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Sample records for activate inkt cells

  1. Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui, E-mail: hzhang@wsu.edu; Zhang, Faya; Zhu, Zhaohui

    Alcohol consumption exhibits diverse effects on different types of immune cells. NKT cells are a unique T cell population and play important immunoregulatory roles in different types of immune responses. The effects of chronic alcohol consumption on NKT cells remain to be elucidated. Using a mouse model of chronic alcohol consumption, we found that alcohol increases the percentage of NKT cells, especially iNKT cells in the thymus and liver, but not in the spleen or blood. Alcohol consumption decreases the percentage of NK1.1{sup −} iNKT cells in the total iNKT cell population in all of the tissues and organs examined.more » In the thymus, alcohol consumption increases the number of NK1.1{sup +}CD44{sup hi} mature iNKT cells but does not alter the number of NK1.1{sup −} immature iNKT cells. A BrdU incorporation assay shows that alcohol consumption increases the proliferation of thymic NK1.1{sup −} iNKT cells, especially the NK1.1{sup −}CD44{sup lo} Stage I iNKT cells. The percentage of NKG2A{sup +} iNKT cells increases in all of the tissues and organs examined; whereas CXCR3{sup +} iNKT cells only increases in the thymus of alcohol-consuming mice. Chronic alcohol consumption increases the percentage of IFN-γ-producing iNKT cells and increases the blood concentration of IFN-γ and IL-12 after in vivo α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation. Consistent with the increased cytokine production, the in vivo activation of iNKT cells also enhances the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and NK, B, and T cells in the alcohol-consuming mice. Taken together the data indicate that chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation, which favors the Th1 immune response. - Highlights: • Chronic alcohol consumption increases iNKT cells in the thymus and liver • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances thymic Stage I iNKT cell proliferation • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation in thymus and periphery • Chronic alcohol

  2. Activation of iNKT cells by a distinct constituent of the endogenous glucosylceramide fraction

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patrick J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Heiss, Christian; Watts, Gerald F. M.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Veerapen, Natacha; Cox, Liam R.; Azadi, Parastoo; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialized T-cell subset that recognizes lipids as antigens, contributing to immune responses in diverse disease processes. Experimental data suggests that iNKT cells can recognize both microbial and endogenous lipid antigens. Several candidate endogenous lipid antigens have been proposed, although the contextual role of specific antigens during immune responses remains largely unknown. We have previously reported that mammalian glucosylceramides (GlcCers) activate iNKT cells. GlcCers are found in most mammalian tissues, and exist in variable molecular forms that differ mainly in N-acyl fatty acid chain use. In this report, we purified, characterized, and tested the GlcCer fractions from multiple animal species. Although activity was broadly identified in these GlcCer fractions from mammalian sources, we also found activity properties that could not be reconciled by differences in fatty acid chain use. Enzymatic digestion of β-GlcCer and a chromatographic separation method demonstrated that the activity in the GlcCer fraction was limited to a rare component of this fraction, and was not contained within the bulk of β-GlcCer molecular species. Our data suggest that a minor lipid species that copurifies with β-GlcCer in mammals functions as a lipid self antigen for iNKT cells. PMID:25197085

  3. The actin cytoskeleton modulates the activation of iNKT cells by segregating CD1d nanoclusters on antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Salio, Mariolina; Aichinger, Michael C.; Oddone, Anna; Lakadamyali, Melike; Shepherd, Dawn; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize endogenous and exogenous lipid antigens presented in the context of CD1d molecules. The ability of iNKT cells to recognize endogenous antigens represents a distinct immune recognition strategy, which underscores the constitutive memory phenotype of iNKT cells and their activation during inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms regulating such “tonic” activation of iNKT cells remain unclear. Here, we show that the spatiotemporal distribution of CD1d molecules on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) modulates activation of iNKT cells. By using superresolution microscopy, we show that CD1d molecules form nanoclusters at the cell surface of APCs, and their size and density are constrained by the actin cytoskeleton. Dual-color single-particle tracking revealed that diffusing CD1d nanoclusters are actively arrested by the actin cytoskeleton, preventing their further coalescence. Formation of larger nanoclusters occurs in the absence of interactions between CD1d cytosolic tail and the actin cytoskeleton and correlates with enhanced iNKT cell activation. Importantly and consistently with iNKT cell activation during inflammatory conditions, exposure of APCs to the Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist R848 increases nanocluster density and iNKT cell activation. Overall, these results define a previously unidentified mechanism that modulates iNKT cell autoreactivity based on the tight control by the APC cytoskeleton of the sizes and densities of endogenous antigen-loaded CD1d nanoclusters. PMID:26798067

  4. iNKT cell cytotoxic responses control T-lymphoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bassiri, Hamid; Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Barrett, David M.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Wiener, Susan J.; Orange, Jordan S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Nichols, Kim E.

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a lineage of CD1d-restricted glycolipid-reactive T lymphocytes with important roles in host immunity to cancer. iNKT cells indirectly participate in antitumor responses by inducing dendritic cell maturation and producing cytokines that promote tumor clearance by CD8+ T and NK cells. Although iNKT cells thereby act as potent cellular adjuvants, it is less clear whether they directly control the growth of tumors. To gain insights into the direct contribution of iNKT cells to tumor immune surveillance, we developed in vitro and in vivo systems to selectively examine the antitumor activity of iNKT cells in the absence of other cytolytic effectors. Using the EL4 T-lymphoma cell line as a model, we find that iNKT cells exert robust and specific lysis of tumor cells in vitro in a manner that is differentially-induced by iNKT cell agonists of varying TCR affinities, such as OCH, α-galactosyl ceramide and PBS44. In vitro blockade of CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation, disruption of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, or loss of perforin expression significantly reduce iNKT cell killing. Consistent with these findings, iNKT cell reconstitution of T, B, and NK cell-deficient mice slows EL4 growth in vivo via TCR-CD1d and perforin-dependent mechanisms. Together, these observations establish that iNKT cells are sufficient to control the growth of T-lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. They also suggest that the induction of iNKT cell cytotoxic responses in situ might serve as a more effective strategy to prevent and/or treat CD1d+ cancers, such as T-lymphoma. PMID:24563871

  5. iNKT cell cytotoxic responses control T-lymphoma growth in vitro and in vivo .

    PubMed

    Bassiri, Hamid; Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Barrett, David M; Brennan, Patrick J; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Wiener, Susan J; Orange, Jordan S; Brenner, Michael B; Grupp, Stephan A; Nichols, Kim E

    2014-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a lineage of CD1d-restricted glycolipid-reactive T lymphocytes with important roles in host immunity to cancer. iNKT cells indirectly participate in antitumor responses by inducing dendritic cell maturation and producing cytokines that promote tumor clearance by CD8+ T and NK cells. Although iNKT cells thereby act as potent cellular adjuvants, it is less clear whether they directly control the growth of tumors. To gain insights into the direct contribution of iNKT cells to tumor immune surveillance, we developed in vitro and in vivo systems to selectively examine the antitumor activity of iNKT cells in the absence of other cytolytic effectors. Using the EL4 T-lymphoma cell line as a model, we found that iNKT cells exert robust and specific lysis of tumor cells in vitro in a manner that is differentially induced by iNKT cell agonists of varying T-cell receptor (TCR) affinities, such as OCH, α-galactosyl ceramide, and PBS44. In vitro blockade of CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation, disruption of TCR signaling, or loss of perforin expression significantly reduce iNKT cell killing. Consistent with these findings, iNKT cell reconstitution of T, B, and NK cell–deficient mice slows EL4 growth in vivo via TCR-CD1d and perforin-dependent mechanisms. Together, these observations establish that iNKT cells are sufficient to control the growth of T lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. They also suggest that the induction of iNKT cell cytotoxic responses in situ might serve as a more effective strategy to prevent and/or treat CD1d+ cancers, such as T lymphoma. ©2013 AACR.

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US2 Protein Interacts with Human CD1d (hCD1d) and Down-Regulates Invariant NKT (iNKT) Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jihye; Rho, Seung Bae; Lee, Jae Yeon; Bae, Joonbeom; Park, Se Ho; Lee, Suk Jun; Lee, Sang Yeol; Ahn, Curie; Kim, Jae Young; Chun, Taehoon

    2013-01-01

    To avoid host immune surveillance, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encoded endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane glycoprotein US2, which interferes with antigen presenting mechanism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ia and class II molecules. However, not many attempts have been made to study the effect of HCMV US2 on the expression of MHC class Ib molecules. In this study, we examined the effect of HCMV US2 on the expression and function of human CD1d (hCD1d), which presents glycolipid antigens to invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Our results clearly showed that the physiological interaction between ER lumenal domain of HCMV US2 and α3 domain of hCD1d was observed within ER. Compared with mature form of hCD1d, immature form of hCD1d is more susceptible to ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation mediated by HCMV US2. Moreover, the ectopic expression of HCMV US2 leads to the down-modulation of iNKT cell activity without significant change of hCD1d expression. These results will advance our understanding of the function of HCMV US2 in immune evasive mechanisms against anti-viral immunity of iNKT cells. PMID:24213674

  7. The Lysine Acetyltransferase GCN5 Is Required for iNKT Cell Development through EGR2 Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajun; Yun, Chawon; Gao, Beixue; Xu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yana; Wang, Yiming; Kong, Qingfei; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Dent, Sharon Y R; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiangping; Li, Hua-Bin; Fang, Deyu

    2017-07-18

    The development of CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, a population that is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity, is regulated by multiple transcription factors, but the molecular mechanisms underlying how the transcriptional activation of these factors are regulated during iNKT development remain largely unknown. We found that the histone acetyltransferase general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5) is essential for iNKT cell development during the maturation stage. GCN5 deficiency blocked iNKT cell development in a cell-intrinsic manner. At the molecular level, GCN5 is a specific lysine acetyltransferase of early growth responsive gene 2 (EGR2), a transcription factor required for iNKT cell development. GCN5-mediated acetylation positively regulated EGR2 transcriptional activity, and both genetic and pharmacological GCN5 suppression specifically inhibited the transcription of EGR2 target genes in iNKT cells, including Runx1, promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), interleukin (IL)-2Rb, and T-bet. Therefore, our study revealed GCN5-mediated EGR2 acetylation as a molecular mechanism that regulates iNKT development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. iNKT cells ameliorate human autoimmunity: Lessons from alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Ghraieb, Amal; Keren, Aviad; Ginzburg, Alex; Ullmann, Yehuda; Schrum, Adam G; Paus, Ralf; Gilhar, Amos

    2018-04-18

    Alopecia areata (AA) is understood to be a CD8+/NKG2D+ T cell-dependent autoimmune disease. Here, we demonstrate that human AA pathogenesis of is also affected by iNKT10 cells, an unconventional T cell subtype whose number is significantly increased in AA compared to healthy human skin. AA lesions can be rapidly induced in healthy human scalp skin xenotransplants on Beige-SCID mice by intradermal injections of autologous healthy-donor PBMCs pre-activated with IL-2. We show that in this in vivo model, the development of AA lesions is prevented by recognized the iNKT cell activator, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), which stimulates iNKT cells to expand and produce IL-10. Moreover, in pre-established humanized mouse AA lesions, hair regrowth is promoted by α-GalCer treatment through a process requiring both effector-memory iNKT cells, which can interact directly with CD8+/NKG2D+ T cells, and IL-10. This provides the first in vivo evidence in a humanized model of autoimmune disease that iNKT10 cells are key disease-protective lymphocytes. Since these regulatory NKT cells can both prevent the development of AA lesions and promote hair re-growth in established AA lesions, targeting iNKT10 cells may have preventive and therapeutic potential also in other autoimmune disorders related to AA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dual immune effect of iNKT cells considering human cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis: an example of cell plasticity according to different disease scenarios.

    PubMed

    de Gois Macêdo, Bruna; Peixoto, Rephany Fonseca; Maciel, Bruna Leal Lima; de Assis Silva Gomes, Juliana; de Lourdes Assunção Araújo de Azevedo, Fátima; Veras, Robson Cavalcanti; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida; de Lima Grisi, Teresa Cristina Soares; de Araújo, Demétrius Antônio Machado; Amaral, Ian Porto Gurgel do; de Souza Lima, Tatjana Keesen

    2018-04-27

    Although the semi-invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) are a small subpopulation of cells in the peripheral blood, they are presumed to play a role in early stages of infection against various pathogens, including protozoa. This work investigates the activation status and cytokine profile of iNKT cells during human Leishmania infantum and Leishmania braziliensis infection. We studied iNKT cells in symptomatic active visceral patients (AVL) (n=8), symptomatic active cutaneous patients (ACL) (n=13), negative endemic controls (NEC) (n=6) and non-endemic controls (NonEC) (n=6), with and without Total Leishmania antigen stimulus (TLA). The number of iNKT cells in the peripheral blood of ACL and AVL patients unaltered in relation to control groups. Moreover, the iNKT cells from ACL showed a hyperactivation profile compared to AVL patients. Additionally, TLA induced IFN-gamma production in iNKT cells from ACL patients, while in iNKT of AVL patients, TLA induced a decrease of this cytokine. Higher IL-17 and IL-10 production by iNKT cells from ACL patients were also observed compared to all other groups. There were no changes in IL-10 iNKT producing cells in AVL after TLA stimulation. However, TLA induced increase of IL-10 in iNKT cells in ACL patients. These findings suggest that although iNKT cells showed distinct profiles in ACL and AVL patients, they play a dual role in immune modulation in both Leishmania infections. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Non‐glycosidic compounds can stimulate both human and mouse iNKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Jukes, John‐Paul; Gileadi, Uzi; Ghadbane, Hemza; Yu, Ting‐Fong; Shepherd, Dawn; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2016-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize CD1d/glycolipid complexes and upon activation with synthetic agonists display immunostimulatory properties. We have previously described that the non‐glycosidic CD1d‐binding lipid, threitolceramide (ThrCer) activates murine and human iNKT cells. Here, we show that incorporating the headgroup of ThrCer into a conformationally more restricted 6‐ or 7‐membered ring results in significantly more potent non‐glycosidic analogs. In particular, ThrCer 6 was found to promote strong anti‐tumor responses and to induce a more prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells than does the canonical α‐galactosylceramide (α‐GalCer), achieving an enhanced T‐cell response at lower concentrations compared with α‐GalCer both in vitro, using human iNKT‐cell lines and in vivo, using C57BL/6 mice. Collectively, these studies describe novel non‐glycosidic ThrCer‐based analogs that have improved potency in iNKT‐cell activation compared with that of α‐GalCer, and are clinically relevant iNKT‐cell agonists. PMID:26873393

  11. [Immunoregulation by iNKT cells].

    PubMed

    Miyake, Sachiko

    2009-06-01

    NKT cells are defined as cells co-expressing of the natural killer receptors such as NK1.1 or NKR-P1A (CD161) and a T cell receptor (TCR). Although NK1.1(+) TCR(+) lymphocytes are heterogeneous, we focus on two distinct T cell subsets express invariant T cell receptor alpha chains, Valpha14-Jalpha18(Valpha14i) and Valpha19-Jalpha33(Valpha19i). Valpha14i NKT cells (Valpha24i NKT cells for human) are restricted by CD1d and Valpha19i NKT cells (Valpha7.2i NKT cells for human) are restricted by MR1 molecule. These cells emerge as an unique lymphocytes subset to bridge innate and acquired immunity. Here in this review, we discuss on the role of these cells in the regulation of autoimmunity and on the potential of therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases.

  12. Regulatory iNKT cells lack PLZF expression and control Treg cell and macrophage homeostasis in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Lydia; Michelet, Xavier; Zhang, Sai; Brennan, Patrick J.; Moseman, Ashley; Lester, Chantel; Besra, Gurdyal; Vomhof-Dekrey, Emilie E.; Tighe, Mike; Koay, Hui-Fern; Godfrey, Dale I.; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A.; Sant’Angelo, Derek B.; von Andrian, Ulrich; Brenner, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    iNKT cells are CD1d-restricted lipid-sensing innate T cells that express the transcription factor PLZF. iNKT cells accumulate in adipose tissue, where they are anti-inflammatory, but the factors that contribute to their anti-inflammatory nature, and their targets in adipose tissue are unknown. Here we report that adipose tissue iNKT cells have a unique transcriptional program and produce interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-10. Unlike other iNKT cells, they lack PLZF, but express the transcription factor E4BP4, which controls their IL-10 production. Adipose iNKT cells are a tissue resident population that induces an anti-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages and, through production of IL-2, controls the number, proliferation and suppressor function of adipose regulatory T (Treg) cells. Thus, adipose tissue iNKT cells are unique regulators of immune homeostasis in this tissue. PMID:25436972

  13. Interleukin-4-dependent innate collaboration between iNKT cells and B-1 B cells controls adaptative contact sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Regis A; Szczepanik, Marian; Itakura, Atsuko; Lisbonne, Mariette; Dey, Neelendu; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria C; Askenase, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    We showed that hepatic Vα14+ invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, via their rapid interleukin (IL)-4 production, activate B-1 cells to initiate contact sensitivity (CS). This innate collaboration was absent in IL-4–/– and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-6–/– mice and was inhibited by anti-IL-4 treatment. These mice have defective CS because they fail to locally recruit the sensitized effector T cells of acquired immunity. Their CS is reconstituted by transfer of downstream-acting 1-day immune B-1 cells from wild-type mice. Responses were not reconstituted with B-1 cells from IL-4 receptor-α–/– or STAT-6–/– mice, nor by IL-4 treatment of B cell-deficient mice at immunization. Finally, IL-4 was preferentially and transiently produced by hepatic iNKT cells within 7 min after sensitization to mediate collaboration between innate-like iNKT cells and the B-1 B cells that participate in the recruitment of effector T cells in vivo. PMID:16556268

  14. Tissue specific distribution of iNKT cells impacts their cytokine response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, You Jeong; Wang, Haiguang; Starrett, Gabriel J.; Phuong, Vanessa; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Three subsets of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been identified, NKT1, NKT2 and NKT17, which produce distinct cytokines when stimulated, but little is known about their localization. Here, we have defined the anatomic localization and systemic distribution of these subsets and measured their cytokine production. Thymic NKT2 cells that produced interleukin-4 (IL-4) at steady state were located in the medulla and conditioned medullary thymocytes. NKT2 cells were abundant in the mesenteric lymph node (LN) of BALB/c mice and produced IL-4 in the T cell zone that conditioned other lymphocytes. Intravenous injection of α-galactosylceramide activated NKT1 cells with vascular access, but not LN or thymic NKT cells, resulting in systemic interferon-γ and IL-4 production, while oral α-galactosylceramide activated NKT2 cells in the mesenteric LN, resulting in local IL-4 release. These finding indicate that the localization of iNKT cells governs their cytokine response both at steady state and upon activation. PMID:26362265

  15. A mutation within the SH2 domain of slp-76 regulates the tissue distribution and cytokine production of iNKT cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Claudia; Koller, Anna; Baier, Julia; Arnold, Harald; Giessler, Claudia; Opoka, Robert; Schmidt, Stephanie; Willers, Maike; Mihai, Sidonia; Parsch, Hans; Wirtz, Stefan; Daniel, Christoph; Reinhold, Annegret; Engelmann, Swen; Kliche, Stefanie; Bogdan, Christian; Hoebe, Kasper; Mattner, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    TCR ligation is critical for the selection, activation, and integrin expression of T lymphocytes. Here, we explored the role of the TCR adaptor protein slp-76 on iNKT-cell biology. Compared to B6 controls, slp-76(ace/ace) mice carrying a missense mutation (Thr428Ile) within the SH2-domain of slp-76 showed an increase in iNKT cells in the thymus and lymph nodes, but a decrease in iNKT cells in spleens and livers, along with reduced ADAP expression and cytokine response. A comparable reduction in iNKT cells was observed in the livers and spleens of ADAP-deficient mice. Like ADAP(-/-) iNKT cells, slp-76(ace/ace) iNKT cells were characterized by enhanced CD11b expression, correlating with an impaired induction of the TCR immediate-early gene Nur77 and a decreased adhesion to ICAM-1. Furthermore, CD11b-intrinsic effects inhibited cytokine release, concanavalin A-mediated inflammation, and iNKT-cell accumulation in the liver. Unlike B6 and ADAP(-/-) mice, the expression of the transcription factors Id3 and PLZF was reduced, whereas NP-1-expression was enhanced in slp-76(ace/ace) mice. Blockade of NP-1 decreased the recovery of iNKT cells from peripheral lymph nodes, identifying NP-1 as an iNKT-cell-specific adhesion factor. Thus, slp-76 contributes to the regulation of the tissue distribution, PLZF, and cytokine expression of iNKT cells via ADAP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Fas/FasL interaction mediates imbalanced cytokine/cytotoxicity responses of iNKT cells against Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Rui; Hong, Zhenya; Tan, Xiaosheng; Hu, Fenfen; Ding, Yajie; Wang, Wei; Liang, Zhihui; Zhong, Rongrong; Wu, Xiongwen; Weng, Xiufang

    2018-07-01

    The rapid antitumor cytokine production and direct cytotoxicity confer invariant NKT (iNKT) cells ideal candidates for cancer therapy. However, the therapeutic potential of iNKT cells in T-cell malignant diseases remains elusive, as antigen presentation by T cells (T-T presentation) has been suggested to induce hyporesponsiveness of iNKT cells. In this study, we found discrepancies in iNKT cell responses against two T cell-origin cell lines (Jurkat and Molt-4). Human iNKT cells exhibited more intensive cytotoxicity and less efficient cytokine production in response to Fas-bearing Jurkat cells than those to the Fas-negative tumor cells (Molt-4 and myeloid-derived K562). The imbalanced cytokine/cytotoxicity responses of iNKT cells against Jurkat cells were CD1d-dependent and relied mostly on Fas/FasL interaction. The impairment in cytokine production could be overcome by Fas/FasL blocking antibodies and exogenous IL-2. Elevated CD1d levels as well as CD1d and Fas co-localization were found in T-cell lymphomas. However, defects in frequency and function of circulating iNKT cells were observed in the patients, which could be partly rescued by exogenous IL-2. Collectively, the Fas/FasL-dependent aberrant iNKT cell responses and the reversibility of the defects suggest the distinct iNKT cell manipulation in CD1d- and Fas-bearing T cell malignancies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. TET proteins regulate the lineage specification and TCR-mediated expansion of iNKT cells.

    PubMed

    Tsagaratou, Ageliki; González-Avalos, Edahí; Rautio, Sini; Scott-Browne, James P; Togher, Susan; Pastor, William A; Rothenberg, Ellen V; Chavez, Lukas; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2017-01-01

    TET proteins oxidize 5-methylcytosine in DNA to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidation products. We found that simultaneous deletion of Tet2 and Tet3 in mouse CD4 + CD8 + double-positive thymocytes resulted in dysregulated development and proliferation of invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). Tet2-Tet3 double-knockout (DKO) iNKT cells displayed pronounced skewing toward the NKT17 lineage, with increased DNA methylation and impaired expression of genes encoding the key lineage-specifying factors T-bet and ThPOK. Transfer of purified Tet2-Tet3 DKO iNKT cells into immunocompetent recipient mice resulted in an uncontrolled expansion that was dependent on the nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein CD1d, which presents lipid antigens to iNKT cells. Our data indicate that TET proteins regulate iNKT cell fate by ensuring their proper development and maturation and by suppressing aberrant proliferation mediated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR).

  18. Abnormalities in iNKT cells are associated with impaired ability of monocytes to produce IL-10 and suppress T-cell proliferation in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Anjali; Kendrick, Yvonne R; McMichael, Andrew J; Ho, Ling-Pei

    2014-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder characterized by marked T-cell expansion of T helper 1 (Th1) cells. The cause of T-cell overactivity is unknown. We hypothesized that interleukin-10 (IL-10) production by a yet undefined cell type might be defective, resulting in loss of regulation of T-cell activity. Focusing on IL-10-producing monocytes, we first showed that monocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of corticosteroid-naïve sarcoidosis patients (n = 51) produced less IL-10 compared to controls, and were less able to suppress T-cell proliferation. In addition, monocytic IL-10 production correlated negatively with disease activity score. As invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are known to both interact with monocytes and be reduced in sarcoidosis patients, we then asked whether iNKT-specific defects might be responsible for this reduced IL-10 production. We found that greater numbers of circulating iNKT cells was associated with higher IL-10 production. Moreover, iNKT cells enhanced monocytic IL-10 production in vitro. Defective IL-10 production and T-cell suppression by sarcoidosis monocytes could be restored following their coculture with iNKT cells, in a CD1d- and cell contact-dependent process. We suggest that reduced iNKT-cell numbers in sarcoidosis may lead to impaired monocytic IL-10 production and unchecked T-cell expansion in sarcoidosis. These findings provide fresh insight into the mechanism of sarcoidosis disease, and interaction between iNKT cells and monocytes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Identification of an IL-17–producing NK1.1neg iNKT cell population involved in airway neutrophilia

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Marie-Laure; Keller, Alexandre Castro; Paget, Christophe; Fujio, Masakazu; Trottein, François; Savage, Paul B.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Schneider, Elke; Dy, Michel; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria C.

    2007-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are an important source of both T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines, through which they can exert beneficial, as well as deleterious, effects in a variety of inflammatory diseases. This functional heterogeneity raises the question of how far phenotypically distinct subpopulations are responsible for such contrasting activities. In this study, we identify a particular set of iNKT cells that lack the NK1.1 marker (NK1.1neg) and secrete high amounts of interleukin (IL)-17 and low levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-4. NK1.1neg iNKT cells produce IL-17 upon synthetic (α-galactosylceramide [α-GalCer] or PBS-57), as well as natural (lipopolysaccharides or glycolipids derived from Sphingomonas wittichii and Borrelia burgdorferi), ligand stimulation. NK1.1neg iNKT cells are more frequent in the lung, which is consistent with a role in the natural immunity to inhaled antigens. Indeed, airway neutrophilia induced by α-GalCer or lipopolysaccharide instillation was significantly reduced in iNKT-cell–deficient Jα18−/− mice, which produced significantly less IL-17 in their bronchoalveolar lavage fluid than wild-type controls. Furthermore, airway neutrophilia was abolished by a single treatment with neutralizing monoclonal antibody against IL-17 before α-GalCer administration. Collectively, our findings reveal that NK1.1neg iNKT lymphocytes represent a new population of IL-17–producing cells that can contribute to neutrophil recruitment through preferential IL-17 secretion. PMID:17470641

  20. Human iNKT cells induce IL-1β secretion by peripheral blood monocytes via a P2X7-independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Felley, Laura E.; Sharma, Akshat; Theisen, Erin; Romero-Masters, James C.; Sauer, John-Demian; Gumperz, Jenny E.

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine IL-1β plays a central role in inflammatory responses that are initiated by microbial challenges, as well as in those that are due to endogenous processes (often called “sterile” inflammation). IL-1β secretion that occurs independently of microbial stimulation is typically associated with the presence of endogenous alarmins, such as extracellular ATP (an indicator of cytopathic damage). Here we show that IL-2 activated human iNKT cells stimulate the secretion of IL-1β protein by human peripheral blood monocytes in a manner that requires neither the presence of microbial compounds nor signaling through the extracellular ATP receptor P2X7. Monocyte IL-1β production was specifically induced by iNKT cells, since similarly activated polyclonal autologous T cells did not have this effect. Secretion of IL-1β protein occurred rapidly (within 3-4 hours), and required cell contact between the iNKT cells and monocytes. Similar to IL-1β production induced by TLR stimulation, the iNKT-induced pathway appeared to entail a two-step process involving NFκB signaling and IL1B gene transcription, as well as assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome and activation of caspase 1. However, in contrast to the classical inflammasome-mediated pathway of IL-1β production, activation of monocytes via P2X7 was dispensable for iNKT-induced IL-1β secretion and potassium efflux was not required. Moreover, the iNKT-induced effect involved caspase 8 activity, yet induced little monocyte death. These results suggest that IL-2 activated human iNKT cells induce monocytes to produce IL-1β through a distinctive pathway that does not require the presence of microbial danger signals or alarmins associated with cytopathic damage. PMID:27534556

  1. Unusual Suspects in the Development of Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance: NK cells, iNKT cells, and ILCs.

    PubMed

    Bonamichi, Beatriz Dal Santo Francisco; Lee, Jongsoon

    2017-08-01

    The notion that obesity-induced inflammation mediates the development of insulin resistance in animal models and humans has been gaining strong support. It has also been shown that immune cells in local tissues, in particular in visceral adipose tissue, play a major role in the regulation of obesity-induced inflammation. Specifically, obesity increases the numbers and activation of proinflammatory immune cells, including M1 macrophages, neutrophils, Th1 CD4 T cells, and CD8 T cells, while simultaneously suppressing anti-inflammatory cells such as M2 macrophages, CD4 regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, and eosinophils. Recently, however, new cell types have been shown to participate in the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. Some of these cell types also appear to regulate obesity. These cells are natural killer (NK) cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which are closely related, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. It should be noted that, although iNKT cells resemble NK cells in name, they are actually a completely different cell type in terms of their development and functions in immunity and metabolism. In this review, we will focus on the roles that these relatively new players in the metabolism field play in obesity-induced insulin resistance and the regulation of obesity. Copyright © 2017 Korean Diabetes Association.

  2. Involvement of the iNKT Cell Pathway Is Associated With Early-Onset Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Response to Allergen Avoidance Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lexmond, Willem S.; Neves, Joana F.; Nurko, Samuel; Olszak, Torsten; Exley, Mark A.; Blumberg, Richard S.; Fiebiger, Edda

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent experimental evidence suggests that environmental microbial factors early in life determine susceptibility to allergic diseases through inappropriate chemotaxis and local activation of CD1d-restricted, invariant chain natural killer T (iNKT) cells. In this study, we analyzed the involvement of these pathways in pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) before and after dietary allergen elimination. METHODS mRNA expression levels of components of the C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16)–iNKT–CD1d axis were compared in esophageal biopsies from EoE patients vs. normal or inflammatory controls and before and after treatment. RESULTS CXCL16, iNKT cell–associated cell marker Vα24, and CD1d were significantly upregulated in esophageal biopsies from EoE patients and correlated with the expression of inflammatory mediators associated with allergy. Upregulation of each of these factors was significantly more pronounced in patients aged < 6 years at diagnosis, and this early-onset EoE subpopulation was characterized by a more prominent food allergic disease phenotype in a cohort-wide analysis. Successful, but not unsuccessful, treatment of early-onset EoE patients with dietary elimination of instigating allergens led to reduction in infiltrating iNKT cells and complete normalization of mRNA expression levels of CXCL16 and CD1d. CONCLUSIONS Our observations place iNKT cells at the center of allergic inflammation associated with EoE, which could have profound implications for our understanding, treatment and prevention of this and other human allergic diseases. PMID:24513807

  3. Regulatory iNKT cells lack expression of the transcription factor PLZF and control the homeostasis of T(reg) cells and macrophages in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Lydia; Michelet, Xavier; Zhang, Sai; Brennan, Patrick J; Moseman, Ashley; Lester, Chantel; Besra, Gurdyal; Vomhof-Dekrey, Emilie E; Tighe, Mike; Koay, Hui-Fern; Godfrey, Dale I; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; von Andrian, Ulrich; Brenner, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are lipid-sensing innate T cells that are restricted by the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d and express the transcription factor PLZF. iNKT cells accumulate in adipose tissue, where they are anti-inflammatory, but the factors that contribute to their anti-inflammatory nature, as well as their targets in adipose tissue, are unknown. Here we found that iNKT cells in adipose tissue had a unique transcriptional program and produced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-10. Unlike other iNKT cells, they lacked PLZF but expressed the transcription factor E4BP4, which controlled their IL-10 production. The adipose iNKT cells were a tissue-resident population that induced an anti-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages and, through the production of IL-2, controlled the number, proliferation and suppressor function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in adipose tissue. Thus, iNKT cells in adipose tissue are unique regulators of immunological homeostasis in this tissue.

  4. Cross-talk between iNKT cells and monocytes triggers an atheroprotective immune response in SLE patients with asymptomatic plaque.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward; Croca, Sara; Waddington, Kirsty E; Sofat, Reecha; Griffin, Maura; Nicolaides, Andrew; Isenberg, David A; Torra, Ines Pineda; Rahman, Anisur; Jury, Elizabeth C

    2016-12-02

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is a complication of the autoimmune rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We questioned the role played by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in this process because they not only are defective in autoimmunity but also promote atherosclerosis in response to CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation. iNKT cells from SLE patients with asymptomatic plaque (SLE-P) had increased proliferation and interleukin-4 production compared with those from SLE patients with no plaque. The anti-inflammatory iNKT cell phenotype was associated with dyslipidemia and was driven by altered monocyte phospholipid expression and CD1d-mediated cross-talk between iNKT cells and monocytes but not B cells. Healthy iNKT cells differentiated in the presence of healthy monocytes and SLE-P serum polarized macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. Conversely, patients with clinical cardiovascular disease had unresponsive iNKT cells and increased proinflammatory monocytes. iNKT cell function could link immune responses, lipids, and cardiovascular disease in SLE patients and, together with serum lipid taxonomy, help predict preclinical atherosclerosis in SLE patients. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Innate and cytokine-driven signals, rather than microbial antigens, dominate in natural killer T cell activation during microbial infection.

    PubMed

    Brigl, Manfred; Tatituri, Raju V V; Watts, Gerald F M; Bhowruth, Veemal; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Barton, Nathaniel; Cohen, Nadia R; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Besra, Gurdyal S; Brenner, Michael B

    2011-06-06

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are critical for host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. However, the central question of how iNKT cells are activated by microbes has not been fully explained. The example of adaptive MHC-restricted T cells, studies using synthetic pharmacological α-galactosylceramides, and the recent discovery of microbial iNKT cell ligands have all suggested that recognition of foreign lipid antigens is the main driver for iNKT cell activation during infection. However, when we compared the role of microbial antigens versus innate cytokine-driven mechanisms, we found that iNKT cell interferon-γ production after in vitro stimulation or infection with diverse bacteria overwhelmingly depended on toll-like receptor-driven IL-12. Importantly, activation of iNKT cells in vivo during infection with Sphingomonas yanoikuyae or Streptococcus pneumoniae, pathogens which are known to express iNKT cell antigens and which require iNKT cells for effective protection, also predominantly depended on IL-12. Constitutive expression of high levels of IL-12 receptor by iNKT cells enabled instant IL-12-induced STAT4 activation, demonstrating that among T cells, iNKT cells are uniquely equipped for immediate, cytokine-driven activation. These findings reveal that innate and cytokine-driven signals, rather than cognate microbial antigen, dominate in iNKT cell activation during microbial infections.

  6. Uncoupling between CD1d upregulation induced by retinoic acid and conduritol-B-epoxide and iNKT cell responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Balreira, Andrea; Cavallari, Marco; Sá Miranda, Maria Clara; Arosa, Fernando A

    2010-06-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is associated with upregulation of CD1d and MHC-class II expression by monocytes. While the physiological impact of CD1d upregulation remains uncertain, it has been proposed that MHC-class II upregulation is associated with inflammation. Hereby, we show that the decrease in MHC-class II expression seen in GD patients under therapy correlates positively with chitotriosidase activity, a marker of inflamed macrophages. We also show that retinoic acid (RA) and the beta-glucocerebrosidase inhibitor conduritol-B-epoxide (CBE) lead to upregulation of CD1d expression by THP-1 cells, which correlated with an increase in mRNA expression. In vitro co-culture experiments showed that RA treated THP-1 cells were more stimulatory for CD4(+) than for CD8(+) T cells, as determined by CFSE loss, in comparison to untreated THP-1 cells. Interestingly, even though addition of exogenous isoglobotrihexosylceramide (iGb3), a physiological CD1d ligand, augmented the percentage of dividing CD4(+) T cells, we could not detect a significant expansion of CD4(+)Valpha24(+) invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells. In contrast, addition of alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GC) induced expansion of Valpha24(+) iNKT cells as determined by using alpha-GC-loaded human CD1d dimers. These results strengthen the existence of a cross-talk between monocyte lipid accumulation, inflammation and changes in cell surface CD1d and MHC-class II in monocytes, which may result in inappropriate recognition events by immune cells and perpetuate chronic inflammation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis of truncated analogues of the iNKT cell agonist, α-galactosyl ceramide (KRN7000), and their biological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Veerapen, Natacha; Reddington, Faye; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation of iNKT cells by α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer), also known as KRN7000, and its truncated analogue OCH induces both Th1- and Th2-cytokines, with OCH inducing a Th2-cytokine bias. Skewing of the iNKT cells’ response towards either a Th1- or Th2-cytokine profile offers potential therapeutic benefits. The length of both the acyl and the sphingosine chains in α-galactosyl ceramides is known to influence the cytokine release profile. We have synthesized analogues of α-GalCer with truncated sphingosine chains for biological evaluation, with particular emphasis on the Th1/Th2 distribution. Starting from a common precursor, d-lyxose, the sphingosine derivatives were synthesised via a straightforward Wittig condensation. PMID:21145749

  8. Invariant NKT cells from HIV-1 or Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected patients express an activated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Carlos J; Cataño, Juan C; Ramirez, Zoraida; Rugeles, Maria T; Wilson, S Brian; Landay, Alan L

    2008-04-01

    The frequency, subsets and activation status of peripheral blood invariant NKT (iNKT) cells were evaluated in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients and in chronically HIV-1-infected subjects. The absolute numbers of iNKT cells were significantly decreased in TB patients and in HIV-1+ individuals who were antiretroviral therapy naive or had detectable viremia despite receiving HAART. iNKT cell subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of CD4(+) iNKT cells in HIV-1+ subjects, and a decreased percentage of double negative iNKT cells in TB patients. Peripheral blood iNKT cells from HIV-1+ and TB patients had significantly increased expression of CD69, CD38, HLA-DR, CD16, CD56, and CD62L. The expression of CD25 was significantly increased only on iNKT cells from TB patients. These findings indicate that peripheral blood iNKT cells in these two chronic infections show an up-regulated expression of activation markers, suggesting their role in the immune response to infection.

  9. Relationships between Th1 or Th2 iNKT Cell Activity and Structures of CD1d-Antigen Complexes: Meta-analysis of CD1d-Glycolipids Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Xavier; Renault, Nicolas; Farce, Amaury; Chavatte, Philippe; Hénon, Eric

    2014-01-01

    A number of potentially bioactive molecules can be found in nature. In particular, marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds. The activity of an α-galactosylceramide was first discovered in 1993 via screening of a Japanese marine sponge (Agelas mauritanius). Very rapidly, a synthetic glycololipid analogue of this natural molecule was discovered, called KRN7000. Associated with the CD1d protein, this α-galactosylceramide 1 (KRN7000) interacts with the T-cell antigen receptor to form a ternary complex that yields T helper (Th) 1 and Th2 responses with opposing effects. In our work, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations (11.5 µs in total) involving eight different ligands (conducted in triplicate) in an effort to find out correlation at the molecular level, if any, between chemical modulation of 1 and the orientation of the known biological response, Th1 or Th2. Comparative investigations of human versus mouse and Th1 versus Th2 data have been carried out. A large set of analysis tools was employed including free energy landscapes. One major result is the identification of a specific conformational state of the sugar polar head, which could be correlated, in the present study, to the biological Th2 biased response. These theoretical tools provide a structural basis for predicting the very different dynamical behaviors of α-glycosphingolipids in CD1d and might aid in the future design of new analogues of 1. PMID:25376021

  10. Activation of murine invariant NKT cells promotes susceptibility to candidiasis by IL-10 induced modulation of phagocyte antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Norihiro; Kikuchi, Norihiro; Morishima, Yuko; Matsuyama, Masashi; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Shibuya, Akira; Shibuya, Kazuko; Taniguchi, Masaru; Ishii, Yukio

    2016-07-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells play an important role in a variety of antimicrobial immune responses due to their ability to produce high levels of immune-modulating cytokines. Here, we investigated the role of iNKT cells in host defense against candidiasis using Jα18-deficient mice (Jα18(-/-) ), which lack iNKT cells. Jα18(-/-) mice were more resistant to the development of lethal candidiasis than wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, treatment of WT mice with the iNKT cell activating ligand α-galactosylceramide markedly enhanced their mortality after infection with Candida albicans. Serum IL-10 levels were significantly elevated in WT mice in response to infection with C. albicans. Futhermore, IL-10 production increased after in vitro coculture of peritoneal macrophages with iNKT cells and C. albicans. The numbers of peritoneal macrophages, the production of IL-1β and IL-18, and caspase-1 activity were also significantly elevated in Jα18(-/-) mice after infection with C. albicans. The adoptive transfer of iNKT cells or exogenous administration of IL-10 into Jα18(-/-) reversed susceptibility to candidiasis to the level of WT mice. These results suggest that activation of iNKT cells increases the initial severity of C. albicans infection, most likely mediated by IL-10 induced modulation of macrophage antifungal activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells with TLR9 agonists initiates invariant NKT cell-mediated cross-talk with myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Carlos J; Jie, Hyun-Bae; Al-Harthi, Lena; Mulder, Candice; Patiño, Pablo J; Rugeles, María T; Krieg, Arthur M; Landay, Alan L; Wilson, S Brian

    2006-07-15

    CD1d-restricted invariant NK T (iNKT) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to play crucial roles in various types of immune responses, including TLR9-dependent antiviral responses initiated by plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). However, the mechanism by which this occurs is enigmatic because TLRs are absent in iNKT cells and human pDCs do not express CD1d. To explore this process, pDCs were activated with CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides, which stimulated the secretion of several cytokines such as type I and TNF-alpha. These cytokines and other soluble factors potently induced the expression of activation markers on iNKT cells, selectively enhanced double-negative iNKT cell survival, but did not induce their expansion or production of cytokines. Notably, pDC-derived factors licensed iNKT cells to respond to myeloid DCs: an important downstream cellular target of iNKT cell effector function and a critical contributor to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. This interaction supports the notion that iNKT cells can mediate cross-talk between DC subsets known to express mutually exclusive TLR and cytokine profiles.

  12. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamaladasa, A.; Wickramasinghe, N.; Adikari, T. N.; Gomes, L.; Shyamali, N. L. A.; Salio, M.; Cerundolo, V.; Ogg, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)‐γ and interleukin (IL)−4 ex‐vivo enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha‐galactosyl‐ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4+ subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus‐specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl‐6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl‐6 and inducible T cell co‐stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4+ iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  13. Turned on by danger: activation of CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells bear characteristics of innate and adaptive lymphocytes, which allow them to bridge the two halves of the immune response and play roles in many disease settings. Recent work has characterized precisely how their activation is initiated and regulated. Novel antigens from important pathogens have been identified, as has an abundant self-antigen, β-glucopyranosylcaramide, capable of mediating an iNKT-cell response. Studies of the iNKT T-cell receptor (TCR)–antigen–CD1d complex show how docking between CD1d–antigen and iNKT TCR is highly conserved, and how small sequence differences in the TCR establish intrinsic variation in iNKT TCR affinity. The sequence of the TCR CDR3β loop determines iNKT TCR affinity for ligand–CD1d, independent of ligand identity. CD1d ligands can promote T helper type 1 (Th1) or Th2 biased cytokine responses, depending on the composition of their lipid tails. Ligands loaded into CD1d on the cell surface promote Th2 responses, whereas ligands with long hydrophobic tails are loaded endosomally and promote Th1 responses. This information is informing the design of synthetic iNKT-cell antigens. The iNKT cells may be activated by exogenous antigen, or by a combination of dendritic cell-derived interleukin-12 and iNKT TCR–self-antigen–CD1d engagement. The iNKT-cell activation is further modulated by recent foreign or self-antigen encounter. Activation of dendritic cells through pattern recognition receptors alters their antigen presentation and cytokine production, strongly influencing iNKT-cell activation. In a range of bacterial infections, dendritic cell-dependent innate activation of iNKT cells through interleukin-12 is the dominant influence on their activity. PMID:22734667

  14. Metabolic regulator Fnip1 is crucial for iNKT lymphocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Park, Heon; Tsang, Mark; Iritani, Brian M.; Bevan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Folliculin-interacting protein 1 (Fnip1) is an adaptor protein that physically interacts with AMPK, an energy-sensing kinase that stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy in response to low ATP, while turning off energy consumption mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin. Previous studies with Fnip1-null mice revealed that Fnip1 is essential for pre–B-cell development. Here we report a critical role of Fnip1 in invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell development. Thymic iNKT development in Fnip1−/− mice was arrested at stage 2 (NK1.1−CD44+) but development of CD4, CD8, γδ T-cell, and NK cell lineages proceeded normally. Enforced expression of a Vα14Jα18 iNKT TCR transgene or loss of the proapoptotic protein Bim did not rescue iNKT cell maturation in Fnip1−/− mice. Whereas most known essential transcription factors for iNKT cell development were represented normally, Fnip1−/− iNKT cells failed to down-regulate Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger compared with their WT counterparts. Moreover, Fnip1−/− iNKT cells contained hyperactive mTOR and reduced mitochondrial number despite lower ATP levels, resulting in increased sensitivity to apoptosis. These results indicate that Fnip1 is vital for iNKT cell development by maintaining metabolic homeostasis in response to metabolic stress. PMID:24785297

  15. The adaptor molecule SAP plays essential roles during invariant NKT cell cytotoxicity and lytic synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid; Guan, Peng; Wiener, Susan; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André; Orange, Jordan S; Nichols, Kim E

    2013-04-25

    The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) plays critical roles during invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell ontogeny. As a result, SAP-deficient humans and mice lack iNKT cells. The strict developmental requirement for SAP has made it difficult to discern its possible involvement in mature iNKT cell functions. By using temporal Cre recombinase-mediated gene deletion to ablate SAP expression after completion of iNKT cell development, we demonstrate that SAP is essential for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced iNKT cell cytotoxicity against T-cell and B-cell leukemia targets in vitro and iNKT-cell-mediated control of T-cell leukemia growth in vivo. These findings are not restricted to the murine system: silencing RNA-mediated suppression of SAP expression in human iNKT cells also significantly impairs TCR-induced cytolysis. Mechanistic studies reveal that iNKT cell killing requires the tyrosine kinase Fyn, a known SAP-binding protein. Furthermore, SAP expression is required within iNKT cells to facilitate their interaction with T-cell targets and induce reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center to the immunologic synapse (IS). Collectively, these studies highlight a novel and essential role for SAP during iNKT cell cytotoxicity and formation of a functional IS.

  16. Invariant NKT cells provide innate and adaptive help for B cells

    PubMed Central

    Vomhof-DeKrey, Emilie E.; Yates, Jennifer; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    B cells rely on CD4+ T cells helper signals to optimize their responses to T-dependent antigens. Recently another subset of T cells has been identified which provides help for B cells, invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. INKT cells are unique because they provide both innate and adaptive forms of help to B cells, with divergent outcomes. iNKT cells are widely distributed throughout the spleen at rest, consolidate in the marginal zone of the spleen early after activation, and are later found in germinal centers. Understanding the activation requirements for iNKT cells has led to the development of glycolipid containing nanoparticles which efficiently activate iNKT cells, enhance their cooperation with B cells, and which hold promise for vaccine development. PMID:24514004

  17. The adaptor molecule SAP plays essential roles during invariant NKT cell cytotoxicity and lytic synapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid; Guan, Peng; Wiener, Susan; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André; Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule–associated protein (SAP) plays critical roles during invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell ontogeny. As a result, SAP-deficient humans and mice lack iNKT cells. The strict developmental requirement for SAP has made it difficult to discern its possible involvement in mature iNKT cell functions. By using temporal Cre recombinase–mediated gene deletion to ablate SAP expression after completion of iNKT cell development, we demonstrate that SAP is essential for T-cell receptor (TCR)–induced iNKT cell cytotoxicity against T-cell and B-cell leukemia targets in vitro and iNKT-cell–mediated control of T-cell leukemia growth in vivo. These findings are not restricted to the murine system: silencing RNA–mediated suppression of SAP expression in human iNKT cells also significantly impairs TCR-induced cytolysis. Mechanistic studies reveal that iNKT cell killing requires the tyrosine kinase Fyn, a known SAP-binding protein. Furthermore, SAP expression is required within iNKT cells to facilitate their interaction with T-cell targets and induce reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center to the immunologic synapse (IS). Collectively, these studies highlight a novel and essential role for SAP during iNKT cell cytotoxicity and formation of a functional IS. PMID:23430111

  18. CXCL16-positive dendritic cells enhance invariant natural killer T cell-dependent IFNγ production and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Veinotte, Linnea; Gebremeskel, Simon; Johnston, Brent

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crosstalk interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are important in regulating antitumor responses elicited by glycolipid antigens. iNKT cells constitutively express the chemokine receptor CXCR6, while cytokine-activated DCs upregulate the transmembrane chemokine ligand, CXCL16. This study examined the co-stimulatory role of CXCR6/CXCL16 interactions in glycolipid-dependent iNKT cell activation and tumor control. Spleen and liver DCs in wild-type mice, but not iNKT cell deficient (Jα18−/−) mice, transiently upregulated surface CXCL16 following in vivo administration of the glycolipid antigen α-galactosylceramide. Recombinant CXCL16 did not directly induce iNKT cell activation in vitro but enhanced interferon (IFN)-γ production when mouse or human iNKT cells were stimulated with plate-bound anti-CD3. Compared with glycolipid-loaded CXCL16neg DCs, CXCL16hi DCs induced higher levels of IFNγ production in iNKT cell cultures and following adoptive transfer in vivo. The number of IFNγ+ iNKT cells and expansion of T-bet+ iNKT cells were reduced in vivo when CXCL16−/− DCs were used to activate iNKT cells. Enhanced IFNγ production in vivo was not dependent on CXCR6 expression on natural killer (NK) cells. Adoptive transfer of glycolipid-loaded CXCL16hi DCs provided superior protection against tumor metastasis compared to CXCL16neg DC transfers. Similarly, wild-type DCs provided superior protection against metastasis compared with CXCL16−/− DCs. These experiments implicate an important role for CXCR6/CXCL16 interactions in regulating iNKT cell IFNγ production and tumor control. The selective use of CXCL16hi DCs in adoptive transfer immunotherapies may prove useful for enhancing T helper (Th) type 1 responses and clinical outcomes in cancer patients. PMID:27471636

  19. Quantitative and qualitative iNKT repertoire associations with disease susceptibility and outcome in macaque tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Andrew; White, Andrew; Tocheva, Anna S; Fenn, Joe R; Dennis, Mike; Tezera, Liku; Singhania, Akul; Elliott, Tim; Tebruegge, Marc; Elkington, Paul; Gadola, Stephan; Sharpe, Sally; Mansour, Salah

    2017-07-01

    Correlates of immune protection that reliably predict vaccine efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection are urgently needed. Invariant NKT cells (iNKTs) are CD1d-dependent innate T cells that augment host antimicrobial immunity through production of cytokines, including interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We determined peripheral blood iNKT numbers, their proliferative responses and iNKT subset proportions after in vitro antigen expansion by α-galactosylceramide (αGC) in a large cohort of mycobacteria-naïve non-human primates, and macaques from Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine and Mtb challenge studies. Animals studied included four genetically distinct groups of macaques within cynomolgus and rhesus species that differ in their susceptibility to Mtb infection. We demonstrate significant differences in ex vivo iNKT frequency between groups, which trends towards an association with susceptibility to Mtb, but no significant difference in overall iNKT proliferative responses. Susceptible animals exhibited a skewed CD4 + /CD8 + iNKT subset ratio in comparison to more Mtb-resistant groups. Correlation of iNKT subsets post BCG vaccination with clinical disease manifestations following Mtb challenge in the Chinese cynomolgus and Indian rhesus macaques identified a consistent trend linking increased CD8 + iNKTs with favourable disease outcome. Finally, a similar iNKT profile was conferred by BCG vaccination in rhesus macaques. Our study provides the first detailed characterisation of iNKT cells in macaque tuberculosis infection, suggesting that iNKT repertoire differences may impact on disease outcome, which warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cross-activating invariant NKT cells and kupffer cells suppress cholestatic liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Duwaerts, Caroline C; Sun, Eric P; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO (.) ) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO (.) in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO (.) , and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury.

  1. Cross-Activating Invariant NKT Cells and Kupffer Cells Suppress Cholestatic Liver Injury in a Mouse Model of Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Duwaerts, Caroline C.; Sun, Eric P.; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO.) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO. in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO., and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  2. Dual Modifications of α-Galactosylceramide Synergize to Promote Activation of Human Invariant Natural Killer T Cells and Stimulate Anti-tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chennamadhavuni, Divya; Saavedra-Avila, Noemi Alejandra; Carreño, Leandro J; Guberman-Pfeffer, Matthew J; Arora, Pooja; Yongqing, Tang; Koay, Hui-Fern; Godfrey, Dale I; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Richardson, Stewart K; Sundararaj, Srinivasan; Lo, Jae Ho; Wen, Xiangshu; Gascón, José A; Yuan, Weiming; Rossjohn, Jamie; Le Nours, Jérôme; Porcelli, Steven A; Howell, Amy R

    2018-05-17

    Glycosylceramides that activate CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have potential therapeutic applications for augmenting immune responses against cancer and infections. Previous studies using mouse models identified sphinganine variants of α-galactosylceramide as promising iNKT cell activators that stimulate cytokine responses with a strongly proinflammatory bias. However, the activities of sphinganine variants in mice have generally not translated well to studies of human iNKT cell responses. Here, we show that strongly proinflammatory and anti-tumor iNKT cell responses were achieved in mice by a variant of α-galactosylceramide that combines a sphinganine base with a hydrocinnamoyl ester on C6″ of the sugar. Importantly, the activities observed with this variant were largely preserved for human iNKT cell responses. Structural and in silico modeling studies provided a mechanistic basis for these findings and suggested basic principles for capturing useful properties of sphinganine analogs of synthetic iNKT cell activators in the design of immunotherapeutic agents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of CD1d-restricted T cells protects NOD mice from developing diabetes by regulating dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Naumov, Yuri N.; Bahjat, Keith S.; Gausling, Rudolph; Abraham, Roshini; Exley, Mark A.; Koezuka, Yasuhiko; Balk, Steven B.; Strominger, Jack L.; Clare-Salzer, Michael; Wilson, S. Brian

    2001-01-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are immunoregulatory cells whose loss exacerbates diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) female mice. Here, we show that the relative numbers of iNKT cells from the pancreatic islets of NOD mice decrease at the time of conversion from peri-insulitis to invasive insulitis and diabetes. Conversely, NOD male mice who have a low incidence of diabetes showed an increased frequency of iNKT cells. Moreover, administration of α-galactosylceramide, a potent activating ligand presented by CD1d, ameliorated the development of diabetes in NOD female mice and resulted in the accumulation of iNKT cells and myeloid dendritic cells (DC) in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLN), but not in inguinal lymph nodes. Strikingly, injection of NOD female mice with myeloid DC isolated from the PLN, but not those from the inguinal lymph nodes, completely prevented diabetes. Thus, the immunoregulatory role of iNKT cells is manifested by the recruitment of tolerogenic myeloid DC to the PLN and the inhibition of ongoing autoimmune inflammation. PMID:11707602

  4. Enhanced tumor metastasis in response to blockade of the chemokine receptor CXCR6 is overcome by NKT cell activation.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Robyn; Germanov, Elitza; Shimaoka, Takeshi; Johnston, Brent

    2009-11-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells can induce potent antitumor responses in vivo. However, the mechanisms that regulate the effects of iNKT cells are unclear. The chemokine receptor CXCR6, and its ligand CXCL16, have been shown to play critical roles in iNKT cell homeostasis and activation. Thus we investigated the role of CXCR6 in protection against experimental metastasis of B16-F10 melanoma (B16) and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells to the liver and lungs. Wild-type and CXCR6(-/-) mice exhibited no differences in tumor cell metastasis to the lungs. However, metastasis of LLC and B16 tumor cells to the liver was enhanced in CXCR6(-/-) mice. Liver metastasis was also increased in wild-type mice treated with a CXCL16 neutralizing Ab. As Ab treatments did not alter iNKT cell numbers, this implicates a direct role for CXCR6/CXCL16 in regulating antitumor immunity. Cytokine induction was significantly attenuated in CXCR6(-/-) mice upon systemic iNKT cell activation with the glycolipid Ags alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer), alpha-C-GalCer (a Th1 polarizing derivative), or OCH (a Th2 polarizing derivative). Despite differences in the levels of cytokine production, liver and lung metastasis were inhibited significantly in both wild-type and CXCR6(-/-) mice treated with glycolipids. Single doses of alpha-GalCer, alpha-C-GalCer, or OCH were sufficient to prevent liver metastasis and subsequent doses failed to elicit optimal cytokine responses. Our findings implicate a role for CXCR6 in natural immunosurveillance against liver metastasis. However, CXCR6 deficiency could be overcome by systemic iNKT cell activation, demonstrating that even suboptimal iNKT cell activation can protect against metastasis.

  5. Invariant natural killer T cells ameliorate murine chronic GVHD by expanding donor regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Paz, Katelyn; Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Schneidawind, Dominik; Baker, Jeanette; Flynn, Ryan; Duramad, Omar; Feser, Colby; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Negrin, Robert S; Blazar, Bruce R

    2017-06-08

    Chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD) can cause multiorgan system disease, typically with autoimmune-like features, resulting in high mortality and morbidity caused by treatment limitations. Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKTs), a small population characterized by expression of a semi-invariant T-cell receptor, rapidly produce copious amounts of diverse cytokines on activation that exert potent immune regulatory function. Here, we show that iNKTs are significantly reduced in a cGVHD murine model that recapitulates several aspects of autoimmunity and organ fibrosis observed in patients with cGVHD. Low iNKT infused doses effectively prevented and, importantly, reversed established cGVHD, as did third-party iNKTs. iNKTs suppressed the autoimmune response by reducing the germinal center (GC) reaction, which was associated with an increase in total Tregs and follicular Tregs (Tfr) that control the GC reaction, along with pathogenic antibody production. Treg depletion during iNKT infusions completely abolished iNKT efficacy in treating cGVHD. iNKT cell interleukin 4 production and GC migration were critical to cGVHD reversal. In vivo stimulation of iNKT cells by α-galactosyl-ceramide was effective in both preventing and treating cGVHD. Together, this study demonstrates iNKT deficiency in cGVHD mice and highlights the key role of iNKTs in regulating cGVHD pathogenesis and as a potentially novel prophylactic and therapeutic option for patients with cGVHD. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Activation of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Redirects the Inflammatory Response in Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bolognese, Alexandra C; Yang, Weng-Lang; Hansen, Laura W; Sharma, Archna; Nicastro, Jeffrey M; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Sepsis is the third leading cause of death in the neonatal population, due to susceptibility to infection conferred by immaturity of both the innate and adaptive components of the immune system. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are specialized adaptive immune cells that possess important innate-like characteristics and have not yet been well-studied in septic neonates. We hypothesized that iNKT cells would play an important role in mediating the neonatal immune response to sepsis. To study this, we subjected 5- to 7-day-old neonatal C57BL/6 mice to sepsis by intraperitoneal (i.p.) cecal slurry (CS) injection. Thirty hours prior to or immediately following sepsis induction, pups received i.p. injection of the iNKT stimulator KRN7000 (KRN, 0.2 µg/g) or vehicle. Ten hours after CS injection, blood and tissues were collected for various analyses. Thirty-hour pretreatment with KRN resulted in better outcomes in inflammation, lung injury, and survival, while immediate treatment with KRN resulted in worse outcomes compared to vehicle treatment. We further analyzed the activation status of neonatal iNKT cells for 30 h after KRN administration, and showed a peak in frequency of CD69 expression on iNKT cells and serum IFN-γ levels at 5 and 10 h, respectively. We then used CD1d knockout neonatal mice to demonstrate that KRN acts through the major histocompatibility complex-like molecule CD1d to improve outcomes in neonatal sepsis. Finally, we identified that KRN pretreatment exerts its protective effect by increasing systemic levels of TGF-β1. These findings support the importance of iNKT cells for prophylactic immunomodulation in neonates susceptible to sepsis.

  7. Regulatory T cells decrease invariant natural killer T cell-mediated pregnancy loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Tu, J; Jiang, Y; Zhou, J; Schust, D J

    2017-05-01

    Pregnancy loss is the commonest complication of pregnancy. The causes of pregnancy loss are poorly understood. It has been reported that stimulation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells using α-galactosylceramide (αGC) induces pregnancy loss in mice. Here we investigated the mechanisms, especially the role of regulatory T (Treg) cells, in iNKT cell-mediated pregnancy loss. We found that injection of αGC rapidly induced fetal resorption, activated decidual iNKT cells, decreased the percentage of decidual Treg cells and their interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β production, and upregulated the levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-4, and IL-10 in serum. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells from wild-type (WT) and IL-4 -/- mice but not IFN-γ -/- mice into αGC-treated iNKT cell-deficient Jα18 -/- mice restored αGC-induced pregnancy loss. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells downregulated α-GC-induced pregnancy loss in WT mice. Finally, co-culture with αGC-stimulated decidual iNKT cells decreased the production of IL-10 and TGF-β in decidual Treg cells and inhibited their suppressive activity. These findings suggest that activation of iNKT cells induces pregnancy loss in mice in an IFN-γ-dependent manner. In addition, inhibition of the function of decidual Treg cells has an important role in iNKT cell-mediated pregnancy loss.

  8. Invariant NKT cells inhibit development of the Th17 lineage

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Lennart T.; Araujo, Luiza; Kerschen, Philippe; Diem, Séverine; Bourgeois, Elvire; Van, Linh Pham; Carrié, Nadège; Dy, Michel; Liblau, Roland S.; Herbelin, André

    2009-01-01

    T cells differentiate into functionally distinct effector subsets in response to pathogen encounter. Cells of the innate immune system direct this process; CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, for example, can either promote or inhibit Th1 and Th2 responses. Recently, a new subset of CD4+ T helper cells, called Th17, was identified that is implicated in mucosal immunity and autoimmune disorders. To investigate the influence of iNKT cells on the differentiation of naïve T cells we used an adoptive transfer model of traceable antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. Transferred naïve CD25−CD62L+ CD4+ T cells were primed by antigen immunization of the recipient mice, permitting their expansion and Th17 differentiation. This study establishes that in vivo activation of iNKT cells during T-cell priming impedes the commitment of naïve T cells to the Th17 lineage. In vivo cytokine neutralization experiments revealed a role for IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ in the iNKT-cell-mediated regulation of T-cell lineage development. Moreover, by comparing IL-17 production by antigen-experienced T cells from unmanipulated wild-type mice and iNKT-cell-deficient mice, we demonstrate an enhanced Th17 response in mice lacking iNKT cells. This invigorated Th17 response reverts to physiological levels when iNKT cells are introduced into Jα18−/− mice by adoptive transfer, indicating that iNKT cells control the Th17 compartment at steady state. We conclude that iNKT cells play an important role in limiting development of the Th17 lineage and suggest that iNKT cells provide a natural barrier against Th17 responses. PMID:19325124

  9. Invariant NKT Cell Response to Dengue Virus Infection in Human

    PubMed Central

    Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Chan-in, Wilawan; Opasawaschai, Anunya; Pongchaikul, Pisut; Tangthawornchaikul, Nattaya; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue viral infection is a global health threat without vaccine or specific treatment. The clinical outcome varies from asymptomatic, mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). While adaptive immune responses were found to be detrimental in the dengue pathogenesis, the roles of earlier innate events remain largely uninvestigated. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells represent innate-like T cells that could dictate subsequent adaptive response but their role in human dengue virus infection is not known. We hypothesized that iNKT cells play a role in human dengue infection. Methods Blood samples from a well-characterized cohort of children with DF, DHF, in comparison to non-dengue febrile illness (OFI) and healthy controls at various time points were studied. iNKT cells activation were analyzed by the expression of CD69 by flow cytometry. Their cytokine production was then analyzed after α-GalCer stimulation. Further, the CD1d expression on monocytes, and CD69 expression on conventional T cells were measured. Results iNKT cells were activated during acute dengue infection. The level of iNKT cell activation associates with the disease severity. Furthermore, these iNKT cells had altered functional response to subsequent ex vivo stimulation with α-GalCer. Moreover, during acute dengue infection, monocytic CD1d expression was also upregulated and conventional T cells also became activated. Conclusion iNKT cells might play an early and critical role in the pathogenesis of severe dengue viral infection in human. Targeting iNKT cells and CD1d serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for severe dengue infection in the future. PMID:24945350

  10. Leishmania infantum Exoproducts Inhibit Human Invariant NKT Cell Expansion and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Belo, Renata; Santarém, Nuno; Pereira, Cátia; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Macedo, Fátima; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2017-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is one of the major parasite species associated with visceral leishmaniasis, a severe form of the disease that can become lethal if untreated. This obligate intracellular parasite has developed diverse strategies to escape the host immune response, such as exoproducts (Exo) carrying a wide range of molecules, including parasite virulence factors, which are potentially implicated in early stages of infection. Herein, we report that L. infantum Exo and its two fractions composed of extracellular vesicles (EVs) and vesicle-depleted-exoproducts (VDEs) inhibit human peripheral blood invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell expansion in response to their specific ligand, the glycolipid α-GalactosylCeramide (α-GalCer), as well as their capacity to promptly produce IL-4 and IFNγ. Using plate-bound CD1d and α-GalCer, we found that Exo, EV, and VDE fractions reduced iNKT cell activation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that they prevented α-GalCer presentation by CD1d molecules. This direct effect on CD1d was confirmed by the observation that CD1d:α-GalCer complex formation was impaired in the presence of Exo, EV, and VDE fractions. Furthermore, lipid extracts from the three compounds mimicked the inhibition of iNKT cell activation. These lipid components of L. infantum exoproducts, including EV and VDE fractions, might compete for CD1-binding sites, thus blocking iNKT cell activation. Overall, our results provide evidence for a novel strategy through which L. infantum can evade immune responses of mammalian host cells by preventing iNKT lymphocytes from recognizing glycolipids in a TCR-dependent manner. PMID:28674535

  11. Leishmania infantum Exoproducts Inhibit Human Invariant NKT Cell Expansion and Activation.

    PubMed

    Belo, Renata; Santarém, Nuno; Pereira, Cátia; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Macedo, Fátima; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2017-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is one of the major parasite species associated with visceral leishmaniasis, a severe form of the disease that can become lethal if untreated. This obligate intracellular parasite has developed diverse strategies to escape the host immune response, such as exoproducts (Exo) carrying a wide range of molecules, including parasite virulence factors, which are potentially implicated in early stages of infection. Herein, we report that L. infantum Exo and its two fractions composed of extracellular vesicles (EVs) and vesicle-depleted-exoproducts (VDEs) inhibit human peripheral blood invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell expansion in response to their specific ligand, the glycolipid α-GalactosylCeramide (α-GalCer), as well as their capacity to promptly produce IL-4 and IFNγ. Using plate-bound CD1d and α-GalCer, we found that Exo, EV, and VDE fractions reduced iNKT cell activation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that they prevented α-GalCer presentation by CD1d molecules. This direct effect on CD1d was confirmed by the observation that CD1d:α-GalCer complex formation was impaired in the presence of Exo, EV, and VDE fractions. Furthermore, lipid extracts from the three compounds mimicked the inhibition of iNKT cell activation. These lipid components of L. infantum exoproducts, including EV and VDE fractions, might compete for CD1-binding sites, thus blocking iNKT cell activation. Overall, our results provide evidence for a novel strategy through which L. infantum can evade immune responses of mammalian host cells by preventing iNKT lymphocytes from recognizing glycolipids in a TCR-dependent manner.

  12. Lipid-Antigen Presentation by CD1d+ B Cells Is Essential for the Maintenance of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosma, Anneleen; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Isenberg, David A.; Jury, Elizabeth C.; Mauri, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Summary B cells perform many immunological functions, including presenting lipid antigen to CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, known to contribute to maintaining tolerance in autoimmunity. Patients with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) display dysregulated B cell responses and reduced peripheral iNKT cell frequencies. The significance of these defects and how they relate to SLE pathogenesis remain elusive. We report that B cells are essential for iNKT cell expansion and activation in healthy donors but fail to exert a similar effect in SLE patients. Defective B cell-mediated stimulation of iNKT cells in SLE patients was associated with altered CD1d recycling, a defect recapitulated in B cells from healthy donors after stimulation with interferon-α (IFN-α) and anti-immunoglobulin (Ig). iNKT cell number and function were restored in SLE patients responding to anti-CD20 treatment upon normalization of CD1d expression exclusively in repopulated immature B cells. We propose that healthy B cells are pivotal for iNKT cell homeostasis. PMID:22406267

  13. On/off TLR signaling decides proinflammatory or tolerogenic dendritic cell maturation upon CD1d-mediated interaction with invariant NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Caielli, Simone; Conforti-Andreoni, Cristina; Di Pietro, Caterina; Usuelli, Vera; Badami, Ester; Malosio, Maria Luisa; Falcone, Marika

    2010-12-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells play an effector/adjuvant function during antimicrobial and antitumoral immunity and a regulatory role to induce immune tolerance and prevent autoimmunity. iNKT cells that differentially modulate adaptive immunity do not bear a unique phenotype and/or specific cytokine secretion profile, thus opening questions on how a single T cell subset can exert opposite immunological tasks. In this study, we show that iNKT cells perform their dual roles through a single mechanism of action relying on the cognate interaction with myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) and leading to opposite effects depending on the presence of other maturation stimuli simultaneously acting on DCs. The contact of murine purified iNKT cells with immature autologous DCs directly triggers the tolerogenic maturation of DCs, rendering them able to induce regulatory T cell differentiation and prevent autoimmune diabetes in vivo. Conversely, the interaction of the same purified iNKT cells with DCs, in the presence of simultaneous TLR4 stimulation, significantly enhances proinflammatory DC maturation and IL-12 secretion. The different iNKT cell effects are mediated through distinct mechanisms and activation of different molecular pathways within the DC: CD1d signaling and activation of the ERK1/2 pathway for the tolerogenic action, and CD40-CD40L interaction and NF-κB activation for the adjuvant effect. Our data suggest that the DC decision to undergo proinflammatory or tolerogenic maturation results from the integration of different signals received at the time of iNKT cell contact and could have important therapeutic implications for exploiting iNKT cell adjuvant/regulatory properties in autoimmune diseases, infections, and cancer.

  14. Third-party CD4+ invariant natural killer T cells protect from murine GVHD lethality

    PubMed Central

    Schneidawind, Dominik; Baker, Jeanette; Pierini, Antonio; Buechele, Corina; Luong, Richard H.; Meyer, Everett H.

    2015-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is driven by extensive activation and proliferation of alloreactive donor T cells causing significant morbidity and mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a potent immunoregulatory T-cell subset in both humans and mice. Here, we explored the role of adoptively transferred third-party CD4+ iNKT cells for protection from lethal GVHD in a murine model of allogeneic HCT across major histocompatibility barriers. We found that low numbers of CD4+ iNKT cells from third-party mice resulted in a significant survival benefit with retained graft-versus-tumor effects. In vivo expansion of alloreactive T cells was diminished while displaying a T helper cell 2-biased phenotype. Notably, CD4+ iNKT cells from third-party mice were as protective as CD4+ iNKT cells from donor mice although third-party CD4+ iNKT cells were rejected early after allogeneic HCT. Adoptive transfer of third-party CD4+ iNKT cells resulted in a robust expansion of donor CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) that were required for protection from lethal GVHD. However, in vivo depletion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells abrogated both Treg expansion and protection from lethal GVHD. Despite the fact that iNKT cells are a rare cell population, the almost unlimited third-party availability and feasibility of in vitro expansion provide the basis for clinical translation. PMID:25795920

  15. Therapeutic Targeting the Diverse Immunologic Functions Expressed by Hepatic NKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Duwaerts, Caroline C.; Gregory, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction NKT cells comprise approximately 30% of the hepatic lymphoid population in mice (~50% in humans). Most mouse hepatic NKT cells [invariant (i)NKT cells] express T cell receptors, composed of invariant Vα14Jα18 chains. Unlike conventional T cells, iNKT cells recognize glycolipid molecules presented in association with MHC class Ib (CD1d) molecules. Purportedly, iNKT cells serve a key function in a wide range of immunological events; the precise nature of this function is often unclear. Indeed, the consequences of hepatic iNKT cell activation can be beneficial or detrimental. α-Galactosylceramide, the prototypic glycolipid recognized by the iNKT cell receptor, stimulates the rapid production of both interferon-γ and interleukin-4. The reciprocal suppression exhibited by these cytokines limits the potential therapeutic value of α-galactosylceramide. An extensive research effort is ongoing to develop α-galactosylceramide analogs that modulate iNKT cell activity and selectively promote interferon-γ or interleukin-4. Areas covered This review provides a broad overview of hepatic iNKT cells and their purported role in liver disease. Efforts to develop therapeutic agents that promote their beneficial contributions are detailed. Expert Opinion While a growing body of literature documents the differential effects of α-GalCer analogs on IFN-γ and IL-4 production, the effects of these analogs on other iNKT cell activities, e.g., cytolysis and the production of other cytokines, remain to be determined. Similarly, an exhaustive examination of the effects of these analogs on inflammation and liver injury in animal models remains prior to considering their utility in clinical trials. PMID:21564001

  16. Invariant Natural Killer T Cells are Reduced in Hereditary Hemochromatosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Maia, M L; Pereira, C S; Melo, G; Pinheiro, I; Exley, M A; Porto, G; Macedo, M F

    2015-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are CD1d restricted-T cells that react to lipid antigens. iNKT cells were shown to be important in infection, autoimmunity and tumor surveillance. Alterations in the number and function of these cells were described in several pathological conditions including autoimmune and/or liver diseases. CD1d is critical for antigen presentation to iNKT cells, and its expression is increased in liver diseases. The liver is the major organ affected in Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by excessive iron absorption. Herein, we describe the study of iNKT cells of HH patients. Twenty-eight HH patients and 24 control subjects from Santo António Hospital, Porto, were included in this study. Patient's iron biochemical parameters (serum transferrin saturation and ferritin levels) and the liver function marker alanine transaminase (ALT) were determined at the time of study. Peripheral blood iNKT cells were analyzed by flow cytometry using an anti-CD3 antibody and the CD1d tetramer loaded with PBS57. We found a decrease in the percentage and number of circulating iNKT cells from HH patients when compared with control population independently of age. iNKT cell defects were more pronounced in untreated patients, relating with serum ferritin and transferrin saturation levels. No correlation was found with ALT, a marker of active liver dysfunction. Altogether, our results demonstrate that HH patients have reduced numbers of iNKT cells and that these are influenced by iron overload.

  17. Functional Invariant NKT Cells in Pig Lungs Regulate the Airway Hyperreactivity: A Potential Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, Cordelia; Khatri, Mahesh; Rauf, Abdul; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Dwivedi, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Important roles played by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in asthma pathogenesis have been demonstrated. We identified functional iNKT cells and CD1d molecules in pig lungs. Pig iNKT cells cultured in the presence of α-GalCer proliferated and secreted Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Like in other animal models, direct activation of pig lung iNKT cells using α-GalCer resulted in acute airway hyperreactivity (AHR). Clinically, acute AHR-induced pigs had increased respiratory rate, enhanced mucus secretion in the airways, fever, etc. In addition, we observed petechial hemorrhages, infiltration of CD4+ cells, and increased Th2 cytokines in AHR-induced pig lungs. Ex vivo proliferated iNKT cells of asthma induced pigs in the presence of C-glycoside analogs of α-GalCer had predominant Th2 phenotype and secreted more of Th2 cytokine, IL-4. Thus, baby pigs may serve as a useful animal model to study iNKT cell-mediated AHR caused by various environmental and microbial CD1d-specific glycolipid antigens. PMID:21042929

  18. Human Invariant Natural Killer T cells possess immune-modulating functions during Aspergillus infection.

    PubMed

    Beitzen-Heineke, Antonia; Bouzani, Maria; Schmitt, Anna-Lena; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause for invasive fungal infections, a disease associated with high mortality in immune-compromised patients. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells compose a small subset of T cells known to impact the immune response toward various infectious pathogens. To investigate the role of human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection, we studied their activation as determined by CD69 expression and cytokine production in response to distinct fungal morphotypes in the presence of different CD1d(+) antigen presenting cells using flow cytometry and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among CD1d(+) subpopulations, CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs showed the highest potential to activate iNKT cells on a per cell basis. The presence of A. fumigatus decreased this effect of CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs on iNKT cells and led to reduced secretion of TNF-α, G-CSF and RANTES. Production of other Th1 and Th2 cytokines was not affected by the fungus, suggesting an immune-modulating function for human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Larger number of invariant natural killer T cells in PBSC allografts correlates with improved GVHD-free and progression-free survival.

    PubMed

    Malard, Florent; Labopin, Myriam; Chevallier, Patrice; Guillaume, Thierry; Duquesne, Alix; Rialland, Fanny; Derenne, Sophie; Peterlin, Pierre; Leauté, Anne-Gaelle; Brissot, Eolia; Gregoire, Marc; Moreau, Philippe; Saas, Philippe; Gaugler, Béatrice; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-04-07

    We studied the impact of a set of immune cells contained within granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell grafts (naïve and memory T-cell subsets, B cells, regulatory T cells, invariant natural killer T cells [iNKTs], NK cells, and dendritic cell subsets) in patients (n = 80) undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), using the composite end point of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-free and progression-free survival (GPFS) as the primary end point. We observed that GPFS incidences in patients receiving iNKT doses above and below the median were 49% vs 22%, respectively (P= .007). In multivariate analysis, the iNKT dose was the only parameter with a significant impact on GPFS (hazard ratio = 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-0.85;P= .01). The incidences of severe grade III to IV acute GVHD and National Institutes of Health grade 2 to 3 chronic GVHD (12% and 16%, respectively) were low and associated with the use of antithymocyte globulin in 91% of patients. No difference in GVHD incidence was reported according to the iNKT dose. In conclusion, a higher dose of iNKTs within the graft is associated with an improved GPFS. These data may pave the way for prospective and active interventions aiming to manipulate the graft content to improve allo-SCT outcome. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Contribution of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells to Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Ritsu, Masae; Kanno, Emi; Suzuki, Aiko; Kamimatsuno, Rina; Takagi, Naoyuki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Imai, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we determined the contribution of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to the skin wound healing process. In iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18KO) mice lacking iNKT cells, wound closure was significantly delayed compared with wild-type mice. Collagen deposition, expression of α-smooth muscle actin and CD31, and wound breaking strength were significantly attenuated in Jα18KO mice. The adoptive transfer of liver mononuclear cells from wild-type but not from Jα18KO or interferon (IFN)-γ gene-disrupted (IFN-γKO) mice resulted in the reversal of this impaired wound healing in Jα18KO mice. IFN-γ expression was induced in the wounded tissues, which was significantly decreased at 6, 12, and 24 hours, but increased on day 3 after wounding in Jα18KO mice. The main source of the late-phase IFN-γ production in Jα18KO mice were neutrophils rather than NK cells and T cells. Administration of α-galactosylceramide, an activator of iNKT cells, resulted in the acceleration of wound healing on day 3 in wild-type mice. This effect was not observed in IFN-γKO mice. These results indicate that iNKT cells play important roles in wound healing. The iNKT cell-induced IFN-γ production may regulate the wound healing process in the early phase. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ID2 collaborates with ID3 to suppress iNKT and innate-like tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Roy, Sumedha; Kim, Young-Mi; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Baojun; Love, Cassandra; Reddy, Anupama; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Dave, Sandeep; Diehl, Anna Mae; Zhuang, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (ID) proteins, including ID1-4, are transcriptional regulators involved in promoting cell proliferation and survival in various cell types. Although upregulation of Id proteins has been associated with a broad spectrum of tumors, recent studies have identified that ID3 plays a tumor suppressor role in the development of Burkitt’s lymphoma in humans and Hepatosplenic T cell lymphomas in mice. Here, we report rapid lymphoma development in Id2/Id3 double knockout (L-DKO) mice caused by unchecked expansion of either invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells, or a unique subset of innate-like, CD1d-independent T cells. These populations started expansion in neonatal mice and, upon malignant transformation, caused fatality at age between 3–11 months. The malignant cells also gave rise to lymphomas upon transfer to Rag-deficient and wild-type hosts, reaffirming their inherent tumorigenic potential. Microarray analysis revealed a significantly modified program in these neonatal iNKT cells that ultimately led to their malignant transformation. The lymphoma cells demonstrated chromosome instability, along with upregulation of several different signaling pathways, including the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway, which can promote their expansion and migration. Dysregulation of genes with reported driver mutations and the NF-kB pathway were found to be shared between L-DKO lymphomas and human NKT tumors. Our work identifies a distinct premalignant state and multiple tumoriogenic pathways caused by loss function of ID2 and ID3. Thus, conditional deletion of Id2 and Id3 in developing T cells establishes a unique animal model for iNKT and relevant innate-like lymphomas. PMID:28258199

  2. Regulatory T, natural killer T and γδ T cells in multiple sclerosis and chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sandra; Brenu, Ekua; Broadley, Simon; Kwiatek, Richard; Ng, Jennifer; Nguyen, Thao; Freeman, Susan; Staines, Donald; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) may share some similarities in relation to reduced NK cell activity. It is likely that other cells such as regulatory T (Tregs), invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) and gamma delta T (γδ T) cells may also be dysregulated in CFS/ME and MS. To evaluate and compare specific immune regulatory cells of patients with CFS/ME, patients with MS and healthy controls. Sixty three volunteers were included in this study: 24 were CFS/ME patients, 11 were MS patients and 27 were healthy controls. Blood samples were obtained from all participants for flow cytometry analysis of iNKT cells, Tregs and γδ T cell phenotypes. We observed a significant increase in Tregs in the CFS/ME group (p≤0.05) compared to the healthy control group. Total γδ and γδ2 T cells were significantly reduced in MS patients in comparison with the healthy control group. Conversely, CD4+iNKT percentage of iNKT, was significantly increased in the CFS/ME group compared with healthy controls and the double-negative iNKT percentage of iNKT significantly decreased compared with the healthy control group. This study has not identified any immunological disturbances that are common in both MS and CFS/ME patients. However, the differential expression of cell types between the conditions investigated suggests different pathways of disease. These differences need to be explored in further studies.

  3. Excessive interferon-α signaling in autoimmunity alters glycosphingolipid processing in B cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andy Hee-Meng; Sanny, Arleen; Ng, Sze-Wai; Ho, Ying-Swan; Basri, Nurhidayah; Lee, Alison Ping; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2018-05-01

    Excessive interferon-α (IFN-α) production by innate immune cells is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases. What other cell type secretes IFN-α and how IFN-α affects immune cell metabolism and homeostasis in autoimmunity are largely unclear. Here, we report that autoimmune B cells, arising from two different B cell-specific genetic lesions in mice, secrete IFN-α. In addition, IFN-α, found in abundance in autoimmunity, elicited profound changes in the B cell lipidome, increasing their expression of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) and leading to their CD1d-mediated depletion of iNKT cells in vitro and in vivo. IFN-α receptor blockade could reverse the loss of iNKT cells. Excessive stimulation of B cells with IFN-α altered the expression of enzymes that catalyze critical steps in GSL processing, increasing the expressions of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) and globotrihexosylceramide synthase (Gb3S) but decreasing that of α-galactosidase A (α-galA). Inhibiting GCS or restoring α-galA expression prevented iNKT depletion by IFN-α-activated B cells. Taken together, our work indicated that excessive IFN-α perturbs GSL metabolism in B cells which in turn adversely affects iNKT homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A brief review of clinical trials involving manipulation of invariant NKT cells as a promising approach in future cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bojarska-Junak, Agnieszka; Roliński, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    In the recent years researchers have put a lot of emphasis on the possible immunotherapeutic strategies able to target tumors. Many studies have proven that the key role in recognition and eradication of cancer cells, both for mice and humans, is being conducted by the invariant natural killer T-cells (NKT). This small subpopulation of lymphocytes can kill other cells, either directly or indirectly, through the natural killer cells’ (NK) activation. They can also swiftly release cytokines, causing the involvement of elements of the innate and acquired immune system. With the discovery of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) – the first known agonist for iNKT cells – and its later subsequent analogs, it became possible to effectively stimulate iNKT cells, hence to keep control over the tumor progression. This article refers to the current knowledge concerning iNKT cells and the most important aspects of their antitumor activity. It also highlights the clinical trials that aim at increasing the amount of iNKT cells in general and in the microenvironment of the tumor. For sure, the iNKT-based immunotherapeutic approach holds a great potential and is highly probable to become a part of the cancer immunotherapy in the future. PMID:28860937

  5. Characterization of human invariant natural killer T subsets in health and disease using a novel invariant natural killer T cell-clonotypic monoclonal antibody, 6B11.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Carlos J; Pollard, David; Martinson, Jeffrey; Kumari, Kumud; Wasserfall, Clive; Mulder, Candice B; Rugeles, Maria T; Atkinson, Mark A; Landay, Alan L; Wilson, S Brian

    2007-09-01

    Identification of human CD1d-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR)-invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells has been dependent on utilizing combinations of monoclonal antibodies or CD1d tetramers, which do not allow for the most specific analysis of this T-cell subpopulation. A novel monoclonal antibody (clone 6B11), specific for the invariant CDR3 loop of human canonical Valpha24Jalpha18 TCR alpha chain, was developed and used to specifically characterize iNKT cells. In healthy individuals studied for up to 1 year, a wide but stable frequency of circulating iNKT cells (range: 0.01-0.92%) was observed, with no differences in frequency by gender. Four stable iNKT cell subsets were characterized in peripheral blood based on the expression of CD4 and CD8, with CD8(+) iNKT cells being a phenotypic and functionally different subset from CD4(+) and double negative iNKT cells; in particular, LAG-3 was preferentially expressed on CD8(+) iNKT cells. In addition, a strong negative linear correlation between the frequency of total iNKT cells and percentage of the CD4(+) subset was observed. In terms of their potential association with disease, patients at risk for type 1 diabetes had significantly expanded frequencies of double negative iNKT cells when compared to matched controls and first-degree relatives. Moreover, peripheral blood CD4(+) iNKT cells were the highest producers of interleukin-4, while the production of interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha was similar amongst all iNKT cell subsets. These differences in iNKT cell subsets suggest that in humans the relative ratio of iNKT cell subsets may influence susceptibility vs. resistance to immune-mediated diseases.

  6. Characterization of human invariant natural killer T subsets in health and disease using a novel invariant natural killer T cell-clonotypic monoclonal antibody, 6B11

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Carlos J; Pollard, David; Martinson, Jeffrey; Kumari, Kumud; Wasserfall, Clive; Mulder, Candice B; Rugeles, Maria T; Atkinson, Mark A; Landay, Alan L; Wilson, S Brian

    2007-01-01

    Identification of human CD1d-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR)-invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells has been dependent on utilizing combinations of monoclonal antibodies or CD1d tetramers, which do not allow for the most specific analysis of this T-cell subpopulation. A novel monoclonal antibody (clone 6B11), specific for the invariant CDR3 loop of human canonical Vα24Jα18 TCR α chain, was developed and used to specifically characterize iNKT cells. In healthy individuals studied for up to 1 year, a wide but stable frequency of circulating iNKT cells (range: 0·01–0·92%) was observed, with no differences in frequency by gender. Four stable iNKT cell subsets were characterized in peripheral blood based on the expression of CD4 and CD8, with CD8+ iNKT cells being a phenotypic and functionally different subset from CD4+ and double negative iNKT cells; in particular, LAG-3 was preferentially expressed on CD8+ iNKT cells. In addition, a strong negative linear correlation between the frequency of total iNKT cells and percentage of the CD4+ subset was observed. In terms of their potential association with disease, patients at risk for type 1 diabetes had significantly expanded frequencies of double negative iNKT cells when compared to matched controls and first-degree relatives. Moreover, peripheral blood CD4+ iNKT cells were the highest producers of interleukin-4, while the production of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α was similar amongst all iNKT cell subsets. These differences in iNKT cell subsets suggest that in humans the relative ratio of iNKT cell subsets may influence susceptibility vs. resistance to immune-mediated diseases. PMID:17662044

  7. Innate-like behavior of human invariant natural killer T cells during herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Lucie; Nevoralova, Zuzana; Novak, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, CD1d restricted T cells, are involved in the immune responses against various infection agents. Here we describe their behavior during reactivation of human herpes simplex virus (HSV). iNKT cells exhibit only discrete changes, which however, reached statistically significant level due to the relatively large patient group. Higher percentage of iNKT cells express NKG2D. iNKT cells down-regulate NKG2A in a subset of patients. Finally, iNKT cells enhance their capacity to produce TNF-α. Our data suggests that iNKT cells are involved in the immune response against HSV and contribute mainly to its early, innate phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dendritic cells combined with tumor cells and α-galactosylceramide induce a potent, therapeutic and NK-cell dependent antitumor immunity in B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Escribà-Garcia, Laura; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Sierra, Jorge; Briones, Javier

    2017-05-26

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a small population of lymphocytes with unique specificity for glycolipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d receptor on dendritic cells (DCs). iNKT cells play a central role in tumor immunology since they are implicated in the coordination of innate and adaptive immune responses. These cells can be activated with the prototypic lipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), stimulating interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production and cytokine secretion, which contribute to the enhancement of T cell activation. We evaluated the antitumor effect of a combination of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells with the iNKT cell agonist α-GalCer in a therapeutic model of B cell lymphoma. iNKT, NK and T cell phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. Serum cytokines were analyzed by Luminex technology. Significant differences between survival curves were assessed by the log-rank test. For all other data, Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze the differences between groups. This vaccine induced a potent (100% survival), long-lasting and tumor-specific antitumor immune response, that was associated with an increase of both Th1 cytokines and IFN-γ secreting iNKT cells (4.59 ± 0.41% vs. 0.92 ± 0.12% in control group; p = 0.01) and T cells (CD4 IFN-γ + : 3.75 ± 0.59% vs. 0.66 ± 0.18% p = 0.02; CD8 IFN-γ + : 10.61 ± 0.84% vs. 0.47 ± 0.03% p = 0.002). Importantly, natural killer (NK) cells played a critical role in the antitumor effect observed after vaccination. This study provides clinically relevant data for the development of iNKT-cell based immunotherapy treatments for patients with B cell malignancies.

  10. Dendritic cell internalization of α-galactosylceramide from CD8 T cells induces potent antitumor CD8 T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kwang Soon; Yang, Se Hwan; Chung, Doo Hyun; Song, Boyeong; Sprent, Jonathan; Cho, Jae Ho; Sung, Young Chul

    2011-12-15

    Dendritic cells (DC) present α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) to invariant T-cell receptor-expressing natural killer T cells (iNKT) activating these cells to secrete a variety of cytokines, which in turn results in DC maturation and activation of other cell types, including NK cells, B cells, and conventional T cells. In this study, we showed that αGalCer-pulsing of antigen-activated CD8 T cells before adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing mice caused a marked increase in donor T-cell proliferation, precursor frequency, and cytotoxic lymphocyte activity. This effect was interleukin (IL)-2 dependent and involved both natural killer T cells (NKT) and DCs, as mice lacking IL-2, NKTs, and DCs lacked any enhanced response to adoptively transferred αGalCer-loaded CD8 T cells. iNKT activation was mediated by transfer of αGalCer from the cell membrane of the donor CD8 T cells onto the αGalCer receptor CD1d which is present on host DCs. αGalCer transfer was increased by prior activation of the donor CD8 T cells and required AP-2-mediated endocytosis by host DCs. In addition, host iNKT cell activation led to strong IL-2 synthesis, thereby increasing expansion and differentiation of donor CD8 T cells. Transfer of these cells led to improved therapeutic efficacy against established solid tumors in mice. Thus, our findings illustrate how αGalCer loading of CD8 T cells after antigen activation in vitro may leverage the therapeutic potential of adoptive T-cell therapies.

  11. Invariant NKT Cells Regulate the CD8 T Cell Response during Theiler's Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Lennart T.; Mas, Magali; Beaudoin, Lucie; Bauer, Jan; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Lehuen, Agnès; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Liblau, Roland S.

    2014-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are innate lymphocytes with a broad tissue distribution. Here we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the central nervous system (CNS) in the absence of inflammation. Their presence in the CNS dramatically augments following inoculation of C57Bl/6 mice with the neurotropic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). At the peak of inflammation the cellular infiltrate comprises 45 000 iNKT cells for 1 250 CD8 T cells specific for the immunodominant TMEV epitope. To study the interaction between these two T cell subsets, we infected both iNKT cell deficient Jα18-/- mice and iNKT cell enriched Vα14 transgenic mice with TMEV. The CD8 T cell response readily cleared TMEV infection in the iNKT cell deficient mice. However, in the iNKT cell enriched mice TMEV infection persisted and was associated with significant mortality. This was caused by the inhibition of the CD8 T cell response in the cervical lymph nodes and spleen after T cell priming. Taken together we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the CNS in the absence of inflammation and that their enrichment is associated with the inhibition of the anti-viral CD8 T cell response and an augmented mortality during acute encephalomyelitis. PMID:24498175

  12. Amide Analogues of CD1d Agonists Modulate iNKT-Cell-Mediated Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are restricted by the non-polymorphic MHC class I-like protein, CD1d, and activated following presentation of lipid antigens bound to CD1d molecules. The prototypical iNKT cell agonist is α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer). CD1d-mediated activation of iNKT cells by this molecule results in the rapid secretion of a range of pro-inflammatory (Th1) and regulatory (Th2) cytokines. Polarization of the cytokine response can be achieved by modifying the structure of the glycolipid, which opens up the possibility of using CD1d agonists as therapeutic agents for a range of diseases. Analysis of crystal structures of the T-cell receptor−α-GalCer–CD1d complex led us to postulate that amide isosteres of known CD1d agonists should modulate the cytokine response profile upon iNKT-cell activation. To this end, we describe the synthesis and biological activity of amide analogues of α-GalCer and its non-glycosidic analogue threitol ceramide (ThrCer). All of the analogues were found to stimulate murine and human iNKT cells by CD1d-mediated presentation to varying degrees; however, the thioamide and carbamate analogues of ThrCer were of particular interest in that they elicited a strongly polarized cytokine response (more interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), no interleukin-4 (IL-4)) in mice. While the ThrCer-carbamate analogue was shown to transactivate natural killer (NK) cells, a mechanism that has been used to account for the preferential production of IFN-γ by other CD1d agonists, this pathway does not account for the polarized cytokine response observed for the thioamide analogue. PMID:22324848

  13. Sodium chloride inhibits IFN-γ, but not IL-4, production by invariant NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dongjin; Kim, Hye Young; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a distinct subset of T cells that exert Janus-like functions in vivo by producing IFN-γ and IL-4. Sodium chloride modulates the functions of various immune cells, including conventional CD4 + T cells and macrophages. However, it is not known whether sodium chloride affects iNKT cell function, so we addressed this issue. Sodium chloride inhibited IFN-γ, but not IL-4, production by iNKT cells upon TCR or TCR-independent (IL-12 and IL-18) stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, sodium chloride reduced the expression level of tbx21, but not gata-3, in iNKT cells stimulated with TCR engagement or IL-12 + IL-18. Sodium chloride increased phosphorylated p38 expression in iNKT cells and inhibitors of p38, NFAT5, SGK1, and TCF-1 restored IFN-γ production by iNKT cells stimulated with sodium chloride and TCR engagement. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of iNKT cells pretreated with sodium chloride restored antibody-induced joint inflammation to a lesser extent than for untreated iNKT cells in Jα18 knockout mice. These findings suggest that sodium chloride inhibits IFN-γ production by iNKT cells in TCR-dependent and TCR-independent manners, which is dependent on p38, NFAT5, SGK1, and TCF-1. These findings highlight the functional role of sodium chloride in iNKT cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. ©2017 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. Invariant Natural Killer T Cell Deficiency and Functional Impairment in Sleep Apnea: Links to Cancer Comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Gaoatswe, Gadintshware; Kent, Brian D; Corrigan, Michelle A; Nolan, Geraldine; Hogan, Andrew E; McNicholas, Walter T; O'Shea, Donal

    2015-10-01

    Emerging evidence links obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with increased cancer incidence and mortality. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells play an important role in cancer immunity. We hypothesized that patients with OSA have low number of circulating invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, which may also be functionally impaired. This study aims to evaluate the frequency of circulating iNKT cells in OSA. We evaluated the frequency of circulating iNKT cells by flow cytometry in 33 snorers being assessed for possible OSA. Using iNKT cell lines, we also evaluated the effect of exposure to hypoxia over 24 hours on apoptosis, cytotoxicity, and cytokine production. Teaching hospital based sleep unit and research laboratory. Thirty-three snorers were evaluated: 9 with no OSA (apnea-hypopnea frequency [AHI] < 5/h), 12 with mild-moderate OSA (AHI 5-30) and 12 with severe OSA (AHI > 30). Patients with severe OSA had considerably fewer iNKT cells (0.18%) compared to patients with mild-moderate (0.24%) or no OSA (0.35%), P = 0.0026. The frequency of iNKT cells correlated negatively with apnea-hypopnea index (r = -0.58, P = 0.001), oxygen desaturation index (r = -0.58, P = 0.0003), and SpO2% < 90% (r = -0.5407, P = 0.005). The frequency of iNKT cells increased following 12 months of nCPAP therapy (P = 0.015). Hypoxia resulted in increased apoptosis (P = 0.016) and impaired cytotoxicity (P = 0.035). Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have significantly reduced levels of circulating invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and hypoxia leads to impaired iNKT cell function. These observations may partly explain the increased cancer risk reported in patients with OSA. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Invariant natural killer T cells act as an extravascular cytotoxic barrier for joint-invading Lyme Borrelia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Yong; Sanz, Maria-Jesus; Wong, Connie H Y; Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Salman-Dilgimen, Aydan; Moriarty, Tara J; Chaconas, George; Marques, Adriana; Krawetz, Roman; Mody, Christopher H; Kubes, Paul

    2014-09-23

    CXCR6-GFP(+) cells, which encompass 70% invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells), have been found primarily patrolling inside blood vessels in the liver. Although the iNKT cells fail to interact with live pathogens, they do respond to bacterial glycolipids presented by CD1d on liver macrophage that have caught the microbe. In contrast, in this study using dual laser multichannel spinning-disk intravital microscopy of joints, the CXCR6-GFP, which also made up 60-70% iNKT cells, were not found in the vasculature but rather closely apposed to and surrounding the outside of blood vessels, and to a lesser extent throughout the extravascular space. These iNKT cells also differed in behavior, responding rapidly and directly to joint-homing pathogens like Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease. These iNKT cells interacted with B. burgdorferi at the vessel wall and disrupted dissemination attempts by these microbes into joints. Successful penetrance of B. burgdorferi out of the vasculature and into the joint tissue was met by a lethal attack by extravascular iNKT cells through a granzyme-dependent pathway, an observation also made in vitro for iNKT cells from joint but not liver or spleen. These results suggest a novel, critical extravascular iNKT cell immune surveillance in joints that functions as a cytotoxic barrier and explains a large increase in pathogen burden of B. burgdorferi in the joint of iNKT cell-deficient mice, and perhaps the greater susceptibility of humans to this pathogen because of fewer iNKT cells in human joints.

  16. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

    PubMed

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  17. Thio-isoglobotrihexosylceramide, an agonist for activating invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chengfeng; Zhou, Dapeng; Liu, Chengwen; Lou, Yanyan; Yao, Qingjia; Zhang, Wenpeng; Wang, Peng George

    2006-11-23

    Thio-isoglobotrihexosylceramide (S-iGb3) might be resistant to alpha-galactosidases in antigen-presenting cells and have a longer retaining time in the lysosome before being loaded to CD1d. The biological assay showed that S-iGb3 demonstrates a much higher increase as a stimulatory ligand toward invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells as compared to iGb3. [structure: see text].

  18. Human Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Respond to Antigen-Presenting Cells Exposed to Lipids from Olea europaea Pollen.

    PubMed

    Abos Gracia, Beatriz; López Relaño, Juan; Revilla, Ana; Castro, Lourdes; Villalba, Mayte; Martín Adrados, Beatriz; Regueiro, Jose Ramon; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Martínez Naves, Eduardo; Gómez Del Moral, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Allergic sensitization might be influenced by the lipids present in allergens, which can be recognized by natural killer T (NKT) cells on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of olive pollen lipids in human APCs, including monocytes as well as monocyte-derived macrophages (Mϕ) and dendritic cells (DCs). Lipids were extracted from olive (Olea europaea) pollen grains. Invariant (i)NKT cells, monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs were obtained from buffy coats of healthy blood donors, and their cell phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. iNKT cytotoxicity was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. Gene expression of CD1A and CD1D was performed by RT-PCR, and the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α cytokines by monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that monocytes and monocyte-derived Mϕ treated with olive pollen lipids strongly activate iNKT cells. We observed several phenotypic modifications in the APCs upon exposure to pollen-derived lipids. Both Mϕ and monocytes treated with olive pollen lipids showed an increase in CD1D gene expression, whereas upregulation of cell surface CD1d protein occurred only in Mϕ. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of human serum enhance their surface CD1d expression when exposed to olive pollen lipids. Finally, olive pollen lipids were able to stimulate the production of IL-6 but downregulated the production of lipopolysaccharide- induced IL-10 by Mϕ. Olive pollen lipids alter the phenotype of monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs, resulting in the activation of NKT cells, which have the potential to influence allergic immune responses. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Critical role for invariant chain in CD1d-mediated selection and maturation of Vα14-invariant NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Sillé, Fenna C M; Martin, Constance; Jayaraman, Pushpa; Rothchild, Alissa; Besra, Gurdyal S; Behar, Samuel M; Boes, Marianne

    2011-09-30

    The development and maturation of Vα14 invariant (i)NKT cells in mice requires CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation in the thymus and the periphery. Cortical thymocytes mediate positive selection, while professional APCs are involved in thymic negative selection and in terminal maturation of iNKT cells in the periphery. CD1d requires entry in the endosomal pathway to allow antigen acquisition for assembly as lipid/CD1d complexes for display to iNKT cells. This process involves tyrosine-based sorting motifs in the CD1d cytoplasmic tail and invariant chain (Ii) that CD1d associates with in the endoplasmic reticulum. The function of Ii in iNKT cell thymic development and peripheral maturation had not been fully understood. Using mice deficient in Ii and the Ii-processing enzyme cathepsin S (catS), we addressed this question. Ii(-/-) mice but not catS(-/-) mice developed significantly fewer iNKT cells in thymus, that were less mature as measured by CD44 and NK1.1 expression. Ii(-/-) mice but not catS(-/-) mice developed fewer Vβ7(+) cells in their iNKT TCR repertoire than WT counterparts, indicative of a change in endogenous glycolipid antigen/CD1d-mediated iNKT cell selection. Finally, using a Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection model in macrophages, we show that iNKT developed in Ii(-/-) but not catS(-/-) mice have defective effector function. Our data support a role for professional APCs expressing Ii, but no role for catS in the thymic development and peripheral terminal maturation of iNKT cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Infiltration of invariant natural killer T cells occur and accelerate brain infarction in permanent ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Kui; Xue, Li; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Su, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-10-28

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of T cells that have been implicated in inflammation, atopy, autoimmunity, infections, and cancer. Although iNKT cells have been extensively studied over the past decade, its role in the pathogenesis of ischemic brain injury is still largely unknown. In our study, we determined whether iNKT cells infiltration occur in a mouse model of permanent cerebral ischemia. C57BL6/J male mice were treated with either alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) or vehicle control before undergoing permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). α-GalCer, a glycolipid antigen, specifically activates iNKT cells by a CD1d-restricted mechanism. Using flow cytometry, 10,000 leukocytes (CD45 high cells) from the ischemic hemisphere and peripheral blood respectively were analyzed to determine the number of NK1.1 + CD3 + cells at 3, 12, 24 and 48h post-pMCAO. Cerebral infarct size, brain edema and morphological characteristics were measured at the stipulated time points by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, weighing, and H&E staining. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α in brain tissue and serum were assessed by immunohistochemistry and ELISA respectively. We found that the number of iNKT cells started increasing from 12h (PB sample) and 24h (ischemic hemisphere sample) respectively in the vehicle treated group. iNKT cells infiltration occurred at an earlier time-point compared in the α-GalCer treated group (T=3H vs T=12H in PB sample; T=12H vs T=24H in ischemic hemisphere sample). Brain water content at 12h and 24h was significantly higher in pMCAO+α-GalCer mice compared to pMCAO+vehicle mice which was in turn higher than mice that underwent sham surgery. Aggravated morphological abnormalities in HE-stained neurons and significantly increased neurons with pyknotic nuclei and cavitation in the ischemic region were observed at 24h in the pMCAO+α-GalCer and pMCAO+vehicle groups. Cerebral infarct volume

  1. iNKT-CELL ACTIVATION INDUCES LATE PRETERM BIRTH THAT IS ATTENUATED BY ROSIGLITAZONE1

    PubMed Central

    St Louis, Derek; Romero, Roberto; Plazyo, Olesya; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia; Panaitescu, Bogdan; Xu, Yi; Milovic, Tatjana; Xu, Zhonghui; Bhatti, Gaurav; Qing-Sheng, Mi; Drewlo, Sascha; Tarca, Adi L.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality; however, its non-infection-related mechanisms are poorly understood. Herein, we show that the expansion of activated CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in the third trimester by administration of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) induces late PTB and neonatal mortality. In vivo imaging revealed that fetuses from mice that underwent α-GalCer-induced late PTB had bradycardia and died shortly after delivery. Yet, administration of α-GalCer in the second trimester did not cause pregnancy loss. PPARγ activation, through rosiglitazone treatment, reduced the rate of α-GalCer-induced late PTB and improved neonatal survival. Administration of α-GalCer in the third trimester suppressed PPARγ activation as shown by the down-regulation of Fabp4 and Fatp4 in myometrial and decidual tissues, respectively; this suppression was rescued by rosiglitazone treatment. Administration of α-GalCer in the third trimester induced an increase in the activation of conventional CD4+ T cells in myometrial tissues and the infiltration of activated macrophages, neutrophils and mature DCs to myometrial and/or decidual tissues. All of these effects were blunted after rosiglitazone treatment. Administration of α-GalCer also up-regulated the expression of inflammatory genes at the maternal-fetal interface and systemically, and rosiglitazone treatment partially attenuated these responses. Finally, an increased infiltration of activated iNKT-like cells in human decidual tissues is associated with non-infection-related preterm labor/birth. Collectively, these results demonstrate that iNKT-cell activation in vivo leads to late PTB by initiating innate and adaptive immune responses and suggest that the PPARγ pathway has potential as a target for prevention of this syndrome. PMID:26740111

  2. Protection Against Type 1 Diabetes Upon Coxsackievirus B4 Infection and iNKT-Cell Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ghazarian, Liana; Diana, Julien; Beaudoin, Lucie; Larsson, Pär G.; Puri, Raj K.; van Rooijen, Nico; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Lehuen, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells belong to the innate immune system and exercise a dual role as potent regulators of autoimmunity and participate in responses against different pathogens. They have been shown to prevent type 1 diabetes development and to promote antiviral responses. Many studies in the implication of environmental factors on the etiology of type 1 diabetes have suggested a link between enteroviral infections and the development of this disease. This study of the pancreatropic enterovirus Coxsackievirus B4 (CVB4) shows that although infection accelerated type 1 diabetes development in a subset of proinsulin 2–deficient NOD mice, the activation of iNKT cells by a specific agonist, α-galactosylceramide, at the time of infection inhibited the disease. Diabetes development was associated with the infiltration of pancreatic islets by inflammatory macrophages, producing high levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α and activation of anti-islet T cells. On the contrary, macrophages infiltrating the islets after CVB4 infection and iNKT-cell stimulation expressed a number of suppressive enzymes, among which indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase was sufficient to inhibit anti-islet T-cell response and to prevent diabetes. This study highlights the critical interaction between virus and the immune system in the acceleration or prevention of type 1 diabetes. PMID:23894189

  3. Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor

    SciTech Connect

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V.; Kung, Jennifer E.

    2014-10-02

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted {alpha}1 helix resulting in an open A pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-{angstrom} displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d-LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint onmore » CD1d-LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3{alpha} loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3{beta} and J{beta} segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells.« less

  4. Immature Renal Dendritic Cells Recruit Regulatory CXCR6+ Invariant Natural Killer T Cells to Attenuate Crescentic GN

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Turner, Jan-Eric; Tittel, André P.; Krebs, Christian; Disteldorf, Erik; Wegscheid, Claudia; Tiegs, Gisa; Velden, Joachim; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Garbi, Natalio; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Kurts, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Immature renal dendritic cells (DCs) are protective early in murine crescentic GN, but the mechanisms underlying this protection are unknown. Here, depletion of DCs reduced the recruitment of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, which attenuate GN, into the kidney in the early stage of experimental crescentic GN. More than 90% of renal iNKT cells expressed the chemokine receptor CXCR6, and renal DCs produced high amounts of the cognate ligand CXCL16 early after induction of nephritis, suggesting that renal DC-derived CXCL16 might attract protective CXCR6+ iNKT cells. Consistent with this finding, CXCR6-deficient mice exhibited less iNKT cell recruitment and developed nephritis that was more severe, similar to the aggravated nephritis observed in mice depleted of immature DCs. Finally, adoptive transfer of CXCR6-competent NKT cells ameliorated nephritis. Taken together, these results suggest an immunoprotective mechanism involving immature DCs, CXCL16, CXCR6, and regulatory iNKT cells, which might stimulate the development of new therapeutic strategies for GN. PMID:23138484

  5. Immature renal dendritic cells recruit regulatory CXCR6(+) invariant natural killer T cells to attenuate crescentic GN.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Turner, Jan-Eric; Tittel, André P; Krebs, Christian; Disteldorf, Erik; Wegscheid, Claudia; Tiegs, Gisa; Velden, Joachim; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Garbi, Natalio; Stahl, Rolf A K; Steinmetz, Oliver M; Kurts, Christian; Panzer, Ulf

    2012-12-01

    Immature renal dendritic cells (DCs) are protective early in murine crescentic GN, but the mechanisms underlying this protection are unknown. Here, depletion of DCs reduced the recruitment of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, which attenuate GN, into the kidney in the early stage of experimental crescentic GN. More than 90% of renal iNKT cells expressed the chemokine receptor CXCR6, and renal DCs produced high amounts of the cognate ligand CXCL16 early after induction of nephritis, suggesting that renal DC-derived CXCL16 might attract protective CXCR6(+) iNKT cells. Consistent with this finding, CXCR6-deficient mice exhibited less iNKT cell recruitment and developed nephritis that was more severe, similar to the aggravated nephritis observed in mice depleted of immature DCs. Finally, adoptive transfer of CXCR6-competent NKT cells ameliorated nephritis. Taken together, these results suggest an immunoprotective mechanism involving immature DCs, CXCL16, CXCR6, and regulatory iNKT cells, which might stimulate the development of new therapeutic strategies for GN.

  6. Invariant natural killer T cells from children with versus without food allergy exhibit differential responsiveness to milk-derived sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Jyonouchi, Soma; Abraham, Valsamma; Orange, Jordan S; Spergel, Jonathan M; Gober, Laura; Dudek, Emily; Saltzman, Rushani; Nichols, Kim E; Cianferoni, Antonella

    2011-07-01

    A key immunologic feature of food allergy (FA) is the presence of a T(h)2-type cytokine bias. Ligation of the invariant natural killer T cell (iNKT) T-cell receptor (TCR) by sphingolipids presented via the CD1d molecule leads to copious secretion of T(h)2-type cytokines. Major food allergens (eg, milk, egg) are the richest dietary source of sphingolipids (food-derived sphingolipids [food-SLs]). Nonetheless, the role of iNKTs in FA is unknown. To investigate the role of iNKTs in FA and to assess whether food-SL-CD1d complexes can engage the iNKT-TCR and induce iNKT functions. PBMCs from 15 children with cow's milk allergy (MA), 12 children tolerant to cow's milk but with allergy to egg, and 13 healthy controls were incubated with α-galactosylceramide (αGal), cow's milk-sphingomyelin, or hen's egg-ceramide. iNKTs were quantified, and their cytokine production and proliferation were assessed. Human CD1d tetramers loaded with milk-sphingomyelin or egg-ceramide were used to determine food-SL binding to the iNKT-TCR. Milk-sphingomyelin, but not egg-ceramide, can engage the iNKT-TCR and induce iNKT proliferation and T(h)2-type cytokine secretion. Children with FA, especially those with MA, had significantly fewer peripheral blood iNKTs and their iNKTs exhibited a greater T(h)2 response to αGal and milk-sphingomyelin than iNKTs of healthy controls. iNKTs from children with FA, especially those with MA, are reduced in number and exhibit a T(h)2 bias in response to αGal and milk-sphingomyelin. These data suggest a potential role for iNKTs in FA. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Active Cells for Multifunctional Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    techniques to explore a variety of cell designs.  Designed a simplified active cell using Nitinol as the actuation method and relying on Joule heating...for contraction of the cell.  Developed manufacturing techniques for reliably creating Nitinol spring coils in a variety of diameters and gauges...design of the active cells to maximum the stroked length of the active cells by tuning the stiffness of a passive spring in parallel with the Nitinol

  8. Accumulation of invariant NKT cells with increased IFN-γ production in persistent high-risk HPV-infected high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Yang, Pei; Zhu, Hongmei; Chen, Xinlian; Xie, Xiaoyan; Yang, Mei; Liu, Shanling; Wang, He

    2015-04-02

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection has been implicated in the development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells produce large amounts of cytokines to regulate immune responses. However, the role of iNKT cells in human persistent HPV-infected cervical tissues is unknown. In our study, 201 patients with diagnoses ranging from normal ectocervical tissue to CINIII from June 2010 to May 2012 were enrolled. HPV DNA and HPV types were detected using the hybrid capture-2 HPV DNA test. Flow cytometry was used to investigate iNKT and CD3+ T cell infiltration into cervical tissues. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to study IFN-γ expression and immunohistochemistry was used to determine CD3+ T cell distribution. A significant increase in iNKT cells was observed in HPV-positive cervical tissues (p < 0.05), especially in CINII-III (p < 0.01). IFN-γ expression was also increased in HPV-positive cervical tissues (p < 0.05). CD3+ T cells were detected among both epithelium and stromal layers in cervical tissues, and the percentage of CD3+ T cells in HPV-positive cervical tissues was similar to that in HPV-negative cervical tissues (p > 0.05). The iNKT cell aggregation in cervical tissues during the progression from HPV infection to CIN indicates that iNKT cells might play an important role in suppressing immunity. IFN-γ expression could also be related to the HPV infection status. Preventing the accumulation or functioning of iNKT cells in cervical tissues may be a viable method to prevent the development of CIN. The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2521874671514142.

  9. Restored Circulating Invariant NKT Cells Are Associated with Viral Control in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaotao; Zhang, Mingxia; Lai, Qintao; Huang, Xuan; Li, Yongyin; Sun, Jian; Abbott, William G.H.; Ma, Shiwu; Hou, Jinlin

    2011-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious diseases. However, their role in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is not fully understood, especially in human species. In this study, 35 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients, 25 inactive carriers (IC) and 36 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled and the proportions of circulating iNKT cells in fresh isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were detected by flow cytometry. A longitudinal analysis was also conducted in 19 CHB patients who received antiviral therapy with telbivudine. Thereafter, the immune functions of iNKT cells were evaluated by cytokine secretion and a two-chamber technique. The median frequency of circulating iNKT cells in CHB patients (0.13%) was lower than that in HC (0.24%, P = 0.01) and IC (0.19%, P = 0.02), and increased significantly during antiviral therapy with telbivudine (P = 0.0176). The expressions of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and CCR6 were dramatically higher on iNKT cells (82.83%±9.87%, 67.67%±16.83% respectively) than on conventional T cells (30.5%±5.65%, 14.02%±5.92%, both P<0.001) in CHB patients. Furthermore, iNKT cells could migrate toward the CC chemokine ligand 5. Patients with a high ratio (≥1.0) of CD4−/CD4+ iNKT cells at baseline had a higher rate (58.33%) of HBeAg seroconversion than those with a low ratio (<1.0, 0%, P = 0.0174). In conclusion, there is a low frequency of peripheral iNKT cells in CHB patients, which increases to normal levels with viral control. The ratio of CD4−/CD4+ iNKT cells at baseline may be a useful predictor for HBeAg seroconversion in CHB patients on telbivudine therapy. PMID:22194934

  10. SAP is required for the development of innate phenotype in H2-M3-restricted CD8+ T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Bediako, Yaw; Bian, Yao; Zhang, Hong; Cho, Hoonsik; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2012-01-01

    H2-M3-restricted T cells have a pre-activated surface phenotype, rapidly expand and produce cytokines upon stimulation and as such, are classified as innate T cells. Unlike most innate T cells, M3-restricted T cells also express CD8αβ co-receptors and a diverse TCR repertoire: hallmarks of conventional MHC Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells. Although iNKT cells are also innate lymphocytes, they are selected exclusively on hematopoietic cells (HC), while M3-restricted T cells can be selected on either hematopoietic or thymic epithelial cells (TEC). Moreover, their phenotypes differ depending on what cells mediate their selection. Though there is a clear correlation between selection on HC and development of innate phenotype, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. SAP is required for the development of iNKT cells and mediates signals from SLAM receptors that are exclusively expressed on HC. Based on their dual selection pathway, M3-restricted T cells present a unique model for studying the development of innate T cell phenotype. Using both polyclonal and transgenic mouse models we demonstrate that while M3-restricted T cells are capable of developing in the absence of SAP, SAP is required for HC-mediated selection, development of pre-activated phenotype and heightened effector functions of M3-restricted T cells. These findings are significant because they directly demonstrate the need for SAP in HC-mediated acquisition of innate T cell phenotype and suggest that due to their SAP-dependent HC-mediated selection, M3-restricted T cells develop a pre-activated phenotype and an intrinsic ability to proliferate faster upon stimulation, allowing for an important role in the early response to infection. PMID:23041566

  11. Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Are Pathogenic in the HLA-DR4-Transgenic Humanized Mouse Model of Toxic Shock Syndrome and Can Be Targeted to Reduce Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Peter A; Rudak, Patrick T; Choi, Joshua; Xu, Stacey X; Schaub, Robert; Singh, Bhagirath; McCormick, John K; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2017-03-01

    During toxic shock syndrome (TSS), bacterial superantigens trigger a polyclonal T -cell response leading to a potentially catastrophic "cytokine storm". Whether innate-like invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, with remarkable immunomodulatory properties, participate in TSS is unclear. Using genetic and cell depletion approaches, we generated iNKT cell-deficient, superantigen-sensitive HLA-DR4-transgenic (DR4tg) mice, which were compared with their iNKT-sufficient counterparts for responsiveness to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Both approaches indicate that iNKT cells are pathogenic in TSS. Importantly, treating DR4tg mice with a TH2-polarizing glycolipid agonist of iNKT cells reduced SEB-inflicted morbidity/mortality. Therefore, iNKT cells may constitute an attractive therapeutic target in superantigen-mediated illnesses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. 504 Participation of Invariant NKT Cells (Vα24Jα18) during Asthma Exacerbation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca Estela; del Río-Chivardí, Jaime Mariano; Morales-Flores, Amelia; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis Antonio; Moreno-Lafont, Martha; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Vaughan-Figueroa, Juan Gilberto; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Background Invariant NKT cells (or type 1 NKT cells) co-express CD3 marker and NK receptors (CD56, CD161) and use a single type of TCRα chain (Vα24Jα18 for humans), comprising CD4-CD8-, CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. Participation of these cells and their cytokines in asthmatic children, in stable conditions and under exacerbation, was studied. Methods Three groups on children (6–12 years old) were selected: 1) asthmatics under exacerbation attack (AE) within the first 24 hours after the attack and before starting any treatment; 2) asthmatics with stable asthma (SA), without symptoms for at least a month before bleeding; and 3) healthy controls (HC) without history of asthma, atopy and with normal lung function were selected in the Allergy and Clinical Immunology Service, Hospital Infantil de Mexico. Invariant NKT cells and subset levels as well as intracellular cytokines were evaluated in whole blood by 4-color flow cytometry (antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD161, Va24, IL-4 and IFN-g). Results Proportion of iNKT cells among total CD3+ cells in HC group was 0.9%, while in SA patients they were increased up to 2.6%; interestingly, during exacerbation such cells were dimished (1.8%). Concerning iNKT CD4+ cells were 0.6% in HC, 1.8% in SA, and 0.7% in AE, while iNKT CD8+ cells were 0.1% in HC, 0.7% in SA, and 0.4% in AE. Both iNKT cell subsets expressed intracellular IFN-g and IL-4 cytokines in AE, SA and HC but predominantly IFN-g in iNKT CD8+ cells from AE patients. Conclusions iNKT cells participation in asthma pathogenesis was confirmed. Increase of IFN-g production in patients with exacerbations, may provide a regulatory environment to stabilize the condition.

  13. The Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein gp150 Forms an Immune-Evasive Glycan Shield at the Surface of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Anna M.; Oosenbrug, Timo; Lindenbergh, Marthe F. S.; Büll, Christian; Comvalius, Anouskha; Dickson, Kathryn J. I.; Wiegant, Joop; Vrolijk, Hans; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wolterbeek, Ron; Adema, Gosse J.; Griffioen, Marieke; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Tscharke, David C.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.; Ressing, Maaike E.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a key role in host control of viral infection. This is exemplified by life-threatening reactivations of e.g. herpesviruses in individuals with impaired T-cell and/or iNKT cell responses. To allow lifelong persistence and virus production in the face of primed immunity, herpesviruses exploit immune evasion strategies. These include a reduction in viral antigen expression during latency and a number of escape mechanisms that target antigen presentation pathways. Given the plethora of foreign antigens expressed in virus-producing cells, herpesviruses are conceivably most vulnerable to elimination by cell-mediated immunity during the replicative phase of infection. Here, we show that a prototypic herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), encodes a novel, broadly acting immunoevasin, gp150, that is expressed during the late phase of viral replication. In particular, EBV gp150 inhibits antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and the non-classical, lipid-presenting CD1d molecules. The mechanism of gp150-mediated T-cell escape does not depend on degradation of the antigen-presenting molecules nor does it require gp150’s cytoplasmic tail. Through its abundant glycosylation, gp150 creates a shield that impedes surface presentation of antigen. This is an unprecedented immune evasion mechanism for herpesviruses. In view of its likely broader target range, gp150 could additionally have an impact beyond escape of T cell activation. Importantly, B cells infected with a gp150-null mutant EBV displayed rescued levels of surface antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and CD1d, supporting an important role for iNKT cells next to classical T cells in fighting EBV infection. At the same time, our results indicate that EBV gp150 prolongs the timespan for producing viral offspring at the most vulnerable stage of the viral life cycle. PMID:27077376

  14. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  15. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  16. Salivary Gland NK Cells Are Phenotypically and Functionally Unique

    PubMed Central

    Brossay, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+ T cells play vital roles in containing and eliminating systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV). However, CMV has a tropism for the salivary gland acinar epithelial cells and persists in this organ for several weeks after primary infection. Here we characterize a distinct NK cell population that resides in the salivary gland, uncommon to any described to date, expressing both mature and immature NK cell markers. Using RORγt reporter mice and nude mice, we also show that the salivary gland NK cells are not lymphoid tissue inducer NK-like cells and are not thymic derived. During the course of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, we found that salivary gland NK cells detect the infection and acquire activation markers, but have limited capacity to produce IFN-γ and degranulate. Salivary gland NK cell effector functions are not regulated by iNKT or Treg cells, which are mostly absent in the salivary gland. Additionally, we demonstrate that peripheral NK cells are not recruited to this organ even after the systemic infection has been controlled. Altogether, these results indicate that viral persistence and latency in the salivary glands may be due in part to the presence of unfit NK cells and the lack of recruitment of peripheral NK cells. PMID:21249177

  17. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  18. Mechanisms of Invariant Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Immunoregulation in Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    by mesenchymal stem cells . Intriguingly, the increased metastatic ability was dependent on the production of CCL5 by mesenchymal stem cells , which...Tubo, R., &Weinberg, R.A.(2007) Mesenchymal stem cells within tumour stroma promote breast cancer metastasis. Nature. Vol. 449:pp557-563. Breast...can induce preferential secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines ; 2) iNKT cells inhibit effector T cell priming by killing dendritic cells that

  19. CRISPR-Mediated Triple Knockout of SLAMF1, SLAMF5 and SLAMF6 Supports Positive Signaling Roles in NKT Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bonnie; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Preite, Silvia; Garrett, Lisa J; Harper, Ursula L; Schwartzberg, Pamela L

    2016-01-01

    The SLAM family receptors contribute to diverse aspects of lymphocyte biology and signal via the small adaptor molecule SAP. Mutations affecting SAP lead to X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome Type 1, a severe immunodysregulation characterized by fulminant mononucleosis, dysgammaglobulinemia, and lymphoproliferation/lymphomas. Patients and mice having mutations affecting SAP also lack germinal centers due to a defect in T:B cell interactions and are devoid of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. However, which and how SLAM family members contribute to these phenotypes remains uncertain. Three SLAM family members: SLAMF1, SLAMF5 and SLAMF6, are highly expressed on T follicular helper cells and germinal center B cells. SLAMF1 and SLAMF6 are also implicated in iNKT development. Although individual receptor knockout mice have limited iNKT and germinal center phenotypes compared to SAP knockout mice, the generation of multi-receptor knockout mice has been challenging, due to the genomic linkage of the genes encoding SLAM family members. Here, we used Cas9/CRISPR-based mutagenesis to generate mutations simultaneously in Slamf1, Slamf5 and Slamf6. Genetic disruption of all three receptors in triple-knockout mice (TKO) did not grossly affect conventional T or B cell development and led to mild defects in germinal center formation post-immunization. However, the TKO worsened defects in iNKT cells development seen in SLAMF6 single gene-targeted mice, supporting data on positive signaling and potential redundancy between these receptors.

  20. The hydroxyflavone, fisetin, suppresses mast cell activation induced by interaction with activated T cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, K; Takahashi, Y; Mikami, I; Fukusima, T; Oike, H; Kobori, M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cell-to-cell interactions between mast cells and activated T cells are increasingly recognized as a possible mechanism in the aetiology of allergic or non-allergic inflammatory disorders. To determine the anti-allergic effect of fisetin, we examined the ability of fisetin to suppress activation of the human mast cell line, HMC-1, induced by activated Jurkat T cell membranes. Experimental approach: HMC-1 cells were incubated with or without fisetin for 15 min and then co-cultured with Jurkat T cell membranes activated by phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate for 16 h. We determined gene expression in activated HMC-1 cells by DNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis. We also examined activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and MAP kinases (MAPKs) in activated HMC-1 cells. Key results: Fisetin suppresses cell spreading and gene expression in HMC-1 cells stimulated by activated T cell membranes. Additionally, we show that these stimulated HMC-1 cells expressed granzyme B. The stimulatory interaction also induced activation of NF-κB and MAPKs; these activations were suppressed by fisetin. Fisetin also reduced the amount of cell surface antigen CD40 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on activated HMC-1 cells. Conclusions and implications: Fisetin suppressed activation of HMC-1 cells by activated T cell membranes by interfering with cell-to-cell interaction and inhibiting the activity of NF-κB and MAPKs and thereby suppressing gene expression. Fisetin may protect against the progression of inflammatory diseases by limiting interactions between mast cells and activated T cells. PMID:19702784

  1. Mast cell activators as novel immune regulators.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Weaver, Brandi; Choi, Hae Woong; Abraham, Soman N; Staats, Herman F

    2018-05-26

    Mast cells are an important cell type of the innate immune system that when activated, play a crucial role in generating protective innate host responses after bacterial and viral infection. Additionally, activated mast cells influence lymph node composition to regulate the induction of adaptive immune responses. The recognition that mast cells play a beneficial role in host responses to microbial infection and induction of adaptive immunity has provided the rationale to evaluate mast cell activators for use as antimicrobials or vaccine adjuvants. This review summarizes the role of mast cell activators in antimicrobial responses while also discussing the use of different classes of mast cell activators as potent vaccine adjuvants that enhance the induction of protective immune responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Studies on actively allergized cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anne B.; Kent, S. P.; Millar, Rose-Mary; McConnell, I.; Coombs, R. R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A proportion of the plasma cells in lymph nodes of allergized guinea-pigs and mice were found to possess membrane-bound receptors for antigen when tested for rosette-formation at 4° by the suspension-centrifugation technique. This was shown by staining rosetted cells with pyronin-methyl green. Rosette-forming cells of the guinea-pig were further examined by staining with fluorescein-conjugated antigen (rabbit Fab′) and by electron microscopy. By these techniques it was found that many plasma cells which contain antigen-specific intracellular antibodies do not form rosettes, and that cells of the plasmacytic series represented in the rosetted population are limited to plasmablasts and immature plasma cells. The lack of rosette-forming mature plasma cells suggests that a loss of receptors from the cell-membrane occurs as an accompaniment to maturation. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 4 PMID:4717940

  3. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. AHR-Enhancing γδ T Cells Develop in Normal Untreated Mice and Fail to Produce IL-4/13, Unlike TH2 Cells and NKT Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Niyun; Roark, Christina L.; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Taube, Christian; Aydintug, M. Kemal; Wands, JM; Huang, Yafei; Hahn, Youn-Soo; Gelfand, Erwin W.; O’Brien, Rebecca L.; Born, Willi K.

    2008-01-01

    Allergic airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice, mediated by allergen-specific Th2 cells and Th2-like iNKT cells, develops under the influence of enhancing and inhibitory γδ T cells. The AHR-enhancing cells belong to the Vγ1+ γδ T cell subset, cells that are capable of increasing IL-5 and IL-13 levels in the airways in a manner like Th2 cells. They also synergize with iNKT cells in mediating AHR. However, unlike Th2 cells, the AHR-enhancers arise in untreated mice, and we show here that they exhibit their functional bias already as thymocytes, at an HSAhi maturational stage. In further contrast to Th2 cells and also unlike iNKT cells, they could not be stimulated to produce IL-4 and IL-13, consistent with their synergistic dependence on iNKT cells in mediating AHR. Mice deficient in IFN-γ, TNFRp75 or IL-4 did not produce these AHR-enhancing γδ T cells, but in the absence of IFN-γ, their spontaneous development was restored by adoptive transfer of IFN-γ competent dendritic cells from untreated donors. Intra-peritoneal injection of OVA/alum restored development of the AHR-enhancers in all of the mutant strains, indicating that the enhancers still can be induced when they fail to develop spontaneously, and that they themselves need not express TNFRp75, IFN-γ or IL-4 in order to exert their function. We conclude that both the development and the cytokine potential of the AHR-enhancing γδ T cells differs critically from that of Th2 cells and NKT cells, despite similar influences of these cell populations on AHR. PMID:19201853

  5. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  6. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Role of interleukin (IL)-17 and T-helper (Th)17 cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Yang, Jian Ming

    2017-11-04

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17), a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine, is reported to be significantly generated by a distinct subset of CD4 + T-cells, upgrading cancer-elicited inflammation and preventing cancer cells from immune surveillance. T-helper (Th)17 cells produced from naive CD4 + T cells have recently been renowned and generally accepted, gaining eminence in cancer studies and playing the effective role in context of cancer. Th17 cells are the main source of IL-17-secreting cells, It was found that other cell types produced this cytokine as well, including Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), δγT cells, invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, lymphoid-tissue inducer (LTi)-like cells and Natural killer (NK) cells. Th17-associated cytokines give impetus to tumor progression, or inducing angiogenesis and metastasis. This review demonstrates an understanding on how the pro- or antitumor function of Th17 cells and IL-17 may change cancer progression, leading to the appearance of complex and pivotal biologic activities in tumor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stem cell mobilization with G-CSF analogs: a rational approach to separate GVHD and GVL?

    PubMed

    Morris, Edward S; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2006-05-01

    The separation of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) remains the "holy grail" of allogeneic stem cell transplantation, and improvements are urgently needed to allow more effective therapy of malignant disease. The use of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood as a clinical stem cell source is associated with enhanced GVL effects without amplification of significant acute GVHD. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that G-CSF modulates donor T cell function before transplantation, promoting T(H)2 differentiation and regulatory T cell function. In addition, the expansion of immature antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) favors the maintenance of this pattern of T cell differentiation after transplantation. Although these patterns of T cell differentiation attenuate acute GVHD, they do not have an impact on the cytolytic pathways of the CD8(+) T cells that are critical for effective GVL. Recently, it has been demonstrated that modification of G-CSF, either by pegylation of the native cytokine or conjugation to Flt-3L, results in the expansion and activation of donor iNKT cells, which significantly augment CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity and GVL effects after transplantation. Given that these cytokines also enhance the expansion of regulatory T cells and APCs, they further separate GVHD and GVL, offering potential clinical advantages for the transplant recipient.

  9. Force Dynamics During T Cell Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, David A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    T cell activation is an essential step in the adaptive immune response. The binding of the T cell receptor (TCR) with antigen triggers signaling cascades and cell spreading. Physical forces exerted on the TCR by the cytoskeleton have been shown to induce signaling events. While cellular forces are known to depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton, the biophysical mechanisms underlying force induced activation of TCR-antigen interactions unknown. Here, we use traction force microscopy to measure the force dynamics of activated Jurkat T cells. The movements of beads embedded in an elastic gel serve as a non-invasive reporter of cytoskeletal and molecular motor dynamics. We examined the statistical structure of the force profiles throughout the cell during signaling activation. We found two spatially distinct active regimes of force generation characterized by different time scales. Typically, the interior of the cells was found to be more active than the periphery. Inhibition of myosin motor activity altered the correlation time of the bead displacements indicating additional sources of stochastic force generation. Our results indicate a complex interaction between myosin activity and actin polymerization dynamics in producing cellular forces in immune cells.

  10. Active lithium chloride cell for spacecraft power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischmann, C. W.; Horning, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An active thionyl chloride high rate battery is under development for spacecraft operations. It is a 540kC (150 Ah) battery capable of pulses up to 75A. This paper describes the design and initial test data on a 'state-of-the-art' cell that has been selected to be the baseline for the prototype cell for that battery. Initial data indicate that the specification can be met with fresh cells. Data for stored cells and additional environmental test data are in the process of being developed.

  11. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  12. Pro-Inflammatory Activated Kupffer Cells by Lipids Induce Hepatic NKT Cells Deficiency through Activation-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tongfang; Sui, Yongheng; Lian, Min; Li, Zhiping; Hua, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary lipids play an important role in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) through alternation of liver innate immune response. Aims The present study was to investigate the effect of lipid on Kupffer cells phenotype and function in vivo and in vitro. And further to investigate the impact of lipid on ability of Kupffer cell lipid antigen presentation to activate NKT cells. Methods Wild type male C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal or high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis, Kupffer cell abundance, NKT cell number and cytokine gene expression were evaluated. Antigen presentation assay was performed with Kupffer cells treated with certain fatty acids in vitro and co-cultured with NKT cells. Results High-fat diet induced hepatosteatosis, significantly increased Kupffer cells and decreased hepatic NKT cells. Lipid treatment in vivo or in vitro induced increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines gene expression and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells expressed high levels of CD1d on cell surface and only presented exogenous lipid antigen to activate NKT cells. Ability of Kupffer cells to present antigen and activate NKT cells was enhanced after lipid treatment. In addition, pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipid treatment induced hepatic NKT cells activation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Conclusion High-fat diet increase Kupffer cells number and induce their pro-inflammatory status. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupfffer cells by lipid promote hepatic NKT cell over-activation and cell death, which lead to further hepatic NKT cell deficiency in the development of NAFLD. PMID:24312613

  13. Recombinant ArtinM activates mast cells.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria Cintra; Cecilio, Nerry Tatiana; de Almeida Buranello, Patricia Andressa; Pranchevicius, Maria Cristina; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2016-07-04

    Mast cells are hematopoietically derived cells that play a role in inflammatory processes such as allergy, as well as in the immune response against pathogens by the selective and rapid release of preformed and lipid mediators, and the delayed release of cytokines. The native homotetrameric lectin ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin purified from Artocarpus heterophyllus seeds, is one of several lectins that are able to activate mast cells. Besides activating mast cells, ArtinM has been shown to affect several biological responses, including immunomodulation and acceleration of wound healing. Because of the potential pharmacological application of ArtinM, a recombinant ArtinM (rArtinM) was produced in Escherichia coli. The current study evaluated the ability of rArtinM to induce mast cell degranulation and activation. The glycan binding specificity of rArtinM was similar to that of jArtinM. rArtinM, via its CRD, was able to degranulate, releasing β-hexosaminidase and TNF-α, and to promote morphological changes on the mast cell surface. Moreover, rArtinM induced the release of the newly-synthesized mediator, IL-4. rArtinM does not have a co-stimulatory effect on the FcεRI degranulation via. The IgE-dependent mast cell activation triggered by rArtinM seems to be dependent on NFkB activation. The lectin rArtinM has the ability to activate and degranulate mast cells via their CRDs. The present study indicates that rArtinM is a suitable substitute for the native form, jArtinM, and that rArtinM may serve as an important and reliable pharmacological agent.

  14. Lactate dehydrogenase activity drives hair follicle stem cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Aimee, Flores; John, Schell; Abby, Krall; David, Jelinek; Matilde, Miranda; Melina, Grigorian; Daniel, Braas; White Andrew, C; Jessica, Zhou; Nick, Graham; Thomas, Graeber; Pankaj, Seth; Denis, Evseenko; Hilary, Coller; Jared, Rutter; Heather, Christofk; Lowry William, E

    2017-01-01

    Summary While normally dormant, Hair Follicle Stem Cells (HFSCs) quickly become activated to divide during a new hair cycle. The quiescence of HFSCs is known to be regulated by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Here we provide several lines of evidence to demonstrate that HFSCs utilize glycolytic metabolism and produce significantly more lactate than other cells in the epidermis. Furthermore, lactate generation appears to be critical for the activation of HFSCs as deletion of lactate dehydrogenase (Ldha) prevented their activation. Conversely, genetically promoting lactate production in HFSCs through mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (Mpc1) deletion accelerated their activation and the hair cycle. Finally, we identify small molecules that increase lactate production by stimulating Myc levels or inhibiting Mpc1 carrier activity and can topically induce the hair cycle. These data suggest that HFSCs maintain a metabolic state that allow them to remain dormant and yet quickly respond to appropriate proliferative stimuli. PMID:28812580

  15. Modulation of T Cell Activation by Malignant Melanoma Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Schütte, Ute; Frank, Natasha Y.; Zhan, Qian; Hoerning, André; Robles, Susanne C.; Zhou, Jun; Hodi, F. Stephen; Spagnoli, Giulio C.; Murphy, George F.; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Highly immunogenic cancers such as malignant melanoma are capable of inexorable tumor growth despite the presence of antitumor immunity. This raises the possibility that only a restricted minority of tumorigenic malignant cells might possess the phenotypic and functional characteristics to modulate tumor-directed immune activation. Here we provide evidence supporting this hypothesis, by demonstrating that tumorigenic ABCB5+ malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs) possess the capacity to preferentially inhibit interleukin (IL)-2-dependent T cell activation and to support, in a B7.2-dependent manner, regulatory T (Treg) cell induction. Compared to melanoma bulk populations, ABCB5+ MMICs expressed lower levels of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, showed aberrant positivity for MHC class II, and exhibited lower expression levels of the melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs) MART-1, ML-IAP, NY-ESO-1, and MAGE-A. In addition, tumorigenic ABCB5+ subpopulations preferentially expressed the costimulatory molecules B7.2 and PD-1 in both established melanoma xenografts and clinical tumor specimens in vivo. In immune activation assays, ABCB5+ melanoma cells inhibited mitogen-dependent human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation and IL-2 production more efficiently than ABCB5− populations. Moreover, coculture with ABCB5+ MMICs increased, in a B7.2 signalling-dependent manner, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cell abundance and IL-10 production by mitogen-activated PBMCs. Consistent with these findings, ABCB5+ melanoma subsets also preferentially inhibited IL-2 production and induced IL-10 secretion by cocultured patient-derived, syngeneic PBMCs. Our findings identify novel T cell-modulatory functions of ABCB5+ melanoma subpopulations and suggest specific roles for MMICs in the evasion of antitumor immunity and in cancer immunotherapeutic resistance. PMID:20068175

  16. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  17. RNase activity in erythroid cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Burka, E R

    1969-09-01

    The characteristics of degradation of reticulocyte ribonucleic acid (RNA) and ribosomes were studied in a whole erythroid cell lysate system. The process followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and indicated that RNA degradation in the erythroid cell is mediated by an enzyme previously isolated from reticulocyte hemolysates. Erythroid cell RNase activity had a temperature optimum of 50 degrees C, a pH optimum of 7.0, was not energy dependent, was heat labile at physiologic pH, and was inhibited by Mg(++), Ca(++), and exposure to bentonite and deoxycholate. Free sulfhydryl groups were not essential for RNase activity. Of the substrates occurring naturally within the erythroid cell, isolated ribosomal RNA was most susceptible to the action of the enzyme, intact ribosomes least susceptible, and transfer RNA intermediate between them. Natural substrates were degraded completely to nucleotides in cell lysates. Competitive inhibition studies indicate that one enzyme system is capable of degrading both RNA and ribosomes, although the existence of more than one enzyme has not been excluded. Erythroid cell lysates quickly broke down polyribosomes into single ribosomes. The more rapid degradation of ribosomes, as compared with transfer RNA, which occurs in vivo, as opposed to findings in vitro, suggests that there is a special intracellular mechanism responsible for ribosome degradation in the maturing erythroid cell.

  18. Mechanisms of Invariant Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Immunoregulation in Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    iNKTcells play a major role in regulating the response to treatment with local radiotherapy and CTLA-4 blockade. Preclinical models and clinical trials...and cure rate following treatment with radiotherapy and CTLA-4 blockade, suggesting that iNKT cells can play a major role in regulating the response...represent a small population of cells, their role in shaping the ensuing adaptive response puts them at a critical bridge between the innate and

  19. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  20. Early T-cell activation biophysics

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Nelly; Hivroz, Claire

    2009-01-01

    The T-cell is one of the main players in the mammalian immune response. It ensures antigen recognition at the surface of antigen-presenting cells in a complex and highly sensitive and specific process, in which the encounter of the T-cell receptor with the agonist peptide associated with the major histocompatibility complex triggers T-cell activation. While signaling pathways have been elucidated in increasing detail, the mechanism of TCR triggering remains highly controversial despite active research published in the past 10 years. In this paper, we present a short overview of pending questions on critical initial events associated with T-cell triggering. In particular, we examine biophysical approaches already in use, as well as future directions. We suggest that the most recent advances in fluorescence super-resolution imaging, coupled with the new classes of genetic fluorescent probes, will play an important role in elucidation of the T-cell triggering mechanism. Beyond this aspect, we predict that exploration of mechanical cues in the triggering process will provide new clues leading to clarification of the entire mechanism. PMID:20514131

  1. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV ) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.

  2. Selforganization of modular activity of grid cells

    PubMed Central

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Si, Bailu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A unique topographical representation of space is found in the concerted activity of grid cells in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex. Many among the principal cells in this region exhibit a hexagonal firing pattern, in which each cell expresses its own set of place fields (spatial phases) at the vertices of a triangular grid, the spacing and orientation of which are typically shared with neighboring cells. Grid spacing, in particular, has been found to increase along the dorso‐ventral axis of the entorhinal cortex but in discrete steps, that is, with a modular structure. In this study, we show that such a modular activity may result from the self‐organization of interacting units, which individually would not show discrete but rather continuously varying grid spacing. Within our “adaptation” network model, the effect of a continuously varying time constant, which determines grid spacing in the isolated cell model, is modulated by recurrent collateral connections, which tend to produce a few subnetworks, akin to magnetic domains, each with its own grid spacing. In agreement with experimental evidence, the modular structure is tightly defined by grid spacing, but also involves grid orientation and distortion, due to interactions across modules. Thus, our study sheds light onto a possible mechanism, other than simply assuming separate networks a priori, underlying the formation of modular grid representations. PMID:28768062

  3. T cell immunoregulation in active ocular toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Cynthia A; Vieira, Erica L M; Castro, Vinicius M; Dutra, Walderez O; Costa, Rogerio A; Orefice, Juliana L; Campos, Wesley R; Orefice, Fernando; Young, Lucy H; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2017-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is an important cause of infectious ocular disease. The physiopathology of retinochoroidal lesions associated with this infection is not completely understood. The present study was undertaken to investigate cytokine production by T cells from individuals with active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis (TR) comparing with controls. Eighteen patients with active TR and 15 healthy controls (6 controls IgG + to Toxoplasma and 9 negative controls) were included in the study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were incubated in the presence or absence of T. gondii antigen (STAg), and stained against CD4, CD8, TNF, IL-10 and IFN-γ. Baseline expression of cytokines was higher in TR/IgG + patients in comparison with controls. Cytokine expression was not increased by STAg in vitro stimulation in controls. After stimulation, TR/IgG + patients' lymphocytes increased cytokine as compared to cultures from both controls. While T cells were the main source of IL-10, but also IFN-γ and TNF, other lymphocyte populations were relevant source of inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, it was observed a negative correlation between ocular lesion size and IL-10 expression by CD4 + lymphocytes. This study showed that T cells are the main lymphocyte populations expressing IL-10 in patients with TR. Moreover, expression of IL-10 plays a protective role in active TR. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  5. Saposins modulate human invariant Natural Killer T cells self-reactivity and facilitate lipid exchange with CD1d molecules during antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Ghadbane, Hemza; Dushek, Omer; Shepherd, Dawn; Cypen, Jeremy; Gileadi, Uzi; Aichinger, Michael C.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Qi, Xiaoyang; van der Merwe, P. Anton; Wojno, Justyna; Veerapen, Natacha; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Yuan, Weiming; Cresswell, Peter; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins, such as molecules of the saposin family, facilitate extraction of lipids from biological membranes for their loading onto CD1d molecules. Although it has been shown that prosaposin-deficient mice fail to positively select invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, it remains unclear whether saposins can facilitate loading of endogenous iNKT cell agonists in the periphery during inflammatory responses. In addition, it is unclear whether saposins, in addition to loading, also promote dissociation of lipids bound to CD1d molecules. To address these questions, we used a combination of cellular assays and demonstrated that saposins influence CD1d-restricted presentation to human iNKT cells not only of exogenous lipids but also of endogenous ligands, such as the self-glycosphingolipid β-glucopyranosylceramide, up-regulated by antigen-presenting cells following bacterial infection. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in human myeloid cells CD1d-loading of endogenous lipids after bacterial infection, but not at steady state, requires trafficking of CD1d molecules through an endo-lysosomal compartment. Finally, using BIAcore assays we demonstrated that lipid-loaded saposin B increases the off-rate of lipids bound to CD1d molecules, providing important insights into the mechanisms by which it acts as a “lipid editor,” capable of fine-tuning loading and unloading of CD1d molecules. These results have important implications in understanding how to optimize lipid-loading onto antigen-presenting cells, to better harness iNKT cells central role at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:24248359

  6. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  7. [Development, physiology, and cell activity of bone].

    PubMed

    de Baat, P; Heijboer, M P; de Baat, C

    2005-07-01

    Bones are of crucial importance for the human body, providing skeletal support, serving as a home for the formation of haematopoietic cells, and reservoiring calcium and phosphate. Long bones develop by endochondral ossification. Flat bones develop by intramembranous ossification. Bone tissue contains hydroxyapatite and various extracellular proteins, producing bone matrix. Two biological mechanisms, determining the strength of bone, are modelling and remodelling. Modelling can change bone shape and size through bone formation by osteoblasts at some sites and through bone destruction by osteoclasts at other sites. Remodelling is bone turnover, also performed by osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The processes of modelling and remodelling are induced by mechanical loads, predominantly muscle loads. Osteoblasts develop from mesenchymal stem cells. Many stimulating factors are known to activate the differentiation. Mature osteoblasts synthesize bone matrix and may further differentiate into osteocytes. Osteocytes maintain structural bone integrity and allow bone to adapt to any mechanical and chemical stimulus. Osteoclasts derive from haematopoietic stem cells. A number of transcription and growth factors have been identified essential for osteoclast differentiation and function. Finally, there is a complex interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Bone destruction starts by attachment of osteoclasts to the bone surface. Following this, osteoclasts undergo specific morphological changes. The process of bone destruction starts by acid dissolution of hydroxyapatite. After that osteoclasts start to destruct the organic matrix.

  8. Characterization of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Self, Sally; Menk, Jeremiah; Lazarchick, John

    2017-03-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), a recently recognized nonneoplastic mast cell disease driving chronic multisystem inflammation and allergy, appears prevalent and thus important. We report the first systematic characterization of a large MCAS population. Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, family histories, physical examination and laboratory findings were reviewed in 298 retrospective and 115 prospective patients with MCAS. Blood samples from prospective subjects were examined by flow cytometry for clonal mast cell disease and tested for cytokines potentially driving the monocytosis frequent in MCAS. Demographically, white females dominated. Median ages at symptom onset and diagnosis were 9 and 49 years, respectively (range: 0-88 and 16-92, respectively) and median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 30 years (range: 1-85). Median numbers of comorbidities, symptoms, and family medical issues were 11, 20, and 4, respectively (range: 1-66, 2-84, and 0-33, respectively). Gastroesophageal reflux, fatigue and dermatographism were the most common comorbidity, symptom and examination finding. Abnormalities in routine laboratories were common and diverse but typically modest. The most useful diagnostic markers were heparin, prostaglandin D 2 , histamine and chromogranin A. Flow cytometric and cytokine assessments were unhelpful. Our study highlights MCAS׳s morbidity burden and challenging heterogeneity. Recognition is important given good survival and treatment prospects. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exosomes derived from pancreatic cancer cells induce activation and profibrogenic activities in pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Masamune, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamada, Shin; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Nabeshima, Tatsuhide; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) interact with pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), which play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrogenesis, to develop the cancer-conditioned tumor microenvironment. Exosomes are membrane-enclosed nanovesicles, and have been increasingly recognized as important mediators of cell-to-cell communications. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of PCC-derived exosomes on cell functions in PSCs. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned medium of Panc-1 and SUIT-2 PCCs. Human primary PSCs were treated with PCC-derived exosomes. PCC-derived exosomes stimulated the proliferation, migration, activation of ERK and Akt, the mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (ACTA2) and fibrosis-related genes, and procollagen type I C-peptide production in PSCs. Ingenuity pathway analysis of the microarray data identified transforming growth factor β1 and tumor necrosis factor as top upstream regulators. PCCs increased the expression of miR-1246 and miR-1290, abundantly contained in PCC-derived exosomes, in PSCs. Overexpression of miR-1290 induced the expression of ACTA2 and fibrosis-related genes in PSCs. In conclusion, PCC-derived exosomes stimulate activation and profibrogenic activities in PSCs. Exosome-mediated interactions between PSCs and PCCs might play a role in the development of the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential activation of human T cells to allogeneic endothelial cells, epithelial cells and fibroblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the direct pathway, T cells recognize intact donor major histocompatability complexes and allogeneic peptide on the surface of donor antigen presenting cells (APCs). Indirect allorecognition results from the recognition of processed alloantigen by self MHC complexes on self APCs. In this study, we wished to evaluate the relative contribution of different intragraft cells to the alloactivation of nave and memory T cells though the direct and the indirect pathway of allorecognition. Methods The processing of membrane fragments from IFN-treated single donor endothelial cells (EC), fibroblasts or renal epithelial cells (RPTEC) was evaluated by DiOC labeling of each cell type and flow cytometry following interaction with PBMC. Direct pathway activation of nave CD45RA+ or memory CD45RO+ CD4+ T cells was evaluated following coculture with IFN-treated and MHC class II-expressing EC, fibroblasts or RPTEC. Indirect pathway activation was assessed using CD45RA+ or CD45RO+ CD4+ T cells cocultured with autologous irradiated APCs in the absence or presence of sonicates derived from IFN-treated allogeneic EC, fibroblasts or RPTEC. Activation of T cells was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation and by ELISpot assays. Results We find that CD14+ APCs readily acquire membrane fragments from fibroblasts and RPTEC, but fail to acquire membrane fragments from intact EC. However, APCs process membranes from EC undergoing apoptosis.There was a notable direct pathway alloproliferative response of CD45RO+ CD4+ T cells to IFN-treated EC, but not to fibroblasts or RPTEC. Also, there was a minimal direct pathway response of CD45RA+ CD4+ T cells to all cell types. In contrast, we found that both CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ CD4+ T cells proliferated following coculture with autologous APCs in the presence of sonicates derived from IFN-treated EC, fibroblasts or RPTEC. By ELISpot, we found that these T cells stimulated via the indirect pathway also produced the cytokines IFN, IL-2, IL-4

  11. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell Activation Following Cutaneous Burn in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    satellite cell activation and survival during oxidative stress. J Muscle Res Cell Motil 2011;32(2):99–109. [33] Rathbone CR, Booth FW, Lees SJ. Sirt1 ...Skeletal muscle satellite cell activation following cutaneous burn in rats Xiaowu Wu*, Thomas J. Walters, Christopher R. Rathbone Extremity Trauma...f o Article history: Accepted 15 October 2012 Keywords: Muscle precursor cell Thermal injury Atrophy Skeletal muscle Activation a b s t r a c t

  12. Decreased natural killer cell activity in atopic eczema.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, T J; Rycroft, R; Brostoff, J

    1985-01-01

    We have studied NK cell activity in atopic and non-atopic subjects using a standard 51Cr-release assay and K562 target cells. In atopics (AT) with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma, NK cell activity was similar to that in non-atopic (N) subjects, whilst patients with severe atopic eczema (AE) had depressed NK cell activity compared to AT or N subjects. In addition, circulating T-cell numbers and Con A responsiveness was decreased in AE, although neither parameter was correlated with decreased NK cell activity. However, decreased NK cell activity in atopic eczema was positively correlated with decreased numbers of Fc gamma + lymphocytes (P = 0.01) and decreased effector: target cell binding (P = 0.05), and negatively correlated with increased monocytes in AE (P = 0.09). AE NK cell activity was equally or more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of drugs such as dibutyryl cyclic AMP, prostaglandins (PG) D2,E2 and histamine. The relative percentage increase in NK cell activity by the interferon inducer poly I:C was similar in AE patients and controls. The results suggest that reduced numbers of circulating NK cells and pre-NK cells account for the depressed level of NK cell activity in subjects with severe atopic eczema. PMID:3876984

  13. Mesenchymal stromal cell-derived extracellular vesicles attenuate lung ischemia-reperfusion injury and enhance reconditioning of donor lungs after circulatory death.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew L; Zhao, Yunge; Robert Smith, J; Weiss, Mark L; Kron, Irving L; Laubach, Victor E; Sharma, Ashish K

    2017-12-21

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury after transplantation as well as acute shortage of suitable donor lungs are two critical issues impacting lung transplant patients. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory role of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) to attenuate lung IR injury and improve of ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP)-mediated rehabilitation in donation after circulatory death (DCD) lungs. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice underwent sham surgery or lung IR using an in vivo hilar-ligation model with or without MSCs or EVs. In vitro studies used primary iNKT cells and macrophages (MH-S cells) were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation with/without co-cultures with MSCs or EVs. Also, separate groups of WT mice underwent euthanasia and 1 h of warm ischemia and stored at 4 °C for 1 h followed by 1 h of normothermic EVLP using Steen solution or Steen solution containing MSCs or EVs. Lungs from MSCs or EV-treated mice had significant attenuation of lung dysfunction and injury (decreased edema, neutrophil infiltration and myeloperoxidase levels) compared to IR alone. A significant decrease in proinflammatory cytokines (IL-17, TNF-α, CXCL1 and HMGB1) and upregulation of keratinocyte growth factor, prostaglandin E2 and IL-10 occurred in the BAL fluid from MSC or EV-treated mice after IR compared to IR alone. Furthermore, MSCs or EVs significantly downregulated iNKT cell-produced IL-17 and macrophage-produced HMGB1 and TNF-α after hypoxia/reoxygenation. Finally, EVLP of DCD lungs with Steen solution including MSCs or EVs provided significantly enhanced protection versus Steen solution alone. Co-cultures of MSCs or EVs with lung endothelial cells prevents neutrophil transendothelial migration after exposure to hypoxia/reoxygenation and TNF-α/HMGB1 cytomix. These results suggest that MSC-derived EVs can attenuate lung inflammation and injury after IR as well as enhance EVLP-mediated reconditioning of

  14. Characterization of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Afrin, Lawrence B.; Self, Sally; Menk, Jeremiah; Lazarchick, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), a recently recognized non-neoplastic mast cell (MC) disease driving chronic multisystem inflammation ± allergy, appears prevalent and thus important. We report the first systematic characterization of a large MCAS population. Method Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, family histories, and physical exam and laboratory findings were reviewed in 298 retrospective and 115 prospective MCAS patients. Blood samples from prospective subjects were examined by flow cytometry for clonal MC disease and tested for cytokines potentially driving the monocytosis frequent in MCAS. Results Demographically, white females dominated. Median ages at symptom onset/diagnosis were 9/49 years (ranges 0–88/16–92); median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 30 years (range 1–85). Median numbers of comorbidities/symptoms/family medical issues were 11/20/4 (ranges 1–66/2–84/0–33). Gastroesophageal reflux, fatigue, and dermatographism were the most common comorbidity, symptom, and exam finding. Abnormalities in routine labs were common and diverse but typically modest. The most useful diagnostic markers were heparin, prostaglandin D2, histamine, and chromogranin A. Flow cytometric and cytokine assessments were unhelpful. Conclusions Our study highlights MCAS’s morbidity burden and challenging heterogeneity. Recognition is important given good survival and treatment prospects. PMID:28262205

  15. Phagocytic cell function in active brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ocon, P; Reguera, J M; Morata, P; Juarez, C; Alonso, A; Colmenero, J D

    1994-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed phagocytic cell function in 51 patients with active brucellosis and its relationship with different clinical, serological, and evolutionary variables. A control group was made up of 30 blood donors of similar geographic extraction, age, and sex, with no previous history of brucellosis or known exposure ot the infection or specific antibodies. The investigations were carried out at the time of diagnosis, at the conclusion of treatment, and after 6 months of follow-up. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction in response to Brucella antigen were significantly increased in the patients at the time of diagnosis with respect to the control group. In contrast, chemotaxis in response to Brucella antigen and phagocytosis were significantly reduced in the patients with respect to the control group. The alterations in phagocytic cell function were greater in patients with bacteremia, with focal forms of the disease, or with a longer diagnostic delay. Most of these initial alterations tended to normalize with treatment, indicating their transient character. PMID:8112863

  16. Lifestyles and mental health status are associated with natural killer cell and lymphokine-activated killer cell activities.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K; Takeshita, T; Inoue-Sakurai, C; Maruyama, S

    2001-04-10

    We investigated the association of lifestyle and mental health status with natural killer (NK) cell and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activities in healthy males. NK cell activity was determined in 105 male workers and LAK cell activity was determined in 54 male workers. Peripheral blood was obtained from each subject and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood. These PBMC were used as effector cells. LAK cells were generated by incubation of PBMC with interleukin-2 for 72 h. NK cell activity against NK-sensitive K562 cells and LAK cell activity against NK-resistant Raji cells were examined by 51Cr release assay. Overall lifestyles were evaluated according to the answers on a questionnaire regarding eight health practices (cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, eating breakfast, hours of sleep, hours of work, physical exercise, nutritional balance, mental stress). Subjects with a good overall lifestyle showed significantly higher NK cell (P < 0.05) and LAK cell (P < 0.05) activities than those with a poor overall lifestyles. Among eight lifestyle factors, cigarette smoking has relatively strong effects on NK cell and LAK cell activities. Subjects who complained of unstable mental status had significantly lower NK cell activity than those who reported stable mental status. When subjects were divided into four groups by lifestyle and mental health status, subjects who had poor or moderate lifestyle and reported unstable mental status showed the lowest NK cell activity and subjects who had good lifestyle and reported stable mental status showed the highest NK cell activity among four groups.

  17. Tissue Factor promotes breast cancer stem cell activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Hudhaifah; Harrison, Hannah; Clarke, Robert; Landberg, Goran; Bundred, Nigel J; Versteeg, Henri H; Kirwan, Cliona C

    2017-04-18

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cells that can self-renew and initiate tumours. The clotting-initiating protein Tissue Factor (TF) promotes metastasis and may be overexpressed in cancer cells with increased CSC activity. We sought to determine whether TF promotes breast CSC activity in vitro using human breast cancer cell lines. TF expression was compared in anoikis-resistant (CSC-enriched) and unselected cells. In cells sorted into of TF-expressing and TF-negative (FACS), and in cells transfected to knockdown TF (siRNA) and overexpress TF (cDNA), CSC activity was compared by (i) mammosphere forming efficiency (MFE) (ii) holoclone colony formation (Hc) and (iii) ALDH1 activity. TF expression was increased in anoikis-resistant and high ALDH1-activity T47D cells compared to unselected cells. FACS sorted TF-expressing T47Ds and TF-overexpressing MCF7s had increased CSC activity compared to TF-low cells. TF siRNA cells (MDAMB231,T47D) had reduced CSC activity compared to control cells. FVIIa increased MFE and ALDH1 in a dose-dependent manner (MDAMB231, T47D). The effects of FVIIa on MFE were abrogated by TF siRNA (T47D). Breast CSCs (in vitro) demonstrate increased activity when selected for high TF expression, when induced to overexpress TF, and when stimulated (with FVIIa). Targeting the TF pathway in vivo may abrogate CSC activity.

  18. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  19. NK Cell-derived Exosomes From NK Cells Previously Exposed to Neuroblastoma Cells Augment the Antitumor Activity of Cytokine-activated NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Behfar, Maryam; Mohseni, Rashin; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed A; Asgharzadeh, Shahab

    2017-09-01

    Immune cell-derived exosomes can increase immunity against tumors. In contrast, tumor-derived exosomes can reduce the immunity and can change the tumor microenvironment to further develop and provide metastasis. These effects take place by an alteration in the innate and adaptive immune cell functions. In this experiment, we studied the natural killer (NK) cells' effectiveness on tumor cells after expansion and thereafter incubated it with exosomes. The exosomes were derived from 2 populations of NK cells: (1) naive NK cells and, (2) NK cells previously exposed to neuroblastoma (NB) cells. Moreover, we have studied the NB-derived exosomes on NK cell function. The molecular load of the characterized exosomes (by means of nanoparticle-tracking analysis, flow cytometry, scanning electron microscopy, and western blot) from NK cells exposed to the NB cell revealed their expression of natural killer cell receptors in addition to CD56, NKG2D, and KIR2DL2 receptors. These exosomes were used to treat NK cells and thereafter administered to NB tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed some kind of NK cells' education by the exosomes. This education from NK cells previously exposed to NB cell-derived exosomes caused efficient and greater cytotoxicity against NB tumors, but NB-derived exosomes act as tumor promoters by providing a tumor supporting niche. Hence, this method of preparing the exosomes has a dramatic effect on activation of anti-NK cells against NB cells.

  20. Single cell multiplexed assay for proteolytic activity using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    Cellular enzymes interact in a post-translationally regulated fashion to govern individual cell behaviors, yet current platform technologies are limited in their ability to measure multiple enzyme activities simultaneously in single cells. Here, we developed multi-color Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based enzymatic substrates and use them in a microfluidics platform to simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities from water-in-oil droplets that contain single cells. By integrating the microfluidic platform with a computational analytical method, Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), we are able to infer six different protease activity signals from individual cells in a high throughput manner (~100 cells/experimental run). We characterized protease activity profiles at single cell resolution for several cancer cell lines including breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, lung cancer cell line PC-9, and leukemia cell line K-562 using both live-cell and in-situ cell lysis assay formats, with special focus on metalloproteinases important in metastasis. The ability to measure multiple proteases secreted from or expressed in individual cells allows us to characterize cell heterogeneity and has potential applications including systems biology, pharmacology, cancer diagnosis and stem cell biology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Markers of nonselective and specific NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Leslie A; Sun, Michel M; Geurs, Theresa L; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; French, Anthony R

    2013-06-15

    NK cell activation is controlled by the integration of signals from cytokine receptors and germline-encoded activation and inhibitory receptors. NK cells undergo two distinct phases of activation during murine CMV (MCMV) infection: a nonselective phase mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and a specific phase driven by signaling through Ly49H, an NK cell activation receptor that recognizes infected cells. We sought to delineate cell surface markers that could distinguish NK cells that had been activated nonselectively from those that had been specifically activated through NK cell receptors. We demonstrated that stem cell Ag 1 (Sca-1) is highly upregulated during viral infections (to an even greater extent than CD69) and serves as a novel marker of early, nonselective NK cell activation. Indeed, a greater proportion of Sca-1(+) NK cells produced IFN-γ compared with Sca-1(-) NK cells during MCMV infection. In contrast to the universal upregulation of Sca-1 (as well as KLRG1) on NK cells early during MCMV infection, differential expression of Sca-1, as well as CD27 and KLRG1, was observed on Ly49H(+) and Ly49H(-) NK cells late during MCMV infection. Persistently elevated levels of KLRG1 in the context of downregulation of Sca-1 and CD27 were observed on NK cells that expressed Ly49H. Furthermore, the differential expression patterns of these cell surface markers were dependent on Ly49H recognition of its ligand and did not occur solely as a result of cellular proliferation. These findings demonstrate that a combination of Sca-1, CD27, and KLRG1 can distinguish NK cells nonselectively activated by cytokines from those specifically stimulated through activation receptors.

  2. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  3. Tyrosine kinase Btk is required for NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Zheng, Jian; Han, Chaofeng; Jin, Jing; Han, Huanxing; Liu, Yinping; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-07-06

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is not only critical for B cell development and differentiation but is also involved in the regulation of Toll-like receptor-triggered innate response of macrophages. However, whether Btk is involved in the regulation of natural killer (NK) cell innate function remains unknown. Here, we show that Btk expression is up-regulated during maturation and activation of mouse NK cells. Murine Btk(-/-) NK cells have decreased innate immune responses to the TLR3 ligand, with reduced expressions of IFN-γ, perforin, and granzyme-B and decreased cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, Btk is found to promote TLR3-triggered NK cell activation mainly by activating the NF-κB pathway. Poly(I:C)-induced NK cell-mediated acute hepatitis was observed to be attenuated in Btk(-/-) mice or the mice with in vivo administration of the Btk inhibitor. Correspondingly, liver damage was aggravated in Btk(-/-) mice after the adoptive transfer of Btk(+/+) NK cells, further indicating that Btk-mediated NK cell activation contributes to TLR3-triggered acute liver injury. Importantly, reduced TLR3-triggered activation of human NK cells was observed in Btk-deficient patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia, as evidenced by the reduced IFN-γ, CD69, and CD107a expression and cytotoxic activity. These results indicate that Btk is required for activation of NK cells, thus providing insight into the physiological significance of Btk in the regulation of immune cell functions and innate inflammatory response.

  4. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  5. A Tumor Cell-Selective Inhibitor of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatases Sensitizes Breast Cancer Cells to Lymphokine-Activated Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenmeier, Christof T.; Vollmer, Laura L.; Vernetti, Lawrence A.; Caprio, Lindsay; Davis, Keanu; Korotchenko, Vasiliy N.; Day, Billy W.; Tsang, Michael; Hulkower, Keren I.; Lotze, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Dual specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases [dual specificity phosphatase/MAP kinase phosphatase (DUSP-MKP)] have been hypothesized to maintain cancer cell survival by buffering excessive MAPK signaling caused by upstream activating oncogenic products. A large and diverse body of literature suggests that genetic depletion of DUSP-MKPs can reduce tumorigenicity, suggesting that hyperactivating MAPK signaling by DUSP-MKP inhibitors could be a novel strategy to selectively affect the transformed phenotype. Through in vivo structure-activity relationship studies in transgenic zebrafish we recently identified a hyperactivator of fibroblast growth factor signaling [(E)-2-benzylidene-5-bromo-3-(cyclohexylamino)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-one (BCI-215)] that is devoid of developmental toxicity and restores defective MAPK activity caused by overexpression of DUSP1 and DUSP6 in mammalian cells. Here, we hypothesized that BCI-215 could selectively affect survival of transformed cells. In MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, BCI-215 inhibited cell motility, caused apoptosis but not primary necrosis, and sensitized cells to lymphokine-activated killer cell activity. Mechanistically, BCI-215 induced rapid and sustained phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the absence of reactive oxygen species, and its toxicity was partially rescued by inhibition of p38 but not JNK or ERK. BCI-215 also hyperactivated MKK4/SEK1, suggesting activation of stress responses. Kinase phosphorylation profiling documented BCI-215 selectively activated MAPKs and their downstream substrates, but not receptor tyrosine kinases, SRC family kinases, AKT, mTOR, or DNA damage pathways. Our findings support the hypothesis that BCI-215 causes selective cancer cell cytotoxicity in part through non-redox-mediated activation of MAPK signaling, and the findings also identify an intersection with immune cell killing that is

  6. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  7. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    PubMed

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation.

  8. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states.

  9. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  10. Investigation of Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity in Pig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moncorgé, Olivier; Long, Jason S.; Cauldwell, Anna V.; Zhou, Hongbo; Lycett, Samantha J.

    2013-01-01

    Reassortant influenza viruses with combinations of avian, human, and/or swine genomic segments have been detected frequently in pigs. As a consequence, pigs have been accused of being a “mixing vessel” for influenza viruses. This implies that pig cells support transcription and replication of avian influenza viruses, in contrast to human cells, in which most avian influenza virus polymerases display limited activity. Although influenza virus polymerase activity has been studied in human and avian cells for many years by use of a minigenome assay, similar investigations in pig cells have not been reported. We developed the first minigenome assay for pig cells and compared the activities of polymerases of avian or human influenza virus origin in pig, human, and avian cells. We also investigated in pig cells the consequences of some known mammalian host range determinants that enhance influenza virus polymerase activity in human cells, such as PB2 mutations E627K, D701N, G590S/Q591R, and T271A. The two typical avian influenza virus polymerases used in this study were poorly active in pig cells, similar to what is seen in human cells, and mutations that adapt the avian influenza virus polymerase for human cells also increased activity in pig cells. In contrast, a different pattern was observed in avian cells. Finally, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 polymerase activity was tested because this subtype has been reported to replicate only poorly in pigs. H5N1 polymerase was active in swine cells, suggesting that other barriers restrict these viruses from becoming endemic in pigs. PMID:23077313

  11. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  12. Activation of human B cells by phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, H; Nishioka, Y; Reich, C F; Pisetsky, D S; Lipsky, P E

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the potential of DNA to elicit immune responses in man, we examined the capacity of a variety of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to stimulate highly purified T cell-depleted human peripheral blood B cells. Among 47 ODNs of various sequences tested, 12 phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (sODNs) induced marked B cell proliferation and Ig production. IL-2 augmented both proliferation and production of IgM, IgG, and IgA, as well as IgM anti-DNA antibodies, but was not necessary for B cell stimulation. Similarly, T cells enhanced stimulation, but were not necessary for B cell activation. After stimulation with the active sODNs, more than 95% of B cells expressed CD25 and CD86. In addition, B cells stimulated with sODNs expressed all six of the major immunoglobulin VH gene families. These results indicate that the human B cell response to sODN is polyclonal. Active sODN coupled to Sepharose beads stimulated B cells as effectively as the free sODN, suggesting that stimulation resulted from engagement of surface receptors. These data indicate that sODNs can directly induce polyclonal activation of human B cells in a T cell-independent manner by engaging as yet unknown B cell surface receptors. PMID:8787674

  13. Antiviral Regulation in Porcine Monocytic Cells at Different Activation States

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytic cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, exist in different activation states that are critical to the regulation of antimicrobial immunity. Many pandemic viruses are monocytotropic, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which directly infects subsets of monocytic cells and interferes with antiviral responses. To study antiviral responses in PRRSV-infected monocytic cells, we characterized inflammatory cytokine responses and genome-wide profiled signature genes to investigate response pathways in uninfected and PRRSV-infected monocytic cells at different activation states. Our findings showed suppressed interferon (IFN) production in macrophages in non-antiviral states and an arrest of lipid metabolic pathways in macrophages at antiviral states. Importantly, porcine monocytic cells at different activation states were susceptible to PRRSV and responded differently to viral infection. Based on Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, two approaches were used to potentiate antiviral activity: (i) pharmaceutical modulation of cellular lipid metabolism and (ii) in situ PRRSV replication-competent expression of interferon alpha (IFN-α). Both approaches significantly suppressed exogenous viral infection in monocytic cells. In particular, the engineered IFN-expressing PRRSV strain eliminated exogenous virus infection and sustained cell viability at 4 days postinfection in macrophages. These findings suggest an intricate interaction of viral infection with the activation status of porcine monocytic cells. An understanding and integration of antiviral infection with activation status of monocytic cells may provide a means of potentiating antiviral immunity. IMPORTANCE Activation statuses of monocytic cells, including monocytes, macrophages (Mϕs), and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. Unfortunately, the activation status of porcine monocytic cells or how cell activation status

  14. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Production by T Cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Rothchild, Alissa C; Stowell, Britni; Goyal, Girija; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Yang, Qianting; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher M; Dranoff, Glenn; Chen, Xinchun; Lee, Jinhee; Behar, Samuel M

    2017-10-24

    Mice deficient for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF -/- ) are highly susceptible to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and clinical data have shown that anti-GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies can lead to increased susceptibility to tuberculosis in otherwise healthy people. GM-CSF activates human and murine macrophages to inhibit intracellular M. tuberculosis growth. We have previously shown that GM-CSF produced by iNKT cells inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis However, the more general role of T cell-derived GM-CSF during infection has not been defined and how GM-CSF activates macrophages to inhibit bacterial growth is unknown. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to nonconventional T cells, conventional T cells also produce GM-CSF during M. tuberculosis infection. Early during infection, nonconventional iNKT cells and γδ T cells are the main source of GM-CSF, a role subsequently assumed by conventional CD4 + T cells as the infection progresses. M. tuberculosis -specific T cells producing GM-CSF are also detected in the peripheral blood of infected people. Under conditions where nonhematopoietic production of GM-CSF is deficient, T cell production of GM-CSF is protective and required for control of M. tuberculosis infection. However, GM-CSF is not required for T cell-mediated protection in settings where GM-CSF is produced by other cell types. Finally, using an in vitro macrophage infection model, we demonstrate that GM-CSF inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth requires the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Thus, we identified GM-CSF production as a novel T cell effector function. These findings suggest that a strategy augmenting T cell production of GM-CSF could enhance host resistance against M. tuberculosis IMPORTANCE Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, the leading cause of death by any infection worldwide. T cells are critical components of the immune

  15. Biomarkers for evaluation of mast cell and basophil activation.

    PubMed

    Kabashima, Kenji; Nakashima, Chisa; Nonomura, Yumi; Otsuka, Atsushi; Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; De Feo, Giulia; Triggiani, Massimo

    2018-03-01

    Mast cells and basophils play a pathogenetic role in allergic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. These cells have different development, anatomical location and life span but share many similarities in mechanisms of activation and type of mediators. Mediators secreted by mast cells and basophils correlate with clinical severity in asthma, chronic urticaria, anaphylaxis, and other diseases. Therefore, effective biomarkers to measure mast cell and basophil activation in vivo could potentially have high diagnostic and prognostic values. An ideal biomarker should be specific for mast cells or basophils, easily and reproducibly detectable in blood or biological fluids and should be metabolically stable. Markers of mast cell and basophil include molecules secreted by stimulated cells and surface molecules expressed upon activation. Some markers, such as histamine and lipid mediators are common to mast cells and basophils whereas others, such as tryptase and other proteases, are relatively specific for mast cells. The best surface markers of activation expressed on mast cells and basophils are CD63 and CD203. While these mediators and surface molecules have been associated to a variety of diseases, none of them fulfills requirements for an optimal biomarker and search for better indicators of mast cell/basophil activation in vivo is ongoing. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Automatically activated, 300 ampere-hour silver-zinc cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    A prototype silver zinc cell is reported for which the electrolyte is being stored in a separate tank; the cell is being activated when additional power is required by collapsing the neoprene bellows container and thus forcing the electrolyte into cell through a plastic connection. A solar array is proposed as main power source for the flow actuator.

  17. A Single Subset of Dendritic Cells Controls the Cytokine Bias of Natural Killer T Cell Responses to Diverse Glycolipid Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O.A.; Saini, Neeraj K.; Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Goldberg, Michael F.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J.; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R.; Jervis, Peter J.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α+ DEC-205+ dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α+ dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:24412610

  18. NK cell activation: distinct stimulatory pathways counterbalancing inhibitory signals.

    PubMed

    Bakker, A B; Wu, J; Phillips, J H; Lanier, L L

    2000-01-01

    A delicate balance between positive and negative signals regulates NK cell effector function. Activation of NK cells may be initiated by the triggering of multiple adhesion or costimulatory molecules, and can be counterbalanced by inhibitory signals induced by receptors for MHC class I. A common pathway of inhibitory signaling is provided by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) in the cytoplasmic domains of these receptors which mediate the recruitment of SH2 domain-bearing tyrosine phosphate-1 (SHP-1). In contrast to the extensive progress that has been made regarding the negative regulation of NK cell function, our knowledge of the signals that activate NK cells is still poor. Recent studies of the activating receptor complexes have shed new light on the induction of NK cell effector function. Several NK receptors using novel adaptors with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) and with PI 3-kinase recruiting motifs have been implicated in NK cell stimulation.

  19. Light Activated Cell Migration in Synthetic Extracellular Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiongyu; Wang, Xiaobo; Tibbitt, Mark W.; Anseth, Kristi S.; Montell, Denise J.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic extracellular matrices provide a framework in which cells can be exposed to defined physical and biological cues. However no method exists to manipulate single cells within these matrices. It is desirable to develop such methods in order to understand fundamental principles of cell migration and define conditions that support or inhibit cell movement within these matrices. Here, we present a strategy for manipulating individual mammalian stem cells in defined synthetic hydrogels through selective optical activation of Rac, which is an intracellular signaling protein that plays a key role in cell migration. Photoactivated cell migration in synthetic hydrogels depended on mechanical and biological cues in the biomaterial. Real-time hydrogel photodegradation was employed to create geometrically defined channels and spaces in which cells could be photoactivated to migrate. Cell migration speed was significantly higher in the photo-etched channels and cells could easily change direction of movement compared to the bulk hydrogels. PMID:22889487

  20. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  1. Dynamic acoustic field activated cell separation (DAFACS).

    PubMed

    Skotis, G D; Cumming, D R S; Roberts, J N; Riehle, M O; Bernassau, A L

    2015-02-07

    Advances in diagnostics, cell and stem cell technologies drive the development of application-specific tools for cell and particle separation. Acoustic micro-particle separation offers a promising avenue for high-throughput, label-free, high recovery, cell and particle separation and isolation in regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach utilizing a dynamic acoustic field that is capable of separating an arbitrary size range of cells. We first demonstrate the method for the separation of particles with different diameters between 6 and 45 μm and secondly particles of different densities in a heterogeneous medium. The dynamic acoustic field is then used to separate dorsal root ganglion cells. The shearless, label-free and low damage characteristics make this method of manipulation particularly suited for biological applications. Advantages of using a dynamic acoustic field for the separation of cells include its inherent safety and biocompatibility, the possibility to operate over large distances (centimetres), high purity (ratio of particle population, up to 100%), and high efficiency (ratio of separated particles over total number of particles to separate, up to 100%).

  2. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  3. Carcinoembryonic antigen-stimulated THP-1 macrophages activate endothelial cells and increase cell-cell adhesion of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Cary B; Bajenova, Olga; Andrews, Charles; Heydrick, Stanley; Bushell, Kristen N; Reed, Karen L; Thomas, Peter; Becker, James M; Stucchi, Arthur F

    2007-01-01

    The liver is the most common site for metastasis by colorectal cancer, and numerous studies have shown a relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels and metastasis to this site. CEA activates hepatic macrophages or Kupffer cells via binding to the CEA receptor (CEA-R), which results in the production of cytokines and the up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules, both of which are implicated in hepatic metastasis. Since tissue macrophages implicated in the metastatic process can often be difficult to isolate, the aim of this study was to develop an in vitro model system to study the complex mechanisms of CEA-induced macrophage activation and metastasis. Undifferentiated, human monocytic THP-1 (U-THP) cells were differentiated (D-THP) to macrophages by exposure to 200 ng/ml phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) for 18 h. Immunohistochemistry showed two CEA-R isoforms present in both U- and D-THP cells. The receptors were localized primarily to the nucleus in U-THP cells, while a significant cell-surface presence was observed following PMA-differentiation. Incubation of D-THP-1 cells with CEA resulted in a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release over 24 h compared to untreated D-THP-1 or U-THP controls confirming the functionality of these cell surface receptors. U-THP cells were unresponsive to CEA. Attachment of HT-29 cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells significantly increased at 1 h after incubation with both recombinant TNF-alpha and conditioned media from CEA stimulated D-THP cells by six and eightfold, respectively. This study establishes an in vitro system utilizing a human macrophage cell line expressing functional CEA-Rs to study activation and signaling mechanisms of CEA that facilitate tumor cell attachment to activated endothelial cells. Utilization of this in vitro system may lead to a more complete understanding of the expression and function of CEA-R and facilitate the design of anti

  4. Calcium supplementation prevents endothelial cell activation: possible relevance to preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Tong, Mancy; Wu, Man; Stone, Peter R; Snowise, Saul; Chamley, Lawrence W

    2013-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. A hallmark of preeclampsia is endothelial cell dysfunction/activation in response to 'toxins' from the placenta. Necrotic trophoblastic debris (NTD) is one possible placental toxin and other activators of endothelial cells include inflammatory cytokines. Calcium supplementation appears to protect 'at-risk' women from developing preeclampsia but how is unclear. Placental explants were cultured with interleukin-6 (IL-6) in varied concentrations of calcium. The resultant trophoblastic debris was exposed to endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were exposed to activators including NTD, IL-6, and preeclamptic sera in the presence of varied concentrations of calcium and activation monitored by quantifying cell surface markers by ELISA. Raising the levels of calcium did not prevent the IL-6-induced shedding of NTD from placental explants but did prevent the activation of endothelial cells in response to IL-6, preeclamptic sera, or NTD. Reducing the level of calcium directly induced the activation of endothelial cells. Inhibiting nitric oxide synthetase ablated the ability of high calcium levels to protect endothelial cell activation. The activity of endothelial cell nitric oxide synthetase was blocked with L-N-nitroarginine methyl ester. Our results demonstrate calcium levels do not affect the shedding of trophoblastic debris but are important to endothelial cell activation and supplemental calcium may reverse the activation of the endothelium in preeclamptic women. These results may in part explain the benefits of calcium supplementation in the reduction of risk for developing preeclampsia and provide in-vitro mechanistic support for the use of calcium supplementation in at-risk women.

  5. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-09-15

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with (3H)arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1more » X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity.« less

  6. Human NK cells activated by EBV+ lymphoblastoid cells overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms of drug resistance in haematological cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Azaceta, Gemma; Muntasell, Aura; Aguiló, Nacho; Núñez, David; Gálvez, Eva M; Naval, Javier; Anel, Alberto; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; Marzo, Isabel; Villalba, Martín; Pardo, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells recognize and eliminate transformed or infected cells that have downregulated MHC class-I and express specific activating ligands. Recent evidence indicates that allogeneic NK cells are useful to eliminate haematological cancer cells independently of MHC-I expression. However, it is unclear if transformed cells expressing mutations that confer anti-apoptotic properties and chemoresistance will be susceptible to NK cells. Allogeneic primary human NK cells were activated using different protocols and prospectively tested for their ability to eliminate diverse mutant haematological and apoptotic-resistant cancer cell lines as well as patient-derived B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with chemotherapy multiresistance. Here, we show that human NK cells from healthy donors activated in vitro with Epstein Barr virus positive (EBV+)-lymphoblastoid cells display an enhanced cytotoxic and proliferative potential in comparison to other protocols of activation such a K562 cells plus interleukin (IL)2. This enhancement enables them to kill more efficiently a variety of haematological cancer cell lines, including a panel of transfectants that mimic natural mutations leading to oncogenic transformation and chemoresistance (e.g., overexpression of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 or downregulation of p53, Bak/Bax or caspase activity). The effect was also observed against blasts from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients showing multi-resistance to chemotherapy. Our findings demonstrate that particular in vitro activated NK cells may overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms and oncogenic alterations frequently occurring in transformed cells, pointing toward the use of EBV+-lymphoblastoid cells as a desirable strategy to activate NK cells in vitro for the purpose of treating haematological neoplasia with poor prognosis. PMID:25949911

  7. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  8. Activities for leptin in bovine trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Hughes, C K; Xie, M M; McCoski, S R; Ealy, A D

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is involved in various reproductive processes in humans and rodents, including placental development and function. The specific ways that leptin influences placental development and function in cattle are poorly understood. This work was completed to explore how leptin regulates hormone, cytokine and metalloprotease transcript abundance, and cell proliferation in cultured bovine trophoblast cells. In the first set of studies, cells were cultured in the presence of graded recombinant bovine leptin concentrations (0, 10, 50, 250 ng/mL) for 6 or 24 h. Transcript profiles were examined from extracted RNA. Leptin supplementation did not affect abundance of the maternal recognition of pregnancy factor, interferon-tau (IFNT), but leptin increased (P < 0.05) abundance of chorionic somatomammotropin hormone 2 (CSH2; ie, placental lactogen) at both 6 and 24 h at each concentration tested. At 24 h, the greatest CSH2 abundance (P < 0.05) was detected in cells supplemented with 50 ng/mL leptin. Transcript abundance of the remodeling factor, metalloprotease 2 (MMP2), was greater (P < 0.05) in leptin-treated cells at 24 h but not at 6 h. The 24 h MMP2 response was greatest (P < 0.05) at 250 ng/mL. Transcript abundance for MMP9 was not altered by leptin treatment. In a separate set of studies, cell proliferation assays were completed. Leptin supplementation did not affect bovine trophoblast cell line proliferation at any dose tested. In conclusion, leptin supplementation did not affect bovine trophoblast cell proliferation or IFNT expression, but leptin increases CSH2 and MMP2 transcript abundance. Both of these factors are involved with peri-implantation and postimplantation placental development and function, and this implicates leptin as a potential mediator of early placental development and function in cattle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem/Multipotent Stromal Cells from Human Decidua Basalis Reduce Endothelial Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Alshabibi, Manal A; Al Huqail, Al Joharah; Khatlani, Tanvir; Abomaray, Fawaz M; Alaskar, Ahmed S; Alawad, Abdullah O; Kalionis, Bill; Abumaree, Mohamed Hassan

    2017-09-15

    Recently, we reported the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from the decidua basalis of human placenta (DBMSCs). These cells express a unique combination of molecules involved in many important cellular functions, which make them good candidates for cell-based therapies. The endothelium is a highly specialized, metabolically active interface between blood and the underlying tissues. Inflammatory factors stimulate the endothelium to undergo a change to a proinflammatory and procoagulant state (ie, endothelial cell activation). An initial response to endothelial cell activation is monocyte adhesion. Activation typically involves increased proliferation and enhanced expression of adhesion and inflammatory markers by endothelial cells. Sustained endothelial cell activation leads to a type of damage to the body associated with inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the ability of DBMSCs to protect endothelial cells from activation through monocyte adhesion, by modulating endothelial proliferation, migration, adhesion, and inflammatory marker expression. Endothelial cells were cocultured with DBMSCs, monocytes, monocyte-pretreated with DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes were also evaluated. Monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells was examined following treatment with DBMSCs. Expression of endothelial cell adhesion and inflammatory markers was also analyzed. The interaction between DBMSCs and monocytes reduced endothelial cell proliferation and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In contrast, endothelial cell migration increased in response to DBMSCs and monocytes. Endothelial cell expression of adhesion and inflammatory molecules was reduced by DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes. The mechanism of reduced endothelial proliferation involved enhanced phosphorylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Our study shows for the first time that DBMSCs protect endothelial cells from activation by

  10. Tyrosine Kinase Btk Is Required for NK Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yan; Zheng, Jian; Han, Chaofeng; Jin, Jing; Han, Huanxing; Liu, Yinping; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is not only critical for B cell development and differentiation but is also involved in the regulation of Toll-like receptor-triggered innate response of macrophages. However, whether Btk is involved in the regulation of natural killer (NK) cell innate function remains unknown. Here, we show that Btk expression is up-regulated during maturation and activation of mouse NK cells. Murine Btk−/− NK cells have decreased innate immune responses to the TLR3 ligand, with reduced expressions of IFN-γ, perforin, and granzyme-B and decreased cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, Btk is found to promote TLR3-triggered NK cell activation mainly by activating the NF-κB pathway. Poly(I:C)-induced NK cell-mediated acute hepatitis was observed to be attenuated in Btk−/− mice or the mice with in vivo administration of the Btk inhibitor. Correspondingly, liver damage was aggravated in Btk−/− mice after the adoptive transfer of Btk+/+ NK cells, further indicating that Btk-mediated NK cell activation contributes to TLR3-triggered acute liver injury. Importantly, reduced TLR3-triggered activation of human NK cells was observed in Btk-deficient patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia, as evidenced by the reduced IFN-γ, CD69, and CD107a expression and cytotoxic activity. These results indicate that Btk is required for activation of NK cells, thus providing insight into the physiological significance of Btk in the regulation of immune cell functions and innate inflammatory response. PMID:22589540

  11. Activation-induced necroptosis contributes to B-cell lymphopenia in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; Liu, F; Dong, G; Ren, D; Xu, Y; Dou, J; Wang, T; Sun, L; Hou, Y

    2014-01-01

    B-cell abnormality including excessive activation and lymphopenia is a central feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although activation threshold, auto-reaction and death of B cells can be affected by intrinsical and/or external signaling, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that co-activation of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and B-cell receptor (BCR) pathways is a core event for the survival/dead states of B cells in SLE. We found that the mortalities of CD19+CD27- and CD19+IgM+ B-cell subsets were increased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLE patients. The gene microarray analysis of CD19+ B cells from active SLE patients showed that the differentially expressed genes were closely correlated to TLR7, BCR, apoptosis, necroptosis and immune pathways. We also found that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR could trigger normal B cells to take on SLE-like B-cell characters including the elevated viability, activation and proliferation in the first 3 days and necroptosis in the later days. Moreover, the necroptotic B cells exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and hypoxia, along with the elevated expression of necroptosis-related genes, consistent with that in both SLE B-cell microarray and real-time PCR verification. Expectedly, pretreatment with the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) inhibitor Necrostatin-1, and not the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD, suppressed B-cell death. Importantly, B cells from additional SLE patients also significantly displayed high expression levels of necroptosis-related genes compared with those from healthy donors. These data indicate that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR pathways can promote B cells to hyperactivation and ultimately necroptosis. Our finding provides a new explanation on B-cell lymphopenia in active SLE patients. These data suggest that extrinsic factors may increase the intrinsical abnormality of B cells in SLE patients. PMID:25210799

  12. Curcumin Suppresses T Cell Activation by Blocking Ca2+ Mobilization and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells (NFAT) Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kliem, Christian; Merling, Anette; Giaisi, Marco; Köhler, Rebecca; Krammer, Peter H.; Li-Weber, Min

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of the spice turmeric and has been shown to have a number of pharmacologic and therapeutic activities including antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin have primarily been attributed to its inhibitory effect on NF-κB activity due to redox regulation. In this study, we show that curcumin is an immunosuppressive phytochemical that blocks T cell-activation-induced Ca2+ mobilization with IC50 = ∼12.5 μm and thereby prevents NFAT activation and NFAT-regulated cytokine expression. This finding provides a new mechanism for curcumin-mediated anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive function. We also show that curcumin can synergize with CsA to enhance immunosuppressive activity because of different inhibitory mechanisms. Furthermore, because Ca2+ is also the secondary messenger crucial for the TCR-induced NF-κB signaling pathway, our finding also provides another mechanism by which curcumin suppresses NF-κB activation. PMID:22303019

  13. Augmentation of immune cell activity against tumor cells by Rauwolfia radix.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang-Bi; Hong, Tie; Inoue, Satoshi; Urano, Tomohiko; Cho, Shigefumi; Otsu, Koji; Kitahara, Maya; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Cyong, Jong-Chol

    2002-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of Rauwolfia radix on heat shock protein (HSP) 70 expression and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in activated human T cells. When activated T cells were cultured with Rauwolfia radix for 18 h, HSP70 expression after heat shock was remarkably increased, and cytotoxicity against T98G tumor cells was augmented. Moreover, Rauwolfia radix also enhanced the cytotoxicity of heat shocked activated T cells against Molt-4 and T98G tumor cells. Secretions of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-alpha), due to Concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation, were increased by Rauwolfia radix in activated T cells. To investigate the antitumor effect in vivo, EL-4 tumor-bearing mice were administered with Rauwolfia radix in drinking water. The survival period of the Rauwolfia radix treatment group was significantly prolonged compared with that of the control group. Reserpine, the major active ingredient of Rauwolfia radix, also enhanced the cytotoxicity of activated T cells against Molt-4 and T98G tumor cells, and prolonged the survival period of EL-4 tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our results suggest that Rauwolfia radix can enhance the activity of immune cells against tumor cells.

  14. Protease-activated receptor 2 modulates proliferation and invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Eryani, Kamal; Cheng, Jun; Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Babkair, Hamzah; Essa, Ahmed; Saku, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Based on our previous finding that protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) regulates hemophagocytosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells, which induces their heme oxygenase 1-dependent keratinization, we have formulated a hypothesis that PAR-2 functions in wider activities of SCC cells. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigated immunohistochemical profiles of PAR-2 in oral SCC tissues and its functional roles in cell proliferation and invasion in SCC cells in culture. The PAR-2 expression modes were determined in 48 surgical tissue specimens of oral SCC. Using oral SCC-derived cell systems, we determined both gene and protein expression levels of PAR-2. SCC cell proliferation and invasive properties were also examined in conditions in which PAR-2 was activated by the synthetic peptide SLIGRL. PAR-2 was immunolocalized in oral SCC and carcinoma in situ cells, especially in those on the periphery of carcinoma cell foci (100% of cases), but not in normal oral epithelia. Its expression at both gene and protein levels was confirmed in 3 oral SCC cell lines including ZK-1. Activation of PAR-2 induced ZK-1 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAR-2-activated ZK-1 cells invaded faster than nonactivated ones. The expression of PAR-2 is specific to oral malignancies, and PAR-2 regulates the growth and invasion of oral SCC cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. T Cell Activation Thresholds are Affected by Gravitational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley; Gonzalez, M.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    1999-01-01

    T cells stimulated in space flight by various mitogenic signals show a dramatic reduction in proliferation and expression of early activation markers. Similar results are also obtained in a ground based model of microgravity, clinorotation, which provides a vector-averaged reduction of the apparent gravity on cells without significant shear force. Here we demonstrate that T cell inhibition is due to an increase in the required threshold for activation. Dose response curves indicate that cells activated during clinorotation require higher stimulation to achieve the same level of activation, as measured by CD69 expression. Interleukin 2 receptor expression, and DNA synthesis. The amount of stimulation necessary for 50% activation is 5 fold in the clinostat relative to static. Correlation of TCR internalization with activation also exhibit a dramatic right shift in clinorotation, demonstrating unequivocally that signal transduction mechanism independent of TCR triggering account for the increased activation threshold. Previous results from space flight experiments are consistent with the dose response curves obtained for clinorotation. Activation thresholds are important aspects of T cell memory, autoimmunity and tolerance Clinorotation is a useful, noninvasive tool for the study of cellular and biochemical event regulating T cell activation threshold and the effects of gravitation forces on these systems.

  16. MERTK as negative regulator of human T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cabezón, Raquel; Carrera-Silva, E. Antonio; Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Errasti, Andrea E.; Calderón-Gómez, Elisabeth; Lozano, Juan José; España, Carolina; Ricart, Elena; Panés, Julián; Rothlin, Carla Vanina; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis whether MERTK, which is up-regulated in human DCs treated with immunosuppressive agents, is directly involved in modulating T cell activation. MERTK is a member of the TAM family and contributes to regulating innate immune response to ACs by inhibiting DC activation in animal models. However, whether MERTK interacts directly with T cells has not been addressed. Here, we show that MERTK is highly expressed on dex-induced human tol-DCs and participates in their tolerogenic effect. Neutralization of MERTK in allogenic MLR, as well as autologous DC–T cell cultures, leads to increased T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Additionally, we identify a previously unrecognized noncell-autonomous regulatory function of MERTK expressed on DCs. Mer-Fc protein, used to mimic MERTK on DCs, suppresses naïve and antigen-specific memory T cell activation. This mechanism is mediated by the neutralization of the MERTK ligand PROS1. We find that MERTK and PROS1 are expressed in human T cells upon TCR activation and drive an autocrine proproliferative mechanism. Collectively, these results suggest that MERTK on DCs controls T cell activation and expansion through the competition for PROS1 interaction with MERTK in the T cells. In conclusion, this report identified MERTK as a potent suppressor of T cell response. PMID:25624460

  17. Cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells in vitro under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, O. V.; Buravkova, L. B.; Rykova, M. P.

    2005-08-01

    Changes in the immune response during space flight are close relation to functions of NK lymphocytes and their ability to interact with target cells. The aim of this research was to study NK cells cytotoxic activity and their ability to produce cytokines under microgravity in vitro. The modification of the method to study NK cells cytotoxic activity with the use of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and myeloblasts K-562 (as target cells) proved highly effective (Buravkova et al., 2004). The flight experiment "Cell-to-cell interaction" with the use of the special device "Fibroblast-1" was carried out by Russian cosmonauts within the first two days after the docking when a new crew was taking over on International Space Station (ISS 8 - 10). The data collected on board ISS revealed that NK lymphocytes cytotoxic activity in vitro can increase under microgravity. The ground-based simulation experiments showed that long-term changes in gravity vector direction clinorotation resulted in a smaller increase of NK cells cytotoxic activity than it did in microgravity. As lymphocytes produce cytokines while interacting with target cells, the levels of TNF-α, IL-1α, IL- 2, IL-6 in cell-conditioned medium were assessed. The data showed that microgravity has varied effects on cytokines production level.

  18. Active elastic dimers: cells moving on rigid tracks.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J H; Das, Moumita; Schwarz, J M

    2014-09-01

    Experiments suggest that the migration of some cells in the three-dimensional extracellular matrix bears strong resemblance to one-dimensional cell migration. Motivated by this observation, we construct and study a minimal one-dimensional model cell made of two beads and an active spring moving along a rigid track. The active spring models the stress fibers with their myosin-driven contractility and α-actinin-driven extendability, while the friction coefficients of the two beads describe the catch and slip-bond behaviors of the integrins in focal adhesions. In the absence of active noise, net motion arises from an interplay between active contractility (and passive extendability) of the stress fibers and an asymmetry between the front and back of the cell due to catch-bond behavior of integrins at the front of the cell and slip-bond behavior of integrins at the back. We obtain reasonable cell speeds with independently estimated parameters. We also study the effects of hysteresis in the active spring, due to catch-bond behavior and the dynamics of cross linking, and the addition of active noise on the motion of the cell. Our model highlights the role of α-actinin in three-dimensional cell motility and does not require Arp2/3 actin filament nucleation for net motion.

  19. Airway structural cells regulate TLR5-mediated mucosal adjuvant activity.

    PubMed

    Van Maele, L; Fougeron, D; Janot, L; Didierlaurent, A; Cayet, D; Tabareau, J; Rumbo, M; Corvo-Chamaillard, S; Boulenouar, S; Jeffs, S; Vande Walle, L; Lamkanfi, M; Lemoine, Y; Erard, F; Hot, D; Hussell, T; Ryffel, B; Benecke, A G; Sirard, J-C

    2014-05-01

    Antigen-presenting cell (APC) activation is enhanced by vaccine adjuvants. Most vaccines are based on the assumption that adjuvant activity of Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists depends on direct, functional activation of APCs. Here, we sought to establish whether TLR stimulation in non-hematopoietic cells contributes to flagellin's mucosal adjuvant activity. Nasal administration of flagellin enhanced T-cell-mediated immunity, and systemic and secretory antibody responses to coadministered antigens in a TLR5-dependent manner. Mucosal adjuvant activity was not affected by either abrogation of TLR5 signaling in hematopoietic cells or the presence of flagellin-specific, circulating neutralizing antibodies. We found that flagellin is rapidly degraded in conducting airways, does not translocate into lung parenchyma and stimulates an early immune response, suggesting that TLR5 signaling is regionalized. The flagellin-specific early response of lung was regulated by radioresistant cells expressing TLR5 (particularly the airway epithelial cells). Flagellin stimulated the epithelial production of a small set of mediators that included the chemokine CCL20, which is known to promote APC recruitment in mucosal tissues. Our data suggest that (i) the adjuvant activity of TLR agonists in mucosal vaccination may require TLR stimulation of structural cells and (ii) harnessing the effect of adjuvants on epithelial cells can improve mucosal vaccines.

  20. Colonic epithelial cell activation and the paradoxical effects of butyrate.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P R; Rosella, O; Wilson, A J; Mariadason, J M; Rickard, K; Byron, K; Barkla, D H

    1999-04-01

    Butyrate may have paradoxical effects on epithelial cells of similar origin. This study aimed to examine the hypothesis that one mechanism that dictates a cell's response to butyrate is its state of activation. First, the responses to 24 h exposure to butyrate (1-2 mM) of normal and neoplastic human colonic epithelial cells activated by their isolation and primary culture, and of colon cancer cell lines, LIM1215 and Caco-2, were examined. In primary cultures of normal and cancer cells, butyrate had no effect on alkaline phosphatase activities but significantly suppressed urokinase receptor expression by a mean +/- SEM of 30 +/- 12% and 36 +/- 9%, respectively. Interleukin-8 secretion was suppressed by 44 +/- 7% in normal cells (P < 0.05) but was unchanged in cancer cells. In contrast, the cell lines significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activities by >50%, urokinase receptor expression >2-fold and interleukin-8 secretion >3-fold in response to butyrate. Secondly, the effect of butyrate on Caco-2 cells was examined with or without prior exposure to a specific activating stimulus [tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha)]. Interleukin-8 secretion increased by 145 +/- 23% and 132 +/- 17% on 24 h exposure to 2 mM butyrate or 0.1 microM TNF alpha alone, respectively. However, in cells pre-treated with TNF alpha, butyrate significantly inhibited secretion by 34 +/- 7% below unstimulated levels. The response to butyrate of urokinase receptor, whose expression was not stimulated by TNF alpha, was unchanged. These effects were mimicked by trichostatin A, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, suggesting that butyrate's paradoxical effects may have been operating by the same mechanism. In conclusion, some of the paradoxical effects of butyrate do not appear to represent inherent differences between normal and transformed cells. Rather, the response may be determined by the state of activation of the cells.

  1. Function of the nucleotide exchange activity of vav1 in T cell development and activation.

    PubMed

    Saveliev, Alexander; Vanes, Lesley; Ksionda, Olga; Rapley, Jonathan; Smerdon, Stephen J; Rittinger, Katrin; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2009-12-15

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signals and therefore plays a critical role in the development and activation of T cells. It has been presumed that the GEF activity of Vav1 is important for its function; however, there has been no direct demonstration of this. Here, we generated mice expressing enzymatically inactive, but normally folded, Vav1 protein. Analysis of these mice showed that the GEF activity of Vav1 was necessary for the selection of thymocytes and for the optimal activation of T cells, including signal transduction to Rac1, Akt, and integrins. In contrast, the GEF activity of Vav1 was not required for TCR-induced calcium flux, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase D1, and cell polarization. Thus, in T cells, the GEF activity of Vav1 is essential for some, but not all, of its functions.

  2. Function of the Nucleotide Exchange Activity of Vav1 in T cell Development and Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Saveliev, Alexander; Vanes, Lesley; Ksionda, Olga; Rapley, Jonathan; Smerdon, Stephen J.; Rittinger, Katrin; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.

    2012-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signals and therefore plays a critical role in the development and activation of T cells. It has been presumed that the GEF activity of Vav1 is important for its function; however, there has been no direct demonstration of this. Here, we generated mice expressing enzymatically inactive, but normally folded, Vav1 protein. Analysis of these mice showed that the GEF activity of Vav1 was necessary for the selection of thymocytes and for the optimal activation of T cells, including signal transduction to Rac1, Akt, and integrins. In contrast, the GEF activity of Vav1 was not required for TCR-induced calcium flux, activation of extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase D1 (PKD1), and cell polarization. Thus, in T cells, the GEF activity of Vav1 is essential for some, but not all, of its functions. PMID:20009105

  3. Knockdown of MAGEA6 Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Signaling to Inhibit Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xueting; Xie, Jing; Huang, Hang; Deng, Zhexian

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma antigen A6 (MAGEA6) is a cancer-specific ubiquitin ligase of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The current study tested MAGEA6 expression and potential function in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MAGEA6 and AMPK expression in human RCC tissues and RCC cells were tested by Western blotting assay and qRT-PCR assay. shRNA method was applied to knockdown MAGEA6 in human RCC cells. Cell survival and proliferation were tested by MTT assay and BrdU ELISA assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was tested by the TUNEL assay and single strand DNA ELISA assay. The 786-O xenograft in nude mouse model was established to test RCC cell growth in vivo. MAGEA6 is specifically expressed in RCC tissues as well as in the established (786-O and A498) and primary human RCC cells. MAGEA6 expression is correlated with AMPKα1 downregulation in RCC tissues and cells. It is not detected in normal renal tissues nor in the HK-2 renal epithelial cells. MAGEA6 knockdown by targeted-shRNA induced AMPK stabilization and activation, which led to mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in-activation and RCC cell death/apoptosis. AMPK inhibition, by AMPKα1 shRNA or the dominant negative AMPKα1 (T172A), almost reversed MAGEA6 knockdown-induced RCC cell apoptosis. Conversely, expression of the constitutive-active AMPKα1 (T172D) mimicked the actions by MAGEA6 shRNA. In vivo, MAGEA6 shRNA-bearing 786-O tumors grew significantly slower in nude mice than the control tumors. AMPKα1 stabilization and activation as well as mTORC1 in-activation were detected in MAGEA6 shRNA tumor tissues. MAGEA6 knockdown inhibits human RCC cells via activating AMPK signaling. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  5. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    DOE PAGES

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; ...

    2015-08-07

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose, in this paper we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout themore » entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Finally, our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation.« less

  6. Twin Knudsen Cell Configuration for Activity Measurements by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1996-01-01

    A twin Knudsen cell apparatus for alloy activity measurements by mass spectrometry is described. Two Knudsen cells - one containing an alloy and one containing a pure component - are mounted on a single flange and translated into the sampling region via a motorized x-y table. Mixing of the molecular beams from the cells is minimized by a novel system of shutters. Activity measurements were taken on two well-characterized alloys to verify the operation of the system. Silver activity measurements are reported for Ag-Cu alloys and aluminum activity measurements are reported for Fe-Al alloys. The temperature dependence of activity for a 0.474 mol fraction Al-Fe alloy gives a partial molar heat of aluminum. Measurements taken with the twin cell show good agreement with literature values for these alloys.

  7. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  8. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic pathways in T cell activation and lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luís; Lochner, Matthias; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of immunometabolism support the concept that fundamental processes in T cell biology, such as TCR-mediated activation and T helper lineage differentiation, are closely linked to changes in the cellular metabolic programs. Although the major task of the intermediate metabolism is to provide the cell with a constant supply of energy and molecular precursors for the production of biomolecules, the dynamic regulation of metabolic pathways also plays an active role in shaping T cell responses. Key metabolic processes such as glycolysis, fatty acid and mitochondrial metabolism are now recognized as crucial players in T cell activation and differentiation, and their modulation can differentially affect the development of T helper cell lineages. In this review, we describe the diverse metabolic processes that T cells engage during their life cycle from naïve towards effector and memory T cells. We consider in particular how the cellular metabolism may actively support the function of T cells in their different states. Moreover, we discuss how molecular regulators such as mTOR or AMPK link environmental changes to adaptations in the cellular metabolism and elucidate the consequences on T cell differentiation and function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Jillian H.; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P.; Gregg, Randal K.

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter. When

  11. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jillian H; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P; Gregg, Randal K

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter

  12. Activation of B cells by non-canonical helper signals

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Cols, Montserrat; Puga, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Cognate interaction between T and B lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system is essential for the production of high-affinity antibodies against microbes, and for the establishment of long-term immunological memory. Growing evidence shows that—in addition to presenting antigens to T and B cells—macrophages, dendritic cells and other cells of the innate immune system provide activating signals to B cells, as well as survival signals to antibody-secreting plasma cells. Here, we discuss how these innate immune cells contribute to the induction of highly diversified and temporally sustained antibody responses, both systemically and at mucosal sites of antigen entry. PMID:22868664

  13. The natural product chitosan enhances the anti-tumor activity of natural killer cells by activating dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Dong, Wenjuan; Nalin, Ansel P; Wang, Yufeng; Pan, Pan; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Yibo; Tun, Steven; Zhang, Jianying; Wang, Li-Shu; He, Xiaoming; Caligiuri, Michael A; Yu, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    Natural products comprise an important class of biologically active molecules. Many of these compounds derived from natural sources exhibit specific physiologic or biochemical effects. An example of a natural product is chitosan, which is enriched in the shells of certain seafood that are frequently consumed worldwide. Like other natural products, chitosan has the potential for applications in clinical medicine and perhaps in cancer therapy. Toward this end, the immunomodulatory or anti-cancer properties of chitosan have yet to be reported. In this study, we discovered that chitosan enhanced the anti-tumor activity of natural killer (NK) cells by activating dendritic cells (DCs). In the presence of DCs, chitosan augmented IFN-γ production by human NK cells. Mechanistically, chitosan activated DCs to express pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-15, which in turn activated the STAT4 and NF-κB signaling pathways, respectively, in NK cells. Moreover, chitosan promoted NK cell survival, and also enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity against leukemia cells. Finally, a related in vivo study demonstrated that chitosan activated NK cells against B16F10 tumor cells in an immunocompetent syngeneic murine melanoma model. This effect was accompanied by in vivo upregulation of IL-12 and IL-15 in DCs, as well as increased IFN-γ production and cytolytic degranulation in NK cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that chitosan activates DCs leading to enhanced capacity for immune surveillance by NK cells. We believe that our study has future clinical applications for chitosan in the prevention or treatment of cancer and infectious diseases.

  14. Study of the cell activity in three-dimensional cell culture by using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunngam, Pakajiraporn; Mahardika, Anggara; Hiroko, Matsuyoshi; Andriana, Bibin Bintang; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a estimation technique of local cell activity in cultured 3D cell aggregate with gelatin hydrogel microspheres by using Raman spectroscopy. It is an invaluable technique allowing real-time, nondestructive, and invasive measurement. Cells in body generally exist in 3D structure, which physiological cell-cell interaction enhances cell survival and biological functions. Although a 3D cell aggregate is a good model of the cells in living tissues, it was difficult to estimate their physiological conditions because there is no effective technique to make observation of intact cells in the 3D structure. In this study, cell aggregates were formed by MC3T-E1 (pre-osteoblast) cells and gelatin hydrogel microspheres. In appropriate condition MC3T-E1 cells can differentiate into osteoblast. We assume that the activity of the cell would be different according to the location in the aggregate because the cells near the surface of the aggregate have more access to oxygen and nutrient. Raman imaging technique was applied to measure 3D image of the aggregate. The concentration of the hydroxyapatite (HA) is generated by osteoblast was estimated with a strong band at 950-970 cm-1 which assigned to PO43- in HA. It reflects an activity of the specific site in the cell aggregate. The cell density in this specific site was analyzed by multivariate analysis of the 3D Raman image. Hence, the ratio between intensity and cell density in the site represents the cell activity.

  15. Antiproliferative activity of flavonoids on several cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kawaii, S; Tomono, Y; Katase, E; Ogawa, K; Yano, M

    1999-05-01

    Twenty-seven Citrus flavonoids were examined for their antiproliferative activities against several tumor and normal human cell lines. As a result, 7 flavonoids were judged to be active against the tumor cell lines, while they had weak antiproliferative activity against the normal human cell lines. The rank order of potency was luteolin, natsudaidain, quercetin, tangeretin, eriodictyol, nobiletin, and 3,3',4',5,6,7,8-heptamethoxyflavone. The structure-activity relationship established from comparison among these flavones and flavanones showed that the ortho-catechol moiety in ring B and a C2-C3 double bond were important for the antiproliferative activity. As to polymethoxylated flavones, C-3 hydroxyl and C-8 methoxyl groups were essential for high activity.

  16. NITRIC OXIDE, MITOCHONDRIAL HYPERPOLARIZATION AND T-CELL ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gyorgy; Koncz, Agnes; Fernandez, David; Perl, Andras

    2007-01-01

    T lymphocyte activation is associated with nitric oxide (NO) production that plays an essential role in multiple T cell functions. NO acts as a messenger, activating soluble guanyl cyclase and participating in the transduction signaling pathways involving cyclic GMP. NO modulates mitochondrial events that are involved in apoptosis and regulates mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial biogenesis in many cell types, including lymphocytes. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization (MHP), an early and reversible event during both T lymphocyte activation and apoptosis, is regulated by NO. Here, we discuss recent evidence that NO-induced MHP represents a molecular switch in multiple T cell signaling pathways. Overproduction of NO in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) induces mitochondrial biogenesis and alters Ca2+ signaling. Thus, while NO plays a physiological role in lymphocyte cell signaling, its overproduction may disturb normal T cell function, contributing to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:17462531

  17. Physiological pathways regulating the activity of magnocellular neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Leng, G; Brown, C H; Russell, J A

    1999-04-01

    Magnocellular oxytocin and vasopressin cells are among the most extensively studied neurons in the brain; their large size and high synthetic capacity, their discrete, homogeneous distribution and the anatomical separation of their terminals from their cell bodies, and the ability to determine their neuronal output readily by measurements of hormone concentration in the plasma, combine to make these systems amenable to a wide range of fundamental investigations. While vasopressin cells have intrinsic burst-generating properties, oxytocin cells are organized within local pattern-generating networks. In this review we consider the rôle played by particular afferent pathways in the regulation of the activity of oxytocin and vasopressin cells. For both cell types, the effects of changes in the activity of synaptic input can be complex.

  18. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle; Verceles, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a coupled fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent staining technology for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology, and live versus dead), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from an environmental sample.

  19. B cell depletion reduces T cell activation in pancreatic islets in a murine autoimmune diabetes model.

    PubMed

    Da Rosa, Larissa C; Boldison, Joanne; De Leenheer, Evy; Davies, Joanne; Wen, Li; Wong, F Susan

    2018-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterised by the destruction of beta cells in the islets of Langerhans, resulting in deficient insulin production. B cell depletion therapy has proved successful in preventing diabetes and restoring euglycaemia in animal models of diabetes, as well as in preserving beta cell function in clinical trials in the short term. We aimed to report a full characterisation of B cell kinetics post B cell depletion, with a focus on pancreatic islets. Transgenic NOD mice with a human CD20 transgene expressed on B cells were injected with an anti-CD20 depleting antibody. B cells were analysed using multivariable flow cytometry. There was a 10 week delay in the onset of diabetes when comparing control and experimental groups, although the final difference in the diabetes incidence, following prolonged observation, was not statistically significant (p = 0.07). The co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were reduced on stimulation of B cells during B cell depletion and repopulation. IL-10-producing regulatory B cells were not induced in repopulated B cells in the periphery, post anti-CD20 depletion. However, the early depletion of B cells had a marked effect on T cells in the local islet infiltrate. We demonstrated a lack of T cell activation, specifically with reduced CD44 expression and effector function, including IFN-γ production from both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. These CD8 + T cells remained altered in the pancreatic islets long after B cell depletion and repopulation. Our findings suggest that B cell depletion can have an impact on T cell regulation, inducing a durable effect that is present long after repopulation. We suggest that this local effect of reducing autoimmune T cell activity contributes to delay in the onset of autoimmune diabetes.

  20. Dendritic cells for active anti-cancer immunotherapy: targeting activation pathways through genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2009-12-01

    Tumour immunotherapy has become a treatment modality for cancer, harnessing the immune system to recognize and eradicate tumour cells specifically. It is based on the expression of tumour associated antigens (TAA) by the tumour cells and aims at the induction of TAA-specific effector T cell responses, whilst overruling various mechanisms that can hamper the anti-tumour immune response, e.g. regulatory T cells (Treg). (Re-) activation of effector T cells requires the completion of a carefully orchestrated series of specific steps. Particularly important is the provision of TAA presentation and strong stimulatory signals, delivered by co-stimulatory surface molecules and cytokines. These can only be delivered by professional antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, DC need to be loaded with TAA and appropriately activated. It is not surprising that an extensive part of DC research has focused on the delivery of both TAA and activation signals to DC, developing a one step approach to obtain potent stimulatory DC. The simultaneous delivery of TAA and activation signals is therefore the topic of this review, emphasizing the role of DC in mediating T cell activation and how we can manipulate DC for the pill-pose of enhancing tumour immunotherapy. As we gain a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate induction of TAA-specific T cells, rational approaches for the activation of T cell responses can be developed for the treatment of cancer.

  1. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  2. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  3. Spontaneous activity of cochlear hair cells triggered by fluid secretion mechanism in adjacent support cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl− efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. Release of Cl− from ISCs also forces K+ efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea, and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that support cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  4. Nuclear calcium is required for human T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Samstag, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signals in stimulated T cells are generally considered single entities that merely trigger immune responses, whereas costimulatory events specify the type of reaction. Here we show that the “T cell calcium signal” is a composite signal harboring two distinct components that antagonistically control genomic programs underlying the immune response. Using human T cells from healthy individuals, we establish nuclear calcium as a key signal in human T cell adaptogenomics that drives T cell activation and is required for signaling to cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element–binding protein and the induction of CD25, CD69, interleukin-2, and γ-interferon. In the absence of nuclear calcium signaling, cytosolic calcium activating nuclear factor of activated T cells translocation directed the genomic response toward enhanced expression of genes that negatively modulate T cell activation and are associated with a hyporesponsive state. Thus, nuclear calcium controls the T cell fate decision between a proliferative immune response and tolerance. Modulators of nuclear calcium–driven transcription may be used to develop a new type of pro-tolerance immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27810914

  5. A Model Approach to the Electrochemical Cell: An Inquiry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Deanna M.; Pentecost, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to address some student misconceptions in electrochemistry, this guided-inquiry laboratory was devised to give students an opportunity to use a manipulative that simulates the particulate-level activity within an electrochemical cell, in addition to using an actual electrochemical cell. Students are led through a review of expected…

  6. The potential of a dielectrophoresis activated cell sorter (DACS) as a next generation cell sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Hwang, Bohyun; Kim, Byungkyu

    2016-12-01

    Originally introduced by H. A. Pohl in 1951, dielectrophoretic (DEP) force has been used as a striking tool for biological particle manipulation (or separation) for the last few decades. In particular, dielectrophoresis activated cell sorters (DACSes) have been developed for applications in various biomedical fields. These applications include cell replacement therapy, drug screening and medical diagnostics. Since a DACS does not require a specific bio-marker, it is able to function as a biological particle sorting tool with numerous configurations for various cells [e.g. red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), circulating tumor cells, leukemia cells, breast cancer cells, bacterial cells, yeast cells and sperm cells]. This article explores current DACS capabilities worldwide, and it also looks at recent developments intended to overcome particular limitations. First, the basic theories are reviewed. Then, representative DACSes based on DEP trapping, traveling wave DEP systems, DEP field-flow fractionation and DEP barriers are introduced, and the strong and weak points of each DACS are discussed. Finally, for the purposes of commercialization, prerequisites regarding throughput, efficiency and recovery rates are discussed in detail through comparisons with commercial cell sorters (e.g. fluorescent activated and magnetic activated cell sorters).

  7. Protective antitumor activity through dendritic cell immunization is mediated by NK cell as well as CTL activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, K D; Kim, J K; Kim, S J; Choe, I S; Chung, T H; Choe, Y K; Lim, J S

    1999-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) capable of inducing the primary T cell response to antigen. Although tumor cells express target antigens, they are incapable of stimulating a tumor-specific immune response due to a defect in the costimulatory signal that is required for optimal activation of T cells. In this work, we describe a new approach using tumor-DC coculture to improve the antigen presenting capacity of tumor cells, which does not require a source of tumor-associated antigen. Immunization of a weakly immunogenic and progressive tumor cocultured with bone marrow-derived DCs generated an effective tumor vaccine. Immunization with the cocultured DCs was able to induce complete protective immunity against tumor challenges and was effective for the induction of tumor-specific CTL (cytotoxic T lymphocyte) activity. Furthermore, high NK cell activity was observed in mice in which tumors were rejected. In addition, immunization with tumor-pulsed DCs induced delayed tumor growth, but not tumor eradication in tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that coculture of DCs with tumors generated antitumor immunity due to the NK cell activation as well as tumor-specific T cell. This approach would be useful for designing tumor vaccines using DCs when the information about tumor antigens is limited.

  8. Gene Transfer in Eukaryotic Cells Using Activated Dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennig, Jörg

    Gene transfer into eukaryotic cells plays an important role in cell biology. Over the last 30 years a number of transfection methods have been developed to mediate gene transfer into eukaryotic cells. Classical methods include co-precipitation of DNA with calcium phosphate, charge-dependent precipitation of DNA with DEAE-dextran, electroporation of nucleic acids, and formation of transfection complexes between DNA and cationic liposomes. Gene transfer technologies based on activated PAMAM-dendrimers provide another class of transfection reagents. PAMAM-dendrimers are highly branched, spherical molecules. Activation of newly synthesized dendrimers involves hydrolytic removal of some of the branches, and results in a molecule with a higher degree of flexibility. Activated dendrimers assemble DNA into compact structures via charge interactions. Activated dendrimer - DNA complexes bind to the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells, and are transported into the cell by non-specific endocytosis. A structural model of the activated dendrimer - DNA complex and a potential mechanism for its uptake into cells will be discussed.

  9. Thrombomodulin inhibits the activation of eosinophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roeen, Ziaurahman; Toda, Masaaki; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Onishi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yasuma, Taro; Urawa, Masahito; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils and mast cells play critical roles in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Activation of both cells leads to the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in the airway of asthmatic patients. Recently, we have shown that inhaled thrombomodulin inhibits allergic bronchial asthma in a mouse model. In the present study, we hypothesize that thrombomodulin can inhibit the activation of eosinophils and mast cells. The effect of thrombomodulin on the activation and release of inflammatory mediators from eosinophils and mast cells was evaluated. Thrombomodulin inhibited the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis, upregulation of CD11b and degranulation of eosinophils. Treatment with thrombomodulin also significantly suppressed the degranulation and synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in eosinophils and mast cells. Mice treated with a low-dose of inhaled thrombomodulin have decreased number of eosinophils and activated mast cells and Th2 cytokines in the lungs compared to untreated mice. The results of this study suggest that thrombomodulin may modulate allergic responses by inhibiting the activation of both eosinophils and mast cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Fibroblast-Like Cells of Mesenchymal Origin of Cytotoxic Activity of Lymphocytes against NK-Sensitive Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Lupatov, A Yu; Kim, Ya S; Bystrykh, O A; Vakhrushev, I V; Pavlovich, S V; Yarygin, K N; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-02-01

    We studied immunosuppressive properties of skin fibroblasts and mesenchymal stromal cells against NK cells. In vitro experiments showed that mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from human umbilical cord and human skin fibroblasts can considerably attenuate cytotoxic activity of NK cells against Jurkat cells sensitive to NK-mediated lysis. NK cells cultured in lymphocyte population exhibited higher cytotoxic activity than isolated NK cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells or fibroblasts added 1:1 to lymphocyte culture almost completely suppressed NK cell cytotoxicity. This suggests that fibroblast-like cells can suppress not only isolated NK cells, but also NK cells in natural cell microenvironment.

  11. Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cells And Their Emerging Role In Health And Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Kumar, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigens presented by a class I MHC-like molecule CD1d, a member of the CD1 family. While most of the initial studies on NKT cells focused on a subset with semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) termed iNKT cells, majority of CD1d-restricted lipid-reactive human T cells express diverse TCRs and are termed as type II NKT cells. These cells constitute a distinct population of circulating and tissue-resident effector T cells with immune-regulatory properties. They react to a growing list of self- as well as non-self lipid ligands, and share some properties with both iNKT as well as conventional T cells. Emerging body of evidence points to their role in the regulation of immunity to pathogens/tumors and in autoimmune/metabolic disorders. Improved understanding of the biology of these cells and the ability to manipulate their function may be of therapeutic benefit in diverse disease conditions. PMID:28115591

  12. Drosophila Perlecan Regulates Intestinal Stem Cell Activity via Cell-Matrix Attachment

    PubMed Central

    You, Jia; Zhang, Yan; Li, Zhouhua; Lou, Zhefeng; Jin, Longjin; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Stem cells require specialized local microenvironments, termed niches, for normal retention, proliferation, and multipotency. Niches are composed of cells together with their associated extracellular matrix (ECM). Currently, the roles of ECM in regulating niche functions are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Perlecan (Pcan), a highly conserved ECM component, controls intestinal stem cell (ISC) activities and ISC-ECM attachment in Drosophila adult posterior midgut. Loss of Pcan from ISCs, but not other surrounding cells, causes ISCs to detach from underlying ECM, lose their identity, and fail to proliferate. These defects are not a result of a loss of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling activity but partially depend on integrin signaling activity. We propose that Pcan secreted by ISCs confers niche properties to the adjacent ECM that is required for ISC maintenance of stem cell identity, activity, and anchorage to the niche. PMID:24936464

  13. An Activation/Inhibition Network Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    memory is a powerful concept, no one has found a way of doing activation and inhibition on it, so I’ll stick to the simple mapping. --------- AAB -W...Rumongus Scale Integration.. G-9- Vorking Paper 31 Referens. Fahiman, S.. NL: A s=u LI= rpnng A" using rial-world kowledge . MIT Pess, Cambridge, 1979

  14. Micropipette force probe to quantify single-cell force generation: application to T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, Anna; Babataheri, Avin; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Barakat, Abdul I.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Hivroz, Claire; Husson, Julien

    2017-01-01

    In response to engagement of surface molecules, cells generate active forces that regulate many cellular processes. Developing tools that permit gathering mechanical and morphological information on these forces is of the utmost importance. Here we describe a new technique, the micropipette force probe, that uses a micropipette as a flexible cantilever that can aspirate at its tip a bead that is coated with molecules of interest and is brought in contact with the cell. This technique simultaneously allows tracking the resulting changes in cell morphology and mechanics as well as measuring the forces generated by the cell. To illustrate the power of this technique, we applied it to the study of human primary T lymphocytes (T-cells). It allowed the fine monitoring of pushing and pulling forces generated by T-cells in response to various activating antibodies and bending stiffness of the micropipette. We further dissected the sequence of mechanical and morphological events occurring during T-cell activation to model force generation and to reveal heterogeneity in the cell population studied. We also report the first measurement of the changes in Young’s modulus of T-cells during their activation, showing that T-cells stiffen within the first minutes of the activation process. PMID:28931600

  15. Baculovirus directly activates murine NK cells via TLR9.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, T; Suzuki, T; Chang, M O; Kitajima, M; Takaku, H

    2017-04-01

    The importance of natural killer (NK) cells in innate immune responses against tumors or viral infections enhances the appeal of NK cell-based immunotherapeutic approaches. We have recently reported that baculovirus (BV)-infected dendritic cells (DCs; BV-DCs) induce antitumor immunity against established tumors in mice. These antitumor effects were CD8 + T-cell and NK cell dependent; however, they were found to be CD4 + T-cell independent. In this study, we investigated the involvement of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the process of BV recognition by NK cells. We found that BV directly stimulated NK cells, induced the expression of the activation marker CD69 and promoted interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production and cytotoxicity. Moreover, TLR9 knockout in mice (tlr9-/- NK cells) inhibited NK cell responses to BV, indicating that TLR9 may have a relevant role in the BV-induced upregulation of NK cell functions. Our data demonstrated for the first time that NK cells directly recognize BV via TLR9, which provides opportunities for the use of this technique as an effective tool for BV-based immunotherapies against malignancies.

  16. Caerulomycin A Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Khatri, Neeraj; Vohra, Rakesh M.; Jolly, Ravinder S.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caerulomycin A (CaeA) is a known antifungal and antibiotic agent. Further, CaeA is reported to induce the expansion of regulatory T cell and prolongs the survival of skin allografts in mouse model of transplantation. In the current study, CaeA was purified and characterized from a novel species of actinomycetes, Actinoalloteichus spitiensis. The CaeA was identified for its novel immunosuppressive property by inhibiting in vitro and in vivo function of T cells. Methods Isolation, purification and characterization of CaeA were performed using High Performance Flash Chromatography (HPFC), NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. In vitro and in vivo T cell studies were conducted in mice using flowcytometry, ELISA and thymidine-[methyl-3H] incorporation. Results CaeA significantly suppressed T cell activation and IFN-γ secretion. Further, it inhibited the T cells function at G1 phase of cell cycle. No apoptosis was noticed by CaeA at a concentration responsible for inducing T cell retardation. Furthermore, the change in the function of B cells but not macrophages was observed. The CaeA as well exhibited substantial inhibitory activity in vivo. Conclusion This study describes for the first time novel in vitro and in vivo immunosuppressive function of CaeA on T cells and B cells. CaeA has enough potential to act as a future immunosuppressive drug. PMID:25286329

  17. Exosomes from uninfected cells activate transcription of latent HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Robert A; Schwab, Angela; DeMarino, Catherine; Akpamagbo, Yao; Lepene, Benjamin; Kassaye, Seble; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2017-07-14

    HIV-1 infection causes AIDS, infecting millions worldwide. The virus can persist in a state of chronic infection due to its ability to become latent. We have previously shown a link between HIV-1 infection and exosome production. Specifically, we have reported that exosomes transport viral proteins and RNA from infected cells to neighboring uninfected cells. These viral products could then elicit an innate immune response, leading to activation of the Toll-like receptor and NF-κB pathways. In this study, we asked whether exosomes from uninfected cells could activate latent HIV-1 in infected cells. We observed that irrespective of combination antiretroviral therapy, both short- and long-length viral transcripts were increased in wild-type HIV-1-infected cells exposed to purified exosomes from uninfected cells. A search for a possible mechanism for this finding revealed that the exosomes increase RNA polymerase II loading onto the HIV-1 promoter in the infected cells. These viral transcripts, which include trans-activation response (TAR) RNA and a novel RNA that we termed TAR- gag , can then be packaged into exosomes and potentially be exported to neighboring uninfected cells, leading to increased cellular activation. To better decipher the exosome release pathways involved, we used siRNA to suppress expression of ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins and found that ESCRT II and IV significantly control exosome release. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes from uninfected cells activate latent HIV-1 in infected cells and that true transcriptional latency may not be possible in vivo , especially in the presence of combination antiretroviral therapy.

  18. Education of human natural killer cells by activating killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Fauriat, Cyril; Ivarsson, Martin A; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2010-02-11

    Expression of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) specific for self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules provides an educational signal that generates functional natural killer (NK) cells. However, the effects of activating KIRs specific for self-MHC class I on NK-cell education remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that the activating receptor KIR2DS1 tunes down the responsiveness of freshly isolated human NK cells to target cell stimulation in donors homozygous for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C2, the ligand of KIR2DS1. The tuning was apparent in KIR2DS1(+) NK cells lacking expression of inhibitory KIRs and CD94/NKG2A, as well as in KIR2DS1(+) NK cells coexpressing the inhibitory MHC class I-specific receptors CD94/NKG2A and KIR2DL3, but not KIR2DL1. However, the tuning of responsiveness was restricted to target cell recognition because KIR2DS1(+) NK cells responded well to stimulation with exogenous cytokines. Our results provide the first example of human NK-cell education by an activating KIR and suggest that the education of NK cells via activating KIRs is a mechanism to secure tolerance that complements education via inhibitory KIRs.

  19. Telomere elongation in immortal human cells without detectable telomerase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, T M; Englezou, A; Gupta, J; Bacchetti, S; Reddel, R R

    1995-01-01

    Immortalization of human cells is often associated with reactivation of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds TTAGGG repeats onto telomeres and compensates for their shortening. We examined whether telomerase activation is necessary for immortalization. All normal human fibroblasts tested were negative for telomerase activity. Thirteen out of 13 DNA tumor virus-transformed cell cultures were also negative in the pre-crisis (i.e. non-immortalized) stage. Of 35 immortalized cell lines, 20 had telomerase activity as expected, but 15 had no detectable telomerase. The 15 telomerase-negative immortalized cell lines all had very long and heterogeneous telomeres of up to 50 kb. Hybrids between telomerase-negative and telomerase-positive cells senesced. Two senescent hybrids demonstrated telomerase activity, indicating that activation of telomerase is not sufficient for immortalization. Some hybrid clones subsequently recommenced proliferation and became immortalized either with or without telomerase activity. Those without telomerase activity also had very long and heterogeneous telomeres. Taken together, these data suggest that the presence of lengthened or stabilized telomeres is necessary for immortalization, and that this may be achieved either by the reactivation of telomerase or by a novel and as yet unidentified mechanism. Images PMID:7556065

  20. Telomere elongation in immortal human cells without detectable telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Bryan, T M; Englezou, A; Gupta, J; Bacchetti, S; Reddel, R R

    1995-09-01

    Immortalization of human cells is often associated with reactivation of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds TTAGGG repeats onto telomeres and compensates for their shortening. We examined whether telomerase activation is necessary for immortalization. All normal human fibroblasts tested were negative for telomerase activity. Thirteen out of 13 DNA tumor virus-transformed cell cultures were also negative in the pre-crisis (i.e. non-immortalized) stage. Of 35 immortalized cell lines, 20 had telomerase activity as expected, but 15 had no detectable telomerase. The 15 telomerase-negative immortalized cell lines all had very long and heterogeneous telomeres of up to 50 kb. Hybrids between telomerase-negative and telomerase-positive cells senesced. Two senescent hybrids demonstrated telomerase activity, indicating that activation of telomerase is not sufficient for immortalization. Some hybrid clones subsequently recommenced proliferation and became immortalized either with or without telomerase activity. Those without telomerase activity also had very long and heterogeneous telomeres. Taken together, these data suggest that the presence of lengthened or stabilized telomeres is necessary for immortalization, and that this may be achieved either by the reactivation of telomerase or by a novel and as yet unidentified mechanism.

  1. Idiopathic Mast Cell Activation Syndrome With Associated Salicylate Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Rechenauer, Tobias; Raithel, Martin; Götze, Thomas; Siebenlist, Gregor; Rückel, Aline; Baenkler, Hanns-Wolf; Hartmann, Arndt; Haller, Florian; Hoerning, André

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic mast cell activation syndrome can be a rare cause for chronic abdominal pain in children. It remains a diagnosis by exclusion that can be particularly challenging due to the vast variety of possible clinical manifestations. We present a 13-year-old boy who suffered from a multitude of unspecific complaints over a long period of time. In this case, an assessment of mast cell-derived metabolites and immunohistochemical analysis of bioptic specimen was worthwhile. After ruling out, primary (oncologic) and secondary causes for mast cell activation, pharmacologic treatment adapted to the patient's salicylate intolerance resulted in a major relief of symptoms.

  2. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2006-07-05

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1{sup V12} or Cdc42{sup V12} could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra ormore » SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA{sup L63} decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia.« less

  3. Rhythmic autocrine activity in cultured insect epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Mesnier, M; Partiaoglou, N; Oberlander, H; Porcheron, P

    2000-05-01

    It is now well established that ecdysteroids can be produced in insects in the absence of prothoracic glands. In this respect, it has been shown that cells in culture can produce ecdysteroids. Our aims were: (1) to determine whether ecdysteroid target cells of epidermal origin could also be the source of ecdysteroids; (2) to monitor more accurately the kinetics of ecdysteroid production; and (3) to check for possible relationships between this synthetic activity and dynamics of cell division. An insect cell line (IAL-PID2) established from imaginal discs of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, with wild-type sensitivity to ecdysteroids was used in our study. Our results showed that the Plodia cell line exhibited autocrine activity. When division of IAL-PID2 cells was synchronized, a rhythmic production of ecdysteroids was observed. However, further experiments indicated that this rhythmicity could be cell autonomous. This led us to anticipate the existence of two cell subpopulations that would be able to produce ecdysteroids rhythmically, a minor one that would be cell cycle serum-independent population, and a major population that would need serum growth factors to proliferate and produce ecdysteroids. Qualitative study of the ecdysteroid content of the media clearly showed that ecdysone was the major immunoreactive product. Taken together, our findings clearly show that an insect cell line of epidermal origin is capable of rhythmic autocrine production of ecdysteroids. These results support the hypothesis that alternate sites for ecdysteroid production in vivo may exist and could play a role in local regulation of development. We now plan to determine the cellular basis of this rhythmic autocrine activity and to confirm the existence of growth factor-autonomous cells in the culture as well as the potent role played by ecdysteroids in the cross-talk between various cell subpopulations. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  5. Osthole activates glucose uptake but blocks full activation in L929 fibroblast cells, and inhibits uptake in HCLE cells

    PubMed Central

    Alabi, Ola D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Kerk, Samuel A.; Braun, Emily; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Osthole, a coumarin derivative, has been used in Chinese medicine and studies have suggested a potential use in treatment of diabetes and cancers. Therefore, we investigated the effects of osthole and other coumarins on GLUT1 activity in two cell lines that exclusively express GLUT1. Main Methods We measured the magnitude and time frame of the effects of osthole and related coumarins on glucose uptake in two cells lines; L929 fibroblast cells which have low GLUT1 expression levels and low basal glucose uptake and HCLE cells which have high GLUT1 concentrations and high basal uptake. We also explored the effects of these coumarins in combination with other GLUT1 activators. Key findings Osthole activates glucose uptake in L929 cells with a modest maximum 1.7-fold activation achieved by 50 µM with both activation and recovery occurring within minutes. However, osthole blocks full acute activation of glucose uptake by other, more robust activators. This behavior mimics the effects of other thiol reactive compounds and suggests that osthole is interacting with cysteine residues, possibly within GLUT1 itself. Coumarin, 7-hydroxycoumarin, and 7-methoxycoumarin, do not affect glucose uptake, which is consistent with the notion that the isoprenoid structure in osthole may be important to gain membrane access to GLUT1. In contrast to its effects in L929 cells, osthole inhibits basal glucose uptake in the more active HCLE cells. Significance The differential effects of osthole in L929 and HCLE cells indicated that regulation of GLUT1 varies, likely depending on its membrane concentration. PMID:24657891

  6. Osthole activates glucose uptake but blocks full activation in L929 fibroblast cells, and inhibits uptake in HCLE cells.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Ola D; Gunnink, Stephen M; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Kerk, Samuel A; Braun, Emily; Louters, Larry L

    2014-05-02

    Osthole, a coumarin derivative, has been used in Chinese medicine and studies have suggested a potential use in treatment of diabetes and cancers. Therefore, we investigated the effects of osthole and other coumarins on GLUT1 activity in two cell lines that exclusively express GLUT1. We measured the magnitude and time frame of the effects of osthole and related coumarins on glucose uptake in two cells lines; L929 fibroblast cells which have low GLUT1 expression levels and low basal glucose uptake and HCLE cells which have high GLUT1 concentrations and high basal uptake. We also explored the effects of these coumarins in combination with other GLUT1 activators. Osthole activates glucose uptake in L929 cells with a modest maximum 1.7-fold activation achieved by 50 μM with both activation and recovery occurring within minutes. However, osthole blocks full acute activation of glucose uptake by other, more robust activators. This behavior mimics the effects of other thiol reactive compounds and suggests that osthole is interacting with cysteine residues, possibly within GLUT1 itself. Coumarin, 7-hydroxycoumarin, and 7-methoxycoumarin, do not affect glucose uptake, which is consistent with the notion that the isoprenoid structure in osthole may be important to gain membrane access to GLUT1. In contrast to its effects in L929 cells, osthole inhibits basal glucose uptake in the more active HCLE cells. The differential effects of osthole in L929 and HCLE cells indicated that regulation of GLUT1 varies, likely depending on its membrane concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolation of osteogenic cells from the trauma-activated periosteum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hsiao; Bullock, John

    1987-12-01

    Closed, greenstick type fractures were created in adult male white New Zealand rabbits. After a waiting period of 5 days the developing callous and bone approximately 1 cm to each side of the callous was harvested and cell cultures established. Biochemical assays for total protein, alkaline phosphatase activity and glycosamino-glycan content were performed on spent media collected at each change and upon the cells after their termination, in an attempt to more fully characterize the osteoblast population. Since little is known about bone forming cells isolated from this source it is important to establish baseline data so as to be able to relate reactions of these cells to altered environmental conditions.

  8. Mast cells in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease - Activators and actions.

    PubMed

    Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2017-12-05

    Mast cells are potent actors involved in inflammatory reactions in various tissues, including both in the intimal and the adventitial layers of atherosclerotic arteries. In the arterial intima, the site of atherogenesis, mast cells are activated to degranulate, and thereby triggered to release an abundance of preformed inflammatory mediators, notably histamine, heparin, neutral proteases and cytokines stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules. Depending on the stimulus, mast cell activation may also launch prolonged synthesis and secretion of single bioactive molecules, such as cytokines and derivatives of arachidonic acid. The mast cell-derived mediators may impede the functions of different types of cells present in atherosclerotic lesions, and also compromise the structural and functional integrity of the intimal extracellular matrix. In the adventitial layer of atherosclerotic coronary arteries, mast cells locate next to peptidergic sensory nerve fibers, which, by releasing neuropeptides may activate mast cells to release vasoactive compounds capable of triggering local vasoconstriction. The concerted actions of arterial mast cells have the potential to contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, and ultimately to destabilization and rupture of an advanced atherosclerotic plaque with ensuing atherothrombotic complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu; Feracci, Helene

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealedmore » for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.« less

  10. Platelet activation suppresses HIV-1 infection of T cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Platelets, anucleate cell fragments abundant in human blood, can capture HIV-1 and platelet counts have been associated with viral load and disease progression. However, the impact of platelets on HIV-1 infection of T cells is unclear. Results We found that platelets suppress HIV-1 spread in co-cultured T cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Platelets containing granules inhibited HIV-1 spread in T cells more efficiently than degranulated platelets, indicating that the granule content might exert antiviral activity. Indeed, supernatants from activated and thus degranulated platelets suppressed HIV-1 infection. Infection was inhibited at the stage of host cell entry and inhibition was independent of the viral strain or coreceptor tropism. In contrast, blockade of HIV-2 and SIV entry was less efficient. The chemokine CXCL4, a major component of platelet granules, blocked HIV-1 entry and neutralization of CXCL4 in platelet supernatants largely abrogated their anti-HIV-1 activity. Conclusions Release of CXCL4 by activated platelets inhibits HIV-1 infection of adjacent T cells at the stage of virus entry. The inhibitory activity of platelet-derived CXCL4 suggests a role of platelets in the defense against infection by HIV-1 and potentially other pathogens. PMID:23634812

  11. Platelet activation suppresses HIV-1 infection of T cells.

    PubMed

    Solomon Tsegaye, Theodros; Gnirß, Kerstin; Rahe-Meyer, Niels; Kiene, Miriam; Krämer-Kühl, Annika; Behrens, Georg; Münch, Jan; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    Platelets, anucleate cell fragments abundant in human blood, can capture HIV-1 and platelet counts have been associated with viral load and disease progression. However, the impact of platelets on HIV-1 infection of T cells is unclear. We found that platelets suppress HIV-1 spread in co-cultured T cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Platelets containing granules inhibited HIV-1 spread in T cells more efficiently than degranulated platelets, indicating that the granule content might exert antiviral activity. Indeed, supernatants from activated and thus degranulated platelets suppressed HIV-1 infection. Infection was inhibited at the stage of host cell entry and inhibition was independent of the viral strain or coreceptor tropism. In contrast, blockade of HIV-2 and SIV entry was less efficient. The chemokine CXCL4, a major component of platelet granules, blocked HIV-1 entry and neutralization of CXCL4 in platelet supernatants largely abrogated their anti-HIV-1 activity. Release of CXCL4 by activated platelets inhibits HIV-1 infection of adjacent T cells at the stage of virus entry. The inhibitory activity of platelet-derived CXCL4 suggests a role of platelets in the defense against infection by HIV-1 and potentially other pathogens.

  12. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Cell Cycle-Dependent Rho GTPase Activity Dynamically Regulates Cancer Cell Motility and Invasion In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Shinji; Kamioka, Yuji; Mimori, Koshi; Naito, Yoko; Ishii, Taeko; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nishida, Naohiro; Maeda, Sakae; Naito, Atsushi; Kikuta, Junichi; Nishikawa, Keizo; Nishimura, Junichi; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Ikeda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Ishii, Hideshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Kikuchi, Akira; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism behind the spatiotemporal control of cancer cell dynamics and its possible association with cell proliferation has not been well established. By exploiting the intravital imaging technique, we found that cancer cell motility and invasive properties were closely associated with the cell cycle. In vivo inoculation of human colon cancer cells bearing fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) demonstrated an unexpected phenomenon: S/G2/M cells were more motile and invasive than G1 cells. Microarray analyses showed that Arhgap11a, an uncharacterized Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP), was expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Expression of ARHGAP11A in cancer cells suppressed RhoA-dependent mechanisms, such as stress fiber formation and focal adhesion, which made the cells more prone to migrate. We also demonstrated that RhoA suppression by ARHGAP11A induced augmentation of relative Rac1 activity, leading to an increase in the invasive properties. RNAi-based inhibition of Arhgap11a reduced the invasion and in vivo expansion of cancers. Additionally, analysis of human specimens showed the significant up-regulation of Arhgap11a in colon cancers, which was correlated with clinical invasion status. The present study suggests that ARHGAP11A, a cell cycle-dependent RhoGAP, is a critical regulator of cancer cell mobility and is thus a promising therapeutic target in invasive cancers. PMID:24386239

  14. Cell cycle-dependent Rho GTPase activity dynamically regulates cancer cell motility and invasion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Shinji; Kamioka, Yuji; Mimori, Koshi; Naito, Yoko; Ishii, Taeko; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nishida, Naohiro; Maeda, Sakae; Naito, Atsushi; Kikuta, Junichi; Nishikawa, Keizo; Nishimura, Junichi; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Ikeda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Ishii, Hideshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Kikuchi, Akira; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism behind the spatiotemporal control of cancer cell dynamics and its possible association with cell proliferation has not been well established. By exploiting the intravital imaging technique, we found that cancer cell motility and invasive properties were closely associated with the cell cycle. In vivo inoculation of human colon cancer cells bearing fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) demonstrated an unexpected phenomenon: S/G2/M cells were more motile and invasive than G1 cells. Microarray analyses showed that Arhgap11a, an uncharacterized Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP), was expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Expression of ARHGAP11A in cancer cells suppressed RhoA-dependent mechanisms, such as stress fiber formation and focal adhesion, which made the cells more prone to migrate. We also demonstrated that RhoA suppression by ARHGAP11A induced augmentation of relative Rac1 activity, leading to an increase in the invasive properties. RNAi-based inhibition of Arhgap11a reduced the invasion and in vivo expansion of cancers. Additionally, analysis of human specimens showed the significant up-regulation of Arhgap11a in colon cancers, which was correlated with clinical invasion status. The present study suggests that ARHGAP11A, a cell cycle-dependent RhoGAP, is a critical regulator of cancer cell mobility and is thus a promising therapeutic target in invasive cancers.

  15. A PTEN inhibitor displays preclinical activity against hepatocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Augello, Giuseppa; Puleio, Roberto; Emma, Maria Rita; Cusimano, Antonella; Loria, Guido R.; McCubrey, James A.; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is considered a tumor suppressor gene. However, PTEN mutations rarely occur in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whereas heterozygosity of PTEN, resulting in reduced PTEN expression, has been observed in 32–44% of HCC patients. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the small molecule PTEN inhibitor VO-OHpic in HCC cells. VO-OHpic inhibited cell viability, cell proliferation and colony formation, and induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in Hep3B (low PTEN expression) and to a lesser extent in PLC/PRF/5 (high PTEN expression) cells, but not in PTEN-negative SNU475 cells. VO-OHpic synergistically inhibited cell viability when combined with PI3K/mTOR and RAF/MEK/ERK pathway inhibitors, but only in Hep3B cells, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice bearing xenografts of Hep3B cells. Therefore, we demonstrated for the first time that VO-OHpic inhibited cell growth and induced senescence in HCC cells with low PTEN expression, and that the combination of VO-OHpic with PI3K/mTOR and RAF/MEK/ERK inhibitors resulted in a more effective tumor cell kill. Our findings, hence, provide proof-of-principle evidence that pharmacological inhibition of PTEN may represent a promising approach for HCC therapy in a subclass of patients with a low PTEN expression. PMID:26794644

  16. Berberine displays antitumor activity in esophageal cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Xian; Qi, Bo; Yao, Wen-Jian; Gu, Cheng-Wei; Wei, Xiu-Feng; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Bao-Sheng

    2017-04-14

    To investigate the effects of berberine on esophageal cancer (EC) cells and its molecular mechanisms. Human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line KYSE-70 and esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line SKGT4 were used. The effects of berberine on cell proliferation were evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. For cell cycle progression, KYSE-70 cells were stained with propidium iodide (PI) staining buffer (10 mg/mL PI and 100 mg/mL RNase A) for 30 min and cell cycle was analyzed using a BD FACSCalibur flow cytometer. For apoptosis assay, cells were stained with an Annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis detection kit. The rate of apoptotic cells was analyzed using a dual laser flow cytometer and estimated using BD ModFit software. Levels of proteins related to cell cycle and apoptosis were examined by western blotting. Berberine treatment resulted in growth inhibition of KYSE-70 and SKGT4 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. KYSE-70 cells were more susceptible to the inhibitory activities of berberine than SKGT4 cells were. In KYSE-70 cells treated with 50 μmol/L berberine for 48 h, the number of cells in G 2 /M phase (25.94% ± 5.01%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (9.77% ± 1.28%, P < 0.01), and berberine treatment resulted in p21 up-regulation in KYSE-70 cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that berberine significantly augmented the KYSE-70 apoptotic population at 12 and 24 h post-treatment, when compared with control cells (0.83% vs 43.78% at 12 h, P < 0.05; 0.15% vs 81.86% at 24 h, P < 0.01), and berberine-induced apoptotic effect was stronger at 24 h compared with 12 h. Western blotting showed that berberine inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin and p70S6K, and enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in a sustained manner. Berberine is an inhibitor of human EC cell growth and could be considered as a potential drug for the treatment

  17. Berberine displays antitumor activity in esophageal cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Xian; Qi, Bo; Yao, Wen-Jian; Gu, Cheng-Wei; Wei, Xiu-Feng; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Bao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of berberine on esophageal cancer (EC) cells and its molecular mechanisms. METHODS Human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line KYSE-70 and esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line SKGT4 were used. The effects of berberine on cell proliferation were evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. For cell cycle progression, KYSE-70 cells were stained with propidium iodide (PI) staining buffer (10 mg/mL PI and 100 mg/mL RNase A) for 30 min and cell cycle was analyzed using a BD FACSCalibur flow cytometer. For apoptosis assay, cells were stained with an Annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis detection kit. The rate of apoptotic cells was analyzed using a dual laser flow cytometer and estimated using BD ModFit software. Levels of proteins related to cell cycle and apoptosis were examined by western blotting. RESULTS Berberine treatment resulted in growth inhibition of KYSE-70 and SKGT4 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. KYSE-70 cells were more susceptible to the inhibitory activities of berberine than SKGT4 cells were. In KYSE-70 cells treated with 50 μmol/L berberine for 48 h, the number of cells in G2/M phase (25.94% ± 5.01%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (9.77% ± 1.28%, P < 0.01), and berberine treatment resulted in p21 up-regulation in KYSE-70 cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that berberine significantly augmented the KYSE-70 apoptotic population at 12 and 24 h post-treatment, when compared with control cells (0.83% vs 43.78% at 12 h, P < 0.05; 0.15% vs 81.86% at 24 h, P < 0.01), and berberine-induced apoptotic effect was stronger at 24 h compared with 12 h. Western blotting showed that berberine inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin and p70S6K, and enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in a sustained manner. CONCLUSION Berberine is an inhibitor of human EC cell growth and could be considered as a

  18. Neuropeptides activate human mast cell degranulation and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Kulka, Marianna; Sheen, Cecilia H; Tancowny, Brian P; Grammer, Leslie C; Schleimer, Robert P

    2008-01-01

    During neuronal-induced inflammation, mast cells may respond to stimuli such as neuropeptides in an FcεRI-independent manner. In this study, we characterized human mast cell responses to substance P (SP), nerve growth factor (NGF), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and compared these responses to human mast cell responses to immunoglobulin E (IgE)/anti-IgE and compound 48/80. Primary cultured mast cells, generated from CD34+ progenitors in the presence of stem cell factor and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and human cultured mast cells (LAD2) were stimulated with these and other stimuli (gastrin, concanavalin A, radiocontrast media, and mannitol) and their degranulation and chemokine production was assessed. VIP and SP stimulated primary human mast cells and LAD cells to degranulate; gastrin, concanavalin A, radiocontrast media, mannitol, CGRP and NGF did not activate degranulation. While anti-IgE stimulation did not induce significant production of chemokines, stimulation with VIP, SP or compound 48/80 potently induced production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, inducible protein-10, monokine induced by interferon-γ (MIG), RANTES (regulated on activation, normal, T-cell expressed, and secreted) and IL-8. VIP, SP and compound 48/80 also activated release of tumour necrosis factor, IL-3 and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, but not IL-4, interferon-γ or eotaxin. Human mast cells expressed surface neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R), NK2R, NK3R and VIP receptor type 2 (VPAC2) but not VPAC1 and activation of human mast cells by IgE/anti-IgE up-regulated expression of VPAC2, NK2R, and NK3R. These studies demonstrate the pattern of receptor expression and activation of mast cell by a host of G-protein coupled receptor ligands and suggest that SP and VIP activate a unique signalling pathway in human mast cells. These results are likely to have direct relevance to neuronally induced inflammatory diseases. PMID

  19. Biofuel cell operating on activated THP-1 cells: A fuel and substrate study.

    PubMed

    Javor, Kristina; Tisserant, Jean-Nicolas; Stemmer, Andreas

    2017-01-15

    It is known that electrochemical energy can be harvested from mammalian cells, more specifically from white blood cells (WBC). This study focuses on an improved biofuel cell operating on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) activated THP-1 human monocytic cells. Electrochemical investigation showed strong evidence pointing towards hydrogen peroxide being the primary current source, confirming that the current originates from NADPH oxidase activity. Moreover, an adequate substrate for differentiation and activation of THP-1 cells was examined. ITO, gold, platinum and glass were tested and the amount of superoxide anion produced by NADPH oxidase was measured by spectrophotometry through WST-1 reduction at 450nm and used as an indicator of cellular activity and viability. These substrates were subsequently used in a conventional two-compartment biofuel cell where the power density output was recorded. The material showing the highest cell activity compared to the reference cell culture plate and the highest power output was ITO. Under our experimental conditions, a power density of 4.5μW/cm 2 was reached. To the best of our knowledge, this is a threefold higher power output than other leukocyte biofuel cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Anticancer activity of Astragalus polysaccharide in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao-Yan; Ke, Yuan; Zeng, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Ying-Wen; Yu, Hai-Jun

    2017-01-01

    We have reported that Chinese herbs Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) can inhibit nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activity during the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice. NF-κB plays important roles in genesis, growth, development and metastasis of cancer. NF-κB is also involved in the development of treatment resistance in tumors. Here we investigated the antitumor activity of APS in human non-small cell lung cells (A549 and NCI-H358) and the related mechanisms of action. The dose-effect and time-effect of antitumor of APS were determined in human lung cancer cell line A549 and NCI-H358. The inhibition effect of APS on the P65 mRNA and protein was detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot in A549 cells respectively. The inhibition effect of APS on the p50, CyclinD1 and Bcl-xL protein was detected by Western blot in A549 cells respectively. The effect of APS on NF-κB transcription activity was measured with NF-κB luciferase detection. Finally, the nude mice A549 xenograft was introduced to confirm the antitumor activity of APS in vivo. Cell viability detection results indicated that APS can inhibit the proliferation of human lung cancer cell line A549 and NCI-H358 in the concentration of 20 and 40 mg/mL. NF-κB activator Phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) can attenuate the antitumor activity of APS in both cell lines, but NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 (Bay) can enhance the effect of APS in both cell lines. In vivo APS can delay the growth of A549 xenograft in BALB/C nude mice. APS can down-regulate the expression of P65 mRNA and protein of A549 cells and decrease the expression of p50, CyclinD1 and Bcl-xL protein. The luciferase detection showed that the APS could reduce the P65 transcription activity in A549 cells. PMA can partially alleviate the inhibition activity of P65 transcription activity of APS in A549 cells, and Bay can enhance the down-regulation of the P65 transcription activity induced by APS in A549 cells. APS has a

  1. Limited tumor infiltration by activated T effector cells restricts the therapeutic activity of regulatory T cell depletion against established melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Quezada, Sergio A.; Peggs, Karl S.; Simpson, Tyler R.; Shen, Yuelei; Littman, Dan R.; Allison, James P.

    2008-01-01

    Interference with inhibitory immunological checkpoints controlling T cell activation provides new opportunities to augment cancer immunotherapies. Whereas cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4 blockade has shown promising preclinical and clinical results, therapeutic CD4+CD25+ T reg cell depletion has failed to consistently enhance immune-based therapies. Using B16/BL6, a transplantable murine melanoma model, we show a dichotomy between the effects of T reg cell depletion on tumor rejection dependent on whether depletion occurs before (prophylactic) or after (therapeutic) tumor engraftment. Failure to promote rejection with therapeutic depletion is not related to lack of T reg cell depletion, to elimination of CD25+ effector T cells, or to a failure to enhance systemic antitumor T cell responses, but correlates with failure of effector cells to infiltrate the tumor and increase the intratumor ratio of effector T cell/T reg cell. Finally, systemic antitumor responses generated upon therapeutic T reg cell depletion are significantly stronger than those generated in the presence of T reg cells, and are capable of eliciting rejection of established tumors after transfer into immunoablated recipients receiving combination immunotherapy. The data demonstrate a dissociation between measurable systemic responses and tumor rejection during CD25-directed T reg cell depletion, and suggest an alternative, clinically applicable strategy for the treatment of established tumors. PMID:18725522

  2. Adenosine production by human B cells and B cell–mediated suppression of activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Saze, Zenichiro; Schuler, Patrick J.; Hong, Chang-Sook; Cheng, Dongmei; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-independent role of B cells in modulating T-cell responses is incompletely understood. Freshly isolated or cultured B cells isolated from the peripheral blood of 30 normal donors were evaluated for CD39 and CD73 coexpression, the ability to produce adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine (ADO) in the presence of exogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as well as A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 adenosine receptor (ADOR) expression. Human circulating B cells coexpress ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73, hydrolyze exogenous ATP to 5′-AMP and ADO, and express messenger RNA for A1R, A2AR, and A3R. 2-chloroadenosine inhibited B-cell proliferation and cytokine expression, and only A3R selective antagonist restored B-cell functions. This suggested that B cells use the A3R for autocrine signaling and self-regulation. Mediated effects on B-cell growth ± ADOR antagonists or agonists were tested in carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester assays. In cocultures, resting B cells upregulated functions of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. However, in vitro–activated B cells downregulated CD73 expression, mainly produced 5′-AMP, and inhibited T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. These B cells acquire the ability to restrict potentially harmful effects of activated T cells. Thus, B cells emerge as a key regulatory component of T cell–B cell interactions, and their dual regulatory activity is mediated by the products of ATP hydrolysis, 5′-AMP, and ADO. PMID:23678003

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Disrupt mTOR-Signaling and Aerobic Glycolysis During T-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Martin; Hofmann, Andreas D; Bruns, Heiko; Haibach, Martina; Loschinski, Romy; Saul, Domenica; Mackensen, Andreas; Le Blanc, Katarina; Jitschin, Regina; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess numerous regenerative and immune modulating functions. Transplantation across histocompatibility barriers is feasible due to their hypo-immunogenicity. MSCs have emerged as promising tools for treating graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. It is well established that their clinical efficacy is substantially attributed to fine-tuning of T-cell responses. At the same time, increasing evidence suggests that metabolic processes control T-cell function and fate. Here, we investigated the MSCs' impact on the metabolic framework of activated T-cells. In fact, MSCs led to mitigated mTOR signaling. This phenomenon was accompanied by a weaker glycolytic response (including glucose uptake, glycolytic rate, and upregulation of glycolytic machinery) toward T-cell activating stimuli. Notably, MSCs express indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which mediates T-cell suppressive tryptophan catabolism. Our observations suggest that IDO-induced tryptophan depletion interferes with a tryptophan-sufficiency signal that promotes cellular mTOR activation. Despite an immediate suppression of T-cell responses, MSCs foster a metabolically quiescent T-cell phenotype characterized by reduced mTOR signaling and glycolysis, increased autophagy, and lower oxidative stress levels. In fact, those features have previously been shown to promote generation of long-lived memory cells and it remains to be elucidated how MSC-induced metabolic effects shape in vivo T-cell immunity. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Phosphoinositide 3–kinase γ participates in T cell receptor–induced T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Alcázar, Isabela; Marqués, Miriam; Kumar, Amit; Hirsch, Emilio; Wymann, Matthias; Carrera, Ana C.; Barber, Domingo F.

    2007-01-01

    Class I phosphoinositide 3–kinases (PI3Ks) constitute a family of enzymes that generates 3-phosphorylated polyphosphoinositides at the cell membrane after stimulation of protein tyrosine (Tyr) kinase–associated receptors or G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). The class I PI3Ks are divided into two types: class IA p85/p110 heterodimers, which are activated by Tyr kinases, and the class IB p110γ isoform, which is activated by GPCR. Although the T cell receptor (TCR) is a protein Tyr kinase–associated receptor, p110γ deletion affects TCR-induced T cell stimulation. We examined whether the TCR activates p110γ, as well as the consequences of interfering with p110γ expression or function for T cell activation. We found that after TCR ligation, p110γ interacts with Gαq/11, lymphocyte-specific Tyr kinase, and ζ-associated protein. TCR stimulation activates p110γ, which affects 3-phosphorylated polyphosphoinositide levels at the immunological synapse. We show that TCR-stimulated p110γ controls RAS-related C3 botulinum substrate 1 activity, F-actin polarization, and the interaction between T cells and antigen-presenting cells, illustrating a crucial role for p110γ in TCR-induced T cell activation. PMID:17998387

  5. NAMPT/PBEF1 enzymatic activity is indispensable for myeloma cell growth and osteoclast activity

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Khan, Sharmin; Ling, Wen; Bam, Rakesh; Li, Xin; van Rhee, Frits; Usmani, Saad; Barlogie, Bart; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) cells typically grow in focal lesions, stimulating osteoclasts that destroy bone and support MM. Osteoclasts and MM cells are hypermetabolic. The coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is not only essential for cellular metabolism; it also affects activity of NAD-dependent enzymes, such as PARP-1 and SIRT-1. Nicotinamide phos-phoribosyltransferase (NAMPT/PBEF/visfatin, encoded by PBEF1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in NAD+ biosynthesis from nicotinamide. Coculture of primary MM cells with osteoclasts induced PBEF1 upregulation in both cell types. PBEF1 expression was higher in experimental myelomatous bones than in nonmyelomatous bone and higher in MM patients’ plasma cells than in healthy donors’ counterparts. APO866 is a specific PBEF1 inhibitor known to deplete cellular NAD+, APO866 at low nanomolar concentrations inhibited growth of primary MM cells or MM cell lines cultured alone or cocultured with osteoclasts and induced apoptosis in these cells. PBEF1 activity and NAD+ content were reduced in MM cells by APO866, resulting in lower activity of PARP-1 and SIRT-1. The inhibitory effect of APO866 on MM cell growth was abrogated by supplementation of extracellular NAD+ or NAM. APO866 inhibited NF-κB activity in osteoclast precursors and suppressed osteoclast formation and activity. PBEF1 knockdown similarly inhibited MM cell growth and osteoclast formation. In the SCID-rab model, APO866 inhibited growth of primary MM and H929 cells and prevented bone disease. These findings indicate that MM cells and osteoclasts are highly sensitive to NAD+ depletion and that PBEF1 inhibition represents a novel approach to target cellular metabolism and inhibit PARP-1 and bone disease in MM. PMID:23435312

  6. Vinculin contributes to Cell Invasion by Regulating Contractile Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2008-07-01

    Vinculin is a component of the focal adhesion complex and is described as a mechano-coupling protein connecting the integrin receptor and the actin cytoskeleton. Vinculin knock-out (k.o.) cells (vin-/-) displayed increased migration on a 2-D collagen- or fibronectin-coated substrate compared to wildtype cells, but the role of vinculin in cell migration through a 3-D connective tissue is unknown. We determined the invasiveness of established tumor cell lines using a 3-D collagen invasion assay. Gene expression analysis of 4 invasive and 4 non-invasive tumor cell lines revealed that vinculin expression was significantly increased in invasive tumor cell lines. To analyze the mechanisms by which vinculin increased cell invasion in a 3-D gel, we studied mouse embryonic fibroblasts wildtype and vin-/- cells. Wildtype cells were 3-fold more invasive compared vin-/- cells. We hypothesized that the ability to generate sufficient traction forces is a prerequisite for tumor cell migration in a 3-D connective tissue matrix. Using traction microscopy, we found that wildtype exerted 3-fold higher tractions on fibronectin-coated polyacrylamide gels compared to vin-/- cells. These results show that vinculin controls two fundamental functions that lead to opposite effects on cell migration in a 2-D vs. a 3-D environment: On the one hand, vinculin stabilizes the focal adhesions (mechano-coupling function) and thereby reduces motility in 2-D. On the other hand, vinculin is also a potent activator of traction generation (mechano-regulating function) that is important for cell invasion in a 3-D environment.

  7. HURTLE CELLS IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ACTIVITIES IN HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS PARENCHYMA.

    PubMed

    Tsagareli, Z; Kvachadze, T; Melikadze, E; Metreveli, L; Nikobadze, E; Gogiashvili, L

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the participation and utility of Hǘrtle cells morphological requirment and transformation under Hashimoto autoimmune thyroiditis versus Riedel´s struma. Several markers have been evaluated to detect induced activities of Hǘrtle cells. Study subject - specimens (tissue fragments) collected from TG surgery (thyroidectomy) for mollecular (receptor) diagnosis of Hǘrtle cells activities using routine histological and immunohistochemical samples. 89 cases were selected in Hashimoto thyroiditis diagnosis with Hǘrtle cells history (adenoma and adenomatous grouth of oncocytes). Markers as: TSH receptors, TTF-1, S-100 protein, also anti-TPO and anti-TG levels in blood plasm were detected. It was shown that solid cell claster-nests like agregation of oncocytes and adenomatous growth foci in parafollicular areas with anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies levels arising while Riedel´s struma shown only large intra- and extra glandular inflammatory proliferative fibrosing process. Large positive expression of TTF-1 and S-100 protein and the negative reaction of TSH receptor factor suggest that Thyroid parenchyma disorganization and mollecular biological atypia with Hǘrtle cells are proceses due to hypothyreoidismus, as well as neuroectodermal cells prominent activities in 70% of Hashimoto cases.

  8. Activation of Postnatal Neural Stem Cells Requires Nuclear Receptor TLX

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wenze; Zou, Yuhua; Shen, ChengCheng; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) continually produce new neurons in postnatal brains. However, the majority of these cells stay in a non-dividing, inactive state. The molecular mechanism that is required for these cells to enter proliferation still remains largely unknown. Here, we show that nuclear receptor TLX (NR2E1) controls the activation status of postnatal NSCs in mice. Lineage tracing indicates that TLX-expressing cells give rise to both activated and inactive postnatal NSCs. Surprisingly, loss of TLX function does not result in spontaneous glial differentiation, but rather leads to a precipitous age-dependent increase of inactive cells with marker expression and radial morphology for NSCs. These inactive cells are mis-positioned throughout the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus during development and can proliferate again after reintroducing ectopic TLX. RNA-seq analysis of sorted NSCs revealed a TLX-dependent global expression signature, which includes the p53 signaling pathway. TLX regulates p21 expression in a p53-dependent manner and acute removal of p53 can rescue the proliferation defect of TLX-null NSCs in culture. Together, these findings suggest that TLX acts as an essential regulator that ensures the proliferative ability of postnatal NSCs by controlling their activation through genetic interaction with p53 and other signaling pathways. PMID:21957244

  9. Activation of postnatal neural stem cells requires nuclear receptor TLX.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenze; Zou, Yuhua; Shen, Chengcheng; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2011-09-28

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) continually produce new neurons in postnatal brains. However, the majority of these cells stay in a nondividing, inactive state. The molecular mechanism that is required for these cells to enter proliferation still remains largely unknown. Here, we show that nuclear receptor TLX (NR2E1) controls the activation status of postnatal NSCs in mice. Lineage tracing indicates that TLX-expressing cells give rise to both activated and inactive postnatal NSCs. Surprisingly, loss of TLX function does not result in spontaneous glial differentiation, but rather leads to a precipitous age-dependent increase of inactive cells with marker expression and radial morphology for NSCs. These inactive cells are mispositioned throughout the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus during development and can proliferate again after reintroduction of ectopic TLX. RNA-seq analysis of sorted NSCs revealed a TLX-dependent global expression signature, which includes the p53 signaling pathway. TLX regulates p21 expression in a p53-dependent manner, and acute removal of p53 can rescue the proliferation defect of TLX-null NSCs in culture. Together, these findings suggest that TLX acts as an essential regulator that ensures the proliferative ability of postnatal NSCs by controlling their activation through genetic interaction with p53 and other signaling pathways.

  10. STATs shape the active enhancer landscape of T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Takahashi, Hayato; Nakayamada, Shingo; Sun, Hong-Wei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2012-11-21

    Signaling pathways are intimately involved in cellular differentiation, allowing cells to respond to their environment by regulating gene expression. Although enhancers are recognized as key elements that regulate selective gene expression, the interplay between signaling pathways and actively used enhancer elements is not clear. Here, we use CD4(+) T cells as a model of differentiation, mapping the activity of cell-type-specific enhancer elements in T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cells. Our data establish that STAT proteins have a major impact on the activation of lineage-specific enhancers and the suppression of enhancers associated with alternative cell fates. Transcriptome analysis further supports a functional role for enhancers regulated by STATs. Importantly, expression of lineage-defining master regulators in STAT-deficient cells fails to fully recover the chromatin signature of STAT-dependent enhancers. Thus, these findings point to a critical role of STATs as environmental sensors in dynamically molding the specialized enhancer architecture of differentiating cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brucella and Osteoarticular Cell Activation: Partners in Crime

    PubMed Central

    Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Arriola Benitez, Paula C.; Delpino, M. Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarticular brucellosis is the most common presentation of human active disease although its prevalence varies widely. The three most common forms of osteoarticular involvement are sacroiliitis, spondylitis, and peripheral arthritis. The molecular mechanisms implicated in bone damage have been recently elucidated. B. abortus induces bone damage through diverse mechanisms in which TNF-α and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-the natural modulator of bone homeostasis are involved. These processes are driven by inflammatory cells, like monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, Th17 CD4+ T, and B cells. In addition, Brucella abortus has a direct effect on osteoarticular cells and tilts homeostatic bone remodeling. These bacteria inhibit bone matrix deposition by osteoblasts (the only bone cells involved in bone deposition), and modify the phenotype of these cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokine secretion, contributing to bone matrix degradation. B. abortus also affects osteoclasts (cells naturally involved in bone resorption) by inducing an increase in osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation; thus, increasing mineral and organic bone matrix resorption, contributing to bone damage. Given that the pathology induced by Brucella species involved joint tissue, experiments conducted on synoviocytes revealed that besides inducing the activation of these cells to secrete chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines and MMPS, the infection also inhibits synoviocyte apoptosis. Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that replicates preferentially in the endoplasmic reticulum of macrophages. The analysis of B. abortus-infected synoviocytes indicated that bacteria also replicate in their reticulum suggesting that they could use this cell type for intracellular replication during the osteoarticular localization of the disease. Finally, the molecular mechanisms of osteoarticular brucellosis discovered recently shed light on how the

  12. Coupling Bacterial Activity Measurements with Cell Sorting by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Servais; Courties; Lebaron; Troussellier

    1999-08-01

    > Abstract A new procedure to investigate the relationship between bacterial cell size and activity at the cellular level has been developed; it is based on the coupling of radioactive labeling of bacterial cells and cell sorting by flow cytometry after SYTO 13 staining. Before sorting, bacterial cells were incubated in the presence of tritiated leucine using a procedure similar to that used for measuring bacterial production by leucine incorporation and then stained with SYTO 13. Subpopulations of bacterial cells were sorted according to their average right-angle light scatter (RALS) and fluorescence. Average RALS was shown to be significantly related to the average biovolume. Experiments were performed on samples collected at different times in a Mediterranean seawater mesocosm enriched with nitrogen and phosphorus. At four sampling times, bacteria were sorted in two subpopulations (cells smaller and larger than 0.25 µm(3)). The results indicate that, at each sampling time, the growth rate of larger cells was higher than that of smaller cells. In order to confirm this tendency, cell sorting was performed on six subpopulations differing in average biovolume during the mesocosm follow-up. A clear increase of the bacterial growth rates was observed with increasing cell size for the conditions met in this enriched mesocosm.http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00248/bibs/38n2p180.html

  13. A Cell-Cell Fusion Assay to Assess Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Membrane-Fusion Activity.

    PubMed

    York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H

    2018-01-01

    For many viruses that enter their target cells through pH-dependent fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, cell-cell fusion assays can provide an experimental platform for investigating the structure-function relationships that promote envelope glycoprotein membrane-fusion activity. Typically, these assays employ effector cells expressing the recombinant envelope glycoprotein on the cell surface and target cells engineered to quantitatively report fusion with the effector cell. In the protocol described here, Vero cells are transfected with a plasmid encoding the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein complex GPC and infected with the vTF7-3 vaccinia virus expressing the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. These effector cells are mixed with target cells infected with the vCB21R-lacZ vaccinia virus encoding a β-galactosidase reporter under the control of the T7 promoter. Cell-cell fusion is induced upon exposure to low-pH medium (pH 5.0), and the resultant expression of the β-galactosidase reporter is quantitated using a chemiluminescent substrate. We have utilized this robust microplate cell-cell fusion assay extensively to study arenavirus entry and its inhibition by small-molecule fusion inhibitors.

  14. Hili Inhibits HIV Replication in Activated T Cells.

    PubMed

    Peterlin, B Matija; Liu, Pingyang; Wang, Xiaoyun; Cary, Daniele; Shao, Wei; Leoz, Marie; Hong, Tian; Pan, Tao; Fujinaga, Koh

    2017-06-01

    P-element-induced wimpy-like (Piwil) proteins restrict the replication of mobile genetic elements in the germ line. They are also expressed in many transformed cell lines. In this study, we discovered that the human Piwil 2 (Hili) protein can also inhibit HIV replication, especially in activated CD4 + T cells that are the preferred target cells for this virus in the infected host. Although resting cells did not express Hili, its expression was rapidly induced following T cell activation. In these cells and transformed cell lines, depletion of Hili increased levels of viral proteins and new viral particles. Further studies revealed that Hili binds to tRNA. Some of the tRNAs represent rare tRNA species, whose codons are overrepresented in the viral genome. Targeting tRNA Arg (UCU) with an antisense oligonucleotide replicated effects of Hili and also inhibited HIV replication. Finally, Hili also inhibited the retrotransposition of the endogenous intracysternal A particle (IAP) by a similar mechanism. Thus, Hili joins a list of host proteins that inhibit the replication of HIV and other mobile genetic elements. IMPORTANCE Piwil proteins inhibit the movement of mobile genetic elements in the germ line. In their absence, sperm does not form and male mice are sterile. This inhibition is thought to occur via small Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). However, in some species and in human somatic cells, Piwil proteins bind primarily to tRNA. In this report, we demonstrate that human Piwil proteins, especially Hili, not only bind to select tRNA species, including rare tRNAs, but also inhibit HIV replication. Importantly, T cell activation induces the expression of Hili in CD4 + T cells. Since Hili also inhibited the movement of an endogenous retrovirus (IAP), our finding shed new light on this intracellular resistance to exogenous and endogenous retroviruses as well as other mobile genetic elements. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  17. CD16A Activation of NK Cells Promotes NK Cell Proliferation and Memory-Like Cytotoxicity against Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Jens H W; Koch, Joachim; Götz, Jana-Julia; Arnold, Annette; Reusch, Uwe; Gantke, Thorsten; Rajkovic, Erich; Treder, Martin; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2018-05-01

    CD16A is a potent cytotoxicity receptor on human natural killer (NK) cells, which can be exploited by therapeutic bispecific antibodies. So far, the effects of CD16A-mediated activation on NK cell effector functions beyond classical antibody-dependent cytotoxicity have remained poorly elucidated. Here, we investigated NK cell responses after exposure to therapeutic antibodies such as the tetravalent bispecific antibody AFM13 (CD30/CD16A), designed for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma and other CD30 + lymphomas. Our results reveal that CD16A engagement enhanced subsequent IL2- and IL15-driven NK cell proliferation and expansion. This effect involved the upregulation of CD25 (IL2Rα) and CD132 (γ c ) on NK cells, resulting in increased sensitivity to low-dose IL2 or to IL15. CD16A engagement initially induced NK cell cytotoxicity. The lower NK cell reactivity observed 1 day after CD16A engagement could be recovered by reculture in IL2 or IL15. After reculture in IL2 or IL15, these CD16A-experienced NK cells exerted more vigorous IFNγ production upon restimulation with tumor cells or cytokines. Importantly, after reculture, CD16A-experienced NK cells also exerted increased cytotoxicity toward different tumor targets, mainly through the activating NK cell receptor NKG2D. Our findings uncover a role for CD16A engagement in priming NK cell responses to restimulation by cytokines and tumor cells, indicative of a memory-like functionality. Our study suggests that combination of AFM13 with IL2 or IL15 may boost NK cell antitumor activity in patients by expanding tumor-reactive NK cells and enhancing NK cell reactivity, even upon repeated tumor encounters. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(5); 517-27. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. MiRAR-miRNA Activity Reporter for Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Turk, Matthew A; Chung, Christina Z; Manni, Emad; Zukowski, Stephanie A; Engineer, Anish; Badakhshi, Yasaman; Bi, Yumin; Heinemann, Ilka U

    2018-06-19

    microRNA (miRNA) activity and regulation are of increasing interest as new therapeutic targets. Traditional approaches to assess miRNA levels in cells rely on RNA sequencing or quantitative PCR. While useful, these approaches are based on RNA extraction and cannot be applied in real-time to observe miRNA activity with single-cell resolution. We developed a green fluorescence protein (GFP)-based reporter system that allows for a direct, real-time readout of changes in miRNA activity in live cells. The miRNA activity reporter (MiRAR) consists of GFP fused to a 3′ untranslated region containing specific miRNA binding sites, resulting in miRNA activity-dependent GFP expression. Using qPCR, we verified the inverse relationship of GFP fluorescence and miRNA levels. We demonstrated that this novel optogenetic reporter system quantifies cellular levels of the tumor suppressor miRNA let-7 in real-time in single Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells. Our data shows that the MiRAR can be applied to detect changes in miRNA levels upon disruption of miRNA degradation pathways. We further show that the reporter could be adapted to monitor another disease-relevant miRNA, miR-122. With trivial modifications, this approach could be applied across the miRNome for quantification of many specific miRNA in cell cultures, tissues, or transgenic animal models.

  19. Capsaicin-mediated apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells activates dendritic cells via CD91.

    PubMed

    Gilardini Montani, Maria Saveria; D'Eliseo, Donatella; Cirone, Mara; Di Renzo, Livia; Faggioni, Alberto; Santoni, Angela; Velotti, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Immunostimulation by anticancer cytotoxic drugs is needed for long-term therapeutic success. Activation of dendritic cells (DCs) is crucial to obtain effective and long-lasting anticancer T-cell mediated immunity. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of capsaicin-mediated cell death of bladder cancer cells on the activation of human monocyte-derived CD1a+ immature DCs. Immature DCs (generated from human peripheral blood-derived CD14+ monocytes cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4) were cocultured with capsaicin (CPS)-induced apoptotic bladder cancer cells. DC activation was investigated using immunofluorescence and flow cytometric analysis for key surface molecules. In some experiments, CD91 was silenced in immature DCs. We found that capsaicin-mediated cancer cell apoptosis upregulates CD86 and CD83 expression on DCs, indicating the induction of DC activation. Moreover, silencing of CD91 (a common receptor for damage-associated molecular patterns, such as calreticulin and heat-shock protein-90/70) in immature DCs led to the inhibition of DC activation. Our data show that CPS-mediated cancer cell apoptosis activates DCs via CD91, suggesting CPS as an attractive candidate for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Activation of cell-surface proteases promotes necroptosis, inflammation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhenyu; Zhang, Anling; Choksi, Swati; Li, Weihua; Li, Tao; Zhang, Xue-Min; Liu, Zheng-Gang

    2016-08-01

    Necroptosis is a programmed, caspase-independent cell death that is morphologically similar to necrosis. TNF-induced necroptosis is mediated by receptor-interacting protein kinases, RIP1 and RIP3, and the mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL). After being phosphorylated by RIP3, MLKL is translocated to the plasma membrane and mediates necroptosis. However, the execution of necroptosis and its role in inflammation and other cellular responses remain largely elusive. In this study, we report that MLKL-mediated activation of cell-surface proteases of the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family promotes necroptosis, inflammation and cell migration. ADAMs are specifically activated at the early stage of necroptosis when MLKL is phosphorylated and translocated to the cell plasma membrane. Activation of ADAMs induces ectodomain shedding of diverse cell-surface proteins including adhesion molecules, receptors, growth factors and cytokines. Importantly, the shedding of cell-surface proteins disrupts cell adhesion and accelerates necroptosis, while the soluble fragments of the cleaved proteins trigger the inflammatory responses. We also demonstrate that the shedding of E-cadherin ectodomain from necroptotic cells promotes cell migration. Thus, our study provides a novel mechanism of necroptosis-induced inflammation and new insights into the physiological and pathological functions of this unique form of cell death.

  1. Activation of cell-surface proteases promotes necroptosis, inflammation and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Zhang, Anling; Choksi, Swati; Li, Weihua; Li, Tao; Zhang, Xue-Min; Liu, Zheng-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis is a programmed, caspase-independent cell death that is morphologically similar to necrosis. TNF-induced necroptosis is mediated by receptor-interacting protein kinases, RIP1 and RIP3, and the mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL). After being phosphorylated by RIP3, MLKL is translocated to the plasma membrane and mediates necroptosis. However, the execution of necroptosis and its role in inflammation and other cellular responses remain largely elusive. In this study, we report that MLKL-mediated activation of cell-surface proteases of the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family promotes necroptosis, inflammation and cell migration. ADAMs are specifically activated at the early stage of necroptosis when MLKL is phosphorylated and translocated to the cell plasma membrane. Activation of ADAMs induces ectodomain shedding of diverse cell-surface proteins including adhesion molecules, receptors, growth factors and cytokines. Importantly, the shedding of cell-surface proteins disrupts cell adhesion and accelerates necroptosis, while the soluble fragments of the cleaved proteins trigger the inflammatory responses. We also demonstrate that the shedding of E-cadherin ectodomain from necroptotic cells promotes cell migration. Thus, our study provides a novel mechanism of necroptosis-induced inflammation and new insights into the physiological and pathological functions of this unique form of cell death. PMID:27444869

  2. Activated Raf-1 causes growth arrest in human small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, R K; Weber, E; McMahon, M; Williams, J R; Baylin, S; Mal, A; Harter, M L; Dillehay, L E; Claudio, P P; Giordano, A; Nelkin, B D; Mabry, M

    1998-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 25% of all lung cancers, and is almost uniformly fatal. Unlike other lung cancers, ras mutations have not been reported in SCLC, suggesting that activation of ras-associated signal transduction pathways such as the raf-MEK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are associated with biological consequences that are unique from other cancers. The biological effects of raf activation in small cell lung cancer cells was determined by transfecting NCI-H209 or NCI-H510 SCLC cells with a gene encoding a fusion protein consisting of an oncogenic form of human Raf-1 and the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor (DeltaRaf-1:ER), which can be activated with estradiol. DeltaRaf-1:ER activation resulted in phosphorylation of MAPK. Activation of this pathway caused a dramatic loss of soft agar cloning ability, suppression of growth capacity, associated with cell accumulation in G1 and G2, and S phase depletion. Raf activation in these SCLC cells was accompanied by a marked induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p27(kip1), and a decrease in cdk2 protein kinase activities. Each of these events can be inhibited by pretreatment with the MEK inhibitor PD098059. These data demonstrate that MAPK activation by DeltaRaf-1:ER can activate growth inhibitory pathways leading to cell cycle arrest. These data suggest that raf/MEK/ MAPK pathway activation, rather than inhibition, may be a therapeutic target in SCLC and other neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:9421477

  3. Activation of formylmethanofuran synthesis in cell extracts of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, T A; Wolfe, R S

    1989-01-01

    In cell extracts of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, formylmethanofuran (formyl-MFR) synthesis (an essential CO2 fixation reaction that is an early step in CO2 reduction to methane) is subject to a complex activation that involves a heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and N-(7-mercaptoheptanoyl)threonine O3-phosphate (CoM-S-S-HTP). In this paper we report that titanium(III) citrate, a low-potential reducing agent, stimulated CO2 reduction to methane and activated formyl-MFR synthesis in cell extracts. Titanium(III) citrate functioned as the sole source of electrons for formyl-MFR synthesis and enabled this reaction to occur independently of CoM-S-S-HTP. In addition, CoM-S-S-HTP was found to activate an unknown electron carrier that reduced metronidazole. The activation of formyl-MFR synthesis by CoM-S-S-HTP may involve the activation of a low-potential electron carrier. PMID:2921239

  4. mTOR activation is critical for betulin treatment in renal cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Wenlong; Ji, Shiqi; Zhang, Haijian

    Betulin, a natural product isolated from the bark of the birch trees, exhibits multiple anticancer effects. Activation of mTOR signaling pathway has been found in numerous cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, we attempted to study whether mTOR signaling was essential for betulin to treat RCC. Based on cell survival and colony formation assays, we found that mTOR hyperactive RCC cell line 786-O cells were more sensitive to betulin treatment compared with mTOR-inactive Caki-2 cells. Knockdown of TSC2 in Caki-2 cells had similar results to 786-O cells, and mTOR silencing in 786-O cells rescued the inhibitory effect of betulin, indicating thatmore » betulin inhibited RCC cell proliferation in an mTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, betulin treatment decreases the levels of glucose consumption and lactate production in 786-O cells, while minimal effects were observed in Caki-2 cells. In addition, betulin significantly inhibited the expression of PKM2 and HK2 in 786-O cells. Finally, knockdown of PKM2 or HK2 in 786-O reversed the anti-proliferative effects of betulin, and overexpression of PKM2 or HK2 in Caki-2 cells enhanced the sensitivity to betulin treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrated the critical role of mTOR activation in RCC cells to betulin treatment, suggesting that betulin might be valuable for targeted therapies in RCC patients with mTOR activation.« less

  5. Lipopolysaccharides in liver injury: molecular mechanisms of Kupffer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Su, Grace L

    2002-08-01

    Endogenous gut-derived bacterial lipopolysaccharides have been implicated as important cofactors in the pathogenesis of liver injury. However, the molecular mechanisms by which lipopolysaccharides exert their effect are not entirely clear. Recent studies have pointed to proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha as mediators of hepatocyte injury. Within the liver, Kupffer cells are major sources of proinflammatory cytokines that are produced in response to lipopolysaccharides. This review will focus on three important molecular components of the pathway by which lipopolysaccharides activate Kupffer cells: CD14, Toll-like receptor 4, and lipopolysaccharide binding protein. Within the liver, lipopolysaccharides bind to lipopolysaccharide binding protein, which then facilitates its transfer to membrane CD14 on the surface of Kupffer cells. Signaling of lipopolysaccharide through CD14 is mediated by the downstream receptor Toll-like receptor 4 and results in activation of Kupffer cells. The role played by these molecules in liver injury will be examined.

  6. Differential PKA activation and AKAP association determines cell fate in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The dependence of malignant properties of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on IGF1R signaling has been demonstrated and several IGF1R antagonists are currently in clinical trials. Recently, we identified a novel pathway in which cAMP independent PKA activation by TGFβ signaling resulted in the destabilization of survivin/XIAP complex leading to increased cell death. In this study, we evaluated the effect of IGF1R inhibition or activation on PKA activation and its downstream cell survival signaling mechanisms. Methods Small molecule IGF1R kinase inhibitor OSI-906 was used to test the effect of IGF1R inhibition on PKA activation, AKAP association and its downstream cell survival signaling. In a complementary approach, ligand mediated activation of IGF1R was performed and AKAP/PKA signaling was analyzed for their downstream survival effects. Results We demonstrate that the inhibition of IGF1R in the IGF1R-dependent CRC subset generates cell death through a novel mechanism involving TGFβ stimulated cAMP independent PKA activity that leads to disruption of cell survival by survivin/XIAP mediated inhibition of caspase activity. Importantly, ligand mediated activation of the IGF1R in CRC cells results in the generation of cAMP dependent PKA activity that functions in cell survival by inhibiting caspase activity. Therefore, this subset of CRC demonstrates 2 opposing pathways organized by 2 different AKAPs in the cytoplasm that both utilize activation of PKA in a manner that leads to different outcomes with respect to life and death. The cAMP independent PKA activation pathway is dependent upon mitochondrial AKAP149 for its apoptotic functions. In contrast, Praja2 (Pja2), an AKAP-like E3 ligase protein was identified as a key element in controlling cAMP dependent PKA activity and pro-survival signaling. Genetic manipulation of AKAP149 and Praja2 using siRNA KD had opposing effects on PKA activity and survivin/XIAP regulation. Conclusions We had identified 2

  7. Sorting drops and cells with acoustics: acoustic microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Lothar; Weitz, David A; Franke, Thomas

    2014-10-07

    We describe a versatile microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter that uses acoustic actuation to sort cells or drops at ultra-high rates. Our acoustic sorter combines the advantages of traditional fluorescence-activated cell (FACS) and droplet sorting (FADS) and is applicable for a multitude of objects. We sort aqueous droplets, at rates as high as several kHz, into two or even more outlet channels. We can also sort cells directly from the medium without prior encapsulation into drops; we demonstrate this by sorting fluorescently labeled mouse melanoma cells in a single phase fluid. Our acoustic microfluidic FACS is compatible with standard cell sorting cytometers, yet, at the same time, enables a rich variety of more sophisticated applications.

  8. Isolation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Cheung, Tom H; Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-10-01

    The prospective isolation of purified stem cell populations has dramatically altered the field of stem cell biology, and it has been a major focus of research across tissues in different organisms. Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) are now among the most intensely studied stem cell populations in mammalian systems, and the prospective isolation of these cells has allowed cellular and molecular characterizations that were not dreamed of a decade ago. In this protocol, we describe how to isolate MuSCs from limb muscles of adult mice by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We provide a detailed description of the physical and enzymatic dissociation of mononucleated cells from limb muscles, a procedure that is essential in order to maximize cell yield. We also describe a FACS-based method that is used subsequently to obtain highly pure populations of either quiescent or activated MuSCs (VCAM(+)CD31(-)CD45(-)Sca1(-)). The isolation process takes ∼5-6 h to complete. The protocol also allows for the isolation of endothelial cells, hematopoietic cells and mesenchymal stem cells from muscle tissue.

  9. Human embryonic stem cell-derived NK cells acquire functional receptors and cytolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Woll, Petter S; Martin, Colin H; Miller, Jeffrey S; Kaufman, Dan S

    2005-10-15

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide a unique resource to analyze early stages of human hematopoiesis. However, little is known about the ability to use hESCs to evaluate lymphocyte development. In the present study, we use a two-step culture method to demonstrate efficient generation of functional NK cells from hESCs. The CD56(+)CD45(+) hESC-derived lymphocytes express inhibitory and activating receptors typical of mature NK cells, including killer cell Ig-like receptors, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and CD16. Limiting dilution analysis suggests that these cells can be produced from hESC-derived hemopoietic progenitors at a clonal frequency similar to CD34(+) cells isolated from cord blood. The hESC-derived NK cells acquire the ability to lyse human tumor cells by both direct cell-mediated cytotoxicity and Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Additionally, activated hESC-derived NK cells up-regulate cytokine production. hESC-derived lymphoid progenitors provide a novel means to characterize specific cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to development of specific human lymphocyte populations. These cells may also provide a source for innovative cellular immune therapies.

  10. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL–6, TNFα and IL–12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  11. DOCK2 regulates cell proliferation through Rac and ERK activation in B cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Nishihara, Hiroshi, E-mail: nisihara@patho2.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Kimura, Taichi

    2010-04-23

    DOCK2; a member of the CDM protein family, regulates cell motility and cytokine production through the activation of Rac in mammalian hematopoietic cells and plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the immune system. Here we demonstrated the alternative function of DOCK2 in hematopoietic tumor cells, especially in terms of its association with the tumor progression. Immunostaining for DOCK2 in 20 cases of human B cell lymphoma tissue specimens including diffuse large B cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma revealed the prominent expression of DOCK2 in all of the lymphoma cells. DOCK2-knockdown (KD) of the B cell lymphoma cell lines,more » Ramos and Raji, using the lentiviral shRNA system presented decreased cell proliferation compared to the control cells. Furthermore, the tumor formation of DOCK2-KD Ramos cell in nude mice was significantly abrogated. Western blotting analysis and pull-down assay using GST-PAK-RBD kimeric protein suggested the presence of DOCK2-Rac-ERK pathway regulating the cell proliferation of these lymphoma cells. This is the first report to clarify the prominent role of DOCK2 in hematopoietic malignancy.« less

  12. Micropipette force probe to quantify single-cell force generation: application to T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Anna; Babataheri, Avin; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Barakat, Abdul I; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Hivroz, Claire; Husson, Julien

    2017-11-07

    In response to engagement of surface molecules, cells generate active forces that regulate many cellular processes. Developing tools that permit gathering mechanical and morphological information on these forces is of the utmost importance. Here we describe a new technique, the micropipette force probe, that uses a micropipette as a flexible cantilever that can aspirate at its tip a bead that is coated with molecules of interest and is brought in contact with the cell. This technique simultaneously allows tracking the resulting changes in cell morphology and mechanics as well as measuring the forces generated by the cell. To illustrate the power of this technique, we applied it to the study of human primary T lymphocytes (T-cells). It allowed the fine monitoring of pushing and pulling forces generated by T-cells in response to various activating antibodies and bending stiffness of the micropipette. We further dissected the sequence of mechanical and morphological events occurring during T-cell activation to model force generation and to reveal heterogeneity in the cell population studied. We also report the first measurement of the changes in Young's modulus of T-cells during their activation, showing that T-cells stiffen within the first minutes of the activation process. © 2017 Sawicka et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Spectral perspective on the electromagnetic activity of cells.

    PubMed

    Kučera, Ondrej; Červinková, Kateřina; Nerudová, Michaela; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    In this mini-review, we summarize the current hypotheses, theories and experimental evidence concerning the electromagnetic activity of living cells. We systematically classify the bio-electromagnetic phenomena in terms of frequency and we assess their general acceptance in scientific community. We show that the electromagnetic activity of cells is well established in the low frequency range below 1 kHz and on optical wavelengths, while there is only limited evidence for bio-electromagnetic processes in radio- frequency and millimeter-wave ranges. This lack of generally accepted theory or trustful experimental results is the cause for controversy which accompanies this topic. We conclude our review with the discussion of the relevance of the electromagnetic activity of cells to human medicine.

  14. Cytokine activation induces human memory-like NK cells.

    PubMed

    Romee, Rizwan; Schneider, Stephanie E; Leong, Jeffrey W; Chase, Julie M; Keppel, Catherine R; Sullivan, Ryan P; Cooper, Megan A; Fehniger, Todd A

    2012-12-06

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that play an important role in the immune response to infection and malignancy. Recent studies in mice have shown that stimulation of NK cells with cytokines or in the context of a viral infection results in memory-like properties. We hypothesized that human NK cells exhibit such memory-like properties with an enhanced recall response after cytokine preactivation. In the present study, we show that human NK cells preactivated briefly with cytokine combinations including IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 followed by a 7- to 21-day rest have enhanced IFN-γ production after restimulation with IL-12 + IL-15, IL-12 + IL-18, or K562 leukemia cells. This memory-like phenotype was retained in proliferating NK cells. In CD56(dim) NK cells, the memory-like IFN-γ response was correlated with the expression of CD94, NKG2A, NKG2C, and CD69 and a lack of CD57 and KIR. Therefore, human NK cells have functional memory-like properties after cytokine activation, which provides a novel rationale for integrating preactivation with combinations of IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 into NK cell immunotherapy strategies.

  15. ASBESTOS-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF CELL SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using respiratory epithelial cells transfected with either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase, the authors tested the hypothesis that the activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signal pathway after asbestos exposure involves an oxidative stress. Western blot...

  16. Characterization of Antiapoptotic Activities of Chlamydia pneumoniae in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Silke F.; Schwarz, Claudia; Vier, Juliane; Häcker, Georg

    2001-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is an obligate intracellular bacterium which frequently causes airway infection in humans and has been implicated in atherosclerosis. Here we show that infection with C. pneumoniae protects HeLa human epithelioid cells against apoptosis induced by external stimuli. In infected HeLa cells, apoptosis induced by staurosporine and CD95-death-receptor signaling was strongly reduced. Upon treatment with staurosporine, generation of effector caspase activity, processing of caspase-3 and caspase-9 and cytochrome c redistribution were all profoundly inhibited in cells infected with C. pneumoniae. Bacterial protein synthesis during early infection was required for this inhibition. Furthermore, cytochrome c-induced processing and activation of caspases were inhibited in cytosolic extracts from infected cells, suggesting that a C. pneumoniae-dependent antiapoptotic factor was generated in the cytosol upon infection. Infection with C. pneumoniae failed to induce significant NF-κB activation in HeLa cells, indicating that no NF-κB-dependent cellular factors were involved in the protection against apoptosis. These results show that C. pneumoniae is capable of interfering with the host cell's apoptotic apparatus at probably at least two steps in signal transduction and might explain the propensity of these bacteria to cause chronic infections in humans. PMID:11598088

  17. Glucose metabolism regulates T cell activation, differentiation, and functions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Clovis S; Ostrowski, Matias; Balderson, Brad; Christian, Nicole; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is equipped to eliminate both tumors and pathogenic microorganisms. It requires a series of complex and coordinated signals to drive the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of appropriate T cell subsets. It is now established that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, emerging evidence now suggest that specific metabolic alterations associated with distinct T cell subsets may be ancillary to their differentiation and influential in their immune functions. The "Warburg effect" originally used to describe a phenomenon in which most cancer cells relied on aerobic glycolysis for their growth is a key process that sustain T cell activation and differentiation. Here, we review how different aspects of metabolism in T cells influence their functions, focusing on the emerging role of key regulators of glucose metabolism such as HIF-1α. A thorough understanding of the role of metabolism in T cell function could provide insights into mechanisms involved in inflammatory-mediated conditions, with the potential for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat these diseases.

  18. Dielectrophoretic focusing integrated pulsed laser activated cell sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiongfeng; Kung, Yu-Chun; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Teitell, Michael A.; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2017-08-01

    We present a pulsed laser activated cell sorter (PLACS) integrated with novel sheathless size-independent dielectrophoretic (DEP) focusing. Microfluidic fluorescence activated cell sorting (μFACS) systems aim to provide a fully enclosed environment for sterile cell sorting and integration with upstream and downstream microfluidic modules. Among them, PLACS has shown a great potential in achieving comparable performance to commercial aerosol-based FACS (>90% purity at 25,000 cells sec-1). However conventional sheath flow focusing method suffers a severe sample dilution issue. Here we demonstrate a novel dielectrophoresis-integrated pulsed laser activated cell sorter (DEP-PLACS). It consists of a microfluidic channel with 3D electrodes laid out to provide a tunnel-shaped electric field profile along a 4cmlong channel for sheathlessly focusing microparticles/cells into a single stream in high-speed microfluidic flows. All focused particles pass through the fluorescence detection zone along the same streamline regardless of their sizes and types. Upon detection of target fluorescent particles, a nanosecond laser pulse is triggered and focused in a neighboring channel to generate a rapidly expanding cavitation bubble for precise sorting. DEP-PLACS has achieved a sorting purity of 91% for polystyrene beads at a throughput of 1,500 particle/sec.

  19. AEA Cell-Bypass-Switch Activation: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Denney; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Wannemacher, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this project included the following: (1) verify the performance of AEA cell bypass protection device (CBPD) under simulated EOS-Aqua/Aura flight hardware configuration; (2) assess the safety of the hardware under an inadvertent firing of CBPD switch, as well as the closing of CBPD; and (3) confirm that the mode of operation of CBPD switch is the formation of a continuous low impedance path (a homogeneous low melting point alloy). The nominal performance of AEA CBPD under flight operating conditions (vacuum except zero-G, and high impedance cell) has been demonstrated. There is no evidence of cell rupture or excessive heat production during or after CBPD switch activation under simulated high cell impedance (open-circuit cell failure mode). The formation of a continuous low impedance path (a homogeneous low melting point alloy) has been confirmed.

  20. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist increases cell proliferation and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    XIE, LIQUN; DUAN, ZEXING; LIU, CAIJU; ZHENG, YANMIN; ZHOU, JING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in the human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990, and to evaluate its effect on cell proliferation and invasion. The expression of PAR-2 protein and mRNA in SW1990 cells was determined by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. MTT and cell invasion and migration assays, as well as semi-quantitative PCR and zymography analysis, were additionally performed. PAR-2 mRNA was significantly upregulated in the cells treated with trypsin or the PAR-2 activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Lys-Val (SLIGKV) (P<0.01), but not in the Val-Lys-Gly-Ile-Leu-Ser group (P>0.05). Trypsin and SLIGKV significantly promoted SW1990 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, trypsin and SLIGKV significantly increased the mRNA expression (P<0.01) and gelatinolytic activity (P<0.01) of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. In conclusion, PAR-2 is expressed in SW1990 cells. PAR-2 activation may promote the invasion and migration of human pancreatic cancer cells by increasing MMP-2 expression. PMID:25452809

  1. Allograft dendritic cell p40 homodimers activate donor-reactive memory CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Su, Charles A.; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Ayasoufi, Katayoun; Min, Booki; Valujskikh, Anna; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2018-01-01

    Recipient endogenous memory T cells with donor reactivity pose an important barrier to successful transplantation and costimulatory blockade–induced graft tolerance. Longer ischemic storage times prior to organ transplantation increase early posttransplant inflammation and negatively impact early graft function and long-term graft outcome. Little is known about the mechanisms enhancing endogenous memory T cell activation to mediate tissue injury within the increased inflammatory environment of allografts subjected to prolonged cold ischemic storage (CIS). Endogenous memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation is markedly increased within complete MHC-mismatched cardiac allografts subjected to prolonged versus minimal CIS, and the memory CD8+ T cells directly mediate CTLA-4Ig–resistant allograft rejection. Memory CD8+ T cell activation within allografts subjected to prolonged CIS requires memory CD4+ T cell stimulation of graft DCs to produce p40 homodimers, but not IL-12 p40/p35 heterodimers. Targeting p40 abrogates memory CD8+ T cell proliferation within the allografts and their ability to mediate CTLA-4Ig–resistant allograft rejection. These findings indicate a critical role for memory CD4+ T cell–graft DC interactions to increase the intensity of endogenous memory CD8+ T cell activation needed to mediate rejection of higher-risk allografts subjected to increased CIS. PMID:29467328

  2. Th17 Cells and Activated Dendritic Cells Are Increased in Vitiligo Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Moussai, Dariush; Gulati, Nicholas; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Cohen, Jules A.; Krueger, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a common skin disorder, characterized by progressive skin de-pigmentation due to the loss of cutaneous melanocytes. The exact cause of melanocyte loss remains unclear, but a large number of observations have pointed to the important role of cellular immunity in vitiligo pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we characterized T cell and inflammation-related dermal dendritic cell (DC) subsets in pigmented non-lesional, leading edge and depigmented lesional vitiligo skin. By immunohistochemistry staining, we observed enhanced populations of CD11c+ myeloid dermal DCs and CD207+ Langerhans cells in leading edge vitiligo biopsies. DC-LAMP+ and CD1c+ sub-populations of dermal DCs expanded significantly in leading edge and lesional vitiligo skin. We also detected elevated tissue mRNA levels of IL-17A in leading edge skin biopsies of vitiligo patients, as well as IL-17A positive T cells by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Langerhans cells with activated inflammasomes were also noted in lesional vitiligo skin, along with increased IL-1ß mRNA, which suggest the potential of Langerhans cells to drive Th17 activation in vitiligo. Conclusions/Significance These studies provided direct tissue evidence that implicates active Th17 cells in vitiligo skin lesions. We characterized new cellular immune elements, in the active margins of vitiligo lesions (e.g. populations of epidermal and dermal dendritic cells subsets), which could potentially drive the inflammatory responses. PMID:21541348

  3. Serine protease activity in m-1 cortical collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lian; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S; Schiro, Faith R; Hamm, L Lee

    2002-04-01

    An apical serine protease, channel-activating protease 1 (CAP1), augments sodium transport in A6 cells. Prostasin, a novel serine protease originally purified from seminal fluid, has been proposed to be the mammalian ortholog of CAP1. We have recently found functional evidence for a similar protease activity in the M-1 cortical collecting duct cell line. The purposes of the present studies were to determine whether prostasin (or CAP1) is present in collecting duct cells by use of mouse M-1 cells, to sequence mouse prostasin, and to further characterize the identity of the serine protease activity and additional functional features in M-1 cells. Using mouse expressed sequence tag sequences that are highly homologous to the published human prostasin sequence as templates, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) were used to sequence mouse prostasin mRNA, which shows 99% identical to published mouse CAP1 sequence. A single 1800-bp transcript was found by Northern analysis, and this was not altered by aldosterone. Equivalent short-circuit current (I(eq)), which represents sodium transport in these cells, dropped to 59+/-3% of control value within 1 hour of incubation with aprotinin, a serine protease inhibitor. Trypsin increased the I(eq) in aprotinin-treated cells to the value of the control group within 5 minutes. Application of aprotinin not only inhibited amiloride sensitive I(eq) but also reduced transepithelial resistance (R(te)) to 43+/-2%, an effect not expected with simple inhibition of sodium channels. Trypsin partially reversed the effect of aprotinin on R(te). Another serine protease inhibitor, soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI), decreased I(eq) in M-1 cells. STI inhibited I(eq) gradually over 6 hours, and the inhibition of I(eq) by 2 inhibitors was additive. STI decreased transepithelial resistance much less than did aprotinin. Neither aldosterone nor dexamethasone significantly augmented protease activity

  4. Mechanisms regulating plasminogen activators in transformed retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Nathan; Chintala, Shravan K.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is a major clinical issue in glaucoma, but the mechanisms that lead to RGC death are currently unclear. We have previously reported that elevated levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) cause the death of RGCs in vivo and transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) in vitro. Yet, it is unclear how secreted proteases such as tPA and uPA directly cause RGCs' death. In this study, by employing RGC-5 cells, we report that tPA and uPA elicit their direct effect through the low-density lipoprotein-related receptor-1 (LRP-1). We also show that blockade of protease-LRP-1 interaction leads to a compete reduction in autocrine synthesis of tPA and uPA, and prevents protease-mediated death of RGC-5 cells. RGC-5 cells were cultured in serum-free medium and treated with 2.0 uM Staurosporine to induce their differentiation. Neurite outgrowth was observed by a phase contrast microscope and quantified by NeuroJ imaging software. Proteolytic activities of tPA and uPA were determined by zymography assays. Cell viability was determined by MTT assays. Compared to untreated RGC-5 cells, cells treated with Staurosporine differentiated, synthesized and secreted elevated levels of tPA and uPA, and underwent cell death. In contrast, when RGC-5 cells were treated with Staurosporine along with the receptor associated protein (RAP), proteolytic activities of both tPA and uPA were significantly reduced. Under these conditions, a significant number of RGC-5 cells survived and showed increased neurite outgrowth. These results indicate that LRP-1 regulates autocrine synthesis of tPA and uPA in RGC-5 cells and suggest that the use of RAP to antagonize the effect of proteases may be a way to prevent RGC death in glaucoma. PMID:18243176

  5. Strain energy storage and dissipation rate in active cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Agosti, A; Ambrosi, D; Turzi, S

    2018-05-01

    When living cells are observed at rest on a flat substrate, they can typically exhibit a rounded (symmetric) or an elongated (polarized) shape. Although the cells are apparently at rest, the active stress generated by the molecular motors continuously stretches and drifts the actin network, the cytoskeleton of the cell. In this paper we theoretically compare the energy stored and dissipated in this active system in two geometric configurations of interest: symmetric and polarized. We find that the stored energy is larger for a radially symmetric cell at low activation regime, while the polar configuration has larger strain energy when the active stress is beyond a critical threshold. Conversely, the dissipation of energy in a symmetric cell is always larger than that of a nonsymmetric one. By a combination of symmetry arguments and competition between surface and bulk stress, we argue that radial symmetry is an energetically expensive metastable state that provides access to an infinite number of lower-energy states, the polarized configurations.

  6. Strain energy storage and dissipation rate in active cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosti, A.; Ambrosi, D.; Turzi, S.

    2018-05-01

    When living cells are observed at rest on a flat substrate, they can typically exhibit a rounded (symmetric) or an elongated (polarized) shape. Although the cells are apparently at rest, the active stress generated by the molecular motors continuously stretches and drifts the actin network, the cytoskeleton of the cell. In this paper we theoretically compare the energy stored and dissipated in this active system in two geometric configurations of interest: symmetric and polarized. We find that the stored energy is larger for a radially symmetric cell at low activation regime, while the polar configuration has larger strain energy when the active stress is beyond a critical threshold. Conversely, the dissipation of energy in a symmetric cell is always larger than that of a nonsymmetric one. By a combination of symmetry arguments and competition between surface and bulk stress, we argue that radial symmetry is an energetically expensive metastable state that provides access to an infinite number of lower-energy states, the polarized configurations.

  7. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain.

  8. Master switches of T-cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Beier, K C; Kallinich, T; Hamelmann, E

    2007-04-01

    T-cells play a central role in allergic airway diseases such as bronchial asthma. The imbalance between allergen-specific pro-inflammatory and pro-allergic T-cell responses on one hand and regulatory or suppressive T-cell responses on the other may best explain the development of unwanted immune responses against environmental allergens, which lead to immunoglobulin E production and airway inflammation. A key role in the fine tuning of any T-cell response is provided by the engagement of so-called co-stimulatory molecules that are required for the full activation of T-cells and the recognition of antigens via the antigen-specific T-cell receptor. Many of these co-stimulatory molecules have been identified only recently, leading to a fundamental change in the overall understanding of T-cell regulation. Due to their pivotal impact on T-cell differentiation and control, co-stimulatory molecules are promising targets for therapeutic intervention in T-cell-regulated or -mediated immune disorders, including allergic diseases and asthma. In the present article, an attempt is made to summarise the current knowledge on the basic concept of co-stimulation, the presently known co-stimulatory molecules and their various functions on T-cell activation or suppression. The mini-series will be completed by two more articles describing the recent experimental studies and preliminary clinical findings regarding the role of co-stimulatory molecules in allergic disorders and bronchial asthma, and a discussion regarding the feasibility of co-stimulatory molecules as potential targets for the treatment of allergic airway disease. Although it is too early for any clinical implication or utilisation at this moment, the authors are convinced that a better understanding of co-stimulation in the context of allergic asthma will finally provide novel and promising approaches for treatment and prevention.

  9. Increased Intraepithelial Vα24 Invariant NKT Cells in the Celiac Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Bernardo, David; Martínez-Abad, Beatriz; Allegretti, Yessica; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Calvo, Carmen; Chirdo, Fernando G.; Garrote, José A.; Arranz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an interferon (IFN)γ-mediated duodenal hypersensitivity to wheat gluten occurring in genetically predisposed individuals. Gluten-free diet (GFD) leads to a complete remission of the disease. Vα24-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are important to maintain immune homeostasis in the gut mucosa because of their unique capacity to rapidly produce large quantities of both T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 cytokines upon stimulation. We studied the presence of these cells in the CD duodenum. Duodenal biopsies were obtained from 45 untreated-CD patients (uCD), 15 Gluten Free Diet-CD patients (GFD-CD), 44 non-inflamed non-CD controls (C-controls) and 15 inflamed non-CD controls (I-controls). Two populations from Spain and Argentina were recruited. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Vα24-Jα18 (invariant TCRα chain of human iNKT cells), IFNγ and intracellular transcription factor Forkhead Box P3 (Foxp3), and flow cytometry intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) profile were determined. Both uCD and GFD-CD patients had higher Vα24-Jα18 mRNA levels than non-CD controls (I and C-controls). The expression of Vα24-Jα18 correlated with Marsh score for the severity of mucosal lesion and also with increased mRNA IFNγ levels. uCD and GFD-CD patients had decreased mRNA expression of FoxP3 but increased expression of Vα24-Jα18, which revealed a CD-like molecular profile. Increased numbers of iNKT cells were confirmed by flow cytometry within the intraepithelial lymphocyte compartment of uCD and GFD-CD patients and correlated with Vα24-Jα18 mRNA expression. In conclusion, we have found an increased number of iNKT cells in the duodenum from both uCD and GFD-CD patients, irrespective of the mucosal status. A CD-like molecular profile, defined by an increased mRNA expression of Vα24-Jα18 together with a decreased expression of FoxP3, may represent a pro-inflammatory signature of the CD duodenum. PMID:26529008

  10. Increased Intraepithelial Vα24 Invariant NKT Cells in the Celiac Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Bernardo, David; Martínez-Abad, Beatriz; Allegretti, Yessica; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Calvo, Carmen; Chirdo, Fernando G; Garrote, José A; Arranz, Eduardo

    2015-10-30

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an interferon (IFN)γ-mediated duodenal hypersensitivity to wheat gluten occurring in genetically predisposed individuals. Gluten-free diet (GFD) leads to a complete remission of the disease. Vα24-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are important to maintain immune homeostasis in the gut mucosa because of their unique capacity to rapidly produce large quantities of both T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 cytokines upon stimulation. We studied the presence of these cells in the CD duodenum. Duodenal biopsies were obtained from 45 untreated-CD patients (uCD), 15 Gluten Free Diet-CD patients (GFD-CD), 44 non-inflamed non-CD controls (C-controls) and 15 inflamed non-CD controls (I-controls). Two populations from Spain and Argentina were recruited. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Vα24-Jα18 (invariant TCRα chain of human iNKT cells), IFNγ and intracellular transcription factor Forkhead Box P3 (Foxp3), and flow cytometry intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) profile were determined. Both uCD and GFD-CD patients had higher Vα24-Jα18 mRNA levels than non-CD controls (I and C-controls). The expression of Vα24-Jα18 correlated with Marsh score for the severity of mucosal lesion and also with increased mRNA IFNγ levels. uCD and GFD-CD patients had decreased mRNA expression of FoxP3 but increased expression of Vα24-Jα18, which revealed a CD-like molecular profile. Increased numbers of iNKT cells were confirmed by flow cytometry within the intraepithelial lymphocyte compartment of uCD and GFD-CD patients and correlated with Vα24-Jα18 mRNA expression. In conclusion, we have found an increased number of iNKT cells in the duodenum from both uCD and GFD-CD patients, irrespective of the mucosal status. A CD-like molecular profile, defined by an increased mRNA expression of Vα24-Jα18 together with a decreased expression of FoxP3, may represent a pro-inflammatory signature of the CD duodenum.

  11. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results:more » IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.« less

  12. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  13. Regulation of pancreatic stellate cell activation by Notch3.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiyan; Zhang, Yuxiang

    2018-01-05

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs) are the key cellular source of cancer-associated fibroblasts in the pancreatic stroma of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), however, the activation mechanism of PaSCs is not yet known. The Notch signaling pathway, components of which are expressed in stromal cells, is involved in the fibrosis of several organs, including the lung and liver. In the current study, we investigated whether Notch signal transduction is involved in PaSC activation in PDAC. The expression of Notch signaling pathway components in human PDAC was examined via immunohistochemical staining and assessed in mouse PaSCs using RT-qPCR and western blotting. Notch3 expression in both PDAC stromal cells and activated mouse PaSCs was evaluated using immunofluorescence, RT-qPCR and western blotting. The impact of siRNA-mediated Notch3 knockdown on PaSC activation was detected with RT-qPCR and western blotting, and the impact on PaSC proliferation and migration was detected using CCK-8 assays and scratch experiments. The effect of conditioned medium from PaSCs activated with Notch3 siRNA on pancreatic cancer (LTPA) cells was also detected with CCK-8 assays and scratch experiments. The data were analyzed for statistical significance using Student's t-test. Notch3 was overexpressed in both human PDAC stromal cells and activated mouse PaSCs, and Notch3 knockdown with Notch3 siRNA decreased the proliferation and migration of mouse PaSCs. The levels of markers related to PaSC activation, such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen I and fibronectin, decreased in response to Notch3 knockdown, indicating that Notch3 plays an important role in PaSC activation. Furthermore, we confirmed that inhibition of PaSC activation via Notch3 siRNA reduced the proliferation and migration of PaSC-induced mouse pancreatic cancer (LTPA) cells. Notch3 inhibition in PaSCs can inhibit the activation, proliferation and migration of PaSCs and reduce the Pa

  14. Salen-Mn compounds induces cell apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells through promoting AMPK activity and cell autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoshuang; Jia, Jing; Li, Feng; Liu, Wei; Yang, Chao; Jin, Bin; Shi, Qi; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Guo, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Currently only docetaxel has been approved to be used in the chemotherapy of prostate cancer and new drugs are urgent need. Salen-Mn is a novel type of synthetic reagent bionic and exerts remarkable anticancer activities. However, the effect of Salen-Mn on human prostate cancer has not been elucidated yet. In this study, we found that treatment of PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells with Salen-Mn inhibited cell growth in dose and time dependent manner. Moreover, Salen-Mn induced cell apoptosis, and increased the expression of apoptotic proteins, such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, and Bax, in PC-3 and DU145 prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that Salen-Mn induced expression of LC3-I/II, which is protein marker of cell autophagy, in both dose and time dependent manners; in addition, Salen-Mn increased the phosphorylation of AMPK, suggesting that Salen-Mn increase cell autophagy through activating AMPK pathway. On the other hand, when PC-3 and DU145 cells were treated with Salen-Mn and 3-MA, an inhibitor of cell autophagy, the inhibitory effect of Salen-Mn on cell growth and the induction of apoptotic proteins were decreased. In addition, we found that Salen-Mn inhibited the growth of PC-3 cell xenografts in nude mice. In summary, our results indicate that Salen-Mn suppresses cell growth through inducing AMPK activity and autophagic cell death related cell apoptosis in prostate cancer cells and suggest that Salen-Mn and its derivatives could be new options for the chemical therapeutics in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:29156794

  15. Probiotic bacteria cell walls stimulate the activity of the intestinal epithelial cells and macrophage functionality.

    PubMed

    Lemme-Dumit, J M; Polti, M A; Perdigón, G; Galdeano, C Maldonado

    2018-01-29

    The effect of oral administration of probiotic bacteria cell walls (PBCWs) in the stimulation of the immune system in healthy BALB/c mice was evaluated. We focused our investigation mainly on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) which are essential for coordinating an adequate mucosal immune response and on the functionality of macrophages. The probiotic bacteria and their cell walls were able to stimulate the IECs exhibiting an important activation and cytokine releases. Supplementation with PBCWs promoted macrophage activation from peritoneum and spleen, indicating that the PBCWs oral administration was able to improve the functionality of the macrophages. In addition, the PBCWs increased immunoglobulin A (IgA)-producing cells in the gut lamina propria in a similar way to probiotic bacteria, but this supplementation did not have an effect on the population of goblet cells in the small intestine epithelium. These results indicate that the probiotic bacteria and their cell walls have an important immunoregulatory effect on the IECs without altering the homeostatic environment but with an increase in IgA+ producing cells and in the innate immune cells, mainly those distant from the gut such as spleen and peritoneum. These findings about the capacity of the cell walls from probiotic bacteria to stimulate key cells, such as IECs and macrophages, and to improve the functioning of the immune system, suggest that those structures could be applied as a new oral adjuvant.

  16. M1 muscarinic receptor activation mediates cell death in M1-HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Graham, E Scott; Woo, Kerhan K; Aalderink, Miranda; Fry, Sandie; Greenwood, Jeffrey M; Glass, Michelle; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    HEK293 cells have been used extensively to generate stable cell lines to study G protein-coupled receptors, such as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). The activation of M1 mAChRs in various cell types in vitro has been shown to be protective. To further investigate M1 mAChR-mediated cell survival, we generated stable HEK293 cell-lines expressing the human M1 mAChR. M1 mAChRs were efficiently expressed at the cell surface and efficiently internalised within 1 h by carbachol. Carbachol also induced early signalling cascades similar to previous reports. Thus, ectopically expressed M1 receptors behaved in a similar fashion to the native receptor over short time periods of analysis. However, substantial cell death was observed in HEK293-M1 cells within 24 h after carbachol application. Death was only observed in HEK cells expressing M1 receptors and fully blocked by M1 antagonists. M1 mAChR-stimulation mediated prolonged activation of the MEK-ERK pathway and resulted in prolonged induction of the transcription factor EGR-1 (>24 h). Blockade of ERK signalling with U0126 did not reduce M1 mAChR-mediated cell-death significantly but inhibited the acute induction of EGR-1. We investigated the time-course of cell death using time-lapse microscopy and xCELLigence technology. Both revealed the M1 mAChR cytotoxicity occurs within several hours of M1 activation. The xCELLigence assay also confirmed that the ERK pathway was not involved in cell-death. Interestingly, the MEK blocker did reduce carbachol-mediated cleaved caspase 3 expression in HEK293-M1 cells. The HEK293 cell line is a widely used pharmacological tool for studying G-protein coupled receptors, including mAChRs. Our results highlight the importance of investigating the longer term fate of these cells in short term signalling studies. Identifying how and why activation of the M1 mAChR signals apoptosis in these cells may lead to a better understanding of how mAChRs regulate cell-fate decisions.

  17. Biliary epithelium and liver B cells exposed to bacteria activate intrahepatic MAIT cells through MR1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Kurioka, Ayako; Parekh, Krishan; Stirling, Kathryn; Roberts, Sheree; Dutton, Emma E.; Hunter, Stuart; Geh, Daniel; Braitch, Manjit K.; Rajanayagam, Jeremy; Iqbal, Tariq; Pinkney, Thomas; Brown, Rachel; Withers, David R.; Adams, David H.; Klenerman, Paul; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T cells characterised by the invariant TCR-chain, Vα7.2-Jα33, and are restricted by MR1, which presents bacterial vitamin B metabolites. They are important for antibacterial immunity at mucosal sites; however, detailed characteristics of liver-infiltrating MAIT (LI-MAIT) and their role in biliary immune surveillance remain unexplored. Methods The phenotype and intrahepatic localisation of human LI-MAIT cells was examined in diseased and normal livers. MAIT cell activation in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, biliary epithelial cells (BEC) and liver B cells was assessed with/without anti-MR1. Results Intrahepatic MAIT cells predominantly localised to bile ducts in the portal tracts. Consistent with this distribution, they expressed biliary tropic chemokine receptors CCR6, CXCR6, and integrin αEβ7. LI-MAIT cells were also present in the hepatic sinusoids and possessed tissue-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3 and integrins LFA-1 and VLA-4, suggesting their recruitment via hepatic sinusoids. LI-MAIT cells were enriched in the parenchyma of acute liver failure livers compared to chronic diseased livers. LI-MAIT cells had an activated, effector memory phenotype, expressed α4β7 and receptors for IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23. Importantly, in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, liver B cells and BEC, MAIT cells upregulated IFN-γ and CD40 Ligand and degranulated in an MR1-dependent, cytokine-independent manner. In addition, diseased liver MAIT cells expressed T-bet and RORγt and the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence of an immune surveillance effector response for MAIT cells towards BEC in human liver; thus they could be manipulated for treatment of biliary disease in the future. PMID:26743076

  18. 5-ASA affects cell cycle progression in colorectal cells by reversibly activating a replication checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Luciani, M Gloria; Campregher, Christoph; Fortune, John M; Kunkel, Thomas A; Gasche, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiologic, animal, and laboratory studies suggest that 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA) protects from the development of CRC by altering cell cycle progression and by inducing apoptosis. Our previous results indicate that 5-ASA improves replication fidelity in colorectal cells, an effect that is active in reducing mutations. In this study, we hypothesized that 5-ASA restrains cell cycle progression by activating checkpoint pathways in colorectal cell lines, which would prevent tumor development and improve genomic stability. CRC cells with different genetic backgrounds such as HT29, HCT116, HCT116(p53-/-), HCT116+chr3, and LoVo were treated with 5-ASA for 2-96 hours. Cell cycle progression, phosphorylation, and DNA binding of cell cycle checkpoint proteins were analyzed. We found that 5-ASA at concentrations between 10 and 40 mmol/L affects cell cycle progression by inducing cells to accumulate in the S phase. This effect was independent of the hMLH1, hMSH2, and p53 status because it was observed to a similar extent in all cell lines under investigation. Moreover, wash-out experiments demonstrated reversibility within 48 hours. Although p53 did not have a causative role, p53 Ser15 was strongly phosphorylated. Proteins involved in the ATM-and-Rad3-related kinase (ATR)-dependent S-phase checkpoint response (Chk1 and Rad17) were also phosphorylated but not ataxia telengectasia mutated kinase. Our data demonstrate that 5-ASA causes cells to reversibly accumulate in S phase and activate an ATR-dependent checkpoint. The activation of replication checkpoint may slow down DNA replication and improve DNA replication fidelity, which increases the maintenance of genomic stability and counteracts carcinogenesis.

  19. 5-ASA Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Colorectal Cells by Reversibly Activating a Replication Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANI, M. GLORIA; CAMPREGHER, CHRISTOPH; FORTUNE, JOHN M.; KUNKEL, THOMAS A.; GASCHE, CHRISTOPH

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiologic, animal, and laboratory studies suggest that 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA) protects from the development of CRC by altering cell cycle progression and by inducing apoptosis. Our previous results indicate that 5-ASA improves replication fidelity in colorectal cells, an effect that is active in reducing mutations. In this study, we hypothesized that 5-ASA restrains cell cycle progression by activating checkpoint pathways in colorectal cell lines, which would prevent tumor development and improve genomic stability. Methods CRC cells with different genetic backgrounds such as HT29, HCT116, HCT116p53−/−, HCT116+chr3, and LoVo were treated with 5-ASA for 2–96 hours. Cell cycle progression, phosphorylation, and DNA binding of cell cycle checkpoint proteins were analyzed. Results We found that 5-ASA at concentrations between 10 and 40 mmol/L affects cell cycle progression by inducing cells to accumulate in the S phase. This effect was independent of the hMLH1, hMSH2, and p53 status because it was observed to a similar extent in all cell lines under investigation. Moreover, wash-out experiments demonstrated reversibility within 48 hours. Although p53 did not have a causative role, p53 Ser15 was strongly phosphorylated. Proteins involved in the ATM-and-Rad3-related kinase (ATR)-dependent S-phase checkpoint response (Chk1 and Rad17) were also phosphorylated but not ataxia telengectasia mutated kinase. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that 5-ASA causes cells to reversibly accumulate in S phase and activate an ATR-dependent checkpoint. The activation of replication checkpoint may slow down DNA replication and improve DNA replication fidelity, which increases the maintenance of genomic stability and counteracts carcinogenesis. PMID:17241873

  20. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-28

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  1. Monocyte activation by smooth muscle cell-derived matrices.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, J; Jorgensen, R W; Martin, B M; Franzblau, C

    1990-12-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes adhere to and penetrate the vessel wall endothelium and contact the subendothelial space prior to the development of the atherosclerotic plaque. In an attempt to model the early events of plaque development we used an elastin-rich, multicomponent, cell-derived matrix from neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cells as a substratum for monocytes. Using this model, we show that human monocyte morphology and metabolism are markedly altered by the matrix substratum. When a mixed mononuclear cell population is seeded on matrix or plastic, only monocytes adhere to the matrix surface. In contrast, lymphocytes as well as monocytes adhere to the plastic surface. The matrix-adherent monocytes develop large intracellular granules and form extensive clusters of individual cells. Metabolically, these cells develop sodium fluoride resistant non-specific esterase activity and their media contain more growth factor activity and PGE2. Although total protein synthesis is equivalent in both cultures, the matrix contact induces an increase in specific proteins in the media. We also show that a purified alpha-elastin substratum induces some, but not all, of the monocyte changes seen when using the matrix substratum. Using the alpha-elastin substratum, there is selective adhesion of monocytes and increased growth factor activity, however, the cells are morphologically different from the matrix-adherent cells. Thus, the use of the smooth muscle cell-derived matrix, in conjunction with purified matrix components, serves as a model that can provide insight into the mechanisms of monocyte adhesion and stimulation by the matrix environment that exists in vivo. Such mechanisms may be particularly important in atherogenesis.

  2. PAR1 activation affects the neurotrophic properties of Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Elena; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Somma, Francesca; Correani, Virginia; Maras, Bruno; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Ciraci, Viviana; Artico, Marco; Fornai, Francesco; Fumagalli, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is the prototypic member of a family of four G-protein-coupled receptors that signal in response to extracellular proteases. In the peripheral nervous system, the expression and/or the role of PARs are still poorly investigated. High PAR1 mRNA expression was found in the rat dorsal root ganglia and the signal intensity of PAR1 mRNA increased in response to sciatic nerve transection. In the sciatic nerve, functional PAR1 receptor was reported at the level of non-compacted Schwann cell myelin microvilli of the nodes of Ranvier. Schwann cells are the principal population of glial cells of the peripheral nervous system which myelinate axons playing an important role during axonal regeneration and remyelination. The present study was undertaken in order to determine if the activation of PAR1 affects the neurotrophic properties of Schwann cells. Our results suggest that the stimulation of PAR1 could potentiate the Schwann cell ability to favour nerve regeneration. In fact, the conditioned medium obtained from Schwann cell cultures challenged with a specific PAR1 activating peptide (PAR1 AP) displays increased neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties with respect to the culture medium from untreated Schwann cells. The proteomic analysis of secreted proteins in untreated and PAR1 AP-treated Schwann cells allowed the identification of factors differentially expressed in the two samples. Some of them (such as macrophage migration inhibitory factor, matrix metalloproteinase-2, decorin, syndecan 4, complement C1r subcomponent, angiogenic factor with G patch and FHA domains 1) appear to be transcriptionally regulated after PAR1 AP treatment as shown by RT-PCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Leptin deficiency in vivo enhances the ability of splenic dendritic cells to activate T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic adipokine that is critical for regulating food intake and energy expenditure and also participates in functions of the immune system, including those of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we assess the effect of leptin deficiency on the function splenic dendritic cells (sDC). sDC from leptin-deficient mice (Lepob) were evaluated ex vivo for phenotype, ability to respond to inflammatory stimuli, to acquire and process antigens and to activate T cells. The data show that Lepob sDC express activation markers similar to controls and respond similarly to LPS activation or anti-CD40 cross-linking. In addition, antigen acquisition and processing by Lepob sDC was similar to controls. However, Lepob sDC elicited higher production of IFN-γ in mixed lymphocyte reactions and increased production of IL-2 by antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma relative to controls. To assess Lepob sDC activation of T cells in vivo, Lepob and control mice were infected systemically with Mycobacterium avium. Lepob mice were significantly better at neutralizing the infection as measured by splenic bacterial load over time. This was mirrored with an increased percentage of activated T cells in M. avium-infected Lepob mice. Thus, although no changes were detected in sDC phenotype, activation, antigen processing or presentation, these DC surprisingly presented an enhanced ability to activate T cells ex vivo and in vivo. These data demonstrate that leptin can modulate DC function and suggest that leptin may dampen T-cell responsiveness in the physiological setting. PMID:24966213

  4. Identification of active and quiescent adipose vascular stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guiting; Xin, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Haiyang; Banie, Lia; Wang, Guifang; Qiu, Xuefeng; Ning, Hongxiu; Lue, Tom F; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of both active and quiescent stem cells in bone marrow, hair follicle and intestine. We attempted to identify active and quiescent vascular stromal cells (VSC) in adipose tissue. For identification of active VSC, adult rats were injected intraperitoneally with thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) and their subcutaneous tissue harvested 3 days later. For identification of quiescent VSC, newborn rats were injected intraperitoneally with EdU and their subcutaneous tissue harvested 9 weeks later. The harvested adipose tissues were examined for the co-localization of EdU with VSC marker CD34, smooth muscle marker SMA, endothelial marker RECA and pericyte marker CD140b. In adult rat adipose tissues harvested 3 days after EdU injection, there were 28.80 ± 8.70 (mean ± SD) EdU+ cells/100 × microscopic field, and approximately 6.2% of cell nuclei were labeled with EdU. The percentages of EdU+ cells expressing the following markers were approximately: 84 for CD34, 5.6 for RECA (rat endothelial marker), 3.7 for SMA and 14.8 for CD140b. In the adipose tissues of newborn rats that were harvested 9 weeks after EdU injection, the percentages of EdU+ cells expressing the following markers were approximately: 76 for CD34, 1.8 for RECA, 0 for SMA and 12.9 for CD140b. In both the short-term (active) and long-term (quiescent) EdU-labeled adipose tissues, the EdU label was consistently co-localized with CD34 and in the proximity of CD140b stain or in the adventitia. Both active and quiescent VSC expressed CD34 and localized to capillaries and the adventitia of larger blood vessels.

  5. A Micro Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter for Astrobiology Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Donald W.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    A micro-scale Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (microFACS) for astrobiology applications is under development. This device is designed to have a footprint of 7 cm x 7 cm x 4 cm and allow live-dead counts and sorting of cells that have fluorescent characteristics from staining. The FACS system takes advantage of microfluidics to create a cell sorter that can fit in the palm of the hand. A micron-scale channel allows cells to pass by a blue diode which causes emission of marker-expressed cells which are detected by a filtered photodetector. A small microcontroller then counts cells and operates high speed valves to select which chamber the cell is collected in (a collection chamber or a waste chamber). Cells with the expressed characteristic will be collected in the collection chamber. This system has been built and is currently being tested. We are also designing a system with integrated MEMS-based pumps and valves for a small and compact unit to fly on small satellite-based biology experiments.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA3 on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA3 may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interleukin-2 activation of cytotoxic cells in postmastectomy seroma.

    PubMed

    Gercel-Taylor, C; Hoffman, J P; Taylor, D D; Owens, K J; Eisenberg, B L

    1996-02-15

    Lymphocytes were isolated from breast seroma fluids and used to study the mechanism of activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes and possible role of immunological potentiation following surgery in breast cancer patients. Single or serial samples were obtained from patients who had undergone mastectomy or lumpectomy with axillary node dissection. Lymphocytes were activated with rIL-2 (interleukin-2) and their cytotoxic activity was studied against Daudi and K562 cells and against a breast tumor line (SKBr-3). All of the patients (21/21) responded to IL-2 stimulation by significant activation of cytotoxic activity. The unstimulated cytotoxic activity of these cells against NK targets was low with less than 10% specific release in cytotoxicity assays. In simultaneous experiments, autologous seroma fluid was included during activation of lymphocytes to study possible regulatory molecules that may be present. In 17/21 patients, the presence of their seroma fluid, during the activation period, enhanced or did not effect the cytotoxic potential of their lymphocytes; inhibition was observed when seroma fluids from 4/21 patients were included. Analysis of the cytotoxic population derived from combined IL-2 and seroma treatments indicates the presence of cells with increased expression of CD56, and CD2, as well as in some cases CD16 expression. Cytotoxic lymphocytes derived from IL-2 and seroma treatments appeared to be more effective killers. Modulation of CD2 expression with seroma alone appeared to result in the generation of this highly cytotoxic population. This study demonstrates the role of CD2 expression in the effectiveness of LAK cell killing and also potential benefit of an immunotherapeutic approach to the postoperative treatment of carcinoma of the breast.

  8. Inflammation activates the interferon signaling pathways in taste bud cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Zhou, Minliang; Brand, Joseph; Huang, Liquan

    2007-10-03

    Patients with viral and bacterial infections or other inflammatory illnesses often experience taste dysfunctions. The agents responsible for these taste disorders are thought to be related to infection-induced inflammation, but the mechanisms are not known. As a first step in characterizing the possible role of inflammation in taste disorders, we report here evidence for the presence of interferon (IFN)-mediated signaling pathways in taste bud cells. IFN receptors, particularly the IFN-gamma receptor IFNGR1, are coexpressed with the taste cell-type markers neuronal cell adhesion molecule and alpha-gustducin, suggesting that both the taste receptor cells and synapse-forming cells in the taste bud can be stimulated by IFN. Incubation of taste bud-containing lingual epithelia with recombinant IFN-alpha and IFN-gamma triggered the IFN-mediated signaling cascades, resulting in the phosphorylation of the downstream STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 1) transcription factor. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid into mice, mimicking bacterial and viral infections, respectively, altered gene expression patterns in taste bud cells. Furthermore, the systemic administration of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma significantly increased the number of taste bud cells undergoing programmed cell death. These findings suggest that bacterial and viral infection-induced IFNs can act directly on taste bud cells, affecting their cellular function in taste transduction, and that IFN-induced apoptosis in taste buds may cause abnormal cell turnover and skew the representation of different taste bud cell types, leading to the development of taste disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first study providing direct evidence that inflammation can affect taste buds through cytokine signaling pathways.

  9. Optimization of active cell area on the dye-sensitized solar cell efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, A. W.; Nurosyid, F.; Supriyanto, Agus

    2017-11-01

    This study is aimed to obtain optimal active area producing high efficiency of DSSC module. The DSSC structure is constructed of TiO2 as working electrode, dye as photosensitizer, platinum as counter electrode, and electrolyte as electron transfer media. TiO2 paste was deposited on Fluorine-doped Tin Oxide (FTO) by screen printing method. Meanwhile, platinum was also coated on FTO via brush painting method. Keithley I-V meter was performed to characterize DSSC electrical property. The active area of each cell was varied of 4.5 cm2, 9 cm2, and 13.5 cm2. Each cell was assembled into a module using an external series connection of Z type. The module was consisted of 12 cells, 6 cells, and 4 cells with module active area of 54 cm2. The optimal active area of DSSC cell is 4.5 cm2 resulting 0.4149% efficiency. In addition, the highest efficiency of DSSC module is 0.2234% acquired by 6 cells assembling.

  10. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F. Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  11. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-08

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Immunomodulation of phloretin by impairing dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Ching-Liang; Ng, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Chen, Der-Yuan; Pan, I-Hong; Huang, Kao-Jean

    2014-05-01

    Dietary compounds in fruits and vegetables have been shown to exert many biological activities. In addition to antioxidant effects, a number of flavonoids are able to modulate inflammatory responses. Here, we demonstrated that phloretin (PT), a natural dihydrochalcone found in many fruits, suppressed the activation and function of mouse dendritic cells (DCs). Phloretin disturbed the multiple intracellular signaling pathways in DCs induced by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), including ROS, MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK), and NF-κB, and thereby reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Phloretin also effectively suppressed the activation of DCs treated with different dosages of LPS or various TLR agonists. The LPS-induced DC maturation was attenuated by phloretin because the expression levels of the MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules were down-regulated, which then inhibited the LPS-stimulating DCs and the subsequent naïve T cell activation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Moreover, in vivo administration of phloretin suppressed the phenotypic maturation of the LPS-challenged splenic DCs and decreased the IFN-γ production from the activated CD4 T cells. Thus, we suggest that phloretin may potentially be an immunomodulator by impairing the activation and function of DCs and phloretin-contained fruits may be helpful in the improvement of inflammation and autoimmune diseases.

  13. Heme-mediated cell activation: the inflammatory puzzle of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Guarda, Caroline Conceição da; Santiago, Rayra Pereira; Fiuza, Luciana Magalhães; Aleluia, Milena Magalhães; Ferreira, Júnia Raquel Dutra; Figueiredo, Camylla Vilas Boas; Yahouedehou, Setondji Cocou Modeste Alexandre; Oliveira, Rodrigo Mota de; Lyra, Isa Menezes; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza

    2017-06-01

    Hemolysis triggers the onset of several clinical manifestations of sickle cell anemia (SCA). During hemolysis, heme, which is derived from hemoglobin (Hb), accumulates due to the inability of detoxification systems to scavenge sufficiently. Heme exerts multiple harmful effects, including leukocyte activation and migration, enhanced adhesion molecule expression by endothelial cells and the production of pro-oxidant molecules. Area covered: In this review, we describe the effects of heme on leukocytes and endothelial cells, as well as the features of vascular endothelial cells related to vaso-occlusion in SCA. Expert commentary: Free Hb, heme and iron, potent cytotoxic intravascular molecules released during hemolysis, can exacerbate, modulate and maintain the inflammatory response, a main feature of SCA. Endothelial cells in the vascular environment, as well as leukocytes, can become activated via the molecular signaling effects of heme. Due to the hemolytic nature of SCA, hemolysis represents an interesting therapeutic target for heme-scavenging purposes.

  14. Active cells for redundant and configurable articulated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swensen, John P.; Nawroj, Ahsan I.; Pounds, Paul E. I.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2014-10-01

    The proposed research effort explores the development of active cells—simple contractile electro-mechanical units that can be used as the material basis for larger articulable structures. Each cell, which might be considered a ‘muscle unit,’ consists of a contractile Nitinol Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) core with conductive terminals. Large numbers of these cells might be combined and externally powered to change phase, contracting to either articulate with a large strain or increase the stiffness of the ensemble, depending on the cell design. Unlike traditional work in modular robotics, the approach presented here focuses on cells that have a simplistic design and function, are inexpensive to fabricate, and are eventually scalable to sub-millimeter sizes, working toward our vision of articulated and robotic structures that can be custom-fabricated from large numbers of general cell units, similar to biological structures. In this paper, we present the design of the active cells and demonstrate their usage with three articulated structures built with them.

  15. Identification and genetic analysis of cancer cells with PCR-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Eastburn, Dennis J.; Sciambi, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Cell sorting is a central tool in life science research for analyzing cellular heterogeneity or enriching rare cells out of large populations. Although methods like FACS and FISH-FC can characterize and isolate cells from heterogeneous populations, they are limited by their reliance on antibodies, or the requirement to chemically fix cells. We introduce a new cell sorting technology that robustly sorts based on sequence-specific analysis of cellular nucleic acids. Our approach, PCR-activated cell sorting (PACS), uses TaqMan PCR to detect nucleic acids within single cells and trigger their sorting. With this method, we identified and sorted prostate cancer cells from a heterogeneous population by performing >132 000 simultaneous single-cell TaqMan RT-PCR reactions targeting vimentin mRNA. Following vimentin-positive droplet sorting and downstream analysis of recovered nucleic acids, we found that cancer-specific genomes and transcripts were significantly enriched. Additionally, we demonstrate that PACS can be used to sort and enrich cells via TaqMan PCR reactions targeting single-copy genomic DNA. PACS provides a general new technical capability that expands the application space of cell sorting by enabling sorting based on cellular information not amenable to existing approaches. PMID:25030902

  16. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T. C.; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F. T.; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light–inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation–dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell–depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  17. Cyclosporine Induces Endothelial Cell Release of Complement-Activating Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Brandon; Klawitter, Jelena; Goldberg, Ryan; McCullough, James W.; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cooper, James E.; Christians, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Defective control of the alternative pathway of complement is an important risk factor for several renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Infections, drugs, pregnancy, and hemodynamic insults can trigger episodes of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in susceptible patients. Although the mechanisms linking these clinical events with disease flares are unknown, recent work has revealed that each of these clinical conditions causes cells to release microparticles. We hypothesized that microparticles released from injured endothelial cells promote intrarenal complement activation. Calcineurin inhibitors cause vascular and renal injury and can trigger hemolytic uremic syndrome. Here, we show that endothelial cells exposed to cyclosporine in vitro and in vivo release microparticles that activate the alternative pathway of complement. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles caused injury to bystander endothelial cells and are associated with complement-mediated injury of the kidneys and vasculature in cyclosporine-treated mice. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles did not bind factor H, an alternative pathway regulatory protein present in plasma, explaining their complement-activating phenotype. Finally, we found that in renal transplant patients, the number of endothelial microparticles in plasma increases 2 weeks after starting tacrolimus, and treatment with tacrolimus associated with increased C3 deposition on endothelial microparticles in the plasma of some patients. These results suggest that injury-associated release of endothelial microparticles is an important mechanism by which systemic insults trigger intravascular complement activation and complement-dependent renal diseases. PMID:24092930

  18. ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN UROTSA CELLS BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN UROTSA CELLS BY METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS. Z Drobna1, I Jaspers2, D J Thomas3 and M Styblo1. 1Department of Pediatrics; 2Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

  19. Decorin binds myostatin and modulates its activity to muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Takayuki; Kishioka, Yasuhiro; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi

    2006-02-10

    Myostatin, a member of TGF-{beta} superfamily of growth factors, acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. The mechanism whereby myostatin controls the proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells is mostly clarified. However, the regulation of myostatin activity to myogenic cells after its secretion in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is still unknown. Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan, binds TGF-{beta} and regulates its activity in the ECM. Thus, we hypothesized that decorin could also bind to myostatin and participate in modulation of its activity to myogenic cells. In order to test the hypothesis, we investigated the interaction between myostatin andmore » decorin by surface plasmon assay. Decorin interacted with mature myostatin in the presence of concentrations of Zn{sup 2+} greater than 10 {mu}M, but not in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. Kinetic analysis with a 1:1 binding model resulted in dissociation constants (K {sub D}) of 2.02 x 10{sup -8} M and 9.36 x 10{sup -9} M for decorin and the core protein of decorin, respectively. Removal of the glycosaminoglycan chain by chondroitinase ABC digestion did not affect binding, suggesting that decorin could bind to myostatin with its core protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that immobilized decorin could rescue the inhibitory effect of myostatin on myoblast proliferation in vitro. These results suggest that decorin could trap myostatin and modulate its activity to myogenic cells in the ECM.« less

  20. Dendritic Cell Activation by Glucan Isolated from Umbilicaria Esculenta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Kim, Jee Youn; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Moo Sung; Lee, Sang Rin; Kang, Jong Soon; Kim, Hwan Mook; Lee, Kyung-Ae; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2010-01-01

    Background Lichen-derived glucans have been known to stimulate the functions of immune cells. However, immunostimulatory activity of glucan obtained from edible lichen, Umbilicaria esculenta, has not been reported. Thus we evaluated the phenotype and functional maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) following treatment of extracted glucan (PUE). Methods The phenotypic and functional maturation of PUE-treated DCs was assessed by flow cytometric analysis and cytokine production, respectively. PUE-treated DCs was also used for mixed leukocyte reaction to evaluate T cell-priming capacity. Finally we detected the activation of MAPK and NF-κB by immunoblot. Results Phenotypic maturation of DCs was shown by the elevated expressions of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II molecules. Functional activation of DCs was proved by increased cytokine production of IL-12, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-α/β, decreased endocytosis, and enhanced proliferation of allogenic T cells. Polymyxin B, specific inhibitor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), did not affect PUE activity, which suggested that PUE was free of LPS contamination. As a mechanism of action, PUE increased phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPKs, and enhanced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50/p65 in DCs. Conclusion These results indicate that PUE induced DC maturation via MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21286379

  1. Kefiran suppresses antigen-induced mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Furuno, Tadahide; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2012-01-01

    Kefir is a traditional fermented milk beverage produced by kefir grains in the Caucasian countries. Kefiran produced by Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens in kefir grains is an exopolysaccharide having a repeating structure with glucose and galactose residues in the chain sequence and has been suggested to exert many health-promoting effects such as immunomodulatory, hypotensive, hypocholesterolemic activities. Here we investigated the effects of kefiran on mast cell activation induced by antigen. Pretreatment with kefiran significantly inhibited antigen-induced Ca(2+) mobilization, degranulation, and tumor necrosis factor-α production in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) in a dose-dependent manner. The phosphorylation of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) after antigen stimulation was also suppressed by pretreatment of BMMCs with kefiran. These findings indicate that kefiran suppresses mast cell degranulation and cytokine production by inhibiting the Akt and ERKs pathways, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect for kefiran.

  2. Dynamical analysis of uterine cell electrical activity model.

    PubMed

    Rihana, S; Santos, J; Mondie, S; Marque, C

    2006-01-01

    The uterus is a physiological system consisting of a large number of interacting smooth muscle cells. The uterine excitability changes remarkably with time, generally quiescent during pregnancy, the uterus exhibits forceful synchronized contractions at term leading to fetus expulsion. These changes characterize thus a dynamical system susceptible of being studied through formal mathematical tools. Multiple physiological factors are involved in the regulation process of this complex system. Our aim is to relate the physiological factors to the uterine cell dynamic behaviors. Taking into account a previous work presented, in which the electrical activity of a uterine cell is described by a set of ordinary differential equations, we analyze the impact of physiological parameters on the response of the model, and identify the main subsystems generating the complex uterine electrical activity, with respect to physiological data.

  3. Lysozyme activity and nitroblue-tetrazolium reduction in leukaemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Catovsky, D.; Galton, D. A. G.

    1973-01-01

    The cytochemical methods for lysozyme and nitroblue-tetrazolium reduction have been used to study the blast cells of acute myeloid leukaemia. Both proved useful in characterizing the cases with predominant monocytic differentiation. The demonstration of lysozyme activity helped to define two main groups: (a) with predominantly lysozyme-negative cells (myeloblastic-promyelocytic), and (b) with considerable numbers of positive cells (monoblastic-monocytic). In addition this test was also of value in the differentiation of other leukaemic disorders. Reduction of nitroblue-tetrazolium was also a feature of monocytic differentiation. The combination of these two methods with those for myeloperoxidase and non-specific esterase activity contributes to the cytological characterization of acute myeloid leukaemia. Images PMID:4511938

  4. Raman-activated cell sorting based on dielectrophoretic single-cell trap and release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiran; Ren, Lihui; Zhang, Xu; Shan, Yufei; Wang, Yun; Ji, Yuetong; Yin, Huabing; Huang, Wei E; Xu, Jian; Ma, Bo

    2015-02-17

    Raman-activated cell sorting (RACS) is a promising single-cell technology that holds several significant advantages, as RACS is label-free, information-rich, and potentially in situ. To date, the ability of the technique to identify single cells in a high-speed flow has been limited by inherent weakness of the spontaneous Raman signal. Here we present an alternative pause-and-sort RACS microfluidic system that combines positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) for single-cell trap and release with a solenoid-valve-suction-based switch for cell separation. This has allowed the integration of trapping, Raman identification, and automatic separation of individual cells in a high-speed flow. By exerting a periodical pDEP field, single cells were trapped, ordered, and positioned individually to the detection point for Raman measurement. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, a mixture of two cell strains containing carotenoid-producing yeast (9%) and non-carotenoid-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (91%) was sorted, which enriched the former to 73% on average and showed a fast Raman-activated cell sorting at the subsecond level.

  5. FGF2 activates TRPC and Ca2+ signaling leading to satellite cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yewei; Schneider, Martin F.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite cells, as stem cells of adult skeletal muscle, are tightly associated with the differentiated muscle fibers and remain quiescent in the absence of muscle damage. In response to an injury, the quiescent satellite cell is activated by soluble factors, including FGFs released from injured myofibers. Using immunostaining, we here first show that TRPC1 channels are highly expressed in satellite cells attached to muscle fibers. Since CD34, a traditional stem cell marker, was recently found to be expressed in skeletal muscle satellite cells we labeled living satellite cells in their physiological niche associated with host FDB fibers using anti-CD34-FITC antibody. We then monitored intra-cellular calcium in anti-CD34-FITC labeled satellite cells attached to muscle fibers using the calcium sensitive dye X rhod-1 which has little fluorescence cross talk with FITC. FGF2 increased intracellular calcium in satellite cells, which was antagonized by the TRPC channel blocker SKF 96365. Immunostaining showed that NFATc3 is highly expressed in satellite cells, but not in host FDB fibers. Elevation of intracellular calcium by FGF2 is accompanied by nuclear translocation of NFATc3 and NFATc2 and by an increase in the number of MyoD positive cells per muscle fiber, both of which were attenuated by TRPC blocker SKF 96365. Our results suggest a novel pathway of satellite cell activation where FGF2 enhances calcium influx through a TRPC channel, and the increased cytosolic calcium leads to both NFATc3 and NFATc2 nuclear translocation and enhanced number of MyoD positive satellite cells per muscle fiber. PMID:24575047

  6. Endothelial connexin 32 regulates tissue factor expression induced by inflammatory stimulation and direct cell-cell interaction with activated cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takayuki; Akita, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Shimaoka, Motomu; Suzuki, Koji

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) interacts with adjacent EC through gap junction, and abnormal expression or function of Cxs is associated with cardiovascular diseases. In patients with endothelial dysfunction, the up-regulation of tissue factor (TF) expression promotes the pathogenic activation of blood coagulation, however the relationship between gap junctions and TF expression in ECs remains uncharacterized. ECs express the gap junction (GJ) proteins connexin32 (Cx32), Cx37, Cx40 and Cx43. We investigated the role of endothelial gap junctions, particularly Cx32, in modulating TF expression during vascular inflammation. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and TF activity was assessed in the presence of GJ blockers and an inhibitory anti-Cx32 monoclonal antibody. Treatment with GJ blockers and anti-Cx32 monoclonal antibody enhanced the TNF-α-induced TF activity and mRNA expression in HUVECs. TNF-α-activated effector HUVECs or mouse MS-1 cells were co-cultured with non-stimulated acceptor HUVECs and TF expression in acceptor HUVECs was detected. Effector EC induced TF expression in adjacent acceptor HUVECs through direct cell-cell interaction. Cell-cell interaction induced TF expression was reduced by anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) monoclonal antibody. Soluble ICAM1-Fc fusion protein promotes TF expression. GJ blockers and anti-Cx32 monoclonal antibody enhanced TF expression induced by cell-cell interaction and ICAM1-Fc treatment. Blockade of endothelial Cx32 increased TF expression induced by TNF-α stimulation and cell-cell interaction which was at least partly dependent upon ICAM1. These results suggest that direct Cx32-mediated interaction modulates TF expression in ECs during vascular inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antitumor activity of the Korean mistletoe lectin is attributed to activation of macrophages and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Taek Joon; Yoo, Yung Choon; Kang, Tae Bong; Song, Seong Kyu; Lee, Kyung Bok; Her, Erk; Song, Kyung Sik; Kim, Jong Bae

    2003-10-01

    Inhibitory effect of the lectins (KML-C) isolated from Korean mistletoe (KM; Viscum album coloratum) on tumor metastases produced by murine tumor cells (B16-BL6 melanoma, colon 26-M3.1 carcinoma and L5178Y-ML25 lymphoma cells) was investigated in syngeneic mice. An intravenous (i.v.) administration of KML-C (20-50 ng/mouse) 2 days before tumor inoculation significantly inhibited lung metastases of both B16-BL6 and colon 26-M3.1 cells. The prophylactic effect of 50 ng/mouse of KML-C on lung metastasis was almost the same with that of 100 microg/mouse of KM. Treatment with KML-C 1 day after tumor inoculation induced a significant inhibition of not only the experimental lung metastasis induced by B16-BL6 and colon 26-M3.1 cells but also the liver and spleen metastasis of L5178Y-ML25 cells. Furthermore, multiple administration of KML-C given at 3 day-intervals after tumor inoculation led to a significant reduction of lung metastasis and suppression of the growth of B16-BL6 melanoma cells in a spontaneous metastasis model. In an assay for natural killer (NK) cell activity, i.v. administration of KML-C (50 ng/mouse) significantly augmented NK cytotoxicity against Yac-1 tumor cells 2 days after KML-C treatment. In addition, treatment with KML-C (50 ng/mouse) induced tumoricidal activity of peritoneal macrophages against B16-BL6 and 3LL cells. These results suggest that KML-C has an immunomodulating activity to enhance the host defense system against tumors, and that its prophylactic and therapeutic effect on tumor metastasis is associated with the activation of NK cells and macrophages.

  8. Activated ovarian endothelial cells promote early follicular development and survival.

    PubMed

    Kedem, Alon; Aelion-Brauer, Anate; Guo, Peipei; Wen, Duancheng; Ding, Bi-Sen; Lis, Raphael; Cheng, Du; Sandler, Vladislav M; Rafii, Shahin; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2017-09-19

    New data suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) elaborate essential "angiocrine factors". The aim of this study is to investigate the role of activated ovarian endothelial cells in early in-vitro follicular development. Mouse ovarian ECs were isolated using magnetic cell sorting or by FACS and cultured in serum free media. After a constitutive activation of the Akt pathway was initiated, early follicles (50-150 um) were mechanically isolated from 8-day-old mice and co-cultured with these activated ovarian endothelial cells (AOEC) (n = 32), gel (n = 24) or within matrigel (n = 27) in serum free media for 14 days. Follicular growth, survival and function were assessed. After 6 passages, flow cytometry showed 93% of cells grown in serum-free culture were VE-cadherin positive, CD-31 positive and CD 45 negative, matching the known EC profile. Beginning on day 4 of culture, we observed significantly higher follicular and oocyte growth rates in follicles co-cultured with AOECs compared with follicles on gel or matrigel. After 14 days of culture, 73% of primary follicles and 83% of secondary follicles co-cultured with AOEC survived, whereas the majority of follicles cultured on gel or matrigel underwent atresia. This is the first report of successful isolation and culture of ovarian ECs. We suggest that co-culture with activated ovarian ECs promotes early follicular development and survival. This model is a novel platform for the in vitro maturation of early follicles and for the future exploration of endothelial-follicular communication. In vitro development of early follicles necessitates a complex interplay of growth factors and signals required for development. Endothelial cells (ECs) may elaborate essential "angiocrine factors" involved in organ regeneration. We demonstrate that co-culture with ovarian ECs enables culture of primary and early secondary mouse ovarian follicles.

  9. CAR T cell therapy for breast cancer: harnessing the tumor milieu to drive T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Bajgain, Pradip; Tawinwung, Supannikar; D'Elia, Lindsey; Sukumaran, Sujita; Watanabe, Norihiro; Hoyos, Valentina; Lulla, Premal; Brenner, Malcolm K; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F

    2018-05-10

    The adoptive transfer of T cells redirected to tumor via chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has produced clinical benefits for the treatment of hematologic diseases. To extend this approach to breast cancer, we generated CAR T cells directed against mucin1 (MUC1), an aberrantly glycosylated neoantigen that is overexpressed by malignant cells and whose expression has been correlated with poor prognosis. Furthermore, to protect our tumor-targeted cells from the elevated levels of immune-inhibitory cytokines present in the tumor milieu, we co-expressed an inverted cytokine receptor linking the IL4 receptor exodomain with the IL7 receptor endodomain (4/7ICR) in order to transform the suppressive IL4 signal into one that would enhance the anti-tumor effects of our CAR T cells at the tumor site. First (1G - CD3ζ) and second generation (2G - 41BB.CD3ζ) MUC1-specific CARs were constructed using the HMFG2 scFv. Following retroviral transduction transgenic expression of the CAR±ICR was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro CAR/ICR T cell function was measured by assessing cell proliferation and short- and long-term cytotoxic activity using MUC1+ MDA MB 468 cells as targets. In vivo anti-tumor activity was assessed using IL4-producing MDA MB 468 tumor-bearing mice using calipers to assess tumor volume and bioluminescence imaging to track T cells. In the IL4-rich tumor milieu, 1G CAR.MUC1 T cells failed to expand or kill MUC1+ tumors and while co-expression of the 4/7ICR promoted T cell expansion, in the absence of co-stimulatory signals the outgrowing cells exhibited an exhausted phenotype characterized by PD-1 and TIM3 upregulation and failed to control tumor growth. However, by co-expressing 2G CAR.MUC1 (signal 1 - activation + signal 2 - co-stimulation) and 4/7ICR (signal 3 - cytokine), transgenic T cells selectively expanded at the tumor site and produced potent and durable tumor control in vitro and in vivo. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of targeting breast

  10. Evaluation of a cell phone-based physical activity diary.

    PubMed

    Sternfeld, Barbara; Jiang, Sheng-Fang; Picchi, Teresa; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Ainsworth, Barbara; Quesenberry, Charles P

    2012-03-01

    Physical activity (PA) diaries reduce the recall error inherent in self-reported PA but are burdensome. The purpose of this study was to compare a cell phone-based diary with a paper diary and examine the reliability and validity of the cell phone diary. In a pilot study, 25 women and 23 men, age 45-65 yr, completed cell phone and paper PA diaries 4 d·wk(-1) for three consecutive weeks and a user satisfaction survey. In the subsequent validation study, 623 middle-age participants (52.5% women) were asked to complete the cell phone diary and wear an accelerometer for two 7-d periods, approximately 6 months apart. They also completed two PA questionnaires. Fitness, body mass index, and percent body fat were obtained as indirect validation criteria. Estimates of PA from the cell phone and paper diaries were similar (mean within person difference = -43.8 MET·min·d(-1) of total PA, SD = 360, P = 0.49, 7.4 min·d(-1) of moderate-vigorous PA, SD = 66, P = 0.53). Users preferred the cell phone diary over the paper diary (59.6% vs 35.4%). In the subsequent study, intraclass correlations for the cell phone diary ranged from 0.55 for light PA to 0.63 for vigorous PA. Although PA estimates from the cell phone diary were generally significantly higher than those from the accelerometer and the questionnaires, correlations for moderate and vigorous PA were moderate (ρ = 0.25-0.59 with the questionnaires and 0.27-0.35 with the accelerometer). The correlations between the cell phone diary and the indirect validation criteria were generally in the expected direction and of moderate magnitude. A cell phone-based PA diary is equivalent to a paper diary, acceptable to users, and a relatively reliable and valid approach to self-reported PA.

  11. A bioluminescent caspase-1 activity assay rapidly monitors inflammasome activation in cells.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha; Moehring, Danielle; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Núñez, Gabriel; Callaway, Justin; Ting, Jenny; Scurria, Mike; Ugo, Tim; Bernad, Laurent; Cali, James; Lazar, Dan

    2017-08-01

    Inflammasomes are protein complexes induced by diverse inflammatory stimuli that activate caspase-1, resulting in the processing and release of cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18, and pyroptosis, an immunogenic form of cell death. To provide a homogeneous method for detecting caspase-1 activity, we developed a bioluminescent, plate-based assay that combines a substrate, Z-WEHD-aminoluciferin, with a thermostable luciferase in an optimized lytic reagent added directly to cultured cells. Assay specificity for caspase-1 is conferred by inclusion of a proteasome inhibitor in the lytic reagent and by use of a caspase-1 inhibitor to confirm activity. This approach enables a specific and rapid determination of caspase-1 activation. Caspase-1 activity is stable in the reagent thereby providing assay convenience and flexibility. Using this assay system, caspase-1 activation has been determined in THP-1 cells following treatment with α-hemolysin, LPS, nigericin, gramicidin, MSU, R848, Pam3CSK4, and flagellin. Caspase-1 activation has also been demonstrated in treated J774A.1 mouse macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from mice, as well as in human primary monocytes. Caspase-1 activity was not detected in treated BMDMs derived from Casp1 -/- mice, further confirming the specificity of the assay. Caspase-1 activity can be measured directly in cultured cells using the lytic reagent, or caspase-1 activity released into medium can be monitored by assay of transferred supernatant. The caspase-1 assay can be multiplexed with other assays to monitor additional parameters from the same cells, such as IL-1β release or cell death. The caspase-1 assay in combination with a sensitive real-time monitor of cell death allows one to accurately establish pyroptosis. This assay system provides a rapid, convenient, and flexible method to specifically and quantitatively monitor caspase-1 activation in cells in a plate-based format. This will allow a more efficient and effective

  12. Skin dendritic cell and T cell activation associated with dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duyen, Huynh Thi Le; Cerny, Daniela; Trung, Dinh The; Pang, Jassia; Velumani, Sumathy; Toh, Ying Xiu; Qui, Phan Tu; Hao, Nguyen Van; Simmons, Cameron; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Wills, Bridget; Fink, Katja

    2017-10-27

    The pathogenesis of severe dengue remains unclear, particularly the mechanisms underlying the plasma leakage that results in hypovolaemic shock in a small proportion of individuals. Maximal leakage occurs several days after peak viraemia implicating immunological pathways. Skin is a highly vascular organ and also an important site of immune reactions with a high density of dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages and T cells. We obtained skin biopsies and contemporaneous blood samples from patients within 24 hours of onset of dengue shock syndrome (DSS), and from healthy controls. We analyzed cell subsets by flow cytometry, and soluble mediators and antibodies by ELISA; the percentage of migratory CD1a + dermal DCs was significantly decreased in the DSS patients, and skin CD8 + T cells were activated, but there was no accumulation of dengue-specific antibodies. Inflammatory monocytic cells were not observed infiltrating the skin of DSS cases on whole-mount histology, although CD14 dim cells disappeared from blood.

  13. A purified, fermented, extract of Triticum aestivum has lymphomacidal activity mediated via natural killer cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Barisone, Gustavo A.; O’Donnell, Robert T.; Ma, Yunpeng; Abuhay, Mastewal W.; Lundeberg, Kathleen; Gowda, Sonia

    2018-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) affects over 400,000 people in the United States; its incidence increases with age. Treatment options are numerous and expanding, yet efficacy is often limited by toxicity, particularly in the elderly. Nearly 70% patients eventually die of the disease. Many patients explore less toxic alternative therapeutics proposed to boost anti-tumor immunity, despite a paucity of rigorous scientific data. Here we evaluate the lymphomacidal and immunomodulatory activities of a protein fraction isolated from fermented wheat germ. Fermented wheat germ extract was produced by fermenting wheat germ with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A protein fraction was tested for lymphomacidal activity in vitro using NHL cell lines and in vivo using mouse xenografts. Mechanisms of action were explored in vitro by evaluating apoptosis and cell cycle and in vivo by immunophenotyping and measurement of NK cell activity. Potent lymphomacidal activity was observed in a panel of NHL cell lines and mice bearing NHL xenografts. This activity was not dependent on wheat germ agglutinin or benzoquinones. Fermented wheat germ proteins induced apoptosis in NHL cells, and augmented immune effector mechanisms, as measured by NK cell killing activity, degranulation and production of IFNγ. Fermented wheat germ extract can be easily produced and is efficacious in a human lymphoma xenograft model. The protein fraction is quantifiable and more potent, shows direct pro-apoptotic properties, and enhances immune-mediated tumor eradication. The results presented herein support the novel concept that proteins in fermented wheat germ have direct pro-apoptotic activity on lymphoma cells and augment host immune effector mechanisms. PMID:29304125

  14. Calpain expression and activity during lens fiber cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Alicia; Shi, Yanrong; Kumar, Nalin M; Bassnett, Steven

    2009-05-15

    In animal models, the dysregulated activity of calcium-activated proteases, calpains, contributes directly to cataract formation. However, the physiological role of calpains in the healthy lens is not well defined. In this study, we examined the expression pattern of calpains in the mouse lens. Real time PCR and Western blotting data indicated that calpain 1, 2, 3, and 7 were expressed in lens fiber cells. Using controlled lysis, depth-dependent expression profiles for each calpain were obtained. These indicated that, unlike calpain 1, 2, and 7, which were most abundant in cells near the lens surface, calpain 3 expression was strongest in the deep cortical region of the lens. We detected calpain activities in vitro and showed that calpains were active in vivo by microinjecting fluorogenic calpain substrates into cortical fiber cells. To identify endogenous calpain substrates, membrane/cytoskeleton preparations were treated with recombinant calpain, and cleaved products were identified by two-dimensional difference electrophoresis/mass spectrometry. Among the calpain substrates identified by this approach was alphaII-spectrin. An antibody that specifically recognized calpain-cleaved spectrin was used to demonstrate that spectrin is cleaved in vivo, late in fiber cell differentiation, at or about the time that lens organelles are degraded. The generation of the calpain-specific spectrin cleavage product was not observed in lens tissue from calpain 3-null mice, indicating that calpain 3 is uniquely activated during lens fiber differentiation. Our data suggest a role for calpains in the remodeling of the membrane cytoskeleton that occurs with fiber cell maturation.

  15. Regulatory dendritic cells: there is more than just immune activation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne V; Nino-Castro, Andrea C; Schultze, Joachim L

    2012-01-01

    The immune system exists in a delicate equilibrium between inflammatory responses and tolerance. This unique feature allows the immune system to recognize and respond to potential threats in a controlled but normally limited fashion thereby preventing a destructive overreaction against healthy tissues. While the adaptive immune system was the major research focus concerning activation vs. tolerance in the immune system more recent findings suggest that cells of the innate immune system are important players in the decision between effective immunity and induction of tolerance or immune inhibition. Among immune cells of the innate immune system dendritic cells (DCs) have a special function linking innate immune functions with the induction of adaptive immunity. DCs are the primary professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) initiating adaptive immune responses. They belong to the hematopoietic system and arise from CD34(+) stem cells in the bone marrow. Particularly in the murine system two major subgroups of DCs, namely myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) can be distinguished. DCs are important mediators of innate and adaptive immunity mostly due to their remarkable capacity to present processed antigens via major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) to T cells and B cells in secondary lymphoid organs. A large body of literature has been accumulated during the last two decades describing which role DCs play during activation of T cell responses but also during the establishment and maintenance of central tolerance (Steinman et al., 2003). While the concept of peripheral tolerance has been clearly established during the last years, the role of different sets of DCs and their particular molecular mechanisms of immune deviation has not yet fully been appreciated. In this review we summarize accumulating evidence about the role of regulatory DCs in situations where the balance between tolerance and immunogenicity has been altered leading to pathologic

  16. Regulatory dendritic cells: there is more than just immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne V.; Nino-Castro, Andrea C.; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system exists in a delicate equilibrium between inflammatory responses and tolerance. This unique feature allows the immune system to recognize and respond to potential threats in a controlled but normally limited fashion thereby preventing a destructive overreaction against healthy tissues. While the adaptive immune system was the major research focus concerning activation vs. tolerance in the immune system more recent findings suggest that cells of the innate immune system are important players in the decision between effective immunity and induction of tolerance or immune inhibition. Among immune cells of the innate immune system dendritic cells (DCs) have a special function linking innate immune functions with the induction of adaptive immunity. DCs are the primary professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) initiating adaptive immune responses. They belong to the hematopoietic system and arise from CD34+ stem cells in the bone marrow. Particularly in the murine system two major subgroups of DCs, namely myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) can be distinguished. DCs are important mediators of innate and adaptive immunity mostly due to their remarkable capacity to present processed antigens via major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) to T cells and B cells in secondary lymphoid organs. A large body of literature has been accumulated during the last two decades describing which role DCs play during activation of T cell responses but also during the establishment and maintenance of central tolerance (Steinman et al., 2003). While the concept of peripheral tolerance has been clearly established during the last years, the role of different sets of DCs and their particular molecular mechanisms of immune deviation has not yet fully been appreciated. In this review we summarize accumulating evidence about the role of regulatory DCs in situations where the balance between tolerance and immunogenicity has been altered leading to pathologic

  17. STATs Shape the Active Enhancer Landscape of T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Takahashi, Hayato; Nakayamada, Shingo; Sun, Hong-wei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Kanno, Yuka; O’Shea, John J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Signaling pathways are intimately involved in cellular differentiation, allowing cells to respond to their environment by regulating gene expression. While enhancers are recognized as key elements that regulate selective gene expression, the interplay between signaling pathways and actively used enhancer elements is not clear. Here, we use CD4+ T cells as a model of differentiation, mapping the acquisition of cell-type-specific enhancer elements in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cells. Our data establish that STAT proteins have a major impact on the acquisition of lineage-specific enhancers and the suppression of enhancers associated with alternative cell fates. Transcriptome analysis further supports a functional role for enhancers regulated by STATs. Importantly, expression of lineage-defining master regulators in STAT-deficient cells fails to fully recover the chromatin signature of STAT-dependent enhancers. Thus, these findings point to a critical role of STATs as environmental sensors in dynamically molding the specialized enhancer architecture of differentiating cells. PMID:23178119

  18. Fuel Cell Activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fuel cells have a long history in space applications and may have potential application in aeronautics as well. A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that directly transforms the chemical energy of a fuel and oxidant into electrical energy. Alkaline fuel cells have been the mainstay of the U.S. space program, providing power for the Apollo missions and the Space Shuttle. However, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer potential benefits over alkaline systems and are currently under development for the next generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Furthermore, primary and regenerative systems utilizing PEM technology are also being considered for future space applications such as surface power and planetary aircraft. In addition to these applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the feasibility of the use of both PEM and solid oxide fuel cells for low- or zero-emission electric aircraft propulsion. These types of systems have potential applications for high altitude environmental aircraft, general aviation and commercial aircraft, and high attitude airships. NASA Glenn has a unique set of capabilities and expertise essential to the successful development of advanced fuel cell power systems for space and aeronautics applications. NASA Glenn's role in past fuel cell development programs as well as current activities to meet these new challenges will be presented

  19. Uptake and intracellular activity of AM-1155 in phagocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Kusajima, H; Hosaka, M; Fukuda, H; Oomori, Y; Shinoda, H

    1996-01-01

    The uptake and intracellular activity of AM-1155 in murine J774.1 macrophages and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were investigated. AM-1155 penetrated phagocytic cells rapidly and reversibly, although the penetration process was not affected by metabolic inhibitors such as sodium fluoride, cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, or ouabain or by nucleoside transport system inhibitors such as adenosine. The intracellular concentration-to-extracellular concentration ratio of AM-1155 in both cell types of phagocytes ranged from 5 to 7. These ratios were almost equal to those for sparfloxacin. The intracellular activity of AM-1155 in J774.1 macrophages, examined with Staphylococcus aureus 209P as a test bacterium, was dependent on the extracellular concentration. AM-1155 at a concentration of 1 microgram/ml reduced the number of viable cells of S. aureus ingested by more than 90%. The intracellular activity of AM-1155 was more potent than those of sparfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, flomoxef, and erythromycin. These results suggest that the potent intracellular activity of AM-1155 might mainly be due to the high intracellular concentration and its potent in vitro activity. PMID:9124835

  20. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N.; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S.; Hardy, Ian R.; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K.; Wright, Timothy M.; Schultz, Peter G.; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR–T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  1. Role of Cell-to-Cell Variability in Activating a Positive Feedback Antiviral Response in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianzhong; Nudelman, German; Shimoni, Yishai; Kumar, Madhu; Ding, Yaomei; López, Carolina; Hayot, Fernand; Wetmur, James G.; Sealfon, Stuart C.

    2011-01-01

    In the first few hours following Newcastle disease viral infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, the induction of IFNB1 is extremely low and the secreted type I interferon response is below the limits of ELISA assay. However, many interferon-induced genes are activated at this time, for example DDX58 (RIGI), which in response to viral RNA induces IFNB1. We investigated whether the early induction of IFNBI in only a small percentage of infected cells leads to low level IFN secretion that then induces IFN-responsive genes in all cells. We developed an agent-based mathematical model to explore the IFNBI and DDX58 temporal dynamics. Simulations showed that a small number of early responder cells provide a mechanism for efficient and controlled activation of the DDX58-IFNBI positive feedback loop. The model predicted distributions of single cell responses that were confirmed by single cell mRNA measurements. The results suggest that large cell-to-cell variation plays an important role in the early innate immune response, and that the variability is essential for the efficient activation of the IFNB1 based feedback loop. PMID:21347441

  2. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  3. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  4. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1more » μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.« less

  5. African Swine Fever Virus IAP Homologue Inhibits Caspase Activation and Promotes Cell Survival in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nogal, María L.; González de Buitrago, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, Clara; Cubelos, Beatriz; Carrascosa, Angel L.; Salas, María L.; Revilla, Yolanda

    2001-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) A224L is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. We have investigated the antiapoptotic function of the viral IAP both in stably transfected cells and in ASFV-infected cells. A224L was able to substantially inhibit caspase activity and cell death induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and cycloheximide or staurosporine when overexpressed in Vero cells by gene transfection. We have also observed that ASFV infection induces caspase activation and apoptosis in Vero cells. Furthermore, using a deletion mutant of ASFV lacking the A224L gene, we have shown that the viral IAP modulates the proteolytic processing of the effector cell death protease caspase-3 and the apoptosis which are induced in the infected cells. Our findings indicate that A224L interacts with the proteolytic fragment of caspase-3 and inhibits the activity of this protease during ASFV infection. These observations could indicate a conserved mechanism of action for ASFV IAP and other IAP family members to suppress apoptosis. PMID:11222676

  6. African swine fever virus IAP homologue inhibits caspase activation and promotes cell survival in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nogal, M L; González de Buitrago, G; Rodríguez, C; Cubelos, B; Carrascosa, A L; Salas, M L; Revilla, Y

    2001-03-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) A224L is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. We have investigated the antiapoptotic function of the viral IAP both in stably transfected cells and in ASFV-infected cells. A224L was able to substantially inhibit caspase activity and cell death induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and cycloheximide or staurosporine when overexpressed in Vero cells by gene transfection. We have also observed that ASFV infection induces caspase activation and apoptosis in Vero cells. Furthermore, using a deletion mutant of ASFV lacking the A224L gene, we have shown that the viral IAP modulates the proteolytic processing of the effector cell death protease caspase-3 and the apoptosis which are induced in the infected cells. Our findings indicate that A224L interacts with the proteolytic fragment of caspase-3 and inhibits the activity of this protease during ASFV infection. These observations could indicate a conserved mechanism of action for ASFV IAP and other IAP family members to suppress apoptosis.

  7. Glial cell activation, recruitment, and survival of B-lineage cells following MCMV brain infection.

    PubMed

    Lokensgard, James R; Mutnal, Manohar B; Prasad, Sujata; Sheng, Wen; Hu, Shuxian

    2016-05-20

    persisted through the latest time tested (60 days post infection). Finally, astrocytes produce BAFF (B cell activating factor of the TNF family) and promote proliferation of B cells via cell-to-cell contact. CXCR3 is the primary chemokine receptor on CD19(+) B cells persisting within the brain, and migration to microglial cell supernatants is mediated through this receptor. Correspondingly, microglial cells produce CXCL9 and CXCL10, but not CXCL13. Reactive astrocytes promote B cell proliferation.

  8. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  9. Imiquimod activates p53-dependent apoptosis in a human basal cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Mu, Szu-Wei; Jiang, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Sin-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Huang, Jau-Ling; Wu, Chun-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ju; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-03-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 controls DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy and numerous other cellular processes. Imiquimod (IMQ), a synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 ligand for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC), eliminates cancer cells by activating cell-mediated immunity and directly inducing apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. To evaluate the role of p53 in IMQ-induced cell death in skin cancer cells. The expression, phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p53 were detected by real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, cycloheximide chase analysis, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Using BCC/KMC1 cell line as a model, the upstream signaling of p53 activation was dissected by over-expression of TLR7/8, the addition of ROS scavenger, ATM/ATR inhibitors and pan-caspase inhibitor. The role of p53 in IMQ-induced apoptosis and autophagy was assessed by genetically silencing p53 and evaluated by a DNA content assay, immunoblotting, LC3 puncta detection and acridine orange staining. IMQ induced p53 mRNA expression and protein accumulation, increased Ser15 phosphorylation, promoted nuclear translocation and up-regulated its target genes in skin cancer cells in a TLR7/8-independent manner. In BCC/KMC1 cells, the induction of p53 by IMQ was achieved through increased ROS production to stimulate the ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2 axis but was not mediated by inducing DNA damage. The pharmacological inhibition of ATM/ATR significantly suppressed IMQ-induced p53 activation and apoptosis. Silencing of p53 significantly decreased the IMQ-induced caspase cascade activation and apoptosis but enhanced autophagy. Mutant p53 skin cancer cell lines were more resistant to IMQ-induced apoptosis than wildtype p53 skin cancer cell lines. IMQ induced ROS production to stimulate ATM/ATR pathways and contributed to p53-dependent apoptosis in a skin basal cell carcinoma cell line BCC/KMC1. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology

  10. AMP-activated kinase mediates adipose stem cell-stimulated neuritogenesis of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, B; Luan, Z; Wei, X; He, Y; Wei, G; Johnstone, B H; Farlow, M; Du, Y

    2011-05-05

    Adipose tissue stroma contains a population of mesenchymal stem cells, which support repair of damaged tissues through the protective effects of secreted trophic factors. Neurotrophic factors, including nerve growth factor (NGF) have been identified in media collected from cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ASC). We previously demonstrated that administration of cell-free ASC conditioned medium (ASC-CM) at 24 h after injury reduced lesion volume and promoted functional recovery in a rat model of neonatal brain hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury. The timing of administration well after the peak in neural cell apoptosis in the affected region suggests that regeneration of lost neurons is promoted by factors in ASC-CM. In this study, we determined which of the factors in ASC-CM could induce neurogenesis by testing the ability of the mixture, either whole or after inactivating specific components, to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro using the neurogenic cell line PC12. Neuritogenesis in PC12 cells treated with ASC-CM was observed at a level comparable to that observed with purified recombinant NGF. It was observed that NGF in ASC-CM was mainly responsible for inducing PC12 cell neuritogenesis. Interestingly, both ASC-CM and NGF induced PC12 cell neuritogenesis through activation of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) pathway which is the central protein involved in controlling many critical functions in response to changes in the cellular energy status. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of AMPK activity greatly reduced neuritogenesis in PC12 cells. These results suggest that, in addition to possessing neuroprotective properties, ASC-CM mediates repair of damaged tissues through inducing neuronal differentiation via NGF-induced AMPK activation. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. OCT1-Mediated Metformin Uptake Regulates Pancreatic Stellate Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunhua; Qiu, Shanhu; Zhu, Xiangyun; Lin, Hao; Li, Ling

    2018-06-27

    Metformin treatment is reported to be associated with a lower incidence of and mortality from pancreatic cancer (PC) in type 2 diabetes patients. Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are key stroma cells responsible for pancreatic fibrogenesis and PC progression. However, little research is about the influence of metformin on PSCs. Given the potential beneficial effects of metformin on PC, pancreatic tumour stroma is an important target for new therapeutics. We observed the effects of metformin on PSCs. We investigated the effects of metformin on human PSCs proliferation and the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Cells were cultured with different concentrations of metformin (0-10 mmol/L). Cell proliferation was determined by immunofluorescence staining for nuclear Ki67 labelling. ECM production was studied by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulatory molecule responsible for metformin action, and the organic cation transporter member 1 (OCT1), which is believed to be the most important transporter for the pharmacological action of metformin, were investigated for their possible involvements in metformin-induced proliferation and ECM production. Our results showed that metformin inhibited PSCs proliferation and decreased the production of ECM proteins by activation of AMPK phosphorylation. Silencing of OCT1 expression resulted in a reduction in the effects of metformin on PSCs activity. Collectively, the data indicate that OCT1 may contribute to uptake metformin and regulate PSCs activity. OCT1 is a target of metformin in regulating PSCs activity. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies) from bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost) from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells. PMID:20831775

  13. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies) from bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Peternel, Spela; Komel, Radovan

    2010-09-10

    In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry.To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process.To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared.During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation.During sonication proteins are released (lost) from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity.High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells.

  14. IL-17B activated mesenchymal stem cells enhance proliferation and migration of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bie, Qingli; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Caixia; Ji, Xiaoyun; Barnie, Prince Amoah; Qi, Chen; Peng, Jingjing; Zhang, Danyi; Zheng, Dong; Su, Zhaoliang; Wang, Shengjun; Xu, Huaxi

    2017-03-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells are important cells in tumor microenvironment. We have previously demonstrated that IL-17B/IL-17RB signal promoted progression of gastric cancer. In this study, we further explored the effect of IL-17B on mesenchymal stem cells in tumor microenvironment and its impact on the tumor progression. The results showed that IL-17B induced the expression of stemness-related genes Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4 in mesenchymal stem cells and enhanced its tumor-promoting effect. The supernatant from cultured mesenchymal stem cells after treating with exogenous rIL-17B promoted the proliferation and migration of MGC-803, therefor suggesting that rIL-17B might promote mesenchymal stem cells to produce soluble factors. In addition, rIL-17B also activated the NF-κΒ, STAT3, β-catenin pathway in mesenchymal stem cells. Our data revealed a new mechanism that IL-17B enhanced the progression of gastric cancer by activating mesenchymal stem cells.

  15. Pterostilbene induces apoptosis through caspase activation in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, J; Guo, H; Chen, Y

    2016-01-01

    Pterostilbene, an analog of resveratrol increasing bioavailability has shown to offer antioxidant and anticancer properties in vitro and in vivo. Dietary compounds with anti-oxidant properties have been shown to gain importance due to therapeutic applications. In addition, compounds with higher bioavailability levels show great interest in present scenario. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating the cytotoxic role of pterostilbene and its mechanism of cell death in ovarian cancer cells line. The effect of pterostilbene was determined on SKOV-3 cells, by cytotoxicity assays, oxidative stress levels, [Ca2+]i levels, mitochondrial depolarization, cell cycle analysis and caspase 3, 8, and 9 activities. The study revealed that pterostilbene offered cytotoxic effect at a concentration of IC50-55 uM. Further, pterostilbene induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis through enhancing oxidative stress, [Ca2+]i levels, mitochondrial depolarization, Sub G1 accumulation, and activation of caspase 3 and 9. The study demonstrates for the first time the cytotoxic potential of pterostilbene against ovarian cancer cells.

  16. Benzoxazole derivatives suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Ah; Park, Minhwa; Kim, Yu-Hee; Choo, Hea-Young Park; Lee, Kyung Ho

    2018-05-01

    Mast cells are central regulators of allergic inflammation that function by releasing various proallergic inflammatory mediators, including histamine, eicosanoids and proinflammatory cytokines. Occasionally, bacterial infections may initiate or worsen allergic inflammation. A number of studies have indicated that activation of lipoxygenase in mast cells positive regulates allergic inflammatory responses by generating leukotrienes and proinflammatory cytokines. In the present study, the effects of benzoxazole derivatives on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines, production of histamine and surface expression of co‑stimulatory molecules on bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were studied. The benzoxazole derivatives significantly reduced the expression of interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑6, IL‑13, tumor necrosis factor‑α, perilipin (PLIN) 2, and PLIN3 in BMMCs treated with LPS. Furthermore, histamine production was suppressed in BMMCs treated with LPS, or treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate/ionomycin. Benzoxazole derivatives marginally affected the surface expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)80 and CD86 on BMMCs in the presence of LPS, although LPS alone did not increase the expression of those proteins. Therefore, benzoxazole derivatives inhibited the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in mast cells and may be potential candidate anti‑allergic agents to suppress mast cell activation.

  17. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  18. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase in human cells by the mycotoxin patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.-S.; Yu, F.-Y.; Su, C.-C.

    2005-09-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by certain species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, is often detectable in moldy fruits and their derivative products. PAT led to a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Exposure of HEK293 cells to concentrations above 5 {mu}M PAT for 30 min induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation; activation of ERK1/2 was also observed after 24 h incubation with 0.05 {mu}M of PAT. Treatment of human PBMCs for 30 min with 30 {mu}Mmore » PAT dramatically increased the phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Both MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suppressed ERK1/2 activation in either HEK293 or MDCK cells. In HEK293 cells, U0126-mediated inhibition of PAT-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulted in a significant decrease in levels of DNA damage, expressed as tail moment values, in the single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Conversely, U0126 did not affect cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the DNA synthesis rate in PAT-treated cultures. Exposure of HEK293 cells for 90 min to 15 {mu}M PAT elevated the levels of early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) mRNA, but not of c-fos, fosB, and junB mRNAs. These results indicate that in human cells, PAT causes a rapid and persistent activation of ERK1/2 and this signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating PAT-induced DNA damage and egr-1 gene expression.« less

  19. Fasting inhibits hepatic stellate cells activation and potentiates anti-cancer activity of Sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lo Re, Oriana; Panebianco, Concetta; Porto, Stefania; Cervi, Carlo; Rappa, Francesca; Di Biase, Stefano; Caraglia, Michele; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2018-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a poor outcome. Most HCCs develop in the context of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis caused by chronic inflammation. Short-term fasting approaches enhance the activity of chemotherapy in preclinical cancer models, other than HCC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sorafenib is the mainstay of treatment in HCC. However, its benefit is frequently short-lived. Whether fasting can alleviate liver fibrosis and whether combining fasting with Sorafenib is beneficial remains unknown. A 24 hr fasting (2% serum, 0.1% glucose)-induced changes on human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) LX-2 proliferation/viability/cell cycle were assessed by MTT and flow cytometry. Expression of lypolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation markers (vimentin, αSMA) was evaluated by qPCR and immunoblotting. Liver fibrosis and inflammation were evaluated in a mouse model of steatohepatitis exposed to cycles of fasting, by histological and biochemical analyses. A 24 hr fasting-induced changes were also analyzed on the proliferation/viability/glucose uptake of human HCC cells exposed to Sorafenib. An expression panel of genes involved in survival, inflammation, and metabolism was examined by qPCR in HCC cells exposed to fasting and/or Sorafenib. Fasting decreased the proliferation and the activation of HSC. Repeated cycles of short term starvation were safe in mice but did not improve fibrosis. Fasting synergized with Sorafenib in hampering HCC cell growth and glucose uptake. Finally, fasting normalized the expression levels of genes which are commonly altered by Sorafenib in HCC cells. Fasting or fasting-mimicking diet diets should be evaluated in preclinical studies as a mean to potentiate the activity of Sorafenib in clinical use. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  1. Nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in sickle cell disease painful crisis

    PubMed Central

    Schimmel, Marein; Nur, Erfan; Biemond, Bart J.; van Mierlo, Gerard J.; Solati, Shabnam; Brandjes, Dees P.; Otten, Hans-Martin; Schnog, John-John; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2013-01-01

    Activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of vaso-occlusive painful sickle cell crisis. Upon activation, polymorphonuclear neutrophils can form neutrophil extracellular traps. Neutrophil extracellular traps consist of a meshwork of extracellular DNA, nucleosomes, histones and neutrophil proteases. Neutrophil extracellular traps have been demonstrated to be toxic to endothelial and parenchymal cells. This prospective cohort study was conducted to determine neutrophil extracellular trap formation in sickle cell patients during steady state and painful crisis. As a measure of neutrophil extracellular traps, plasma nucleosomes levels were determined and polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed measuring plasma levels of elastase-α1-antitrypsin complexes in 74 patients in steady state, 70 patients during painful crisis, and 24 race-matched controls using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Nucleosome levels in steady state sickle cell patients were significantly higher than levels in controls. During painful crisis levels of both nucleosomes and elastase-α1-antitrypsin complexes increased significantly. Levels of nucleosomes correlated significantly to elastase-α1-antitrypsin complex levels during painful crisis, (Sr = 0.654, P<0.001). This was seen in both HbSS/HbSβ0-thalassemia (Sr=0.55, P<0.001) and HbSC/HbSβ+-thalassemia patients (Sr=0.90, P<0.001) during painful crisis. Levels of nucleosomes showed a correlation with length of hospital stay and were highest in patients with acute chest syndrome. These data support the concept that neutrophil extracellular trap formation and neutrophil activation may play a role in the pathogenesis of painful sickle cell crisis and acute chest syndrome. PMID:23911704

  2. Diesel-Enriched Particulate Matter Functionally Activates Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Michael; Karp, Matthew; Killedar, Smruti; Bauer, Stephen M.; Guo, Jia; Williams, D'Ann; Breysse, Patrick; Georas, Steve N.; Williams, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have associated exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) with exacerbations of asthma. It is unknown how different sources of PM affect innate immunity. We sought to determine how car- and diesel exhaust–derived PM affects dendritic cell (DC) activation. DC development was modeled using CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors. Airborne PM was collected from exhaust plenums of Fort McHenry Tunnel providing car-enriched particles (CEP) and diesel-enriched particles (DEP). DC were stimulated for 48 hours with CEP, DEP, CD40-ligand, or lipopolysaccharide. DC activation was assessed by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and standard culture techniques. DEP increased uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran (a model antigen) by DC. Diesel particles enhanced cell-surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules (e.g., CD40 [P < 0.01] and MHC class II [P < 0.01]). By contrast, CEP poorly affected antigen uptake and expression of cell surface molecules, and did not greatly affect cytokine secretion by DC. However, DEP increased production of TNF, IL-6, and IFN-γ (P < 0.01), IL-12 (P < 0.05), and vascular endothelial growth factor (P < 0.001). In co-stimulation assays of PM-exposed DC and alloreactive CD4+ T cells, both CEP and DEP directed a Th2-like pattern of cytokine production (e.g., enhanced IL-13 and IL-18 and suppressed IFN-γ production). CD4+ T cells were not functionally activated on exposure to either DEP or CEP. Car- and diesel-enriched particles exert a differential effect on DC activation. Our data support the hypothesis that DEP (and to a lesser extent CEP) regulate important functional aspects of human DC, supporting an adjuvant role for this material. PMID:17630318

  3. Targeting LAG-3 and PD-1 to Enhance T Cell Activation by Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenegger, Felix S.; Rothe, Maurine; Schnorfeil, Frauke M.; Deiser, Katrin; Krupka, Christina; Augsberger, Christian; Schlüter, Miriam; Neitz, Julia; Subklewe, Marion

    2018-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibition has been shown to successfully reactivate endogenous T cell responses directed against tumor-associated antigens, resulting in significantly prolonged overall survival in patients with various tumor entities. For malignancies with low endogenous immune responses, this approach has not shown a clear clinical benefit so far. Therapeutic vaccination, particularly dendritic cell (DC) vaccination, is a strategy to induce T cell responses. Interaction of DCs and T cells is dependent on receptor–ligand interactions of various immune checkpoints. In this study, we analyzed the influence of blocking antibodies targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), HVEM, CD244, TIM-3, and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) on the proliferation and cytokine secretion of T cells after stimulation with autologous TLR-matured DCs. In this context, we found that LAG-3 blockade resulted in superior T cell activation compared to inhibition of other pathways, including PD-1/PD-L1. This result was consistent across different methods to measure T cell stimulation (proliferation, IFN-γ secretion), various stimulatory antigens (viral and bacterial peptide pool, specific viral antigen, specific tumor antigen), and seen for both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Only under conditions with a weak antigenic stimulus, particularly when combining antigen presentation by peripheral blood mononuclear cells with low concentrations of peptides, we observed the highest T cell stimulation with dual blockade of LAG-3 and PD-1 blockade. We conclude that priming of novel immune responses can be strongly enhanced by blockade of LAG-3 or dual blockade of LAG-3 and PD-1, depending on the strength of the antigenic stimulus. PMID:29535740

  4. Targeting LAG-3 and PD-1 to Enhance T Cell Activation by Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Lichtenegger, Felix S; Rothe, Maurine; Schnorfeil, Frauke M; Deiser, Katrin; Krupka, Christina; Augsberger, Christian; Schlüter, Miriam; Neitz, Julia; Subklewe, Marion

    2018-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibition has been shown to successfully reactivate endogenous T cell responses directed against tumor-associated antigens, resulting in significantly prolonged overall survival in patients with various tumor entities. For malignancies with low endogenous immune responses, this approach has not shown a clear clinical benefit so far. Therapeutic vaccination, particularly dendritic cell (DC) vaccination, is a strategy to induce T cell responses. Interaction of DCs and T cells is dependent on receptor-ligand interactions of various immune checkpoints. In this study, we analyzed the influence of blocking antibodies targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), HVEM, CD244, TIM-3, and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) on the proliferation and cytokine secretion of T cells after stimulation with autologous TLR-matured DCs. In this context, we found that LAG-3 blockade resulted in superior T cell activation compared to inhibition of other pathways, including PD-1/PD-L1. This result was consistent across different methods to measure T cell stimulation (proliferation, IFN-γ secretion), various stimulatory antigens (viral and bacterial peptide pool, specific viral antigen, specific tumor antigen), and seen for both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Only under conditions with a weak antigenic stimulus, particularly when combining antigen presentation by peripheral blood mononuclear cells with low concentrations of peptides, we observed the highest T cell stimulation with dual blockade of LAG-3 and PD-1 blockade. We conclude that priming of novel immune responses can be strongly enhanced by blockade of LAG-3 or dual blockade of LAG-3 and PD-1, depending on the strength of the antigenic stimulus.

  5. Computational properties of mitochondria in T cell activation and fate

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we review how mitochondrial Ca2+ transport (mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and Na+/Ca2+ exchange) is involved in T cell biology, including activation and differentiation through shaping cellular Ca2+ signals. Based on recent observations, we propose that the Ca2+ crosstalk between mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm may form a proportional–integral–derivative (PID) controller. This PID mechanism (which is well known in engineering) could be responsible for computing cellular decisions. In addition, we point out the importance of analogue and digital signal processing in T cell life and implication of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in this process. PMID:27852805

  6. Computational properties of mitochondria in T cell activation and fate.

    PubMed

    Uzhachenko, Roman; Shanker, Anil; Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we review how mitochondrial Ca 2+ transport (mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake and Na + /Ca 2+ exchange) is involved in T cell biology, including activation and differentiation through shaping cellular Ca 2+ signals. Based on recent observations, we propose that the Ca 2+ crosstalk between mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm may form a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. This PID mechanism (which is well known in engineering) could be responsible for computing cellular decisions. In addition, we point out the importance of analogue and digital signal processing in T cell life and implication of mitochondrial Ca 2+ transport in this process. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Characterization of Thermally Activated Metalloenediyne Cytotoxicity in Human Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Keller, Eric J; Porter, Meghan; Garrett, Joy E; Varie, Meredith; Wang, Haiyan; Pollok, Karen E; Turchi, John J; Zaleski, Jeffrey M; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2018-05-15

    Enediynes are a highly cytotoxic class of compounds. However, metallation of these compounds may modulate their activation, and thus their cytotoxicity. We previously demonstrated that cytotoxicity of two different metalloenediynes, including (Z)-N,N'-bis[1-pyridyl-2-yl-meth-(E)-ylidene]octa-4-ene-2,6-diyne-1,8-diamine] (PyED), is potentiated when the compounds are administered to HeLa cells during hyperthermia treatment at concentrations that are minimally or not cytotoxic at 37°C. In this study, we further characterized the concentration, time and temperature dependence of cytotoxicity of PyED on human U-1 melanoma cells. We also investigated the potential mechanisms by which PyED cytotoxicity is enhanced during hyperthermia treatment. Cell killing with PyED was dependent on concentration, temperature during treatment and time of exposure. Potentiation of cytotoxicity was observed when cells were treated with PyED at temperatures ≥39.5°C, and enhancement of cell killing increased with temperature and with increasing time at a given temperature. All cells treated with PyED were shown to have DNA damage, but substantially more damage was observed in cells treated with PyED during heating. DNA repair was also inhibited in cells treated with the drug during hyperthermia. Thus, potentiation of PyED cytotoxicity by hyperthermia may be due to enhancement of drug-induced DNA lesions, and/or the inhibition of repair of sublethal DNA damage. While the selective thermal activation of PyED supports the potential clinical utility of metalloenediynes as cancer thermochemotherapeutic agents, therapeutic gain could be optimized by identifying compounds that produce minimal toxicity at 37°C but which become activated and show enhancement of cytotoxicity within a tumor subjected to localized hyperthermic or thermal ablative treatment, or which might act as bifunctional agents. We thus also describe the development and initial characterization of a novel cofactor complex of Py

  8. Haemocytes control stem cell activity in the Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Ayyaz, Arshad; Li, Hongjie; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-06-01

    Coordination of stem cell activity with inflammatory responses is critical for regeneration and homeostasis of barrier epithelia. The temporal sequence of cell interactions during injury-induced regeneration is only beginning to be understood. Here we show that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are regulated by macrophage-like haemocytes during the early phase of regenerative responses of the Drosophila intestinal epithelium. On tissue damage, haemocytes are recruited to the intestine and secrete the BMP homologue DPP, inducing ISC proliferation by activating the type I receptor Saxophone and the Smad homologue SMOX. Activated ISCs then switch their response to DPP by inducing expression of Thickveins, a second type I receptor that has previously been shown to re-establish ISC quiescence by activating MAD. The interaction between haemocytes and ISCs promotes infection resistance, but also contributes to the development of intestinal dysplasia in ageing flies. We propose that similar interactions influence pathologies such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer in humans.

  9. Hemocytes control stem cell activity in the Drosophila intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ayyaz, Arshad; Li, Hongjie; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Coordination of stem cell activity with inflammatory responses is critical for regeneration and homeostasis of barrier epithelia. The temporal sequence of cell interactions during injury-induced regeneration is only beginning to be understood. Here we show that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are regulated by macrophage-like hemocytes during the early phase of regenerative responses of the Drosophila intestinal epithelium. Upon tissue damage, hemocytes are recruited to the intestine and secrete the TGFβ/BMP homologue Dpp, inducing ISC proliferation by activating the Type I receptor Saxophone and the Smad homologue Smox. Activated ISCs then switch their response to Dpp by inducing expression of Thickveins, a second Type I receptor that has previously been shown to re-establish ISC quiescence by activating Mad. The interaction between hemocytes and ISCs promotes infection resistance, but also contributes to the development of intestinal dysplasia in aging flies. We propose that similar interactions influence pathologies like inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer in humans. PMID:26005834

  10. Solar Cell Polymer Based Active Ingredients PPV and PCBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardeli, H.; Sanjaya, H.; Resikarnila, R.; Nitami H, R.

    2018-04-01

    A polymer solar cell is a solar cell based on a polymer bulk heterojunction structure using the method of thin film, which can convert solar energy into electrical energy. Absorption of light is carried by active material layer PPV: PCBM. This study aims to make solar cells tandem and know the value of converting solar energy into electrical energy and increase the value of efficiency generated through morphological control, ie annealing temperature and the ratio of active layer mixture. The active layer is positioned above the PEDOT:PSS layer on ITO glass substrate. The characterization results show the surface morphology of the PPV:PCBM active layer is quite evenly at annealing temperature of 165 ° C. The result of conversion of electrical energy with a UV light source in annealing samples with temperature 165 ° C is 0.03 mA and voltage of 4.085 V with an efficiency of 2.61% and mixed ratio variation was obtained in comparison of P3HT: PCBM is 1: 3

  11. Caspase Activity Is Required for Engulfment of Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shklyar, Boris; Levy-Adam, Flonia; Mishnaevski, Ketty

    2013-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytic neighbors is crucial for normal development of multicellular organisms. However, how phagocytes discriminate between healthy and dying cells remains poorly understood. We focus on glial phagocytosis of apoptotic neurons during development of the Drosophila central nervous system. We identified phosphatidylserine (PS) as a ligand on apoptotic cells for the phagocytic receptor Six Microns Under (SIMU) and report that PS alone is not sufficient for engulfment. Our data reveal that, additionally to PS exposure, caspase activity is required for clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytes. Here we demonstrate that SIMU recognizes and binds PS on apoptotic cells through its N-terminal EMILIN (EMI), Nimrod 1 (NIM1), and NIM2 repeats, whereas the C-terminal NIM3 and NIM4 repeats control SIMU affinity to PS. Based on the structure-function analysis of SIMU, we discovered a novel mechanism of internal inhibition responsible for differential affinities of SIMU to its ligand which might prevent elimination of living cells exposing PS on their surfaces. PMID:23754750

  12. Gamma Delta T-Cells Regulate Wound Myeloid Cell Activity After Burn

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    With regard to trauma , recent studies have shown the presence of activated +% T cells in the circulation of patients with severe inflammatory response...14). No analgesics were used postburn because they can impact the immune response to burn injury and other forms of trauma (15). The mice were then...burn, trauma , and sepsis (17, 19, 24Y26). Gr-1, CD11b, and F4/80 antigens have been shown to be expressed on the surface of immature myeloid cells

  13. SB225002 Induces Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells through the Activation of GLIPR1

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Paulo C.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Zenatti, Priscila Pini; Nunes, Ricardo J.; Yunes, Rosendo A.; Nowill, Alexandre E.; Libermann, Towia A.; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent childhood malignancy. In the effort to find new anti-leukemic agents, we evaluated the small drug SB225002 (N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-N’-(2-bromophenyl)urea). Although initially described as a selective antagonist of CXCR2, later studies have identified other cellular targets for SB225002, with potential medicinal use in cancer. We found that SB225002 has a significant pro-apoptotic effect against both B- and T-ALL cell lines. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that treatment with SB225002 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest. Transcriptional profiling revealed that SB225002-mediated apoptosis triggered a transcriptional program typical of tubulin binding agents. Network analysis revealed the activation of genes linked to the JUN and p53 pathways and inhibition of genes linked to the TNF pathway. Early cellular effects activated by SB225002 included the up-regulation of GLIPR1, a p53-target gene shown to have pro-apoptotic activities in prostate and bladder cancer. Silencing of GLIPR1 in B- and T-ALL cell lines resulted in increased resistance to SB225002. Although SB225002 promoted ROS increase in ALL cells, antioxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine pre-treatment only modestly attenuated cell death, implying that the pro-apoptotic effects of SB225002 are not exclusively mediated by ROS. Moreover, GLIPR1 silencing resulted in increased ROS levels both in untreated and SB225002-treated cells. In conclusion, SB225002 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different B- and T-ALL cell lines. Inhibition of tubulin function with concurrent activation of the p53 pathway, in particular, its downstream target GLIPR1, seems to underlie the anti-leukemic effect of SB225002. PMID:26302043

  14. NKL homeobox gene activities in hematopoietic stem cells, T-cell development and T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Scherr, Michaela; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Battmer, Karin; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Drexler, Hans G

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells represent developmentally arrested T-cell progenitors, subsets of which aberrantly express homeobox genes of the NKL subclass, including TLX1, TLX3, NKX2-1, NKX2-5, NKX3-1 and MSX1. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional landscape of all 48 members of the NKL homeobox gene subclass in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and during lymphopoiesis, identifying activities of nine particular genes. Four of these were expressed in HSPCs (HHEX, HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1) and three in common lymphoid progenitors (HHEX, HLX1 and MSX1). Interestingly, our data indicated downregulation of NKL homeobox gene transcripts in late progenitors and mature T-cells, a phenomenon which might explain the oncogenic impact of this group of genes in T-ALL. Using MSX1-expressing T-ALL cell lines as models, we showed that HHEX activates while HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1 repress MSX1 transcription, demonstrating the mutual regulation and differential activities of these homeobox genes. Analysis of a public T-ALL expression profiling data set comprising 117 patient samples identified 20 aberrantly activated members of the NKL subclass, extending the number of known NKL homeobox oncogene candidates. While 7/20 genes were also active during hematopoiesis, the remaining 13 showed ectopic expression. Finally, comparative analyses of T-ALL patient and cell line profiling data of NKL-positive and NKL-negative samples indicated absence of shared target genes but instead highlighted deregulation of apoptosis as common oncogenic effect. Taken together, we present a comprehensive survey of NKL homeobox genes in early hematopoiesis, T-cell development and T-ALL, showing that these genes generate an NKL-code for the diverse stages of lymphoid development which might be fundamental for regular differentiation.

  15. NKL homeobox gene activities in hematopoietic stem cells, T-cell development and T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pommerenke, Claudia; Scherr, Michaela; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Battmer, Karin; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.; Drexler, Hans G.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells represent developmentally arrested T-cell progenitors, subsets of which aberrantly express homeobox genes of the NKL subclass, including TLX1, TLX3, NKX2-1, NKX2-5, NKX3-1 and MSX1. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional landscape of all 48 members of the NKL homeobox gene subclass in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and during lymphopoiesis, identifying activities of nine particular genes. Four of these were expressed in HSPCs (HHEX, HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1) and three in common lymphoid progenitors (HHEX, HLX1 and MSX1). Interestingly, our data indicated downregulation of NKL homeobox gene transcripts in late progenitors and mature T-cells, a phenomenon which might explain the oncogenic impact of this group of genes in T-ALL. Using MSX1-expressing T-ALL cell lines as models, we showed that HHEX activates while HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1 repress MSX1 transcription, demonstrating the mutual regulation and differential activities of these homeobox genes. Analysis of a public T-ALL expression profiling data set comprising 117 patient samples identified 20 aberrantly activated members of the NKL subclass, extending the number of known NKL homeobox oncogene candidates. While 7/20 genes were also active during hematopoiesis, the remaining 13 showed ectopic expression. Finally, comparative analyses of T-ALL patient and cell line profiling data of NKL-positive and NKL-negative samples indicated absence of shared target genes but instead highlighted deregulation of apoptosis as common oncogenic effect. Taken together, we present a comprehensive survey of NKL homeobox genes in early hematopoiesis, T-cell development and T-ALL, showing that these genes generate an NKL-code for the diverse stages of lymphoid development which might be fundamental for regular differentiation. PMID:28151996

  16. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, LaKeisha G.

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets formore » developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  17. Rapamycin-treated human endothelial cells preferentially activate allogeneic regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Yi, Tai; Qin, Lingfeng; Maldonado, Roberto A.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Tellides, George; Pober, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human graft endothelial cells (ECs) can act as antigen-presenting cells to initiate allograft rejection by host memory T cells. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor used clinically to suppress T cell responses, also acts on DCs, rendering them tolerogenic. Here, we report the effects of rapamycin on EC alloimmunogenicity. Compared with mock-treated cells, rapamycin-pretreated human ECs (rapa-ECs) stimulated less proliferation and cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4+ memory cells, an effect mimicked by shRNA knockdown of mTOR or raptor in ECs. The effects of rapamycin persisted for several days and were linked to upregulation of the inhibitory molecules PD-L1 and PD-L2 on rapa-ECs. Additionally, rapa-ECs produced lower levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. CD4+ memory cells activated by allogeneic rapa-ECs became hyporesponsive to restimulation in an alloantigen-specific manner and contained higher percentages of suppressive CD4+CD25hiCD127loFoxP3+ cells that did not produce effector cytokines. In a human-mouse chimeric model of allograft rejection, rapamycin pretreatment of human arterial allografts increased graft EC expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 and reduced subsequent infiltration of allogeneic effector T cells into the artery intima and intimal expansion. Preoperative conditioning of allograft ECs with rapamycin could potentially reduce immune-mediated rejection. PMID:23478407

  18. Novel platform for minimizing cell loss on separation process: Droplet-based magnetically activated cell separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngho; Hong, Su; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Kangsun; Yun, Seok; Kang, Yuri; Paek, Kyeong-Kap; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Kim, Byungkyu

    2007-07-01

    To reduce the problem of cell loss due to adhesion, one of the basic phenomena in microchannel, we proposed the droplet-based magnetically activated cell separator (DMACS). Based on the platform of the DMACS—which consists of permanent magnets, a coverslip with a circle-shaped boundary, and an injection tube—we could collect magnetically (CD45)-labeled (positive) cells with high purity and minimize cell loss due to adhesion. To compare separation efficiency between the MACS and the DMACS, the total number of cells before and after separation with both the separators was counted by flow cytometry. We could find that the number (3241/59940) of cells lost in the DMACS is much less than that (22360/59940) in the MACS while the efficiency of cell separation in the DMACS (96.07%) is almost the same as that in the MACS (96.72%). Practically, with fluorescent images, it was visually confirmed that the statistical data are reliable. From the viability test by using Hoechst 33 342, it was also demonstrated that there was no cell damage on a gas-liquid interface. Conclusively, DMACS will be a powerful tool to separate rare cells and applicable as a separator, key component of lab-on-a-chip.

  19. Purification of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors using magnetic activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Gonçalo M C; Fernandes, Tiago G; Rodrigues, Carlos A V; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Diogo, Maria Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Neural precursor (NP) cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), and their neuronal progeny, will play an important role in disease modeling, drug screening tests, central nervous system development studies, and may even become valuable for regenerative medicine treatments. Nonetheless, it is challenging to obtain homogeneous and synchronously differentiated NP populations from hiPSCs, and after neural commitment many pluripotent stem cells remain in the differentiated cultures. Here, we describe an efficient and simple protocol to differentiate hiPSC-derived NPs in 12 days, and we include a final purification stage where Tra-1-60+ pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are removed using magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS), leaving the NP population nearly free of PSCs.

  20. Metastable primordial germ cell-like state induced from mouse embryonic stem cells by Akt activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, Noriko; Kimura, Tohru, E-mail: tkimura@patho.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Watanabe-Kushima, Shoko

    Specification to primordial germ cells (PGCs) is mediated by mesoderm-induction signals during gastrulation. We found that Akt activation during in vitro mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated self-renewing spheres with differentiation states between those of ESCs and PGCs. Essential regulators for PGC specification and their downstream germ cell-specific genes were expressed in the spheres, indicating that the sphere cells had commenced differentiation to the germ lineage. However, the spheres did not proceed to spermatogenesis after transplantation into testes. Sphere cell transfer to the original feeder-free ESC cultures resulted in chaotic differentiation. In contrast, when the spheres were culturedmore » on mouse embryonic fibroblasts or in the presence of ERK-cascade and GSK3 inhibitors, reversion to the ESC-like state was observed. These results indicate that Akt signaling promotes a novel metastable and pluripotent state that is intermediate to those of ESCs and PGCs.« less

  1. Endothelial Activation by Platelets from Sickle Cell Anemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Proença-Ferreira, Renata; Brugnerotto, Ana Flávia; Garrido, Vanessa Tonin; Dominical, Venina Marcela; Vital, Daiana Morelli; Ribeiro, Marilene de Fátima Reis; dos Santos, Melissa Ercolin; Traina, Fabíola; Olalla-Saad, Sara T.; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with a hypercoagulable state. Increased platelet activation is reported in SCA and SCA platelets may present augmented adhesion to the vascular endothelium, potentially contributing to the vaso-occlusive process. We sought to observe the effects of platelets (PLTs) from healthy control (CON) individuals and SCA individuals on endothelial activation, in vitro. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured, in the presence, or not, of washed PLTs from CON or steady-state SCA individuals. Supernatants were reserved for cytokine quantification, and endothelial adhesion molecules (EAM) were analyzed by flow cytometry; gene expressions of ICAM1 and genes of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed by qPCR. SCA PLTs were found to be more inflammatory, displaying increased adhesive properties, an increased production of IL-1β and a tendency towards elevated expressions of P-selectin and activated αIIbβ3. Following culture in the presence of SCA PLTs, HUVEC presented significant augmentations in the expressions of the EAM, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, as well as increased IL-8 production and increased ICAM1 and NFKB1 (encodes p50 subunit of NF-κB) gene expressions. Interestingly, transwell inserts abolished the effects of SCA PLTs on EAM expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway, BAY 11-7082, also prevented the induction of EAM expression on the HUVEC surface by SCA PLTs. In conclusion, we find further evidence to indicate that platelets circulate in an activated state in sickle cell disease and are capable of stimulating endothelial cell activation. This effect appears to be mediated by direct contact, or even adhesion, between the platelets and endothelial cells and via NFκB-dependent signaling. As such, activated platelets in SCD may contribute to endothelial activation and, therefore, to the vaso-occlusive process. Results provide further evidence to support the use of anti-platelet approaches in association

  2. An essential role for platelet-activating factor in activating mast cell migration following ultraviolet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Chen, Limo; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D.; Limón-Flores, Alberto Y.; Ma, Ying; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The UVB (290–320 nm) radiation in sunlight is responsible for inducing skin cancer. Exposure to UV radiation is also immunosuppressive, and the systemic immune suppression induced by UV is a well-recognized risk factor for cancer induction. As UVB radiation is absorbed within the upper layers of the skin, indirect mechanisms must play a role in activating systemic immune suppression. One prominent example is mast cell migration, which from the skin to the draining LN is an essential step in the cascade of events leading to immune suppression. What triggers mast cell migration is not entirely clear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PAF, a lipid mediator of inflammation produced by the skin in response to UV exposure, is involved. Mast cell-deficient mice (KitW-sh/W-sh) are resistant to the suppressive effect of UV radiation, and reconstituting mast cell-deficient mice with normal bone marrow-derived mast cells restores susceptibility to immunosuppression. However, when mast cells from PAFR−/− mice were used, the reconstituted mice were not susceptible to the suppressive effects of UV. Furthermore, PAFR−/− mice showed impaired UV-induced mast cell migration when compared with WT mice. Finally, injecting PAF into WT mice mimicked the effect of UV irradiation and induced mast cell migration but not in PAFR−/− mice. Our findings indicate that PAFR binding induces mast cells to migrate from the skin to the LNs, where they mediate immune suppression. PMID:24009177

  3. Stimulation of cell-surface urokinase-type plasminogen activator activity and cell migration in vascular endothelial cells by a novel hexapeptide analogue of neurotensin.

    PubMed

    Ushiro, S; Mizoguchi, K; Yoshida, S; Jimi, S; Fujiwara, T; Yoshida, M; Wei, E T; Kitabgi, P; Amagaya, S; Ono, M; Kuwano, M

    1997-12-01

    To investigate if neurotensin (NT) could induce activation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in vascular endothelial cells, we utilized the acetyl-NT (8-13) analogue, TJN-950, in which the C-terminal leucine is reduced to leucinol. TJN-950 inhibited the binding of 125I-NT to membranes of newborn rat brains and of COS-7 cells transfected with rat NT receptor cDNA, but at 10(4) higher doses than NT (8-13). However, TJN-950 was as effective as NT in inducing the fibrinolytic activity in bovine vascular aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and enhanced the migration of vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, administration of TJN-950 induced neovascularization in the rat cornea in vivo. TJN-950 had no effect on expression of uPA, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 or uPA receptor mRNA. The binding of 125I-TJN-950 to cell membranes was blocked by unlabeled uPA and TJN-950, but not the amino-terminal or 12-32 fragment of uPA. TJN-950 may enhance uPA activity in vascular endothelial cells by interacting with the uPA receptor, resulting in induction of angiogenesis.

  4. Predictors of osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Cheng, Kevin; Niu, Xiaomei; Moore-King, Evadne; Fadojutimi-Akinsi, Margaret F.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Sable, Craig; Rana, Sohail; Dham, Niti; Campbell, Andrew; Ensing, Gregory; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Castro, Oswaldo L.; Gordeuk, Victor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Bone changes are common in sickle cell disease, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) type 5b is produced by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In other forms of hemolytic anemia, increased iron stores are associated with osteoporosis. We hypothesized that transfusional iron overload would be associated with increased osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease. Design and Methods We examined tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations in patients with sickle cell disease and normal controls of similar age and sex distribution at steady state. Serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentration was measured using an immunocapture enzyme assay and plasma concentrations of other cytokines were assayed using the Bio-Plex suspension array system. Tricuspid regurgitation velocity, an indirect measure of systolic pulmonary artery pressure, was determined by echocardiography. Results Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations were higher in 58 adults with sickle cell disease than in 22 controls (medians of 4.4 versus 2.4 U/L, respectively; P=0.0001). Among the patients with sickle cell disease, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b independently correlated with blood urea nitrogen (standardized beta=0.40, P=0.003), interleukin-8 (standardized beta=0.30, P=0.020), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 5 (standardized beta=−0.28, P=0.031) concentrations, but not with serum ferritin concentration. Frequent blood transfusions (>10 units in life time) were not associated with higher tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels in multivariate analysis. There were strong correlations among tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, alkaline phosphatase and tricuspid regurgitation velocity (r>0.35, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients with sickle cell disease have increased osteoclast activity as reflected by serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations. Our results may support a

  5. Genetic abolishment of hepatocyte proliferation activates hepatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yoko; Zhang, Mingjun; Yamaji, Sachie; Cang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Quiescent hepatic stem cells (HSCs) can be activated when hepatocyte proliferation is compromised. Chemical injury rodent models have been widely used to study the localization, biomarkers, and signaling pathways in HSCs, but these models usually exhibit severe promiscuous toxicity and fail to distinguish damaged and non-damaged cells. Our goal is to establish new animal models to overcome these limitations, thereby providing new insights into HSC biology and application. We generated mutant mice with constitutive or inducible deletion of Damaged DNA Binding protein 1 (DDB1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, in hepatocytes. We characterized the molecular mechanism underlying the compensatory activation and the properties of oval cells (OCs) by methods of mouse genetics, immuno-staining, cell transplantation and gene expression profiling. We show that deletion of DDB1 abolishes self-renewal capacity of mouse hepatocytes in vivo, leading to compensatory activation and proliferation of DDB1-expressing OCs. Partially restoring proliferation of DDB1-deficient hepatocytes by ablation of p21, a substrate of DDB1 E3 ligase, alleviates OC proliferation. Purified OCs express both hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers, form colonies in vitro, and differentiate to hepatocytes after transplantation. Importantly, the DDB1 mutant mice exhibit very minor liver damage, compared to a chemical injury model. Microarray analysis reveals several previously unrecognized markers, including Reelin, enriched in oval cells. Here we report a genetic model in which irreversible inhibition of hepatocyte duplication results in HSC-driven liver regeneration. The DDB1 mutant mice can be broadly applied to studies of HSC differentiation, HSC niche and HSCs as origin of liver cancer.

  6. Genetic Abolishment of Hepatocyte Proliferation Activates Hepatic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Yoko; Zhang, Mingjun; Yamaji, Sachie; Cang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Quiescent hepatic stem cells (HSCs) can be activated when hepatocyte proliferation is compromised. Chemical injury rodent models have been widely used to study the localization, biomarkers, and signaling pathways in HSCs, but these models usually exhibit severe promiscuous toxicity and fail to distinguish damaged and non-damaged cells. Our goal is to establish new animal models to overcome these limitations, thereby providing new insights into HSC biology and application. We generated mutant mice with constitutive or inducible deletion of Damaged DNA Binding protein 1 (DDB1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, in hepatocytes. We characterized the molecular mechanism underlying the compensatory activation and the properties of oval cells (OCs) by methods of mouse genetics, immuno-staining, cell transplantation and gene expression profiling. We show that deletion of DDB1 abolishes self-renewal capacity of mouse hepatocytes in vivo, leading to compensatory activation and proliferation of DDB1-expressing OCs. Partially restoring proliferation of DDB1-deficient hepatocytes by ablation of p21, a substrate of DDB1 E3 ligase, alleviates OC proliferation. Purified OCs express both hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers, form colonies in vitro, and differentiate to hepatocytes after transplantation. Importantly, the DDB1 mutant mice exhibit very minor liver damage, compared to a chemical injury model. Microarray analysis reveals several previously unrecognized markers, including Reelin, enriched in oval cells. Here we report a genetic model in which irreversible inhibition of hepatocyte duplication results in HSC-driven liver regeneration. The DDB1 mutant mice can be broadly applied to studies of HSC differentiation, HSC niche and HSCs as origin of liver cancer. PMID:22384083

  7. Cellular cooperation in lymphocyte activation. III. B-cell helper effect in the enhancement of T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, T; Kin, K; Itoh, Y; Kawai, T; Kano, Y; Shioiri-Nakano, K

    1979-01-01

    T and B cells were purified from human tonsil and peripheral blood by the removal of phagocytic cells, followed by filtration through a nylon fiber column (NC) and E-rosette formation. Purified T and B cells contained less than 1% of other cell types. The responses of T cells to concanavalin A (Con A) and soluble protein A were greatly enhanced in the presence of autologous B cells. Participation of B cells in T-cell enhancement was confirmed by the following observations: (a) purified B copulation, which was separated further from adherent B cells, retained its enhancing activity. (b) Another adherent cell-free B-cell preparation, which was purified from the NC-passed fraction, and (c) no T lymphoid but some B lymphoid cell lines, elicited strong T-cell enhancement. It was also found that the enhancing capacity of B cells required no metabolic activity, but rather an intact cell form and direct cell-to-cell contact with responding cells. The stimulatory determinants on B cells were resistant to trypsin and neuraminidase treatment. In this paper a hypothesis will be presented that at least two signals are prerequisite for the effective activation of T cells.

  8. NADPH Oxidase Signaling Pathway Mediates Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced Inhibition of Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Haowen; Zhou, Yu; Qin, Xingping; Cheng, Jing; He, Yun; Jiang, Yugang

    2018-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have blossomed into an effective approach with great potential for the treatment of liver fibrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the underlying antifibrosis mechanisms by which the BMSC inhibit activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in vivo and in vitro. To study the effect of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) on activated HSCs, we used HSCs and the coculture systems to evaluate the inhibition of activated HSCs from the aspects of the apoptosis of activated HSCs. In addition, activation of NADPH oxidase pathway and the changes in liver histopathology were tested by using the carbon tetrachloride- (CCl 4 -) induced liver fibrosis in mice. Introduction of hBM-MSCs significantly inhibited the proliferation of activated HSCs by inducing the apoptosis process of activated HSCs. The effect of hBM-MSCs reduced the signaling pathway of NADPH oxidase in activated HSCs. Besides, the signaling pathway of NADPH oxidase mediated hBM-MSC upregulation of the expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and downregulation of the expression of α 1(I) collagen and alpha-smooth muscle actin ( α -SMA) in activated HSCs. Moreover, the hBM-MSC-induced decrease in the signaling pathway of NADPH oxidase was accompanied by the decrease of the activated HSC number and liver fibrosis in a mouse model of CCl 4 -induced liver fibrosis. The hBM-MSCs act as a promising drug source against liver fibrosis development with respect to hepatopathy as a therapeutic target.

  9. Aloe vera extract activity on human corneal cells.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Anna; Paduch, Roman

    2012-02-01

    Ocular diseases are currently an important problem in modern societies. Patients suffer from various ophthalmologic ailments namely, conjunctivitis, dry eye, dacryocystitis or degenerative diseases. Therefore, there is a need to introduce new treatment methods, including medicinal plants usage. Aloe vera [Aloe barbadensis Miller (Liliaceae)] possesses wound-healing properties and shows immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory or antioxidant activities. NR uptake, MTT, DPPH• reduction, Griess reaction, ELISA and rhodamine-phalloidin staining were used to test toxicity, antiproliferative activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine level, and distribution of F-actin in cells, respectively. The present study analyzes the effect of Aloe vera extracts obtained with different solvents on in vitro culture of human 10.014 pRSV-T corneal cells. We found no toxicity of ethanol, ethyl acetate and heptane extracts of Aloe vera on human corneal cells. No ROS reducing activity by heptane extract and trace action by ethanol (only at high concentration 125 µg/ml) extract of Aloe vera was observed. Only ethyl acetate extract expressed distinct free radical scavenging effect. Plant extracts decreased NO production by human corneal cells as compared to untreated controls. The cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10) production decreased after the addition of Aloe vera extracts to the culture media. Aloe vera contains multiple pharmacologically active substances which are capable of modulating cellular phenotypes and functions. Aloe vera ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts may be used in eye drops to treat inflammations and other ailments of external parts of the eye such as the cornea.

  10. Liver Cell-Derived Microparticles Activate Hedgehog Signaling and Alter Gene Expression in Hepatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Witek, Rafal P.; Yang, Liu; Liu, Renshui; Jung, Youngmi; Omenetti, Alessia; Syn, Wing-Kin; Choi, Steve S.; Cheong, Yeiwon; Fearing, Caitlin M.; Agboola, Kolade M.; Chen, Wei; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Angiogenesis contributes to vascular remodeling during cirrhosis. In cirrhotic livers, cholangiocytes and myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (MF-HSC) produce Hedgehog (Hh) ligands. During embryogenesis Hh ligands are released from ligand-producing cells in microparticles and activate Hh signaling in endothelial cells. We studied whether adult liver cell-derived microparticles contain Hh ligands that alter hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC). Methods MF-HSCs and cholangiocytes were exposed to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to induce Hh ligands; microparticles were isolated from medium, analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunoblots, and applied to Hh-reporter containing cells. Microparticles were also obtained from serum and bile of rats after bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham surgery and applied to normal primary liver SEC with or without cyclopamine, a Hh signaling inhibitor. Effects on SEC gene expression were evaluated by QRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Finally, Hh target gene expression and SEC activation markers were compared in primary SEC and in liver sections from healthy and BDL rats. Results PDGF-treated MF-HSC and cholangiocytes released exosome-enriched microparticles containing biologically active Hh ligands. BDL also increased release of Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles into plasma and bile. TEM and immunoblots revealed similarities among microparticles from all sources; all microparticles induced similar Hh-dependent changes in SEC gene expression. SEC from healthy livers did not express Hh target genes or activation markers, but both were up-regulated in SEC after BDL. Conclusions Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles released from liver cells alter hepatic SEC gene expression, suggesting a novel mechanism for cirrhotic vasculopathy. PMID:19013163

  11. Liver cell-derived microparticles activate hedgehog signaling and alter gene expression in hepatic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Witek, Rafal P; Yang, Liu; Liu, Renshui; Jung, Youngmi; Omenetti, Alessia; Syn, Wing-Kin; Choi, Steve S; Cheong, Yeiwon; Fearing, Caitlin M; Agboola, Kolade M; Chen, Wei; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis contributes to vascular remodeling during cirrhosis. In cirrhotic livers, cholangiocytes, and myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (MF-HSC) produce Hedgehog (Hh) ligands. During embryogenesis Hh ligands are released from ligand-producing cells in microparticles and activate Hh signaling in endothelial cells. We studied whether adult liver cell-derived microparticles contain Hh ligands that alter hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC). MF-HSC and cholangiocytes were exposed to platelet-derived growth factor to induce Hh ligands; microparticles were isolated from medium, analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunoblots, and applied to Hh-reporter-containing cells. Microparticles were obtained from serum and bile of rats after bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham surgery and applied to normal primary liver SEC with or without cyclopamine, an Hh signaling inhibitor. Effects on SEC gene expression were evaluated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Hh target gene expression and SEC activation markers were compared in primary SEC and in liver sections from healthy and BDL rats. Platelet-derived growth factor-treated MF-HSC and cholangiocytes released exosome-enriched microparticles containing biologically-active Hh ligands. BDL increased release of Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles into plasma and bile. Transmission electron microscopy and immunoblots revealed similarities among microparticles from all sources; all microparticles induced similar Hh-dependent changes in SEC gene expression. SEC from healthy livers did not express Hh target genes or activation markers, but both were up-regulated in SEC after BDL. Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles released from liver cells alter hepatic SEC gene expression, suggesting a novel mechanism for cirrhotic vasculopathy.

  12. IL-23 Activated γδ T Cells Affect Th17 Cells and Regulatory T Cells by Secreting IL-21 in Children with Primary Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Yan, J; Yang, B; Zhang, G; Wang, M; Dong, S; Liu, W; Yang, H; Li, Q

    2018-01-01

    This study (1) analysed the percentage of γδ T cells, γδ T cell subsets, Th17 cells and regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and (2) determined the role of IL-23 in primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS) patients with active disease and in remission. Eighty-four patients with PNS and 51 healthy age-matched controls were included in this study. The percentage of γδ T cells, γδ T cell subsets, Th17 cells and Treg cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were analysed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMBCs from PNS patients with active disease were cultured in the presence of IL-23, IL-23 and an IL-23 antagonist, or IL23 and an anti-IL-21 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The percentage of γδ T cells, IL-23R + γδ T cells and IL-17 + γδ T cells were significantly increased in PNS patients with active disease. There was a positive correlation between the percentage of γδ T cells, IL-23R + γδ T cells, IL-17 + γδ T cells and the Th17/Treg ratio. IL-23 increased the percentage of γδ T cells and Th17 cells and decreased the percentage of Treg cells in PBMCs isolated from PNS patients with active disease. Anti-IL-21 mAb reduced the percentage of γδ T cells and Th17 cells, but increased the percentage of Treg cells. γδ T cells, IL-17 + γδ T cells and IL-23R + γδ T cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of paediatric PNS by modulating the balance of Th17/Treg cells. γδ T cells may cause an imbalance in Th17/Treg cells by secreting IL-21 in the presence of IL-23. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  13. Enhanced cytotoxic activity of effector T-cells against cholangiocarcinoma by dendritic cells pulsed with pooled mRNA.

    PubMed

    Junking, Mutita; Grainok, Janya; Thepmalee, Chutamas; Wongkham, Sopit; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2017-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignancy of bile duct epithelia with an increasing in incidence rate worldwide. Surgery is the only curative treatment, while adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy render poor responses. Cell-based immunotherapy is a potential strategy for cholangiocarcinoma treatment. However, variation of tumor antigens in cholangiocarcinoma leads to the ineffectiveness of cell-based immunotherapy. In this study, we examined the activation of effector T-cells by dendritic cells pulsed with protein lysate or total RNA from cholangiocarcinoma cell lines for their cytolytic activity against cholangiocarcinoma. Broad-spectrum antigen types with respect to RNA antigen sources were obtained from combination of three cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (KKU-213, KKU-100, and KKU-055). Compared with protein lysate-pulsed dendritic cells, total RNA-pulsed dendritic cells induced anti-tumor effector T-cell response with higher killing ability to KKU-100 and KKU-213 cells compared with protein lysate-pulsed dendritic cells. Moreover, pooled messenger RNA from three cholangiocarcinoma cell lines significantly increased the specific killing capacity of activated lymphocytes against KKU-213 cells. These results suggest that activation of anti-tumor effector T-cells against cholangiocarcinoma by RNA-pulsed dendritic cells is more effective than that by protein lysate-pulsed dendritic cells. In addition, pulsing dendritic cells with pooled messenger RNA from multiple cell lines enhanced the efficacy of a cellular immune response against cholangiocarcinoma.

  14. Biliary epithelium and liver B cells exposed to bacteria activate intrahepatic MAIT cells through MR1.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Hannah C; van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Kurioka, Ayako; Parekh, Krishan; Stirling, Kathryn; Roberts, Sheree; Dutton, Emma E; Hunter, Stuart; Geh, Daniel; Braitch, Manjit K; Rajanayagam, Jeremy; Iqbal, Tariq; Pinkney, Thomas; Brown, Rachel; Withers, David R; Adams, David H; Klenerman, Paul; Oo, Ye H

    2016-05-01

    Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T cells characterised by the invariant TCR-chain, Vα7.2-Jα33, and are restricted by MR1, which presents bacterial vitamin B metabolites. They are important for antibacterial immunity at mucosal sites; however, detailed characteristics of liver-infiltrating MAIT (LI-MAIT) and their role in biliary immune surveillance remain unexplored. The phenotype and intrahepatic localisation of human LI-MAIT cells was examined in diseased and normal livers. MAIT cell activation in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, biliary epithelial cells (BEC) and liver B cells was assessed with/without anti-MR1. Intrahepatic MAIT cells predominantly localised to bile ducts in the portal tracts. Consistent with this distribution, they expressed biliary tropic chemokine receptors CCR6, CXCR6, and integrin αEβ7. LI-MAIT cells were also present in the hepatic sinusoids and possessed tissue-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3 and integrins LFA-1 and VLA-4, suggesting their recruitment via hepatic sinusoids. LI-MAIT cells were enriched in the parenchyma of acute liver failure livers compared to chronic diseased livers. LI-MAIT cells had an activated, effector memory phenotype, expressed α4β7 and receptors for IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23. Importantly, in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, liver B cells and BEC, MAIT cells upregulated IFN-γ and CD40 Ligand and degranulated in an MR1-dependent, cytokine-independent manner. In addition, diseased liver MAIT cells expressed T-bet and RORγt and the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Our findings provide the first evidence of an immune surveillance effector response for MAIT cells towards BEC in human liver; thus they could be manipulated for treatment of biliary disease in the future. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of cell binding activities of Leptospira ECM adhesins.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Gregory T; Hahn, Beth L; Evangelista, Karen V; Padmore, Lavinia; Aranda, Patrick S; Coburn, Jenifer

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic infection that occurs globally. The bacteria colonize the renal proximal tubules of many animals and are shed in the urine. Contact with the urine, or with water contaminated with the urine of infected animals can cause infection of new host animals, including humans. Mechanisms of colonization of the proximal tubule and other tissues are not known, but specific interactions between bacterial adhesins and host substrates are likely to be critical in this process. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesins have been previously identified, but more recently, it has been shown that Leptospira bind more efficiently to cells than ECM. In this work, recombinant forms of five putative Leptospira ECM adhesins, namely LipL32, Loa22, OmpL1, p31/LipL45, and LenA were evaluated for binding to cells as well as an expanded variety of ECM components. Reproducible and significant adhesin activity was demonstrated only for OmpL1, which bound to both mammalian cell lines tested and to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). While determination of biologically significant bacterial adhesion activity will require generation of site-directed mutant strains, our results suggest that OmpL1 is a strong candidate for future evaluation regarding the roles of the adhesin activity of the protein during L. interrogans infection.

  16. Evaluation of Cell Binding Activities of Leptospira ECM Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory T.; Hahn, Beth L.; Evangelista, Karen V.; Padmore, Lavinia; Aranda, Patrick S.; Coburn, Jenifer

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic infection that occurs globally. The bacteria colonize the renal proximal tubules of many animals and are shed in the urine. Contact with the urine, or with water contaminated with the urine of infected animals can cause infection of new host animals, including humans. Mechanisms of colonization of the proximal tubule and other tissues are not known, but specific interactions between bacterial adhesins and host substrates are likely to be critical in this process. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesins have been previously identified, but more recently, it has been shown that Leptospira bind more efficiently to cells than ECM. In this work, recombinant forms of five putative Leptospira ECM adhesins, namely LipL32, Loa22, OmpL1, p31/LipL45, and LenA were evaluated for binding to cells as well as an expanded variety of ECM components. Reproducible and significant adhesin activity was demonstrated only for OmpL1, which bound to both mammalian cell lines tested and to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). While determination of biologically significant bacterial adhesion activity will require generation of site-directed mutant strains, our results suggest that OmpL1 is a strong candidate for future evaluation regarding the roles of the adhesin activity of the protein during L. interrogans infection. PMID:25875373

  17. Detection of protease activity in cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Verdoes, Martijn; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are involved in a wide variety of biologically and medically important events. They are entangled in a complex network of processes that regulate their activity, which makes their study intriguing, but challenging. For comprehensive understanding of protease biology and effective drug discovery, it is therefore essential to study proteases in models that are close to their complex native environments such as live cells or whole organisms. Protease activity can be detected by reporter substrates and activity-based probes, but not all of these reagents are suitable for intracellular or in vivo use. This review focuses on the detection of proteases in cells and in vivo. We summarize the use of probes and substrates as molecular tools, discuss strategies to deliver these tools inside cells, and describe sophisticated read-out techniques such as mass spectrometry and various imaging applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Activation of B Cells by a Dendritic Cell-Targeted Oral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Bikash; Owen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Tao; Zadeh, Mojgan; Lightfoot, Yaíma L.; Ge, Jun-Wei; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Production of long-lived, high affinity humoral immunity is an essential characteristic of successful vaccination and requires cognate interactions between T and B cells in germinal centers. Within germinal centers, specialized T follicular helper cells assist B cells and regulate the antibody response by mediating the differentiation of B cells into memory or plasma cells after exposure to T cell-dependent antigens. It is now appreciated that local immune responses are also essential for protection against infectious diseases that gain entry to the host by the mucosal route; therefore, targeting the mucosal compartments is the optimum strategy to induce protective immunity. However, because the gastrointestinal mucosae are exposed to large amounts of environmental and dietary antigens on a daily basis, immune regulatory mechanisms exist to favor tolerance and discourage autoimmunity at these sites. Thus, mucosal vaccination strategies must ensure that the immunogen is efficiently taken up by the antigen presenting cells, and that the vaccine is capable of activating humoral and cellular immunity, while avoiding the induction of tolerance. Despite significant progress in mucosal vaccination, this potent platform for immunotherapy and disease prevention must be further explored and refined. Here we discuss recent progress in the understanding of the role of different phenotypes of B cells in the development of an efficacious mucosal vaccine against infectious disease. PMID:24372255

  19. DUOX enzyme activity promotes AKT signalling in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Christopher A; Clerkin, John S; Cotter, Thomas G

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are related to tumour progression, and high levels of ROS have been observed in prostate tumours compared to normal prostate. ROS can positively influence AKT signalling and thereby promote cell survival. The aim of this project was to establ