in the myocardial tissue, while the proportion of iNKT in CD3-positive cells in the PBMC positively correlated with the inflammation area (linear fit; R(2)=0.91) and virus capsid protein VP1 (linear fit; R(2)=0.93) in the myocardial tissue. The results imply that iNKT might be used as a parameter for the diagnosis of myocarditis in clinical practice.

  18. Combination of Intratumoral Invariant Natural Killer T Cells and Interferon-Gamma Is Associated with Prognosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Wei; Ju, Min-Jie; Cai, Ming-Yan; Dai, Chen-Xin; Hu, Jie; Qiu, Shuang-Jian; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of intratumoral invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after curative resection. Experimental Design Expression of TRAV10, encoding the Vα24 domain of iNKT cells, and IFN-γ mRNA were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in tumor from 224 HCC patients undergoing curative resection. The prognostic value of these two and other clinicopathologic factors was evaluated. Results Either intratumoral iNKT cells and IFN-γ alone or their combination was an independent prognostic factor for OS (P = 0.001) and RFS (P = 0.001) by multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis. Patients with concurrent low levels of iNKT cells and IFN-γ had a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.784 for OS and 2.673 for RFS. The areas under the curve of iNKT cells, IFN-γand their combination were 0.618 vs 0.608 vs 0.654 for death and 0.591 vs 0.604 vs 0.633 for recurrence respectively by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The prognosis was the worst for HCC patients with concurrent low levels of iNKT cells and IFN-γ, which might be related with more advanced pTNM stage and more vascular invasion. Conclusions Combination of intratumoral iNKT cells and IFN-γ is a promising independent predictor for recurrence and survival in HCC, which has a better power to predict HCC patients’ outcome compared with intratumoral iNKT cells or IFN-γ alone. PMID:23940564

  19. Active Cells for Multifunctional Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    techniques to explore a variety of cell designs.  Designed a simplified active cell using Nitinol as the actuation method and relying on Joule heating...for contraction of the cell.  Developed manufacturing techniques for reliably creating Nitinol spring coils in a variety of diameters and gauges...design of the active cells to maximum the stroked length of the active cells by tuning the stiffness of a passive spring in parallel with the Nitinol

  20. Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V; Kung, Jennifer E; Gumperz, Jenny; Adams, Erin J

    2012-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted α1 helix resulting in an open A' pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-Å displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d–LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint on CD1d–LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3α loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3β and Jβ segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells. PMID:22395072

  1. Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor

    SciTech Connect

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V.; Kung, Jennifer E.

    2014-10-02

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted {alpha}1 helix resulting in an open A pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-{angstrom} displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d-LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint onmore » CD1d-LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3{alpha} loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3{beta} and J{beta} segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells.« less

  2. Immature Renal Dendritic Cells Recruit Regulatory CXCR6+ Invariant Natural Killer T Cells to Attenuate Crescentic GN

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Turner, Jan-Eric; Tittel, André P.; Krebs, Christian; Disteldorf, Erik; Wegscheid, Claudia; Tiegs, Gisa; Velden, Joachim; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Garbi, Natalio; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Kurts, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Immature renal dendritic cells (DCs) are protective early in murine crescentic GN, but the mechanisms underlying this protection are unknown. Here, depletion of DCs reduced the recruitment of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, which attenuate GN, into the kidney in the early stage of experimental crescentic GN. More than 90% of renal iNKT cells expressed the chemokine receptor CXCR6, and renal DCs produced high amounts of the cognate ligand CXCL16 early after induction of nephritis, suggesting that renal DC-derived CXCL16 might attract protective CXCR6+ iNKT cells. Consistent with this finding, CXCR6-deficient mice exhibited less iNKT cell recruitment and developed nephritis that was more severe, similar to the aggravated nephritis observed in mice depleted of immature DCs. Finally, adoptive transfer of CXCR6-competent NKT cells ameliorated nephritis. Taken together, these results suggest an immunoprotective mechanism involving immature DCs, CXCL16, CXCR6, and regulatory iNKT cells, which might stimulate the development of new therapeutic strategies for GN. PMID:23138484

  3. Protection against type 1 diabetes upon Coxsackievirus B4 infection and iNKT-cell stimulation: role of suppressive macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ghazarian, Liana; Diana, Julien; Beaudoin, Lucie; Larsson, Pär G; Puri, Raj K; van Rooijen, Nico; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Lehuen, Agnès

    2013-11-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells belong to the innate immune system and exercise a dual role as potent regulators of autoimmunity and participate in responses against different pathogens. They have been shown to prevent type 1 diabetes development and to promote antiviral responses. Many studies in the implication of environmental factors on the etiology of type 1 diabetes have suggested a link between enteroviral infections and the development of this disease. This study of the pancreatropic enterovirus Coxsackievirus B4 (CVB4) shows that although infection accelerated type 1 diabetes development in a subset of proinsulin 2-deficient NOD mice, the activation of iNKT cells by a specific agonist, α-galactosylceramide, at the time of infection inhibited the disease. Diabetes development was associated with the infiltration of pancreatic islets by inflammatory macrophages, producing high levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α and activation of anti-islet T cells. On the contrary, macrophages infiltrating the islets after CVB4 infection and iNKT-cell stimulation expressed a number of suppressive enzymes, among which indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase was sufficient to inhibit anti-islet T-cell response and to prevent diabetes. This study highlights the critical interaction between virus and the immune system in the acceleration or prevention of type 1 diabetes.

  4. Preclinical Evaluation of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in the 5T33 Multiple Myeloma Model

    PubMed Central

    Nur, Haneen; Fostier, Karel; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Renmans, Wim; Bertrand, Elisabeth; Leleu, Xavier; Favreau, Mérédis; Breckpot, Karine; Schots, Rik; De Waele, Marc; Van Valckenborgh, Els; De Bruyne, Elke; Facon, Thierry; Elewaut, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Immunomodulators have been used in recent years to reactivate host anti-tumor immunity in several hematological malignancies. This report describes the effect of activating natural killer T (NKT) cells by α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) in the 5T33MM model of multiple myeloma (MM). NKT cells are T lymphocytes, co-expressing T and NK receptors, while invariant NKT cells (iNKTs) also express a unique semi-invariant TCR α-chain. We followed iNKT numbers during the development of the disease in both 5T33MM mice and MM patients and found that their numbers dropped dramatically at the end stage of the disease, leading to a loss of total IFN-γ secretion. We furthermore observed that α-GalCer treatment significantly increased the survival of 5T33MM diseased mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time the possibility of using a preclinical murine MM model to study the effects of α-GalCer and show promising results of α-GalCer treatment in a low tumor burden setting. PMID:23741460

  5. 504 Participation of Invariant NKT Cells (Vα24Jα18) during Asthma Exacerbation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca Estela; del Río-Chivardí, Jaime Mariano; Morales-Flores, Amelia; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis Antonio; Moreno-Lafont, Martha; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Vaughan-Figueroa, Juan Gilberto; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Background Invariant NKT cells (or type 1 NKT cells) co-express CD3 marker and NK receptors (CD56, CD161) and use a single type of TCRα chain (Vα24Jα18 for humans), comprising CD4-CD8-, CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. Participation of these cells and their cytokines in asthmatic children, in stable conditions and under exacerbation, was studied. Methods Three groups on children (6–12 years old) were selected: 1) asthmatics under exacerbation attack (AE) within the first 24 hours after the attack and before starting any treatment; 2) asthmatics with stable asthma (SA), without symptoms for at least a month before bleeding; and 3) healthy controls (HC) without history of asthma, atopy and with normal lung function were selected in the Allergy and Clinical Immunology Service, Hospital Infantil de Mexico. Invariant NKT cells and subset levels as well as intracellular cytokines were evaluated in whole blood by 4-color flow cytometry (antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD161, Va24, IL-4 and IFN-g). Results Proportion of iNKT cells among total CD3+ cells in HC group was 0.9%, while in SA patients they were increased up to 2.6%; interestingly, during exacerbation such cells were dimished (1.8%). Concerning iNKT CD4+ cells were 0.6% in HC, 1.8% in SA, and 0.7% in AE, while iNKT CD8+ cells were 0.1% in HC, 0.7% in SA, and 0.4% in AE. Both iNKT cell subsets expressed intracellular IFN-g and IL-4 cytokines in AE, SA and HC but predominantly IFN-g in iNKT CD8+ cells from AE patients. Conclusions iNKT cells participation in asthma pathogenesis was confirmed. Increase of IFN-g production in patients with exacerbations, may provide a regulatory environment to stabilize the condition.

  6. Globosides but not isoglobosides can impact the development of invariant natural killer T cells and their interaction with dendritic cells1

    PubMed Central

    Porubsky, Stefan; Speak, Anneliese O.; Salio, Mariolina; Jennemann, Richard; Bonrouhi, Mahnaz; Zafarulla, Rashad; Singh, Yogesh; Dyson, Julian; Luckow, Bruno; Lehuen, Agnes; Malle, Ernst; Müthing, Johannes; Platt, Frances M.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of endogenous lipid antigen(s) on CD1d is required for the development of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Isoglobotrihexosylceramide (iGb3) has been implicated as this endogenous selecting ligand and recently suggested to control over-stimulation and deletion of iNKT cells in α-galactosidase A-deficient mice (αGalA−/−, human Fabry disease), which accumulate isoglobosides and globosides. However, the presence and function of iGb3 in murine thymus remained controversial. In this paper we generate a globotrihexosylceramide (Gb3) synthase deficient mouse (Gb3S−/−) and show that in αGalA−/−/Gb3S−/− double knockout mice, which store isoglobosides but no globosides, minute amounts of iGb3 can be detected by high performance liquid chromatography. Furthermore we demonstrate that iGb3-deficiency does not only fail to impact selection of iNKT cells, in terms of frequency and absolute numbers, but also does not alter the distribution of the T cell receptor (TCR) complementarity determining region 3 of iNKT cells. Analyzing multiple gene targeted mouse strains, we demonstrate that globoside, rather than iGb3, storage is the major cause for reduced iNKT cell frequencies and defective antigen presentation in αGalA−/− mice. Finally, we show that correction of globoside storage in αGalA−/− mice by crossing them with Gb3S−/− normalizes iNKT cell frequencies and dendritic cell (DC) function. We conclude that, although detectable in murine thymus in αGalA−/−/Gb3S−/− mice, iGb3 does not influence either the development of iNKT cells or their interaction with peripheral DCs. Moreover in αGalA−/− mice it is the Gb3-storage that is responsible for the decreased iNKT cell numbers and impeded antigen presentation on DCs. PMID:22875802

  7. Multitarget magnetic activated cell sorter

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Kim, Unyoung; Soh, H. Tom

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic selection allows high-throughput sorting of target cells based on surface markers, and it is extensively used in biotechnology for a wide range of applications from in vitro diagnostics to cell-based therapies. However, existing methods can only perform separation based on a single parameter (i.e., the presence or absence of magnetization), and therefore, the simultaneous sorting of multiple targets at high levels of purity, recovery, and throughput remains a challenge. In this work, we present an alternative system, the multitarget magnetic activated cell sorter (MT-MACS), which makes use of microfluidics technology to achieve simultaneous spatially-addressable sorting of multiple target cell types in a continuous-flow manner. We used the MT-MACS device to purify 2 types of target cells, which had been labeled via target-specific affinity reagents with 2 different magnetic tags with distinct saturation magnetization and size. The device was engineered so that the combined effects of the hydrodynamic force produced from the laminar flow and the magnetophoretic force produced from patterned ferromagnetic structures within the microchannel result in the selective purification of the differentially labeled target cells into multiple independent outlets. We demonstrate here the capability to simultaneously sort multiple magnetic tags with >90% purity and >5,000-fold enrichment and multiple bacterial cell types with >90% purity and >500-fold enrichment at a throughput of 109 cells per hour. PMID:19015523

  8. MicroRNA-133b Regulation of Th-POK Expression and Dendritic Cell Signals Affect NKT17 Cell Differentiation in the Thymus.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Caterina; De Giorgi, Lorena; Cosorich, Ilaria; Sorini, Chiara; Fedeli, Maya; Falcone, Marika

    2016-10-15

    NKT17 cells represent a functional subset of Vα14 invariant NKT (iNKT) cells with important effector functions in infections and autoimmune diseases. The mechanisms that drive NKT17 cell differentiation in the thymus are still largely unknown. The percentage of NKT17 cells has a high variability between murine strains due to differential thymic differentiation. For example, the NOD strain carries a high percentage and absolute numbers of NKT17 cells compared with other strains. In this study, we used the NOD mouse model to analyze what regulates NKT17 cell frequency in the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs. In accordance with previous studies showing that the zinc finger transcription factor Th-POK is a key negative regulator of thymic NKT17 cell differentiation in the thymus, our data indicate that excessive NKT17 cell frequency in NOD mice correlates with defective Th-POK expression by thymic Vα14iNKT cells. Moreover, we found that Th-POK expression is under epigenetic regulation mediated by microRNA-133b whose expression is reduced in Vα14iNKT cells of NOD mice. We also demonstrated in a conditional knockout model of dendritic cell (DC) depletion (CD11cCreXDTA.B6 and CD11cCreRosa26DTA.NOD mice) that DCs play a crucial role in regulating Vα14iNKT cell maturation and their acquisition of an NKT17 cytokine secretion phenotype in the thymus. Overall, our data show that mechanisms regulating NKT17 cell differentiation are unique and completely different from those of Vα14iNKT cells. Specifically, we found that epigenetic regulation through microRNA-133b-regulated Th-POK expression and signals provided by DCs are fundamental for thymic NKT17 cell differentiation. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Circulating CD56dim natural killer cells and CD56+ T cells that produce interferon-γ or interleukin-10 are expanded in asymptomatic, E antigen-negative patients with persistent hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Conroy, M J; Mac Nicholas, R; Grealy, R; Taylor, M; Otegbayo, J A; O'Dea, S; Mulcahy, F; Ryan, T; Norris, S; Doherty, D G

    2015-03-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can result in spontaneous resolution or chronic infection, which can remain asymptomatic or can progress to cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. The host immune response is thought to be a major determinant of the outcome of HBV infection and virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) can mediate immunity against the virus and cause liver pathology. Antigen-nonspecific innate lymphocytes may also contribute to HBV infection and liver disease, therefore, we examined the frequencies, phenotypes, cytolytic activities and cytokine profiles of circulating natural killer (NK) cells, CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and CD56(+) T cells in 102 asymptomatic HBV-infected patients and compared them with those in 66 uninfected control subjects. NK cells expressing low levels of CD56 (CD56(dim)) and CD56(+) T cells were significantly expanded in the circulation of HBV-infected patients compared with control subjects. CD1d expression and iNKT cell frequencies were similar in both groups. Despite these expansions, we did not detect augmented natural or cytokine-induced cytotoxicity in the HBV-infected subjects. All lymphocyte populations studied produced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) significantly more frequently when taken from HBV-infected patients compared with when taken from healthy controls. Additionally, NK cells from the patients more frequently produced interleukin-10. As our HBV-infected cohort consisted of asymptomatic patients with low viral loads, we propose that CD56(dim) NK cells and CD56(+) T cells control HBV infection by noncytolytic mechanisms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Cholesteryl α-Glucosides Contribute to Its Pathogenicity and Immune Response by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuki; Vela, Jose Luis; Matsumura, Fumiko; Hoshino, Hitomi; Tyznik, Aaron; Lee, Heeseob; Girardi, Enrico; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Liddington, Robert; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Bao, Xingfeng; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Jin, Rongsheng; Zong, Yinong; Seeberger, Peter H.; Nakayama, Jun; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Fukuda, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10–15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer), while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18−/−) or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis. PMID:24312443

  11. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  12. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  13. Participation of CD161(+) and invariant natural killer T cells in pediatric asthma exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Carpio-Pedroza, Juan C; Vaughan, Gilberto; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca E; del Río-Chivardí, Jaime M; Vergara-Castañeda, Arely; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis A; Morales-Flores, Amelia; Rodríguez-Moreno, Guadalupe; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia M; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma has been defined as a disease of chronic airway inflammation in which many cells and cellular products participate with variable degrees of airflow obstruction and hyperresponsiveness that lead to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Prominent among these cellular elements are two cell types referred to as the invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and a subpopulation of T cells expressing the molecule CD161, which are both thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Although the presence of iNKT and other CD161(+) cells in murine models has been associated with asthma, relatively few studies have been performed in the adult patient with asthma that have been often conflicting and even fewer studies are available in children. The present study was performed to investigate the peripheral blood frequencies of iNKT and CD161(+) T cells in children with asthma. A total of 35 children, 19 stable asthmatic patients, 6 who had experienced an asthmatic attack within 24 hours and had not received any treatment, and 10 healthy controls, aged 6-12 years, were enrolled in the study. iNKT and CD161(+) T-cell frequencies in blood were measured together with quantitative levels of IL-4 and interferon (IFN) γ using a cytofluorimetric approach. The results show that iNKT cells are increased in pediatric asthmatic patients undergoing exacerbations of asthma. These cells also produced less IFN-γ and more IL-4 than children with stable asthma and in healthy control children. These results suggest that iNKT cells might participate in the development of the asthmatic exacerbations. The increased production of IL-4 in conjunction with the decrease of IFN-γ may be mechanistically responsible, at least partially, for the heightening of the immunologic response leading to the asthmatic attack in children. Knowledge of these interactive mechanisms involving the iNKT cell and our understanding of its role in the exacerbation of

  14. Salivary Gland NK Cells Are Phenotypically and Functionally Unique

    PubMed Central

    Brossay, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+ T cells play vital roles in containing and eliminating systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV). However, CMV has a tropism for the salivary gland acinar epithelial cells and persists in this organ for several weeks after primary infection. Here we characterize a distinct NK cell population that resides in the salivary gland, uncommon to any described to date, expressing both mature and immature NK cell markers. Using RORγt reporter mice and nude mice, we also show that the salivary gland NK cells are not lymphoid tissue inducer NK-like cells and are not thymic derived. During the course of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, we found that salivary gland NK cells detect the infection and acquire activation markers, but have limited capacity to produce IFN-γ and degranulate. Salivary gland NK cell effector functions are not regulated by iNKT or Treg cells, which are mostly absent in the salivary gland. Additionally, we demonstrate that peripheral NK cells are not recruited to this organ even after the systemic infection has been controlled. Altogether, these results indicate that viral persistence and latency in the salivary glands may be due in part to the presence of unfit NK cells and the lack of recruitment of peripheral NK cells. PMID:21249177

  15. Dynamics of NKT-Cell Responses to Chlamydial Infection.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Joyee, Antony George; Yang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells have gained great attention owing to their critical functional roles in immunity to various pathogens. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on the role of NKT cells in host defense against and pathogenesis due to Chlamydia, which is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that poses a threat to the public health worldwide. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that NKT cells, particularly invariant NKT (iNKT) cells, play a crucial role in host defense against chlamydial infections, especially in C. pneumoniae infection. iNKT cells can promote type-1 protective responses to C. pneumoniae by inducing enhanced production of IL-12 by dendritic cells (DCs), in particular CD8α+ DCs, which promote the differentiation of naive T cells into protective IFN-γ-producing Th1/Tc1 type CD4+/CD8+ T cells. This iNKT-cell-mediated modulation of DC function is largely dependent upon CD40-CD40L interaction, IFN-γ production, and cell-to-cell contact. In addition, iNKT cells modulate the function of natural killer cells. NKT cells may be also involved in the pathogenesis of some chlamydial diseases by inducing different patterns of cytokine production. A better understanding of NKT-cell biology will enable us to rationally design prophylactic and therapeutic tools to combat infectious diseases.

  16. Immunoregulation of NKT Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junwei; Wu, Meng; Wang, Jing; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with different variety of clinical manifestations. Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate lymphocytes that play a regulatory role during broad range of immune responses. A number of studies demonstrated that the quantity and quality of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells showed marked defects in SLE patients in comparison to healthy controls. This finding suggests that iNKT cells may play a regulatory role in the occurrence and development of this disease. In this review, we mainly summarized the most recent findings about the behavior of NKT cells in SLE patients and mouse models, as well as how NKT cells affect the proportion of T helper cells and the production of autoreactive antibodies in the progress of SLE. This will help people better understand the role of NKT cells in the development of SLE and improve the therapy strategy.

  17. Evolution of nonclassical MHC-dependent invariant T cells

    PubMed Central

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    TCR-mediated specific recognition of antigenic peptides in the context of classical MHC molecules is a cornerstone of adaptive immunity of jawed vertebrate. Ancillary to these interactions, the T cell repertoire also includes unconventional T cells that recognize endogenous and/or exogenous antigens in a classical MHC-unrestricted manner. Among these, the mammalian nonclassical MHC class I-restricted invariant T cell (iT) subsets, such as iNKT and MAIT cells, are now believed to be integral to immune response initiation as well as in orchestrating subsequent adaptive immunity. Until recently the evolutionary origins of these cells were unknown. Here we review our current understanding of a nonclassical MHC class I-restricted iT cell population in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Parallels with the mammalian iNKT and MAIT cells underline the crucial biological roles of these evolutionarily ancient immune subsets. PMID:25117267

  18. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. B cell superstimulatory influenza virus activates peritoneal B cells.

    PubMed

    Rott, O; Charreire, J; Mignon-Godefroy, K; Cash, E

    1995-07-01

    We evaluated the potential of B cell "superstimulatory" influenza viruses to activate peritoneal B cells (PBC) from BALB/c mice containing both CD5+ and CD5- "sister" cells. Like conventional B cells, PBCs responded to influenza viruses in a hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA) subtype-specific manner with proliferation and vigorous Ig synthesis. However, a number of HA subtypes that are highly stimulatory for conventional B cells failed to induce significant responses of PBC. Isotype-determination revealed a high predominance of IgM and only very low production of IgA and IgG. HA-activated CD5+ B cells showed a hyperexpression of various activation markers, including MHC class II, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54), and B7-1 molecules. In contrast to conventional B cells, where activation by HA is antagonized by phorbol esters (PMA), HA and PMA acted synergistically on PBC, suggesting differential activation requirements of B-2 cells vs PBC in response to HA. Like HA stimulation of B-2 cells, virus-triggered proliferation of PBC was abrogated by a simultaneous treatment with F(ab')2 fragments of anti-Ig Ab and exhibited synergistic effects with LPS stimulation. HA-mediated proliferative responses of PBC, but not of B-2 cells, were positively controlled by various cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, and to a lesser extent by IL-6. In conclusion, our data present the first example of a stimulation of peritoneal B cells by a polyclonal-activating virus, findings that call for considering infections with polyclonal B cell-stimulatory viruses as a means of expanding the pool of potentially autoreactive CD5+ B cells.

  20. ROCK Inhibition Activates MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seungwon; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2014-01-01

    Dormant carcinoma cancer cells showing epithelial characteristics can be activated to dissipate into the surrounding tissue or organs through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the molecular details underlying the activation of dormant cancer cells have been less explored. In this study, we examined the molecular pathway to activate dormant breast cancer cells. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition disrupted cell junction, promoted cell proliferation and migration / invasion in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional substrates. The disintegration of cell junction upon ROCK inhibition, coupled with the loss of E-cadherin and b-catenin from the cell membrane, was associated with the activation of Rac1 upon ROCK inhibition. Migration / invasion also increased upon ROCK inhibition. However, the activation of MCF-7 cells upon ROCK inhibition was not associated with the up-regulation of typical EMT markers, such as snail and slug. Based on these results, we suggest the potential risk for dormant cancer cells to dissipate through non-typical EMT when ROCK activity is down-regulated. PMID:24523903

  1. Active contractions in single suspended epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gyger, Markus; Stange, Roland; Kießling, Tobias R; Fritsch, Anatol; Kostelnik, Katja B; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of active contractions in tissue cells to date have been focused on cells that exert forces via adhesion sites to substrates or to other cells. In this study we show that also suspended epithelial cells exhibit contractility, revealing that contractions can occur independently of focal adhesions. We employ the Optical Stretcher to measure adhesion-independent mechanical properties of an epithelial cell line transfected with a heat-sensitive cation channel. During stretching the heat transferred to the ion channel causes a pronounced Ca(2+) influx through the plasma membrane that can be blocked by adequate drugs. This way the contractile forces in suspended cells are shown to be partially triggered by Ca(2+) signaling. A phenomenological mathematical model is presented, incorporating a term accounting for the active stress exerted by the cell, which is both necessary and sufficient to describe the observed increase in strain when the Ca(2+) influx is blocked. The median and the shape of the strain distributions depend on the activity of the cells. Hence, it is unlikely that they can be described by a simple Gaussian or log normal distribution, but depend on specific cellular properties such as active contractions. Our results underline the importance of considering activity when measuring cellular mechanical properties even in the absence of measurable contractions. Thus, the presented method to quantify active contractions of suspended cells offers new perspectives for a better understanding of cellular force generation with possible implications for medical diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Force Dynamics During T Cell Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, David A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    T cell activation is an essential step in the adaptive immune response. The binding of the T cell receptor (TCR) with antigen triggers signaling cascades and cell spreading. Physical forces exerted on the TCR by the cytoskeleton have been shown to induce signaling events. While cellular forces are known to depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton, the biophysical mechanisms underlying force induced activation of TCR-antigen interactions unknown. Here, we use traction force microscopy to measure the force dynamics of activated Jurkat T cells. The movements of beads embedded in an elastic gel serve as a non-invasive reporter of cytoskeletal and molecular motor dynamics. We examined the statistical structure of the force profiles throughout the cell during signaling activation. We found two spatially distinct active regimes of force generation characterized by different time scales. Typically, the interior of the cells was found to be more active than the periphery. Inhibition of myosin motor activity altered the correlation time of the bead displacements indicating additional sources of stochastic force generation. Our results indicate a complex interaction between myosin activity and actin polymerization dynamics in producing cellular forces in immune cells.

  3. Activated gammadelta T cells promote the activation of uveitogenic T cells and exacerbate EAU development.

    PubMed

    Nian, Hong; Shao, Hui; O'Brien, Rebecca L; Born, Willi K; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2011-07-29

    To determine how the activation of γδ T cells affects the generation of uveitogenic αβ T cells and the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). γδ T cells were isolated from B6 mice immunized with the uveitogenic peptide IRBP(1-20) and αβ T cells from immunized TCR-δ(-/-) mice. Resting γδ T cells were prepared by culture of separated γδ T cells in cytokine-free medium for 3 to 5 days, when they showed downregulation of CD69 expression. Activated γδ T cells were prepared by incubating resting γδ T cells with anti-γδ TCR (GL3) for 2 days. Responder αβ T cells were cocultured with immunizing antigen and antigen-presenting cells. The numbers of antigen-specific T cells expressing IL-17 or IFN-γ were determined by intracellular staining followed by FACS analysis after stimulation, with or without the addition of purified γδ T cells. The cytokines in the culture medium were measured by ELISA. Highly enriched γδ T cells exert widely different effects on autoreactive αβ T cells in EAU, depending on the activation status of the γδ T cells. Whereas nonactivated γδ T cells had little effect on the activation of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein-specific αβ T cells in vitro and in vivo, activated γδ T cells promoted the generation of uveitogenic T cells and exacerbated the development of EAU. The functional ability of γδ T cells is greatly influenced by their activation status. Activated γδ T cells exacerbate EAU through increased activation of uveitogenic T cells.

  4. Role of interleukin (IL)-17 and T-helper (Th)17 cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Yang, Jian Ming

    2017-11-04

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17), a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine, is reported to be significantly generated by a distinct subset of CD4 + T-cells, upgrading cancer-elicited inflammation and preventing cancer cells from immune surveillance. T-helper (Th)17 cells produced from naive CD4 + T cells have recently been renowned and generally accepted, gaining eminence in cancer studies and playing the effective role in context of cancer. Th17 cells are the main source of IL-17-secreting cells, It was found that other cell types produced this cytokine as well, including Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), δγT cells, invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, lymphoid-tissue inducer (LTi)-like cells and Natural killer (NK) cells. Th17-associated cytokines give impetus to tumor progression, or inducing angiogenesis and metastasis. This review demonstrates an understanding on how the pro- or antitumor function of Th17 cells and IL-17 may change cancer progression, leading to the appearance of complex and pivotal biologic activities in tumor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Function and expression of CD1d and invariant natural killer T-cell receptor in the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus).

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Alina Suzann; Paletta, Daniel; Starick, Lisa; Schumann, Richard F; Niewiesk, Stefan; Herrmann, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) belongs to the rodent family of Cricetidae and provides a powerful model to study the pathogenesis of human respiratory viruses and measles virus. Recent studies in other rodent models have suggested a role for invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in antiviral immunity and vaccination against respiratory virus infections. Using new experimental tools, we provide the first evidence for a functional CD1d cell molecule (crCD1d) and iNKT T-cell receptor in cotton rats. The crCD1d cDNA sequence was identified and crCD1d transductants showed that monoclonal antibody WTH-2 stains crCD1d as efficiently as mouse or rat CD1d. The expression of crCD1d was clearly weaker for thymocytes and B cells, and higher for T cells, which is different to what is found in murine species. The antigen-presenting capacity of crCD1d was demonstrated with crCD1d-immunoglobulin dimers loaded with the glycolipid PBS57, which bound iNKT T-cell receptors. Evidence for functional cotton rat iNKT cells was provided by detection of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 in cultures of splenocytes stimulated with PBS57 and α-galactosylceramide and by specific staining of about 0·2% of splenocytes with PBS57-loaded crCD1d dimers. Canonical AV14/AJ18 rearrangements were identified and found to contain multiple members of the AV14 (AV11) family. One of them was expressed and found to bind CD1d dimers. In summary, these data provide the first evidence for functional CD1d molecules and iNKT T-cell receptors in cotton rats and provide the tools to analyse them both in the cotton rat model of infectious diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Activation of glioma cells generates immune tolerant NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo; Wu, Wei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Yang; Ren, Gang; Fan, Wenhai

    2014-12-12

    Therapeutic outcomes of glioma are currently not encouraging. Tumor tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of glioma. It is reported that micro RNAs (miR) are associated with tumor development. This study aims to investigate the role of miR-92a in the development of tolerant natural killer T (NKT) cells. In this study, U87 cells (a human glioma cell line) and primary glioma cells were prepared. The assessment of miR-92a was performed by real time RT-PCR. The expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 in NKT cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results showed that abundant IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells were detected in glioma tissue. Cultures of glioma cells and NKT cells induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-10 in NKT cells. Glioma cells expressed miR-92a; the latter played a critical role in the induction of IL-6 and IL-10 expression in NKT cells. The expression of the antitumor molecules, including perforin, Fas ligand, and interferon-γ, was significantly attenuated compared with control NKT cells. The IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells showed less capability in the induction of apoptosis in glioma cells, but showed the immune suppressor functions on CD8(+) T cell activities. We conclude that glioma-derived miR-92a induces IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells; this fraction of NKT cells can suppress cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. T cell activation requires force generation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering of the T cell receptor (TCR) integrates both binding kinetics and mechanical forces. To understand the contribution of the T cell cytoskeleton to these forces, we triggered T cells using a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented antigenic stimulation using the AFM cantilever while simultaneously imaging with optical microscopy and measuring forces on the cantilever. T cells respond forcefully to antigen after calcium flux. All forces and calcium responses were abrogated upon treatment with an F-actin inhibitor. When we emulated the forces of the T cell using the AFM cantilever, even these actin-inhibited T cells became activated. Purely mechanical stimulation was not sufficient; the exogenous forces had to couple through the TCR. These studies suggest a mechanical–chemical feedback loop in which TCR-triggered T cells generate forceful contacts with antigen-presenting cells to improve access to antigen. PMID:27241914

  8. Illuminating the Cell's Biochemical Activity Architecture.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2017-10-03

    All cellular behaviors arise through the coordinated actions of numerous intracellular biochemical pathways. Over the past 20 years, efforts to probe intracellular biochemical processes have undergone a fundamental transformation brought about by advances in fluorescence imaging, such as the development of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters and new imaging technologies; the impact of these approaches on our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of biological function cannot be understated. In particular, the ability to obtain information on the spatiotemporal regulation of biochemical processes unfolding in real time in the native context of a living cell has crystallized the view, long a matter of speculation, that cells achieve specific biological outcomes through the imposition of spatial control over the distribution of various biomolecules, and their associated biochemical activities, within the cellular environment. Indeed, the compartmentalization of biochemical activities by cells is now known to be pervasive and to span a multitude of spatial scales, from the length of a cell to just a few enzymes. In this Perspective, part of this special issue on "Seeing into cells", we highlight several recent imaging studies that provide detailed insights into not just where molecules are but where molecules are active within cells, offering a glimpse into the emerging view of biochemical activity architecture as a complement to the physical architecture of a cell.

  9. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Porta, Caterina; Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stephane; Alava, Mikko; Zapperi, Stefano

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems.

  10. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipids induce hepatic NKT cells deficiency through activation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tongfang; Sui, Yongheng; Lian, Min; Li, Zhiping; Hua, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Dietary lipids play an important role in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) through alternation of liver innate immune response. The present study was to investigate the effect of lipid on Kupffer cells phenotype and function in vivo and in vitro. And further to investigate the impact of lipid on ability of Kupffer cell lipid antigen presentation to activate NKT cells. Wild type male C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal or high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis, Kupffer cell abundance, NKT cell number and cytokine gene expression were evaluated. Antigen presentation assay was performed with Kupffer cells treated with certain fatty acids in vitro and co-cultured with NKT cells. High-fat diet induced hepatosteatosis, significantly increased Kupffer cells and decreased hepatic NKT cells. Lipid treatment in vivo or in vitro induced increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines gene expression and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells expressed high levels of CD1d on cell surface and only presented exogenous lipid antigen to activate NKT cells. Ability of Kupffer cells to present antigen and activate NKT cells was enhanced after lipid treatment. In addition, pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipid treatment induced hepatic NKT cells activation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. High-fat diet increase Kupffer cells number and induce their pro-inflammatory status. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupfffer cells by lipid promote hepatic NKT cell over-activation and cell death, which lead to further hepatic NKT cell deficiency in the development of NAFLD.

  11. Mast Cell Activation Disease and Microbiotic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Khoruts, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the diagnostically challenging presentation of mast cell activation disease (MCAD) and current thoughts regarding interactions between microbiota and MCs. A search for all studies on interactions between mast cells, mast cell activation disease, and microbiota published on pubmed.gov and scholar.google.com between 1960 and 2015 was conducted using the search terms mast cell, mastocyte, mastocytosis, mast cell activation, mast cell activation disease, mast cell activation syndrome, microbiome, microbiota. A manual review of the references from identified studies was also conducted. Studies were excluded if they were not accessible electronically or by interlibrary loan. Research increasingly is revealing essential involvement of MCs in normal human biology and in human disease. Via many methods, normal MCs-present sparsely in every tissue-sense their environment and reactively exert influences that, directly and indirectly, locally and remotely, improve health. The dysfunctional MCs of the "iceberg" of MCAD, on the other hand, sense abnormally, react abnormally, activate constitutively, and sometimes (in mastocytosis, the "tip" of the MCAD iceberg) even proliferate neoplastically. MCAD causes chronic multisystem illness generally, but not necessarily, of an inflammatory ± allergic theme and with great variability in behavior among patients and within any patient over time. Furthermore, the range of signals to which MCs respond and react include signals from the body's microbiota, and regardless of whether an MCAD patient has clonal mastocytosis or the bulk of the iceberg now known as MC activation syndrome (also suspected to be clonal but without significant MC proliferation), dysfunctional MCs interact as dysfunctionally with those microbiota as they interact with other human tissues, potentially leading to many adverse consequences. Interactions between microbiota and MCs are complex at baseline. The potential for both pathology and benefit

  12. NKT-cell subsets: promoters and protectors in inflammatory liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vipin

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) are innate-like cells which are abundant in liver sinusoids and express the cell surface receptors of NK cells (e.g., NK1.1 (mouse) or CD161+/CD56+(human)) as well as an antigen receptor (TCR) characteristic of conventional T cells. NKT cells recognize lipid antigens in the context of CD1d, a non-polymorphic MHC class I-like molecule. Activation of NKT cells has a profound influence on the immune response against tumors and infectious organisms and in autoimmune diseases. NKT cells can be categorized into at least two distinct subsets: iNKT or type I use a semi-invariant TCR, whereas type II NKT TCRs are more diverse. Recent evidence suggests that NKT-cell subsets can play opposing roles early in non-microbial liver inflammation in that type I NKT are proinflammatory whereas type II NKT cells inhibit type I NKT-mediated liver injury. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pravin J; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells and exhibit two main characteristics that define stem cells: self-renewal and differentiation. MSCs can migrate to sites of injury, inflammation, and tumor. Moreover, MSCs undergo myofibroblast like differentiation, including increased production of α-SMA in response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a growth factor commonly secreted by tumor cells to evade immune surveillance. Based on our previous finding hMSCs become activated and resemble carcinoma-associated myofibroblasts upon prolonged exposure to conditioned medium from MDAMB231 human breast cancer cells. Here, we show that keratinocyte conditioned medium (KCM) induces differentiation of MSCs to resemble dermal myofibroblast like cells using immunofluorescence techniques demonstrating punctate vinculin staining, and F-actin filaments.

  14. Lactate dehydrogenase activity drives hair follicle stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Flores, Aimee; Schell, John; Krall, Abigail S; Jelinek, David; Miranda, Matilde; Grigorian, Melina; Braas, Daniel; White, Andrew C; Zhou, Jessica L; Graham, Nicholas A; Graeber, Thomas; Seth, Pankaj; Evseenko, Denis; Coller, Hilary A; Rutter, Jared; Christofk, Heather R; Lowry, William E

    2017-09-01

    Although normally dormant, hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) quickly become activated to divide during a new hair cycle. The quiescence of HFSCs is known to be regulated by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Here we provide several lines of evidence to demonstrate that HFSCs utilize glycolytic metabolism and produce significantly more lactate than other cells in the epidermis. Furthermore, lactate generation appears to be critical for the activation of HFSCs as deletion of lactate dehydrogenase (Ldha) prevented their activation. Conversely, genetically promoting lactate production in HFSCs through mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1) deletion accelerated their activation and the hair cycle. Finally, we identify small molecules that increase lactate production by stimulating Myc levels or inhibiting Mpc1 carrier activity and can topically induce the hair cycle. These data suggest that HFSCs maintain a metabolic state that allows them to remain dormant and yet quickly respond to appropriate proliferative stimuli.

  15. Lactate dehydrogenase activity drives hair follicle stem cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Aimee, Flores; John, Schell; Abby, Krall; David, Jelinek; Matilde, Miranda; Melina, Grigorian; Daniel, Braas; White Andrew, C; Jessica, Zhou; Nick, Graham; Thomas, Graeber; Pankaj, Seth; Denis, Evseenko; Hilary, Coller; Jared, Rutter; Heather, Christofk; Lowry William, E

    2017-01-01

    Summary While normally dormant, Hair Follicle Stem Cells (HFSCs) quickly become activated to divide during a new hair cycle. The quiescence of HFSCs is known to be regulated by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Here we provide several lines of evidence to demonstrate that HFSCs utilize glycolytic metabolism and produce significantly more lactate than other cells in the epidermis. Furthermore, lactate generation appears to be critical for the activation of HFSCs as deletion of lactate dehydrogenase (Ldha) prevented their activation. Conversely, genetically promoting lactate production in HFSCs through mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (Mpc1) deletion accelerated their activation and the hair cycle. Finally, we identify small molecules that increase lactate production by stimulating Myc levels or inhibiting Mpc1 carrier activity and can topically induce the hair cycle. These data suggest that HFSCs maintain a metabolic state that allow them to remain dormant and yet quickly respond to appropriate proliferative stimuli. PMID:28812580

  16. Contractile activity of human follicular dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Fernández, Raquel; Prados, Alejandro; Tirado-González, Irene; Martín, Francisco; Abadía, Ana C; Olivares, Enrique G

    2014-11-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) present antigens to B cells in the lymphoid follicle and inhibit B-cell apoptosis. In previous work, we obtained human FDC lines that allowed us to study the antigen phenotype and functions of these cells, finding that they expressed α-smooth muscle (SM) actin (a protein involved in cell contraction) and were able to contract collagen gel matrixes in gel contraction assays. Actin polymerization associated with cell contractility is essential for many cellular functions. We report here that interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ increased FDC contractility, and IL-10 reduced contractility, whereas IL-4 had no effect. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin (LT)-α1β2, cytokines involved in FDC differentiation, also increased FDC contractility. In different cell systems, cell contraction is related with the incorporation of α-SM actin into stress fibers. By confocal microscopy, we showed that cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, inhibited α-SM actin incorporation and relaxed FDCs. Likewise, IL-10 significantly decreased the proportion of FDCs with α-SM actin-positive stress fibers, whereas cytokines that increased FDC contractility also increased this proportion. However, none of the cytokines tested significantly affected α-SM actin expression as determined by flow cytometry. IL-10, in addition to decreasing FDC contractility, increased the inhibitory activity of FDC in spontaneous B-cell apoptosis (P<0.05), but the other cytokines did not affect this activity. We conclude that cytokines related with FDC physiology regulate the contractility of these cells, and IL-10 also regulates the effect of FDC on B-cell apoptosis.

  17. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  18. Immune Reconstitution After Antithymocyte Globulin-Conditioned Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Mark; Dhadda, Manveer; Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Liu, Yiping; Hagel, Laura M; Podgorny, Peter; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Khan, Faisal M.; Luider, Joanne; Auer-Grzesiak, Iwona; Mansoor, Adnan; Russell, James A; Daly, Andrew; Stewart, Douglas A.; Maloney, David; Boeckh, Michael; Storek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) has been increasingly used to prevent graft-vs-host disease (GVHD), however, its impact on immune reconstitution is relatively unknown. Here we studied (1) immune reconstitution after ATG-conditioned hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), (2) determined factors influencing the reconstitution, and (3) compared it to non-ATG-conditioned HCT. Methods Immune cell subset counts were determined at 1–24 months posttransplant in 125 HCT recipients who received ATG during conditioning. The subset counts were also determined in 46 non-ATG-conditioned patients (similarly treated). Results (1) Reconstitution after ATG-conditioned HCT was fast for innate immune cells, intermediate for B cells and CD8 T cells, and very slow for CD4 T cells and invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. (2) Faster reconstitution after ATG-conditioned HCT was associated with higher number of cells of the same subset transferred with the graft in case of memory B cells, naïve CD4 T cells, naïve CD8 T cells, iNKT cells and myeloid dendritic cells; lower recipient age in case of naïve CD4 T cells and naïve CD8 T cells; cytomegalovirus recipient seropositivity in case of memory/effector T cells; absence of GVHD in case of naïve B cells; lower ATG serum levels in case of most T cell subsets including iNKT cells, and higher ATG levels in case of NK cells and B cells. (3) Compared to non-ATG-conditioned HCT, reconstitution after ATG-conditioned HCT was slower for CD4 T cells, and faster for NK cells and B cells. Conclusions ATG worsens reconstitution of CD4 T cells but improves reconstitution of NK and B cells. PMID:22985195

  19. CD8(+)NKT-like cells regulate the immune response by killing antigen-bearing DCs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Xi; Li, Zhengyuan; Chai, Yijie; Jiang, Yunfeng; Wang, Qian; Ji, Yewei; Zhu, Zhongli; Wan, Ying; Yuan, Zhenglong; Chang, Zhijie; Zhang, Minghui

    2015-09-15

    CD1d-dependent NKT cells have been extensively studied; however, the function of CD8(+)NKT-like cells, which are CD1d-independent T cells with NK markers, remains unknown. Here, we report that CD1d-independent CD8(+)NKT-like cells, which express both T cell markers (TCRβ and CD3) and NK cell receptors (NK1.1, CD49b and NKG2D), are activated and significantly expanded in mice immunized with GFP-expressing dendritic cells. Distinct from CD1d-dependent NKT cells, CD8(+)NKT-like cells possess a diverse repertoire of TCRs and secrete high levels of IFN-gamma but not IL-4. CD8(+)NKT-like cell development is normal in CD1d(-/-) mice, which suggests that CD8(+)NKT-like cells undergo a unique development pathway that differs from iNKT cells. Further functional analyses show that CD8(+)NKT-like cells suppress T-cell responses through elimination of dendritic cells in an antigen-specific manner. Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8(+)NKT-like cells into RIP-OVA mice prevented subsequent development of diabetes in the animals induced by activated OT-I CD8 T cells. Our study suggests that CD8(+)NKT-like cells can function as antigen-specific suppressive cells to regulate the immune response through killing antigen-bearing DCs. Antigen-specific down regulation may provide an active and precise method for constraining an excessive immune response and avoiding bypass suppression of necessary immune responses to other antigens.

  20. CD8+NKT-like cells regulate the immune response by killing antigen-bearing DCs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Xi; Li, Zhengyuan; Chai, Yijie; Jiang, Yunfeng; Wang, Qian; Ji, Yewei; Zhu, Zhongli; Wan, Ying; Yuan, Zhenglong; Chang, Zhijie; Zhang, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    CD1d-dependent NKT cells have been extensively studied; however, the function of CD8+NKT-like cells, which are CD1d-independent T cells with NK markers, remains unknown. Here, we report that CD1d-independent CD8+NKT-like cells, which express both T cell markers (TCRβ and CD3) and NK cell receptors (NK1.1, CD49b and NKG2D), are activated and significantly expanded in mice immunized with GFP-expressing dendritic cells. Distinct from CD1d-dependent NKT cells, CD8+NKT-like cells possess a diverse repertoire of TCRs and secrete high levels of IFN-gamma but not IL-4. CD8+NKT-like cell development is normal in CD1d−/− mice, which suggests that CD8+NKT-like cells undergo a unique development pathway that differs from iNKT cells. Further functional analyses show that CD8+NKT-like cells suppress T-cell responses through elimination of dendritic cells in an antigen-specific manner. Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+NKT-like cells into RIP-OVA mice prevented subsequent development of diabetes in the animals induced by activated OT-I CD8 T cells. Our study suggests that CD8+NKT-like cells can function as antigen-specific suppressive cells to regulate the immune response through killing antigen-bearing DCs. Antigen-specific down regulation may provide an active and precise method for constraining an excessive immune response and avoiding bypass suppression of necessary immune responses to other antigens. PMID:26369936

  1. Adenosinetriphosphatase Activity in the Cell Membranes of Kidney Tubule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spater, Herman W.; Novikoff, Alex B.; Masek, Bertha

    1958-01-01

    This cytochemical study demonstrates high levels of apparent ATPase activity in the infolded cell membranes of the proximal tubules (dog, rat, human, mouse, monkey, and opossum) and ascending loops of Henle (dog, rat, human and, to a variable degree, mouse). Electron microscopy has shown (see Rhodin (1)) that these membranes separate adjacent cells where they interlock with one another by multiple cytoplasmic lamellae containing oriented mitochondria. The significance of the high ATPase activity is considered in relation to possible movements of the membranes and to "active transport" believed to occur there. In the rat, enzyme activity in the proximal tubule membranes does not survive formol-calcium fixation, and it is therefore necessary to use unfixed sections for its demonstration. However, in edematous rats with experimental nephrosis (induced by the injection of aminonucleoside or with antikidney serum) marked ATPase activity is exhibited in these membranes even after formol-calcium fixation. When proximal tubule or Henle loop cells of the dog acquire an altered metabolism, as indicated by accumulated lipide spheres or by "droplets," the infolded ATPase-rich membranes are no longer demonstrable. PMID:13610942

  2. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  3. Selforganization of modular activity of grid cells

    PubMed Central

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Si, Bailu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A unique topographical representation of space is found in the concerted activity of grid cells in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex. Many among the principal cells in this region exhibit a hexagonal firing pattern, in which each cell expresses its own set of place fields (spatial phases) at the vertices of a triangular grid, the spacing and orientation of which are typically shared with neighboring cells. Grid spacing, in particular, has been found to increase along the dorso‐ventral axis of the entorhinal cortex but in discrete steps, that is, with a modular structure. In this study, we show that such a modular activity may result from the self‐organization of interacting units, which individually would not show discrete but rather continuously varying grid spacing. Within our “adaptation” network model, the effect of a continuously varying time constant, which determines grid spacing in the isolated cell model, is modulated by recurrent collateral connections, which tend to produce a few subnetworks, akin to magnetic domains, each with its own grid spacing. In agreement with experimental evidence, the modular structure is tightly defined by grid spacing, but also involves grid orientation and distortion, due to interactions across modules. Thus, our study sheds light onto a possible mechanism, other than simply assuming separate networks a priori, underlying the formation of modular grid representations. PMID:28768062

  4. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Na, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Min-Sung; Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell-T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity.

  5. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  6. Sertoli Cells Maintain Leydig Cell Number and Peritubular Myoid Cell Activity in the Adult Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana; Milne, Laura; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Jeffrey, Nathan; Guillou, Florian; Freeman, Tom C.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR) specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health. PMID:25144714

  7. A subset of AID-dependent B-1a cells initiates hypersensitivity and pneumococcal pneumonia resistance.

    PubMed

    Askenase, Phillip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Paliwal, Vipin; Redegeld, Frank; Groot Kormelink, Thomas; Kerfoot, Steven; Hutchinson, Andrew T; van Loveren, Henk; Campos, Regis; Itakura, Atsuko; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Yamamoto, Natsuo; Nazimek, Katarzyn; Szczepanik, Marian; Ptak, Wold

    2015-12-01

    We propose that there is a special B-1a B cell subset ("sB-1a" cells) that mediates linked processes very early after immunization to initiate cutaneous contact sensitivity (CS), delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), and immune resistance to pneumococcal pneumonia. Our published data indicate that in CS and DTH, these initiating processes are required for elicitation of the delayed onset and late-occurring classical T cell-mediated responses. sB-1a cells resemble memory B2 cells, as they are stimulated within 1 h of immunization and depend on T helper cytokines-uniquely IL-4 from hepatic iNKT cells--for activation and rapid migration from the peritoneal cavity to the spleen to secrete IgM antibody (Ab) and Ab-derived free light chains (FLCs) by only 1 day after immunization. Unlike conventional B-1a (cB-1a) cell-produced IgM natural Ab, IgM Ab produced by sB-1a cells has high Ag affinity owing to immunoglobulin V-region mutations induced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). The dominant cB-1a cells are increased in immunized AID-deficient mice but do not mediate initiation, CS, or pneumonia resistance because natural Ab has relatively low Ag affinity because of unmutated germ-line V regions. In CS and DTH, sB-1a IgM Ag affinity is sufficiently high to mediate complement activation for generation of C5a that, together with vasoactive mediators such as TNF-α released by FLC-sensitized mast cells, activate local endothelium for extravascular recruitment of effector T cells. We conclude by discussing the possibility of functional sB-1 cells in humans. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Killing Breast Cancer Cells Through Activation of the Apoptosome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    mitochodria. Once released, cytochrome known as Apaf-1, which oligomerizes and activates caspase cancer cells have apoptosomes which are hypersensitive to...develop cytoplasmic variants of cytochrome c and/or small to activate the apoptosome in breast cancer cells .

  9. Bursts of active transport in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-15

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  10. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  11. Characterization of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Self, Sally; Menk, Jeremiah; Lazarchick, John

    2017-03-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), a recently recognized nonneoplastic mast cell disease driving chronic multisystem inflammation and allergy, appears prevalent and thus important. We report the first systematic characterization of a large MCAS population. Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, family histories, physical examination and laboratory findings were reviewed in 298 retrospective and 115 prospective patients with MCAS. Blood samples from prospective subjects were examined by flow cytometry for clonal mast cell disease and tested for cytokines potentially driving the monocytosis frequent in MCAS. Demographically, white females dominated. Median ages at symptom onset and diagnosis were 9 and 49 years, respectively (range: 0-88 and 16-92, respectively) and median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 30 years (range: 1-85). Median numbers of comorbidities, symptoms, and family medical issues were 11, 20, and 4, respectively (range: 1-66, 2-84, and 0-33, respectively). Gastroesophageal reflux, fatigue and dermatographism were the most common comorbidity, symptom and examination finding. Abnormalities in routine laboratories were common and diverse but typically modest. The most useful diagnostic markers were heparin, prostaglandin D 2 , histamine and chromogranin A. Flow cytometric and cytokine assessments were unhelpful. Our study highlights MCAS׳s morbidity burden and challenging heterogeneity. Recognition is important given good survival and treatment prospects. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exosomes derived from pancreatic cancer cells induce activation and profibrogenic activities in pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Masamune, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamada, Shin; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Nabeshima, Tatsuhide; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) interact with pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), which play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrogenesis, to develop the cancer-conditioned tumor microenvironment. Exosomes are membrane-enclosed nanovesicles, and have been increasingly recognized as important mediators of cell-to-cell communications. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of PCC-derived exosomes on cell functions in PSCs. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned medium of Panc-1 and SUIT-2 PCCs. Human primary PSCs were treated with PCC-derived exosomes. PCC-derived exosomes stimulated the proliferation, migration, activation of ERK and Akt, the mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) and fibrosis-related genes, and procollagen type I C-peptide production in PSCs. Ingenuity pathway analysis of the microarray data identified transforming growth factor β1 and tumor necrosis factor as top upstream regulators. PCCs increased the expression of miR-1246 and miR-1290, abundantly contained in PCC-derived exosomes, in PSCs. Overexpression of miR-1290 induced the expression of ACTA2 and fibrosis-related genes in PSCs. In conclusion, PCC-derived exosomes stimulate activation and profibrogenic activities in PSCs. Exosome-mediated interactions between PSCs and PCCs might play a role in the development of the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Unique Interplay between Sugar and Lipid in Determining the Antigenic Potency of Bacterial Antigens for NKT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yali; Tarumoto, Norihito; Pei, Bo; Wang, Jing; Illarionov, Petr; Kinjo, Yuki; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2011-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are an evolutionary conserved T cell population characterized by features of both the innate and adaptive immune response. Studies have shown that iNKT cells are required for protective responses to Gram-positive pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, and that these cells recognize bacterial diacylglycerol antigens presented by CD1d, a non-classical antigen-presenting molecule. The combination of a lipid backbone containing an unusual fatty acid, vaccenic acid, as well as a glucose sugar that is weaker or not stimulatory when linked to other lipids, is required for iNKT cell stimulation by these antigens. Here we have carried out structural and biophysical studies that illuminate the reasons for the stringent requirement for this unique combination. The data indicate that vaccenic acid bound to the CD1d groove orients the protruding glucose sugar for TCR recognition, and it allows for an additional hydrogen bond of the glucose with CD1d when in complex with the TCR. Furthermore, TCR binding causes an induced fit in both the sugar and CD1d, and we have identified the CD1d amino acids important for iNKT TCR recognition and the stability of the ternary complex. The studies show also how hydrogen bonds formed by the glucose sugar can account for the distinct binding kinetics of the TCR for this CD1d-glycolipid complex. Therefore, our studies illuminate the mechanism of glycolipid recognition for antigens from important pathogens. PMID:22069376

  14. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  15. Saposins modulate human invariant Natural Killer T cells self-reactivity and facilitate lipid exchange with CD1d molecules during antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Ghadbane, Hemza; Dushek, Omer; Shepherd, Dawn; Cypen, Jeremy; Gileadi, Uzi; Aichinger, Michael C.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Qi, Xiaoyang; van der Merwe, P. Anton; Wojno, Justyna; Veerapen, Natacha; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Yuan, Weiming; Cresswell, Peter; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins, such as molecules of the saposin family, facilitate extraction of lipids from biological membranes for their loading onto CD1d molecules. Although it has been shown that prosaposin-deficient mice fail to positively select invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, it remains unclear whether saposins can facilitate loading of endogenous iNKT cell agonists in the periphery during inflammatory responses. In addition, it is unclear whether saposins, in addition to loading, also promote dissociation of lipids bound to CD1d molecules. To address these questions, we used a combination of cellular assays and demonstrated that saposins influence CD1d-restricted presentation to human iNKT cells not only of exogenous lipids but also of endogenous ligands, such as the self-glycosphingolipid β-glucopyranosylceramide, up-regulated by antigen-presenting cells following bacterial infection. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in human myeloid cells CD1d-loading of endogenous lipids after bacterial infection, but not at steady state, requires trafficking of CD1d molecules through an endo-lysosomal compartment. Finally, using BIAcore assays we demonstrated that lipid-loaded saposin B increases the off-rate of lipids bound to CD1d molecules, providing important insights into the mechanisms by which it acts as a “lipid editor,” capable of fine-tuning loading and unloading of CD1d molecules. These results have important implications in understanding how to optimize lipid-loading onto antigen-presenting cells, to better harness iNKT cells central role at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:24248359

  16. Phagocytic cell function in active brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ocon, P; Reguera, J M; Morata, P; Juarez, C; Alonso, A; Colmenero, J D

    1994-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed phagocytic cell function in 51 patients with active brucellosis and its relationship with different clinical, serological, and evolutionary variables. A control group was made up of 30 blood donors of similar geographic extraction, age, and sex, with no previous history of brucellosis or known exposure ot the infection or specific antibodies. The investigations were carried out at the time of diagnosis, at the conclusion of treatment, and after 6 months of follow-up. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction in response to Brucella antigen were significantly increased in the patients at the time of diagnosis with respect to the control group. In contrast, chemotaxis in response to Brucella antigen and phagocytosis were significantly reduced in the patients with respect to the control group. The alterations in phagocytic cell function were greater in patients with bacteremia, with focal forms of the disease, or with a longer diagnostic delay. Most of these initial alterations tended to normalize with treatment, indicating their transient character. PMID:8112863

  17. Signaling for synergistic activation of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Hun Sik

    2012-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in early surveillance against virus infection and cellular transformation, and are also implicated in the control of inflammatory response through their effector functions of direct lysis of target cells and cytokine secretion. NK cell activation toward target cell is determined by the net balance of signals transmitted from diverse activating and inhibitory receptors. A distinct feature of NK cell activation is that stimulation of resting NK cells with single activating receptor on its own cannot mount natural cytotoxicity. Instead, specific pairs of co-activation receptors are required to unleash NK cell activation via synergy-dependent mechanism. Because each co-activation receptor uses distinct signaling modules, NK cell synergy relies on the integration of such disparate signals. This explains why the study of the mechanism underlying NK cell synergy is important and necessary. Recent studies revealed that NK cell synergy depends on the integration of complementary signals converged at a critical checkpoint element but not on simple amplification of the individual signaling to overcome intrinsic activation threshold. This review focuses on the signaling events during NK cells activation and recent advances in the study of NK cell synergy.

  18. Lifestyles and mental health status are associated with natural killer cell and lymphokine-activated killer cell activities.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K; Takeshita, T; Inoue-Sakurai, C; Maruyama, S

    2001-04-10

    We investigated the association of lifestyle and mental health status with natural killer (NK) cell and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activities in healthy males. NK cell activity was determined in 105 male workers and LAK cell activity was determined in 54 male workers. Peripheral blood was obtained from each subject and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood. These PBMC were used as effector cells. LAK cells were generated by incubation of PBMC with interleukin-2 for 72 h. NK cell activity against NK-sensitive K562 cells and LAK cell activity against NK-resistant Raji cells were examined by 51Cr release assay. Overall lifestyles were evaluated according to the answers on a questionnaire regarding eight health practices (cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, eating breakfast, hours of sleep, hours of work, physical exercise, nutritional balance, mental stress). Subjects with a good overall lifestyle showed significantly higher NK cell (P < 0.05) and LAK cell (P < 0.05) activities than those with a poor overall lifestyles. Among eight lifestyle factors, cigarette smoking has relatively strong effects on NK cell and LAK cell activities. Subjects who complained of unstable mental status had significantly lower NK cell activity than those who reported stable mental status. When subjects were divided into four groups by lifestyle and mental health status, subjects who had poor or moderate lifestyle and reported unstable mental status showed the lowest NK cell activity and subjects who had good lifestyle and reported stable mental status showed the highest NK cell activity among four groups.

  19. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  20. Active cochlear amplification is dependent on supporting cell gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Chen, Jin; Zong, Liang; Chen, Guang-Di; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian hearing relies upon active cochlear mechanics, which arises from outer hair cell electromotility and hair bundle movement, to amplify acoustic stimulations increasing hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Here we describe the novel finding that gap junctions between cochlear supporting cells also have a critical role in active cochlear amplification in vivo. We find that targeted-deletion of connexin 26 in Deiters cells and outer pillar cells, which constrain outer hair cells standing on the basilar membrane, causes a leftward shift in outer hair cell electromotility towards hyperpolarization, and reduces active cochlear amplification with hearing loss. Coincident with large reduction in distortion product otoacoustic emission and severe hearing loss at high frequencies, the shift is larger in shorter outer hair cells. Our study demonstrates that active cochlear amplification in vivo is dependent on supporting cell gap junctions. These new findings also show that connexin 26 deficiency can reduce active cochlear amplification to induce hearing loss.

  1. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C.; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Barnes, Eleanor; Ball, Jonathan; Burgess, Gary; Cooke, Graham; Dillon, John; Gore, Charles; Foster, Graham; Guha, Neil; Halford, Rachel; Herath, Cham; Holmes, Chris; Howe, Anita; Hudson, Emma; Irving, William; Khakoo, Salim; Koletzki, Diana; Martin, Natasha; Mbisa, Tamyo; McKeating, Jane; McLauchlan, John; Miners, Alec; Murray, Andrea; Shaw, Peter; Simmonds, Peter; Spencer, Chris; Targett-Adams, Paul; Thomson, Emma; Vickerman, Peter; Zitzmann, Nicole; Moore, Michael D.; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Dustin, Lynn B.; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M.; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B.; Screaton, Gavin R.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation—driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation—is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  2. Ecto-ATPase activity of vertebrate blood cells.

    PubMed

    Bencic, D C; Yates, T J; Ingermann, R L

    1997-01-01

    Ecto-ATPase activity was measured for red blood cells, white blood cells, and whole blood from a variety of vertebrates. A large range of red blood cell ecto-ATPase activity was observed; for example, at 10 degrees C, red blood cells from a catastomid fish (Catostomus macrocheilus) and a newt (Taricha rivularis) had activities of 56 +/- 9 and 25,000,000 +/- 14,000,000 pmol ATP per 10(6) red blood cells per hour, respectively (mean +/- SD). Several control experiments verified that the measured ATPase activity was not the result of intracellular ATPases released due to cell damage or lysis nor due to the release of intracellular nucleoside triphosphate or uptake of extracellular ATP. Red blood cell ecto-ATPase activity was relatively low within the teleosts, was high within the reptiles, and had the greatest range and single highest value within the amphibians. Within the endotherms, avian red blood cell ecto-ATPase activities were greater than mammalian red blood cell ecto-ATPase activities, which were the lowest for all vertebrates examined. The lowest ecto-ATPase activities measured were for human and skunk red blood cells, which had activities of 13 +/- 1 and 11 +/- 2 pmol ATP per 10(6) red blood cells per hour, respectively, at 35 degrees C. Ecto-ATPase activity was measured in white blood cells of several vertebrate species and appeared generally high and less variable than red blood cell ecto-ATPase activity. Measured whole blood ecto-ATPase activity showed a range of three orders of magnitude and correlated positively with red blood cell ecto-ATPase activities. Ecto-ATPase activity was also determined for red blood cells from fetal, 1-3 d old neonatal, and pregnant garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans); these activities were not significantly different from the activity of red blood cells from nonpregnant adult females. Overall, the data from the present study demonstrate a wide range of red blood cell and whole blood ecto-ATPase activities among vertebrates

  3. Mucus secretion-stimulating activity in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kulemann-Kloene, H; Krag, S S; Bang, F B

    1982-08-20

    Two fractions isolated from cultured lymphoblastoid cells stimulated mucus secretion from the urn cell complex of the marine invertebrate Sipunculus nudus. The activity detected in the nuclear fraction was trypsin-sensitive, and it increased in response to specific nucleotides.

  4. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  5. Mechanisms for glycolipid antigen-driven cytokine polarization by Vα14i NKT cells1

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Barbara A.; Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Wingender, Gerhard; Wang, Jing; Scott, Iain; Tsuji, Moriya; Franck, Richard W.; Porcelli, Steven; Zajonc, Dirk; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Certain glycolipid antigens (Ags) for Vα14i NKT cells can direct the overall cytokine balance of the immune response. TH2-biasing OCH has a lower TCR avidity than the most potent agonist known, αGalCer. Although the CD1d-exposed portions of OCH and αGalCer are identical, structural analysis indicates that there are subtle CD1d conformational differences due to differences in the buried lipid portion of these two Ags, likely accounting for the difference in antigenic potency. TH1 biasing C-glycoside/CD1d has even weaker TCR interactions than OCH/CD1d. Despite this, C-glycoside caused a greater downstream activation of NK cells to produce IFNγ, accounting for its promotion of TH1 responses. We found that this difference correlated with the finding that C-glycoside/CD1d complexes survive much longer in vivo. Therefore, we suggest that the pharmacokinetic properties of glycolipids are a major determinant of cytokine skewing, suggesting a pathway for designing therapeutic glycolipids for modulating iNKT cell responses. PMID:19949076

  6. Control of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by T Cells Responding to Activated T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Ansgar W.; Mor, Felix; Karin, Nathan; Cohen, Irun R.

    1989-05-01

    T cell vaccination against experimental autoimmune disease is herein shown to be mediated in part by anti-ergotypic T cells, T cells that recognize and respond to the state of activation of other T cells. The anti-ergotypic response thus combines with the previously shown anti-idiotypic T cell response to regulate autoimmunity.

  7. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states.

  8. Cytoskeletal forces during signaling activation in Jurkat T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Hui, King Lam; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    T-cells are critical for the adaptive immune response in the body. The binding of the T-cell receptor (TCR) with antigen on the surface of antigen-presenting cells leads to cell spreading and signaling activation. The underlying mechanism of signaling activation is not completely understood. Although cytoskeletal forces have been implicated in this process, the contribution of different cytoskeletal components and their spatial organization are unknown. Here we use traction force microscopy to measure the forces exerted by Jurkat T-cells during TCR activation. Perturbation experiments reveal that these forces are largely due to actin assembly and dynamics, with myosin contractility contributing to the development of force but not its maintenance. We find that Jurkat T-cells are mechanosensitive, with cytoskeletal forces and signaling dynamics both sensitive to the stiffness of the substrate. Our results delineate the cytoskeletal contributions to interfacial forces exerted by T-cells during activation. PMID:25518938

  9. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc‑1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and transforming growth factor‑β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co‑cultured adhesive potential of Panc‑1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc‑1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc‑1 cells. The expression of TNF‑α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc

  10. Propagating Wave of ERK Activation Orients Collective Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kazuhiro; Kondo, Yohei; Naoki, Honda; Hiratsuka, Toru; Itoh, Reina E; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2017-11-06

    The biophysical framework of collective cell migration has been extensively investigated in recent years; however, it remains elusive how chemical inputs from neighboring cells are integrated to coordinate the collective movement. Here, we provide evidence that propagation waves of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase activation determine the direction of the collective cell migration. A wound-healing assay of Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells revealed two distinct types of ERK activation wave, a "tidal wave" from the wound, and a self-organized "spontaneous wave" in regions distant from the wound. In both cases, MDCK cells collectively migrated against the direction of the ERK activation wave. The inhibition of ERK activation propagation suppressed collective cell migration. An ERK activation wave spatiotemporally controlled actomyosin contraction and cell density. Furthermore, an optogenetic ERK activation wave reproduced the collective cell migration. These data provide new mechanistic insight into how cells sense the direction of collective cell migration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity in Pig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moncorgé, Olivier; Long, Jason S.; Cauldwell, Anna V.; Zhou, Hongbo; Lycett, Samantha J.

    2013-01-01

    Reassortant influenza viruses with combinations of avian, human, and/or swine genomic segments have been detected frequently in pigs. As a consequence, pigs have been accused of being a “mixing vessel” for influenza viruses. This implies that pig cells support transcription and replication of avian influenza viruses, in contrast to human cells, in which most avian influenza virus polymerases display limited activity. Although influenza virus polymerase activity has been studied in human and avian cells for many years by use of a minigenome assay, similar investigations in pig cells have not been reported. We developed the first minigenome assay for pig cells and compared the activities of polymerases of avian or human influenza virus origin in pig, human, and avian cells. We also investigated in pig cells the consequences of some known mammalian host range determinants that enhance influenza virus polymerase activity in human cells, such as PB2 mutations E627K, D701N, G590S/Q591R, and T271A. The two typical avian influenza virus polymerases used in this study were poorly active in pig cells, similar to what is seen in human cells, and mutations that adapt the avian influenza virus polymerase for human cells also increased activity in pig cells. In contrast, a different pattern was observed in avian cells. Finally, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 polymerase activity was tested because this subtype has been reported to replicate only poorly in pigs. H5N1 polymerase was active in swine cells, suggesting that other barriers restrict these viruses from becoming endemic in pigs. PMID:23077313

  12. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  13. Antiviral Regulation in Porcine Monocytic Cells at Different Activation States

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytic cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, exist in different activation states that are critical to the regulation of antimicrobial immunity. Many pandemic viruses are monocytotropic, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which directly infects subsets of monocytic cells and interferes with antiviral responses. To study antiviral responses in PRRSV-infected monocytic cells, we characterized inflammatory cytokine responses and genome-wide profiled signature genes to investigate response pathways in uninfected and PRRSV-infected monocytic cells at different activation states. Our findings showed suppressed interferon (IFN) production in macrophages in non-antiviral states and an arrest of lipid metabolic pathways in macrophages at antiviral states. Importantly, porcine monocytic cells at different activation states were susceptible to PRRSV and responded differently to viral infection. Based on Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, two approaches were used to potentiate antiviral activity: (i) pharmaceutical modulation of cellular lipid metabolism and (ii) in situ PRRSV replication-competent expression of interferon alpha (IFN-α). Both approaches significantly suppressed exogenous viral infection in monocytic cells. In particular, the engineered IFN-expressing PRRSV strain eliminated exogenous virus infection and sustained cell viability at 4 days postinfection in macrophages. These findings suggest an intricate interaction of viral infection with the activation status of porcine monocytic cells. An understanding and integration of antiviral infection with activation status of monocytic cells may provide a means of potentiating antiviral immunity. IMPORTANCE Activation statuses of monocytic cells, including monocytes, macrophages (Mϕs), and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. Unfortunately, the activation status of porcine monocytic cells or how cell activation status

  14. Targeted disruption of CD1d prevents NKT cell development in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guan; Artiaga, Bianca L.; Hackmann, Timothy J.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Walters, Eric M; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Driver, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in mice genetically lacking natural killer T (NKT) cells show that these lymphocytes make important contributions to both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the usefulness of murine models to study human NKT cells is limited by the many differences between mice and humans, including that their NKT cell frequencies, subsets and distribution are dissimilar. A more suitable model may be swine that share many metabolic, physiological and growth characteristics with humans and are also similar for NKT cells. Thus, we analyzed genetically modified pigs made deficient for CD1d that is required for the development of Type I invariant NKT (iNKT) cells that express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) and Type II NKT cells that use variable TCRs. Peripheral blood analyzed by flow cytometry and interferon-γ (IFNγ) enzyme-linked immuno spot (ELISPOT) assays demonstrated that CD1d-knockout pigs completely lack iNKT cells while other leukocyte populations remain intact. CD1d and NKT cells have been shown to be involved in shaping the composition of the commensal microbiota in mice. Therefore, we also compared the fecal microbiota profile between pigs expressing and lacking NKT cells. However, no differences were found between pigs lacking or expressing CD1d. Our results are the first to show that knocking-out CD1d prevents the development of iNKT cells in a non-rodent species. CD1d-deficient pigs should offer a useful model to more accurately determine the contribution of NKT cells for human immune responses. They also have potential for understanding how NKT cells impact the health of commercial swine. PMID:25930071

  15. Apoptotic cells activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibit epithelial cell growth without change in intracellular energy stores.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vimal A; Massenburg, Donald; Vujicic, Snezana; Feng, Lanfei; Tang, Meiyi; Litbarg, Natalia; Antoni, Angelika; Rauch, Joyce; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Levine, Jerrold S

    2015-09-11

    Apoptosis plays an indispensable role in the maintenance and development of tissues. We have shown that receptor-mediated recognition of apoptotic target cells by viable kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) inhibits the proliferation and survival of PTECs. Here, we examined the effect of apoptotic targets on PTEC cell growth (cell size during G1 phase of the cell cycle). Using a cell culture model, we show that apoptotic cells potently activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a highly sensitive sensor of intracellular energy stores. AMPK activation leads to decreased activity of its downstream target, ribosomal protein p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K), and concomitant inhibition of cell growth. Importantly, these events occur without detectable change in intracellular levels of AMP, ADP, or ATP. Inhibition of AMPK, either pharmacologically by compound C or molecularly by shRNA, diminishes the effects of apoptotic targets and largely restores p70S6K activity and cell size to normal levels. Apoptotic targets also inhibit Akt, a second signaling pathway regulating cell growth. Expression of a constitutively active Akt construct partially relieved cell growth inhibition but was less effective than inhibition of AMPK. Inhibition of cell growth by apoptotic targets is dependent on physical interaction between apoptotic targets and PTECs but independent of phagocytosis. We conclude that receptor-mediated recognition of apoptotic targets mimics the effects of intracellular energy depletion, activating AMPK and inhibiting cell growth. By acting as sentinels of environmental change, apoptotic death may enable nearby viable cells, especially nonmigratory epithelial cells, to monitor and adapt to local stresses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Killing Breast Cancer Cells through Activation of the Apoptosome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    oligomerizes and activates caspase 9. We demonstrated that breast cancer cells have apoptosomes which are hypersensitive to cytochrome c. Thus we...have proposed to develop cytoplasmic variants of cytochrome c and/or small molecule cytochrome c mimetics to activate the apoptosome in breast cancer cells .

  17. Laser-induced endothelial cell activation supports fibrin formation

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Ben T.; Jasuja, Reema; Chen, Vivien M.; Nandivada, Prathima; Furie, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced vessel wall injury leads to rapid thrombus formation in an animal thrombosis model. The target of laser injury is the endothelium. We monitored calcium mobilization to assess activation of the laser-targeted cells. Infusion of Fluo-4 AM, a calcium-sensitive fluorochrome, into the mouse circulation resulted in dye uptake in the endothelium and circulating hematopoietic cells. Laser injury in mice treated with eptifibatide to inhibit platelet accumulation resulted in rapid calcium mobilization within the endothelium. Calcium mobilization correlated with the secretion of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1, a marker of endothelium activation. In the absence of eptifibatide, endothelium activation preceded platelet accumu-lation. Laser activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells loaded with Fluo-4 resulted in a rapid increase in calcium mobilization associated cell fluorescence similar to that induced by adenosine diphosphate (10μM) or thrombin (1 U/mL). Laser activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor treated human plasma devoid of platelets and cell microparticles led to fibrin for-mation that was inhibited by an inhibitory monoclonal anti–tissue factor antibody. Thus laser injury leads to rapid endothelial cell activation. The laser activated endothelial cells can support formation of tenase and prothrombinase and may be a source of activated tissue factor as well. PMID:20675401

  18. Dynamic microtubules regulate cellular contractility during T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hui, King Lam; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2017-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering and subsequent T-cell activation are essential for the adaptive immune response. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have shown that force transduction across the TCR complex is involved during TCR triggering, and that the T cell might use its force-generation machinery to probe the mechanical properties of the opposing antigen-presenting cell, giving rise to different signaling and physiological responses. Mechanistically, actin polymerization and turnover have been shown to be essential for force generation by T cells, but how these actin dynamics are regulated spatiotemporally remains poorly understood. Here, we report that traction forces generated by T cells are regulated by dynamic microtubules (MTs) at the interface. These MTs suppress Rho activation, nonmuscle myosin II bipolar filament assembly, and actin retrograde flow at the T-cell–substrate interface. Our results suggest a novel role of the MT cytoskeleton in regulating force generation during T-cell activation. PMID:28490501

  19. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  20. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  1. Nylon Wool Purification Alters the Activation of T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method. PMID:18952296

  2. Effect of substrate mechanical properties on T cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2013-03-01

    T cell activation is a key process in cell-mediated immunity, and engagement of T cell receptors by peptides on antigen presenting cells leads to activation of signaling cascades as well as cytoskeletal reorganization and large scale membrane deformations. While significant advances have been made in understanding the biochemical signaling pathways, the effects imposed by the physical environment and the role of mechanical forces on cell activation are not well understood. In this study, we have used anti-CD3 coated elastic polyacrylamide gels as stimulatory substrates to enable the spreading of Jurkat T cells and the measurement of cellular traction forces. We have investigated the effect of substrate stiffness on the dynamics of T cell spreading and cellular force generation. We found that T cells display more active and sustained edge dynamics on softer gels and that they exert increased traction stresses with increasing gel stiffness. A dynamic actin cytoskeleton was required to maintain the forces generated during activation, as inferred from small molecule inhibition experiments. Our results indicate an important role for physical properties of the antigen presenting cell as well as cytoskeleton-driven forces in signaling activation.

  3. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-09-15

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with (3H)arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1more » X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity.« less

  4. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L.; Milla, Marcos E.; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  5. Human NK cells activated by EBV+ lymphoblastoid cells overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms of drug resistance in haematological cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Azaceta, Gemma; Muntasell, Aura; Aguiló, Nacho; Núñez, David; Gálvez, Eva M; Naval, Javier; Anel, Alberto; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; Marzo, Isabel; Villalba, Martín; Pardo, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells recognize and eliminate transformed or infected cells that have downregulated MHC class-I and express specific activating ligands. Recent evidence indicates that allogeneic NK cells are useful to eliminate haematological cancer cells independently of MHC-I expression. However, it is unclear if transformed cells expressing mutations that confer anti-apoptotic properties and chemoresistance will be susceptible to NK cells. Allogeneic primary human NK cells were activated using different protocols and prospectively tested for their ability to eliminate diverse mutant haematological and apoptotic-resistant cancer cell lines as well as patient-derived B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with chemotherapy multiresistance. Here, we show that human NK cells from healthy donors activated in vitro with Epstein Barr virus positive (EBV+)-lymphoblastoid cells display an enhanced cytotoxic and proliferative potential in comparison to other protocols of activation such a K562 cells plus interleukin (IL)2. This enhancement enables them to kill more efficiently a variety of haematological cancer cell lines, including a panel of transfectants that mimic natural mutations leading to oncogenic transformation and chemoresistance (e.g., overexpression of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 or downregulation of p53, Bak/Bax or caspase activity). The effect was also observed against blasts from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients showing multi-resistance to chemotherapy. Our findings demonstrate that particular in vitro activated NK cells may overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms and oncogenic alterations frequently occurring in transformed cells, pointing toward the use of EBV+-lymphoblastoid cells as a desirable strategy to activate NK cells in vitro for the purpose of treating haematological neoplasia with poor prognosis. PMID:25949911

  6. Identification of rhythmically active cells in guinea-pig stomach

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, Emma J; Hirst, G D S; Tomita, T

    1999-01-01

    When intracellular recordings were made from the antral region of guinea-pig stomach, cells with different patterns of electrical activity were detected.One group of cells, slow-wave cells, generated slow waves which consisted of initial and secondary components. When filled with either Lucifer Yellow or neurobiotin, the cells identified as smooth muscle cells lying in the circular muscle layer.A second group of cells, driving cells, generated large, rapidly rising, potential changes, driving potentials. They had small cell bodies with several processes. With neurobiotin, a network of cells was visualized that resembled c-kit positive interstitial cells of the myenteric region.A third group of cells generated sequences of potential changes which resembled driving potentials but had smaller amplitudes and slow rates of rise. These cells resembled smooth muscle cells lying in the longitudinal muscle layer.When simultaneous recordings were made from the driving and slow-wave cells, driving potentials and slow waves occurred synchronously. Current injections indicated that both cell types were part of a common electrical syncytium.The initial component of slow waves persisted in low concentrations of caffeine, but the secondary component was abolished; higher concentrations shortened the duration of the residual initial component. Driving potentials continued in the presence of low concentrations of caffeine; moderate concentrations of caffeine shortened their duration.Hence three different types of cells were distinguished on the basis of their electrical activity, their responses to caffeine and their structure. These were smooth muscle cells, lying in the longitudinal and circular layers, and interstitial cells in the myenteric region. The observations suggest that interstitial cells initiate slow waves. PMID:9852332

  7. Cutting edge: cell surface linker for activation of T cells is recruited to microclusters and is active in signaling.

    PubMed

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Barr, Valarie A; Kortum, Robert L; Park, Anna K; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2013-04-15

    A controversy has recently emerged regarding the location of the cellular pool of the adapter linker for activation of T cells (LAT) that participates in propagation of signals downstream of the TCR. In one model phosphorylation and direct recruitment of cell surface LAT to activation-induced microclusters is critical for T cell activation, whereas in the other model vesicular, but not surface, LAT participates in these processes. By using a chimeric version of LAT that can be tracked via an extracellular domain, we provide evidence that LAT located at the cell surface can be recruited efficiently to activation-induced microclusters within seconds of TCR engagement. Importantly, we also demonstrate that this pool of LAT at the plasma membrane is rapidly phosphorylated. Our results provide support for the model in which the cell utilizes LAT from the cell surface for rapid responses to TCR stimulation.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem/Multipotent Stromal Cells from Human Decidua Basalis Reduce Endothelial Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Alshabibi, Manal A; Al Huqail, Al Joharah; Khatlani, Tanvir; Abomaray, Fawaz M; Alaskar, Ahmed S; Alawad, Abdullah O; Kalionis, Bill; Abumaree, Mohamed Hassan

    2017-09-15

    Recently, we reported the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from the decidua basalis of human placenta (DBMSCs). These cells express a unique combination of molecules involved in many important cellular functions, which make them good candidates for cell-based therapies. The endothelium is a highly specialized, metabolically active interface between blood and the underlying tissues. Inflammatory factors stimulate the endothelium to undergo a change to a proinflammatory and procoagulant state (ie, endothelial cell activation). An initial response to endothelial cell activation is monocyte adhesion. Activation typically involves increased proliferation and enhanced expression of adhesion and inflammatory markers by endothelial cells. Sustained endothelial cell activation leads to a type of damage to the body associated with inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the ability of DBMSCs to protect endothelial cells from activation through monocyte adhesion, by modulating endothelial proliferation, migration, adhesion, and inflammatory marker expression. Endothelial cells were cocultured with DBMSCs, monocytes, monocyte-pretreated with DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes were also evaluated. Monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells was examined following treatment with DBMSCs. Expression of endothelial cell adhesion and inflammatory markers was also analyzed. The interaction between DBMSCs and monocytes reduced endothelial cell proliferation and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In contrast, endothelial cell migration increased in response to DBMSCs and monocytes. Endothelial cell expression of adhesion and inflammatory molecules was reduced by DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes. The mechanism of reduced endothelial proliferation involved enhanced phosphorylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Our study shows for the first time that DBMSCs protect endothelial cells from activation by

  9. Signal Transduction in T Cell Activation and Tolerance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    CD8 and p56Ick may form a linkage via a metal ion, as has been found in the HIV- encoded tat protein (50). Several lines of evidence suggest a role for... Jurkat human T cell line have demonstrated a TCR-associated tvrosine kinase activity which is not p59-.- (60). This kinase activity is observed...sufficient "stimulus for IL-2 production (41). In addition, recent experiments have dem- onstrated that activation of the PLC pathway in Jurkat cells

  10. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Filopodial Activities in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Torng, Wen; Kao, Yu-Chiu; Sung, Kung-Bin; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Microenvironment stiffening plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis. While filopodia are generally thought to be one of the cellular mechanosensors for probing environmental stiffness, the effects of environmental stiffness on filopodial activities of cancer cells remain unclear. In this work, we investigated the filopodial activities of human lung adenocarcinoma cells CL1-5 cultured on substrates of tunable stiffness using a novel platform. The platform consists of an optical system called structured illumination nano-profilometry, which allows time-lapsed visualization of filopodial activities without fluorescence labeling. The culturing substrates were composed of polyvinyl chloride mixed with an environmentally friendly plasticizer to yield Young's modulus ranging from 20 to 60 kPa. Cell viability studies showed that the viability of cells cultured on the substrates was similar to those cultured on commonly used elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane. Time-lapsed live cell images were acquired and the filopodial activities in response to substrates with varying degrees of stiffness were analyzed. Statistical analyses revealed that lung cancer cells cultured on softer substrates appeared to have longer filopodia, higher filopodial densities with respect to the cellular perimeter, and slower filopodial retraction rates. Nonetheless, the temporal analysis of filopodial activities revealed that whether a filopodium decides to extend or retract is purely a stochastic process without dependency on substrate stiffness. The discrepancy of the filopodial activities between lung cancer cells cultured on substrates with different degrees of stiffness vanished when the myosin II activities were inhibited by treating the cells with blebbistatin, which suggests that the filopodial activities are closely modulated by the adhesion strength of the cells. Our data quantitatively relate filopodial activities of lung cancer cells with environmental stiffness and should shed light

  11. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells.

  12. T Cell Activation Thresholds are Affected by Gravitational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley; Gonzalez, M.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    1999-01-01

    T cells stimulated in space flight by various mitogenic signals show a dramatic reduction in proliferation and expression of early activation markers. Similar results are also obtained in a ground based model of microgravity, clinorotation, which provides a vector-averaged reduction of the apparent gravity on cells without significant shear force. Here we demonstrate that T cell inhibition is due to an increase in the required threshold for activation. Dose response curves indicate that cells activated during clinorotation require higher stimulation to achieve the same level of activation, as measured by CD69 expression. Interleukin 2 receptor expression, and DNA synthesis. The amount of stimulation necessary for 50% activation is 5 fold in the clinostat relative to static. Correlation of TCR internalization with activation also exhibit a dramatic right shift in clinorotation, demonstrating unequivocally that signal transduction mechanism independent of TCR triggering account for the increased activation threshold. Previous results from space flight experiments are consistent with the dose response curves obtained for clinorotation. Activation thresholds are important aspects of T cell memory, autoimmunity and tolerance Clinorotation is a useful, noninvasive tool for the study of cellular and biochemical event regulating T cell activation threshold and the effects of gravitation forces on these systems.

  13. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Tamara C.; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis. PMID:26567213

  14. A single subset of dendritic cells controls the cytokine bias of natural killer T cell responses to diverse glycolipid antigens.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O A; Saini, Neeraj K; Kharkwal, Shalu S; Goldberg, Michael F; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R; Jervis, Peter J; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-16

    Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α(+) DEC-205(+) dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α(+) dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Activated Notch Causes Deafness by Promoting a Supporting Cell Phenotype in Developing Auditory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Savoy-Burke, Grace; Gilels, Felicia A.; Pan, Wei; Pratt, Diana; Que, Jianwen; Gan, Lin; White, Patricia M.; Kiernan, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether activated Notch can promote a supporting cell fate during sensory cell differentiation in the inner ear. Methods An activated form of the Notch1 receptor (NICD) was expressed in early differentiating hair cells using a Gfi1-Cre mouse allele. To determine the effects of activated Notch on developing hair cells, Gfi1-NICD animals and their littermate controls were assessed at 5 weeks for hearing by measuring auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). The differentiation of NICD-expressing hair cells was assessed at postnatal day (P) 6, 11 and 20, using histological and molecular markers for hair cells, as well as supporting cells/progenitor cells. We also examined whether the effects of Notch were mediated by SOX2, a gene expressed in supporting cells and a likely downstream target of Notch, by crossing an inducible form of SOX2 to the Gfi1-Cre. Results Activation of Notch1 in developing auditory hair cells causes profound deafness. The NICD-expressing hair cells switch off a number of hair cell markers and lose their characteristic morphology. Instead, NICD-expressing hair cells adopt a morphology resembling supporting cells and upregulate a number of supporting cell markers. These effects do not appear to be mediated by SOX2, because although expression of SOX2 caused some hearing impairment, the SOX2-expressing hair cells did not downregulate hair cell markers nor exhibit a supporting cell-like phenotype. Conclusions Our data show that Notch signaling inhibits hair cell differentiation and promotes a supporting cell-like phenotype, and that these effects are unlikely to be mediated by SOX2. PMID:25264928

  16. Innate response activator B cells: origins and functions.

    PubMed

    Chousterman, Benjamin G; Swirski, Filip K

    2015-10-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells are a subset of B-1a derived B cells that produce the growth factors granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor and IL-3. In mouse models of sepsis and pneumonia, B-1a B cells residing in serosal sites recognize bacteria, migrate to the spleen or lung, and differentiate to IRA B cells that then contribute to the host response by amplifying inflammation and producing polyreactive IgM. In atherosclerosis, IRA B cells accumulate in the spleen, where they promote extramedullary hematopoiesis and activate classical dendritic cells. In this review, we focus on the ontogeny and function of IRA B cells in acute and chronic inflammation. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. δ-cells and β-cells are electrically coupled and regulate α-cell activity via somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Briant, L J B; Reinbothe, T M; Spiliotis, I; Miranda, C; Rodriguez, B; Rorsman, P

    2018-01-15

    We used a mouse expressing a light-sensitive ion channel in β-cells to understand how α-cell activity is regulated by β-cells. Light activation of β-cells triggered a suppression of α-cell activity via gap junction-dependent activation of δ-cells. Mathematical modelling of human islets suggests that 23% of the inhibitory effect of glucose on glucagon secretion is mediated by β-cells via gap junction-dependent activation of δ-cells/somatostatin secretion. Glucagon, the body's principal hyperglycaemic hormone, is released from α-cells of the pancreatic islet. Secretion of this hormone is dysregulated in type 2 diabetes mellitus but the mechanisms controlling secretion are not well understood. Regulation of glucagon secretion by factors secreted by neighbouring β- and δ-cells (paracrine regulation) have been proposed to be important. In this study, we explored the importance of paracrine regulation by using an optogenetic strategy. Specific light-induced activation of β-cells in mouse islets expressing the light-gated channelrhodopsin-2 resulted in stimulation of electrical activity in δ-cells but suppression of α-cell activity. Activation of the δ-cells was rapid and sensitive to the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone, whereas the effect on electrical activity in α-cells was blocked by CYN 154806, an antagonist of the somatostatin-2 receptor. These observations indicate that optogenetic activation of the β-cells propagates to the δ-cells via gap junctions, and the consequential stimulation of somatostatin secretion inhibits α-cell electrical activity by a paracrine mechanism. To explore whether this pathway is important for regulating α-cell activity and glucagon secretion in human islets, we constructed computational models of human islets. These models had detailed architectures based on human islets and consisted of a collection of >500 α-, β- and δ-cells. Simulations of these models revealed that this gap junctional/paracrine mechanism

  18. Cell fusion activity of hepatitis C virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Takikawa, S; Ishii, K; Aizaki, H; Suzuki, T; Asakura, H; Matsuura, Y; Miyamura, T

    2000-06-01

    To examine the cell fusion activity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins (E1 and E2), we have established a sensitive cell fusion assay based on the activation of a reporter gene as described previously (O. Nussbaum, C. C. Broder, and E. A. Berger, J. Virol. 68:5411-5422, 1994). The chimeric HCV E1 and E2 proteins, each consisting of the ectodomain of the E1 and E2 envelope protein and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein, were expressed on the cell surface. Cells expressing the chimeric envelope proteins and T7 RNA polymerase were cocultured with the various target cell lines transfected with a reporter plasmid encoding the luciferase gene under the control of the T7 promoter. After cocultivation, the cell fusion activity was determined by the expression of luciferase in the cocultured cells. The induction of cell fusion requires both the chimeric E1 and E2 proteins and occurs in a low-pH-dependent manner. Although it has been shown that HCV E2 protein binds human CD81 (P. Pileri, Y. Uematsu, S. Campagnoli, G. Galli, F. Falugi, R. Petracca, A. J. Weiner, M. Houghton, D. Rosa, G. Grandi, and S. Abrignani, Science 282:938-941, 1998), the expression of human CD81 alone is not sufficient to confer susceptibility to cell fusion in the mouse cell line. Treatment of the target cells with pronase, heparinase, or heparitinase reduced the cell fusion activity induced by the chimeric envelope proteins. These results suggest (i) that both HCV E1 and E2 proteins are responsible for fusion with the endosomal membrane after endocytosis and (ii) that certain protein molecules other than human CD81 and some glycosaminoglycans on the cell surface are also involved in the cell fusion induced by HCV.

  19. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  20. Knockdown of MAGEA6 Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Signaling to Inhibit Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xueting; Xie, Jing; Huang, Hang; Deng, Zhexian

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma antigen A6 (MAGEA6) is a cancer-specific ubiquitin ligase of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The current study tested MAGEA6 expression and potential function in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MAGEA6 and AMPK expression in human RCC tissues and RCC cells were tested by Western blotting assay and qRT-PCR assay. shRNA method was applied to knockdown MAGEA6 in human RCC cells. Cell survival and proliferation were tested by MTT assay and BrdU ELISA assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was tested by the TUNEL assay and single strand DNA ELISA assay. The 786-O xenograft in nude mouse model was established to test RCC cell growth in vivo. MAGEA6 is specifically expressed in RCC tissues as well as in the established (786-O and A498) and primary human RCC cells. MAGEA6 expression is correlated with AMPKα1 downregulation in RCC tissues and cells. It is not detected in normal renal tissues nor in the HK-2 renal epithelial cells. MAGEA6 knockdown by targeted-shRNA induced AMPK stabilization and activation, which led to mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in-activation and RCC cell death/apoptosis. AMPK inhibition, by AMPKα1 shRNA or the dominant negative AMPKα1 (T172A), almost reversed MAGEA6 knockdown-induced RCC cell apoptosis. Conversely, expression of the constitutive-active AMPKα1 (T172D) mimicked the actions by MAGEA6 shRNA. In vivo, MAGEA6 shRNA-bearing 786-O tumors grew significantly slower in nude mice than the control tumors. AMPKα1 stabilization and activation as well as mTORC1 in-activation were detected in MAGEA6 shRNA tumor tissues. MAGEA6 knockdown inhibits human RCC cells via activating AMPK signaling. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  2. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    DOE PAGES

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; ...

    2015-08-07

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose, in this paper we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout themore » entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Finally, our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation.« less

  3. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  5. Treadmill running induces satellite cell activation in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-12-01

    Skeletal muscle-derived stem cells, termed as satellite cells, play essential roles in regeneration after muscle injury in adult skeletal muscle. Diabetes mellitus (DM), one of the most common metabolic diseases, causes impairments of satellite cell function. However, the studies of the countermeasures for the DM-induced dysfunction of satellite cells have been poor. Here, we investigated the effects of chronic running exercise on satellite cell activation in diabetic mice focused on the molecular mechanism including Notch and Wnt signaling, which are contribute to the fate determination of satellite cells. Male C57BL/6 mice 4 weeks of age were injected with streptozotocin and were randomly divided into runner group and control group. Runner group mice were performed treadmill running for 4 weeks. DM attenuated satellite cell activation and the expressions of the components of Notch and Wnt signaling. However, chronic running resulted in activation of satellite cells in diabetic mice and salvaged the inactivity of Wnt signaling but not Notch signaling. Our results suggest that chronic running induces satellite cell activation via upregulation of Wnt signaling in diabetic as well as normal mice.

  6. Metabolic pathways in T cell activation and lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luís; Lochner, Matthias; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of immunometabolism support the concept that fundamental processes in T cell biology, such as TCR-mediated activation and T helper lineage differentiation, are closely linked to changes in the cellular metabolic programs. Although the major task of the intermediate metabolism is to provide the cell with a constant supply of energy and molecular precursors for the production of biomolecules, the dynamic regulation of metabolic pathways also plays an active role in shaping T cell responses. Key metabolic processes such as glycolysis, fatty acid and mitochondrial metabolism are now recognized as crucial players in T cell activation and differentiation, and their modulation can differentially affect the development of T helper cell lineages. In this review, we describe the diverse metabolic processes that T cells engage during their life cycle from naïve towards effector and memory T cells. We consider in particular how the cellular metabolism may actively support the function of T cells in their different states. Moreover, we discuss how molecular regulators such as mTOR or AMPK link environmental changes to adaptations in the cellular metabolism and elucidate the consequences on T cell differentiation and function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Sclerostin Antibody Administration Converts Bone Lining Cells Into Active Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wan; Lu, Yanhui; Williams, Elizabeth A; Lai, Forest; Lee, Ji Yeon; Enishi, Tetsuya; Balani, Deepak H; Ominsky, Michael S; Ke, Hua Zhu; Kronenberg, Henry M; Wein, Marc N

    2017-05-01

    Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) increases osteoblast activity, in part through increasing modeling-based bone formation on previously quiescent surfaces. Histomorphometric studies have suggested that this might occur through conversion of bone lining cells into active osteoblasts. However, direct data demonstrating Scl-Ab-induced conversion of lining cells into active osteoblasts are lacking. Here, we used in vivo lineage tracing to determine if Scl-Ab promotes the conversion of lining cells into osteoblasts on periosteal and endocortical bone surfaces in mice. Two independent, tamoxifen-inducible lineage-tracing strategies were used to label mature osteoblasts and their progeny using the DMP1 and osteocalcin promoters. After a prolonged "chase" period, the majority of labeled cells on bone surfaces assumed a thin, quiescent morphology. Then, mice were treated with either vehicle or Scl-Ab (25 mg/kg) twice over the course of the subsequent week. After euthanization, marked cells were enumerated, their thickness quantified, and proliferation and apoptosis examined. Scl-Ab led to a significant increase in the average thickness of labeled cells on periosteal and endocortical bone surfaces, consistent with osteoblast activation. Scl-Ab did not induce proliferation of labeled cells, and Scl-Ab did not regulate apoptosis of labeled cells. Therefore, direct reactivation of quiescent bone lining cells contributes to the acute increase in osteoblast numbers after Scl-Ab treatment in mice. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Ly108 expression distinguishes subsets of invariant NKT cells that help autoantibody production and secrete IL-21 from those that secrete IL-17 in lupus prone NZB/W mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaobin; Zhang, Bo; Jarrell, Justin A; Price, Jordan V; Dai, Hongjie; Utz, Paul J; Strober, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Lupus is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by anti-nuclear antibodies in humans and genetically susceptible NZB/W mice that can cause immune complex glomerulonephritis. T cells contribute to lupus pathogenesis by secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17, and by interacting with B cells and secreting helper factors such as IL-21 that promote production of IgG autoantibodies. In the current study, we determined whether purified NKT cells or far more numerous conventional non-NKT cells in the spleen of NZB/W female mice secrete IL-17 and/or IL-21 after TCR activation in vitro, and provide help for spontaneous IgG autoantibody production by purified splenic CD19(+) B cells. Whereas invariant NKT cells secreted large amounts of IL-17 and IL-21, and helped B cells, non-NKT cells did not. The subset of IL-17 secreting NZB/W NKT cells expressed the Ly108(lo)CD4(-)NK1.1(-) phenotype, whereas the IL-21 secreting subset expressed the Ly108(hi)CD4(+)NK1.1(-) phenotype and helped B cells secrete a variety of IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. α-galactocylceramide enhanced the helper activity of NZB/W and B6.Sle1b NKT cells for IgG autoantibody secretion by syngeneic B cells. In conclusion, different subsets of iNKT cells from mice with genetic susceptibility to lupus can contribute to pathogenesis by secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines and helping autoantibody production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jillian H; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P; Gregg, Randal K

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter

  10. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Jillian H.; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P.; Gregg, Randal K.

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter. When

  11. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhen, Yun-fang; Zhang, Ya; Guo, Zhi-xiong; Dai, Jin; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2013-01-01

    The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or by RNA interference (RNAi) of light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  12. Salinomycin Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent Autophagy in Cultured Osteoblastoma Cells: A Negative Regulator against Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Guo, Zhi-xiong; Dai, Jin; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2013-01-01

    Background The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. Key Findings Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or by RNA interference (RNAi) of light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. Conclusions Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin’s effect in cancer cells. PMID:24358342

  13. Human natural killer (NK) cells produce a late-acting B-cell differentiation activity.

    PubMed

    Kimata, H; Sherr, E H; Saxon, A

    1988-09-01

    The supernatant of unstimulated purified NKH-1 bearing human natural killer (NK) cells was found to enhance ongoing immunoglobulin synthesis. This NK-Cell supernatant (NKSN) enhanced IgE, IgG, and IgA synthesis from corresponding B-cell lines without increasing thymidine incorporation or cell number. Separation of NKH-1+ cells into CD3- or CD3+ cells showed that this activity was produced by the CD3- population. Recombinant human interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, IL-4, interferon (INF)-beta 1, INF-gamma, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, or partially purified low molecular weight B-cell growth factor (BCGF) failed to provide the same enhancement of Ig synthesis. While the NKSN contained small amounts of IL-6 (0.1 U/ml) and IL-6 could increase Ig synthesis in vitro, the optimal IL-6 enhancement was far less than that observed with NKSN. NKSN also enhanced ongoing Ig synthesis from in vivo activated B cells obtained from peripheral blood or bone marrow but failed to induce Ig synthesis from resting or in vitro activated B cells. These results demonstrate that human NK (CD3-, NKH-1+) cells can produce B-cell differentiation activity capable of regulating Ig production in vivo, which appears to be distinct from the activity of previously described cytokines.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane vesicles inhibit T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Athman, Jaffre J.; Sande, Obondo J.; Groft, Sarah G.; Reba, Scott M.; Nagy, Nancy; Wearsch, Pamela A; Richardson, Edward T.; Rojas, Roxana; Boom, W. Henry; Shukla, Supriya; Harding, Clifford V.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis utilizes multiple mechanisms to evade host immune responses, and inhibition of effector CD4+ T cell responses by M. tuberculosis may contribute to immune evasion. T cell receptor signaling is inhibited by M. tuberculosis cell envelope lipoglycans, such as lipoarabinomannan and lipomannan, but a mechanism for lipoglycans to traffic from M. tuberculosis within infected macrophages to reach T cells is unknown. In these studies, we found that membrane vesicles produced by M. tuberculosis and released from infected macrophages inhibited the activation of CD4+ T cells, as indicated by reduced production of interleukin-2 and reduced T cell proliferation. Flow cytometry and western blot demonstrated that lipoglycans from M. tuberculosis-derived bacterial vesicles (BVs) are transferred to T cells, where they inhibit T cell responses. Stimulation of CD4+ T cells in the presence of BVs induced expression of GRAIL, a marker of T cell anergy; upon restimulation, these T cells showed reduced ability to proliferate, confirming a state of T cell anergy. Furthermore, lipoarabinomannan was associated with T cells after their incubation with infected macrophages in vitro and when T cells were isolated from lungs of M. tuberculosis-infected mice, confirming the occurrence of lipoarabinomannan trafficking to T cells in vivo. These studies demonstrate a novel mechanism for the direct regulation of CD4+ T cells by M. tuberculosis lipoglycans conveyed by BVs that are produced by M. tuberculosis and released from infected macrophages. These lipoglycans are transferred to T cells to inhibit T cell responses, providing a mechanism that may promote immune evasion. PMID:28122965

  15. Renal cells activate the platelet receptor CLEC-2 through podoplanin

    PubMed Central

    Christou, Charita M.; Pearce, Andrew C.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; Mistry, Anita R.; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Fenton-May, Angharad E.; Johnson, Louise A.; Jackson, David G.; Watson, Steve P.; O'Callaghan, Chris A.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that the C-type lectin-like receptor, CLEC-2, is expressed on platelets and that it mediates powerful platelet aggregation by the snake venom toxin, rhodocytin. In addition, we have provided indirect evidence for an endogenous ligand for CLEC-2 in renal cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This putative ligand facilitates transmission of HIV through its incorporation into the viral envelope and binding to CLEC-2 on platelets. The aim of this study was to identify the ligand on these cells which binds to CLEC-2 on platelets. Recombinant CLEC-2 exhibits specific binding to 293T cells in which the HIV can be grown. Further, 293T cells activate both platelets and CLEC-2-transfected DT-40 B cells. The transmembrane protein podoplanin was identified on 293T cells and demonstrated to mediate both binding of 293T cells to CLEC-2 and 293T cell activation of CLEC-2-transfected DT-40 B cells. Podoplanin is expressed on renal cells (podocytes). Further, a direct interaction between CLEC-2 and podoplanin was confirmed using surface plasmon resonance and was shown to be independent of glycosylation of CLEC-2. The interaction has an affinity of 24.5 ± 3.7μM. The present study identifies podoplanin as a ligand for CLEC-2 on renal cells. PMID:18215137

  16. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle; Verceles, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a coupled fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent staining technology for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology, and live versus dead), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from an environmental sample.

  17. Dendritic cells for active anti-cancer immunotherapy: targeting activation pathways through genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2009-12-01

    Tumour immunotherapy has become a treatment modality for cancer, harnessing the immune system to recognize and eradicate tumour cells specifically. It is based on the expression of tumour associated antigens (TAA) by the tumour cells and aims at the induction of TAA-specific effector T cell responses, whilst overruling various mechanisms that can hamper the anti-tumour immune response, e.g. regulatory T cells (Treg). (Re-) activation of effector T cells requires the completion of a carefully orchestrated series of specific steps. Particularly important is the provision of TAA presentation and strong stimulatory signals, delivered by co-stimulatory surface molecules and cytokines. These can only be delivered by professional antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, DC need to be loaded with TAA and appropriately activated. It is not surprising that an extensive part of DC research has focused on the delivery of both TAA and activation signals to DC, developing a one step approach to obtain potent stimulatory DC. The simultaneous delivery of TAA and activation signals is therefore the topic of this review, emphasizing the role of DC in mediating T cell activation and how we can manipulate DC for the pill-pose of enhancing tumour immunotherapy. As we gain a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate induction of TAA-specific T cells, rational approaches for the activation of T cell responses can be developed for the treatment of cancer.

  18. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  19. Effect of reversine on cell cycle, apoptosis, and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Huang, Di; Weng, Jiefeng; Zhang, Shuai; Zhang, Qiang; Mai, Zhenhao; Gu, Weili

    2016-12-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence show that liver fibrosis is potentially reversible. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in the development of liver fibrosis. Some studies have shown that reversine could induce cell apoptosis. We attempted to elucidate the effect of reversine on cell cycle, apoptosis, and activation of HSCs. Data showed that reversine induced morphological changes in HSCs, inhibited cell proliferation, and induced cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Reversine induced cell apoptosis through caspase-dependent and mitochondria-dependent pathways. Reversine inhibited the activation of HSCs through TGF-β signaling pathway and degraded extracellular matrix protein collagen-I. The decreased TIMP1 and TGF-β 1 proteins promoted fibrosis reversion. Reversine might be a promising drug for liver fibrosis reversion because it induces HSCs apoptosis, restrains cell proliferation, reduces HSCs activation, and degrades extracellular matrix in vitro.

  20. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not bymore » antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.« less

  1. TRPV4 channel activation selectively inhibits tumor endothelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Thoppil, Roslin J.; Adapala, Ravi K.; Cappelli, Holly C.; Kondeti, Vinay; Dudley, Andrew C.; Gary Meszaros, J.; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Thodeti, Charles K.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell proliferation is a critical event during angiogenesis, regulated by both soluble factors and mechanical forces. Although the proliferation of tumor cells is studied extensively, little is known about the proliferation of tumor endothelial cells (TEC) and its contribution to tumor angiogenesis. We have recently shown that reduced expression of the mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 in TEC causes aberrant mechanosensitivity that result in abnormal angiogenesis. Here, we show that TEC display increased proliferation compared to normal endothelial cells (NEC). Further, we found that TEC exhibit high basal ERK1/2 phosphorylation and increased expression of proliferative genes important in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, pharmacological activation of TRPV4, with a small molecular activator GSK1016790A (GSK), significantly inhibited TEC proliferation, but had no effect on the proliferation of NEC or the tumor cells (epithelial) themselves. This reduction in TEC proliferation by TRPV4 activation was correlated with a decrease in high basal ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Finally, using a syngeneic tumor model revealed that TRPV4 activation, with GSK, significantly reduced endothelial cell proliferation in vivo. Our findings suggest that TRPV4 channels regulate tumor angiogenesis by selectively inhibiting tumor endothelial cell proliferation. PMID:26388427

  2. A Model Approach to the Electrochemical Cell: An Inquiry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Deanna M.; Pentecost, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to address some student misconceptions in electrochemistry, this guided-inquiry laboratory was devised to give students an opportunity to use a manipulative that simulates the particulate-level activity within an electrochemical cell, in addition to using an actual electrochemical cell. Students are led through a review of expected…

  3. The potential of a dielectrophoresis activated cell sorter (DACS) as a next generation cell sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Hwang, Bohyun; Kim, Byungkyu

    2016-12-01

    Originally introduced by H. A. Pohl in 1951, dielectrophoretic (DEP) force has been used as a striking tool for biological particle manipulation (or separation) for the last few decades. In particular, dielectrophoresis activated cell sorters (DACSes) have been developed for applications in various biomedical fields. These applications include cell replacement therapy, drug screening and medical diagnostics. Since a DACS does not require a specific bio-marker, it is able to function as a biological particle sorting tool with numerous configurations for various cells [e.g. red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), circulating tumor cells, leukemia cells, breast cancer cells, bacterial cells, yeast cells and sperm cells]. This article explores current DACS capabilities worldwide, and it also looks at recent developments intended to overcome particular limitations. First, the basic theories are reviewed. Then, representative DACSes based on DEP trapping, traveling wave DEP systems, DEP field-flow fractionation and DEP barriers are introduced, and the strong and weak points of each DACS are discussed. Finally, for the purposes of commercialization, prerequisites regarding throughput, efficiency and recovery rates are discussed in detail through comparisons with commercial cell sorters (e.g. fluorescent activated and magnetic activated cell sorters).

  4. Activation of Human T-Helper/Inducer Cell, T-Cytotoxic Cell, B-Cell, and Natural Killer (NK)-Cells and induction of Natural Killer Cell Activity against K562 Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells with Modified Citrus Pectin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets like T, B and NK-cells. Methods MCP treated human blood samples were incubated with specific antibody combinations and analyzed in a flow cytometer using a 3-color protocol. To test functionality of the activated NK-cells, isolated normal lymphocytes were treated with increasing concentrations of MCP. Log-phase PKH26-labeled K562 leukemic cells were added to the lymphocytes and incubated for 4 h. The mixture was stained with FITC-labeled active form of caspase 3 antibody and analyzed by a 2-color flow cytometry protocol. The percentage of K562 cells positive for PKH26 and FITC were calculated as the dead cells induced by NK-cells. Monosaccharide analysis of the MCP was performed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulse amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). Results MCP activated T-cytotoxic cells and B-cell in a dose-dependent manner, and induced significant dose-dependent activation of NK-cells. MCP-activated NK-cells demonstrated functionality in inducing cancer cell death. MCP consisted of oligogalacturonic acids with some containing 4,5-unsaturated non-reducing ends. Conclusions MCP has immunostimulatory properties in human blood samples, including the activation of functional NK cells against K562 leukemic cells in culture. Unsaturated oligogalacturonic acids appear to be the immunostimulatory carbohydrates in MCP. PMID:21816083

  5. Synthetic spatially graded Rac activation drives cell polarization and movement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Benjamin; Holmes, William R; Wang, C Joanne; Ueno, Tasuku; Harwell, Andrew; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah; Inoue, Takanari; Levchenko, Andre

    2012-12-26

    Migrating cells possess intracellular gradients of active Rho GTPases, which serve as central hubs in transducing signals from extracellular receptors to cytoskeletal and adhesive machinery. However, it is unknown whether shallow exogenously induced intracellular gradients of Rho GTPases are sufficient to drive cell polarity and motility. Here, we use microfluidic control to generate gradients of a small molecule and thereby directly induce linear gradients of active, endogenous Rac without activation of chemotactic receptors. Gradients as low as 15% were sufficient not only to trigger cell migration up the chemical gradient but to induce both cell polarization and repolarization. Cellular response times were inversely proportional to the steepness of Rac inducer gradient in agreement with a mathematical model, suggesting a function for chemoattractant gradient amplification upstream of Rac. Increases in activated Rac levels beyond a well-defined threshold augmented polarization and decreased sensitivity to the imposed gradient. The threshold was governed by initial cell polarity and PI3K activity, supporting a role for both in defining responsiveness to Rac activation. Our results reveal that Rac can serve as a starting point in defining cell polarity. Furthermore, our methodology may serve as a template to investigate processes regulated by intracellular signaling gradients.

  6. Overnutrition induces β-cell differentiation through prolonged activation of β-cells in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyu; Maddison, Lisette A; Page-McCaw, Patrick; Chen, Wenbiao

    2014-04-01

    Insulin from islet β-cells maintains glucose homeostasis by stimulating peripheral tissues to remove glucose from circulation. Persistent elevation of insulin demand increases β-cell number through self-replication or differentiation (neogenesis) as part of a compensatory response. However, it is not well understood how a persistent increase in insulin demand is detected. We have previously demonstrated that a persistent increase in insulin demand by overnutrition induces compensatory β-cell differentiation in zebrafish. Here, we use a series of pharmacological and genetic analyses to show that prolonged stimulation of existing β-cells is necessary and sufficient for this compensatory response. In the absence of feeding, tonic, but not intermittent, pharmacological activation of β-cell secretion was sufficient to induce β-cell differentiation. Conversely, drugs that block β-cell secretion, including an ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP) channel agonist and an L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, suppressed overnutrition-induced β-cell differentiation. Genetic experiments specifically targeting β-cells confirm existing β-cells as the overnutrition sensor. First, inducible expression of a constitutively active K ATP channel in β-cells suppressed the overnutrition effect. Second, inducible expression of a dominant-negative K ATP mutant induced β-cell differentiation independent of nutrients. Third, sensitizing β-cell metabolism by transgenic expression of a hyperactive glucokinase potentiated differentiation. Finally, ablation of the existing β-cells abolished the differentiation response. Taken together, these data establish that overnutrition induces β-cell differentiation in larval zebrafish through prolonged activation of β-cells. These findings demonstrate an essential role for existing β-cells in sensing overnutrition and compensating for their own insufficiency by recruiting additional β-cells.

  7. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology.

    PubMed

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje; van Rooijen, Karlijn L; Dijstelbloem, Hilde M; Rasmussen, Jan T; de Vooght, Karen M K; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Gaillard, Carlo A J M; van Solinge, Wouter W

    2012-04-01

    Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and α(v)-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine-lactadherin-α(v)-integrin pathway is the acknowledged route for removal of apoptotic innate cells by phagocytes. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of red blood cells was further explored using a more (patho)physiological approach. Red blood cells were exposed to oxidative stress, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. After opsonization with lactadherin, red blood cells were incubated with endothelial cells to study erythrophagocytosis and examine cytotoxicity. Red blood cells exposed to oxidative stress show alterations such as phosphatidylserine exposure and loss of deformability. When incubated with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape ('rounding up'). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated that marked erythrophagocytosis has cytotoxic effects. Activated endothelial cells show significant phagocytosis of phosphatidylserine-exposing and rigid red blood cells under both static and flow conditions. This results in a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We postulate that activated endothelial cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to vasopathological effects as seen, for instance, in sickle cell

  8. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    PubMed Central

    Fens, Marcel H.A.M.; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje; van Rooijen, Karlijn L.; Dijstelbloem, Hilde M.; Rasmussen, Jan T.; de Vooght, Karen M.K.; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Gaillard, Carlo A.J.M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and αv-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine-lactadherin-αv-integrin pathway is the acknowledged route for removal of apoptotic innate cells by phagocytes. Design and Methods Endothelial cell phagocytosis of red blood cells was further explored using a more (patho)physiological approach. Red blood cells were exposed to oxidative stress, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. After opsonization with lactadherin, red blood cells were incubated with endothelial cells to study erythrophagocytosis and examine cytotoxicity. Results Red blood cells exposed to oxidative stress show alterations such as phosphatidylserine exposure and loss of deformability. When incubated with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape (‘rounding up’). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated that marked erythrophagocytosis has cytotoxic effects. Conclusions Activated endothelial cells show significant phagocytosis of phosphatidylserine-exposing and rigid red blood cells under both static and flow conditions. This results in a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We postulate that activated endothelial cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to

  9. B-cell activity of polyclonal antithymocyte globulins.

    PubMed

    Zand, Martin S

    2006-12-15

    Polyclonal antithymocyte globulins (AThG) are a subset of antilymphocyte antibody preparations derived from the sera of rabbits or horses immunized with unfractionated cells isolated from pediatric human thymi. In vivo, AThG preparations have been used to successfully treat antibody mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients. In vitro, AThG can induce apoptosis of naïve and memory B cells and terminally differentiated plasma cells. The presence of B-cell reactive antibodies in AThG results from a thymic inoculum containing a significant percentage of CD20(+) B cells and CD138(+) plasma cells. In this paper, the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the B-cell activity of AThG preparations, and their mechanisms of action, are reviewed.

  10. Micropipette force probe to quantify single-cell force generation: application to T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, Anna; Babataheri, Avin; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Barakat, Abdul I.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Hivroz, Claire; Husson, Julien

    2017-01-01

    In response to engagement of surface molecules, cells generate active forces that regulate many cellular processes. Developing tools that permit gathering mechanical and morphological information on these forces is of the utmost importance. Here we describe a new technique, the micropipette force probe, that uses a micropipette as a flexible cantilever that can aspirate at its tip a bead that is coated with molecules of interest and is brought in contact with the cell. This technique simultaneously allows tracking the resulting changes in cell morphology and mechanics as well as measuring the forces generated by the cell. To illustrate the power of this technique, we applied it to the study of human primary T lymphocytes (T-cells). It allowed the fine monitoring of pushing and pulling forces generated by T-cells in response to various activating antibodies and bending stiffness of the micropipette. We further dissected the sequence of mechanical and morphological events occurring during T-cell activation to model force generation and to reveal heterogeneity in the cell population studied. We also report the first measurement of the changes in Young’s modulus of T-cells during their activation, showing that T-cells stiffen within the first minutes of the activation process. PMID:28931600

  11. Exosomes from uninfected cells activate transcription of latent HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Robert A; Schwab, Angela; DeMarino, Catherine; Akpamagbo, Yao; Lepene, Benjamin; Kassaye, Seble; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2017-07-14

    HIV-1 infection causes AIDS, infecting millions worldwide. The virus can persist in a state of chronic infection due to its ability to become latent. We have previously shown a link between HIV-1 infection and exosome production. Specifically, we have reported that exosomes transport viral proteins and RNA from infected cells to neighboring uninfected cells. These viral products could then elicit an innate immune response, leading to activation of the Toll-like receptor and NF-κB pathways. In this study, we asked whether exosomes from uninfected cells could activate latent HIV-1 in infected cells. We observed that irrespective of combination antiretroviral therapy, both short- and long-length viral transcripts were increased in wild-type HIV-1-infected cells exposed to purified exosomes from uninfected cells. A search for a possible mechanism for this finding revealed that the exosomes increase RNA polymerase II loading onto the HIV-1 promoter in the infected cells. These viral transcripts, which include trans-activation response (TAR) RNA and a novel RNA that we termed TAR- gag , can then be packaged into exosomes and potentially be exported to neighboring uninfected cells, leading to increased cellular activation. To better decipher the exosome release pathways involved, we used siRNA to suppress expression of ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins and found that ESCRT II and IV significantly control exosome release. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes from uninfected cells activate latent HIV-1 in infected cells and that true transcriptional latency may not be possible in vivo , especially in the presence of combination antiretroviral therapy.

  12. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621's cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)'s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent.

  13. Estrogen administration activates extrathymic T cell differentiation in the liver

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In addition to T cell differentiation in the thymus, we have recently reported that extrathymic T cell differentiation occurs preferentially in the sinusoids of the liver. Although this extrathymic pathway is relatively minor in normal mice, it becomes predominant in mice with autoimmune diseases, athymic mice, and aged mice. In the present study, injection of normal male C3H/He mice, 6-8 wk of age, with 1 mg of estrogen resulted in an increase in mononuclear cells (MNC) yielded from the liver and a drastic decrease in thymocytes approximately 10 d after such injection. This unique modulation was not observed with hydrocortisone injection (5 mg/mouse, i.p.) nor with irradiation (5 Gy/mouse). Rather, these immunosuppressive treatments induced a simultaneous decrease in cell number in both the liver and thymus. A time-kinetics study on the cell number and spontaneous cell proliferation revealed that an increase in spontaneous cell proliferation in the liver preceded the increase in the number of liver MNC, and a decrease in spontaneous cell proliferation in the thymus preceded the decrease in the number of thymocytes. At this time, an enrichment of alpha/beta T cells with intermediate T cell receptors (TCRs), including forbidden T cell oligoclones and V beta 8+ cells, which are characterized as extrathymic alpha/beta T cells with unique properties, took place in the liver. On the other hand, the thymic atrophy induced by estrogen resulted in a prominent decrease in immature double-positive (CD(4+)8+) alpha/beta T cells with dull TCRs. These results indicate that estrogen administration activates an extrathymic pathway of T cell differentiation in the liver and reciprocally inactivates the intrathymic pathway. As extrathymic T cells have unique characteristics such as autoreactivity, the present findings might be intimately related to a female predominance of autoimmune diseases and suggest a possible role of estrogen in this phenomenon. PMID:1531494

  14. Fingolimod induces BAFF and expands circulating transitional B cells without activating memory B cells and plasma cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yusei; Niino, Masaaki; Takahashi, Eri; Suzuki, Masako; Mizuno, Masanori; Hisahara, Shin; Fukazawa, Toshiyuki; Amino, Itaru; Nakano, Fumihito; Nakamura, Masakazu; Akimoto, Sachiko; Minami, Naoya; Fujiki, Naoto; Doi, Shizuki; Shimohama, Shun; Terayama, Yasuo; Kikuchi, Seiji

    2018-02-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who are treated with fingolimod have an increased proportion of transitional B cells in the circulation, but the underlying mechanism is not known. We hypothesized that B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) is involved in the process. Compared with healthy controls and untreated MS patients, fingolimod-treated MS patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of BAFF, which positively correlated with the proportions and the absolute numbers of transitional B cells in blood. Despite the elevated concentrations of BAFF in fingolimod-treated MS patients, serum levels of soluble transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen were not elevated. Our results show that fingolimod induces BAFF in the circulation and expands transitional B cells, but does not activate memory B cells or plasma cells in MS, which is favorable for the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Activated NKT cells imprint NK-cell differentiation, functionality and education.

    PubMed

    Riese, Peggy; Trittel, Stephanie; May, Tobias; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Chambers, Benedict J; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    NK cells represent a vital component of the innate immune system. The recent discoveries demonstrating that the functionality of NK cells depends on their differentiation and education status underscore their potential as targets for immune intervention. However, to exploit their full potential, a detailed understanding of the cellular interactions involved in these processes is required. In this regard, the cross-talk between NKT cells and NK cells needs to be better understood. Our results provide strong evidence for NKT cell-induced effects on key biological features of NK cells. NKT-cell activation results in the generation of highly active CD27(high) NK cells with improved functionality. In this context, degranulation activity and IFNγ production were mainly detected in the educated subset. In a mCMV infection model, we also demonstrated that NKT-cell stimulation induced the generation of highly functional educated and uneducated NK cells, crucial players in viral control. Thus, our findings reveal new fundamental aspects of the NKT-NK cell axis that provide important hints for the manipulation of NK cells in clinical settings. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  17. Cinnamon effectively inhibits the activity of leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Su, M C; Zhao, R B; Ouyang, H M; Dong, X D; Hu, P; Pei, Q; Lu, J; Li, Z F; Zhang, C R; Yang, T-H

    2016-08-19

    Cinnamon is the main component of Sanyangxuedai, which is one of the effective traditional Chinese medicines for treating malignancies. Leukemia is a prevalent malignant disease that Sanyangxuedai has been used to treat. Although successful in several studies, there is a lack of solid evidence as to why Sanyangxuedai has an effect on leukemia, and little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the active ingredients of cinnamon were isolated, purified, and identified. The transwell transport pool formed with the Caco-2 cell model was used to filter the active ingredients of cinnamon by simulating the gastrointestinal barrier in vitro. Moreover, the cell morphology, cell cycle status, apoptosis status, and antigenic variation of the cell surface antigens were observed and measured in K562 cells after treatment with the active ingredients of cinnamon. Our results showed that 50-75 μM was a safe concentration of cinnamon extract for treatment of K562 cells for 72 h. The cinnamon extract caused growth inhibition of K562 cells. Cinnamon extract seemed to arrest the cells at the G1 stage and increased the apoptosis rate significantly. Interestingly, cinnamon extract treatment upregulated the expression of erythroid and myeloid differentiation antigens and downregulated that of the megakaryocytic differentiation antigens in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that cinnamon extract from Sanyangxuedai may be effective for treating leukemia.

  18. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  20. Activated macrophages induce metastatic behavior of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jedinak, Andrej; Dudhgaonkar, Shailesh; Sliva, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages were linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of variety of cancers. However, the role of macrophages in colon cancer is elusive. In the present study, we demonstrate that activated macrophage-conditioned medium (AMCM), containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and IL-6, markedly induced proliferation and migration of human colon cancer cells HCT116. Furthermore, AMCM significantly increased activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from colon cancer cells, which subsequently induced capillary morphogenesis of human aortic endothelial cells. In conclusion, the interruption of signaling between activated macrophages and colon cancer cells could be considered as a new therapeutic strategy. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition ofmore » ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.« less

  2. Janus particles as artificial antigen-presenting cells for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Jia, Yilong; Gao, Yuan; Sanchez, Lucero; Anthony, Stephen M; Yu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the multifunctionality of Janus particles can be exploited for in vitro T cell activation. We engineer bifunctional Janus particles on which the spatial distribution of two ligands, anti-CD3 and fibronectin, mimics the "bull's eye" protein pattern formed in the membrane junction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. Different levels of T cell activation can be achieved by simply switching the spatial distribution of the two ligands on the surfaces of the "bull's eye" particles. We find that the ligand pattern also affects clustering of intracellular proteins. This study demonstrates that anisotropic particles, such as Janus particles, can be developed as artificial antigen-presenting cells for modulating T cell activation.

  3. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  4. Amelioration of NK cell function driven by Vα24+ invariant NKT cell activation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Iyoda, Tomonori; Yamasaki, Satoru; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Abe, Yu; Suzuki, Kenshi; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Shimizu, Kanako; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2018-02-01

    NK cells represent a first line of immune defense, but are progressively dysregulated in multiple myeloma (MM) patients. To restore and facilitate their antitumor effect, NK cells are required in sufficient quantities and must be stimulated. We initially assessed the proportions of NKT and NK cells in 34 MM patients. The frequencies of both in PBMC populations correlated with those in BMMNCs irrespective of low BMMNC numbers. We then assessed the adjunctive effect of stimulating NKT cells with CD1d and α-GalCer complexes on the NK cells. The expression of NKG2D on CD56 dim CD16 + NK cells and DNAM-1 on CD56 bright CD16 - NK cells increased after NKT cell activation. Apparently, NK cell-mediated anti-tumor effects were dependent on NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligands on myeloma cells. Thus, NK cell function in patients could be ameliorated, beyond the effect of immunosuppression, by NKT cell activation. This NKT-driven NK cell therapy could represent a potential new treatment modality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Retinoids are important cofactors in T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Murine thymic T cells depleted of antigen-presenting cells proliferate poorly in response to crosslinking anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies or concanavalin A when cultured in conventional fetal calf serum- containing serum. However, in a serum-free medium formulated to contain, in addition to basic ingredients, insulin, transferrin, albumin, linoleic acid (ITLB), and retinol, proliferation is vigorous. The presence of retinol is critical, because when omitted, cells do not become activated. The subsets of T cells proliferating with the assistance of retinol cofactor are both CD4+ and CD8+ thymic T cells, and CD4+ peripheral T cells. Mature CD8+ T cells of lymph nodes can also be activated in ITLB medium plus retinol, provided that interleukin 2 (IL-2) is added. Retinol needs to be present at the time when T cell receptor triggering is initiated, suggesting that early activation events (G0 to G1 transition) are dependent on retinol. It is currently less clear whether or not subsequent events associated with G1 to S phase transition also require the presence of retinol. 14- hydroxy-retroretinol (14HRR) is a metabolic product of retinol in lymphocytes, and this retinoid effectively supports T cell activation in conjunction with a mitogen in lieu of retinol. Thus, while retinol and its intracellular product, 14HRR, are unable to activate T cells on their own, they are important cofactors. The requirement for retinol in CD3-mediated T cell activation cannot be satisfied by retinoic acid or ILs-1, 2, 4, and 6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha whereas interferon gamma can substitute for retinol. Our experiments are compatible with the idea that retinol, in the course of cellular activation, is converted to 14HRR, which is needed as intracellular messenger. If substantiated by molecular studies now underway, our data should lead to the description of a new signal pathway distinct from the retinoic acid signal pathway observed in nonlymphoid cells, but perhaps functioning by a

  6. Osteoblastic activation in the hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Calvi, Laura M

    2006-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are rare primitive cells capable of reconstituting all blood cell lineages throughout the life of an individual. The microenvironment in which stem cells reside is essential for their survival, self-renewal, and differentiation. This microenvironment, or HSC niche, has been difficult to define in bone and bone marrow, but recent studies from our laboratory and others have shown that osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, are an essential regulatory component of this complex cellular network. We established that parathyroid hormone (PTH), through activation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R) in osteoblastic cells, could alter the HSC niche resulting in HSC expansion in vivo and in vitro and improving dramatically the survival of mice receiving bone marrow transplants. These findings are of great clinical appeal, because they suggest that a strategy aimed at modifying supportive cells in a stem cell niche can expand HSC. While a number of molecules have been found to be important for hematopoietic/osteoblastic interactions, we have focused on the Jagged1/Notch signaling pathway, which was necessary for the PTH-dependent HSC expansion. Since the Jagged1/Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in the microenvironmental control of stem cell self-renewal in several organ systems, definition of Jagged1 modulation, which is currently poorly understood, should provide additional molecular targets for stem cell regulation and advance the understanding of stem cell-microenvironmental interactions.

  7. Active Biochemical Regulation of Cell Volume and a Simple Model of Cell Tension Response

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jiaxiang; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-01-01

    Active contractile forces exerted by eukaryotic cells play significant roles during embryonic development, tissue formation, and cell motility. At the molecular level, small GTPases in signaling pathways can regulate active cell contraction. Here, starting with mechanical force balance at the cell cortex, and the recent discovery that tension-sensitive membrane channels can catalyze the conversion of the inactive form of Rho to the active form, we show mathematically that this active regulation of cellular contractility together with osmotic regulation can robustly control the cell size and membrane tension against external mechanical or osmotic shocks. We find that the magnitude of active contraction depends on the rate of mechanical pulling, but the cell tension can recover. The model also predicts that the cell exerts stronger contractile forces against a stiffer external environment, and therefore exhibits features of mechanosensation. These results suggest that a simple system for maintaining homeostatic values of cell volume and membrane tension could explain cell tension response and mechanosensation in different environments. PMID:26488645

  8. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly themore » lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.« less

  9. Biofuel cell operating on activated THP-1 cells: A fuel and substrate study.

    PubMed

    Javor, Kristina; Tisserant, Jean-Nicolas; Stemmer, Andreas

    2017-01-15

    It is known that electrochemical energy can be harvested from mammalian cells, more specifically from white blood cells (WBC). This study focuses on an improved biofuel cell operating on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) activated THP-1 human monocytic cells. Electrochemical investigation showed strong evidence pointing towards hydrogen peroxide being the primary current source, confirming that the current originates from NADPH oxidase activity. Moreover, an adequate substrate for differentiation and activation of THP-1 cells was examined. ITO, gold, platinum and glass were tested and the amount of superoxide anion produced by NADPH oxidase was measured by spectrophotometry through WST-1 reduction at 450nm and used as an indicator of cellular activity and viability. These substrates were subsequently used in a conventional two-compartment biofuel cell where the power density output was recorded. The material showing the highest cell activity compared to the reference cell culture plate and the highest power output was ITO. Under our experimental conditions, a power density of 4.5μW/cm 2 was reached. To the best of our knowledge, this is a threefold higher power output than other leukocyte biofuel cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Inhibit T Cell Activation by Depleting Cystine and Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Minu K.; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K.; Rodriguez, Paulo; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients and are potent inhibitors of T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Their inhibitory activity is attributed to production of arginase, reactive oxygen species, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and IL-10. We now report that MDSC also block T cell activation by sequestering cystine and limiting the availability of cysteine. Cysteine is an essential amino acid for T cell activation because T cells lack cystathionase, which converts methionine to cysteine, and because they do not have an intact xc− transporter and therefore cannot import cystine and reduce it intracellularly to cysteine. T cells depend on antigen presenting cells (APC) such as macrophages and dendritic cells to export cysteine which is imported by T cells via their ASC neutral amino acid transporter. MDSC express the xc− transporter and import cystine; however, they do not express the ASC transporter and do not export cysteine. MDSC compete with APC for extracellular cystine, and in the presence of MDSC, APC release of cysteine is reduced, thereby limiting the extracellular pool of cysteine. Therefore, MDSC consume cystine and do not return cysteine to their microenvironment, thereby depriving T cells of the cysteine they require for activation and function. PMID:20028852

  11. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  12. Activation, co–activation, and co–stimulation of resting human NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryceson, Yenan T.; March, Michael E.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Long, Eric O.

    2013-01-01

    NK cells possess potent perforin– and IFN-γ–dependent effector functions that are tightly regulated. Inhibitory receptors for MHC class I display variegated expression among NK cells, which confers specificity to individual NK cells. Specificity is also provided by engagement of an array of NK cell activation receptors. Target cells may express ligands for a multitude of activation receptors, many of which signal through different pathways. How inhibitory receptors intersect different signaling cascades is not fully understood. This review focuses on advances in understanding how activation receptors cooperate to induce cytotoxicity in resting NK cells. The role of activating receptors in determining specificity and providing redundancy of target cell recognition is discussed. Using Drosophila insect cells as targets, we have recently examined the contribution of individual receptors. Interestingly, the strength of activation is not determined simply by additive effects of parallel activation pathways. Combinations of signals from different receptors can have different outcomes: synergy, no enhancement over individual signals, or additive effects. Cytotoxicity requires combined signals for granule polarization and degranulation. The integrin LFA-1 contributes a signal for polarization, but not degranulation. Conversely, CD16 alone or synergistic combinations, such as NKG2D and 2B4, signal for PLC-γ and PI3K–dependent degranulation. PMID:17100877

  13. Cell-transforming activity and genotoxicity of phenolphthalein in cultured Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, T; Tamura, Y; Yagi, E; Hasegawa, K; Tanaka, Y; Uehama, A; Someya, T; Hamaguchi, F; Yamamoto, H; Barrett, J C

    1997-11-27

    Phenolphthalein is a cathartic agent widely used in non-prescription laxatives. For the simultaneous assessment of in vitro carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of phenolphthalein, the ability of this chemical to induce cell transformation and genetic effects was examined using the Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell model. Cell growth was reduced by treatment with phenolphthalein at 10-40 microM in a dose-related manner. Treatment with phenolphthalein for 48 hr induced a dose-dependent increase in morphological transformation of SHE cells. Over the dose range that resulted in cell transformation ( 10-40 microM), treatment of SHE cells with phenolphthalein induced gene mutations at the hprt locus but not at the Na+/K+ ATPase locus. A statistically significant level of chromosomal aberrations was elicited in SHE cells treated with phenolphthalein at the highest dose (40 microM). Meanwhile, neither numerical chromosomal changes nor DNA adduct formation, analyzed by the nuclease P1 enhancement version of 32P-post-labeling, were induced by treatment with phenolphthalein at any concentrations examined. We thus report cell-transforming activity and mutagenicity of phenolphthalein assessed with the same mammalian cells in culture. Our results provide evidence that phenolphthalein has cell-transforming and genotoxic activity in cultured mammalian cells. The mutagenic and clastogenic activities of phenolphthalein could be a causal mechanism for carcinogenicity in rodents.

  14. Ribosome Mediated Quinary Interactions Modulate In-Cell Protein Activities.

    PubMed

    DeMott, Christopher M; Majumder, Subhabrata; Burz, David S; Reverdatto, Sergey; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2017-08-15

    Ribosomes are present inside bacterial cells at micromolar concentrations and occupy up to 20% of the cell volume. Under these conditions, even weak quinary interactions between ribosomes and cytosolic proteins can affect protein activity. By using in-cell and in vitro NMR spectroscopy, and biophysical techniques, we show that the enzymes, adenylate kinase and dihydrofolate reductase, and the respective coenzymes, ATP and NADPH, bind to ribosomes with micromolar affinity, and that this interaction suppresses the enzymatic activities of both enzymes. Conversely, thymidylate synthase, which works together with dihydrofolate reductase in the thymidylate synthetic pathway, is activated by ribosomes. We also show that ribosomes impede diffusion of green fluorescent protein in vitro and contribute to the decrease in diffusion in vivo. These results strongly suggest that ribosome-mediated quinary interactions contribute to the differences between in vitro and in vivo protein activities and that ribosomes play a previously under-appreciated nontranslational role in regulating cellular biochemistry.

  15. Activation of human NK cells by malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Amir; Riley, Eleanor M

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes a protocol to assess activation of human NK cells following in vitro stimulation with malaria-infected red blood cells. Activation is assessed by flow cytometry, staining for cell surface expression of CD69 and accumulation of intracellular IFN-gamma. Procedures are described for in vitro propagation and purification of Plasmodium falciparum parasites, separation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from heparinised blood by density centrifugation, in vitro culture of PBMC and for staining and analysis of PBMC by flow cytometry. Some examples of typical FACS plots are shown.

  16. Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cells And Their Emerging Role In Health And Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Kumar, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigens presented by a class I MHC-like molecule CD1d, a member of the CD1 family. While most of the initial studies on NKT cells focused on a subset with semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) termed iNKT cells, majority of CD1d-restricted lipid-reactive human T cells express diverse TCRs and are termed as type II NKT cells. These cells constitute a distinct population of circulating and tissue-resident effector T cells with immune-regulatory properties. They react to a growing list of self- as well as non-self lipid ligands, and share some properties with both iNKT as well as conventional T cells. Emerging body of evidence points to their role in the regulation of immunity to pathogens/tumors and in autoimmune/metabolic disorders. Improved understanding of the biology of these cells and the ability to manipulate their function may be of therapeutic benefit in diverse disease conditions. PMID:28115591

  17. CD1d- and MR1-Restricted T Cells in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Peter A.; Anantha, Ram V.; Shaler, Christopher R.; McCormick, John K.; Haeryfar, S.M. Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated immune responses to infection, such as those encountered in sepsis, can be catastrophic. Sepsis is typically triggered by an overwhelming systemic response to an infectious agent(s) and is associated with high morbidity and mortality even under optimal critical care. Recent studies have implicated unconventional, innate-like T lymphocytes, including CD1d- and MR1-restricted T cells as effectors and/or regulators of inflammatory responses during sepsis. These cell types are typified by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, variant NKT (vNKT) cells, and mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. iNKT and vNKT cells are CD1d-restricted, lipid-reactive cells with remarkable immunoregulatory properties. MAIT cells participate in antimicrobial defense, and are restricted by major histocompatibility complex-related protein 1 (MR1), which displays microbe-derived vitamin B metabolites. Importantly, NKT and MAIT cells are rapid and potent producers of immunomodulatory cytokines. Therefore, they may be considered attractive targets during the early hyperinflammatory phase of sepsis when immediate interventions are urgently needed, and also in later phases when adjuvant immunotherapies could potentially reverse the dangerous state of immunosuppression. We will highlight recent findings that point to the significance or the therapeutic potentials of NKT and MAIT cells in sepsis and will also discuss what lies ahead in research in this area. PMID:26322041

  18. HURTLE CELLS IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ACTIVITIES IN HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS PARENCHYMA.

    PubMed

    Tsagareli, Z; Kvachadze, T; Melikadze, E; Metreveli, L; Nikobadze, E; Gogiashvili, L

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the participation and utility of Hǘrtle cells morphological requirment and transformation under Hashimoto autoimmune thyroiditis versus Riedel´s struma. Several markers have been evaluated to detect induced activities of Hǘrtle cells. Study subject - specimens (tissue fragments) collected from TG surgery (thyroidectomy) for mollecular (receptor) diagnosis of Hǘrtle cells activities using routine histological and immunohistochemical samples. 89 cases were selected in Hashimoto thyroiditis diagnosis with Hǘrtle cells history (adenoma and adenomatous grouth of oncocytes). Markers as: TSH receptors, TTF-1, S-100 protein, also anti-TPO and anti-TG levels in blood plasm were detected. It was shown that solid cell claster-nests like agregation of oncocytes and adenomatous growth foci in parafollicular areas with anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies levels arising while Riedel´s struma shown only large intra- and extra glandular inflammatory proliferative fibrosing process. Large positive expression of TTF-1 and S-100 protein and the negative reaction of TSH receptor factor suggest that Thyroid parenchyma disorganization and mollecular biological atypia with Hǘrtle cells are proceses due to hypothyreoidismus, as well as neuroectodermal cells prominent activities in 70% of Hashimoto cases.

  19. Activation of Postnatal Neural Stem Cells Requires Nuclear Receptor TLX

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wenze; Zou, Yuhua; Shen, ChengCheng; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) continually produce new neurons in postnatal brains. However, the majority of these cells stay in a non-dividing, inactive state. The molecular mechanism that is required for these cells to enter proliferation still remains largely unknown. Here, we show that nuclear receptor TLX (NR2E1) controls the activation status of postnatal NSCs in mice. Lineage tracing indicates that TLX-expressing cells give rise to both activated and inactive postnatal NSCs. Surprisingly, loss of TLX function does not result in spontaneous glial differentiation, but rather leads to a precipitous age-dependent increase of inactive cells with marker expression and radial morphology for NSCs. These inactive cells are mis-positioned throughout the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus during development and can proliferate again after reintroducing ectopic TLX. RNA-seq analysis of sorted NSCs revealed a TLX-dependent global expression signature, which includes the p53 signaling pathway. TLX regulates p21 expression in a p53-dependent manner and acute removal of p53 can rescue the proliferation defect of TLX-null NSCs in culture. Together, these findings suggest that TLX acts as an essential regulator that ensures the proliferative ability of postnatal NSCs by controlling their activation through genetic interaction with p53 and other signaling pathways. PMID:21957244

  20. Contribution of stress to asthma worsening through mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Enakuaa, Souad; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Asadi, Shahrzad; Papadimas, Evangelos C; Angelidou, Asimenia; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios

    2012-07-01

    To review the available evidence linking stress to asthma and to investigate whether mast cells contribute to the effect of stress through activation by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). The PubMed database was searched for articles (1998-2011) using the keywords anxiety, asthma, exacerbation, inflammation, mast cells, socioeconomic status, stress, violence, and worsening. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic, with emphasis on clinical or epidemiologic data linking stress to asthma and studies that offered possible explanations for how stress may affect asthma. Many articles point to an association between stress (socioeconomic status, interpersonal conflicts, emotional distress, terrorism) and asthma exacerbations but without any distinct pathogenetic mechanism. A few articles have reported reduced circulating cortisol and/or sensitivity to corticosteroids. We propose that mast cells, known to be involved in the pathophysiology of asthma, can be activated by CRH, which is secreted under stress in the lungs, leading to selective release of proinflammatory mediators. This effect may be augmented by neuropeptides or cytokines. CRH also reduces T-regulatory cell production of interleukin 10, which in known to inhibit allergic mast cell activation. More studies are required to investigate lung levels of CRH and selective mast cell mediators. Reducing stress and using CRH receptor antagonists and/or mast cell blockers may serve as possible new therapeutic approaches for asthma. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Death Pathways Triggered by Activated Ras in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Ras GTPases are best known for their ability to serve as molecular switches regulating cell growth, differentiation and survival. Gene mutations that result in expression of constitutively active forms of Ras proteins have been clearly linked to oncogenesis in animal models and humans. However, over the past two decades, evidence has gradually accumulated to support a paradoxical role for Ras proteins in the initiation of cell death pathways. The balance between the opposing functions of Ras in cell proliferation/survival versus cell death can be critical for determining the overall fate of the cancer cell. In this review we will survey the body of literature that points to the ability of activated Ras proteins to tip the scales toward cell death under conditions where cancer cells encounter adverse environmental conditions or are subjected to apoptotic stimuli. In some cases the consequences of Ras activation are mediated through interactions with known effectors and well defined apoptotic death pathways. However, in other cases it appears that Ras operates by triggering novel non-apoptotic death mechanisms that are just beginning to be characterized. Understanding the details of these pathways, and the various factors that go into changing the nature of Ras signaling from pro-survival to pro-death, could potentially set the stage for the development of novel therapeutic approaches aimed at manipulating the pro-death Ras effector pathways in cancers. PMID:21196257

  2. T cell antigen receptor activation and actin cytoskeleton remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sudha; Curado, Silvia; Mayya, Viveka

    2013-01-01

    T cells constitute a crucial arm of the adaptive immune system and their optimal function is required for a healthy immune response. After the initial step of T cell-receptor (TCR) triggering by antigenic peptide complexes on antigen presenting cell (APC), the T cell exhibits extensive cytoskeletal remodeling. This cytoskeletal remodeling leads to formation of an “immunological synapse” [1] characterized by regulated clustering, segregation and movement of receptors at the interface. Synapse formation regulates T cell activation and response to antigenic peptides and proceeds via feedback between actin cytoskeleton and TCR signaling. Actin polymerization participates in various events during the synapse formation, maturation, and eventually its disassembly. There is increasing knowledge about the actin effectors that couple TCR activation to actin rearrangements [2, 3], and how defects in these effectors translate into impairment of T cell activation. In this review we aim to summarize and integrate parts of what is currently known about this feedback process. In addition, in light of recent advancements in our understanding of TCR triggering and translocation at the synapse, we speculate on the organizational and functional diversity of microfilament architecture in the T cell. PMID:23680625

  3. Shed syndecan-2 enhances tumorigenic activities of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sojoong; Choi, Youngsil; Jun, Eunsung; Kim, In-San; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Because earlier studies showed the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-2, sheds from colon cancer cells in culture, the functional roles of shed syndecan-2 were assessed. A non-cleavable mutant of syndecan-2 in which the Asn148-Leu149 residues were replaced with Asn148-Ile149, had decreased shedding, less cancer-associated activities of syndecan-2 in vitro, and less syndecan-2-mediated metastasis of mouse melanoma cells in vivo, suggesting the importance of shedding on syndecan-2-mediated pro-tumorigenic functions. Indeed, shed syndecan-2 from cancer-conditioned media and recombinant shed syndecan-2 enhanced cancer-associated activities, and depletion of shed syndecan-2 abolished these effects. Similarly, shed syndecan-2 was detected from sera of patients from advanced carcinoma (625.9 ng/ml) and promoted cancer-associated activities. Furthermore, a series of syndecan-2 deletion mutants showed that the tumorigenic activity of shed syndecan-2 resided in the C-terminus of the extracellular domain and a shed syndecan-2 synthetic peptide (16 residues) was sufficient to establish subcutaneous primary growth of HT29 colon cancer cells, pulmonary metastases (B16F10 cells), and primary intrasplenic tumor growth and liver metastases (4T1 cells). Taken together, these results demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 directly enhances colon cancer progression and may be a promising therapeutic target for controlling colon cancer development. PMID:25686828

  4. Dopamine Modulates the Activity of Sensory Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Toro, Cecilia; Trapani, Josef G; Pacentine, Itallia; Maeda, Reo; Sheets, Lavinia; Mo, Weike; Nicolson, Teresa

    2015-12-16

    The senses of hearing and balance are subject to modulation by efferent signaling, including the release of dopamine (DA). How DA influences the activity of the auditory and vestibular systems and its site of action are not well understood. Here we show that dopaminergic efferent fibers innervate the acousticolateralis epithelium of the zebrafish during development but do not directly form synapses with hair cells. However, a member of the D1-like receptor family, D1b, tightly localizes to ribbon synapses in inner ear and lateral-line hair cells. To assess modulation of hair-cell activity, we reversibly activated or inhibited D1-like receptors (D1Rs) in lateral-line hair cells. In extracellular recordings from hair cells, we observed that D1R agonist SKF-38393 increased microphonic potentials, whereas D1R antagonist SCH-23390 decreased microphonic potentials. Using ratiometric calcium imaging, we found that increased D1R activity resulted in larger calcium transients in hair cells. The increase of intracellular calcium requires Cav1.3a channels, as a Cav1 calcium channel antagonist, isradipine, blocked the increase in calcium transients elicited by the agonist SKF-38393. Collectively, our results suggest that DA is released in a paracrine fashion and acts at ribbon synapses, likely enhancing the activity of presynaptic Cav1.3a channels and thereby increasing neurotransmission. The neurotransmitter dopamine acts in a paracrine fashion (diffusion over a short distance) in several tissues and bodily organs, influencing and regulating their activity. The cellular target and mechanism of the action of dopamine in mechanosensory organs, such as the inner ear and lateral-line organ, is not clearly understood. Here we demonstrate that dopamine receptors are present in sensory hair cells at synaptic sites that are required for signaling to the brain. When nearby neurons release dopamine, activation of the dopamine receptors increases the activity of these mechanosensitive

  5. Femtosecond laser fabricated microfluorescence-activated cell sorter for single cell recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragheri, F.; Paiè, P.; Nava, G.; Yang, T.; Minzioni, P.; Martinez Vazquez, R.; Bellini, N.; Ramponi, R.; Cristiani, I.; Osellame, R.

    2014-03-01

    Manipulation, sorting and recovering of specific live cells from samples containing less than a few thousand cells is becoming a major hurdle in rare cell exploration such as stem cell research or cell based diagnostics. Moreover the possibility of recovering single specific cells for culturing and further analysis would be of great impact in many biological fields ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In recent years considerable effort has been devoted to the development of integrated and low-cost optofluidic devices able to handle single cells, which usually rely on microfluidic circuits that guarantee a controlled flow of the cells. Among the different microfabrication technologies, femtosecond laser micromachining (FLM) is ideally suited for this purpose as it provides the integration of both microfluidic and optical functions on the same glass chip leading to monolithic, robust and portable devices. Here a new optofluidic device is presented, which is capable of sorting and recovering of single cells, through optical forces, on the basis of their fluorescence and. Both fluorescence detection and single cell sorting functions are integrated in the microfluidic chip by FLM. The device, which is specifically designed to operate with a limited amount of cells but with a very high selectivity, is fabricated by a two-step process that includes femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. The capability of the device to act as a micro fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been tested on polystyrene beads and on tumor cells and the results on the single live cell recovery are reported.

  6. A Cell-Cell Fusion Assay to Assess Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Membrane-Fusion Activity.

    PubMed

    York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H

    2018-01-01

    For many viruses that enter their target cells through pH-dependent fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, cell-cell fusion assays can provide an experimental platform for investigating the structure-function relationships that promote envelope glycoprotein membrane-fusion activity. Typically, these assays employ effector cells expressing the recombinant envelope glycoprotein on the cell surface and target cells engineered to quantitatively report fusion with the effector cell. In the protocol described here, Vero cells are transfected with a plasmid encoding the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein complex GPC and infected with the vTF7-3 vaccinia virus expressing the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. These effector cells are mixed with target cells infected with the vCB21R-lacZ vaccinia virus encoding a β-galactosidase reporter under the control of the T7 promoter. Cell-cell fusion is induced upon exposure to low-pH medium (pH 5.0), and the resultant expression of the β-galactosidase reporter is quantitated using a chemiluminescent substrate. We have utilized this robust microplate cell-cell fusion assay extensively to study arenavirus entry and its inhibition by small-molecule fusion inhibitors.

  7. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  8. Cell activity analysis by capillary zone electrophoresis combined with specific cell staining.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jinmei; Zhang, Lu; Qu, Feng; Ren, Xiaomin; Zhao, Xinying; Liu, Qingsheng

    2011-02-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was used to determine Hela cells activity with Hela treated by 0-46 μM methylmercury (MeHg) as the apoptosis model. The treated and untreated cells were stained by four different dyes (Janus Green B, Rhodamine 123, Neutral Red and Trypan Blue) and analyzed by CZE with UV/Vis detection. The absorbance of cells at 214 nm could indicate the degree of cell shrinkage and component leakage induced by MeHg. The intensity of cell absorbance at maximum visible absorption wavelength of dyes represented mitochondrial activity, lysosome phagocytosis ability and cell membrane integrity. For different concentrations of MeHg treatment, the change of cell activity was in good agreement with Janus Green B uptake colorimetric assay (R² =0.914) and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-di-phenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay (R² =0.892). 80% of RSD (n=3) values were in the range of 0.5-15.0%. The established CZE method could be used to analyze intact cells with only UV-Vis detector. The CZE method has some features equivalent to the existing universal method, and it has the potential to be a universal tool for cell activity determination. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metabolically active human brown adipose tissue derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francisco J; Holt, Dolly J; Vargas, Vanessa; Yockman, James; Boudina, Sihem; Atkinson, Donald; Grainger, David W; Revelo, Monica P; Sherman, Warren; Bull, David A; Patel, Amit N

    2014-02-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a key role in the evolutionarily conserved mechanisms underlying energy homeostasis in mammals. It is characterized by fat vacuoles 5-10 µm in diameter and expression of uncoupling protein one, central to the regulation of thermogenesis. In the human newborn, BAT depots are typically grouped around the vasculature and solid organs. These depots maintain body temperature during cold exposure by warming the blood before its distribution to the periphery. They also ensure an optimal temperature for biochemical reactions within solid organs. BAT had been thought to involute throughout childhood and adolescence. Recent studies, however, have confirmed the presence of active BAT in adult humans with depots residing in cervical, supraclavicular, mediastinal, paravertebral, and suprarenal regions. While human pluripotent stem cells have been differentiated into functional brown adipocytes in vitro and brown adipocyte progenitor cells have been identified in murine skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue, multipotent metabolically active BAT-derived stem cells from a single depot have not been identified in adult humans to date. Here, we demonstrate a clonogenic population of metabolically active BAT stem cells residing in adult humans that can: (a) be expanded in vitro; (b) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential; and (c) functionally differentiate into metabolically active brown adipocytes. Our study defines a new target stem cell population that can be activated to restore energy homeostasis in vivo for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics.

  11. CD16A Activation of NK Cells Promotes NK Cell Proliferation and Memory-Like Cytotoxicity against Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Jens H W; Koch, Joachim; Götz, Jana-Julia; Arnold, Annette; Reusch, Uwe; Gantke, Thorsten; Rajkovic, Erich; Treder, Martin; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2018-05-01

    CD16A is a potent cytotoxicity receptor on human natural killer (NK) cells, which can be exploited by therapeutic bispecific antibodies. So far, the effects of CD16A-mediated activation on NK cell effector functions beyond classical antibody-dependent cytotoxicity have remained poorly elucidated. Here, we investigated NK cell responses after exposure to therapeutic antibodies such as the tetravalent bispecific antibody AFM13 (CD30/CD16A), designed for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma and other CD30 + lymphomas. Our results reveal that CD16A engagement enhanced subsequent IL2- and IL15-driven NK cell proliferation and expansion. This effect involved the upregulation of CD25 (IL2Rα) and CD132 (γ c ) on NK cells, resulting in increased sensitivity to low-dose IL2 or to IL15. CD16A engagement initially induced NK cell cytotoxicity. The lower NK cell reactivity observed 1 day after CD16A engagement could be recovered by reculture in IL2 or IL15. After reculture in IL2 or IL15, these CD16A-experienced NK cells exerted more vigorous IFNγ production upon restimulation with tumor cells or cytokines. Importantly, after reculture, CD16A-experienced NK cells also exerted increased cytotoxicity toward different tumor targets, mainly through the activating NK cell receptor NKG2D. Our findings uncover a role for CD16A engagement in priming NK cell responses to restimulation by cytokines and tumor cells, indicative of a memory-like functionality. Our study suggests that combination of AFM13 with IL2 or IL15 may boost NK cell antitumor activity in patients by expanding tumor-reactive NK cells and enhancing NK cell reactivity, even upon repeated tumor encounters. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(5); 517-27. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Visualizing nuclear RNAi activity in single living human cells.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Shira; Mor, Amir; Dotan, Iris; Tzadok, Sivan; Kanter, Itamar; Kinor, Noa; Canaani, Dan; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2017-10-17

    Nuclear RNA interference (RNAi) is mediated by the canonical RNAi machinery and can lead to transcriptional silencing, transcriptional activation, or modulation of alternative splicing patterns. These effects transpire through changes in histone and DNA modifications via RNAi-mediated recruitment of chromatin-modifying enzymes. To prove that nuclear RNAi occurs and modulates transcription in human cells, we used live-cell imaging to detect and track nuclear RNAi transcriptional repression in single living human cells. While employing reporter genes constructed with inducible promoters and cognate-inducible short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeted against the reporter coding region, we have characterized the dynamics of the nuclear RNAi process in living human cells. We show that the silencing effect is mediated through the nascent mRNA, followed by activity of histone methylating enzymes, but not through DNA methylation.

  13. mTOR activation is critical for betulin treatment in renal cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenlong; Ji, Shiqi; Zhang, Haijian; Han, Zhixing; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Jianwen; Ping, Hao

    2017-01-22

    Betulin, a natural product isolated from the bark of the birch trees, exhibits multiple anticancer effects. Activation of mTOR signaling pathway has been found in numerous cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, we attempted to study whether mTOR signaling was essential for betulin to treat RCC. Based on cell survival and colony formation assays, we found that mTOR hyperactive RCC cell line 786-O cells were more sensitive to betulin treatment compared with mTOR-inactive Caki-2 cells. Knockdown of TSC2 in Caki-2 cells had similar results to 786-O cells, and mTOR silencing in 786-O cells rescued the inhibitory effect of betulin, indicating that betulin inhibited RCC cell proliferation in an mTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, betulin treatment decreases the levels of glucose consumption and lactate production in 786-O cells, while minimal effects were observed in Caki-2 cells. In addition, betulin significantly inhibited the expression of PKM2 and HK2 in 786-O cells. Finally, knockdown of PKM2 or HK2 in 786-O reversed the anti-proliferative effects of betulin, and overexpression of PKM2 or HK2 in Caki-2 cells enhanced the sensitivity to betulin treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrated the critical role of mTOR activation in RCC cells to betulin treatment, suggesting that betulin might be valuable for targeted therapies in RCC patients with mTOR activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential PKA activation and AKAP association determines cell fate in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The dependence of malignant properties of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on IGF1R signaling has been demonstrated and several IGF1R antagonists are currently in clinical trials. Recently, we identified a novel pathway in which cAMP independent PKA activation by TGFβ signaling resulted in the destabilization of survivin/XIAP complex leading to increased cell death. In this study, we evaluated the effect of IGF1R inhibition or activation on PKA activation and its downstream cell survival signaling mechanisms. Methods Small molecule IGF1R kinase inhibitor OSI-906 was used to test the effect of IGF1R inhibition on PKA activation, AKAP association and its downstream cell survival signaling. In a complementary approach, ligand mediated activation of IGF1R was performed and AKAP/PKA signaling was analyzed for their downstream survival effects. Results We demonstrate that the inhibition of IGF1R in the IGF1R-dependent CRC subset generates cell death through a novel mechanism involving TGFβ stimulated cAMP independent PKA activity that leads to disruption of cell survival by survivin/XIAP mediated inhibition of caspase activity. Importantly, ligand mediated activation of the IGF1R in CRC cells results in the generation of cAMP dependent PKA activity that functions in cell survival by inhibiting caspase activity. Therefore, this subset of CRC demonstrates 2 opposing pathways organized by 2 different AKAPs in the cytoplasm that both utilize activation of PKA in a manner that leads to different outcomes with respect to life and death. The cAMP independent PKA activation pathway is dependent upon mitochondrial AKAP149 for its apoptotic functions. In contrast, Praja2 (Pja2), an AKAP-like E3 ligase protein was identified as a key element in controlling cAMP dependent PKA activity and pro-survival signaling. Genetic manipulation of AKAP149 and Praja2 using siRNA KD had opposing effects on PKA activity and survivin/XIAP regulation. Conclusions We had identified 2

  15. Sorting drops and cells with acoustics: acoustic microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Lothar; Weitz, David A; Franke, Thomas

    2014-10-07

    We describe a versatile microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter that uses acoustic actuation to sort cells or drops at ultra-high rates. Our acoustic sorter combines the advantages of traditional fluorescence-activated cell (FACS) and droplet sorting (FADS) and is applicable for a multitude of objects. We sort aqueous droplets, at rates as high as several kHz, into two or even more outlet channels. We can also sort cells directly from the medium without prior encapsulation into drops; we demonstrate this by sorting fluorescently labeled mouse melanoma cells in a single phase fluid. Our acoustic microfluidic FACS is compatible with standard cell sorting cytometers, yet, at the same time, enables a rich variety of more sophisticated applications.

  16. Enhanced Efflux Pump Activity in Old Candida glabrata Cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Somanon; Fries, Bettina C

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the effect of replicative aging on antifungal resistance in Candida glabrata Our studies demonstrate significantly increased transcription of ABC transporters and efflux pump activity in old versus young C. glabrata cells of a fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant strain. In addition, higher tolerance to killing by micafungin and amphotericin B was noted and is associated with higher transcription of glucan synthase gene FKS1 and lower ergosterol content in older cells. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Spectral perspective on the electromagnetic activity of cells.

    PubMed

    Kučera, Ondrej; Červinková, Kateřina; Nerudová, Michaela; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    In this mini-review, we summarize the current hypotheses, theories and experimental evidence concerning the electromagnetic activity of living cells. We systematically classify the bio-electromagnetic phenomena in terms of frequency and we assess their general acceptance in scientific community. We show that the electromagnetic activity of cells is well established in the low frequency range below 1 kHz and on optical wavelengths, while there is only limited evidence for bio-electromagnetic processes in radio- frequency and millimeter-wave ranges. This lack of generally accepted theory or trustful experimental results is the cause for controversy which accompanies this topic. We conclude our review with the discussion of the relevance of the electromagnetic activity of cells to human medicine.

  18. DOCK2 regulates cell proliferation through Rac and ERK activation in B cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Nishihara, Hiroshi, E-mail: nisihara@patho2.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Kimura, Taichi

    2010-04-23

    DOCK2; a member of the CDM protein family, regulates cell motility and cytokine production through the activation of Rac in mammalian hematopoietic cells and plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the immune system. Here we demonstrated the alternative function of DOCK2 in hematopoietic tumor cells, especially in terms of its association with the tumor progression. Immunostaining for DOCK2 in 20 cases of human B cell lymphoma tissue specimens including diffuse large B cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma revealed the prominent expression of DOCK2 in all of the lymphoma cells. DOCK2-knockdown (KD) of the B cell lymphoma cell lines,more » Ramos and Raji, using the lentiviral shRNA system presented decreased cell proliferation compared to the control cells. Furthermore, the tumor formation of DOCK2-KD Ramos cell in nude mice was significantly abrogated. Western blotting analysis and pull-down assay using GST-PAK-RBD kimeric protein suggested the presence of DOCK2-Rac-ERK pathway regulating the cell proliferation of these lymphoma cells. This is the first report to clarify the prominent role of DOCK2 in hematopoietic malignancy.« less

  19. Polystyrene nanoparticles activate ion transport in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J; Gong, X; Nahirney, D; Duszyk, M; Radomski, Mw

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, nanotechnology has provided researchers with new nanometer materials, such as nanoparticles, which have the potential to provide new therapies for many lung diseases. In this study, we investigated the acute effects of polystyrene nanoparticles on epithelial ion channel function. Human submucosal Calu-3 cells that express cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and baby hamster kidney cells engineered to express the wild-type CFTR gene were used to investigate the actions of negatively charged 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles on short-circuit current in Calu-3 cells by Ussing chamber and single CFTR Clchannels alone and in the presence of known CFTR channel activators by using baby hamster kidney cell patches. Polystyrene nanoparticles caused sustained, repeatable, and concentration-dependent increases in short-circuit current. In turn, these short-circuit current responses were found to be biphasic in nature, ie, an initial peak followed by a plateau. EC(50) values for peak and plateau short-circuit current responses were 1457 and 315.5 ng/mL, respectively. Short-circuit current was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a CFTR Cl(-) channel blocker. Polystyrene nanoparticles activated basolateral K(+) channels and affected Cl(-) and HCO(3) (-) secretion. The mechanism of short-circuit current activation by polystyrene nanoparticles was found to be largely dependent on calcium-dependent and cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of CFTR Cl(-) channels. Recordings from isolated inside-out patches using baby hamster kidney cells confirmed the direct activation of CFTR Cl(-) channels by the nanoparticles. This is the first study to identify the activation of ion channels in airway cells after exposure to polystyrene-based nanomaterials. Thus, polystyrene nanoparticles cannot be considered as a simple neutral vehicle for drug delivery for the treatment of lung diseases, due to the fact that they may have the ability to

  20. Polystyrene nanoparticles activate ion transport in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, J; Gong, X; Nahirney, D; Duszyk, M; Radomski, MW

    2011-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, nanotechnology has provided researchers with new nanometer materials, such as nanoparticles, which have the potential to provide new therapies for many lung diseases. In this study, we investigated the acute effects of polystyrene nanoparticles on epithelial ion channel function. Methods Human submucosal Calu-3 cells that express cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and baby hamster kidney cells engineered to express the wild-type CFTR gene were used to investigate the actions of negatively charged 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles on short-circuit current in Calu-3 cells by Ussing chamber and single CFTR Clchannels alone and in the presence of known CFTR channel activators by using baby hamster kidney cell patches. Results Polystyrene nanoparticles caused sustained, repeatable, and concentration-dependent increases in short-circuit current. In turn, these short-circuit current responses were found to be biphasic in nature, ie, an initial peak followed by a plateau. EC50 values for peak and plateau short-circuit current responses were 1457 and 315.5 ng/mL, respectively. Short-circuit current was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a CFTR Cl− channel blocker. Polystyrene nanoparticles activated basolateral K+ channels and affected Cl− and HCO3 − secretion. The mechanism of short-circuit current activation by polystyrene nanoparticles was found to be largely dependent on calcium-dependent and cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of CFTR Cl− channels. Recordings from isolated inside-out patches using baby hamster kidney cells confirmed the direct activation of CFTR Cl− channels by the nanoparticles. Conclusion This is the first study to identify the activation of ion channels in airway cells after exposure to polystyrene-based nanomaterials. Thus, polystyrene nanoparticles cannot be considered as a simple neutral vehicle for drug delivery for the treatment of lung diseases, due to the fact

  1. ASBESTOS-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF CELL SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using respiratory epithelial cells transfected with either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase, the authors tested the hypothesis that the activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signal pathway after asbestos exposure involves an oxidative stress. Western blot...

  2. Human Dendritic Cells Synergistically Activated by FVIII Plus LPS Induce Activation of Autologous CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lilija; Ringler, Eva; Kistner, Klaus Maximilian; Waibler, Zoe

    2018-03-19

    The most severe side effect in haemophilia A (HA) treatment is the development of anti-factor VIII antibodies, also called inhibitors. Why inhibitors develop in a proportion of treated HA patients and how this can be prevented remains largely unanswered. Among numerous theories, the presence of immunological danger signals, associated with events such as surgery or infection, has been proposed to play a role. In this study, we demonstrate that human dendritic cells (DC) synergistically activated by a combination of factor VIII (FVIII) concentrate plus the bacterial danger signal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induce a significantly stronger activation of autologous CD4 + T cells than DC pretreated with FVIII or LPS alone. The observed T cell activation is dependent on antigen processing, presentation on MHC class II molecules and costimulation via CD86. Of note, FVIII plus LPS pretreated DC predominantly induce the activation of memory T cells and a minor proportion of naive T cells. Collectively, our data support a model in which immunological danger signals plus FVIII concentrates synergistically increase human CD4 + T cell responses to FVIII protein. Schattauer.

  3. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  4. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Noolu, Bindu; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Chauhan, Anitha; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Manchala, Raghunath; Ismail, Ayesha

    2013-01-09

    Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau's method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification of active component(s) from the leaf

  5. Glucose Metabolism Regulates T Cell Activation, Differentiation, and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Clovis S.; Ostrowski, Matias; Balderson, Brad; Christian, Nicole; Crowe, Suzanne M.

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is equipped to eliminate both tumors and pathogenic microorganisms. It requires a series of complex and coordinated signals to drive the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of appropriate T cell subsets. It is now established that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, emerging evidence now suggest that specific metabolic alterations associated with distinct T cell subsets may be ancillary to their differentiation and influential in their immune functions. The “Warburg effect” originally used to describe a phenomenon in which most cancer cells relied on aerobic glycolysis for their growth is a key process that sustain T cell activation and differentiation. Here, we review how different aspects of metabolism in T cells influence their functions, focusing on the emerging role of key regulators of glucose metabolism such as HIF-1α. A thorough understanding of the role of metabolism in T cell function could provide insights into mechanisms involved in inflammatory-mediated conditions, with the potential for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat these diseases. PMID:25657648

  6. Glucose metabolism regulates T cell activation, differentiation, and functions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Clovis S; Ostrowski, Matias; Balderson, Brad; Christian, Nicole; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is equipped to eliminate both tumors and pathogenic microorganisms. It requires a series of complex and coordinated signals to drive the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of appropriate T cell subsets. It is now established that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, emerging evidence now suggest that specific metabolic alterations associated with distinct T cell subsets may be ancillary to their differentiation and influential in their immune functions. The "Warburg effect" originally used to describe a phenomenon in which most cancer cells relied on aerobic glycolysis for their growth is a key process that sustain T cell activation and differentiation. Here, we review how different aspects of metabolism in T cells influence their functions, focusing on the emerging role of key regulators of glucose metabolism such as HIF-1α. A thorough understanding of the role of metabolism in T cell function could provide insights into mechanisms involved in inflammatory-mediated conditions, with the potential for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat these diseases.

  7. Effect of millimeter waves on natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Makar, V R; Logani, M K; Bhanushali, A; Kataoka, M; Ziskin, M C

    2005-01-01

    Millimeter wave therapy (MMWT) is being widely used for the treatment of many diseases in Russia and other East European countries. MMWT has been reported to reduce the toxic effects of chemotherapy on the immune system. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether millimeter waves (MMWs) can modulate the effect of cyclophosphamide (CPA), an anticancer drug, on natural killer (NK) cell activity. NK cells play an important role in the antitumor response. MMWs were produced with a Russian-made YAV-1 generator. The device produced modulated 42.2 +/- 0.2 GHz radiation through a 10 x 20 mm rectangular output horn. Mice, restrained in plastic tubes, were irradiated on the nasal area. Peak SAR at the skin surface and peak incident power density were measured as 622 +/- 100 W/kg and 31 +/- 5 mW/cm2, respectively. The maximum temperature elevation, measured at the end of 30 min, was 1 degrees C. The animals, restrained in plastic tubes, were irradiated on the nasal area. CPA injection (100 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally on the second day of 3-days exposure to MMWs. All the irradiation procedures were performed in a blinded manner. NK cell activation and cytotoxicity were measured after 2, 5, and 7 days following CPA injection. Flow cytometry of NK cells showed that CPA treatment caused a marked enhancement in NK cell activation. The level of CD69 expression, which represents a functional triggering molecule on activated NK cells, was increased in the CPA group at all the time points tested as compared to untreated mice. However, the most enhancement in CD69 expression was observed on day 7. A significant increase in TNF-alpha level was also observed on day 7 following CPA administration. On the other hand, CPA caused a suppression of the cytolytic activity of NK cells. MMW irradiation of the CPA treated groups resulted in further enhancement of CD69 expression on NK cells, as well as in production of TNF-alpha. Furthermore, MMW irradiation restored CPA

  8. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  9. Stochasticity and spatial heterogeneity in T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Nigel J; van der Merwe, P Anton

    2007-04-01

    Stochastic and spatial aspects are becoming increasingly recognized as an important factor in T-cell activation. Activation occurs in an intrinsically noisy environment, requiring only a handful of agonist peptide-major histocompatibility complex molecules, thus making consideration of signal to noise of prime importance in understanding sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, it is widely established that surface-bound ligands are more effective at activation than soluble forms, while surface patternation has highlighted the role of spatial relocation in activation. Here we consider the results of a number of models of T-cell activation, from a realistic model of kinetic segregation-induced T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering through to simple queuing theory models. These studies highlight the constraints on cell activation by a surface receptor that recruits kinases. Our analysis shows that TCR triggering based on trapping of bound TCRs in regions of close proximity that exclude large ectodomain-containing molecules, such as the phosphatases CD45 and CD148, can effectively reproduce known signaling characteristics and is a viable 'signal transduction' mechanism distinct from oligomerization and conformation-based mechanisms. A queuing theory analysis shows the interrelation between sensitivity and specificity, emphasizing that these are properties of individual cell functions and need not be, nor are likely to be, uniform across different functions. In fact, threshold-based mechanisms of detection are shown to be poor at ligand discrimination because, although they can be highly specific, that specificity is limited to a small range of peptide densities. Time integration mechanisms however are able to control noise effectively, while kinetic proofreading mechanisms endow them with good specificity properties. Thus, threshold mechanisms are likely to be important for rapidly detecting minimal signaling requirements, thus achieving efficient scanning of antigen

  10. ROG negatively regulates T-cell activation but is dispensable for Th-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bok Yun; Miaw, Shi-Chuen; Ho, I-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    ROG, a transcriptional repressor, is a direct target gene of NF-AT and a putative negative regulator of T-cell activation. In addition, overexpression of ROG suppresses the activity of GATA-3, implying a role of ROG in the differentiation and function of Th cells. Despite these observations, the function of ROG has yet to be confirmed by loss-of-function approaches. Here we report that ROG-deficient T cells are hypersensitive to anti-CD3 stimulation and produce more interleukin-2 (IL-2) due to enhanced NF-kappaB activity. ROG-deficient dendritic cells also produce more IL-12p40, another NF-kappaB target gene. However, ROG-deficient Th cells are capable of differentiating into Th1 and Th2 cells, and ROG-deficient mice have no defect in mounting appropriate Th immune responses in vivo. Thus, ROG is dispensable for the differentiation and function of Th cells but serves as a mediator of NF-AT-initiated suppression of NF-kappaB. Its mechanism of action and its expression pattern are distinct from those of other transcription factors negatively regulating the activation of T cells.

  11. Th17 Cells and Activated Dendritic Cells Are Increased in Vitiligo Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Moussai, Dariush; Gulati, Nicholas; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Cohen, Jules A.; Krueger, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a common skin disorder, characterized by progressive skin de-pigmentation due to the loss of cutaneous melanocytes. The exact cause of melanocyte loss remains unclear, but a large number of observations have pointed to the important role of cellular immunity in vitiligo pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we characterized T cell and inflammation-related dermal dendritic cell (DC) subsets in pigmented non-lesional, leading edge and depigmented lesional vitiligo skin. By immunohistochemistry staining, we observed enhanced populations of CD11c+ myeloid dermal DCs and CD207+ Langerhans cells in leading edge vitiligo biopsies. DC-LAMP+ and CD1c+ sub-populations of dermal DCs expanded significantly in leading edge and lesional vitiligo skin. We also detected elevated tissue mRNA levels of IL-17A in leading edge skin biopsies of vitiligo patients, as well as IL-17A positive T cells by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Langerhans cells with activated inflammasomes were also noted in lesional vitiligo skin, along with increased IL-1ß mRNA, which suggest the potential of Langerhans cells to drive Th17 activation in vitiligo. Conclusions/Significance These studies provided direct tissue evidence that implicates active Th17 cells in vitiligo skin lesions. We characterized new cellular immune elements, in the active margins of vitiligo lesions (e.g. populations of epidermal and dermal dendritic cells subsets), which could potentially drive the inflammatory responses. PMID:21541348

  12. Antihelminthic niclosamide modulates dendritic cells activation and function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Shan; Li, Yi-Rong; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chen, Ying-Che; Chu, Chiang-Liang; Pan, I-Hong; Wu, Yu-Shan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) link the sensing of the environment by the innate immune system to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, DCs are considered to be a major target in the development of immunomodulating compounds. In this study, the effect of niclosamide, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug, on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived DCs was examined. Our experimental results show that niclosamide reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression of LPS-activated DCs. In addition, niclosamide also affected the expression of MHC and costimulatory molecules and influenced the ability of the cells to take up antigens. Therefore, in mixed cell cultures composed of syngeneic OVA-specific T cells and DCs, niclosamide-treated DCs showed a decreased ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, intravenous injection of niclosamide also attenuated contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice during sensitization with 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene. Blocking the LPS-induced activation of MAPK-ERK, JNK and NF-κB may contribute to the inhibitory effect of niclosamide on DC activation. Collectively, our findings suggest that niclosamide can manipulate the function of DCs. These results provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of niclosamide and suggest that it may be useful for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders or DC-mediated autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Renal cell carcinoma with erythrocytosis and elevated erythropoietic stimulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Burk, J R; Lertora, J J; Martinez, I R; Fisher, J W

    1977-08-01

    A case study is presented of a 55-year-old man who had clear cell renal carcinoma with pulmonary metastases and erythrocytosis. The increase in red blood cell mass was associated with an elevation in erythropoietic stimulatory activity in serum, pleural fluid, and tumor-cyst fluid as determined by the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay. It is postulated that the increased erythropoietic stimulatory activity represents autonomous tumor secretion of erythropoietin or an erythropoietin-like material. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the proximal tubular origin of this tumor.

  14. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  15. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results:more » IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.« less

  16. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. TSLP-activated dendritic cells induce human T follicular helper cell differentiation through OX40-ligand.

    PubMed

    Pattarini, Lucia; Trichot, Coline; Bogiatzi, Sofia; Grandclaudon, Maximilien; Meller, Stephan; Keuylian, Zela; Durand, Melanie; Volpe, Elisabetta; Madonna, Stefania; Cavani, Andrea; Chiricozzi, Andrea; Romanelli, Marco; Hori, Toshiyuki; Hovnanian, Alain; Homey, Bernhard; Soumelis, Vassili

    2017-05-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) are important regulators of humoral responses. Human Tfh polarization pathways have been thus far associated with Th1 and Th17 polarization pathways. How human Tfh cells differentiate in Th2-skewed environments is unknown. We show that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)-activated dendritic cells (DCs) promote human Tfh differentiation from naive CD4 T cells. We identified a novel population, distinct from Th2 cells, expressing IL-21 and TNF, suggestive of inflammatory cells. TSLP-induced T cells expressed CXCR5, CXCL13, ICOS, PD1, BCL6, BTLA, and SAP, among other Tfh markers. Functionally, TSLP-DC-polarized T cells induced IgE secretion by memory B cells, and this depended on IL-4Rα. TSLP-activated DCs stimulated circulating memory Tfh cells to produce IL-21 and CXCL13. Mechanistically, TSLP-induced Tfh differentiation depended on OX40-ligand, but not on ICOS-ligand. Our results delineate a pathway of human Tfh differentiation in Th2 environments. © 2017 Pattarini et al.

  18. Avian influenza virus directly infects human natural killer cells and inhibits cell activity.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huawei; Liu, Yinping; Sia, Sin Fun; Peiris, J S Malik; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei

    2017-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell is a key component of innate immunity and plays an important role in host defense against virus infection by directly destroying infected cells. Influenza is a respiratory disease transmitted in the early phase of virus infection. Evasion of host innate immunity including NK cells is critical for the virus to expand and establish a successful acute infection. Previously, we showed that human influenza H1N1 virus infects NK cells and induces cell apoptosis, as well as inhibits NK cell activity. In this study, we further demonstrated that avian influenza virus also directly targeted NK cells as an immunoevasion strategy. The avian virus infected human NK cells and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, avian influenza virion and HA protein inhibited NK cell cytotoxicity. This novel strategy has obvious advantages for avian influenza virus, allowing the virus sufficient time to expand and subsequent spread before the onset of the specific immune response. Our findings provide an important clue for the immunopathogenesis of avian influenza, and also suggest that direct targeting NK cells may be a common strategy used by both human and avian influenza viruses to evade NK cell immunity.

  19. M2 receptor activation inhibits cell cycle progression and survival in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Michela; Fabbiano, Cinzia; Bari, Maria Di; Conte, Claudia; Castigli, Emilia; Sciaccaluga, Miriam; Ponti, Donatella; Ruggieri, Paola; Raco, Antonino; Ricordy, Ruggero; Calogero, Antonella; Tata, Ada Maria

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors, expressed in several primary and metastatic tumours, appear to be implicated in their growth and propagation. In this work we have demonstrated that M2 muscarinic receptors are expressed in glioblastoma human specimens and in glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, we have characterized the effects of the M2 agonist arecaidine on cell growth and survival both in two different glioblastoma cell lines (U251MG and U87MG) and in primary cultures obtained from different human biopsies. Cell growth analysis has demonstrated that the M2 agonist arecaidine strongly decreased cell proliferation in both glioma cell lines and primary cultures. This effect was dose and time dependent. FACS analysis has confirmed cell cycle arrest at G1/S and at G2/M phase in U87 cells and U251 respectively. Cell viability analysis has also shown that arecaidine induced severe apoptosis, especially in U251 cells. Chemosensitivity assays have, moreover, shown arecaidine and temozolomide similar effects on glioma cell lines, although IC50 value for arecaidine was significantly lower than temozolomide. In conclusion, we report for the first time that M2 receptor activation has a relevant role in the inhibition of glioma cell growth and survival, suggesting that M2 may be a new interesting therapeutic target to investigate for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:23490231

  20. Expression and functional activity of PPARgamma in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Welters, Hannah J; McBain, Stuart C; Tadayyon, Moh; Scarpello, John H B; Smith, Stephen A; Morgan, Noel G

    2004-08-01

    Rosiglitazone is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) and ameliorates insulin resistance in type II diabetes. In addition, it may also promote increased pancreatic beta-cell viability, although it is not known whether this effect is mediated by a direct action on the beta cell. We have investigated this possibility. Semiquantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis (Taqman) revealed that freshly isolated rat islets and the clonal beta-cell line, BRIN-BD11, express PPARgamma, as well as PPARalpha and PPARdelta. The levels of expression of PPARgamma were estimated by reference to adipose tissue and were found to represent approximately 60% (islets) and 30% (BRIN-BD11) of that found in freshly isolated visceral adipose tissue. Western blotting confirmed the presence of immunoreactive PPARgamma in rat (and human) islets and in BRIN-BD11 cells. Transfection of BRIN-BD11 cells with a PPARgamma-sensitive luciferase reporter construct was used to evaluate the functional competence of the endogenous PPARgamma. Luciferase activity was modestly increased by the putative endogenous ligand, 15-deoxy-Delta12,14 prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2). Rosiglitazone also caused activation of the luciferase reporter construct but this effect required concentrations of the drug (50-100 microm) that are beyond the expected therapeutic range. This suggests that PPARgamma is relatively insensitive to activation by rosiglitazone in BRIN-BD11 cells. Exposure of BRIN-BD11 cells to the lipotoxic effector, palmitate, caused a marked loss of viability. This was attenuated by treatment of the cells with either actinomycin D or cycloheximide suggesting that a pathway of programmed cell death was involved. Rosiglitazone failed to protect BRIN-BD11 cells from the toxic actions of palmitate at concentrations up to 50 microm. Similar results were obtained with a range of other PPARgamma agonists. Taken together, the present data suggest

  1. Activated T cells in an animal model of allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, I; Carreras, B; McGrath, L; Rice, A; Easty, D L

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to determine whether the presence of lymphocytic infiltrates observed in the histology of ocular allergic conditions in humans or in the late phase of ocular anaphylactic reactions in experimental animals is a non-specific event dependent only on the degranulation of mast cells, or is conditioned by a specific response to antigen. With this in mind, responses to antigen and to a non-immunological mast cell degranulator (compound 48/80) were compared in an experimental model of allergic conjunctivitis. Rats were sensitised to ovalbumin and challenged topically in the left conjunctival sac either with ovalbumin or compound 48/80. The presence of T cells and activated T cells in the infiltrate was studied by immunohistochemical staining on conjunctival tissue obtained at 4, 24, and 48 hours after challenge. Ovalbumin sensitised and challenged rats showed increased numbers of T cells in the conjunctival infiltrate, statistically significant when compared with compound 48/80 challenged rats at 48 hours and with controls at 4, 24, and 48 hours. The number of T cells was significantly higher in compound 48/80 challenged rats only at 48 hours when compared with controls. As for the number of activated T cells, only ovalbumin sensitised and challenged rats showed significantly increased levels of these cells compared with both sensitised animals challenged with compound 48/80 and controls at 4 and 24 hours after challenge. These results suggest that the infiltration of the conjunctiva by activated T lymphocytes is, at least in part, dependent on a specific response to antigen. Images PMID:8025049

  2. PAR1 activation affects the neurotrophic properties of Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Elena; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Somma, Francesca; Correani, Virginia; Maras, Bruno; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Ciraci, Viviana; Artico, Marco; Fornai, Francesco; Fumagalli, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is the prototypic member of a family of four G-protein-coupled receptors that signal in response to extracellular proteases. In the peripheral nervous system, the expression and/or the role of PARs are still poorly investigated. High PAR1 mRNA expression was found in the rat dorsal root ganglia and the signal intensity of PAR1 mRNA increased in response to sciatic nerve transection. In the sciatic nerve, functional PAR1 receptor was reported at the level of non-compacted Schwann cell myelin microvilli of the nodes of Ranvier. Schwann cells are the principal population of glial cells of the peripheral nervous system which myelinate axons playing an important role during axonal regeneration and remyelination. The present study was undertaken in order to determine if the activation of PAR1 affects the neurotrophic properties of Schwann cells. Our results suggest that the stimulation of PAR1 could potentiate the Schwann cell ability to favour nerve regeneration. In fact, the conditioned medium obtained from Schwann cell cultures challenged with a specific PAR1 activating peptide (PAR1 AP) displays increased neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties with respect to the culture medium from untreated Schwann cells. The proteomic analysis of secreted proteins in untreated and PAR1 AP-treated Schwann cells allowed the identification of factors differentially expressed in the two samples. Some of them (such as macrophage migration inhibitory factor, matrix metalloproteinase-2, decorin, syndecan 4, complement C1r subcomponent, angiogenic factor with G patch and FHA domains 1) appear to be transcriptionally regulated after PAR1 AP treatment as shown by RT-PCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  4. Oxytocin-Stimulated NFAT Transcriptional Activation in Human Myometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Craig A.; López Bernal, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a peptide hormone that binds the OXT receptor on myometrial cells, initiating an intracellular signaling cascade, resulting in accumulation of intracellular calcium and smooth muscle contraction. In other systems, an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ stimulates nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is transcriptionally active in arterial and ileal smooth muscle. Here we have investigated the role of NFAT in the mechanism of action of OXT. Human myometrial cells expressed all five NFAT isoforms (NFATC1–C4 and -5). Myometrial cells were transduced with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a NFATC1-EFP reporter, and a semi-automated imaging system was used to monitor effects of OXT on reporter localization in live cells. OXT induced a concentration-dependent nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP in a reversible manner, which was inhibited by OXT antagonists and calcineurin inhibitors. Pulsatile stimulation with OXT caused intermittent, pulse-frequency-dependent, nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP, which was more efficient than sustained stimulation. OXT induced nuclear translocation of endogenous NFAT that was transcriptionally active, because OXT stimulated activity of a NFAT-response element-luciferase reporter and induced calcineurin-NFAT dependent expression of RGS2, RCAN1, and PTGS2 (COX2) mRNA. Furthermore, OXT-dependent transcription was dependent on protein neosynthesis; cycloheximide abolished RGS2 transcription but augmented RCAN1 and COX2 transcriptional readouts. This study identifies a novel signaling mechanism within the myometrium, whereby calcineurin-NFAT signaling mediates OXT-induced transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we show NFATC1-EFP is responsive to pulses of OXT, a mechanism by which myometrial cells could decode OXT pulse frequency. PMID:22902539

  5. Suppressor cell regulation of cell-mediated immune responses in renal infection in vitro modulation of suppressor cell activity.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, T; Marshall, E

    1980-01-01

    Infection-induced anergy is a frequent complication of bacterial, viral, and parsitic infection. A marked suppression of the thymus-derived (T) lymphocyte response to concanavalin A has been demonstrated in vitro during renal infection and the mechanisms by which suppression occurs have been investigated. In particular we have considered the possibility that suppression might result from the inhibitory effect of prostaglandins, secreted by activated macrophages with immunoregulatory potential. The experiments have shown that the T-lymphocyte effector status in experimentally-induced renal infection is determined by two suppressor cells, one infection-induced and the other naturally occurring. The inability to respond to mitogenic stimulation was reversible and restoration of immune responsiveness to splenic lymphocytes from infected animals could be achieved in two stepwise manipulations; differential centrifugation removed the infection-induced suppressor cells, and the suppressor activity of the naturally occurring suppressor cells could then be inhibited by indomethacin. Thus the two suppressor cells were distinguishable on the basis of their physical characteristics and their response to indomethacin. The dominant factor determining the immune responsiveness of splenic lymphocytes from the pyelonephritic animals was, however, the infection-induced suppressor cell. This cell has been characterized as a sedimentable cell (30 g) with suppressor activity demonstrable in co-culture experiments. Plastic-adherent cells from the sedimentable fraction of pyelonephritic animals' splenic cells were shown to have suppressor activity that was not inhibited by indomethacin. The infection-induced and naturally occurring suppressor cells can be viewed as prototypes for the equivalent cells in man and may be useful models for studying the role of these cells as determinants in the pathogenesis of infectious disease. PMID:6448267

  6. A Micro Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter for Astrobiology Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Donald W.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    A micro-scale Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (microFACS) for astrobiology applications is under development. This device is designed to have a footprint of 7 cm x 7 cm x 4 cm and allow live-dead counts and sorting of cells that have fluorescent characteristics from staining. The FACS system takes advantage of microfluidics to create a cell sorter that can fit in the palm of the hand. A micron-scale channel allows cells to pass by a blue diode which causes emission of marker-expressed cells which are detected by a filtered photodetector. A small microcontroller then counts cells and operates high speed valves to select which chamber the cell is collected in (a collection chamber or a waste chamber). Cells with the expressed characteristic will be collected in the collection chamber. This system has been built and is currently being tested. We are also designing a system with integrated MEMS-based pumps and valves for a small and compact unit to fly on small satellite-based biology experiments.

  7. Established cell surface markers efficiently isolate highly overlapping populations of skeletal muscle satellite cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Maesner, Claire C; Almada, Albert E; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) has enabled the direct isolation of highly enriched skeletal muscle stem cell, or satellite cell, populations from postnatal tissue. Several distinct surface marker panels containing different positively selecting surface antigens have been used to distinguish muscle satellite cells from other non-myogenic cell types. Because functional and transcriptional heterogeneity is known to exist within the satellite cell population, a direct comparison of results obtained in different laboratories has been complicated by a lack of clarity as to whether commonly utilized surface marker combinations select for distinct or overlapping subsets of the satellite cell pool. This study therefore sought to evaluate phenotypic and functional overlap among popular satellite cell sorting paradigms. Utilizing a transgenic Pax7 -zsGreen reporter mouse, we compared the overlap between the fluorescent signal of canonical paired homeobox protein 7 ( Pax7 ) expressing satellite cells to cells identified by combinations of surface markers previously published for satellite cells isolation. We designed two panels for mouse skeletal muscle analysis, each composed of markers that exclude hematopoietic and stromal cells (CD45, CD11b, Ter119, CD31, and Sca1), combined with previously published antibody clones recognizing surface markers present on satellite cells (β1-integrin/CXCR4, α7-integrin/CD34, and Vcam1). Cell populations were comparatively analyzed by flow cytometry and FACS sorted for functional assessment of myogenic activity. Consistent with prior reports, each of the commonly used surface marker schemes evaluated here identified a highly enriched satellite cell population, with 89-90 % positivity for Pax7 expression based on zsGreen fluorescence. Distinct surface marker panels were also equivalent in their ability to identify the majority of the satellite cell pool, with 90-93 % of all Pax7-zsGreen positive cells marked by each of the

  8. Assessment of genetic markers and glioblastoma stem-like cells in activation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Aysel; Haydaroglu, Ayfer; Biray Avci, Cigir; Gunduz, Cumhur; Oktar, Nezih; Dalbasti, Tayfun; Caglar, Hasan Onur; Attar, Rukset; Kitapcioglu, Gul

    2013-09-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive intraparenchymal primary brain tumor in adults. The principal reasons for the poor outcomes of GBM are the high rates of recurrence and resistance to chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine the role of tailored cellular therapy for GBM with a poor prognosis and compare the activity of dendritic cells (DCs) that have encountered GBM cells. Detecting the correlations between methylation and expression of MGMT and PTEN genes and GBM cancer stem cells (CSCs) markers after co-cultures with a mononuclear cell cocktail are also aims for this study. Allogenic umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived DCs were labeled with the CD11a and CD123 for immature DCs, and CD80 and CD11c for mature DCs. CD34, CD45, and CD56 cells were isolated from allogenic UCB for using in DCs maturation. GBM CSCs were detected with CD133/1 and CD111 antibodies after co-culture studies. DC activation was carried out via GBM cells including CD133 and CD111 cells and a mononuclear cells cocktail including CD34, CD45, and CD56 natural killer cells. Real-time PCR was performed to detect the expression and promoter methylation status of PTEN and MGMT genes. The expression of CSCs markers was found in all GBM cases, and a statistically significant correlation was found among them after co-culture studies. The most pronounced affinity of DCs to GBM cells was observed at dilutions between 1/4 and 1/256 in co-cultures. There was a statistically significant correlation between cellularity and granularity ratios for CD123 and CD11c. PTEN and MGMT gene expression and methylation values were evaluated with respect to CSCs expression and no statistical significance was found. Activation of DCs might associate with CSCs and the mononuclear cells cocktail including CD34, CD45, and CD56 cells which were obtained from allogenic UCB.

  9. B-Cell-Activating Factor and the B-Cell Compartment in HIV/SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Trovato, Maria; Chaoul, Nada; Ibrahim, Hany M.; Richard, Yolande

    2017-01-01

    With the goal to design effective HIV vaccines, intensive studies focused on broadly neutralizing antibodies, which arise in a fraction of HIV-infected people. Apart from identifying new vulnerability sites in the viral envelope proteins, these studies have shown that a fraction of these antibodies are produced by self/poly-reactive B-cells. These findings prompted us to revisit the B-cell differentiation and selection process during HIV/SIV infection and to consider B-cells as active players possibly shaping the helper T-cell program within germinal centers (GCs). In this context, we paid a particular attention to B-cell-activating factor (BAFF), a key cytokine in B-cell development and immune response that is overproduced during HIV/SIV infection. As it does in autoimmune diseases, BAFF excess might contribute to the abnormal rescue of self-reactive B-cells at several checkpoints of the B-cell development and impair memory B-cell generation and functions. In this review, we first point out what is known about the functions of BAFF/a proliferation-inducing ligand and their receptors [B-cell maturation, transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI), and BAFF-R], in physiological and pathophysiological settings, in mice and humans. In particular, we highlight recent results on the previously underappreciated regulatory functions of TACI and on the highly regulated production of soluble TACI and BAFF-R that act as decoy receptors. In light of recent data on BAFF, TACI, and BAFF-R, we then revisit the altered phenotypes and functions of B-cell subsets during the acute and chronic phase of HIV/SIV infection. Given the atypical phenotype and reduced functions of memory B-cells in HIV/SIV infection, we particularly discuss the GC reaction, a key checkpoint where self-reactive B-cells are eliminated and pathogen-specific memory B-cells and plasmablasts/cells are generated in physiological settings. Through its capacity to differentially bind and process BAFF-R and

  10. Streptococcus pyogenes activates human plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Veckman, Ville; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2008-02-01

    Human peripheral blood contains two major dendritic cell (DC) populations, namely CD11c(-)CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) and CD11c+CD123(-) myeloid DCs (MDCs). Although the activation of these DC types by various TLR ligands has been relatively well-characterized, less is known about the ability of whole live bacteria to induce PDC and MDC activation. In the present report, we have compared the activation of human PDCs and MDCs in response to major human bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci) and influenza A virus. S. pyogenes stimulation resulted in the maturation of both DC types, as evidenced by enhanced expression of costimulatory molecules and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Furthermore, S. pyogenes-stimulated PDCs and MDCs activated naïve CD4+ T cells and enhanced their Th1 cytokine production. Influenza A virus infection induced rapid PDC activation, whereas MDCs were extremely sensitive to influenza A virus-induced cell death. The most significant differences between DC types were seen in the production of IL-10 and IL-12, which were only produced by S. pyogenes-stimulated MDCs. Although S. pyogenes was able to induce PDC activation, only influenza A virus infection resulted in detectable IFN-alpha production. Our results show that depending on the infecting microbe, the functions of PDCs and MDCs may be partially overlapping, suggesting a considerable flexibility of the human DC system.

  11. Cell in situ zymography: an in vitro cytotechnology for localization of enzyme activity in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Aastha; Jaiswal, Astha; Malhotra, Umang; Kohli, Shrey; Rani, Vibha

    2012-09-01

    In situ zymography is a unique technique for detection and localization of enzyme-substrate interactions majorly in histological sections. Substrate with quenched fluorogenic molecule is incorporated in gel over which tissue sections are mounted and then incubated in buffer. The enzymatic activity is observed in the form of fluorescent signal. With the advancements in the field of biological research, use of in vitro cell culture has become very popular and holds great significance in multiple fields including inflammation, cancer, stem cell biology and the still emerging 3-D cell cultures. The information on analysis of enzymatic activity in cell lines is inadequate presently. We propose a single-step methodology that is simple, sensitive, cost-effective, and functional to perform and study the 'in position' activity of enzyme on substrate for in vitro cell cultures. Quantification of enzymatic activity to carry out comparative studies on cells has also been illustrated. This technique can be applied to a variety of enzyme classes including proteases, amylases, xylanases, and cellulases in cell cultures.

  12. Optimization of active cell area on the dye-sensitized solar cell efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, A. W.; Nurosyid, F.; Supriyanto, Agus

    2017-11-01

    This study is aimed to obtain optimal active area producing high efficiency of DSSC module. The DSSC structure is constructed of TiO2 as working electrode, dye as photosensitizer, platinum as counter electrode, and electrolyte as electron transfer media. TiO2 paste was deposited on Fluorine-doped Tin Oxide (FTO) by screen printing method. Meanwhile, platinum was also coated on FTO via brush painting method. Keithley I-V meter was performed to characterize DSSC electrical property. The active area of each cell was varied of 4.5 cm2, 9 cm2, and 13.5 cm2. Each cell was assembled into a module using an external series connection of Z type. The module was consisted of 12 cells, 6 cells, and 4 cells with module active area of 54 cm2. The optimal active area of DSSC cell is 4.5 cm2 resulting 0.4149% efficiency. In addition, the highest efficiency of DSSC module is 0.2234% acquired by 6 cells assembling.

  13. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu, Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S-activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation. PMID:21435673

  14. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Graham, E-mail: gsimmons@bloodsystems.or; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona

    2011-05-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a proteasemore » essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation.« less

  15. Heme-mediated cell activation: the inflammatory puzzle of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Guarda, Caroline Conceição da; Santiago, Rayra Pereira; Fiuza, Luciana Magalhães; Aleluia, Milena Magalhães; Ferreira, Júnia Raquel Dutra; Figueiredo, Camylla Vilas Boas; Yahouedehou, Setondji Cocou Modeste Alexandre; Oliveira, Rodrigo Mota de; Lyra, Isa Menezes; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza

    2017-06-01

    Hemolysis triggers the onset of several clinical manifestations of sickle cell anemia (SCA). During hemolysis, heme, which is derived from hemoglobin (Hb), accumulates due to the inability of detoxification systems to scavenge sufficiently. Heme exerts multiple harmful effects, including leukocyte activation and migration, enhanced adhesion molecule expression by endothelial cells and the production of pro-oxidant molecules. Area covered: In this review, we describe the effects of heme on leukocytes and endothelial cells, as well as the features of vascular endothelial cells related to vaso-occlusion in SCA. Expert commentary: Free Hb, heme and iron, potent cytotoxic intravascular molecules released during hemolysis, can exacerbate, modulate and maintain the inflammatory response, a main feature of SCA. Endothelial cells in the vascular environment, as well as leukocytes, can become activated via the molecular signaling effects of heme. Due to the hemolytic nature of SCA, hemolysis represents an interesting therapeutic target for heme-scavenging purposes.

  16. Intracellular chemiluminescence activates targeted photodynamic destruction of leukaemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Laptev, R; Nisnevitch, M; Siboni, G; Malik, Z; Firer, M A

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves a two-stage process. A light-absorbing photosensitiser (Ps) is endocytosed and then stimulated by light, inducing transfer of energy to a cytoplasmic acceptor molecule and the generation of reactive oxygen species that initiate damage to cellular membrane components and cytolysis. The expanded use of PDT in the clinic is hindered by the lack of Ps target-cell specificity and the limited tissue penetration by external light radiation. This study demonstrates that bioconjugates composed of transferrin and haematoporphyrin (Tf–Hp), significantly improve the specificity and efficiency of PDT for erythroleukemic cells by a factor of almost seven-fold. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the conjugates accumulate in intracellular vesicles whereas free Hp was mostly membrane bound. Experiments with cells deliberately exposed to Tf–Hp at cells did not develop resistance to subsequent treatments with the conjugate. Furthermore, we show that the compound luminol induces intracellular chemiluminescence. This strategy was then used to obviate the use of external radiation for Ps activation by incubating the cells with luminol either before or together with Tf–Hp. This novel chemical means of PDT activation induced cytotoxicity in 95% of cells. These combined approaches provide an opportunity to develop broader and more effective applications of PDT. PMID:16819545

  17. Intracellular chemiluminescence activates targeted photodynamic destruction of leukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Laptev, R; Nisnevitch, M; Siboni, G; Malik, Z; Firer, M A

    2006-07-17

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves a two-stage process. A light-absorbing photosensitiser (Ps) is endocytosed and then stimulated by light, inducing transfer of energy to a cytoplasmic acceptor molecule and the generation of reactive oxygen species that initiate damage to cellular membrane components and cytolysis. The expanded use of PDT in the clinic is hindered by the lack of Ps target-cell specificity and the limited tissue penetration by external light radiation. This study demonstrates that bioconjugates composed of transferrin and haematoporphyrin (Tf-Hp), significantly improve the specificity and efficiency of PDT for erythroleukemic cells by a factor of almost seven-fold. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the conjugates accumulate in intracellular vesicles whereas free Hp was mostly membrane bound. Experiments with cells deliberately exposed to Tf-Hp at cells did not develop resistance to subsequent treatments with the conjugate. Furthermore, we show that the compound luminol induces intracellular chemiluminescence. This strategy was then used to obviate the use of external radiation for Ps activation by incubating the cells with luminol either before or together with Tf-Hp. This novel chemical means of PDT activation induced cytotoxicity in 95% of cells. These combined approaches provide an opportunity to develop broader and more effective applications of PDT.

  18. Auranofin displays anticancer activity against ovarian cancer cells through FOXO3 activation independent of p53.

    PubMed

    Park, See-Hyoung; Lee, Jung Han; Berek, Jonathan S; Hu, Mickey C-T

    2014-10-01

    Auranofin is a gold-containing compound classified by the World Health Organization as a clinically established rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic agent. Through drug screening for novel anticancer therapeutics, we unexpectedly identified auranofin as a potent anticancer agent against a p53-null ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cell line. However, the molecular mechanism underlying auranofin-mediated anticancer activity in ovarian cancer cells is basically unknown. Here, we show that auranofin inhibits proliferation and survival of SKOV3 cells in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Auranofin treatment activates the pro-apoptotic caspase-3, increases protein levels of apoptosis-inducing proteins Bax and Bim and reduces the expression of the anti-apoptotic mediator Bcl-2 in SKOV3 cells. Moreover, auranofin downregulates IκB kinase (IKK)-β and promotes nuclear localization and the activation of FOXO3 tumor suppressor, leading to cellular apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. In contrast, silencing FOXO3 diminishes the pro-apoptotic signaling of auranofin in SKOV3 cells. These results suggest that auranofin may induce caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in a FOXO3-dependent manner. The observed upregulation of pro-apoptotic genes and apoptosis in cancer cells without p53 in response to auranofin suggests a novel p53-independent mechanism underlying auranofin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells.

  19. Cytokine-dependent regulation of NADPH oxidase activity and the consequences for activated T cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Divya

    2009-01-01

    Cellular dependence on growth factors for survival is developmentally programmed and continues in adult metazoans. Antigen-activated T cell apoptosis in the waning phase of the immune response is thought to be triggered by depletion of cytokines from the microenvironment. T cell apoptosis resulting from cytokine deprivation is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), but their source and position in the apoptotic cascade is poorly understood. RNA interference approaches implicated the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in neglect-induced apoptosis in T cells. Using mice deficient for the catalytic subunit gp91phox to characterize the molecular link to activated T cell apoptosis, we show that gp91phox-deficient T (T−/−) cells generated mitochondrial superoxide but had diminished hydrogen peroxide production in response to neglect, which, in turn, regulated Jun N-terminal kinase–dependent Bax activation and apoptosis. Activated T−/− cells were distinguished by improved survival after activation by superantigens in vivo, adoptive transfers into congenic hosts, and higher recall responses after immunization. Thus, the NADPH oxidase may regulate adaptive immunity in addition to its previously well-characterized role in the innate response. PMID:19546249

  20. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T. C.; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F. T.; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light–inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation–dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell–depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  1. Blue light-activated hypocrellin B damages ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Leung, A. W. N.; Xiang, J. Y.; Xu, C. S.

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, a novel blue light source from LED was used to activate hypocrellin B in ovarian cancer HO-8910 cells. Hyppcrellin B concentration was kept at 2.5 μM and light doses from 0.5-4.0 J/cm2. Photocytotoxicity was investigated using MTT reduction assay and light microscopy after light irradiation. Cellular morphology was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MTT assay showed that the cytotoxicity of blue light-activated hypocrellin B in HO-8910 cells increased along with light dose. The observations from light microscopy reinforced the above results. TEM showed that microvillin disappearance, vacuole formation, chromatin condensation, and topical apoptotic body were observed in the cells treated by both light and hypocrellin B. The findings demonstrated that blue light from LED source could effectively activate hypocrellin B to cause the destruction of HO-8910 cells, indicating that Blue light-activated hypocrellin B might be potential therapeutic strategy in the management of ovarian cancer.

  2. ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN UROTSA CELLS BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN UROTSA CELLS BY METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS. Z Drobna1, I Jaspers2, D J Thomas3 and M Styblo1. 1Department of Pediatrics; 2Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

  3. Blue light-activated hypocrellin B damages ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Leung, A. W. N.; Xiang, J. Y.; Xu, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a novel blue light source from LED was used to activate hypocrellin B in ovarian cancer HO-8910 cells. Hyppcrellin B concentration was kept at 2.5 μM and light doses from 0.5-4.0 J/cm2. Photocytotoxicity was investigated using MTT reduction assay and light microscopy after light irradiation. Cellular morphology was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MTT assay showed that the cytotoxicity of blue light-activated hypocrellin B in HO-8910 cells increased along with light dose. The observations from light microscopy reinforced the above results. TEM showed that microvillin disappearance, vacuole formation, chromatin condensation, and topical apoptotic body were observed in the cells treated by both light and hypocrellin B. The findings demonstrated that blue light from LED source could effectively activate hypocrellin B to cause the destruction of HO-8910 cells, indicating that Blue light-activated hypocrellin B might be potential therapeutic strategy in the management of ovarian cancer.

  4. Antiproliferative and cell apoptosis-inducing activities of compounds from Buddleja davidii in Mgc-803 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Yi, Wenshi; Jin, Linhong; Hu, Deyu; Song, Baoan

    2012-08-31

    Buddleja davidii is widely distributed in the southwestern region of China. We have undertaken a systematic analysis of B. davidii as a Chinese traditional medicine with anticancer activity by isolating natural products for their activity against the human gastric cancer cell line Mgc-803 and the human breast cancer cell line Bcap-37. Ten compounds were extracted and isolated from B. davidii, among which colchicine was identified in B. davidii for the first time. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were investigated in Mgc-803, Bcap-37 cells in vitro by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, and the results showed that luteolin and colchicine had potent inhibitory activities against the growth of Mgc-803 cells. Subsequent fluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis indicated that these two compounds could induce apoptosis in Mgc-803 cells. The results also showed that the percentages of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-, where PI is propidium iodide) and late apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI+) increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After 36 h of incubation with luteolin at 20 μM, the percentages of cells were approximately 15.4% in early apoptosis and 43.7% in late apoptosis; after 36 h of incubation with colchicine at 20 μM, the corresponding values were 7.7% and 35.2%, respectively. Colchicine and luteolin from B. davidii have potential applications as adjuvant therapies for treating human carcinoma cells. These compounds could also induce apoptosis in tumor cells.

  5. Antiproliferative and cell apoptosis-inducing activities of compounds from Buddleja davidii in Mgc-803 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Buddleja davidii is widely distributed in the southwestern region of China. We have undertaken a systematic analysis of B. davidii as a Chinese traditional medicine with anticancer activity by isolating natural products for their activity against the human gastric cancer cell line Mgc-803 and the human breast cancer cell line Bcap-37. Results Ten compounds were extracted and isolated from B. davidii, among which colchicine was identified in B. davidii for the first time. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were investigated in Mgc-803, Bcap-37 cells in vitro by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, and the results showed that luteolin and colchicine had potent inhibitory activities against the growth of Mgc-803 cells. Subsequent fluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis indicated that these two compounds could induce apoptosis in Mgc-803 cells. The results also showed that the percentages of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-, where PI is propidium iodide) and late apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI+) increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After 36 h of incubation with luteolin at 20 μM, the percentages of cells were approximately 15.4% in early apoptosis and 43.7% in late apoptosis; after 36 h of incubation with colchicine at 20 μM, the corresponding values were 7.7% and 35.2%, respectively. Conclusions Colchicine and luteolin from B. davidii have potential applications as adjuvant therapies for treating human carcinoma cells. These compounds could also induce apoptosis in tumor cells. PMID:22938042

  6. Activated human B cells stimulate COX-2 expression in follicular dendritic cell-like cells via TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jini; Lee, Seungkoo; Jeoung, Dooil; Kim, Young-Myeong; Choe, Jongseon

    2018-02-01

    In spite of the potential importance of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in the germinal center, its underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. COX-2 is the key enzyme generating pleiotropic prostaglandins. Based on our previous findings, we hypothesized that lymphocytes would stimulate COX-2 expression in follicular dendritic cell (FDC) by liberating cytokines. In this study, we examined the effect of tonsillar lymphocytes on COX-2 expression in FDC-like cells by immunoblotting. B but not T cells induced COX-2 protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Sub-fractionation analysis of B cell subsets revealed that activated but not resting B cells were responsible for the COX-2 induction. Confocal microscopy of frozen tonsils demonstrated that FDCs indeed express COX-2 in situ, in line with the in vitro results. To identify the stimulating molecule, we added neutralizing antibodies to the coculture of FDC-like cells and B cells. COX-2 induction in FDC-like cells was markedly inhibited by TNF-α neutralizing antibody. Finally, the actual production of TNF-α by activated B cells was confirmed by an enzyme immunoassay. The current study implies an unrecognized cellular interaction between FDC and B cells leading to COX-2 expression during immune inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10-B cells over IL-10+B cells during inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-05-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10 - B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10 + Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10 + B cells over IL-10 - B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10 - B cells over IL-10 + B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10 - B cells over IL-10 + B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10 - B cells over IL-10 + regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Activity of quinone alkylating agents in quinone-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Begleiter, A; Leith, M K

    1990-05-15

    The role of the quinone group in the antitumor activity of quinone alkylating agents, such as mitomycin C and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,5-bis(carboethoxyamino)-1,4-benzoquinone, is still uncertain. The quinone group may contribute to antitumor activity by inducing DNA strand breaks through the formation of free radicals and/or by influencing the alkylating activity of the quinone alkylators. The cytotoxic activity and DNA damage produced by the model quinone alkylating agents, benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard, were compared in L5178Y murine lymphoblasts sensitive and resistant to the model quinone antitumor agent, hydrolyzed benzoquinone mustard. The resistant cell lines, L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10, have increased concentrations of glutathione and elevated catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and DT-diaphorase activity. L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells were 7.4- and 8.5-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone mustard and 1.7- and 4.3-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone dimustard, respectively, compared with sensitive cells, but showed no resistance to the non-quinone alkylating agent, aniline mustard. The formation of DNA double strand breaks by benzoquinone mustard was reduced by 2- and 8-fold in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, while double strand break formation by benzoquinone dimustard was reduced only in the L5178Y/HBM10 cells. The number of DNA-DNA cross-links produced by benzoquinone mustard was 3- and 6-fold lower, and the number produced by benzoquinone dimustard was 35% and 2-fold lower in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, compared with L5178Y parental cells. In contrast, cross-linking by aniline mustard was unchanged in sensitive and resistant cells. Dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, increased the cytotoxic activity of both benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard in L5178Y/HBM10 cells. This study provides evidence that elevated DT-diaphorase activity in the resistant cells

  9. FGF2 activates TRPC and Ca2+ signaling leading to satellite cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yewei; Schneider, Martin F.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite cells, as stem cells of adult skeletal muscle, are tightly associated with the differentiated muscle fibers and remain quiescent in the absence of muscle damage. In response to an injury, the quiescent satellite cell is activated by soluble factors, including FGFs released from injured myofibers. Using immunostaining, we here first show that TRPC1 channels are highly expressed in satellite cells attached to muscle fibers. Since CD34, a traditional stem cell marker, was recently found to be expressed in skeletal muscle satellite cells we labeled living satellite cells in their physiological niche associated with host FDB fibers using anti-CD34-FITC antibody. We then monitored intra-cellular calcium in anti-CD34-FITC labeled satellite cells attached to muscle fibers using the calcium sensitive dye X rhod-1 which has little fluorescence cross talk with FITC. FGF2 increased intracellular calcium in satellite cells, which was antagonized by the TRPC channel blocker SKF 96365. Immunostaining showed that NFATc3 is highly expressed in satellite cells, but not in host FDB fibers. Elevation of intracellular calcium by FGF2 is accompanied by nuclear translocation of NFATc3 and NFATc2 and by an increase in the number of MyoD positive cells per muscle fiber, both of which were attenuated by TRPC blocker SKF 96365. Our results suggest a novel pathway of satellite cell activation where FGF2 enhances calcium influx through a TRPC channel, and the increased cytosolic calcium leads to both NFATc3 and NFATc2 nuclear translocation and enhanced number of MyoD positive satellite cells per muscle fiber. PMID:24575047

  10. Blood pressure modulation following activation of mast cells by cationic cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Maamoun; Schwalb, Herzl; Shefler, Irit; Levdansky, Lilia; Mekori, Yoseph A; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2011-12-01

    Short cell penetrating peptides (CPP) are widely used in vitro to transduce agents into cells. But their systemic effect has not been yet studied in detail. We studied the systemic effect of the cell penetrating peptides, penetratin, transportan and pro-rich, on rat hemodynamic functions. Intra-arterial monitoring of blood pressure showed that injection of the positively charged penetratin and transportan in a wide range of concentrations (2.5-320 μg/kg) caused highly significant transient decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in a dose dependent manner (p<0.01). Pretreatment with histamine receptors blockers or with cromolyn, a mast cell stabilizing agent, significantly attenuated this effect. Furthermore, in vitro incubation of these both peptides with mast cells line, LAD2, caused a massive mast cell degranulation. In vitro studies showed that these CPP in a wide range of concentrations were not cytotoxic without any effect on the survival of LAD2 mast cell line. In contrast, the less positively charged and proline-rich CPP, pro-rich, had no systemic effects with no effect on mast cell degranulation. Our results indicate that intravenously administrated positively charged CPP may have deleterious consequences due to their induced BP drop, mediated by mast cell activation. Therefore, the major effect of mast cell activation on BP should be considered in developing possible future drug therapies based on the injection of membrane-permeable and positively charged CPP. Nevertheless, lower levels of such CPP may be considered as a treatment of systemic high BP through moderate systemic mast cell activation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporal Modulation of Stem Cell Activity using Magnetoactive Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Abdeen, Amr A.; Lee, Junmin; Bharadwaj, N. Ashwin; Ewoldt, Randy H.

    2016-01-01

    Cell activity is coordinated by dynamic interactions with the extracellular matrix, often through stimuli-mediated spatiotemporal stiffening and softening. Dynamic changes in mechanics occur in vivo through enzymatic or chemical means, processes which are challenging to reconstruct in cell culture materials. Here we present a magnetoactive hydrogel material formed by embedding magnetic particles in a hydrogel matrix whereby elasticity can be modulated reversibly by attenuation of a magnetic field. We show orders of magnitude change in elasticity using low magnetic fields and demonstrate reversibility of stiffening with simple permanent magnets. The broad applicability of this technique is demonstrated with two therapeutically relevant bioactivities in mesenchymal stem cells: secretion of proangiogenic molecules, and dynamic control of osteogenesis. The ability to reversibly stiffen cell culture materials across the full spectrum of soft tissue mechanics, using simple materials and commercially available permanent magnets, will make this approach viable for a broad range of laboratory environments. PMID:27276521

  12. Does the ultrasonically activated scalpel release viable airborne cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Nduka, C C; Poland, N; Kennedy, M; Dye, J; Darzi, A

    1998-08-01

    Viable cancer cells may implant at distant sites and cause tumor recurrence. One possible mechanism is the inadvertent exfoliation of viable tumor cells during dissection. The ultrasonically activated scalpel (UAS) uses ultrasonic energy to disrupt tissues by cavitation and produces a dense cloud of cellular debris that may contain viable cells. This study aimed to investigate the viability of airborne cells released during cancer dissection using the UAS and electrosurgery. Flank tumors (n = 8) measuring 1 cm3 were induced in male WAG rats by subcutaneous injection of 2 x 10(6) CC531s colon cancer cells. Dissection was performed in cutting mode using the maximum power output of the respective devices. Electrosurgery was performed using a standard monopolar electrosurgical unit and a needle probe, and ultrasonic dissection was performed with the Harmonic Scalpel utilising the open surgical handset and the hooked spatula tip. The smoke plume was aspirated by a vacuum pump and bubbled under Hank's balanced salt solution to trap particulate matter. The viability of the cellular material was blindly assessed with the trypan blue test and by in vitro culture. The morphology of the cellular debris was studied by examination of cytospin preparations. Large quantities of cellular debris was trapped in the plume from both devices. However, no viable cells were isolated, nor did in vitro cell growth occur with either device. Examination of the debris from the UAS demonstrated a characteristic mixture of amorphous forms and very few morphologically intact cells. The cauterized tumor produced charred cells and tissue fragments. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that viable airborne cancer cells are not released after tumor ablation with the UAS or electrosurgery.

  13. Evaluation of a cell phone-based physical activity diary.

    PubMed

    Sternfeld, Barbara; Jiang, Sheng-Fang; Picchi, Teresa; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Ainsworth, Barbara; Quesenberry, Charles P

    2012-03-01

    Physical activity (PA) diaries reduce the recall error inherent in self-reported PA but are burdensome. The purpose of this study was to compare a cell phone-based diary with a paper diary and examine the reliability and validity of the cell phone diary. In a pilot study, 25 women and 23 men, age 45-65 yr, completed cell phone and paper PA diaries 4 d·wk(-1) for three consecutive weeks and a user satisfaction survey. In the subsequent validation study, 623 middle-age participants (52.5% women) were asked to complete the cell phone diary and wear an accelerometer for two 7-d periods, approximately 6 months apart. They also completed two PA questionnaires. Fitness, body mass index, and percent body fat were obtained as indirect validation criteria. Estimates of PA from the cell phone and paper diaries were similar (mean within person difference = -43.8 MET·min·d(-1) of total PA, SD = 360, P = 0.49, 7.4 min·d(-1) of moderate-vigorous PA, SD = 66, P = 0.53). Users preferred the cell phone diary over the paper diary (59.6% vs 35.4%). In the subsequent study, intraclass correlations for the cell phone diary ranged from 0.55 for light PA to 0.63 for vigorous PA. Although PA estimates from the cell phone diary were generally significantly higher than those from the accelerometer and the questionnaires, correlations for moderate and vigorous PA were moderate (ρ = 0.25-0.59 with the questionnaires and 0.27-0.35 with the accelerometer). The correlations between the cell phone diary and the indirect validation criteria were generally in the expected direction and of moderate magnitude. A cell phone-based PA diary is equivalent to a paper diary, acceptable to users, and a relatively reliable and valid approach to self-reported PA.

  14. A bioluminescent caspase-1 activity assay rapidly monitors inflammasome activation in cells.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha; Moehring, Danielle; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Núñez, Gabriel; Callaway, Justin; Ting, Jenny; Scurria, Mike; Ugo, Tim; Bernad, Laurent; Cali, James; Lazar, Dan

    2017-08-01

    Inflammasomes are protein complexes induced by diverse inflammatory stimuli that activate caspase-1, resulting in the processing and release of cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18, and pyroptosis, an immunogenic form of cell death. To provide a homogeneous method for detecting caspase-1 activity, we developed a bioluminescent, plate-based assay that combines a substrate, Z-WEHD-aminoluciferin, with a thermostable luciferase in an optimized lytic reagent added directly to cultured cells. Assay specificity for caspase-1 is conferred by inclusion of a proteasome inhibitor in the lytic reagent and by use of a caspase-1 inhibitor to confirm activity. This approach enables a specific and rapid determination of caspase-1 activation. Caspase-1 activity is stable in the reagent thereby providing assay convenience and flexibility. Using this assay system, caspase-1 activation has been determined in THP-1 cells following treatment with α-hemolysin, LPS, nigericin, gramicidin, MSU, R848, Pam3CSK4, and flagellin. Caspase-1 activation has also been demonstrated in treated J774A.1 mouse macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from mice, as well as in human primary monocytes. Caspase-1 activity was not detected in treated BMDMs derived from Casp1 -/- mice, further confirming the specificity of the assay. Caspase-1 activity can be measured directly in cultured cells using the lytic reagent, or caspase-1 activity released into medium can be monitored by assay of transferred supernatant. The caspase-1 assay can be multiplexed with other assays to monitor additional parameters from the same cells, such as IL-1β release or cell death. The caspase-1 assay in combination with a sensitive real-time monitor of cell death allows one to accurately establish pyroptosis. This assay system provides a rapid, convenient, and flexible method to specifically and quantitatively monitor caspase-1 activation in cells in a plate-based format. This will allow a more efficient and effective

  15. Pharmacological Activation of p53 in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Mohammad; Elmets, Craig A.; Kopelovich, Levy

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that regulates a large number of genes and guards against genomic instability. Under multiple cellular stress conditions, p53 functions to block cell cycle progression transiently unless proper DNA repair occurs. Failure of DNA repair mechanisms leads to p53-mediated induction of cell death programs. p53 also induces permanent cell cycle arrest known as cellular senescence. During neoplastic progression, p53 is often mutated and fails to efficiently perform these functions. It has been observed that cancers carrying a wild-type p53 may also have interrupted downstream p53 regulatory signaling leading to disruption in p53 functions. Therefore, strategies to reactivate p53 provide an attractive approach for blocking tumor pathogenesis and its progression. p53 activation may also lead to regression of existing early neoplastic lesions and therefore may be important in developing cancer chemoprevention protocols. A large number of small molecules capable of reactivating p53 have been developed and some are progressing through clinical trials for prospective human applications. However, several questions remain to be answered at this stage. For example, it is not certain if pharmacological activation of p53 will restore all of its multifaceted biological responses, assuming that the targeted cell is not killed following p53 activation. It remains to be demonstrated whether the distinct biological effects regulated by specific post-transnationally modified p53 can effectively be restored by refolding mutant p53. Mutant p53 can be classified as a loss of function or gain of function protein depending on the type of mutation. It is also unclear whether reactivation of mutant p53 has similar consequences in cells carrying gain-of-function and loss-of-function p53 mutants. This review provides a description of various pharmacological approaches tested to activate p53 (both wild-type and mutant) and to assess the effects of

  16. B cell receptor revision diminishes the autoreactive B cell response after antigen activation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Hua; Diamond, Betty

    2008-01-01

    Autoreactive B cells are regulated in the BM during development through mechanisms, including editing of the B cell receptor (BCR), clonal deletion, and anergy. Peripheral B cell tolerance is also important for protection from autoimmune damage, although the mechanisms are less well defined. Here we demonstrated, using a mouse model of SLE-like serology, that during an autoimmune response, RAG was reinduced in antigen-activated early memory or preplasma B cells. Expression of RAG was specific to antigen-reactive B cells, required the function of the IL-7 receptor (IL-7R), and contributed to maintenance of humoral tolerance. We also showed that soluble antigen could diminish a non-autoreactive antibody response through induction of BCR revision. These data suggest that tolerance induction operates in B cells at a postactivation checkpoint and that BCR revision helps regulate autoreactivity generated during an ongoing immune response. PMID:18636122

  17. Egg cell-secreted EC1 triggers sperm cell activation during double fertilization.

    PubMed

    Sprunck, Stefanie; Rademacher, Svenja; Vogler, Frank; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2012-11-23

    Double fertilization is the defining characteristic of flowering plants. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating the fusion of one sperm with the egg and the second sperm with the central cell are largely unknown. We show that gamete interactions in Arabidopsis depend on small cysteine-rich EC1 (EGG CELL 1) proteins accumulating in storage vesicles of the egg cell. Upon sperm arrival, EC1-containing vesicles are exocytosed. The sperm endomembrane system responds to exogenously applied EC1 peptides by redistributing the potential gamete fusogen HAP2/GCS1 (HAPLESS 2/GENERATIVE CELL SPECIFIC 1) to the cell surface. Furthermore, fertilization studies with ec1 quintuple mutants show that successful male-female gamete interactions are necessary to prevent multiple-sperm cell delivery. Our findings provide evidence that mutual gamete activation, regulated exocytosis, and sperm plasma membrane modifications govern flowering plant gamete interactions.

  18. Regulatory dendritic cells: there is more than just immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne V.; Nino-Castro, Andrea C.; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system exists in a delicate equilibrium between inflammatory responses and tolerance. This unique feature allows the immune system to recognize and respond to potential threats in a controlled but normally limited fashion thereby preventing a destructive overreaction against healthy tissues. While the adaptive immune system was the major research focus concerning activation vs. tolerance in the immune system more recent findings suggest that cells of the innate immune system are important players in the decision between effective immunity and induction of tolerance or immune inhibition. Among immune cells of the innate immune system dendritic cells (DCs) have a special function linking innate immune functions with the induction of adaptive immunity. DCs are the primary professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) initiating adaptive immune responses. They belong to the hematopoietic system and arise from CD34+ stem cells in the bone marrow. Particularly in the murine system two major subgroups of DCs, namely myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) can be distinguished. DCs are important mediators of innate and adaptive immunity mostly due to their remarkable capacity to present processed antigens via major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) to T cells and B cells in secondary lymphoid organs. A large body of literature has been accumulated during the last two decades describing which role DCs play during activation of T cell responses but also during the establishment and maintenance of central tolerance (Steinman et al., 2003). While the concept of peripheral tolerance has been clearly established during the last years, the role of different sets of DCs and their particular molecular mechanisms of immune deviation has not yet fully been appreciated. In this review we summarize accumulating evidence about the role of regulatory DCs in situations where the balance between tolerance and immunogenicity has been altered leading to pathologic

  19. Dual specificity phosphatase 15 regulates Erk activation in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molina, José F; Lopez-Anido, Camila; Ma, Ki H; Zhang, Chongyu; Olson, Tyler; Muth, Katharina N; Weider, Matthias; Svaren, John

    2017-02-01

    Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the peripheral and central nervous system, respectively. Despite having different myelin components and different transcription factors driving their terminal differentiation there are shared molecular mechanisms between the two. Sox10 is one common transcription factor required for several steps in development of myelinating glia. However, other factors are divergent as Schwann cells need the transcription factor early growth response 2/Krox20 and oligodendrocytes require Myrf. Likewise, some signaling pathways, like the Erk1/2 kinases, are necessary in both cell types for proper myelination. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms that control this shared signaling pathway in myelinating cells remain only partially characterized. The hypothesis of this study is that signaling pathways that are similarly regulated in both Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes play central roles in coordinating the differentiation of myelinating glia. To address this hypothesis, we have used genome-wide binding data to identify a relatively small set of genes that are similarly regulated by Sox10 in myelinating glia. We chose one such gene encoding Dual specificity phosphatase 15 (Dusp15) for further analysis in Schwann cell signaling. RNA interference and gene deletion by genome editing in cultured RT4 and primary Schwann cells showed Dusp15 is necessary for full activation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, we show that Dusp15 represses expression of several myelin genes, including myelin basic protein. The data shown here support a mechanism by which early growth response 2 activates myelin genes, but also induces a negative feedback loop through Dusp15 to limit over-expression of myelin genes. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Rab5 activation as a tumor cell migration switch.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Pablo; Díaz, Jorge; Silva, Patricio; Torres, Vicente A

    2014-03-20

    Increased cell migration is an acquired feature of metastatic cancer cells and relies on derailed signal transduction pathways. Intracellular vesicular trafficking plays a key role in cell migration due to its intricate involvement in cargo transport and membrane composition. In the last decade, endocytosis has been implicated in cell migration and found to be responsible for the internalization of membrane receptors at the plasma membrane, where integrin trafficking and fine-tuning of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by internalization are major mechanisms. Accumulating evidence has suggested a link between endosome dynamics, cell migration, and invasion, in which small GTPases of the Rab family have central roles. We have recently determined that Rab5 activation is a crucial event in promoting focal adhesion disassembly, which is concomitant with the migration and invasion of metastatic cancer cells. The mechanisms underlying this novel role for Rab5 are currently unclear, and their elucidation will provide insight into the role of Rab5 function in cancer cell metastasis.

  1. Rab5 activation as a tumor cell migration switch.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Pablo; Díaz, Jorge; Silva, Patricio; Torres, Vicente A

    2014-01-01

    Increased cell migration is an acquired feature of metastatic cancer cells and relies on derailed signal transduction pathways. Intracellular vesicular trafficking plays a key role in cell migration due to its intricate involvement in cargo transport and membrane composition. In the last decade, endocytosis has been implicated in cell migration and found to be responsible for the internalization of membrane receptors at the plasma membrane, where integrin trafficking and fine-tuning of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by internalization are major mechanisms. Accumulating evidence has suggested a link between endosome dynamics, cell migration, and invasion, in which small GTPases of the Rab family have central roles. We have recently determined that Rab5 activation is a crucial event in promoting focal adhesion disassembly, which is concomitant with the migration and invasion of metastatic cancer cells. The mechanisms underlying this novel role for Rab5 are currently unclear, and their elucidation will provide insight into the role of Rab5 function in cancer cell metastasis.

  2. VICKZ proteins mediate cell migration via their RNA binding activity

    PubMed Central

    Oberman, Froma; Rand, Kinneret; Maizels, Yael; Rubinstein, Ariel M.; Yisraeli, Joel K.

    2007-01-01

    The highly conserved, RNA binding VICKZ proteins help regulate RNA localization, stability, and translation in many eukaryotes. These proteins are also required for cell migration in embryos and cultured cells. In adults, many tumors overexpress VICKZ homologs, and it has been hypothesized that the proteins can mediate cell motility and invasion. How these proteins facilitate cell movement and, in particular, whether their ability to bind RNA plays a role in their function remain unclear. Using HPLC and mass spectrometry to identify a region of Xenopus Vg1 RBP (xVICKZ3) that binds the vegetal localization element of Vg1 RNA, we generated a deletion construct that functions in a dominant-negative manner. The construct associates with full-length xVICKZ3 and severely reduces binding to target RNAs. This dominant-negative construct phenocopies the effect of down-regulating xVICKZ3 in Xenopus embryos. A corresponding deletion in the human homolog hVICKZ1 similarly functions in a dominant-negative fashion to reduce the ability of full-length hVICKZ protein to bind RNA. Expression of the dominant-negative construct in human carcinoma cells inhibits cell movement by several criteria. We conclude that the ability of VICKZ proteins to mediate cell migration, in vitro and in vivo, requires their RNA binding activity. PMID:17652133

  3. Stem cell cytoskeleton is slaved to active motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehfeldt, Florian; Brown, Andre; Engler, Adam; Discher, Dennis

    2007-03-01

    Cells feel their physical microenvironment through their adhesion and respond to it in various ways. Indeed, matrix elasticity can even guide the differentiation of human adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) [Engler et al. Cell 2006]. Sparse cultures of MSCs on elastic collagen--coated substrates that are respectively soft, stiff, or extremely stiff were shown to induce neurogenesis, myogenesis, and osteogenesis. Lineage commitment was evaluated by morphological analysis, protein expression profiles, and transcription microarrays. Differentiation could be completely blocked with a specific non-muscle myosin II (NMM II) inhibitor, suggesting that contractile motor activity is essential for the cells to sense matrix elasticity. Current studies by AFM and near-field fluorescence imaging show that NMM II inhibition in stem cells on rigid glass surfaces promotes actin-rich dendritic outgrowth resembling neurite extension. Dynamic cell studies have been conducted to elucidate the complex molecular interplay of the contractile apparatus in response to selected physical and biochemical stimuli. Additional insight is being gained by using AFM to investigate the local elasticity of the cell's cytoskeletal force sensing machinery.

  4. Fuel Cell Activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fuel cells have a long history in space applications and may have potential application in aeronautics as well. A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that directly transforms the chemical energy of a fuel and oxidant into electrical energy. Alkaline fuel cells have been the mainstay of the U.S. space program, providing power for the Apollo missions and the Space Shuttle. However, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer potential benefits over alkaline systems and are currently under development for the next generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Furthermore, primary and regenerative systems utilizing PEM technology are also being considered for future space applications such as surface power and planetary aircraft. In addition to these applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the feasibility of the use of both PEM and solid oxide fuel cells for low- or zero-emission electric aircraft propulsion. These types of systems have potential applications for high altitude environmental aircraft, general aviation and commercial aircraft, and high attitude airships. NASA Glenn has a unique set of capabilities and expertise essential to the successful development of advanced fuel cell power systems for space and aeronautics applications. NASA Glenn's role in past fuel cell development programs as well as current activities to meet these new challenges will be presented

  5. Genotoxic activity of caramel on Salmonella and cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y N; Chen, X R; Ding, C; Cai, Z N; Li, Q G

    1984-04-01

    The genetic activity of 2 commercial caramel preparations, manufactured either by heating the malt sugar solution directly (non-ammoniated caramel) or by heating it with ammonia (ammoniated caramel) was studied in the Salmonella mutagenicity test and UDS assay in cultured mammalian cells. The non-ammoniated caramel was found to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium TA100, while the ammoniated one was genetically active in all the tester strains used, namely TA100, TA97 and TA98. It was also demonstrated that non-ammoniated caramel was capable of inducing UDS in cultured human amnion FL cells, but for the ammoniated one, no such activity was observed. Furthermore, based on the results obtained in the DNA synthesis inhibition assay, it was suggested that the DNA synthesis inhibition seen in our experiments with the ammoniated caramel was probably not of DNA damage in origin. These data indicate that the mutagenic fractions formed during ammoniated and non-ammoniated caramelization were quite different.

  6. Cardiovascular symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Kolck, Ulrich W; Haenisch, Britta; Molderings, Gerhard J

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, mast cell activation disease (MCAD) has been considered as just one rare (neoplastic) disease, mastocytosis, focused on the mast cell (MC) mediators tryptase and histamine and the suggestive, blatant symptoms of flushing and anaphylaxis. Recently another form of MCAD, the MC activation syndrome, has been recognized featuring inappropriate MC activation with little to no neoplasia and likely much more heterogeneously clonal and far more prevalent than mastocytosis. Increasing expertise and appreciation has been established for the truly very large menagerie of MC mediators and their complex patterns of release, engendering complex, nebulous presentations of chronic and acute illness best characterized as multisystem polymorbidity of generally inflammatory ± allergic theme. We describe the pathogenesis of MCAD with a particular focus on clinical cardiovascular symptoms and the therapeutic options for MC mediator-induced cardiovascular symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  8. Kaempferol induces autophagic cell death of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via activating AMPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Yu, Yi-Qun; Yang, Qi-Lian; Shen, Chun-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2017-10-17

    In the present study, we demonstrate that Kaempferol inhibited survival and proliferation of established human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines (HepG2, Huh-7, BEL7402, and SMMC) and primary human HCC cells. Kaempferol treatment in HCC cells induced profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which led to Ulk1 phosphorylation, mTOR complex 1 inhibition and cell autophagy. Autophagy induction was reflected by Beclin-1/autophagy gene 5 upregulation and p62 degradation as well as light chain 3B (LC3B)-I to LC3B-II conversion and LC3B puncta formation. Inhibition of AMPK, via AMPKα1 shRNA or dominant negative mutation, reversed above signaling changes. AMPK inhibition also largely inhibited Kaempferol-induced cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Autophagy inhibition, by 3-methyaldenine or Beclin-1 shRNA, also protected HCC cells from Kaempferol. Kaempferol downregulated melanoma antigen 6, the AMPK ubiquitin ligase, causing AMPKα1 stabilization and accumulation. We conclude that Kaempferol inhibits human HCC cells via activating AMPK signaling.

  9. Live-cell measurements of kinase activity in single cells using translocation reporters.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takamasa; Jeknić, Stevan; Macklin, Derek N; Akhter, Sajia; Hughey, Jacob J; Regot, Sergi; Covert, Markus W

    2018-01-01

    Although kinases are important regulators of many cellular processes, measuring their activity in live cells remains challenging. We have developed kinase translocation reporters (KTRs), which enable multiplexed measurements of the dynamics of kinase activity at a single-cell level. These KTRs are composed of an engineered construct in which a kinase substrate is fused to a bipartite nuclear localization signal (bNLS) and nuclear export signal (NES), as well as to a fluorescent protein for microscopy-based detection of its localization. The negative charge introduced by phosphorylation of the substrate is used to directly modulate nuclear import and export, thereby regulating the reporter's distribution between the cytoplasm and nucleus. The relative cytoplasmic versus nuclear fluorescence of the KTR construct (the C/N ratio) is used as a proxy for the kinase activity in living, single cells. Multiple KTRs can be studied in the same cell by fusing them to different fluorescent proteins. Here, we present a protocol to execute and analyze live-cell microscopy experiments using KTRs. We describe strategies for development of new KTRs and procedures for lentiviral expression of KTRs in a cell line of choice. Cells are then plated in a 96-well plate, from which multichannel fluorescent images are acquired with automated time-lapse microscopy. We provide detailed guidance for a computational analysis and parameterization pipeline. The entire procedure, from virus production to data analysis, can be completed in ∼10 d.

  10. EMT cells increase breast cancer metastasis via paracrine GLI activation in neighbouring tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Neelakantan, Deepika; Zhou, Hengbo; Oliphant, Michael U. J.; Zhang, Xiaomei; Simon, Lukas M.; Henke, David M.; Shaw, Chad A.; Wu, Meng-Fen; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; White, Lisa D.; Lewis, Michael T.; Ford, Heide L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent fate-mapping studies concluded that EMT is not required for metastasis of carcinomas. Here we challenge this conclusion by showing that these studies failed to account for possible crosstalk between EMT and non-EMT cells that promotes dissemination of non-EMT cells. In breast cancer models, EMT cells induce increased metastasis of weakly metastatic, non-EMT tumour cells in a paracrine manner, in part by non-cell autonomous activation of the GLI transcription factor. Treatment with GANT61, a GLI1/2 inhibitor, but not with IPI 926, a Smoothened inhibitor, blocks this effect and inhibits growth in PDX models. In human breast tumours, the EMT-transcription factors strongly correlate with activated Hedgehog/GLI signalling but not with the Hh ligands. Our findings indicate that EMT contributes to metastasis via non-cell autonomous effects that activate the Hh pathway. Although all Hh inhibitors may act against tumours with canonical Hh/GLI signalling, only GLI inhibitors would act against non-canonical EMT-induced GLI activation. PMID:28604738

  11. EMT cells increase breast cancer metastasis via paracrine GLI activation in neighbouring tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, Deepika; Zhou, Hengbo; Oliphant, Michael U J; Zhang, Xiaomei; Simon, Lukas M; Henke, David M; Shaw, Chad A; Wu, Meng-Fen; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; White, Lisa D; Lewis, Michael T; Ford, Heide L

    2017-06-12

    Recent fate-mapping studies concluded that EMT is not required for metastasis of carcinomas. Here we challenge this conclusion by showing that these studies failed to account for possible crosstalk between EMT and non-EMT cells that promotes dissemination of non-EMT cells. In breast cancer models, EMT cells induce increased metastasis of weakly metastatic, non-EMT tumour cells in a paracrine manner, in part by non-cell autonomous activation of the GLI transcription factor. Treatment with GANT61, a GLI1/2 inhibitor, but not with IPI 926, a Smoothened inhibitor, blocks this effect and inhibits growth in PDX models. In human breast tumours, the EMT-transcription factors strongly correlate with activated Hedgehog/GLI signalling but not with the Hh ligands. Our findings indicate that EMT contributes to metastasis via non-cell autonomous effects that activate the Hh pathway. Although all Hh inhibitors may act against tumours with canonical Hh/GLI signalling, only GLI inhibitors would act against non-canonical EMT-induced GLI activation.

  12. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies) from bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost) from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells. PMID:20831775

  13. [Cytotoxicity of Naja Naja Actra Venom Component combined with activated immune cells on leukemia cell line KG1a].

    PubMed

    He, Yan-Jie; Li, Yu-Hua; Tu, San-Fang; Wu, Hai-Yan; Guo, Kun-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the cytotoxic effect of the Naja Naja Actra Venom Component (NNAVC) combined with activated immune cells on human acute myeloblastic leukemia line KG1a cells. The cytotoxic effects of NNAVC at different concentrations on KG1a cells were measured by CCK-8 method. LDH releasing assay was used to detect the cytotoxic effects of activated immune cells, NNAVC combined with activated immune cells on KG1a cells and the sensitivity of KG1a treated with NNAVC to activated immune cells. The results showed that the inhibitory rate of NNAVC on KG1a cells increased with the concentration enhancement, the cytotoxicity of activated immune cells at the different effector to target (E:T) ratios(6.25:1, 12.5:1, 25:1) on KG1a cells were 12.30%, 24.85% and 52.26%. The cytotoxicity of NNAVC combined with activated immune cells at the different E:T cell ratios (10:1, 20: 1) on KG1a cells were 56.21% and 85.59%, which were higher than that of NNAVC or activated immune cells alone. The cytotoxicity of activated immune cells at the E: T cell ratio of 10:1 on KG1a cells treated with NNAVC at different concentrations were 25.65%, 31.33%, 28.63% and 16.78%, respectively, and that at the E:T cell ratio of 20: 1 were 40.62%, 44.70%, 44.62% and 40.72%. It is concluded that:both of NNAVC and activated immune cells have lethal effect on KG1a cells, and the combination of NNAVC and activated immune cells can strengthen their effect on KG1a.

  14. Glial cell activation, recruitment, and survival of B-lineage cells following MCMV brain infection.

    PubMed

    Lokensgard, James R; Mutnal, Manohar B; Prasad, Sujata; Sheng, Wen; Hu, Shuxian

    2016-05-20

    persisted through the latest time tested (60 days post infection). Finally, astrocytes produce BAFF (B cell activating factor of the TNF family) and promote proliferation of B cells via cell-to-cell contact. CXCR3 is the primary chemokine receptor on CD19(+) B cells persisting within the brain, and migration to microglial cell supernatants is mediated through this receptor. Correspondingly, microglial cells produce CXCL9 and CXCL10, but not CXCL13. Reactive astrocytes promote B cell proliferation.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1more » μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.« less

  16. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-06-30

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus , activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N -glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4⁺ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4⁺ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia.

  17. Tumor specific boosting of IL-2 induced NK activation by paraformaldehyde fixed tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, S; Saxena, R K

    1998-10-01

    NK activation in C57B1/6 mouse spleen cells was carried out with IL-2 in the presence or absence of paraformaldehyde fixed YAC tumor cells. Generation of anti-YAC cytolytic activity was markedly higher when activation was carried out in the presence of fixed tumor cells. In addition the cytotoxic effector cells generated were resistant to anti-Thy-1 + C treatment, indicating that the effector cells were not T lymphocytes. IL-2 activation of NK cells was compared When fixed YAC or EL4 tumor cells were added during the IL-2 activation phase, it was found that the addition of either of these tumor cells significantly boosted the levels of cytotoxic activity generated against both targets. Significantly higher anti-YAC cytotoxic activity was however generated when fixed YAC cells instead of EL4 cells were present during the activation phase. Similarly, significantly greater cytolytic activity was generated against EL4 cells, when fixed EL4 rather than YAC cells were present during the activation phase. Addition of paraformaldehyde fixed syngeneic or allogenic spleen cells instead of tumor cells, did not boost NK activation in response to IL-2, indicating that the boosting of NK activation did not result from exposure to alloantigens during the activation phase. These results indicate that an exposure to tumor cells during IL-2 activation phase, may boost the activation of NK cells in a tumor specific manner.

  18. Multiple Dendritic Cell Populations Activate CD4+ T Cells after Viral Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Mount, Adele M.; Smith, Christopher M.; Kupresanin, Fiona; Stoermer, Kristina; Heath, William R.; Belz, Gabrielle T.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are a heterogeneous cell population that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. CD8α DC play a prominent, and sometimes exclusive, role in driving amplification of CD8+ T cells during a viral infection. Whether this reliance on a single subset of DC also applies for CD4+ T cell activation is unknown. We used a direct ex vivo antigen presentation assay to probe the capacity of flow cytometrically purified DC populations to drive amplification of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following infection with influenza virus by different routes. This study examined the contributions of non-CD8α DC populations in the amplification of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in cutaneous and systemic influenza viral infections. We confirmed that in vivo, effective immune responses for CD8+ T cells are dominated by presentation of antigen by CD8α DC but can involve non-CD8α DC. In contrast, CD4+ T cell responses relied more heavily on the contributions of dermal DC migrating from peripheral lymphoid tissues following cutaneous infection, and CD4 DC in the spleen after systemic infection. CD4+ T cell priming by DC subsets that is dependent upon the route of administration raises the possibility that vaccination approaches could be tailored to prime helper T cell immunity. PMID:18301768

  19. Multiple dendritic cell populations activate CD4+ T cells after viral stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mount, Adele M; Smith, Christopher M; Kupresanin, Fiona; Stoermer, Kristina; Heath, William R; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2008-02-27

    Dendritic cells (DC) are a heterogeneous cell population that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. CD8alpha DC play a prominent, and sometimes exclusive, role in driving amplification of CD8(+) T cells during a viral infection. Whether this reliance on a single subset of DC also applies for CD4(+) T cell activation is unknown. We used a direct ex vivo antigen presentation assay to probe the capacity of flow cytometrically purified DC populations to drive amplification of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells following infection with influenza virus by different routes. This study examined the contributions of non-CD8alpha DC populations in the amplification of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells in cutaneous and systemic influenza viral infections. We confirmed that in vivo, effective immune responses for CD8(+) T cells are dominated by presentation of antigen by CD8alpha DC but can involve non-CD8alpha DC. In contrast, CD4(+) T cell responses relied more heavily on the contributions of dermal DC migrating from peripheral lymphoid tissues following cutaneous infection, and CD4 DC in the spleen after systemic infection. CD4(+) T cell priming by DC subsets that is dependent upon the route of administration raises the possibility that vaccination approaches could be tailored to prime helper T cell immunity.

  20. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutantmore » p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.« less

  1. The Dendritic Cell Synapse: A Life Dedicated to T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, Federica

    2016-01-01

    T-cell activation within immunological synapses is a complex process whereby different types of signals are transmitted from antigen-presenting cells to T cells. The molecular strategies developed by T cells to interpret and integrate these signals have been systematically dissected in recent years and are now in large part understood. On the other side of the immune synapse, dendritic cells (DCs) participate actively in synapse formation and maintenance by remodeling of membrane receptors and intracellular content. However, the details of such changes have been only partially characterized. The DCs actin cytoskeleton has been one of the first systems to be identified as playing an important role in T-cell priming and some of the underlying mechanisms have been elucidated. Similarly, the DCs microtubule cytoskeleton undergoes major spatial changes during synapse formation that favor polarization of the DCs subcellular space toward the interacting T cell. Recently, we have begun to investigate the trafficking machinery that controls polarized delivery of endosomal vesicles at the DC-T immune synapse with the aim of understanding the functional relevance of polarized secretion of soluble factors during T-cell priming. Here, we will review the current knowledge of events occurring in DCs during synapse formation and discuss the open questions that still remain unanswered.

  2. Cathepsin D inhibits oxidative stress-induced cell death via activation of autophagy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hah, Young-Sool; Noh, Hae Sook; Ha, Ji Hye; Ahn, Jin Sook; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Cho, Hee Young; Kim, Deok Ryong

    2012-10-28

    Cathepsin D (CatD), a lysosomal aspartic protease, plays an essential role in tumor progression and apoptosis. However, the function of CatD in cell death is not yet fully understood. In this study, we identified CatD as one of up-regulated proteins in human malignant glioblastoma M059J cells that lack the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK compared with its isogenic M059K cells with normal DNA-PK activity. M059J cells were relatively more resistant to genotoxic stress than M059K cells. Overexpression of wild-type CatD but not catalytically inactive mutant CatD (D295N) inhibited H(2)O(2)-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Furthermore, knockdown of CatD expression abolished anti-apoptotic effect by CatD in the presence of H(2)O(2). Interestingly, high expression of CatD in HeLa cells significantly activated autophagy: increase of acidic autophagic vacuoles, LC3-II formation, and GFP-LC3 puncta. These results suggest that CatD can function as an anti-apoptotic mediator by inducing autophagy under cellular stress. In conclusion, inhibition of autophagy could be a novel strategy for the adjuvant chemotherapy of CatD-expressing cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chondroitin Sulfate Impairs Neural Stem Cell Migration Through ROCK Activation.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Layla T; Mundim, Mayara T V V; Pinto, Agnes S; Chiarantin, Gabrielly M D; Almeida, Maíra E S; Lamers, Marcelo L; Horwitz, Alan R; Santos, Marinilce F; Porcionatto, Marimelia

    2018-04-01

    Brain injuries such as trauma and stroke lead to glial scar formation by reactive astrocytes which produce and secret axonal outgrowth inhibitors. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) constitute a well-known class of extracellular matrix molecules produced at the glial scar and cause growth cone collapse. The CSPG glycosaminoglycan side chains composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS) are responsible for its inhibitory activity on neurite outgrowth and are dependent on RhoA activation. Here, we hypothesize that CSPG also impairs neural stem cell migration inhibiting their penetration into an injury site. We show that DCX+ neuroblasts do not penetrate a CSPG-rich injured area probably due to Nogo receptor activation and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway as we demonstrate in vitro with neural stem cells cultured as neurospheres and pull-down for RhoA. Furthermore, CS-impaired cell migration in vitro induced the formation of large mature adhesions and altered cell protrusion dynamics. ROCK inhibition restored migration in vitro as well as decreased adhesion size.

  4. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  5. Activity of the multikinase inhibitor dasatinib against ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Konecny, G E; Glas, R; Dering, J; Manivong, K; Qi, J; Finn, R S; Yang, G R; Hong, K-L; Ginther, C; Winterhoff, B; Gao, G; Brugge, J; Slamon, D J

    2009-11-17

    Here, we explore the therapeutic potential of dasatinib, a small-molecule inhibitor that targets multiple cytosolic and membrane-bound tyrosine kinases, including members of the Src kinase family, EphA2, and focal adhesion kinase for the treatment of ovarian cancer. We examined the effects of dasatinib on proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and kinase activity using a panel of 34 established human ovarian cancer cell lines. Molecular markers for response prediction were studied using gene expression profiling. Multiple drug effect/combination index (CI) isobologram analysis was used to study the interactions with chemotherapeutic drugs. Concentration-dependent anti-proliferative effects of dasatinib were seen in all ovarian cancer cell lines tested, but varied significantly between individual cell lines with up to a 3 log-fold difference in the IC(50) values (IC(50) range: 0.001-11.3 micromol l(-1)). Dasatinib significantly inhibited invasion, and induced cell apoptosis, but less cell-cycle arrest. At a wide range of clinically achievable drug concentrations, additive and synergistic interactions were observed for dasatinib plus carboplatin (mean CI values, range: 0.73-1.11) or paclitaxel (mean CI values, range: 0.76-1.05). In this study, 24 out of 34 (71%) representative ovarian cancer cell lines were highly sensitive to dasatinib, compared with only 8 out of 39 (21%) representative breast cancer cell lines previously reported. Cell lines with high expression of Yes, Lyn, Eph2A, caveolin-1 and 2, moesin, annexin-1, and uPA were particularly sensitive to dasatinib. These data provide a clear biological rationale to test dasatinib as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy in patients with ovarian cancer.

  6. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase in human cells by the mycotoxin patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.-S.; Yu, F.-Y.; Su, C.-C.

    2005-09-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by certain species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, is often detectable in moldy fruits and their derivative products. PAT led to a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Exposure of HEK293 cells to concentrations above 5 {mu}M PAT for 30 min induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation; activation of ERK1/2 was also observed after 24 h incubation with 0.05 {mu}M of PAT. Treatment of human PBMCs for 30 min with 30 {mu}Mmore » PAT dramatically increased the phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Both MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suppressed ERK1/2 activation in either HEK293 or MDCK cells. In HEK293 cells, U0126-mediated inhibition of PAT-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulted in a significant decrease in levels of DNA damage, expressed as tail moment values, in the single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Conversely, U0126 did not affect cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the DNA synthesis rate in PAT-treated cultures. Exposure of HEK293 cells for 90 min to 15 {mu}M PAT elevated the levels of early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) mRNA, but not of c-fos, fosB, and junB mRNAs. These results indicate that in human cells, PAT causes a rapid and persistent activation of ERK1/2 and this signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating PAT-induced DNA damage and egr-1 gene expression.« less

  7. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-α and PPAR-γ transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W.

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  8. Switching on electrocatalytic activity in solid oxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Jae-Ha; Neagu, Dragos; Miller, David N.; Irvine, John T. S.

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide cells (SOCs) can operate with high efficiency in two ways—as fuel cells, oxidizing a fuel to produce electricity, and as electrolysis cells, electrolysing water to produce hydrogen and oxygen gases. Ideally, SOCs should perform well, be durable and be inexpensive, but there are often competitive tensions, meaning that, for example, performance is achieved at the expense of durability. SOCs consist of porous electrodes—the fuel and air electrodes—separated by a dense electrolyte. In terms of the electrodes, the greatest challenge is to deliver high, long-lasting electrocatalytic activity while ensuring cost- and time-efficient manufacture. This has typically been achieved through lengthy and intricate ex situ procedures. These often require dedicated precursors and equipment; moreover, although the degradation of such electrodes associated with their reversible operation can be mitigated, they are susceptible to many other forms of degradation. An alternative is to grow appropriate electrode nanoarchitectures under operationally relevant conditions, for example, via redox exsolution. Here we describe the growth of a finely dispersed array of anchored metal nanoparticles on an oxide electrode through electrochemical poling of a SOC at 2 volts for a few seconds. These electrode structures perform well as both fuel cells and electrolysis cells (for example, at 900 °C they deliver 2 watts per square centimetre of power in humidified hydrogen gas, and a current of 2.75 amps per square centimetre at 1.3 volts in 50% water/nitrogen gas). The nanostructures and corresponding electrochemical activity do not degrade in 150 hours of testing. These results not only prove that in operando methods can yield emergent nanomaterials, which in turn deliver exceptional performance, but also offer proof of concept that electrolysis and fuel cells can be unified in a single, high-performance, versatile and easily manufactured device. This opens up the possibility of

  9. Cell-Free DNA and Active Rejection in Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Roy D; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Poggio, Emilio D; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Langone, Anthony J; Sood, Puneet; Matas, Arthur J; Mehta, Shikha; Mannon, Roslyn B; Sharfuddin, Asif; Fischbach, Bernard; Narayanan, Mohanram; Jordan, Stanley C; Cohen, David; Weir, Matthew R; Hiller, David; Prasad, Preethi; Woodward, Robert N; Grskovic, Marica; Sninsky, John J; Yee, James P; Brennan, Daniel C

    2017-07-01

    Histologic analysis of the allograft biopsy specimen is the standard method used to differentiate rejection from other injury in kidney transplants. Donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA) is a noninvasive test of allograft injury that may enable more frequent, quantitative, and safer assessment of allograft rejection and injury status. To investigate this possibility, we prospectively collected blood specimens at scheduled intervals and at the time of clinically indicated biopsies. In 102 kidney recipients, we measured plasma levels of dd-cfDNA and correlated the levels with allograft rejection status ascertained by histology in 107 biopsy specimens. The dd-cfDNA level discriminated between biopsy specimens showing any rejection (T cell-mediated rejection or antibody-mediated rejection [ABMR]) and controls (no rejection histologically), P <0.001 (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve [AUC], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.61 to 0.86). Positive and negative predictive values for active rejection at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 61% and 84%, respectively. The AUC for discriminating ABMR from samples without ABMR was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.97). Positive and negative predictive values for ABMR at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 44% and 96%, respectively. Median dd-cfDNA was 2.9% (ABMR), 1.2% (T cell-mediated types ≥IB), 0.2% (T cell-mediated type IA), and 0.3% in controls ( P =0.05 for T cell-mediated rejection types ≥IB versus controls). Thus, dd-cfDNA may be used to assess allograft rejection and injury; dd-cfDNA levels <1% reflect the absence of active rejection (T cell-mediated type ≥IB or ABMR) and levels >1% indicate a probability of active rejection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Fasting inhibits hepatic stellate cells activation and potentiates anti-cancer activity of Sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lo Re, Oriana; Panebianco, Concetta; Porto, Stefania; Cervi, Carlo; Rappa, Francesca; Di Biase, Stefano; Caraglia, Michele; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2018-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a poor outcome. Most HCCs develop in the context of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis caused by chronic inflammation. Short-term fasting approaches enhance the activity of chemotherapy in preclinical cancer models, other than HCC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sorafenib is the mainstay of treatment in HCC. However, its benefit is frequently short-lived. Whether fasting can alleviate liver fibrosis and whether combining fasting with Sorafenib is beneficial remains unknown. A 24 hr fasting (2% serum, 0.1% glucose)-induced changes on human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) LX-2 proliferation/viability/cell cycle were assessed by MTT and flow cytometry. Expression of lypolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation markers (vimentin, αSMA) was evaluated by qPCR and immunoblotting. Liver fibrosis and inflammation were evaluated in a mouse model of steatohepatitis exposed to cycles of fasting, by histological and biochemical analyses. A 24 hr fasting-induced changes were also analyzed on the proliferation/viability/glucose uptake of human HCC cells exposed to Sorafenib. An expression panel of genes involved in survival, inflammation, and metabolism was examined by qPCR in HCC cells exposed to fasting and/or Sorafenib. Fasting decreased the proliferation and the activation of HSC. Repeated cycles of short term starvation were safe in mice but did not improve fibrosis. Fasting synergized with Sorafenib in hampering HCC cell growth and glucose uptake. Finally, fasting normalized the expression levels of genes which are commonly altered by Sorafenib in HCC cells. Fasting or fasting-mimicking diet diets should be evaluated in preclinical studies as a mean to potentiate the activity of Sorafenib in clinical use. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.berndt@med.uni-jena.de; Büttner, Robert, E-mail: Robert-Buettner@gmx.net; Gühne, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie_guehne@gmx.net

    2014-04-01

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCM{sub TGF}, FCM{sub PDGF}) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared tomore » the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCM{sub B}). FCM{sub TGF} stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCM{sub TGF}≫FCM{sub PDGF} induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCM{sub TGF}>FCM{sub PDGF}) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with

  12. NKT Cell-TCR Expression Activates Conventional T Cells in Vivo, but Is Largely Dispensable for Mature NKT Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Vahl, J. Christoph; Heger, Klaus; Knies, Nathalie; Hein, Marco Y.; Boon, Louis; Yagita, Hideo; Polic, Bojan; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cell development depends on recognition of self-glycolipids via their semi-invariant Vα14i-TCR. However, to what extent TCR-mediated signals determine identity and function of mature NKT cells remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain allowing conditional Vα14i-TCR expression from within the endogenous Tcrα locus. We demonstrate that naïve T cells are activated upon replacement of their endogenous TCR repertoire with Vα14i-restricted TCRs, but they do not differentiate into NKT cells. On the other hand, induced TCR ablation on mature NKT cells did not affect their lineage identity, homeostasis, or innate rapid cytokine secretion abilities. We therefore propose that peripheral NKT cells become unresponsive to and thus are independent of their autoreactive TCR. PMID:23853545

  13. Computational properties of mitochondria in T cell activation and fate

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we review how mitochondrial Ca2+ transport (mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and Na+/Ca2+ exchange) is involved in T cell biology, including activation and differentiation through shaping cellular Ca2+ signals. Based on recent observations, we propose that the Ca2+ crosstalk between mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm may form a proportional–integral–derivative (PID) controller. This PID mechanism (which is well known in engineering) could be responsible for computing cellular decisions. In addition, we point out the importance of analogue and digital signal processing in T cell life and implication of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in this process. PMID:27852805

  14. Targeting LAG-3 and PD-1 to Enhance T Cell Activation by Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Lichtenegger, Felix S; Rothe, Maurine; Schnorfeil, Frauke M; Deiser, Katrin; Krupka, Christina; Augsberger, Christian; Schlüter, Miriam; Neitz, Julia; Subklewe, Marion

    2018-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibition has been shown to successfully reactivate endogenous T cell responses directed against tumor-associated antigens, resulting in significantly prolonged overall survival in patients with various tumor entities. For malignancies with low endogenous immune responses, this approach has not shown a clear clinical benefit so far. Therapeutic vaccination, particularly dendritic cell (DC) vaccination, is a strategy to induce T cell responses. Interaction of DCs and T cells is dependent on receptor-ligand interactions of various immune checkpoints. In this study, we analyzed the influence of blocking antibodies targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), HVEM, CD244, TIM-3, and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) on the proliferation and cytokine secretion of T cells after stimulation with autologous TLR-matured DCs. In this context, we found that LAG-3 blockade resulted in superior T cell activation compared to inhibition of other pathways, including PD-1/PD-L1. This result was consistent across different methods to measure T cell stimulation (proliferation, IFN-γ secretion), various stimulatory antigens (viral and bacterial peptide pool, specific viral antigen, specific tumor antigen), and seen for both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Only under conditions with a weak antigenic stimulus, particularly when combining antigen presentation by peripheral blood mononuclear cells with low concentrations of peptides, we observed the highest T cell stimulation with dual blockade of LAG-3 and PD-1 blockade. We conclude that priming of novel immune responses can be strongly enhanced by blockade of LAG-3 or dual blockade of LAG-3 and PD-1, depending on the strength of the antigenic stimulus.

  15. Lysosome activation clears aggregates and enhances quiescent neural stem cell activation during aging.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Dena S; Hebestreit, Katja; Ruetz, Tyson; Webb, Ashley E; McKay, Andrew; Pollina, Elizabeth A; Dulken, Ben W; Zhao, Xiaoai; Yeo, Robin W; Ho, Theodore T; Mahmoudi, Salah; Devarajan, Keerthana; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Rando, Thomas A; Frydman, Judith; Brunet, Anne

    2018-03-16

    In the adult brain, the neural stem cell (NSC) pool comprises quiescent and activated populations with distinct roles. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that quiescent and activated NSCs exhibited differences in their protein homeostasis network. Whereas activated NSCs had active proteasomes, quiescent NSCs contained large lysosomes. Quiescent NSCs from young mice accumulated protein aggregates, and many of these aggregates were stored in large lysosomes. Perturbation of lysosomal activity in quiescent NSCs affected protein-aggregate accumulation and the ability of quiescent NSCs to activate. During aging, quiescent NSCs displayed defects in their lysosomes, increased accumulation of protein aggregates, and reduced ability to activate. Enhancement of the lysosome pathway in old quiescent NSCs cleared protein aggregates and ameliorated the ability of quiescent NSCs to activate, allowing them to regain a more youthful state. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Antiproliferative activity of rosamultic acid is associated with induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, inhibition of cell migration and caspase activation in human gastric cancer (SGC-7901) cells.

    PubMed

    Sui, Cheng-Guang; Meng, Fan-Dong; Li, Yan; Jiang, You-Hong

    2015-08-15

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths after lung cancer globally. Among natural products, natural triterpenes represent a structurally diverse group of organic compounds with potent antitumor activity. The objective of the present research work demonstrated the antiproliferative and apoptotic activity of rosamultic acid, a natural triterpenoid, in human gastric cancer (SGC-7901) cells. Its effect on cellular morphology, cell cycle arrest, DNA fragmentation and expression levels of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 were also determined. Antiproliferative activity of rosamultic acid was evaluated by MTT assay. Phase contrast, fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry using Hoechst 33342, acridine orange/ethidium bromide and Annexin V-FITC as cellular probes were used to evaluate the induction of apoptosis by rosamultic acid. Protein level expressions were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results revealed that rosamultic acid induced dose-dependent as well as time dependent cytotoxic effects in SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. It also led to a reduction in clonogenic activity along with inhibiting the cell migration. Characteristic features of apoptosis induced by rosamultic acid were observed and quantified. Cell cycle arrest at sub-G1 phase was induced by rosamultic acid along with downregulation of expression levels of CDK4, CDK6 and cyclin D1. Rosamultic acid also significantly led to the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 during the 48 h treatment along with cleaving PARP in a dose-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation following rosamultic acid treatment was also observed in these cells. The current study strongly reveals that rosamultic acid inhibits gastric cancer proliferation by inducing apoptosis mediated through cell cycle arrest, downregulation of cell cycle related protein expressions, inhibition of cell migration, DNA damage, and activation of caspases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of polyclonal activators on cytokine production by blood cells and by malignant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kunts, T A; Karpukhina, K V; Mikhaylova, E S; Marinkin, I O; Varaksin, N A; Autenshlyus, A I; Lyakhovich, V V

    2016-01-01

    The production of cytokines by peripheral blood cells and biopsy specimens of tumors stimulated by polyclonal activators (PAs) was evaluated in 34 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Positive correlation between the stimulation index of polyclonal activators (SIPA) for IL-18 production by the tumor and the relative content of poorly differentiated cells was revealed. The latter, in turn, was positively correlated with the numbers of normal and pathologic mitoses and the degree of malignancy. Cancer cells can produce IL-18, which is involved in the process of angiogenesis, stimulates invasion and metastasis. Decrease in SIPA for the production of IL-6 and GCSF by peripheral blood cells could serve as an indicator of malignant progression in invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via LPA4and LPA6negatively regulates cell motile activities of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kaede; Fukushima, Kaori; Onishi, Yuka; Inui, Karin; Node, Yusuke; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2017-01-29

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular biological lipid and interacts with six subtypes of G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA 1 to LPA 6 ). LPA receptors exhibit a variety of cellular functions, depending on types of cancer cells. In this study, to assess the roles of LPA 4 and LPA 6 in cell growth and motile activities of colon cancer cells, LPA 4 and LPA 6 knockdown cells were established from DLD1 and HCT116 cells. LPA treatment increased the cell growth activities of LPA 4 and LPA 6 knockdown cells, compared with control cells. The cell motile activities of LPA 4 and LPA 6 knockdown cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. To evaluate the effects of LPA 4 and LPA 6 on cell motile activity induced by anticancer drug, long-term fluorouracil (5-FU) treated (DLD-5FU) cells were generated. The expression levels of LPAR1, LPAR4 and LPAR6 genes were significantly increased in DLD-5FU cells. DLD-5FU cells showed the high cell motile activity, compared with DLD1 cells. The increased cell motile activity was markedly stimulated by LPA 4 and LPA 6 knockdown. In contrast, the cell motile activity enhanced by 5-FU treatment was suppressed by LPA 1 knockdown. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA 4 and LPA 6 negatively regulates the cell motile activities of DLD1 and HCT116 cells as well as long-term 5-FU treated cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Decoding speech perception from single cell activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Ossmy, Ori; Fried, Itzhak; Mukamel, Roy

    2015-08-15

    Deciphering the content of continuous speech is a challenging task performed daily by the human brain. Here, we tested whether activity of single cells in auditory cortex could be used to support such a task. We recorded neural activity from auditory cortex of two neurosurgical patients while presented with a short video segment containing speech. Population spiking activity (~20 cells per patient) allowed detection of word onset and decoding the identity of perceived words with significantly high accuracy levels. Oscillation phase of local field potentials (8-12Hz) also allowed decoding word identity although with lower accuracy levels. Our results provide evidence that the spiking activity of a relatively small population of cells in human primary auditory cortex contains significant information for classification of words in ongoing speech. Given previous evidence for overlapping neural representation during speech perception and production, this may have implications for developing brain-machine interfaces for patients with deficits in speech production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Solar Cell Polymer Based Active Ingredients PPV and PCBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardeli, H.; Sanjaya, H.; Resikarnila, R.; Nitami H, R.

    2018-04-01

    A polymer solar cell is a solar cell based on a polymer bulk heterojunction structure using the method of thin film, which can convert solar energy into electrical energy. Absorption of light is carried by active material layer PPV: PCBM. This study aims to make solar cells tandem and know the value of converting solar energy into electrical energy and increase the value of efficiency generated through morphological control, ie annealing temperature and the ratio of active layer mixture. The active layer is positioned above the PEDOT:PSS layer on ITO glass substrate. The characterization results show the surface morphology of the PPV:PCBM active layer is quite evenly at annealing temperature of 165 ° C. The result of conversion of electrical energy with a UV light source in annealing samples with temperature 165 ° C is 0.03 mA and voltage of 4.085 V with an efficiency of 2.61% and mixed ratio variation was obtained in comparison of P3HT: PCBM is 1: 3

  1. Cells Actively Stiffen Fibrin Networks by Generating Contractile Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Karin A.; Bacabac, Rommel G.; Piechocka, Izabela K.; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2013-01-01

    During wound healing and angiogenesis, fibrin serves as a provisional extracellular matrix. We use a model system of fibroblasts embedded in fibrin gels to study how cell-mediated contraction may influence the macroscopic mechanical properties of their extracellular matrix during such processes. We demonstrate by macroscopic shear rheology that the cells increase the elastic modulus of the fibrin gels. Microscopy observations show that this stiffening sets in when the cells spread and apply traction forces on the fibrin fibers. We further show that the stiffening response mimics the effect of an external stress applied by mechanical shear. We propose that stiffening is a consequence of active myosin-driven cell contraction, which provokes a nonlinear elastic response of the fibrin matrix. Cell-induced stiffening is limited to a factor 3 even though fibrin gels can in principle stiffen much more before breaking. We discuss this observation in light of recent models of fibrin gel elasticity, and conclude that the fibroblasts pull out floppy modes, such as thermal bending undulations, from the fibrin network, but do not axially stretch the fibers. Our findings are relevant for understanding the role of matrix contraction by cells during wound healing and cancer development, and may provide design parameters for materials to guide morphogenesis in tissue engineering. PMID:24268136

  2. A Cell-Cell Communication-Based Screening System for Novel Microbes with Target Enzyme Activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haseong; Rha, Eugene; Seong, Wonjae; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2016-11-18

    The development of synthetic biological devices has increased rapidly in recent years and the practical benefits of such biological devices are becoming increasingly clear. Here, we further improved the design of a previously reported high-throughput genetic enzyme screening system by investigating device-compatible biological components and phenol-mediated cell-cell communication, both of which increased the efficiency and practicality of the screening device without requiring the use of flow cytometry analysis. A sensor cell was designed to detect novel microbes with target enzyme activities on solid media by forming clear, circular colonies with fluorescence around the unknown microbes producing target enzymes. This mechanism of detection was enabled by the combination of pre-effector phenolic substrate treatment in the presence of target enzyme-producing microbes and control of the growth and fluorescence of remote sensor cells via phenol-mediated cell-cell communication. The sensor cells were applied to screen soil bacteria with phosphatase activity using phenyl phosphate as phenolic substrates. The sensor cells facilitated successful visualization of phosphatase activity in unknown microbes, which were identified by 16S rRNA analysis. Enzyme activity assays confirmed that the proposed screening technique was able to find 23 positive clones out of 33 selected colonies. Since many natural enzymatic reactions produce phenolic compounds from phenol-derived substrates, we anticipate that the proposed technique may have broad applications in the assessment and screening of novel microbes with target enzymes of interest. This method also can provide insights into the identification of novel enzymes for which screening assays are not yet available.

  3. NKL homeobox gene activities in hematopoietic stem cells, T-cell development and T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Scherr, Michaela; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Battmer, Karin; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Drexler, Hans G

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells represent developmentally arrested T-cell progenitors, subsets of which aberrantly express homeobox genes of the NKL subclass, including TLX1, TLX3, NKX2-1, NKX2-5, NKX3-1 and MSX1. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional landscape of all 48 members of the NKL homeobox gene subclass in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and during lymphopoiesis, identifying activities of nine particular genes. Four of these were expressed in HSPCs (HHEX, HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1) and three in common lymphoid progenitors (HHEX, HLX1 and MSX1). Interestingly, our data indicated downregulation of NKL homeobox gene transcripts in late progenitors and mature T-cells, a phenomenon which might explain the oncogenic impact of this group of genes in T-ALL. Using MSX1-expressing T-ALL cell lines as models, we showed that HHEX activates while HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1 repress MSX1 transcription, demonstrating the mutual regulation and differential activities of these homeobox genes. Analysis of a public T-ALL expression profiling data set comprising 117 patient samples identified 20 aberrantly activated members of the NKL subclass, extending the number of known NKL homeobox oncogene candidates. While 7/20 genes were also active during hematopoiesis, the remaining 13 showed ectopic expression. Finally, comparative analyses of T-ALL patient and cell line profiling data of NKL-positive and NKL-negative samples indicated absence of shared target genes but instead highlighted deregulation of apoptosis as common oncogenic effect. Taken together, we present a comprehensive survey of NKL homeobox genes in early hematopoiesis, T-cell development and T-ALL, showing that these genes generate an NKL-code for the diverse stages of lymphoid development which might be fundamental for regular differentiation.

  4. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, LaKeisha G.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets formore » developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  5. Physical Intimacy of Breast Cancer Cells with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Elicits Trastuzumab Resistance through Src Activation

    PubMed Central

    Daverey, Amita; Drain, Allison P.; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-01-01

    The development of resistance to trastuzumab is a major obstacle for lasting effective treatment of patients with ErbB2-overexpressing tumors. Here, we demonstrate that the physical contact of breast cancer cells with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is a potential modulator of trastuzumab response by activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Src and down regulation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Using an in vitro patterned breast cancer/MSC co-culture model, we find that the presence of MSCs results in Src activation that is missing in cancer cells monoculture, transwell co-culture, and cells treated with MSCs conditioned media. Interestingly, the co-culture model also results in PTEN loss and activation of PI3K/AKT pathway that has been demonstrated as fundamental proliferative and survival pathways in clinical settings. To our knowledge, this is the first report that showed PTEN loss without the use of chemical inhibitors, matrix stiffness, or silencing RNAs. In addition, breast cancer cells in co-culture with MSCs conferred trastuzumab resistance in vitro as observed in the lack of inhibition of proliferative and migrative properties of the cancer cells. Our findings show that MSCs are potent mediators of resistance to trastuzumab and might reveal targets to enhance trastuzumab efficacy in patients. PMID:26345302

  6. Metastable primordial germ cell-like state induced from mouse embryonic stem cells by Akt activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, Noriko; Kimura, Tohru, E-mail: tkimura@patho.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Watanabe-Kushima, Shoko

    2010-02-12

    Specification to primordial germ cells (PGCs) is mediated by mesoderm-induction signals during gastrulation. We found that Akt activation during in vitro mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated self-renewing spheres with differentiation states between those of ESCs and PGCs. Essential regulators for PGC specification and their downstream germ cell-specific genes were expressed in the spheres, indicating that the sphere cells had commenced differentiation to the germ lineage. However, the spheres did not proceed to spermatogenesis after transplantation into testes. Sphere cell transfer to the original feeder-free ESC cultures resulted in chaotic differentiation. In contrast, when the spheres were culturedmore » on mouse embryonic fibroblasts or in the presence of ERK-cascade and GSK3 inhibitors, reversion to the ESC-like state was observed. These results indicate that Akt signaling promotes a novel metastable and pluripotent state that is intermediate to those of ESCs and PGCs.« less

  7. Isolation of Cells Specialized in Anticancer Alkaloid Metabolism by Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Ana Luísa; Martínez-Cortés, Teresa; Guedes, Joana G.; Lopes, Telma; Andrade, Cláudia; Bispo, Cláudia; Andrade, Paula; Rodrigues, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant specialized metabolism often presents a complex cell-specific compartmentation essential to accomplish the biosynthesis of valuable plant natural products. Hence, the disclosure and potential manipulation of such pathways may depend on the capacity to isolate and characterize specific cell types. Catharanthus roseus is the source of several medicinal terpenoid indole alkaloids, including the low-level anticancer vinblastine and vincristine, for which the late biosynthetic steps occur in specialized mesophyll cells called idioblasts. Here, the optical, fluorescence, and alkaloid-accumulating properties of C. roseus leaf idioblasts are characterized, and a methodology for the isolation of idioblast protoplasts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting is established, taking advantage of the distinctive autofluorescence of these cells. This achievement represents a crucial step for the development of differential omic strategies leading to the identification of candidate genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis, pathway regulation, and transmembrane transport leading to the anticancer alkaloids from C. roseus. PMID:27356972

  8. Cell-to-cell heterogeneity of EWSR1-FLI1 activity determines proliferation/migration choices in Ewing sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, G-A; Laud-Duval, K; van der Ent, W; Brisac, A; Irondelle, M; Aubert, S; Dirksen, U; Bouvier, C; de Pinieux, G; Snaar-Jagalska, E; Chavrier, P; Delattre, O

    2017-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is characterized by the expression of the chimeric EWSR1-FLI1 transcription factor. Proteomic analyses indicate that the decrease of EWSR1-FLI1 expression leads to major changes in effectors of the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton and the adhesion processes with a shift from cell-to-cell to cell-matrix adhesion. These changes are associated with a dramatic increase of in vivo cell migration and invasion potential. Importantly, EWSR1-FLI1 expression, evaluated by single-cell RT-ddPCR/immunofluorescence analyses, and activity, assessed by expression of EWSR1-FLI1 downstream targets, are heterogeneous in cell lines and in tumours and can fluctuate along time in a fully reversible process between EWSR1-FLI1high states, characterized by highly active cell proliferation, and EWSR1-FLI1low states where cells have a strong propensity to migrate, invade and metastasize. This new model of phenotypic plasticity proposes that the dynamic fluctuation of the expression level of a dominant oncogene is an intrinsic characteristic of its oncogenic potential. PMID:28135250

  9. Neuropilin-1 Expression Characterizes T Follicular Helper (Tfh) Cells Activated during B Cell Differentiation in Human Secondary Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Renand, Amédée; Milpied, Pierre; Rossignol, Julien; Bruneau, Julie; Lemonnier, François; Dussiot, Michael; Coulon, Séverine; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play an essential role in the development of antigen-specific B cell immunity. Tfh cells regulate the differentiation and survival of activated B cells outside and inside germinal centers (GC) of secondary lymphoid organs. They act through cognate contacts with antigen-presenting B cells, but there is no current marker to specifically identify those Tfh cells which productively interact with B cells. Here we show that neuropilin 1 (Nrp1), a cell surface receptor, is selectively expressed by a subset of Tfh cells in human secondary lymphoid organs. Nrp1 expression on Tfh cells correlates with B cell differentiation in vivo and in vitro, is transient, and can be induced upon co-culture with autologous memory B cells in a cell contact-dependent manner. Comparative analysis of ex vivo Nrp1+ and Nrp1- Tfh cells reveals gene expression modulation during activation. Finally, Nrp1 is expressed by malignant Tfh-like cells in a severe case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) associated with elevated terminal B cell differentiation. Thus, Nrp1 is a specific marker of Tfh cells cognate activation in humans, which may prove useful as a prognostic factor and a therapeutic target in neoplastic diseases associated with Tfh cells activity. PMID:24386482

  10. Regulation of visual Wulst cell responsiveness by imprinting causes stimulus-specific activation of rostral cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Kato, Tomomi; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Imprinting behaviour in chicks can be induced exclusively during a short period after hatching. During this period, visual information on the imprinting stimulus is conveyed to the visual Wulst (VW) in the telencephalon, which corresponds to the visual cortex of mammals, and then to the memory-storing region known as the intermediate medial mesopallium. These two regions are indispensable for imprinting. We previously showed that imprinting training altered the response pattern of the VW to the imprinting stimulus; however, the precise distribution of cells and the mechanism involved with this altered response remains unclear. Here we showed that a specific population of rostral VW cells responded to the imprinting stimulus by analysing the subcellular localization of Arc/arg3.1 transcripts in VW cells. GABAergic parvalbumin (PV) cells are abundant in the dorsal region of this area, and imprinting training doubled the number of activated PV-positive neurons. An injection of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, in the dorsal VW disturbed the rostral distribution of responsive cells and thus resulted in a lack of imprinting. These results suggest that activated PV cells restrict VW cells response to dorsal area to form a specific imprinting pathway. PMID:28230107

  11. Predictors of osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Cheng, Kevin; Niu, Xiaomei; Moore-King, Evadne; Fadojutimi-Akinsi, Margaret F.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Sable, Craig; Rana, Sohail; Dham, Niti; Campbell, Andrew; Ensing, Gregory; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Castro, Oswaldo L.; Gordeuk, Victor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Bone changes are common in sickle cell disease, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) type 5b is produced by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In other forms of hemolytic anemia, increased iron stores are associated with osteoporosis. We hypothesized that transfusional iron overload would be associated with increased osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease. Design and Methods We examined tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations in patients with sickle cell disease and normal controls of similar age and sex distribution at steady state. Serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentration was measured using an immunocapture enzyme assay and plasma concentrations of other cytokines were assayed using the Bio-Plex suspension array system. Tricuspid regurgitation velocity, an indirect measure of systolic pulmonary artery pressure, was determined by echocardiography. Results Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations were higher in 58 adults with sickle cell disease than in 22 controls (medians of 4.4 versus 2.4 U/L, respectively; P=0.0001). Among the patients with sickle cell disease, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b independently correlated with blood urea nitrogen (standardized beta=0.40, P=0.003), interleukin-8 (standardized beta=0.30, P=0.020), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 5 (standardized beta=−0.28, P=0.031) concentrations, but not with serum ferritin concentration. Frequent blood transfusions (>10 units in life time) were not associated with higher tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels in multivariate analysis. There were strong correlations among tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, alkaline phosphatase and tricuspid regurgitation velocity (r>0.35, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients with sickle cell disease have increased osteoclast activity as reflected by serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations. Our results may support a

  12. Compounds active against cell walls of medically important fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, R F

    1993-01-01

    A number of substances that directly or indirectly affect the cell walls of fungi have been identified. Those that actively interfere with the synthesis or degradation of polysaccharide components share the property of being produced by soil microbes as secondary metabolites. Compounds specifically interfering with chitin or beta-glucan synthesis have proven effective in studies of preclinical models of mycoses, though they appear to have a restricted spectrum of coverage. Semisynthetic derivatives of some of the natural products have offered improvements in activity, toxicology, or pharmacokinetic behavior. Compounds which act on the cell wall indirectly or by a secondary mechanism of action, such as the azoles, act against diverse fungi but are usually fungistatic in nature. Overall, these compounds are attractive candidates for further development. PMID:8457977

  13. Endothelial cells activate the cancer stem cell-associated NANOGP8 pathway in colorectal cancer cells in a paracrine fashion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Bhattacharya, Rajat; Ye, Xiangcang; Fan, Fan; Boulbes, Delphine R; Xia, Ling; Ellis, Lee M

    2017-08-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been hypothesized to mediate cell survival and chemoresistance. Previous studies from our laboratory described a role for liver parenchymal endothelial cells (LPECs) in mediating the CSC phenotype in CRC cells in a paracrine/angiocrine fashion. The objectives of this study were to determine whether endothelial cells (ECs) from different organs can induce the CSC phenotype in CRC cells and to elucidate the signaling pathways involved. We treated a newly developed CRC cell line (HCP-1) and established CRC cell lines (HT29 and SW480) with conditioned medium (CM) from primary ECs isolated from nonmalignant liver, lung, colon mucosa, and kidney. Our results showed that CM from ECs from all organs increased the number of CSCs, as determined by sphere formation, and protein levels of NANOG and OCT4 in CRC cells. With the focus of further elucidating the role of the liver vascular network in mediating the CSC phenotype, we demonstrated that CM from LPECs increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. Moreover, we showed that LPEC CM specifically induced NANOGP8 expression in CRC cells by specific enzyme digestion and a luciferase reporter assay using a vector containing the NANOGP8 promoter. Lastly, we found that LPEC CM-induced NANOGP8 expression and sphere formation were mediated by AKT activation. Our studies demonstrated a paracrine role for ECs in regulating the CSC phenotype and chemoresistance in CRC cells by AKT-mediated induction of NANOGP8. These studies suggest a more specific approach to target CSCs by blocking the expression of NANOGP8 in cancer cells. © 2017 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Endothelial Cells Promote Pigmentation through Endothelin Receptor B Activation.

    PubMed

    Regazzetti, Claire; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Ghorbel, Houda Hammami; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Ambrosetti, Damien; Bahadoran, Philippe; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Ballotti, Robert; Mahns, Andre; Passeron, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Findings of increased vascularization in melasma lesions and hyperpigmentation in acquired bilateral telangiectatic macules suggested a link between pigmentation and vascularization. Using high-magnification digital epiluminescence dermatoscopy, laser confocal microscopy, and histological examination, we showed that benign vascular lesions of the skin have restricted but significant hyperpigmentation compared with the surrounding skin. We then studied the role of microvascular endothelial cells in regulating skin pigmentation using an in vitro co-culture model using endothelial cells and melanocytes. These experiments showed that endothelin 1 released by microvascular endothelial cells induces increased melanogenesis signaling, characterized by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor phosphorylation, and increased tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase levels. Immunostaining for endothelin 1 in vascular lesions confirmed the increased expression on the basal layer of the epidermis above small vessels compared with perilesional skin. Endothelin acts through the activation of endothelin receptor B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and p38, to induce melanogenesis. Finally, culturing of reconstructed skin with microvascular endothelial cells led to increased skin pigmentation that could be prevented by inhibiting EDNRB. Taken together these results demonstrated the role of underlying microvascularization in skin pigmentation, a finding that could open new fields of research for regulating physiological pigmentation and for treating pigmentation disorders such as melasma.

  15. Fat cells directly sense temperature to activate thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Li; Wu, Jun; Cohen, Paul; Kazak, Lawrence; Khandekar, Melin J; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Zeng, Xing; Gygi, Steven P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2013-07-23

    Classic brown fat and inducible beige fat both dissipate chemical energy in the form of heat through the actions of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1. This nonshivering thermogenesis is crucial for mammals as a defense against cold and obesity/diabetes. Cold is known to act indirectly through the sympathetic nervous systems and β-adrenergic signaling, but here we report that cool temperature (27-33 °C) can directly activate a thermogenic gene program in adipocytes in a cell-autonomous manner. White and beige fat cells respond to cool temperatures, but classic brown fat cells do not. Importantly, this activation in isolated cells is independent of the canonical cAMP/Protein Kinase A/cAMP response element-binding protein pathway downstream of the β-adrenergic receptors. These findings provide an unusual insight into the role of adipose tissues in thermoregulation, as well as an alternative way to target nonshivering thermogenesis for treatment of obesity and metabolic diseases.

  16. Fat cells directly sense temperature to activate thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Li; Wu, Jun; Cohen, Paul; Kazak, Lawrence; Khandekar, Melin J.; Jedrychowski, Mark P.; Zeng, Xing; Gygi, Steven P.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    2013-01-01

    Classic brown fat and inducible beige fat both dissipate chemical energy in the form of heat through the actions of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1. This nonshivering thermogenesis is crucial for mammals as a defense against cold and obesity/diabetes. Cold is known to act indirectly through the sympathetic nervous systems and β-adrenergic signaling, but here we report that cool temperature (27–33 °C) can directly activate a thermogenic gene program in adipocytes in a cell-autonomous manner. White and beige fat cells respond to cool temperatures, but classic brown fat cells do not. Importantly, this activation in isolated cells is independent of the canonical cAMP/Protein Kinase A/cAMP response element-binding protein pathway downstream of the β-adrenergic receptors. These findings provide an unusual insight into the role of adipose tissues in thermoregulation, as well as an alternative way to target nonshivering thermogenesis for treatment of obesity and metabolic diseases. PMID:23818608

  17. Key gravity-sensitive signaling pathways drive T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Boonyaratanakornkit, J B; Cogoli, A; Li, C-F; Schopper, T; Pippia, P; Galleri, G; Meloni, M A; Hughes-Fulford, M

    2005-12-01

    Returning astronauts have experienced altered immune function and increased vulnerability to infection during spaceflights dating back to Apollo and Skylab. Lack of immune response in microgravity occurs at the cellular level. We analyzed differential gene expression to find gravity-dependent genes and pathways. We found inhibited induction of 91 genes in the simulated freefall environment of the random positioning machine. Altered induction of 10 genes regulated by key signaling pathways was verified using real-time RT-PCR. We discovered that impaired induction of early genes regulated primarily by transcription factors NF-kappaB, CREB, ELK, AP-1, and STAT after crosslinking the T-cell receptor contributes to T-cell dysfunction in altered gravity environments. We have previously shown that PKA and PKC are key early regulators in T-cell activation. Since the majority of the genes were regulated by NF-kappaB, CREB, and AP-1, we studied the pathways that regulated these transcription factors. We found that the PKA pathway was down-regulated in vg. In contrast, PI3-K, PKC, and its upstream regulator pLAT were not significantly down-regulated by vectorless gravity. Since NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB are all regulated by PKA and are transcription factors predicted by microarray analysis to be involved in the altered gene expression in vectorless gravity, the data suggest that PKA is a key player in the loss of T-cell activation in altered gravity.

  18. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell Activation Following Cutaneous Burn in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    label activated satellite cells in vivo. Sixteen hours later, predominantly fast-twitch muscles [tibialis anterior (TA), extensor digitorum longus (EDL...proliferation, differentiation, and Fig. 4 – Burn increases the expression of Pax7 in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), but not soleus muscles. Soleus... digitorum longus (EDL), plantaris, and gastrocnemius] and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles of rats that received either 40% total body surface area full-thickness

  19. Fluorescent probes for detecting monoamine oxidase activity and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefeng; Zhang, Huatang; Xie, Yusheng; Hu, Yi; Sun, Hongyan; Zhu, Qing

    2014-04-07

    A series of new fluorogenic probes for monoamine oxidases (MAOs) were reported based on an oxidation and β-elimination mechanism. The limits of detection of the probes for MAO-A and -B were determined to be 3.5 and 6.0 μg mL(-1) respectively. These probes displayed strong activity towards MAOs, especially MAO-B. Cellular imaging studies were also successfully conducted with MCF-7 cells.

  20. Aloe vera extract activity on human corneal cells.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Anna; Paduch, Roman

    2012-02-01

    Ocular diseases are currently an important problem in modern societies. Patients suffer from various ophthalmologic ailments namely, conjunctivitis, dry eye, dacryocystitis or degenerative diseases. Therefore, there is a need to introduce new treatment methods, including medicinal plants usage. Aloe vera [Aloe barbadensis Miller (Liliaceae)] possesses wound-healing properties and shows immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory or antioxidant activities. NR uptake, MTT, DPPH• reduction, Griess reaction, ELISA and rhodamine-phalloidin staining were used to test toxicity, antiproliferative activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine level, and distribution of F-actin in cells, respectively. The present study analyzes the effect of Aloe vera extracts obtained with different solvents on in vitro culture of human 10.014 pRSV-T corneal cells. We found no toxicity of ethanol, ethyl acetate and heptane extracts of Aloe vera on human corneal cells. No ROS reducing activity by heptane extract and trace action by ethanol (only at high concentration 125 µg/ml) extract of Aloe vera was observed. Only ethyl acetate extract expressed distinct free radical scavenging effect. Plant extracts decreased NO production by human corneal cells as compared to untreated controls. The cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10) production decreased after the addition of Aloe vera extracts to the culture media. Aloe vera contains multiple pharmacologically active substances which are capable of modulating cellular phenotypes and functions. Aloe vera ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts may be used in eye drops to treat inflammations and other ailments of external parts of the eye such as the cornea.

  1. Effect of age on proteasomal activity of T cells and macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    T cell function is impaired with aging. Proteasome activity in T cells is important for T cell activation and its activity in macrophages is required for processing antigens in order to be presented via class I major histocompatibility complex to CD8+ T cells. Since studies have demonstrated that pr...

  2. Apamin suppresses biliary fibrosis and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Yeon; An, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Woon-Hae; Park, Yoon-Yub; Park, Kyung Duck; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2017-05-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by the progressive destruction of biliary epithelial cells (BECs) followed by fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver failure. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and portal fibroblasts are the major cellular effectors of enhanced collagen deposition in biliary fibrosis. Apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide neurotoxin found in apitoxin (bee venom), is known to block Ca2+-activated K+ channels and prevent carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. In the present study, we aimed to ascertain whether apamin inhibits biliary fibrosis and the proliferation of HSCs. Cholestatic liver fibrosis was established in mouse models with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) feeding. Cellular assays were performed on HSC-T6 cells (rat immortalized HSCs). DDC feeding led to increased hepatic damage and proinflammtory cytokine levels. Notably, apamin treatment resulted in decreased liver injury and proinflammatory cytokine levels. Moreover, apamin suppressed the deposition of collagen, proliferation of BECs and expression of fibrogenic genes in the DDC-fed mice. In HSCs, apamin suppressed activation of HSCs by inhibiting the Smad signaling pathway. These data suggest that apamin may be a potential therapeutic target in cholestatic liver disease.

  3. MEPE activated by furin promotes pulpal cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Wang, H G; Kawashima, N; Iwata, T; Xu, J; Takahashi, S; Sugiyama, T; Suda, H

    2011-04-01

    Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) is predominantly expressed in osteoblasts, osteocytes, and odontoblasts and plays key biological roles in bone and dentin metabolism. Post-translational modifications are essential for its activation. This study tested the hypothesis that MEPE is activated through proteolytic processing by furin in dental pulp. MEPE was present in three sizes, 1 full-length and 2 cleaved fragments; the cleavage site was 146R↓147. The proprotein convertase family, particularly furin, was a candidate enzyme. Introducing a substitution at the cleavage site inhibited hydrolysis, but there was no cleavage of MEPE expressed in furin-deficient LoVo cells. Therefore, furin is a strong candidate for the proteolytic cleavage of MEPE. The C-terminal cleavage product promoted cell adhesion via its RGD motif. These results indicate that proteolytic processing by furin may activate MEPE during its secretion from odontoblasts and may play important roles in dentinogenesis and pulpal homeostasis. MEPE, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein; PTM, post-translational modifications; OLC, odontoblast-lineage cells.

  4. Fluorometric cell-based assay for β-galactosidase activity in probiotic gram-positive bacterial cells - Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Chiu, Norman H L

    2016-09-01

    Although methods for measuring β-galactosidase activity in intact gram-negative bacterial cells have been reported, the methods may not be applicable to measuring β-galactosidase activity in gram-positive bacterial cells. This report focuses on the development of a fluorometric cell-based assay for measuring β-galactosidase activity in gram-positive cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase activation protects gastric epithelial cells from Helicobacter pylori-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Guoqiang; Zhu, Huanhuan; Zhou, Feng; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Li, Chenwan

    2014-10-10

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), infecting half of the world's population, causes gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved regulator of cellular energy and metabolism. Recent studies indicated an important role for AMPK in promoting cell survival. In this study, we discovered that H Pylori induced AMPK activation in transformed (GEC-1 line) and primary human gastric epithelial cells (GECs). Inhibition of H Pylori-stimulated AMPK kinase activity by AMPK inhibitor compound C exacerbated apoptosis in transformed and primary GECs. Meanwhile, downregulation of AMPK expression by targeted shRNAs promoted apoptosis in H pylori-infected GECs. In contrast, A-769662 and resveratrol, two known AMPK activators, or AMPKα1 over-expression, enhanced H Pylori-induced AMPK activation, and inhibited GEC apoptosis. Our data suggested that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) could be the upstream kinase for AMPK activation by H pylori. Partial depletion of TAK1 by shRNAs not only inhibited AMPK activation, but also suppressed survival of H pylori-infected GECs. Taken together, these results suggest that TAK1-dependent AMPK activation protects GECs from H pylori-Induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Augmenting Trastuzumab Therapy Against Breast Cancer Through Selective Activation of NK Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    12 in combination with rituximab in patients with B-cell non- Hodgkin lymphoma . Blood 99:67-74. 11. Lin, W., Voskens, C.J., Zhang, X., Schindler, D.G...antibody-coated tumor cell used for NK cell activation, cytotoxicity against HER2-expressing breast cancer as well as CD20+ lymphoma was compared using...NK cells activated by trastuzumab-coated breast cancer or rituximab-coated lymphoma . Activated NK cells lysed antibody-coated tumor cells with

  7. Skeletal muscle cells: from local inflammatory response to active immunity.

    PubMed

    Marino, M; Scuderi, F; Provenzano, C; Bartoccioni, E

    2011-02-01

    The skeletal muscles are the major living component of the human body. They are constituted by stable cells, the myofibres, and by adult multipotent stem cells, the satellite cells, which can multiply to regenerate and repair the damaged tissues. Injections of DNA in muscle cells have been used to produce recombinant proteins with opposite goals: somatic reparation of genetic defects, which needs to elicit no inflammatory or immune response, and DNA vaccination, which needs a robust immune response. Because of possible therapeutical interventions, a growing body of information is being produced dealing with every aspect of the myofibres during inflammatory and autoimmune responses: skeletal muscle-antigen presenting cell (APC) interaction and intrinsic APC capabilities of myoblasts and myocytes, the response to released cytokines and their endogenous production, the regulation of Toll-like receptors and major histocompatibility complex expression. According to these data, the muscle tissue is now emerging no longer as a passive bystander, but more as an active player that, when correctly manipulated, can drive tolerance or immunization to these de novo produced proteins. In the present review, we summarize the recent developments on the control of muscle immune function.

  8. Three determinants in ezrin are responsible for cell extension activity.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, M; Roy, C; Montcourrier, P; Sahuquet, A; Mangeat, P

    1997-01-01

    The ERM proteins--ezrin, radixin, and moesin--are key players in membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. In insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses, amino acids 1-115 of ezrin were shown to inhibit an actin- and tubulin-dependent cell-extension activity located in ezrin C-terminal domain (ezrin310-586), whereas full-length ezrin1-586 did not induce any morphological change. To refine the mapping of functional domains of ezrin, 30 additional constructs were overexpressed in Sf9 cells, and the resulting effect of each was qualitatively and semiquantitatively compared. The removal of amino acids 13-30 was sufficient to release a cell-extension phenotype. This effect was abrogated if the 21 distal-most C-terminal amino acids were subsequently deleted (ezrin31-565), confirming the existence of a head-to-tail regulation in the whole molecule. Surprisingly, the deletion in full-length ezrin of the same 21 amino acids provided strong cell-extension competence to ezrin1-565, and this property was recovered in N-terminal constructs as short as ezrin1-310. Within ezrin1-310, amino acid sequences 13-30 and 281-310 were important determinants and acted in cooperation to induce cytoskeleton mobilization. In addition, these same residues are part of a new actin-bindin