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Sample records for activate intracellular signalling

  1. Antithrombotic activities of ferulic acid via intracellular cyclic nucleotide signaling.

    PubMed

    Hong, Qian; Ma, Zeng-Chun; Huang, Hao; Wang, Yu-Guang; Tan, Hong-Ling; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Liang, Qian-De; Zhang, Han-Ting; Gao, Yue

    2016-04-15

    Ferulic acid (FA) produces protective effects against cardiovascular dysfunctions. However, the mechanisms of FA is still not known. Here we examined the antithrombotic effects of FA and its potential mechanisms. Anticoagulation assays and platelet aggregation was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Thromboxane B2 (TXB2), cyclic adenosine monophosphate(cAMP), and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) was determined using enzyme immunoassay kits. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured using the Griess reaction. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting analysis. Oral administration of FA prevented death caused by pulmonary thrombosis and prolonged the tail bleeding and clotting time in mice,while, it did not alter the coagulation parameters, including the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). In addition, FA (50-200µM) dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation induced by various platelet agonists, including adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin, collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), and U46619. Further, FA attenuated intracellular Ca(2)(+) mobilization and TXB2 production induced by the platelet agonists. FA increased the levels of cAMP and cGMP and phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) while decreased phospho-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) in washed rat platelets, VASP is a substrate of cyclic nucleotide and PDE is an enzyme family responsible for hydrolysis of cAMP/cGMP. These results suggest that antithrombotic activities of FA may be regulated by inhibition of platelet aggregation, rather than through inhibiting the release of thromboplastin or formation of thrombin. The mechanism of this action may involve activation of cAMP and cGMP signaling. PMID:26948317

  2. Activator of G-Protein Signaling 3-Induced Lysosomal Biogenesis Limits Macrophage Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Vural, Ali; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Shi, Chong-Shan; Srinivasan, Lalitha; McQuiston, Travis J; Hwang, Il-Young; Yeh, Anthony J; Blumer, Joe B; Briken, Volker; Williamson, Peter R; Otto, Michael; Fraser, Iain D C; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-15

    Many intracellular pathogens cause disease by subverting macrophage innate immune defense mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens actively avoid delivery to or directly target lysosomes, the major intracellular degradative organelle. In this article, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an LPS-inducible protein in macrophages, affects both lysosomal biogenesis and activity. AGS3 binds the Gi family of G proteins via its G-protein regulatory (GoLoco) motif, stabilizing the Gα subunit in its GDP-bound conformation. Elevated AGS3 levels in macrophages limited the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a sensor of cellular nutritional status. This triggered the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, a known activator of lysosomal gene transcription. In contrast, AGS3-deficient macrophages had increased mammalian target of rapamycin activity, reduced transcription factor EB activity, and a lower lysosomal mass. High levels of AGS3 in macrophages enhanced their resistance to infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, whereas AGS3-deficient macrophages were more susceptible. We conclude that LPS priming increases AGS3 levels, which enhances lysosomal function and increases the capacity of macrophages to eliminate intracellular pathogens. PMID:26667172

  3. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Subgenomic Replicons Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Activating an Intracellular Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Keith D.; Mori, Kazutoshi; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2002-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates from a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The replication activities of the HCV subgenomic replicon are shown here to induce ER stress. In response to this stress, cells expressing HCV replicons induce the unfolded protein response (UPR), an ER-to-nucleus intracellular signaling pathway. The UPR is initiated by the proteolytic cleavage of a transmembrane protein, ATF6. The resulting cytoplasmic protein fragment of ATF6 functions as a transcription factor in the nucleus and activates selective genes required for an ER stress response. ATF6 activation leads to increased transcriptional levels of GRP78, an ER luminal chaperone protein. However, the overall level of GRP78 protein is decreased. While ER stress is also known to affect translational attenuation, cells expressing HCV replicons have lower levels of phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2. Interestingly, cap-independent internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation directed by the 5′ noncoding region of HCV and GRP78 is activated in cells expressing HCV replicons. These studies provide insight into the effects of HCV replication on intracellular events and the mechanisms underlying liver pathogenesis. PMID:12097557

  5. Novel robust biomarkers for human bladder cancer based on activation of intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lezhnina, Ksenia; Kovalchuk, Olga; Zhavoronkov, Alexander A.; Korzinkin, Mikhail B.; Zabolotneva, Anastasia A.; Shegay, Peter V.; Sokov, Dmitry G.; Gaifullin, Nurshat M.; Rusakov, Igor G.; Aliper, Alexander M.; Roumiantsev, Sergey A.; Alekseev, Boris Y.; Borisov, Nikolay M.; Buzdin, Anton A.

    2014-01-01

    We recently proposed a new bioinformatic algorithm called OncoFinder for quantifying the activation of intracellular signaling pathways. It was proved advantageous for minimizing errors of high-throughput gene expression analyses and showed strong potential for identifying new biomarkers. Here, for the first time, we applied OncoFinder for normal and cancerous tissues of the human bladder to identify biomarkers of bladder cancer. Using Illumina HT12v4 microarrays, we profiled gene expression in 17 cancer and seven non-cancerous bladder tissue samples. These experiments were done in two independent laboratories located in Russia and Canada. We calculated pathway activation strength values for the investigated transcriptomes and identified signaling pathways that were regulated differently in bladder cancer (BC) tissues compared with normal controls. We found, for both experimental datasets, 44 signaling pathways that serve as excellent new biomarkers of BC, supported by high area under the curve (AUC) values. We conclude that the OncoFinder approach is highly efficient in finding new biomarkers for cancer. These markers are mathematical functions involving multiple gene products, which distinguishes them from “traditional” expression biomarkers that only assess concentrations of single genes. PMID:25296972

  6. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling cascade during T-cell activation: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Piyali; Chowdhury, Saikat; Bhowmick, Rupa; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2015-10-01

    Various T-cell co-receptor molecules and calcium channel CRAC play a pivotal role in the maintenance of cell's functional responses by regulating the production of effector molecules (mostly cytokines) that aids in immune clearance and also maintaining the cell in a functionally active state. Any defect in these co-receptor signalling pathways may lead to an altered expression pattern of the effector molecules. To study the propagation of such defects with time and their effect on the intracellular protein expression patterns, a comprehensive and largest pathway map of T-cell activation network is reconstructed manually. The entire pathway reactions are then translated using logical equations and simulated using the published time series microarray expression data as inputs. After validating the model, the effect of in silico knock down of co-receptor molecules on the expression patterns of their downstream proteins is studied and simultaneously the changes in the phenotypic behaviours of the T-cell population are predicted, which shows significant variations among the proteins expression and the signalling routes through which the response is propagated in the cytoplasm. This integrative computational approach serves as a valuable technique to study the changes in protein expression patterns and helps to predict variations in the cellular behaviour. PMID:26564978

  7. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  8. GLP-2 rapidly activates divergent intracellular signaling pathways involved in intestinal cell survival and proliferation in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously demonstrated the dose-dependent glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 activation of intracellular signals associated with increased epithelial cell survival and proliferation in the neonatal intestine. Our current aim was to quantify the acute, temporal GLP-2 activation of these key intracellu...

  9. Intracellular signalling during neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mócsai, Attila; Walzog, Barbara; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-08-01

    Recruitment of leucocytes such as neutrophils to the extravascular space is a critical step of the inflammation process and plays a major role in the development of various diseases including several cardiovascular diseases. Neutrophils themselves play a very active role in that process by sensing their environment and responding to the extracellular cues by adhesion and de-adhesion, cellular shape changes, chemotactic migration, and other effector functions of cell activation. Those responses are co-ordinated by a number of cell surface receptors and their complex intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we review neutrophil signal transduction processes critical for recruitment to the site of inflammation. The two key requirements for neutrophil recruitment are the establishment of appropriate chemoattractant gradients and the intrinsic ability of the cells to migrate along those gradients. We will first discuss signalling steps required for sensing extracellular chemoattractants such as chemokines and lipid mediators and the processes (e.g. PI3-kinase pathways) leading to the translation of extracellular chemoattractant gradients to polarized cellular responses. We will then discuss signal transduction by leucocyte adhesion receptors (e.g. tyrosine kinase pathways) which are critical for adhesion to, and migration through the vessel wall. Finally, additional neutrophil signalling pathways with an indirect effect on the neutrophil recruitment process, e.g. through modulation of the inflammatory environment, will be discussed. Mechanistic understanding of these pathways provide better understanding of the inflammation process and may point to novel therapeutic strategies for controlling excessive inflammation during infection or tissue damage. PMID:25998986

  10. Spatial and Temporal Regulation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation and Intracellular Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, John J M; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M; Dahan, Sophie; Dominguez, Michel; Posner, Barry I

    2016-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) exemplify how receptor location is coupled to signal transduction. Extracellular binding of ligands to these RTKs triggers their concentration into vesicles that bud off from the cell surface to generate intracellular signaling endosomes. On the exposed cytosolic surface of these endosomes, RTK autophosphorylation selects the downstream signaling proteins and lipids to effect growth factor and polypeptide hormone action. This selection is followed by the recruitment of protein tyrosine phosphatases that inactivate the RTKs and deliver them by membrane fusion and fission to late endosomes. Coincidentally, proteinases inside the endosome cleave the EGF and insulin ligands. Subsequent inward budding of the endosomal membrane generates multivesicular endosomes. Fusion with lysosomes then results in RTK degradation and downregulation. Through the spatial positioning of RTKs in target cells for EGF and insulin action, the temporal extent of signaling, attenuation, and downregulation is regulated. PMID:27023845

  11. The adaptor protein CIN85 assembles intracellular signaling clusters for B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Julius; Wong, Leo E; Pirkuliyeva, Sona; Schulz, Kathrin; Schwiegk, Claudia; Fünfgeld, Kevser Gencalp; Keppler, Selina; Batista, Facundo D; Urlaub, Henning; Habeck, Michael; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Wienands, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor molecule Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kD (CIN85) regulates signaling from a number of cell surface receptors, such as growth factor receptors and antigen receptors on lymphocytes. Because of its multidomain structure, CIN85 is thought to act as a classical adaptor protein that connects functionally distinct components of a given signaling pathway through diverse protein domains. However, we found that in B lymphocytes, CIN85 functions to oligomerize SLP-65, which is the central effector protein of the B cell receptor (BCR). Therefore, CIN85 trimerizes through a carboxyl-terminal, coiled-coil domain. The multiple Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of trimeric CIN85 molecules associated with multiple SLP-65 molecules, which recruited further CIN85 trimers, thereby perpetuating the oligomerization process. Formation of this oligomeric signaling complex in resting B cells rendered the cells poised for the efficient initiation of intracellular signaling upon BCR stimulation. Our data suggest that the functionality of signaling cascades does not rely solely on the qualitative linkage of their various components but requires a critical number of effectors to become concentrated in signaling complexes. PMID:27353366

  12. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 Activates Canonical Notch Signaling To Downregulate TLR2/4 Expression and Promote Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Dunphy, Paige S.; Luo, Tian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ehrlichia chaffeensis preferentially targets mononuclear phagocytes and survives through a strategy of subverting innate immune defenses, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown E. chaffeensis type 1 secreted tandem repeat protein (TRP) effectors are involved in diverse molecular pathogen-host interactions, such as the TRP120 interaction with the Notch receptor-cleaving metalloprotease ADAM17. In the present study, we demonstrate E. chaffeensis, via the TRP120 effector, activates the canonical Notch signaling pathway to promote intracellular survival. We found that nuclear translocation of the transcriptionally active Notch intracellular domain (NICD) occurs in response to E. chaffeensis or recombinant TRP120, resulting in upregulation of Notch signaling pathway components and target genes notch1, adam17, hes, and hey. Significant differences in canonical Notch signaling gene expression levels (>40%) were observed during early and late stages of infection, indicating activation of the Notch pathway. We linked Notch pathway activation specifically to the TRP120 effector, which directly interacts with the Notch metalloprotease ADAM17. Using pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against γ-secretase enzyme, Notch transcription factor complex, Notch1, and ADAM17, we demonstrated that Notch signaling is required for ehrlichial survival. We studied the downstream effects and found that E. chaffeensis TRP120-mediated activation of the Notch pathway causes inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways required for PU.1 and subsequent Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) expression. This investigation reveals a novel mechanism whereby E. chaffeensis exploits the Notch pathway to evade the host innate immune response for intracellular survival. PMID:27381289

  13. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F; Sheehan, David F; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena; Kittler, Josef T

    2015-12-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca(2+). Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca(2+)-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca(2+) in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca(2+) wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. PMID:26631479

  14. Modeling and analysis of early events in T-lymphocyte antigen-activated intracellular-signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanan; Balakrishnan, Venkataramanan; Buzzard, Greg; Geahlen, Robert; Harrison, Marietta; Rundell, Ann

    2005-12-01

    The T-cell antigen-activated signaling pathway is a highly regulated intracellular biochemical system that is crucial for initiating an appropriate adaptive immune response. To improve the understanding of the complex regulatory mechanisms controlling the early events in T-cell signaling, a detailed mathematical model was developed that utilizes ordinary differential equations to describe chemical reactions of the signaling pathway. The model parameter values were constrained by experimental data on the activation of a specific signaling intermediate and indicated an initial rapid cascade of phosphorylation events followed by a comparatively slow signal downregulation. Nonlinear analysis of the model suggested that thresholding and bistability occur as a result of the embedded positive and negative feedback loops within the model. These nonlinear system properties may enhance the T-cell receptor specificity and provide sub-threshold noise filtering with switch-like behavior to ensure proper cell response. Additional analysis using a reduced second-order model led to further understanding of the observed system behavior. Moreover, the interactions between the positive and negative feedback loops enabled the model to exhibit, among a variety of other feasible dynamics, a sustained oscillation that corresponds to a stable limit cycle in the two-dimensional phase plane. Quantitative analysis in this paper has helped identify potential regulatory mechanisms in the early T-cell signaling events. This integrated approach provides a framework to quantify and discover the ensemble of interconnected T-cell antigen-activated signaling pathways from limited experimental data.

  15. Relation of intracellular signal levels and promoter activities in the gal regulon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sandeep; Orosz, László; Sneppen, Kim; Adhya, Sankar; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2009-08-28

    Transcription of many genes is regulated by combinations of multiple signals. In Escherichia coli, combinatorial control is typical in the case of operons related to utilization of different sugars in the absence of glucose. To understand regulation of the transport and metabolic pathways in the galactose system, we measured activities of the six gal regulon promoters simultaneously, using an in vitro transcription system containing purified components. Input functions were computed on the basis of the experimental measurements. We observed four different shapes of input functions. From the results, we can conclude that the structure of the regulatory network is insufficient for the determination of signal integration. It is the actual structure of the promoter and regulatory region, the mechanism of transcription regulation, and the interplay between transcription factors that shape the input function to be suitable for adaptation. PMID:19559028

  16. An inside job: hacking into Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling cascades by the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Denkers, Eric Y; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A; Butcher, Barbara A

    2012-02-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is well known for its skill at invading and living within host cells. New discoveries are now also revealing the astounding ability of the parasite to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm to seize control of the host cell. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of one such secretory protein called ROP16. This molecule is released from rhoptries into the host cell during invasion. The ROP16 molecule acts as a kinase, directly activating both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT6 signaling pathways. In macrophages, an important and preferential target cell of parasite infection, the injection of ROP16 has multiple consequences, including downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling and macrophage deviation to an alternatively activated phenotype. PMID:22104110

  17. An Inside Job: Hacking into Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Signaling Cascades by the Intracellular Protozoan Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Bzik, David J.; Fox, Barbara A.; Butcher, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is well known for its skill at invading and living within host cells. New discoveries are now also revealing the astounding ability of the parasite to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm to seize control of the host cell. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of one such secretory protein called ROP16. This molecule is released from rhoptries into the host cell during invasion. The ROP16 molecule acts as a kinase, directly activating both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT6 signaling pathways. In macrophages, an important and preferential target cell of parasite infection, the injection of ROP16 has multiple consequences, including downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling and macrophage deviation to an alternatively activated phenotype. PMID:22104110

  18. Intracellular Signal Modulation by Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive Oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can crucially affect the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways can be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future. PMID:24683030

  19. Intracellular Signaling Molecules Activated by Epstein-Barr Virus for Induction of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luwen; Wu, Lihong; Hong, Ke; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is the principal oncogenic protein in the EBV transformation process. LMP-1 induces the expression of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7) and activates IRF-7 protein by phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. LMP-1 is an integral membrane protein with two regions in its C terminus that initiate signaling processes, the C-terminal activator regions 1 (CTAR-1) and CTAR-2. Here, genetic analysis of LMP-1 has determined that the PXQXT motif that governs the interaction between LMP-1 CTAR-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) is needed to induce the expression of IRF-7. Mutations in the PXQXT motif in CTAR-1 that disrupt the interaction between LMP-1 and TRAFs abolished the induction of IRF-7. Also, dominant-negative mutants of TRAFs inhibited the induction of IRF-7 by CTAR-1. The last three amino acids (YYD) of CTAR-2 are also important for the induction of IRF-7. When both PXQXT and YYD were mutated (LMP-DM), the LMP-1 mutant failed to induce IRF-7. Also, LMP-DM blocked the induction of IRF-7 by wild-type LMP-1. These data strongly suggest that both CTAR-1 and CTAR-2 of LMP-1 independently induce the expression of IRF-7. In addition, NF-κB is involved in the induction of IRF-7. A superrepressor of IκB (sr-IκB) could block the induction of IRF-7 by LMP-1, and overexpression of NF-κB (p65 plus p50) could induce the expression of IRF-7. In addition, we have found that human IRF-7 is a stable protein, and sodium butyrate, a modifier of chromatin structure, induces IRF-7. PMID:11711629

  20. Intracellular signalling by C-peptide.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes. PMID:18382618

  1. Intracellular signaling and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iakova, Polina; Timchenko, Lubov; Timchenko, Nikolai A

    2011-02-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer related death in the world. The recent development of new techniques for the investigations of global change in the gene expression, signaling pathways and wide genome binding has provided novel information for the mechanisms underlying liver cancer progression. Although these studies identified gene expression signatures in hepatocellular carcinoma, the early steps of the development of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are not well understood. The development of HCC is a multistep process which includes the progressive alterations of gene expression leading to the increased proliferation and to liver cancer. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification of the key steps of the development of HCC with the focus on early events of carcinogenesis and on the role of translational and epigenetic alterations in the development of HCC. Quiescent stage of the liver is supported by several tumor suppressor proteins including p53, Rb and C/EBPα. Studies with chemical models of liver carcinogenesis and with human HCC have shown that the elevation of gankyrin is responsible for the elimination of these three proteins at early steps of carcinogenesis. Later stages of progression of the liver cancer are associated with alterations in many signaling pathways including translation which leads to epigenetic silencing/activation of many genes. Particularly, recent reports suggest a critical role of histone deacetylase 1, HDAC1, in the development of HCC through the interactions with transcription factors such as C/EBP family proteins. PMID:20850540

  2. Control of Intracellular Calcium Signaling as a Neuroprotective Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R. Scott; Goad, Daryl L.; Grillo, Michael A.; Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Both acute and chronic degenerative diseases of the nervous system reduce the viability and function of neurons through changes in intracellular calcium signaling. In particular, pathological increases in the intracellular calcium concentration promote such pathogenesis. Disease involvement of numerous regulators of intracellular calcium signaling located on the plasma membrane and intracellular organelles has been documented. Diverse groups of chemical compounds targeting ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors, pumps and enzymes have been identified as potential neuroprotectants. The present review summarizes the discovery, mechanisms and biological activity of neuroprotective molecules targeting proteins that control intracellular calcium signaling to preserve or restore structure and function of the nervous system. Disease relevance, clinical applications and new technologies for the identification of such molecules are being discussed. PMID:20335972

  3. Optogenetic activation of intracellular adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger CREB phosphorylation and impair memory.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Rial, D; Canas, P M; Yoo, J-H; Li, W; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; van Westen, G J P; Payen, M-P; Augusto, E; Gonçalves, N; Tomé, A R; Li, Z; Wu, Z; Hou, X; Zhou, Y; IJzerman, A P; PIJzerman, Ad; Boyden, E S; Cunha, R A; Qu, J; Chen, J-F

    2015-11-01

    Human and animal studies have converged to suggest that caffeine consumption prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). To test if A2AR activation in the hippocampus is actually sufficient to impair memory function and to begin elucidating the intracellular pathways operated by A2AR, we have developed a chimeric rhodopsin-A2AR protein (optoA2AR), which retains the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin (conferring light responsiveness and eliminating adenosine-binding pockets) fused to the intracellular loop of A2AR to confer specific A2AR signaling. The specificity of the optoA2AR signaling was confirmed by light-induced selective enhancement of cAMP and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) (but not cGMP) levels in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which was abolished by a point mutation at the C terminal of A2AR. Supporting its physiological relevance, optoA2AR activation and the A2AR agonist CGS21680 produced similar activation of cAMP and p-MAPK signaling in HEK293 cells, of p-MAPK in the nucleus accumbens and of c-Fos/phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the hippocampus, and similarly enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Remarkably, optoA2AR activation triggered a preferential p-CREB signaling in the hippocampus and impaired spatial memory performance, while optoA2AR activation in the nucleus accumbens triggered MAPK signaling and modulated locomotor activity. This shows that the recruitment of intracellular A2AR signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger memory dysfunction. Furthermore, the demonstration that the biased A2AR signaling and functions depend on intracellular A2AR loops prompts the possibility of targeting the intracellular A2AR-interacting partners to selectively control different neuropsychiatric behaviors. PMID:25687775

  4. Optogenetic control of intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cells employ a plethora of signaling pathways to make their life-and-death decisions. Extensive genetic, biochemical, and physiological studies have led to the accumulation of knowledge about signaling components and their interactions within signaling networks. These conventional approaches, though useful, lack the ability to control the spatial and temporal aspects of signaling processes. The recently emerged optogenetic tools open up exciting opportunities by enabling signaling regulation with superior temporal and spatial resolution, easy delivery, rapid reversibility, fewer off-target side effects, and the ability to dissect complex signaling networks. Here we review recent achievements in using light to control intracellular signaling pathways, and discuss future prospects for the field, including integration of new genetic approaches into optogenetics. PMID:25529484

  5. Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Of Dynamic Intracellular Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec T.; Kao, J. P.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1989-12-01

    Traditional biochemical assays of cellular messengers require grinding up thousands or millions of cells for each data point. Such destructive measurements use up large amounts of tissue, have poor time resolution, and cannot assess heterogeneity between individual cells or dynamic spatial localizations. Recent technical advances now enable important ionic signals to be continuously imaged inside individual living cells with micron spatial resolution and subsecond time resolution. This methodology relies on the molecular engineering of indicator dyes whose fluorescence is strong and highly sensitive to ions such as Ca2+, H+, or Na+. Binding of these ions shifts the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the corresponding indicator. The ratio of excitation amplitudes at two wavelengths measures the free ion concentration while canceling out intensity variations due to nonuniform cell thickness or dye content. By rapidly alternating between the two ion-sensitive excitation wavelengths, a fluorescence microscope equipped with a low-light television camera and digital image processor can produce dynamic images of intracellular messenger levels. In many populations of cells traditionally assumed to be homogeneous, we find that neighboring individual cells can differ enormously in their cytosolic Ca2+ response to agonist stimulation, some ignoring the stimulus, others raising cytosolic Ca2+ transiently, others showing oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of graded inputs; we are investigating the mechanism of their generation using light flashes to generate pulses of intracellular messengers. Spatial gradients of cytosolic Ca t+ within single cells have been observed in embryos during fertilization and development, neurons exposed to electrical or drug stimulation and in cytotoxic T lymphocytes during killing of target

  6. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Sten

    2014-01-01

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels-one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms-feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction-diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker-Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  7. Receptor-activated Ca2+ inflow in animal cells: a variety of pathways tailored to meet different intracellular Ca2+ signalling requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Barritt, G J

    1999-01-01

    Receptor-activated Ca2+ channels (RACCs) play a central role in regulation of the functions of animal cells. Together with voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCCs) and ligand-gated non-selective cation channels, RACCs provide a variety of pathways by which Ca2+ can be delivered to the cytoplasmic space and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in order to initiate or maintain specific types of intracellular Ca2+ signal. Store-operated Ca2+ channels (SOCs), which are activated by a decrease in Ca2+ in the ER, are a major subfamily of RACCs. A careful analysis of the available data is required in order to discern the different types of RACCs (differentiated chiefly on the basis of ion selectivity and mechanism of activation) and to properly develop hypotheses for structures and mechanisms of activation. Despite much intensive research, the structures and mechanisms of activation of RACCs are only now beginning to be understood. In considering the physiological functions of the different RACCs, it is useful to consider the specificity for Ca2+ of each type of cation channel and the rate at which Ca2+ flows through a single open channel; the locations of the channels on the plasma membrane (in relation to the ER, cytoskeleton and other intracellular units of structure and function); the Ca2+-responsive enzymes and proteins; and the intracellular buffers and proteins that control the distribution of Ca2+ in the cytoplasmic space. RACCs which are non-selective cation channels can deliver Ca2+ directly to specific regions of the cytoplasmic space, and can also admit Na+, which induces depolarization of the plasma membrane, the opening of VOCCs and the subsequent inflow of Ca2+. SOCs appear to deliver Ca2+ specifically to the ER, thereby maintaining oscillating Ca2+ signals. PMID:9882611

  8. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal induces apoptosis by activating ERK1/2 signaling and depleting intracellular glutathione in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yun; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces oxidative damage to cellular constituents, ultimately leading to induction of apoptotic cell death and the pathogenesis of various diseases. The molecular mechanisms for the action of ROS in intestinal diseases remain poorly defined. Here, we reported that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) treatment led to capses-3-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular ROS level and reduced glutathione concentration in intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of 4-HNE were markedly abolished by the antioxidant L-cysteine derivative N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Further studies demonstrated that the protective effect of NAC was associated with restoration of intracellular redox state by Nrf2-related regulation of expression of genes involved in intracellular glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis and inactivation of 4-HNE-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2). The 4-HNE-induced ERK1/2 activation was mediated by repressing mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a negative regulator of ERK1/2, through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism. Importantly, either overexpression of MKP-1 or NAC treatment blocked 4-HNE-induced MKP-1 degradation, thereby protecting cell from apoptosis. These novel findings provide new insights into a functional role of MKP-1 in oxidative stress-induced cell death by regulating ERK1/2 MAP kinase in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27620528

  9. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  10. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  11. Domain-Specific Activation of Death-Associated Intracellular Signalling Cascades by the Cellular Prion Protein in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Vilches, Silvia; Vergara, Cristina; Nicolás, Oriol; Mata, Ágata; Del Río, José A; Gavín, Rosalina

    2016-09-01

    The biological functions of the cellular prion protein remain poorly understood. In fact, numerous studies have aimed to determine specific functions for the different protein domains. Studies of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) domains through in vivo expression of molecules carrying internal deletions in a mouse Prnp null background have provided helpful data on the implication of the protein in signalling cascades in affected neurons. Nevertheless, understanding of the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by these PrP(C) deleted forms is far from complete. To better define the neurotoxic or neuroprotective potential of PrP(C) N-terminal domains, and to overcome the heterogeneity of results due to the lack of a standardized model, we used neuroblastoma cells to analyse the effects of overexpressing PrP(C) deleted forms. Results indicate that PrP(C) N-terminal deleted forms were properly processed through the secretory pathway. However, PrPΔF35 and PrPΔCD mutants led to death by different mechanisms sharing loss of alpha-cleavage and activation of caspase-3. Our data suggest that both gain-of-function and loss-of-function pathogenic mechanisms may be associated with N-terminal domains and may therefore contribute to neurotoxicity in prion disease. Dissecting the molecular response induced by PrPΔF35 may be the key to unravelling the physiological and pathological functions of the prion protein. PMID:26250617

  12. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins as intracellular signaling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Kocab, Andrew J; Duckett, Colin S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have often been considered inhibitors of cell death due to early reports that described their ability to directly bind and inhibit caspases, the primary factors that implement apoptosis. However, a greater understanding is evolving regarding the vital roles played by IAPs as transduction intermediates in a diverse set of signaling cascades associated with functions ranging from the innate immune response to cell migration to cell-cycle regulation. In this review, we discuss the functions of IAPs in signaling, focusing primarily on the cellular IAP (c-IAP) proteins. The c-IAPs are important components in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily signaling cascades, which include activation of the NF-κB transcription factor family. As these receptors modulate cell proliferation and cell death, the involvement of the c-IAPs in these pathways provides an additional means of controlling cellular fate beyond simply inhibiting caspase activity. Additionally, IAP-binding proteins, such as Smac and caspases, which have been described as having cell death-independent roles, may affect c-IAP activity in intracellular signaling. Collectively, the multi-faceted functions and complex regulation of the c-IAPs illustrate their importance as intracellular signaling intermediates. PMID:26462035

  13. In Vivo Detection of Intracellular Signaling Pathways in Developing Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2000-01-01

    Information regarding the intracellular signaling processes that occur during the development of T cells has largely been obtained with the use of transgenic mouse models, which although providing invaluable information are time consuming and costly. To this end, we have developed a novel system that facilitates the In Vivo analysis of signal transduction pathways during T-lymphocyte development. This approach uses reporter-plasmids for the detection of intracellular signals mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase or cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Reporter-plasmids are transfected into thymocytes in fetal thymic organ culture by accelerated DNA/particle bombardment (gene gun), and the activation of a signaling pathway is determined in the form of a standard luciferase assay. Importantly, this powerful technique preserves the structural integrity of the thymus, and will provide an invaluable tool to study how thymocytes respond to normal environmental stimuli encountered during differentiation within the thymic milieu. Thus, this method allows for the monitoring of signals that occur in a biological time frame, such as during differentiation, and within the natural environment of differentiating cells. PMID:11293810

  14. The basal level of intracellular calcium gates the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase - Akt signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fei; Soellner, Deborah; Nunez, Joseph; Wang, Hongbing

    2008-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates survival and neuroplasticity through the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway. Although previous studies suggested the roles of MAPK, PLC-γ-mediated intra-cellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) increase, and extra-cellular calcium influx in regulating Akt activation, the cellular mechanisms are largely unknown. We demonstrated that sub-nanomolar BDNF significantly induced Akt activation in developing cortical neurons. The TrkB-dependent Akt phosphorylation at S473 and T308 required only PI3K, but not PLC and MAPK activity. Blocking NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and chelating extra-cellular calcium by EGTA failed to block BDNF-induced Akt phosphorylation. In contrast, chelating [Ca2+]i by BAPTA-AM abolished Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, sub-nanomolar BDNF did not stimulate [Ca2+]i increase under our culture conditions. Together with that NMDA- and membrane depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i increase did not activate Akt, we conclude that the basal level of [Ca2+]i gates BDNF function. Furthermore, inhibiting calmodulin by W13 suppressed Akt phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 by okadaic acid and tautomycin rescued Akt phosphorylation in BAPTA- and W13-treated neurons. We further demonstrated that the phosphorylation of PDK1 did not correlate with Akt phosphorylation at T308. Our results suggested novel roles of basal [Ca2+]i, rather than activity-induced calcium elevation, in BDNF-Akt signaling. PMID:18485103

  15. Calcium, channels, intracellular signaling and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Jorge-Hernán; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca²⁺) is an important cation able to function as a second messenger in different cells of the immune system, particularly in B and T lymphocytes, macrophages and mastocytes, among others. Recent discoveries related to the entry of Ca²⁺ through the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) has opened a new investigation area about the cell destiny regulated by Ca²⁺ especially in B and T lymphocytes. SOCE acts through calcium-release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The function of CRAC depends of two recently discovered regulators: the Ca²⁺ sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum or stromal interaction molecule (STIM-1) and one subunit of CRAC channels called Orai1. This review focuses on the role of Ca²⁺ signals in B and T lymphocytes functions, the signalling pathways leading to Ca²⁺ influx, and the relationship between Ca²⁺ signals and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24001934

  16. Cilostazol Induces PGI2 Production via Activation of the Downstream Epac-1/Rap1 Signaling Cascade to Increase Intracellular Calcium by PLCε and to Activate p44/42 MAPK in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Ayako

    2015-01-01

    Background Cilostazol, a selective phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitor, is known as an anti-platelet drug and acts directly on platelets. Cilostazol has been shown to exhibit vascular protection in ischemic diseases. Although vascular endothelium-derived prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) plays an important role in vascular protection, it is unknown whether cilostazol directly stimulates PGI2 synthesis in endothelial cells. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of cilostazol-induced PGI2 stimulation in endothelial cells. Methods and Results Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were stimulated with cilostazol and PGI2 accumulation in the culture media was measured. Cilostazol increased PGI2 synthesis via the arachidonic acid pathway. Cilostazol-induced intracellular calcium also promoted PGI2 synthesis via the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor. Using RNAi, silencing of PDE3B abolished the induction effect of cilostazol on PGI2 synthesis and intracellular cAMP accumulation. Inhibition of the exchange protein, which was directly activated by cyclic AMP 1 (Epac-1) and its downstream signal the Ras-like small GTPase (Rap-1), abolished cilostazol-induced PGI2 synthesis, but this did not take place via protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of downstream signaling, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) γ, and phospholipase C (PLC) ε, suppressed cilostazol-induced PGI2 synthesis. Conclusions The PDE3/Epac-1/Rap-1 signaling pathway plays an important role in cilostazol-induced PGI2 synthesis. Namely, stimulation of HAECs with cilostazol induces intracellular calcium elevation via the Rap-1/PLCε/IP3 pathway, along with MAPK activation via direct activation by Epac-1/Rap-1 and indirect activation by Epac-1/Rap-1/PI3Kγ, resulting in synergistically induced PGI2 synthesis. PMID:26181635

  17. Intracellular Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bütepage, Mareike; Eckei, Laura; Verheugd, Patricia; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A key process in the regulation of protein activities and thus cellular signaling pathways is the modification of proteins by post-translational mechanisms. Knowledge about the enzymes (writers and erasers) that attach and remove post-translational modifications, the targets that are modified and the functional consequences elicited by specific modifications, is crucial for understanding cell biological processes. Moreover detailed knowledge about these mechanisms and pathways helps to elucidate the molecular causes of various diseases and in defining potential targets for therapeutic approaches. Intracellular adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation refers to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent modification of proteins with ADP-ribose and is catalyzed by enzymes of the ARTD (ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin like, also known as PARP) family as well as some members of the Sirtuin family. Poly-ADP-ribosylation is relatively well understood with inhibitors being used as anti-cancer agents. However, the majority of ARTD enzymes and the ADP-ribosylating Sirtuins are restricted to catalyzing mono-ADP-ribosylation. Although writers, readers and erasers of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation have been identified only recently, it is becoming more and more evident that this reversible post-translational modification is capable of modulating key intracellular processes and signaling pathways. These include signal transduction mechanisms, stress pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and stress granules, and chromatin-associated processes such as transcription and DNA repair. We hypothesize that mono-ADP-ribosylation controls, through these different pathways, the development of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26426055

  18. Visualization of Intracellular Tyrosinase Activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes produce the melanin pigments in melanosomes and these organelles protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. Tyrosinase is the key cuproenzyme which initiates the pigment synthesis using its substrate amino acid tyrosine or L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). Moreover, the activity of tyrosinase directly correlates to the cellular pigmentation. Defects in tyrosinase transport to melanosomes or mutations in the enzyme or reduced intracellular copper levels results in loss of tyrosinase activity in melanosomes, commonly observed in albinism. Here, we described a method to detect the intracellular activity of tyrosinase in mouse melanocytes. This protocol will visualize the active tyrosinase present in the intracellular vesicles or organelles including melanosomes. PMID:27231711

  19. C-Peptide and its intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2009-01-01

    Although long believed to be inert, C-peptide has now been shown to have definite biological effects both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic animals and in patients with type 1 diabetes. These effects point to a protective action of C-peptide against the development of diabetic microvascular complications. Underpinning these observations is undisputed evidence of C-peptide binding to a variety of cell types at physiologically relevant concentrations, and the downstream stimulation of multiple cell signaling pathways and gene transcription via the activation of numerous transcription factors. These pathways affect such fundamental cellular processes as re-absorptive and/or secretory phenotype, migration, growth, and survival. Whilst the receptor remains to be identified, experimental data points strongly to the existence of a specific G-protein-coupled receptor for C-peptide. Of the cell types studied so far, kidney tubular cells express the highest number of C-peptide binding sites. Accordingly, C-peptide exerts major effects on the function of these cells, and in the context of diabetic nephropathy appears to antagonise the pathophysiological effects of major disease mediators such as TGFbeta1 and TNFalpha. Therefore, based on its cellular activity profile C-peptide appears well positioned for development as a therapeutic tool to treat microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes. PMID:20039003

  20. Cyst formation following disruption of intracellular calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ivana Y.; DesRochers, Teresa M.; Kimmerling, Erica P.; Nguyen, Lily; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in polycystin 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2) cause the common genetic kidney disorder autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). It is unknown how these mutations result in renal cysts, but dysregulation of calcium (Ca2+) signaling is a known consequence of PC2 mutations. PC2 functions as a Ca2+-activated Ca2+ channel of the endoplasmic reticulum. We hypothesize that Ca2+ signaling through PC2, or other intracellular Ca2+ channels such as the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R), is necessary to maintain renal epithelial cell function and that disruption of the Ca2+ signaling leads to renal cyst development. The cell line LLC-PK1 has traditionally been used for studying PKD-causing mutations and Ca2+ signaling in 2D culture systems. We demonstrate that this cell line can be used in long-term (8 wk) 3D tissue culture systems. In 2D systems, knockdown of InsP3R results in decreased Ca2+ transient signals that are rescued by overexpression of PC2. In 3D systems, knockdown of either PC2 or InsP3R leads to cyst formation, but knockdown of InsP3R type 1 (InsP3R1) generated the largest cysts. InsP3R1 and InsP3R3 are differentially localized in both mouse and human kidney, suggesting that regional disruption of Ca2+ signaling contributes to cystogenesis. All cysts had intact cilia 2 wk after starting 3D culture, but the cells with InsP3R1 knockdown lost cilia as the cysts grew. Studies combining 2D and 3D cell culture systems will assist in understanding how mutations in PC2 that confer altered Ca2+ signaling lead to ADPKD cysts. PMID:25228769

  1. Evolution of the Calcium-Based Intracellular Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Marchadier, Elodie; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai; Donoghue, Philip C J; Hetherington, Alistair M; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    To progress our understanding of molecular evolution from a collection of well-studied genes toward the level of the cell, we must consider whole systems. Here, we reveal the evolution of an important intracellular signaling system. The calcium-signaling toolkit is made up of different multidomain proteins that have undergone duplication, recombination, sequence divergence, and selection. The picture of evolution, considering the repertoire of proteins in the toolkit of both extant organisms and ancestors, is radically different from that of other systems. In eukaryotes, the repertoire increased in both abundance and diversity at a far greater rate than general genomic expansion. We describe how calcium-based intracellular signaling evolution differs not only in rate but in nature, and how this correlates with the disparity of plants and animals. PMID:27358427

  2. Evolution of the Calcium-Based Intracellular Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Marchadier, Elodie; Oates, Matt E.; Fang, Hai; Donoghue, Philip C.J.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    To progress our understanding of molecular evolution from a collection of well-studied genes toward the level of the cell, we must consider whole systems. Here, we reveal the evolution of an important intracellular signaling system. The calcium-signaling toolkit is made up of different multidomain proteins that have undergone duplication, recombination, sequence divergence, and selection. The picture of evolution, considering the repertoire of proteins in the toolkit of both extant organisms and ancestors, is radically different from that of other systems. In eukaryotes, the repertoire increased in both abundance and diversity at a far greater rate than general genomic expansion. We describe how calcium-based intracellular signaling evolution differs not only in rate but in nature, and how this correlates with the disparity of plants and animals. PMID:27358427

  3. Analysis of Intracellular Calcium Signaling in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Péntek, Adrienn; Pászty, Katalin; Apáti, Ágota

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of changes in intracellular calcium concentration is one of the most common and useful tools for studying signal transduction pathways or cellular responses in basic research and drug screening purposes as well. Increasing number of such applications using human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives requires development of calcium signal measurements for this special cell type. Here we describe a modified protocol for analysis of calcium signaling events in human embryonic stem cells, which can be used for other pluripotent cell types (such as iPSC) or their differentiated offspring as well. PMID:24482125

  4. HIV-1 protein Tat produces biphasic changes in NMDA-evoked increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of Src kinase and nitric oxide signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Krogh, Kelly A; Wydeven, Nicole; Wickman, Kevin; Thayer, Stanley A.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) afflict about half of HIV-infected patients. HIV-infected cells shed viral proteins, such as the transactivator of transcription (Tat), which can cause neurotoxicity by over activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Here, we show that Tat causes a time-dependent, biphasic change in NMDA-evoked increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). NMDA-evoked responses were potentiated following 2 h exposure to Tat (50 ng/mL). Tat-induced potentiation of NMDA-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i peaked by 8 h and then adapted by gradually reversing to baseline by 24 h and eventually dropping below control by 48 h. Tat-induced potentiation of NMDA-evoked responses was blocked by inhibition of lipoprotein receptors (LRP) or Src tyrosine kinase. Potentiation was unaffected by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, NOS activity was required for adaptation. Adaptation was also prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Together, these findings indicate that Tat potentiates NMDA-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i via LRP-dependent activation of Src and that this potentiation adapts via activation of the NOS/sGC/PKG pathway. Adaptation may protect neurons from excessive Ca2+ influx and could reveal targets for the treatment of HAND. PMID:24666322

  5. Regulation of the Intracellular Localization of Foxo3a by Stress-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathways in Skeletal Muscle Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Stephan; Siffroi-Fernandez, Sandrine; Coldefy, Anne Sophie; Boulukos, Kim; Pisani, Didier F.; Dérijard, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Muscle atrophy is a debilitating process associated with many chronic wasting diseases, like cancer, diabetes, sepsis, and renal failure. Rapid loss of muscle mass occurs mainly through the activation of protein breakdown by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Foxo3a transcription factor is critical for muscle atrophy, since it activates the expression of ubiquitin ligase Atrogin-1. In several models of atrophy, inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway induces nuclear import of Foxo3a through an Akt-dependent process. This study aimed to identify signaling pathways involved in the control of Foxo3a nuclear translocation in muscle cells. We observed that after nuclear import of Foxo3a by PI3K/Akt pathway inhibition, activation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathways induced nuclear export of Foxo3a through CRM1. This mechanism involved the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway and was independent of Akt. Likewise, we showed that inhibition of p38 induced a massive nuclear relocalization of Foxo3a. Our results thus suggest that SAPKs are involved in the control of Foxo3a nucleocytoplasmic translocation in C2C12 cells. Moreover, activation of SAPKs decreases the expression of Atrogin-1, and stable C2C12 myotubes, in which the p38 pathway is constitutively activated, present partial protection against atrophy. PMID:19917721

  6. A Dual Wavelength Microfluorimeter for Measuring Fast Intracellular Calcium Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Perry M.; Besch, Stephen R.

    1995-06-01

    A dual excitation microfluorimeter is described for measuring rapidly changing, intracellular calcium signals. A spinning sector wheel is used in conjunction with a beam masking device to provide rapid, efficient switching between the 2 excitation wavelengths. Exposure intervals as short as 120 [mu]s can be achieved, yielding ratio samples at a rate of 6 kHz. Emission photons are collected using a photomultiplier tube operating in counting mode. When tested using FURA-2 as the calcium reporting dye, throughput noise in the system is demonstrated to be due to the statistical fluctuation inherent in photon counting. An example of the operation of the system, using a guinea pig cardiac myocyte, demonstrates that sufficient ratio data may be acquires to fully characterize the fastest components of the intracellular calcium signal.

  7. Application of atomic force microscopy for studying intracellular signalization in neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankudinov, A. V.; Khalisov, M. M.; Penniyainen, V. A.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2015-10-01

    The first attempt is made at applying the method of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for determining the molecular mechanisms of intracellular signalization with the participation of Na+, K+-ATPhase playing an important role of a signal transductor (amplifier). The AFM method combined with the organotypic cultivation makes it possible to obtain quantitative information on the Young moduli of living neurons and cells subjected to the action of very low concentrations of ouabain. This substance is known to trigger in this case the intracellular signalization processes by transferring a molecular signal to the genome of a cell. The cell response is manifested in a sharp intensification of protein synthesis accompanied by a rearrangement of the cytoskeleton and activation of enzyme signal pathways in a cytosol. AFM measurements of the images of the cell surface relief are performed using the PeakForce quantitative nanomechanical properties mapping PeakForce QNM mode. The Young moduli of control neurons and of sensory neurons under the action of ouabain are measured simultaneously. It is found that the activation of the signal-transducing function of Na+, K+-ATPhase triggers intracellular signal cascades, which increase the cell stiffness. The application of the AFM method in further studies of the mechanisms of intracellular molecular processes appears as promising. Its combination with inhibitory analysis will clarify the role of individual molecules (e.g., a number of ferments) in regulation of growth and development of living organisms.

  8. Connexin 43 hemichannels and intracellular signaling in bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2014-01-01

    Cell function and survival are controlled by intracellular signals, and modulated by surrounding cells and the extracellular environment. Connexin channels participate in these processes by mediating cell-to-cell communication. In bone cells, gap junction channels were detected in the early 1970s, and are present among bone resorbing osteoclasts, bone forming osteoblasts, and osteocytes - mature osteoblasts embedded in the mineralized matrix. These channels are composed mainly by Cx43, although the expression of other connexins (45, 46, and 37) has also been reported. It is now believed that undocked Cx43 hemichannels (connexons) formed in unopposed cell membranes facing the extracellular environment participate in the interaction of bone cells with the extracellular environment, and in their communication with neighboring cells. Thus, we and others demonstrated the presence of active hemichannels in osteoblastic and osteocytic cells. These hemichannels open in response to pharmacological and mechanical stimulation. In particular, preservation of the viability of osteoblasts and osteocytes by the anti-osteoporotic drugs bisphosphonates depends on Cx43 expression in vitro and in vivo, and is mediated by undocked hemichannels. Cx43 hemichannels are also required for the release of prostaglandins and ATP by osteocytes, and for cell survival induced by mechanical stimulation in vitro. Moreover, they are required for the anti-apoptotic effect of parathyroid hormone in osteoblastic cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the presence and function of undocked connexons, and the role of hemichannel regulation for the maintenance of bone cell viability and, potentially, bone health. PMID:24772090

  9. Intracellular autocrine VEGF signaling promotes EBDC cell proliferation, which can be inhibited by Apatinib.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sui; Zhang, Yanyan; Peng, Hong; Ke, Zunfu; Xu, Lixia; Su, Tianhong; Tsung, Allan; Tohme, Samer; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Qiuyang; Lencioni, Riccardo; Zeng, Zhirong; Peng, Baogang; Chen, Minhu; Kuang, Ming

    2016-04-10

    Tumor cells produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which can interact with membrane or cytoplasmic VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) to promote cell growth. We aimed to investigate the role of extracellular/intracellular autocrine VEGF signaling and Apatinib, a highly selective VEGFR2 inhibitor, in extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EBDC). We found conditioned medium or recombinant human VEGF treatment promoted EBDC cell proliferation through a phospholipase C-γ1-dependent pathway. This pro-proliferative effect was diminished by VEGF, VEGFR1 or VEGFR2 neutralizing antibodies, but more significantly suppressed by intracellular VEGFR inhibitor. The rhVEGF induced intracellular VEGF signaling by promoting nuclear accumulation of pVEGFR1/2 and enhancing VEGF promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression. Internal VEGFR2 inhibitor Apatinib significantly inhibited intracellular VEGF signaling, suppressed cell proliferation in vitro and delayed xenograft tumor growth in vivo, while anti-VEGF antibody Bevacizumab showed no effect. Clinically, overexpression of pVEGFR1 and pVEGFR2 was significantly correlated with poorer overall survival (P = .007 and P = .020, respectively). In conclusion, the intracellular autocrine VEGF loop plays a predominant role in VEGF-induced cell proliferation. Apatinib is an effective intracellular VEGF pathway blocker that presents a great therapeutic potential in EBDC. PMID:26805764

  10. Detection and Quantification of Intracellular Signaling Using FRET-Based Biosensors and High Content Imaging.

    PubMed

    Halls, Michelle L; Poole, Daniel P; Ellisdon, Andrew M; Nowell, Cameron J; Canals, Meritxell

    2015-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors represent invaluable tools to detect the spatiotemporal context of second messenger production and intracellular signaling that cannot be attained using traditional methods. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for the use of high content imaging in combination with FRET biosensors to assess second messenger production and intracellular signaling in a time-effective manner. We use four different FRET biosensors to measure cAMP levels, kinase (ERK and PKC), and GTPase activity. Importantly, we provide the protocols to express and measure these sensors in a variety of model cell lines and primary dorsal root ganglia neurons. PMID:26260599

  11. Fatty Acid Signaling: The New Function of Intracellular Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Papackova, Zuzana; Cahova, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, intracellular triacylglycerols (TAG) stored in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been considered to be only passive “energy conserves”. Nevertheless, degradation of TAG gives rise to a pleiotropic spectrum of bioactive intermediates, which may function as potent co-factors of transcription factors or enzymes and contribute to the regulation of numerous cellular processes. From this point of view, the process of lipolysis not only provides energy-rich equivalents but also acquires a new regulatory function. In this review, we will concentrate on the role that fatty acids liberated from intracellular TAG stores play as signaling molecules. The first part provides an overview of the transcription factors, which are regulated by fatty acids derived from intracellular stores. The second part is devoted to the role of fatty acid signaling in different organs/tissues. The specific contribution of free fatty acids released by particular lipases, hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose triacylglycerol lipase and lysosomal lipase will also be discussed. PMID:25674855

  12. Modeling intracellular signaling underlying striatal function in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anu G; Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Blackwell, Kim T; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren

    2014-01-01

    Striatum, which is the input nucleus of the basal ganglia, integrates cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs with dopaminergic afferents from the substantia nigra pars compacta. The combination of dopamine and glutamate strongly modulates molecular and cellular properties of striatal neurons and the strength of corticostriatal synapses. These actions are performed via intracellular signaling networks, containing several intertwined feedback loops. Understanding the role of dopamine and other neuromodulators requires the development of quantitative dynamical models for describing the intracellular signaling, in order to provide precise unambiguous descriptions and quantitative predictions. Building such models requires integration of data from multiple data sources containing information regarding the molecular interactions, the strength of these interactions, and the subcellular localization of the molecules. Due to the uncertainty, variability, and sparseness of these data, parameter estimation techniques are critical for inferring or constraining the unknown parameters, and sensitivity analysis evaluates which parameters are most critical for a given observed macroscopic behavior. Here, we briefly review the modeling approaches and tools that have been used to investigate biochemical signaling in the striatum, along with some of the models built around striatum. We also suggest a future direction for the development of such models from the, now becoming abundant, high-throughput data. PMID:24560149

  13. Modeling intracellular signaling underlying striatal function in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anu G; Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Blackwell, Kim T; Kotaleski, Jeanette H

    2014-01-01

    Striatum, which is the input nucleus of the basal ganglia, integrates cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs with dopaminergic afferents from the substantia nigra pars compacta. The combination of dopamine and glutamate strongly modulates molecular and cellular properties of striatal neurons and the strength of corticostriatal synapses. These actions are performed via intracellular signaling networks, containing several intertwined feedback loops. Understanding the role of dopamine and other neuromodulators requires the development of quantitative dynamical models for describing the intracellular signaling, in order to provide precise unambiguous descriptions and quantitative predictions. Building such models requires integration of data from multiple data sources containing information regarding the molecular interactions, the strength of these interactions, and the subcellular localization of the molecules. Due to the uncertainty, variability, and sparseness of these data, parameter estimation techniques are critical for inferring or constraining the unknown parameters, and sensitivity analysis evaluates which parameters are most critical for a given observed macroscopic behavior. Here, we briefly review the modeling approaches and tools that have been used to investigate biochemical signaling in the striatum, along with some of the models built around striatum. We also suggest a future direction for the development of such models from the, now becoming abundant, high-throughput data. PMID:24560149

  14. Kinetic insulation as an effective mechanism for achieving pathway specificity in intracellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Marcelo; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways that share common components often elicit distinct physiological responses. In most cases, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this signal specificity remain poorly understood. Protein scaffolds and cross-inhibition have been proposed as strategies to prevent unwanted cross-talk. Here, we report a mechanism for signal specificity termed “kinetic insulation.” In this approach signals are selectively transmitted through the appropriate pathway based on their temporal profile. In particular, we demonstrate how pathway architectures downstream of a common component can be designed to efficiently separate transient signals from signals that increase slowly over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that upstream signaling proteins can generate the appropriate input to the common pathway component regardless of the temporal profile of the external stimulus. Our results suggest that multilevel signaling cascades may have evolved to modulate the temporal profile of pathway activity so that stimulus information can be efficiently encoded and transmitted while ensuring signal specificity. PMID:17913886

  15. A mechanism of intracellular P2X receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venketesh; Fountain, Samuel J

    2012-08-17

    P2X receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-activated calcium-permeable ligand-gated ion channels traditionally viewed as sensors of extracellular ATP during diverse physiological processes including pain, inflammation, and taste. However, in addition to a cell surface residency P2XRs also populate the membranes of intracellular compartments, including mammalian lysosomes, phagosomes, and the contractile vacuole (CV) of the amoeba Dictyostelium. The function of intracellular P2XRs is unclear and represents a major gap in our understanding of ATP signaling. Here, we exploit the genetic versatility of Dictyostelium to investigate the effects of physiological concentrations of ATP on calcium signaling in isolated CVs. Within the CV, an acidic calcium store, P2XRs are orientated to sense luminal ATP. Application of ATP to isolated vacuoles leads to luminal translocation of ATP and release of calcium. Mechanisms of luminal ATP translocation and ATP-evoked calcium release share common pharmacology, suggesting that they are linked processes. The ability of ATP to mobilize stored calcium is reduced in vacuoles isolated from P2X(A)R knock-out amoeba and ablated in cells devoid of P2XRs. Pharmacological inhibition of luminal ATP translocation or depletion of CV calcium attenuates CV function in vivo, manifesting as a loss of regulatory cell volume decrease following osmotic swelling. We propose that intracellular P2XRs regulate vacuole activity by acting as calcium release channels, activated by translocation of ATP into the vacuole lumen. PMID:22736763

  16. Menstrual cycle and reproductive aging alters immune reactivity, NGF expression, antioxidant enzyme activities, and intracellular signaling pathways in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Hannah P; Sharma, Utsav; Gopinath, Srinivasan; Sharma, Varun; Hima, Lalgi; ThyagaRajan, Srinivasan

    2013-08-01

    Reproductive senescence in women is a process that begins with regular menstrual cycles and culminates in menopause followed by gradual development of diseases such as autoimmune diseases, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and hormone-dependent cancers. The age-associated impairment in the functions of neuroendocrine system and immune system results in menopause which contributes to subsequent development of diseases and cancer. The aim of this study is to characterize the alterations in immune responses, compensatory factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and antioxidant enzyme activities, and the molecular mechanisms of actions in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of young (follicular and luteal phases), middle-aged, and old healthy women. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from young women in follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (n=20; 22.6±2.9 yrs), middle-aged women (n=19; 47.1±3.8 yrs; perimenopausal) and old (n=16; 63.2±4.7 yrs; post-menopausal) women and analyzed for Concanavalin (Con A)-induced proliferation of lymphocytes and cytokine (IL-2 and IFN-γ) production, expression of NGF, p-NF-κB, p-ERK, p-CREB, and p-Akt, antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], extent of lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide (NO) production. Serum gonadal hormones (17β-estradiol and progesterone) were also measured. A characteristic age- and menstrual cycle-related change was observed in the serum gonadal hormone secretion (estrogen and progesterone), T lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production. Salient features include the age-related decline observed in target-derived growth factors (lymphocyte NGF expression), signaling molecules (p-ERK/ERK and p-CREB/CREB ratios) and compensatory factors such as the activities of plasma and PBMC antioxidant enzymes (SOD and catalase) and NO production. Further, an age-associated increase in p

  17. Structural Reconstruction of Protein-Protein Complexes Involved in Intracellular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Klára; Sok, Péter; Reményi, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Signaling complexes within the cell convert extracellular cues into physiological outcomes. Their assembly involves signaling enzymes, allosteric regulators and scaffold proteins that often contain long stretches of disordered protein regions, display multi-domain architectures, and binding affinity between individual components is low. These features are indispensable for their central roles as dynamic information processing hubs, on the other hand they also make reconstruction of structurally homogeneous complex samples highly challenging. In this present chapter we discuss protein machinery which influences extracellular signal reception, intracellular pathway activity, and cytoskeletal or transcriptional activity. PMID:27165334

  18. Intracellular Penetration and Activity of Gemifloxacin in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    García, Isabel; Pascual, Alvaro; Ballesta, Sofía; Joyanes, Providencia; Perea, Evelio J.

    2000-01-01

    The intracellular penetration and activity of gemifloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were evaluated. Gemifloxacin reached intracellular concentrations eight times higher than extracellular concentrations. The uptake was rapid, reversible, and nonsaturable and was affected by environmental temperature, cell viability, and membrane stimuli. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, gemifloxacin showed intracellular activity against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:11036051

  19. Redox Regulation of Intracellular Zinc: Molecular Signaling in the Life and Death of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aizenman, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Zn2+ has emerged as a major regulator of neuronal physiology, as well as an important signaling agent in neural injury. The intracellular concentration of this metal is tightly regulated through the actions of Zn2+ transporters and the thiol-rich metal binding protein metallothionein, closely linking the redox status of the cell to cellular availability of Zn2+. Accordingly, oxidative and nitrosative stress during ischemic injury leads to an accumulation of neuronal free Zn2+ and the activation of several downstream cell death processes. While this Zn2+ rise is an established signaling event in neuronal cell death, recent evidence suggests that a transient, sublethal accumulation of free Zn2+ can also play a critical role in neuroprotective pathways activated during ischemic preconditioning. Thus, redox-sensitive proteins, like metallothioneins, may play a critical role in determining neuronal cell fate by regulating the localization and concentration of intracellular free Zn2+. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2249–2263. PMID:20849376

  20. Acoustic tweezers for studying intracellular calcium signaling in SKBR-3 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Yoon, Chi Woo; Lim, Hae Gyun; Park, Jin Man; Yoon, Sangpil; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin (FNT) play crucial roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. For better understanding of these associated cellular activities, various microscopic manipulation tools have been used to study their intracellular signaling pathways. Recently, it has appeared that acoustic tweezers may possess similar capabilities in the study. Therefore, we here demonstrate that our newly developed acoustic tweezers with a high-frequency lithium niobate ultrasonic transducer have potentials to study intracellular calcium signaling by FNT-binding to human breast cancer cells (SKBR-3). It is found that intracellular calcium elevations in SKBR-3 cells, initially occurring on the microbead-contacted spot and then eventually spreading over the entire cell, are elicited by attaching an acoustically trapped FNT-coated microbead. Interestingly, they are suppressed by either extracellular calcium elimination or phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. Hence, this suggests that our acoustic tweezers may serve as an alternative tool in the study of intracellular signaling by FNT-binding activities. PMID:26150401

  1. Functional inhibition of β-catenin-mediatedWnt signaling by intracellular VHHantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Newnham, Laura E; Wright, Michael J; Holdsworth, Gill; Kostarelos, Kostas; Robinson, Martyn K; Rabbitts, Terence H; Lawson, Alastair D

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is of central importance in embryogenesis, development and adult tissue homeostasis, and dysregulation of this pathway is associated with cancer and other diseases. Despite the developmental and potential therapeutic significance of this pathway, many aspects of Wnt signaling, including the control of the master transcriptional co-activator β-catenin, remain poorly understood. In order to explore this aspect, a diverse immune llama VHH phagemid library was constructed and panned against β-catenin. VHH antibody fragments from the library were expressed intracellularly, and a number of antibodies were shown to possess function-modifying intracellular activity in a luciferase-based Wnt signaling HEK293 reporter bioassay. Further characterization of one such VHH (named LL3) confirmed that it bound endogenous β-catenin, and that it inhibited the Wnt signaling pathway downstream of the destruction complex, while production of a control Ala-substituted complementarity-determining region (CDR)3 mutant demonstrated that the inhibition of β-catenin activity by the parent intracellular antibody was dependent on the specific CDR sequence of the antibody. PMID:25524068

  2. Light generation of intracellular Ca2+ signals by a genetically encoded protein BACCS

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Sato, Koji; Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Miura, Shigenori; Touhara, Kazushige; Takeuchi, Shoji; Nakata, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ signals are highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner in numerous cellular physiological events. Here we report a genetically engineered blue light-activated Ca2+ channel switch (BACCS), as an optogenetic tool for generating Ca2+ signals. BACCS opens Ca2+-selective ORAI ion channels in response to light. A BACCS variant, dmBACCS2, combined with Drosophila Orai, elevates the Ca2+ concentration more rapidly, such that Ca2+ elevation in mammalian cells is observed within 1 s on light exposure. Using BACCSs, we successfully control cellular events including NFAT-mediated gene expression. In the mouse olfactory system, BACCS mediates light-dependent electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, we generate BACCS mutants, which exhibit fast and slow recovery of intracellular Ca2+. Thus, BACCSs are a useful optogenetic tool for generating temporally various intracellular Ca2+ signals with a large dynamic range, and will be applicable to both in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:26282514

  3. Plasmodesmata dynamics are coordinated by intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brunkard, Jacob O.; Runkel, Anne M.; Zambryski, Patricia C.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane-lined channels called plasmodesmata (PD) connect the cytoplasts of adjacent plant cells across the cell wall, permitting intercellular movement of small molecules, proteins, and RNA. Recent genetic screens for mutants with altered PD transport identified genes suggesting that chloroplasts play crucial roles in coordinating PD transport. Complementing this discovery, studies manipulating expression of PD-localized proteins imply that changes in PD transport strongly impact chloroplast biology. Ongoing efforts to find genes that control root and stomatal development reveal the critical role of PD in enforcing tissue patterning, and newly discovered PD-localized proteins show that PD influence development, intracellular signaling, and defense against pathogens. Together, these studies demonstrate that PD function and formation are tightly integrated with plant physiology. PMID:23978390

  4. Intracellular sensing of complement C3 activates cell autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    Tam, Jerry C H; Bidgood, Susanna R; McEwan, William A; James, Leo C

    2014-09-01

    Pathogens traverse multiple barriers during infection, including cell membranes. We found that during this transition, pathogens carried covalently attached complement C3 into the cell, triggering immediate signaling and effector responses. Sensing of C3 in the cytosol activated mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS)-dependent signaling cascades and induced proinflammatory cytokine secretion. C3 also flagged viruses for rapid proteasomal degradation, preventing their replication. This system could detect both viral and bacterial pathogens but was antagonized by enteroviruses, such as rhinovirus and poliovirus, which cleave C3 using their 3C protease. The antiviral rupintrivir inhibited 3C protease and prevented C3 cleavage, rendering enteroviruses susceptible to intracellular complement sensing. Thus, complement C3 allows cells to detect and disable pathogens that have invaded the cytosol. PMID:25190799

  5. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, Anton V.; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  6. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models. PMID:26764724

  7. A physiologic signaling role for the γ-secretase-derived intracellular fragment of APP

    PubMed Central

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Murphy, M. Paul; Mead, Tonya R.; Akbari, Yama; Sugarman, Michael C.; Jannatipour, Mehrdad; Anliker, Brigitte; Müller, Ulrike; Saftig, Paul; De Strooper, Bart; Wolfe, Michael S.; Golde, Todd E.; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2002-01-01

    Presenilins mediate an unusual intramembranous proteolytic activity known as γ-secretase, two substrates of which are the Notch receptor (Notch) and the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). γ-Secretase-mediated cleavage of APP, like that of Notch, yields an intracellular fragment [APP intracellular domain (AICD)] that forms a transcriptively active complex. We now demonstrate a functional role for AICD in regulating phosphoinositide-mediated calcium signaling. Genetic ablation of the presenilins or pharmacological inhibition of γ-secretase activity (and thereby AICD production) attenuated calcium signaling in a dose-dependent and reversible manner through a mechanism involving the modulation of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Cells lacking APP (and hence AICD) exhibited similar calcium signaling deficits, and—notably—these disturbances could be reversed by transfection with APP constructs containing an intact AICD, but not by constructs lacking this domain. Our findings indicate that the AICD regulates phosphoinositide-mediated calcium signaling through a γ-secretase-dependent signaling pathway, suggesting that the intramembranous proteolysis of APP may play a signaling role analogous to that of Notch. PMID:11917117

  8. Gαi3-Dependent Inhibition of JNK Activity on Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, Guillaume; Yang, Jin Ye; Heximer, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-protein signaling has been shown to modulate a wide variety of intracellular signaling pathways, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. The activity of one MAPK family class, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), has been traditionally linked to the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the plasma membrane. Using a unique set of G-protein signaling tools developed in our laboratory, we show that subcellular domain-specific JNK activity is inhibited by the activation of Gαi3, the Gαi isoform found predominantly within intracellular membranes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–Golgi interface, and their associated vesicle pools. Regulators of intracellular Gαi3, including activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3) and the regulator of G-protein signaling protein 4 (RGS4), have a marked impact on the regulation of JNK activity. Together, these data support the existence of unique intracellular signaling complexes that control JNK activity deep within the cell. This work highlights some of the cellular pathways that are regulated by these intracellular complexes and identifies potential strategies for their regulation in mammalian cells. PMID:26389115

  9. Altered mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, tau hyperphosphorylation and mild spatial learning dysfunction in transgenic rats expressing the beta-amyloid peptide intracellularly in hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, V; Ducatenzeiler, A; Dowd, E; Jänne, J; Grant, S M; Szyf, M; Wandosell, F; Avila, J; Grimm, H; Dunnett, S B; Hartmann, T; Alhonen, L; Cuello, A C

    2004-01-01

    The pathological significance of intracellular Abeta accumulation in vivo is not yet fully understood. To address this, we have studied transgenic rats expressing Alzheimer's-related transgenes that accumulate Abeta intraneuronally in the cerebral and hippocampal cortices but do not develop extracellular amyloid plaques. In these rats, the presence of intraneuronal Abeta is sufficient to provoke up-regulation of the phosphorylated form of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 2 and its enzymatic activity in the hippocampus while no changes were observed in the activity or phosphorylation status of other putative tau kinases such as p38, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and cycline-dependent kinase 5. The increase in active phospho-ERK2 was accompanied by increased levels of tau phosphorylation at S396 and S404 ERK2 sites and a decrease in the phosphorylation of the CREB kinase p90RSK. In a water maze paradigm, male transgenic rats displayed a mild spatial learning deficit relative to control littermates. Our results suggest that in the absence of plaques, intraneuronal accumulation of Abeta peptide correlates with the initial steps in the tau-phosphorylation cascade, alterations in ERK2 signaling and impairment of higher CNS functions in male rats. PMID:15541880

  10. Intracellular sensing of complement C3 activates cell autonomous immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jerry C.H.; Bidgood, Susanna R.; McEwan, William A.; James, Leo C.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens traverse multiple barriers during infection including cell membranes. Here we show that during this transition pathogens carry covalently attached complement C3 into the cell, triggering immediate signalling and effector responses. Sensing of C3 in the cytosol activates MAVS-dependent signalling cascades and induces proinflammatory cytokine secretion. C3 also flags viruses for rapid proteasomal degradation, thereby preventing their replication. This system can detect both viral and bacterial pathogens but is antagonized by enteroviruses, such as rhinovirus and poliovirus, which cleave C3 using their 3C protease. The antiviral Rupintrivir inhibits 3C protease and prevents C3 cleavage, rendering enteroviruses susceptible to intracellular complement sensing. Thus, complement C3 allows cells to detect and disable pathogens that have invaded the cytosol. PMID:25190799

  11. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Picas, Laura; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Goud, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:27092250

  12. Intracellular sensing of microbes and danger signals by the inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabor L; Schrum, Jacob E; De Nardo, Christine M; Latz, Eicke

    2011-09-01

    The cells of the innate immune system mobilize a coordinated immune response towards invading microbes and after disturbances in tissue homeostasis. These immune responses typically lead to infection control and tissue repair. Exaggerated or uncontrolled immune responses, however, can also induce acute of chronic inflammatory pathologies that are characteristic for many common diseases such as sepsis, arthritis, atherosclerosis, or Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, the concerted efforts of many scientists have uncovered numerous mechanisms by which immune cells detect foreign or changed self-substances that appear in infections or during tissue damage. These substances stimulate signaling receptors, which leads to cellular activation and the induction of effector mechanisms. Here, we review the role of inflammasomes, a family of signaling molecules that form multi-molecular signaling platforms and activate inflammatory caspases and interleukin-1β cytokines. PMID:21884172

  13. Intracellular sensing of microbes and danger signals by the inflammasomes

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Gabor L.; Schrum, Jacob E.; De Nardo, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The cells of the innate immune system mobilize a coordinated immune response towards invading microbes and after disturbances in tissue homeostasis. These immune responses typically lead to infection control and tissue repair. Exaggerated or uncontrolled immune responses, however, can also induce acute of chronic inflammatory pathologies that are characteristic for many common diseases such as sepsis, arthritis, atherosclerosis or Alzheimer’s disease. In recent years the concerted efforts of many scientists have uncovered numerous mechanisms by which immune cells detect foreign or changed self-substances that appear in infections or during tissue damage. These substances stimulate signaling receptors, which leads to cellular activation and the induction of effector mechanisms. Here, we review the role of inflammasomes, a family of signaling molecules that form multi-molecular signaling platforms and activate inflammatory caspases and IL-1β cytokines. PMID:21884172

  14. Mitochondrial transporters as novel targets for intracellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Satrústegui, Jorgina; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli

    2007-01-01

    Ca(2+) signaling in mitochondria is important to tune mitochondrial function to a variety of extracellular stimuli. The main mechanism is Ca(2+) entry in mitochondria via the Ca(2+) uniporter followed by Ca(2+) activation of three dehydrogenases in the mitochondrial matrix. This results in increases in mitochondrial NADH/NAD ratios and ATP levels and increased substrate uptake by mitochondria. We review evidence gathered more than 20 years ago and recent work indicating that substrate uptake, mitochondrial NADH/NAD ratios, and ATP levels may be also activated in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) signals via a mechanism that does not require the entry of Ca(2+) in mitochondria, a mechanism depending on the activity of Ca(2+)-dependent mitochondrial carriers (CaMC). CaMCs fall into two groups, the aspartate-glutamate carriers (AGC) and the ATP-Mg/P(i) carriers, also named SCaMC (for short CaMC). The two mammalian AGCs, aralar and citrin, are members of the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle, and citrin, the liver AGC, is also a member of the urea cycle. Both types of CaMCs are activated by Ca(2+) in the intermembrane space and function together with the Ca(2+) uniporter in decoding the Ca(2+) signal into a mitochondrial response. PMID:17237342

  15. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Shiby M.; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  16. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Shiby M; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  17. [Low-dose radiation effects and intracellular signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-10-01

    Accumulated evidence has shown that exposure to low-dose radiation, especially doses less than 0.1 Gy, induces observable effects on mammalian cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not yet been clarified. Recently, it has been shown that low-dose radiation stimulates growth factor receptor, which results in a sequential activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In addition to the activation of the membrane-bound pathways, it is becoming evident that nuclear pathways are also activated by low-dose radiation. Ionizing radiation has detrimental effects on chromatin structure, since radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks result in discontinuity of nucleosomes. Recently, it has been shown that ATM protein, the product of the ATM gene mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia, recognizes alteration in the chromatin structure, and it is activated through intermolecular autophosphorylation at serine 1981. Using antibodies against phosphorylated ATM, we found that the activated and phosphorylated ATM protein is detected as discrete foci in the nucleus between doses of 10 mGy and 1 Gy. Interestingly, the size of the foci induced by low-dose radiation was equivalent to the foci induced by high-dose radiation. These results indicate that the initial signal is amplified through foci growth, and cells evolve a system by which they can respond to a small number of DNA double-strand breaks. From these results, it can be concluded that low-dose radiation is sensed both in the membrane and in the nucleus, and activation of multiple signal transduction pathways could be involved in manifestations of low-dose effects. PMID:17016017

  18. Vertical nanowire probes for intracellular signaling of living cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The single living cell action potential was measured in an intracellular mode by using a vertical nanoelectrode. For intracellular interfacing, Si nanowires were vertically grown in a controlled manner, and optimum conditions, such as diameter, length, and nanowire density, were determined by culturing cells on the nanowires. Vertical nanowire probes were then fabricated with a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process including sequential deposition of the passivation and electrode layers on the nanowires, and a subsequent partial etching process. The fabricated nanowire probes had an approximately 60-nm diameter and were intracellular. These probes interfaced with a GH3 cell and measured the spontaneous action potential. It successfully measured the action potential, which rapidly reached a steady state with average peak amplitude of approximately 10 mV, duration of approximately 140 ms, and period of 0.9 Hz. PMID:24484729

  19. Vertical nanowire probes for intracellular signaling of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Ilsoo; Kim, So-Eun; Jeong, Du-Won; Kim, Ju-Jin; Rhim, Hyewhon; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Park, Seung-Han; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-02-01

    The single living cell action potential was measured in an intracellular mode by using a vertical nanoelectrode. For intracellular interfacing, Si nanowires were vertically grown in a controlled manner, and optimum conditions, such as diameter, length, and nanowire density, were determined by culturing cells on the nanowires. Vertical nanowire probes were then fabricated with a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process including sequential deposition of the passivation and electrode layers on the nanowires, and a subsequent partial etching process. The fabricated nanowire probes had an approximately 60-nm diameter and were intracellular. These probes interfaced with a GH3 cell and measured the spontaneous action potential. It successfully measured the action potential, which rapidly reached a steady state with average peak amplitude of approximately 10 mV, duration of approximately 140 ms, and period of 0.9 Hz.

  20. Intracellular Signaling Pathways Involved in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Layton Tovar, Cristian Fabián; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of immature lymphoid cells. ALL is the most common hematologic malignancy in early childhood, and it reaches peak incidence between the ages of 2 and 3 years. The prognosis of ALL is associated with aberrant gene expression, in addition to the presence of numerical or structural chromosomal alterations, age, race, and immunophenotype. The Relapse rate with regard to pharmacological treatment rises in childhood; thus, the expression of biomarkers associated with the activation of cell signaling pathways is crucial to establish the disease prognosis. Intracellular pathways involved in ALL are diverse, including Janus kinase/Signal transducers and transcription activators (JAK-STAT), Phosphoinositide-3-kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT), Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras-MAPK), Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), Nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-κB), and Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α), among others. In this review, we present several therapeutic targets, intracellular pathways, and molecular markers that are being studied extensively at present. PMID:27065575

  1. An active matter analysis of intracellular Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Tens of thousands of fluorescence-based trajectories at nm resolution have been analyzed, regarding active transport along microtubules in living cells. The following picture emerges. Directed motion to pre-determined locations is certainly an attractive idea, but cannot be pre-programmed as to do so would sacrifice adaptability. The polarity of microtubules is inadequate to identify these directions in cells, and no other mechanism is currently known. We conclude that molecular motors carry cargo through disordered intracellular microtubule networks in a statistical way, with loud cellular ``noise'' both in directionality and speed. Programmed random walks describe how local 1D active transport traverses crowded cellular space efficiently, rapidly, minimizing the energy waste that would result from redundant activity. The mechanism of statistical regulation is not yet understood, however.

  2. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. PMID:27208308

  3. ATP-Evoked Intracellular Ca(2+) Signaling of Different Supporting Cells in the Hearing Mouse Hemicochlea.

    PubMed

    Horváth, T; Polony, G; Fekete, Á; Aller, M; Halmos, G; Lendvai, B; Heinrich, A; Sperlágh, B; Vizi, E S; Zelles, T

    2016-02-01

    Hearing and its protection is regulated by ATP-evoked Ca(2+) signaling in the supporting cells of the organ of Corti, however, the unique anatomy of the cochlea hampers observing these mechanisms. For the first time, we have performed functional ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging (fura-2) in three different supporting cell types in the hemicochlea preparation of hearing mice to measure purinergic receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in pillar, Deiters' and Hensen's cells. Their resting [Ca(2+)]i was determined and compared in the same type of preparation. ATP evoked reversible, repeatable and dose-dependent Ca(2+) transients in all three cell types, showing desensitization. Inhibiting the Ca(2+) signaling of the ionotropic P2X (omission of extracellular Ca(2+)) and metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors (depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores) revealed the involvement of both receptor types. Detection of P2X2,3,4,6,7 and P2Y1,2,6,12,14 receptor mRNAs by RT-PCR supported this finding and antagonism by PPADS suggested different functional purinergic receptor population in pillar versus Deiters' and Hensen's cells. The sum of the extra- and intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent components of the response was about equal with the control ATP response (linear additivity) in pillar cells, and showed supralinearity in Deiters' and Hensen's cells. Calcium-induced calcium release might explain this synergistic interaction. The more pronounced Ca(2+) leak from the endoplasmic reticulum in Deiters' and Hensen's cells, unmasked by cyclopiazonic acid, may also suggests the higher activity of the internal stores in Ca(2+) signaling in these cells. Differences in Ca(2+) homeostasis and ATP-induced Ca(2+) signaling might reflect the distinct roles these cells play in cochlear function and pathophysiology. PMID:26801171

  4. Intracellular RIG-I Signaling Regulates TLR4-Independent Endothelial Inflammatory Responses to Endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Moser, Jill; Heeringa, Peter; Jongman, Rianne M; Zwiers, Peter J; Niemarkt, Anita E; Yan, Rui; de Graaf, Inge A; Li, Ranran; Ravasz Regan, Erzsébet; Kümpers, Philipp; Aird, William C; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Zijlstra, Jan G; Molema, Grietje; van Meurs, Matijs

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infections associated with organ failure that is the most frequent cause of death in hospitalized patients. Exaggerated endothelial activation, altered blood flow, vascular leakage, and other disturbances synergistically contribute to sepsis-induced organ failure. The underlying signaling events associated with endothelial proinflammatory activation are not well understood, yet they likely consist of molecular pathways that act in an endothelium-specific manner. We found that LPS, a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis, is internalized by endothelial cells, leading to intracellular signaling without the need for priming as found recently in immune cells. By identifying a novel role for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) as a central regulator of endothelial activation functioning independent of TLR4, we provide evidence that the current paradigm of TLR4 solely being responsible for LPS-mediated endothelial responses is incomplete. RIG-I, as well as the adaptor protein mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein, regulates NF-κB-mediated induction of adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to LPS. Our findings provide essential new insights into the proinflammatory signaling pathways in endothelial cells and suggest that combined endothelial-specific inhibition of RIG-I and TLR4 will provide protection from aberrant endothelial responses associated with sepsis. PMID:27183587

  5. Regulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling by Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Patrick; Schooler, Kevin; Wiley, H S.

    2001-06-01

    Ligand activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) leads to its rapid internalization and eventual delivery to lysosomes. This process is thought to be a mechanism to attenuate signaling, but signals could potentially be generated following endocytosis. To directly evaluate EGFR signaling during receptor trafficking, we developed a technique to rapidly and selectively isolate internalized EGFR and associated molecules using reversibly-biotinylated anti-EGFR antibodies. In addition, we developed antibodies specific to tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR. Using a combination of fluorescence imaging and affinity precipitation approaches, we evaluated the state of EGFR activation and substrate association during trafficking in epithelial cells. We found that following internalization, EGFR remained active in the early endosomes. However, receptors were inactivated prior to degradation, apparently due to ligand removal from endosomes. Adapter molecules, such as Shc, were associated with EGFR both at the cell surface and within endosomes. Some molecules, such as Grb2, were primarily found associated with surface EGFR, while others, such as Eps8, were only found with intracellular receptors. During the inactivation phase, c-Cbl became EGFR-associated, consistent with its postulated role in receptor attenuation. We conclude that the association of the EGFR with different proteins is compartment-specific . In addition, ligand loss is the proximal cause of EGFR inactivation. Thus, regulated trafficking could potentially influence the pattern as well as the duration of signal transduction.

  6. Roles of Intracellular Cyclic AMP Signal Transduction in the Capacitation and Subsequent Hyperactivation of Mouse and Boar Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    HARAYAMA, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is not until accomplishment of a variety of molecular changes during the transit through the female reproductive tract that mammalian spermatozoa are capable of exhibiting highly activated motility with asymmetric whiplash beating of the flagella (hyperactivation) and undergoing acrosomal exocytosis in the head (acrosome reaction). These molecular changes of the spermatozoa are collectively termed capacitation and promoted by bicarbonate, calcium and cholesterol acceptors. Such capacitation-promoting factors can stimulate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal transduction in the spermatozoa. Meanwhile, hyperactivation and the acrosome reaction are essential to sperm fertilization with oocytes and are apparently triggered by a sufficient increase of intracellular Ca2+ in the sperm flagellum and head, respectively. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the relationship between cAMP signal transduction and calcium signaling cascades in the spermatozoa for the purpose of understanding the molecular basis of capacitation. In this review, I cover updated insights regarding intracellular cAMP signal transduction, the acrosome reaction and flagellar motility in mammalian spermatozoa and then account for possible roles of intracellular cAMP signal transduction in the capacitation and subsequent hyperactivation of mouse and boar spermatozoa. PMID:24162806

  7. Spatiotemporal Intracellular Nitric Oxide Signaling Captured Using Internalized, Near-Infrared Fluorescent Carbon Nanotube Nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent nanosensor probes have suffered from limited molecular recognition and a dearth of strategies for spatial-temporal operation in cell culture. In this work, we spatially imaged the dynamics of nitric oxide (NO) signaling, important in numerous pathologies and physiological functions, using intracellular near-infrared fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes. The observed spatial-temporal NO signaling gradients clarify and refine the existing paradigm of NO signaling based on averaged local concentrations. This work enables the study of transient intracellular phenomena associated with signaling and therapeutics. PMID:25029087

  8. Inhibitors of Intracellular Signaling Pathways that Lead to Stimulated Epidermal Pigmentation: Perspective of Anti-Pigmenting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Imokawa, Genji; Ishida, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Few anti-pigmenting agents have been designed and developed according to their known hyperpigmentation mechanisms and corresponding intracellular signaling cascades. Most anti-pigmenting agents developed so far are mechanistically involved in the interruption of constitutional melanogenic mechanisms by which skin color is maintained at a normal and unstimulated level. Thus, owing to the difficulty of confining topical application to a specific hyperpigmented skin area, potent anti-pigmenting agents capable of attenuating the natural unstimulated pigmentation process have the risk of leading to hypopigmentation. Since intracellular signaling pathways within melanocytes do not function substantially in maintaining normal skin color and are activated only by environmental stimuli such as UV radiation, specifically down-regulating the activation of melanogenesis to the constitutive level would be an appropriate strategy to develop new potent anti-pigmenting agents with a low risk of hypopigmentation. In this article, we review the hyperpigmentation mechanisms and intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the stimulation of melanogenesis. We also discuss a screening and evaluation system to select candidates for new anti-melanogenic substances by focusing on inhibitors of endothelin-1 or stem cell factor-triggered intracellular signaling cascades. From this viewpoint, we show that extracts of the herbs Withania somnifera and Melia toosendan and the natural chemicals Withaferin A and Astaxanthin are new candidates for potent anti-pigmenting substances that avoid the risk of hypopigmentation. PMID:24823877

  9. Inhibitors of intracellular signaling pathways that lead to stimulated epidermal pigmentation: perspective of anti-pigmenting agents.

    PubMed

    Imokawa, Genji; Ishida, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Few anti-pigmenting agents have been designed and developed according to their known hyperpigmentation mechanisms and corresponding intracellular signaling cascades. Most anti-pigmenting agents developed so far are mechanistically involved in the interruption of constitutional melanogenic mechanisms by which skin color is maintained at a normal and unstimulated level. Thus, owing to the difficulty of confining topical application to a specific hyperpigmented skin area, potent anti-pigmenting agents capable of attenuating the natural unstimulated pigmentation process have the risk of leading to hypopigmentation. Since intracellular signaling pathways within melanocytes do not function substantially in maintaining normal skin color and are activated only by environmental stimuli such as UV radiation, specifically down-regulating the activation of melanogenesis to the constitutive level would be an appropriate strategy to develop new potent anti-pigmenting agents with a low risk of hypopigmentation. In this article, we review the hyperpigmentation mechanisms and intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the stimulation of melanogenesis. We also discuss a screening and evaluation system to select candidates for new anti-melanogenic substances by focusing on inhibitors of endothelin-1 or stem cell factor-triggered intracellular signaling cascades. From this viewpoint, we show that extracts of the herbs Withania somnifera and Melia toosendan and the natural chemicals Withaferin A and Astaxanthin are new candidates for potent anti-pigmenting substances that avoid the risk of hypopigmentation. PMID:24823877

  10. Intracellular calcium signals display an avalanche-like behavior over multiple lengthscales

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Lucía; Piegari, Estefanía; Sigaut, Lorena; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2012-01-01

    Many natural phenomena display “self-organized criticality” (SOC), (Bak et al., 1987). This refers to spatially extended systems for which patterns of activity characterized by different lengthscales can occur with a probability density that follows a power law with pattern size. Differently from power laws at phase transitions, systems displaying SOC do not need the tuning of an external parameter. Here we analyze intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signals, a key component of the signaling toolkit of almost any cell type. Ca2+ signals can either be spatially restricted (local) or propagate throughout the cell (global). Different models have suggested that the transition from local to global signals is similar to that of directed percolation. Directed percolation has been associated, in turn, to the appearance of SOC. In this paper we discuss these issues within the framework of simple models of Ca2+ signal propagation. We also analyze the size distribution of local signals (“puffs”) observed in immature Xenopus Laevis oocytes. The puff amplitude distribution obtained from observed local signals is not Gaussian with a noticeable fraction of large size events. The experimental distribution of puff areas in the spatio-temporal record of the image has a long tail that is approximately log-normal. The distribution can also be fitted with a power law relationship albeit with a smaller goodness of fit. The power law behavior is encountered within a simple model that includes some coupling among individual signals for a wide range of parameter values. An analysis of the model shows that a global elevation of the Ca2+ concentration plays a major role in determining whether the puff size distribution is long-tailed or not. This suggests that Ca2+-clearing from the cytosol is key to determine whether IP3-mediated Ca2+ signals can display a SOC-like behavior or not. PMID:22969730

  11. Intracellular calcium signals display an avalanche-like behavior over multiple lengthscales.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Lucía; Piegari, Estefanía; Sigaut, Lorena; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2012-01-01

    Many natural phenomena display "self-organized criticality" (SOC), (Bak et al., 1987). This refers to spatially extended systems for which patterns of activity characterized by different lengthscales can occur with a probability density that follows a power law with pattern size. Differently from power laws at phase transitions, systems displaying SOC do not need the tuning of an external parameter. Here we analyze intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) signals, a key component of the signaling toolkit of almost any cell type. Ca(2+) signals can either be spatially restricted (local) or propagate throughout the cell (global). Different models have suggested that the transition from local to global signals is similar to that of directed percolation. Directed percolation has been associated, in turn, to the appearance of SOC. In this paper we discuss these issues within the framework of simple models of Ca(2+) signal propagation. We also analyze the size distribution of local signals ("puffs") observed in immature Xenopus Laevis oocytes. The puff amplitude distribution obtained from observed local signals is not Gaussian with a noticeable fraction of large size events. The experimental distribution of puff areas in the spatio-temporal record of the image has a long tail that is approximately log-normal. The distribution can also be fitted with a power law relationship albeit with a smaller goodness of fit. The power law behavior is encountered within a simple model that includes some coupling among individual signals for a wide range of parameter values. An analysis of the model shows that a global elevation of the Ca(2+) concentration plays a major role in determining whether the puff size distribution is long-tailed or not. This suggests that Ca(2+)-clearing from the cytosol is key to determine whether IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signals can display a SOC-like behavior or not. PMID:22969730

  12. Spatiotemporal properties of intracellular calcium signaling in osteocytic and osteoblastic cell networks under fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Lu, X Lucas; Luo, Erping; Sajda, Paul; Leong, Pui L; Guo, X Edward

    2013-04-01

    Mechanical stimuli can trigger intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) responses in osteocytes and osteoblasts. Successful construction of bone cell networks necessitates more elaborate and systematic analysis for the spatiotemporal properties of Ca(2+) signaling in the networks. In the present study, an unsupervised algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) was employed to extract the Ca(2+) signals of bone cells in the network. We demonstrated that the ICA-based technology could yield higher signal fidelity than the manual region of interest (ROI) method. Second, the spatiotemporal properties of Ca(2+) signaling in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 and osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell networks under laminar and steady fluid flow stimulation were systematically analyzed and compared. MLO-Y4 cells exhibited much more active Ca(2+) transients than MC3T3-E1 cells, evidenced by more Ca(2+) peaks, less time to the 1st peak and less time between the 1st and 2nd peaks. With respect to temporal properties, MLO-Y4 cells demonstrated higher spike rate and Ca(2+) oscillating frequency. The spatial intercellular synchronous activities of Ca(2+) signaling in MLO-Y4 cell networks were higher than those in MC3T3-E1 cell networks and also negatively correlated with the intercellular distance, revealing faster Ca(2+) wave propagation in MLO-Y4 cell networks. Our findings show that the unsupervised ICA-based technique results in more sensitive and quantitative signal extraction than traditional ROI analysis, with the potential to be widely employed in Ca(2+) signaling extraction in the cell networks. The present study also revealed a dramatic spatiotemporal difference in Ca(2+) signaling for osteocytic and osteoblastic cell networks in processing the mechanical stimulus. The higher intracellular Ca(2+) oscillatory behaviors and intercellular coordination of MLO-Y4 cells provided further evidences that osteocytes may behave as the major mechanical sensor in bone modeling and remodeling

  13. ER functions of oncogenes and tumor suppressors: Modulators of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

    PubMed

    Bittremieux, Mart; Parys, Jan B; Pinton, Paolo; Bultynck, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signals that arise from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the major intracellular Ca(2+)-storage organelle, impact several mitochondrial functions and dictate cell survival and cell death processes. Furthermore, alterations in Ca(2+) signaling in cancer cells promote survival and establish a high tolerance towards cell stress and damage, so that the on-going oncogenic stress does not result in the activation of cell death. Over the last years, the mechanisms underlying these oncogenic alterations in Ca(2+) signaling have started to emerge. An important aspect of this is the identification of several major oncogenes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Mcl-1, PKB/Akt, and Ras, and tumor suppressors, such as p53, PTEN, PML, BRCA1, and Beclin 1, as direct and critical regulators of Ca(2+)-transport systems located at the ER membranes, including IP3 receptors and SERCA Ca(2+) pumps. In this way, these proteins execute part of their function by controlling the ER-mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes, favoring either survival (oncogenes) or cell death (tumor suppressors). Oncogenic mutations, gene deletions or amplifications alter the expression and/or function of these proteins, thereby changing the delicate balance between oncogenes and tumor suppressors, impacting oncogenesis and favoring malignant cell function and behavior. In this review, we provided an integrated overview of the impact of the major oncogenes and tumor suppressors, often altered in cancer cells, on Ca(2+) signaling from the ER Ca(2+) stores. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26772784

  14. Multiple Model-Informed Open-Loop Control of Uncertain Intracellular Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Jeffrey P.; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Rundell, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  15. Multiple model-informed open-loop control of uncertain intracellular signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Perley, Jeffrey P; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2014-04-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  16. Enteric bacteria and osmotic stress: intracellular potassium glutamate as a secondary signal of osmotic stress?

    PubMed

    Booth, I R; Higgins, C F

    1990-06-01

    Enteric bacteria have evolved an impressive array of mechanisms that allow the cell to grow at widely different external osmotic pressures. These serve two linked functions; firstly, they allow the cell to maintain a relatively constant turgor pressure which is essential for cell growth; and secondly they permit changes in cytoplasmic composition such that the accumulation of intracellular osmolytes required to restore turgor pressure does not impair enzyme function. The primary event in turgor regulation is the controlled accumulation of potassium and its counterion glutamate. At high external osmolarities the cytoplasmic levels of potassium glutamate can impair enzyme function. Rapid growth is therefore dependent upon secondary responses, principally the accumulation of compatible solutes, betaine (N-trimethylglycine), proline and trehalose. The accumulation of these solutes is achieved by the controlled activity of transport systems and enzymes in response to changes in external osmotic pressure. It has been proposed that the accumulation of potassium glutamate during turgor regulation acts as a signal for the activation of these systems [1,2]. This brief review will examine the evidence that control over the balance of cytoplasmic osmolytes is achieved by sensing of the intracellular potassium (and glutamate) concentration. PMID:1974769

  17. Propagation of Intracellular Ca2+ Signals in Aged Exocrine Cells.

    PubMed

    Martin-Cano, Francisco E; Camello-Almaraz, Cristina; Macías, Jesús González; Pozo, Maria J; Camello, Pedro J

    2016-02-01

    There is little information on the effects of aging in the propagation of calcium signals and its underlying mechanisms. We studied the effects of aging on propagation of Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells. Fura-2 loaded cells isolated from young (3-4 months old) and aged (24 months old) mouse responded to acetylcholine (ACh) and cholecystokinin (CCK) with a polarized Ca(2+) response initiated at the secretory pole before spreading to the basal one. Aging slowed down the propagation of the response to ACh but enhanced the velocity of the CCK response. This pattern can be explained by the age-induced depolarization of mitochondria, because it can be reproduced in young cells by mitochondrial inhibitors. Aging also increased the role of acidic stores in the CCK signal, as judged by the folimycin-induced suppression of the polarization in aged but not in young cells. The involvement of ryanodine receptors in the ACh response was also enhanced, as indicated by the loss of polarization after the treatment with 8Br-cyclic ADP ribose. Therefore, we conclude that aging modifies differentially the propagation of ACh and CCK-evoked Ca(2+) signals through mitochondrial depolarization and changes in the role of the acidic Ca(2+) stores and ryanodine receptors in the initiation of the signals. PMID:25805851

  18. PRG-1 Regulates Synaptic Plasticity via Intracellular PP2A/β1-Integrin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingfeng; Huai, Jisen; Endle, Heiko; Schlüter, Leslie; Fan, Wei; Li, Yunbo; Richers, Sebastian; Yurugi, Hajime; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Ji, Haichao; Cheng, Hong; Rister, Benjamin; Horta, Guilherme; Baumgart, Jan; Berger, Hendrik; Laube, Gregor; Schmitt, Ulrich; Schmeisser, Michael J; Boeckers, Tobias M; Tenzer, Stefan; Vlachos, Andreas; Deller, Thomas; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in dendritic spine numbers are linked to deficits in learning and memory. While we previously revealed that postsynaptic plasticity-related gene 1 (PRG-1) controls lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling at glutamatergic synapses via presynaptic LPA receptors, we now show that PRG-1 also affects spine density and synaptic plasticity in a cell-autonomous fashion via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)/β1-integrin activation. PRG-1 deficiency reduces spine numbers and β1-integrin activation, alters long-term potentiation (LTP), and impairs spatial memory. The intracellular PRG-1 C terminus interacts in an LPA-dependent fashion with PP2A, thus modulating its phosphatase activity at the postsynaptic density. This results in recruitment of adhesome components src, paxillin, and talin to lipid rafts and ultimately in activation of β1-integrins. Consistent with these findings, activation of PP2A with FTY720 rescues defects in spine density and LTP of PRG-1-deficient animals. These results disclose a mechanism by which bioactive lipid signaling via PRG-1 could affect synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:27453502

  19. Dendritic signal transmission induced by intracellular charge inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarevich, Ivan A.; Kazantsev, Victor B.

    2013-12-01

    Signal propagation in neuronal dendrites represents the basis for interneuron communication and information processing in the brain. Here we take into account charge inhomogeneities arising in the vicinity of ion channels in cytoplasm and obtain a modified cable equation. We show that charge inhomogeneities acting on a millisecond time scale can lead to the appearance of propagating waves with wavelengths of hundreds of micrometers. They correspond to a certain frequency band predicting the appearance of resonant properties in brain neuron signaling. We also show that membrane potential in spiny dendrites obeys the modified cable equation suggesting a crucial role of the spines in dendritic subthreshold resonance.

  20. Signaling Microdomains Regulate Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate-Mediated Intracellular Calcium Transients in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Simon N.; Choe, Chi-Un; Uhlen, Per; DeGray, Brenda; Yeckel, Mark F.; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+signals in neurons use specific temporal and spatial patterns to encode unambiguous information about crucial cellular functions. To understand the molecular basis for initiation and propagation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-mediated intracellular Ca2+ signals, we correlated the subcellular distribution of components of the InsP3 pathway with measurements of agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ transients in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and pheochromocytoma cells. We found specialized domains with high levels of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate kinase (PIPKIγ) and chromogranin B (CGB), proteins acting synergistically to increase InsP3 pumps in the plasma membrane (PMCA) and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum receptor (InsP3R) activity and sensitivity. In contrast, Ca2+ as well as buffers that antagonize the rise in intracellular Ca2+ were distributed uniformly. By pharmacologically blocking phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase and PIPKIγ or disrupting the CGB–InsP3R interaction by transfecting an interfering polypeptide fragment, we produced major changes in the initiation site and kinetics of the Ca2+signal. This study shows that a limited number of proteins can reassemble to form unique, spatially restricted signaling domains to generate distinctive signals in different regions of the same neuron. The finding that the subcellular location of initiation sites and protein microdomains was cell type specific will help to establish differences in spatiotemporal Ca2+signaling in different types of neurons. PMID:15772345

  1. Cutaneous adverse effects of targeted therapies: Part II: Inhibitors of intracellular molecular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, James B; Macdonald, Brooke; Golitz, Loren E; LoRusso, Patricia; Sekulic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-01

    The last decade has spawned an exciting new era of oncotherapy in dermatology, including the development of targeted therapies for metastatic melanoma and basal cell carcinoma. Along with skin cancer, deregulation of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR and RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK intracellular signaling pathways contributes to tumorigenesis of a multitude of other cancers, and inhibitors of these pathways are being actively studied. Similar to other classes of targeted therapies, cutaneous adverse effects are among the most frequent toxicities observed with mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors, PI3K-AKT-mTOR inhibitors, hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors, and immunotherapies. Given the rapid expansion of these families of targeted treatments, dermatologists will be essential in offering dermatologic supportive care measures to cancer patients being treated with these agents. Part II of this continuing medical education article reviews skin-related adverse sequelae, including the frequency of occurrence and the implications associated with on- and off-target cutaneous toxicities of inhibitors of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK pathway, PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, hedgehog signaling pathway, and immunotherapies. PMID:25592339

  2. Bicaudal-D1 regulates the intracellular sorting and signalling of neurotrophin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Terenzio, Marco; Golding, Matthew; Russell, Matthew R G; Wicher, Krzysztof B; Rosewell, Ian; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Ish-Horowicz, David; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2014-01-01

    We have identified a new function for the dynein adaptor Bicaudal D homolog 1 (BICD1) by screening a siRNA library for genes affecting the dynamics of neurotrophin receptor-containing endosomes in motor neurons (MNs). Depleting BICD1 increased the intracellular accumulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-activated TrkB and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) by disrupting the endosomal sorting, reducing lysosomal degradation and increasing the co-localisation of these neurotrophin receptors with retromer-associated sorting nexin 1. The resulting re-routing of active receptors increased their recycling to the plasma membrane and altered the repertoire of signalling-competent TrkB isoforms and p75NTR available for ligand binding on the neuronal surface. This resulted in attenuated, but more sustained, AKT activation in response to BDNF stimulation. These data, together with our observation that Bicd1 expression is restricted to the developing nervous system when neurotrophin receptor expression peaks, indicate that BICD1 regulates neurotrophin signalling by modulating the endosomal sorting of internalised ligand-activated receptors. PMID:24920579

  3. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rekha

    2011-01-01

    Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular) and lysates (intracellular) blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:21915376

  4. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  5. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Billestrup, N.; Allevato, G.; Moldrup, A.

    1994-12-31

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to medite GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH-stimulated metabolic effects such as protein synthesis and lipolysis. Furthermore, this mutant GH receptor internalized rapidly following GH binding. Another truncated GH receptor lacking all but five amino acids of the cytoplasmic domain could not mediate any effects of GH nor did it internalize. Deletion of the proline-rich region or changing the four prolines to alanines also resulted in a GH receptor deficient in signaling. Mutation of phenylalanine 346 to alanine resulted in a GH receptor which did not internalize rapidly; however, this mutant GH receptor was capable of mediating GH-stimulated transcription as well as metabolic effects. These results indicate that the intracellular part of the GH receptor can be divided into at least three functional domains: (1) for transcriptional activity, two domains are involved, one located in the C-terminal 184 amino acids and the other in the proline-rich domain; (2) for metabolic effects, a domain located in or near the proline-rich region is of importance; and (3) for internalization, phenylalanine 346 is necessary. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-01

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. PMID:26051479

  7. Irisin Controls Growth, Intracellular Ca2+ Signals, and Mitochondrial Thermogenesis in Cardiomyoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chao; Zhang, Yuan; Tran, Tran D. N.; Wang, Hai; Li, Shiwu; George, Eva Vertes; Zhuang, Haoyang; Zhang, Peilan; Kandel, Avi; Lai, Yimu; Tang, Dongqi; Reeves, Westley H.; Cheng, Henrique; Ding, Yousong; Yang, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Exercise offers short-term and long-term health benefits, including an increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure in myocardium. The newly-discovered exercise-induced myokine, irisin, stimulates conversion of white into brown adipocytes as well as increased mitochondrial biogenesis and energy expenditure. Remarkably, irisin is highly expressed in myocardium, but its physiological effects in the heart are unknown. The objective of this work is to investigate irisin’s potential multifaceted effects on cardiomyoblasts and myocardium. For this purpose, H9C2 cells were treated with recombinant irisin produced in yeast cells (r-irisin) and in HEK293 cells (hr-irisin) for examining its effects on cell proliferation by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and on gene transcription profiles by qRT-PCR. R-irisin and hr-irisin both inhibited cell proliferation and activated genes related to cardiomyocyte metabolic function and differentiation, including myocardin, follistatin, smooth muscle actin, and nuclear respiratory factor-1. Signal transduction pathways affected by r-irisin in H9C2 cells and C57BL/6 mice were examined by detecting phosphorylation of PI3K-AKT, p38, ERK or STAT3. We also measured intracellular Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial thermogenesis and energy expenditure in r-irisin-treated H9C2 cells. The results showed that r-irisin, in a certain concentration rage, could activate PI3K-AKT and intracellular Ca2+ signaling and increase cellular oxygen consumption in H9C2 cells. Our study also suggests the existence of irisin-specific receptor on the membrane of H9C2 cells. In conclusion, irisin in a certain concentration rage increased myocardial cell metabolism, inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell differentiation. These effects might be mediated through PI3K-AKT and Ca2+ signaling, which are known to activate expression of exercise-related genes such as follistatin and myocardin. This work supports the value

  8. Intracellular Cl- as a signaling ion that potently regulates Na+/HCO3- transporters.

    PubMed

    Shcheynikov, Nikolay; Son, Aran; Hong, Jeong Hee; Yamazaki, Osamu; Ohana, Ehud; Kurtz, Ira; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2015-01-20

    Cl(-) is a major anion in mammalian cells involved in transport processes that determines the intracellular activity of many ions and plasma membrane potential. Surprisingly, a role of intracellular Cl(-) (Cl(-) in) as a signaling ion has not been previously evaluated. Here we report that Cl(-) in functions as a regulator of cellular Na(+) and HCO3 (-) concentrations and transepithelial transport through modulating the activity of several electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3 (-) transporters. We describe the molecular mechanism(s) of this regulation by physiological Cl(-) in concentrations highlighting the role of GXXXP motifs in Cl(-) sensing. Regulation of the ubiquitous Na(+)-HCO3(-) co-transport (NBC)e1-B is mediated by two GXXXP-containing sites; regulation of NBCe2-C is dependent on a single GXXXP motif; and regulation of NBCe1-A depends on a cryptic GXXXP motif. In the basal state NBCe1-B is inhibited by high Cl(-) in interacting at a low affinity GXXXP-containing site. IP3 receptor binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) activation of NBCe1-B unmasks a second high affinity Cl(-) in interacting GXXXP-dependent site. By contrast, NBCe2-C, which does not interact with IRBIT, has a single high affinity N-terminal GXXP-containing Cl(-) in interacting site. NBCe1-A is unaffected by Cl(-) in between 5 and 140 mM. However, deletion of NBCe1-A residues 29-41 unmasks a cryptic GXXXP-containing site homologous with the NBCe1-B low affinity site that is involved in inhibition of NBCe1-A by Cl(-) in. These findings reveal a cellular Cl(-) in sensing mechanism that plays an important role in the regulation of Na(+) and HCO3 (-) transport, with critical implications for the role of Cl(-) in cellular ion homeostasis and epithelial fluid and electrolyte secretion. PMID:25561556

  9. Role of α7 nicotinic receptor in the immune system and intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zdanowski, Robert; Ujazdowska, Dominika; Lewicka, Aneta; Lewicki, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine has been well known as one of the most exemplary neurotransmitters. In humans, this versatile molecule and its synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, have been found in various non-neural tissues such as the epithelium, endothelium, mesothelium muscle, blood cells and immune cells. The non-neuronal acetylcholine is accompanied by the expression of acetylcholinesterase and nicotinic/muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Increasing evidence of the non-neuronal acetylcholine system found throughout the last few years has indicated this neurotransmitter as one of the major cellular signaling molecules (associated e.g. with kinases and transcription factors activity). This system is responsible for maintenance and optimization of the cellular function, such as proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration, intercellular contact and apoptosis. Additionally, it controls proper activity of immune cells and affects differentiation, antigen presentation or cytokine production (both pro- and anti-inflammatory). The present article reviews recent findings about the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the field of immune system and intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:26648784

  10. Involvement of the Tyro3 receptor and its intracellular partner Fyn signaling in Schwann cell myelination.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Torii, Tomohiro; Takada, Shuji; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Saitoh, Yurika; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Ito, Akihito; Ogata, Toru; Terada, Nobuo; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-10-01

    During early development of the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cell precursors proliferate, migrate, and differentiate into premyelinating Schwann cells. After birth, Schwann cells envelop neuronal axons with myelin sheaths. Although some molecular mechanisms underlying myelination by Schwann cells have been identified, the whole picture remains unclear. Here we show that signaling through Tyro3 receptor tyrosine kinase and its binding partner, Fyn nonreceptor cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, is involved in myelination by Schwann cells. Impaired formation of myelin segments is observed in Schwann cell neuronal cultures established from Tyro3-knockout mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Indeed, Tyro3-knockout mice exhibit reduced myelin thickness. By affinity chromatography, Fyn was identified as the binding partner of the Tyro3 intracellular domain, and activity of Fyn is down-regulated in Tyro3-knockout mice, suggesting that Tyro3, acting through Fyn, regulates myelination. Ablating Fyn in mice results in reduced myelin thickness. Decreased myelin formation is observed in cultures established from Fyn-knockout mouse DRG. Furthermore, decreased kinase activity levels and altered expression of myelination-associated transcription factors are observed in these knockout mice. These results suggest the involvement of Tyro3 receptor and its binding partner Fyn in Schwann cell myelination. This constitutes a newly recognized receptor-linked signaling mechanism that can control Schwann cell myelination. PMID:26224309

  11. Prolonged Oxaliplatin Exposure Alters Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A New Mechanism To Explain Oxaliplatin-Associated Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christin; McGowan, Margit; Jordt, Sven; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum based cytotoxic agent commonly used to treat colorectal cancers. Despite its effectiveness, oxaliplatin administration is associated with the development of cold-induced peripheral neuropathy. This potentially permanent side effect is provoked by cold exposure and can range from mild and self limited to severe and debilitating. Even with tumor shrinkage, these painful side effects can force dose-reduction or discontinuation of treatment. Neither the mechanism of action of oxaliplatin nor that of cold-induced neuropathy is understood. Paclitaxel, an entirely different chemotherapeutic agent used to treat a variety of malignancies, also is associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Unlike oxaliplatin, neurotoxicity arising from paclitaxel treatment is better understood and was found to have profound effects on intracellular calcium signaling (1,2). In this study we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on calcium signaling pathways and found that acute exposure of either a neuroblastoma cell line or primary neurons with therapeutic concentrations of oxaliplatin had no effect on intracellular calcium signaling. We also found that cellular temperature sensors (TRP channels) were also not activated by oxaliplatin. Interestingly, prolonged exposure of oxaliplatin sensitized cells to subsequent stimuli and enhanced the magnitude of intracellular calcium responses. Taken together, our results suggest that acute oxaliplatin exposure will not induce abnormal calcium signaling but oxaliplatin-primed cells do exhibit enhanced sensitivity. These findings provide new insight to the mechanism behind oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21859566

  12. Pasteurella haemolytica A1-Derived Leukotoxin and Endotoxin Induce Intracellular Calcium Elevation in Bovine Alveolar Macrophages by Different Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsuan, S. L.; Kannan, M. S.; Jeyaseelan, S.; Prakash, Y. S.; Sieck, G. C.; Maheswaran, S. K.

    1998-01-01

    Leukotoxin and endotoxin derived from Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 1 are the primary virulence factors contributing to the pathogenesis of lung injury in bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. Activation of bovine alveolar macrophages with endotoxin or leukotoxin results in the induction of cytokine gene expression, with different kinetics (H. S. Yoo, S. K. Maheswaran, G. Lin, E. L. Townsend, and T. R. Ames, Infect. Immun. 63:381–388, 1995; H. S. Yoo, B. S. Rajagopal, S. K. Maheswaran, and T. R. Ames, Microb. Pathog. 18:237–252, 1995). Furthermore, extracellular Ca2+ is required for leukotoxin-induced cytokine gene expression. However, the involvement of Ca2+ in endotoxin effects and the precise signaling mechanisms in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ by leukotoxin and endotoxin are not known. In fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester-loaded alveolar macrophages, intracellular Ca2+ regulation by leukotoxin and endotoxin was studied by video fluorescence microscopy. Leukotoxin induced a sustained elevation of intracellular Ca2+ in a concentration-dependent fashion by influx of extracellular Ca2+ through voltage-gated channels. In the presence of fetal bovine serum, endotoxin elevated intracellular Ca2+ even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Leukotoxin-induced intracellular Ca2+ elevation was inhibited by pertussis toxin, inhibitors of phospholipases A2 and C, and the arachidonic acid analog 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid. Intracellular Ca2+ elevation by endotoxin was inhibited by inhibitors of phospholipase C and protein tyrosine kinase, but not by pertussis toxin, or the arachidonic acid analog. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Ca2+ signaling by leukotoxin through a G-protein-coupled mechanism involving activation of phospholipases A2 and C and release of arachidonic acid in bovine alveolar macrophages. Ca2+ signaling by endotoxin, on the other hand, involves activation of phospholipase C and requires tyrosine phosphorylation. The

  13. Dictyostelium uses ether-linked inositol phospholipids for intracellular signalling

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jonathan; Kay, Robert R; Kielkowska, Anna; Niewczas, Izabella; Fets, Louise; Oxley, David; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2014-01-01

    Inositol phospholipids are critical regulators of membrane biology throughout eukaryotes. The general principle by which they perform these roles is conserved across species and involves binding of differentially phosphorylated inositol head groups to specific protein domains. This interaction serves to both recruit and regulate the activity of several different classes of protein which act on membrane surfaces. In mammalian cells, these phosphorylated inositol head groups are predominantly borne by a C38:4 diacylglycerol backbone. We show here that the inositol phospholipids of Dictyostelium are different, being highly enriched in an unusual C34:1e lipid backbone, 1-hexadecyl-2-(11Z-octadecenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-myo-inositol), in which the sn-1 position contains an ether-linked C16:0 chain; they are thus plasmanylinositols. These plasmanylinositols respond acutely to stimulation of cells with chemoattractants, and their levels are regulated by PIPKs, PI3Ks and PTEN. In mammals and now in Dictyostelium, the hydrocarbon chains of inositol phospholipids are a highly selected subset of those available to other phospholipids, suggesting that different molecular selectors are at play in these organisms but serve a common, evolutionarily conserved purpose. PMID:25180230

  14. THE ROLE OF INTRACELLULAR SODIUM (Na+) IN THE REGULATION OF CALCIUM (Ca2+)-MEDIATED SIGNALING AND TOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xian-Min; Groveman, Bradley R; Fang, Xiao-Qian; Lin, Shuang-Xiu

    2010-01-01

    It is known that activated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are a major route of excessive calcium ion (Ca2+) entry in central neurons, which may activate degradative processes and thereby cause cell death. Therefore, NMDARs are now recognized to play a key role in the development of many diseases associated with injuries to the central nervous system (CNS). However, it remains a mystery how NMDAR activity is recruited in the cellular processes leading to excitotoxicity and how NMDAR activity can be controlled at a physiological level. The sodium ion (Na+) is the major cation in extracellular space. With its entry into the cell, Na+ can act as a critical intracellular second messenger that regulates many cellular functions. Recent data have shown that intracellular Na+ can be an important signaling factor underlying the up-regulation of NMDARs. While Ca2+ influx during the activation of NMDARs down-regulates NMDAR activity, Na+ influx provides an essential positive feedback mechanism to overcome Ca2+-induced inhibition and thereby potentiate both NMDAR activity and inward Ca2+ flow. Extensive investigations have been conducted to clarify mechanisms underlying Ca2+-mediated signaling. This review focuses on the roles of Na+ in the regulation of Ca2+-mediated NMDAR signaling and toxicity. PMID:21243124

  15. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  16. The effect of photoinitiators on intracellular AKT signaling pathway in tissue engineering application

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Leyuan; Sheybani, Natasha; Yeudall, W. Andrew; Yang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Free-radical photopolymerization initiated by photoinitiators is an important method to make tissue engineering scaffolds. To advance understanding of photoinitiator cytocompatibility, we examined three photoinitiators including 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone (DMPA), Irgacure 2959 (I-2959), and eosin Y photoinitiating system (EY) in terms of their effects on viability of HN4 cells and expression levels of intracellular AKT and its phosphorylated form p-AKT. Our results show that the photoinitiators and their UV-exposed counterparts affect intracellular AKT signaling, which can be used in conjunction with cell viability for cytocompatibility assessment of photoinitiators. PMID:25709809

  17. Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer Disease: Role of Amyloid Precursor Protein and Presenilin 1 Intracellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nizzari, Mario; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Pagano, Aldo; Porcile, Carola; Russo, Claudio; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder characterized by (1) progressive loss of synapses and neurons, (2) intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein, and (3) amyloid plaques. Genetically, AD is linked to mutations in few proteins amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 and 2 (PS1 and PS2). The molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in AD as well as the physiological function of APP are not yet known. A recent theory has proposed that APP and PS1 modulate intracellular signals to induce cell-cycle abnormalities responsible for neuronal death and possibly amyloid deposition. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of a complex network of proteins, clearly involved in the regulation of signal transduction mechanisms that interact with both APP and PS1. In this review we discuss the significance of novel finding related to cell-signaling events modulated by APP and PS1 in the development of neurodegeneration. PMID:22496686

  18. Dynamic changes in intracellular ROS levels regulate airway basal stem cell homeostasis through Nrf2-dependent Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paul, MK; Bisht, B; Darmawan, DO; Chiou, R; Ha, VL; Wallace, WD; Chon, AC; Hegab, AE; Grogan, T; Elashoff, DA; Alva-Ornelas, JA; Gomperts, BN

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Airways are exposed to myriad environmental and damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), which also have physiological roles as signaling molecules that regulate stem cell function. However, the functional significance of both steady and dynamically changing ROS levels in different stem cell populations, as well as downstream mechanisms that integrate ROS sensing into decisions regarding stem cell homeostasis, are unclear. Here, we show in mouse and human airway basal stem cells (ABSCs) that intracellular flux from low to moderate ROS levels is required for stem cell self-renewal and proliferation. Changing ROS levels activate Nrf2, which activates the Notch pathway to stimulate ABSC self-renewal as well an antioxidant program that scavenges intracellular ROS, returning overall ROS levels to a low state to maintain homeostatic balance. This redox-mediated regulation of lung stem cell function has significant implications for stem cell biology, repair of lung injuries, and diseases such as cancer. PMID:24953182

  19. Bacteriophage lambda cro mutations: effects on activity and intracellular degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Pakula, A A; Young, V B; Sauer, R T

    1986-01-01

    Following random mutagenesis of the bacteriophage lambda cro gene, we have isolated missense mutations that affect approximately half of the 66 residue positions of Cro. About two-thirds of the mutations change residues involved in the maintenance of Cro structure and stability. The corresponding mutant proteins are severely degraded in the cell but often have specific activities near that of wild-type Cro. The remaining mutations affect residues involved in DNA binding. These mutant proteins are present at moderately reduced intracellular levels, but their specific activities are much lower than that of wild type. Images PMID:2947238

  20. Tracking SERS-active nanoprobe intracellular uptake for chemical and biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregas, Molly K.; Yan, Fei; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Khoury, Christopher; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2007-09-01

    A critical aspect of the use of nanoprobes for intracellular studies in chemical and biological sensing involves a fundamental understanding of their uptake and trajectory in cells. In this study, we describe experiments using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and mapping to track cellular uptake of plasmonics-active labeled nanoparticles. Three different Raman-active labels with positive, negative, and neutral charges were conjugated to silver colloidal nanoparticles with the aim of spatially and temporally profiling intracellular delivery and tracking of nanoprobes during uptake in single mammalian cells. 1-D Raman spectra and 2-D Raman mapping are used to identify and locate the probes via their SERS signal intensities. Because Raman spectroscopy is very specific for identification of chemical and molecular signatures, the development of functionalized plasmonics-active nanoprobes capable of exploring intracellular spaces and processes has the ability to provide specific information on the effects of biological and chemical pollutants in the intracellular environment. The results indicate that this technique will allow study of when, where, and how these substances affect cells and living organisms.

  1. Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in endothelial cells by the angiogenesis inhibitors endostatin and angiostatin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Jha, V; Dhanabal, M; Sukhatme, V P; Alper, S L

    2001-05-01

    Intracellular signaling mechanisms by the angiogenesis inhibitors endostatin and angiostatin remain poorly understood. We have found that endostatin (2 microg/ml) and angiostatin (5 microg/ml) elicited transient, approximately threefold increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Acute exposure to angiostatin or endostatin nearly abolished subsequent endothelial [Ca(2+)](i) responses to carbachol or to thapsigargin; conversely, thapsigargin attenuated the Ca(2+) signal elicited by endostatin. The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and the inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor inhibitor xestospongin C both inhibited endostatin-induced elevation in [Ca(2+)](i), and endostatin rapidly elevated endothelial cell IP(3) levels. Pertussis toxin and SB-220025 modestly inhibited the endostatin-induced Ca(2+) signal. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) inhibited the endostatin-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i), as did a subset of Ca(2+)-entry inhibitors. Peak Ca(2+) responses to endostatin and angiostatin in endothelial cells exceeded those in epithelial cells and were minimal in NIH/3T3 cells. Overnight pretreatment of endothelial cells with endostatin reduced the subsequent acute elevation in [Ca(2+)](i) in response to vascular endothelial growth factor or to fibroblast growth factor by approximately 70%. Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling may initiate or mediate some of the cellular actions of endostatin and angiostatin. PMID:11287327

  2. GPR120 promotes adipogenesis through intracellular calcium and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Tongxing; Zhou, Yuanfei; Peng, Jian; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Yang, Yang; Xu, Tao; Peng, Jie; Ren, Jiao; Xiang, Quanhang; Wei, Hongkui

    2016-10-15

    Numerous researches have demonstrated that GPR120 (also called FFAR4) exerts novel functions in insulin resistance and adipogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of GPR120-mediated adipogenic differentiation is still unclear. This study was aimed to interpret the relevant function mechanism of GPR120 in the differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The results showed that GPR120 expression was dramatically increased along with the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes and the adipogenic ability was significantly inhibited in shGPR120-transfected cells. TUG-891, a selective agonist of GPR120, promoted the intracellular triglyceride accumulation in a dose-dependent manner and did not enhance adipogenesis in shGPR120-transfected cells. Markedly, TUG-891 increased the activation of PPARγ in a GPR120-dependent pathway as assessed by luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, in the adipogenic differentiation process of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, TUG-891 increased the [Ca(2+)]i and phosphorylation level of ERK1/2. Pretreatment with inhibitors of either ERK1/2 (U0126) or [Ca(2+)]i (BAPTA-AM) notably attenuated the GPR120-mediated adipogenesis. These results show that GPR120 promotes adipogenesis by increasing PPARγ expression via [Ca(2+)]i and ERK1/2 signal pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. PMID:27302893

  3. Intracellular Signaling Transduction Pathways Triggered by a Well-Known Anti-GHR Monoclonal Antibody, Mab263, in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hainan; Li, Wei; Jiang, Hailong; Yang, Yanhong; Zheng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A series of studies have reported that monoclonal antibody 263 (Mab263), a monoclonal antibody against the growth hormone receptor (GHR), acts as an agonist in vitro and in vivo. However, the intracellular signaling pathways triggered by Mab263 have not yet been delineated. Therefore, we examined the intracellular signaling pathways induced by Mab263 in vivo and in vitro in the present study. The results show that this antibody activated janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), STAT1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not STAT5. The phosphorylation kinetics of JAK2, STAT3/1 and ERK1/2 induced by Mab263 were subsequently analyzed in dose-response and time course experiments. Our observations indicate that Mab263 induced different intracellular signaling pathways than GH, which indicates that Mab263 is a signal-specific molecule and that Mab263 may be a valuable biological reagent to study the mechanism(s) of GHR-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:25391041

  4. Changes of cell-surface thiols and intracellular signaling in human monocytic cell line THP-1 treated with diphenylcyclopropenone.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Morihiko; Motoyama, Akira; Suzuki, Mie; Yanagi, Masashi; Kitagaki, Masato; Kouzuki, Hirokazu; Hagino, Shigenobu; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Sasa, Hitoshi; Kagatani, Saori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2010-12-01

    Changes of cell-surface thiols induced by chemical treatment may affect the conformations of membrane proteins and intracellular signaling mechanisms. In our previous study, we found that a non-toxic dose of diphenylcyclopropene (DPCP), which is a potent skin sensitizer, induced an increase of cell-surface thiols in cells of a human monocytic cell line, THP-1. Here, we examined the influence of DPCP on intracellular signaling. First, we confirmed that DPCP induced an increase of cell-surface thiols not only in THP-1 cells, but also in primary monocytes. The intracellular reduced-form glutathione/oxidized-form glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG ratio) was not affected by DPCP treatment. By means of labeling with a membrane-impermeable thiol-reactive compound, Alexa Fluor 488 C5 maleimide (AFM), followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analysis by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), we identified several proteins whose thiol contents were modified in response to DPCP. These proteins included cell membrane components, such as actin and β-tubulin, molecular chaperones, such as heat shock protein 27A and 70, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible proteins. Next, we confirmed the expression in DPCP-treated cells of spliced XBP1, a known marker of ER stress. We also detected the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK, which are downstream signaling molecules in the IRE1α-ASK1 pathway, which is activated by ER stress. These data suggested that increase of cell-surface thiols might be associated with activation of ER stress-mediated signaling. PMID:21139337

  5. Jagged1 intracellular domain-mediated inhibition of Notch1 signalling regulates cardiac homeostasis in the postnatal heart

    PubMed Central

    Metrich, Mélanie; Bezdek Pomey, April; Berthonneche, Corinne; Sarre, Alexandre; Nemir, Mohamed; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Aims Notch1 signalling in the heart is mainly activated via expression of Jagged1 on the surface of cardiomyocytes. Notch controls cardiomyocyte proliferation and differentiation in the developing heart and regulates cardiac remodelling in the stressed adult heart. Besides canonical Notch receptor activation in signal-receiving cells, Notch ligands can also activate Notch receptor-independent responses in signal-sending cells via release of their intracellular domain. We evaluated therefore the importance of Jagged1 (J1) intracellular domain (ICD)-mediated pathways in the postnatal heart. Methods and results In cardiomyocytes, Jagged1 releases J1ICD, which then translocates into the nucleus and down-regulates Notch transcriptional activity. To study the importance of J1ICD in cardiac homeostasis, we generated transgenic mice expressing a tamoxifen-inducible form of J1ICD, specifically in cardiomyocytes. Using this model, we demonstrate that J1ICD-mediated Notch inhibition diminishes proliferation in the neonatal cardiomyocyte population and promotes maturation. In the neonatal heart, a response via Wnt and Akt pathway activation is elicited as an attempt to compensate for the deficit in cardiomyocyte number resulting from J1ICD activation. In the stressed adult heart, J1ICD activation results in a dramatic reduction of the number of Notch signalling cardiomyocytes, blunts the hypertrophic response, and reduces the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes. Consistently, this occurs concomitantly with a significant down-regulation of the phosphorylation of the Akt effectors ribosomal S6 protein (S6) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein1 (4EBP1) controlling protein synthesis. Conclusions Altogether, these data demonstrate the importance of J1ICD in the modulation of physiological and pathological hypertrophy, and reveal the existence of a novel pathway regulating cardiac homeostasis. PMID:26249804

  6. Shock wave irradiations avoiding fluid flow evoke intracellular Ca2+ signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Toru; Tsukamoto, Akira; Tada, Shigeru

    Shock wave irradiation accelerates therapeutic effects including angiogenesis. One mechanism underlying those effects is cellular responses evoked by shock wave irradiation. Fluid flow is one of major physical phenomena induced by shock wave irradiation. Cellular responses evoked by fluid flow are similar to those evoked by shock wave irradiation. Thus, fluid flow could be responsible for cellular responses evoked by shock wave irradiation. However, it is obscure whether fluid flow is required for the cellular responses evoked by shock wave irradiation. In this study, intracellular Ca2 + signaling was observed in cells seeded in down-sized chambers. In the down-sized chambers, fluid flow was supposed to be suppressed because size of chambers (6 mm in diameter, 1 mm in thickness) was analogous to size of shock wave focus region (3mm in diameter). Dynamics of polystyrene microbeads suspended in the chambers were visualized with a CCD camera and analyzed with a particle image velocimetry (PIV) method to quantify fluid flow in the chamber. As a result, shock wave irradiation evoked intracellular Ca2 + signaling. However, fluid flow was not observed in the chamber due to shock wave irradiation. Thus, it was suggested that physical mechanics, not fluid flow, are further required for evoking intracellular Ca2 + signaling following to shock wave irradiation.

  7. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Exploits Canonical and Noncanonical Host Wnt Signaling Pathways To Stimulate Phagocytosis and Promote Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tian; Dunphy, Paige S.; Lina, Taslima T.

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis invades and survives in phagocytes by modulating host cell processes and evading innate defenses, but the mechanisms are not fully defined. Recently we have determined that E. chaffeensis tandem repeat proteins (TRPs) are type 1 secreted effectors involved in functionally diverse interactions with host targets, including components of the evolutionarily conserved Wnt signaling pathways. In this study, we demonstrated that induction of host canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways by E. chaffeensis TRP effectors stimulates phagocytosis and promotes intracellular survival. After E. chaffeensis infection, canonical and noncanonical Wnt signalings were significantly stimulated during early stages of infection (1 to 3 h) which coincided with dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of β-catenin, a major canonical Wnt signal transducer, and NFATC1, a noncanonical Wnt transcription factor. In total, the expression of ∼44% of Wnt signaling target genes was altered during infection. Knockdown of TRP120-interacting Wnt pathway components/regulators and other critical components, such as Wnt5a ligand, Frizzled 5 receptor, β-catenin, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), and major signaling molecules, resulted in significant reductions in the ehrlichial load. Moreover, small-molecule inhibitors specific for components of canonical and noncanonical (Ca2+ and planar cell polarity [PCP]) Wnt pathways, including IWP-2, which blocks Wnt secretion, significantly decreased ehrlichial infection. TRPs directly activated Wnt signaling, as TRP-coated microspheres triggered phagocytosis which was blocked by Wnt pathway inhibitors, demonstrating a key role of TRP activation of Wnt pathways to induce ehrlichial phagocytosis. These novel findings reveal that E. chaffeensis exploits canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways through TRP effectors to facilitate host cell entry and promote intracellular survival. PMID:26712203

  8. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Exploits Canonical and Noncanonical Host Wnt Signaling Pathways To Stimulate Phagocytosis and Promote Intracellular Survival.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tian; Dunphy, Paige S; Lina, Taslima T; McBride, Jere W

    2016-03-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis invades and survives in phagocytes by modulating host cell processes and evading innate defenses, but the mechanisms are not fully defined. Recently we have determined that E. chaffeensis tandem repeat proteins (TRPs) are type 1 secreted effectors involved in functionally diverse interactions with host targets, including components of the evolutionarily conserved Wnt signaling pathways. In this study, we demonstrated that induction of host canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways by E. chaffeensis TRP effectors stimulates phagocytosis and promotes intracellular survival. After E. chaffeensis infection, canonical and noncanonical Wnt signalings were significantly stimulated during early stages of infection (1 to 3 h) which coincided with dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of β-catenin, a major canonical Wnt signal transducer, and NFATC1, a noncanonical Wnt transcription factor. In total, the expression of ∼44% of Wnt signaling target genes was altered during infection. Knockdown of TRP120-interacting Wnt pathway components/regulators and other critical components, such as Wnt5a ligand, Frizzled 5 receptor, β-catenin, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), and major signaling molecules, resulted in significant reductions in the ehrlichial load. Moreover, small-molecule inhibitors specific for components of canonical and noncanonical (Ca(2+) and planar cell polarity [PCP]) Wnt pathways, including IWP-2, which blocks Wnt secretion, significantly decreased ehrlichial infection. TRPs directly activated Wnt signaling, as TRP-coated microspheres triggered phagocytosis which was blocked by Wnt pathway inhibitors, demonstrating a key role of TRP activation of Wnt pathways to induce ehrlichial phagocytosis. These novel findings reveal that E. chaffeensis exploits canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways through TRP effectors to facilitate host cell entry and promote intracellular survival. PMID:26712203

  9. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Linda G; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna G; Pickering, Darryl S; Plested, Andrew J R; Kristensen, Anders S

    2016-07-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Despite recent advances in structural studies of AMPARs, information about the specific conformational changes that underlie receptor function is lacking. Here, we used single and dual insertion of GFP variants at various positions in AMPAR subunits to enable measurements of conformational changes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells. We produced dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit constructs that had normal activity and displayed intrareceptor FRET. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in live HEK293 cells to determine distinct steady-state FRET efficiencies in the presence of different ligands, suggesting a dynamic picture of the resting state. Patch-clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence changes within these intracellular domains, providing clues as to how posttranslational modifications and receptor function interact. PMID:27313205

  10. Signal Inhibitory Receptor on Leukocytes-1 Limits the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps, but Preserves Intracellular Bacterial Killing.

    PubMed

    Van Avondt, Kristof; van der Linden, Maarten; Naccache, Paul H; Egan, David A; Meyaard, Linde

    2016-05-01

    In response to microbial invasion, neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill extracellular microbes. Alternatively, NET formation can result in tissue damage in inflammatory conditions and may perpetuate autoimmune disease. Intervention strategies that are aimed at modifying pathogenic NET formation should ideally preserve other neutrophil antimicrobial functions. We now show that signal inhibitory receptor on leukocytes-1 (SIRL-1) attenuates NET release by human neutrophils in response to distinct triggers, including opsonized Staphylococcus aureus and inflammatory danger signals. NET release has different kinetics depending on the stimulus, and rapid NET formation is independent of NADPH oxidase activity. In line with this, we show that NET release and reactive oxygen species production upon challenge with opsonized S. aureus require different signaling events. Importantly, engagement of SIRL-1 does not affect bacterially induced production of reactive oxygen species, and intracellular bacterial killing by neutrophils remains intact. Thus, our studies define SIRL-1 as an intervention point of benefit to suppress NET formation in disease while preserving intracellular antimicrobial defense. PMID:27016607

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Intracellular Signaling Pathway Kinetics Predicts Targets for Stem Cell Fate Control

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Davey, Ryan E; Bhola, Patrick; Yin, Ting; Zandstra, Peter W

    2007-01-01

    Directing stem cell fate requires knowledge of how signaling networks integrate temporally and spatially segregated stimuli. We developed and validated a computational model of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3) pathway kinetics, a signaling network involved in embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal. Our analysis identified novel pathway responses; for example, overexpression of the receptor glycoprotein-130 results in reduced pathway activation and increased ESC differentiation. We used a systematic in silico screen to identify novel targets and protein interactions involved in Stat3 activation. Our analysis demonstrates that signaling activation and desensitization (the inability to respond to ligand restimulation) is regulated by balancing the activation state of a distributed set of parameters including nuclear export of Stat3, nuclear phosphatase activity, inhibition by suppressor of cytokine signaling, and receptor trafficking. This knowledge was used to devise a temporally modulated ligand delivery strategy that maximizes signaling activation and leads to enhanced ESC self-renewal. PMID:17616983

  12. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation.

    PubMed

    Dzamukova, Maria R; Naumenko, Ekaterina A; Lvov, Yuri M; Fakhrullin, Rawil F

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (А549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment. PMID:25976444

  13. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation

    PubMed Central

    Dzamukova, Maria R.; Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (А549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment. PMID:25976444

  14. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  15. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  16. The PHR proteins: intracellular signaling hubs in neuronal development and axon degeneration.

    PubMed

    Grill, Brock; Murphey, Rodney K; Borgen, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    During development, a coordinated and integrated series of events must be accomplished in order to generate functional neural circuits. Axons must navigate toward target cells, build synaptic connections, and terminate outgrowth. The PHR proteins (consisting of mammalian Phr1/MYCBP2, Drosophila Highwire and C. elegans RPM-1) function in each of these events in development. Here, we review PHR function across species, as well as the myriad of signaling pathways PHR proteins regulate. These findings collectively suggest that the PHR proteins are intracellular signaling hubs, a concept we explore in depth. Consistent with prominent developmental functions, genetic links have begun to emerge between PHR signaling networks and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, schizophrenia and intellectual disability. Finally, we discuss the recent and important finding that PHR proteins regulate axon degeneration, which has further heightened interest in this fascinating group of molecules. PMID:27008623

  17. BDNF-stimulated intracellular signalling mechanisms underlie exercise-induced improvement in spatial memory in the male Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Ranya G; Lyne, Ronan; Kelly, Áine M

    2014-12-15

    Exercise-induced improvements in learning are associated with neurotrophic and neurogenic changes in the dentate gyrus, but the intracellular signalling mechanisms that may mediate these improvements remain unknown. In the current study we investigate the effects of one week of forced exercise on spatial memory and analyse in parallel BDNF-stimulated signalling pathways in cells of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, we test whether a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of BDNF can mimic the observed cognitive and signalling changes. Male Wistar rats were assigned to exercised and sedentary groups and tested in a spatial task post-exercise. Tissue from the dentate gyrus was assessed for expression and release of BDNF, and for changes in expression and activation of TrkB, ERK and synapsin-1. In a separate set of experiments, male Wistar rats received a single i.c.v. injection of BDNF and were then tested in the same spatial learning task. Exercised and BDNF-treated (but not control) rats could successfully complete an object displacement task that tests spatial learning. Exercised rats and BDNF-treated rats displayed increases BDNF expression and ERK1 activation, while exercised rats showed increases in cell division, stimulated BDNF release, TrkB activation, and synapsin-1 expression in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that exercise-induced increases in BDNF in the dentate gyrus are sufficient to cause improvements in spatial memory by activating signalling cascades that enhance synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. PMID:24269499

  18. Acidic calcium stores open for business: expanding the potential for intracellular Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sandip; Docampo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cytosolic calcium concentration are crucial for a variety of cellular processes in all cells. It has long been appreciated that calcium is stored and released from intracellular calcium stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum. However, emerging evidence indicates that calcium is also dynamically regulated by a seemingly disparate collection of acidic organelles. Here, we review the defining features of these acidic calcium stores and highlight recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of uptake and release of calcium from these stores. We also examine the nature of calcium buffering within the stores and summarize the physiological and patho-physiological significance of these ubiquitous organelles in calcium signaling. PMID:20303271

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 couples cellular prion protein to intracellular signalling in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Laura T; Salazar, Santiago V; Kostylev, Mikhail A; Um, Ji Won; Kaufman, Adam C; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes in mice can be rescued by blockade of either cellular prion protein or metabotropic glutamate receptor 5. We sought genetic and biochemical evidence that these proteins function cooperatively as an obligate complex in the brain. We show that cellular prion protein associates via transmembrane metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 with the intracellular protein mediators Homer1b/c, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and the Alzheimer's disease risk gene product protein tyrosine kinase 2 beta. Coupling of cellular prion protein to these intracellular proteins is modified by soluble amyloid-β oligomers, by mouse brain Alzheimer's disease transgenes or by human Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid-β oligomer-triggered phosphorylation of intracellular protein mediators and impairment of synaptic plasticity in vitro requires Prnp-Grm5 genetic interaction, being absent in transheterozygous loss-of-function, but present in either single heterozygote. Importantly, genetic coupling between Prnp and Grm5 is also responsible for signalling, for survival and for synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease transgenic model mice. Thus, the interaction between metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and cellular prion protein has a central role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, and the complex is a potential target for disease-modifying intervention. PMID:26667279

  20. Intracellular signals involved in the effects of insulin-like growth factors and neuregulins on myofibre formation.

    PubMed

    Zorzano, Antonio; Kaliman, Perla; Gumà, Anna; Palacín, Manuel

    2003-02-01

    A number of extracellular factors are involved in the embryonic development of skeletal muscle and the muscle regeneration that is triggered in response to muscle damage. Some of them, such as insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-like molecules, leukemia inhibitor factor (LIF) or platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs), are involved in the activation of cell proliferation that operates before muscle differentiation. In addition, factors such as IGFs, neuregulins (NRGs), sonic hedgehog (Shh) or Wnt promote muscle differentiation. Here, we review the intracellular signals that are triggered in the myogenic effect of IGFs and neuregulin and we describe common pathways. A fuller understanding of the signalling pathways triggered by these factors may permit the design of new tools for muscle regeneration therapy. PMID:12464385

  1. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michael P.; Cavanaugh, Alice; Breitwieser, Gerda E.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR) interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium. PMID:26317416

  2. Intracellular NAD+ depletion enhances bortezomib-induced anti-myeloma activity

    PubMed Central

    Cagnetta, Antonia; Calimeri, Teresa; Acharya, Chirag; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Zhong, Mike Y.; Patrone, Franco; Nencioni, Alessio; Gobbi, Marco; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibition depletes intracellular NAD+ content leading, to autophagic multiple myeloma (MM) cell death. Bortezomib has remarkably improved MM patient outcome, but dose-limiting toxicities and development of resistance limit its long-term utility. Here we observed higher Nampt messenger RNA levels in bortezomib-resistant patient MM cells, which correlated with decreased overall survival. We demonstrated that combining the NAD+ depleting agent FK866 with bortezomib induces synergistic anti-MM cell death and overcomes bortezomib resistance. This effect is associated with (1) activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and downregulation of Mcl-1; (2) enhanced intracellular NAD+ depletion; (3) inhibition of chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like proteasome activities; (4) inhibition of nuclear factor κB signaling; and (5) inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, Nampt knockdown significantly enhances the anti-MM effect of bortezomib, which can be rescued by ectopically overexpressing Nampt. In a murine xenograft MM model, low-dose combination FK866 and Bortezomib is well tolerated, significantly inhibits tumor growth, and prolongs host survival. Taken together, these findings indicate that intracellular NAD+ level represents a major determinant in the ability of bortezomib to induce apoptosis in MM cells and provide proof of concept for the combination with FK866 as a new strategy to enhance sensitivity or overcome resistance to bortezomib. PMID:23823317

  3. Intracellular NAD⁺ depletion enhances bortezomib-induced anti-myeloma activity.

    PubMed

    Cagnetta, Antonia; Cea, Michele; Calimeri, Teresa; Acharya, Chirag; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Zhong, Mike Y; Patrone, Franco; Nencioni, Alessio; Gobbi, Marco; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2013-08-15

    We recently demonstrated that Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibition depletes intracellular NAD⁺ content leading, to autophagic multiple myeloma (MM) cell death. Bortezomib has remarkably improved MM patient outcome, but dose-limiting toxicities and development of resistance limit its long-term utility. Here we observed higher Nampt messenger RNA levels in bortezomib-resistant patient MM cells, which correlated with decreased overall survival. We demonstrated that combining the NAD⁺ depleting agent FK866 with bortezomib induces synergistic anti-MM cell death and overcomes bortezomib resistance. This effect is associated with (1) activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and downregulation of Mcl-1; (2) enhanced intracellular NAD⁺ depletion; (3) inhibition of chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like proteasome activities; (4) inhibition of nuclear factor κB signaling; and (5) inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, Nampt knockdown significantly enhances the anti-MM effect of bortezomib, which can be rescued by ectopically overexpressing Nampt. In a murine xenograft MM model, low-dose combination FK866 and Bortezomib is well tolerated, significantly inhibits tumor growth, and prolongs host survival. Taken together, these findings indicate that intracellular NAD⁺ level represents a major determinant in the ability of bortezomib to induce apoptosis in MM cells and provide proof of concept for the combination with FK866 as a new strategy to enhance sensitivity or overcome resistance to bortezomib. PMID:23823317

  4. Wnt Signaling in Neurogenesis during Aging and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael; Do, Huong

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, much progress has been made regarding our understanding of neurogenesis in both young and old animals and where it occurs throughout the lifespan, although the growth of new neurons declines with increasing age. In addition, physical activity can reverse this age-dependent decline in neurogenesis. Highly correlated with this decline is the degree of inter and intracellular Wnt signaling, the molecular mechanisms of which have only recently started to be elucidated. So far, most of what we know about intracellular signaling during/following exercise centers around the CREB/CRE initiated transcriptional events. Relatively little is known, however, about how aging and physical activity affect the Wnt signaling pathway. Herein, we briefly review the salient features of neurogenesis in young and then in old adult animals. Then, we discuss Wnt signaling and review the very few in vitro and in vivo studies that have examined the Wnt signaling pathways in aging and physical activity. PMID:24961268

  5. Modulation of bovine sperm signalling pathways: correlation between intracellular parameters and sperm capacitation and acrosome exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Bailey, Janice L; Leclerc, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the viability, intracellular pH (pHi), cAMP ([cAMP]i), calcium concentration and protein phosphotyrosine content were evaluated in relation to the acrosomal and capacitation status of freshly ejaculated bull spermatozoa. These parameters were evaluated before and after incubation with the capacitation inducer heparin, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), the phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase inhibitors phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and sodium orthovanadate, and hydrogen peroxide. The results obtained were integrated to address the physiological interactions between the different signalling events affecting sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction. As expected, heparin promoted the expression of the 'B' pattern of chlortetracycline binding, increased pHi, [cAMP]i and the phosphotyrosine content of sperm proteins. The effects of heparin were enhanced by IBMX. Both PAO and sodium orthovanadate stimulated protein phosphotyrosine content and acrosomal exocytosis, although only PAO affected pH, Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Intracellular pH was increased while both Ca2+ and [cAMP]i were decreased. Physiological concentrations of H2O2 increased [cAMP]i and promoted acrosomal exocytosis. A significant positive correlation was found between sperm capacitation, protein phosphotyrosine content and stored Ca2+ concentration, whereas the acrosome reaction was correlated with pHi and Ca2+ concentration. This study presents the first global analysis of the major elements individually described during sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction signalling pathways, supported by statistical correlations. PMID:19383258

  6. Opposite regulation of cocaine-induced intracellular signaling and gene expression by dopamine D1 and D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Ming

    2006-08-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine induces persistent neuroadaptations that involve alterations in cellular signaling and gene expression mediated by dopamine (DA) receptors in the brain. Both dopamine D1 and D3 receptors mediate cocaine-induced behaviors and they are also coexpressed in the same neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudoputamen (CPu). We have investigated whether these two receptors coordinately regulate intracellular signaling and gene expression after acute and repeated cocaine administration. We found that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and c-fos induction in the CPu following an acute cocaine administration is mediated by the D1 receptor and inhibited by the D3 receptor. ERK activation is necessary for acute cocaine-induced expression of fos family genes that include c-fos, fosB, and fra2. Furthermore, potential target genes of cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein and/or AP-1 transcription complex, including dynorphin, neogenin, and synaptotagmin VII, are also oppositely regulated by D1 and D3 receptors after repeated cocaine injections. Lastly, such regulation requires proper ERK activation. These results suggest that D1 and D3 receptors oppositely regulate target gene expression by regulating ERK activation after cocaine administration. PMID:17105899

  7. Effects of an EGFR-binding affibody molecule on intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Ekerljung, L; Sahlberg, S H; Carlsson, J; Lennartsson, J; Glimelius, B

    2010-04-01

    Effects on intracellular signaling were studied in cells treated with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2 that targets the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is overexpressed in many types of cancers and plays a fundamental role in cell signaling and it is of interest to find targeting agents capable of blocking the receptor. The clinically approved antibody cetuximab (Erbitux) and the natural ligand EGF were included as reference molecules. Two EGFR-rich cell lines, A-431 and U-343, were exposed to the three targeting agents and lysed. The cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with the receptors, or directly separated by SDS-Page. Autophosphorylation of the receptors and phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins Erk and Akt, were evaluated by Western blotting. Although the three different agents compete for the same binding site on EGFR, they influenced the signaling differently. The affibody molecule did not induce autophosphorylation of EGFR or any other receptor in the EGFR-family but, in spite of this, induced phosphorylation of Erk in both cell lines and Akt in the A-431 cells. Thus, the results suggest that the signaling pattern induced by (ZEGFR:955)2 is only partly similar to that induced by cetuximab. This makes the affibody molecule a potentially interesting alternative to cetuximab for EGFR-targeted therapy since it might give different therapy-related effects on tumor cells and different side effects on normal tissues. PMID:20198342

  8. Are Molecular Vibration Patterns of Cell Structural Elements Used for Intracellular Signalling?

    PubMed Central

    Jaross, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Background: To date the manner in which information reaches the nucleus on that part within the three-dimensional structure where specific restorative processes of structural components of the cell are required is unknown. The soluble signalling molecules generated in the course of destructive and restorative processes communicate only as needed. Hypothesis: All molecules show temperature-dependent molecular vibration creating a radiation in the infrared region. Each molecule species has in its turn a specific frequency pattern under given specific conditions. Changes in their structural composition result in modified frequency patterns of the molecules in question. The main structural elements of the cell membrane, of the endoplasmic reticulum, of the Golgi apparatus, and of the different microsomes representing the great variety of polar lipids show characteristic frequency patterns with peaks in the region characterised by low water absorption. These structural elements are very dynamic, mainly caused by the creation of signal molecules and transport containers. By means of the characteristic radiation, the area where repair or substitution services are needed could be identified; this spatial information complements the signalling of the soluble signal molecules. Based on their resonance properties receptors located on the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope should be able to read typical frequencies and pass them into the nucleus. Clearly this physical signalling must be blocked by the cell membrane to obviate the flow of information into adjacent cells. Conclusion: If the hypothesis can be proved experimentally, it should be possible to identify and verify characteristic infrared frequency patterns. The application of these signal frequencies onto cells would open entirely new possibilities in medicine and all biological disciplines specifically to influence cell growth and metabolism. Similar to this intracellular system, an extracellular signalling system

  9. From intracellular signaling to population oscillations: bridging size- and time-scales in collective behavior.

    PubMed

    Sgro, Allyson E; Schwab, David J; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Mestler, Troy; Mehta, Pankaj; Gregor, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Collective behavior in cellular populations is coordinated by biochemical signaling networks within individual cells. Connecting the dynamics of these intracellular networks to the population phenomena they control poses a considerable challenge because of network complexity and our limited knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, from physical systems, we know that behavioral changes in the individual constituents of a collectively behaving system occur in a limited number of well-defined classes, and these can be described using simple models. Here, we apply such an approach to the emergence of collective oscillations in cellular populations of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Through direct tests of our model with quantitative in vivo measurements of single-cell and population signaling dynamics, we show how a simple model can effectively describe a complex molecular signaling network at multiple size and temporal scales. The model predicts novel noise-driven single-cell and population-level signaling phenomena that we then experimentally observe. Our results suggest that like physical systems, collective behavior in biology may be universal and described using simple mathematical models. PMID:25617347

  10. From intracellular signaling to population oscillations: bridging size- and time-scales in collective behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sgro, Allyson E; Schwab, David J; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Mestler, Troy; Mehta, Pankaj; Gregor, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Collective behavior in cellular populations is coordinated by biochemical signaling networks within individual cells. Connecting the dynamics of these intracellular networks to the population phenomena they control poses a considerable challenge because of network complexity and our limited knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, from physical systems, we know that behavioral changes in the individual constituents of a collectively behaving system occur in a limited number of well-defined classes, and these can be described using simple models. Here, we apply such an approach to the emergence of collective oscillations in cellular populations of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Through direct tests of our model with quantitative in vivo measurements of single-cell and population signaling dynamics, we show how a simple model can effectively describe a complex molecular signaling network at multiple size and temporal scales. The model predicts novel noise-driven single-cell and population-level signaling phenomena that we then experimentally observe. Our results suggest that like physical systems, collective behavior in biology may be universal and described using simple mathematical models. PMID:25617347

  11. Intracellular Information Processing through Encoding and Decoding of Dynamic Signaling Features

    PubMed Central

    Makadia, Hirenkumar K.; Schwaber, James S.; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling dynamics and transcriptional regulatory activities are variable within specific cell types responding to an identical stimulus. In addition to studying the network interactions, there is much interest in utilizing single cell scale data to elucidate the non-random aspects of the variability involved in cellular decision making. Previous studies have considered the information transfer between the signaling and transcriptional domains based on an instantaneous relationship between the molecular activities. These studies predict a limited binary on/off encoding mechanism which underestimates the complexity of biological information processing, and hence the utility of single cell resolution data. Here we pursue a novel strategy that reformulates the information transfer problem as involving dynamic features of signaling rather than molecular abundances. We pursue a computational approach to test if and how the transcriptional regulatory activity patterns can be informative of the temporal history of signaling. Our analysis reveals (1) the dynamic features of signaling that significantly alter transcriptional regulatory patterns (encoding), and (2) the temporal history of signaling that can be inferred from single cell scale snapshots of transcriptional activity (decoding). Immediate early gene expression patterns were informative of signaling peak retention kinetics, whereas transcription factor activity patterns were informative of activation and deactivation kinetics of signaling. Moreover, the information processing aspects varied across the network, with each component encoding a selective subset of the dynamic signaling features. We developed novel sensitivity and information transfer maps to unravel the dynamic multiplexing of signaling features at each of these network components. Unsupervised clustering of the maps revealed two groups that aligned with network motifs distinguished by transcriptional feedforward vs feedback interactions. Our new

  12. SET Protein Interacts with Intracellular Domains of the Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Receptor and Differentially Regulates Receptor Signaling to cAMP and Calcium in Gonadotrope Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Avet, Charlotte; Garrel, Ghislaine; Denoyelle, Chantal; Laverrière, Jean-Noël; Counis, Raymond; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Simon, Violaine

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, the receptor of the neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRHR) is unique among the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family because it lacks the carboxyl-terminal tail involved in GPCR desensitization. Therefore, mechanisms involved in the regulation of GnRHR signaling are currently poorly known. Here, using immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down experiments, we demonstrated that SET interacts with GnRHR and targets the first and third intracellular loops. We delineated, by site-directed mutagenesis, SET binding sites to the basic amino acids 66KRKK69 and 246RK247, located next to sequences required for receptor signaling. The impact of SET on GnRHR signaling was assessed by decreasing endogenous expression of SET with siRNA in gonadotrope cells. Using cAMP and calcium biosensors in gonadotrope living cells, we showed that SET knockdown specifically decreases GnRHR-mediated mobilization of intracellular cAMP, whereas it increases its intracellular calcium signaling. This suggests that SET influences signal transfer between GnRHR and G proteins to enhance GnRHR signaling to cAMP. Accordingly, complexing endogenous SET by introduction of the first intracellular loop of GnRHR in αT3-1 cells significantly reduced GnRHR activation of the cAMP pathway. Furthermore, decreasing SET expression prevented cAMP-mediated GnRH stimulation of Gnrhr promoter activity, highlighting a role of SET in gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulation of gene expression. In conclusion, we identified SET as the first direct interacting partner of mammalian GnRHR and showed that SET contributes to a switch of GnRHR signaling toward the cAMP pathway. PMID:23233674

  13. Intracellular mechanisms of hydroquinone toxicity on endotoxin-activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Pinedo, Fernanda Júdice; Bolonheis, Simone Marques; Ferreira, Zulma F; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolas; Teixeira, Simone Aparecida; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2012-11-01

    Circulating neutrophils promptly react to different substances in the blood and orchestrate the beginning of the innate inflammatory response. We have shown that in vivo exposure to hydroquinone (HQ), the most oxidative compound of cigarette smoke and a toxic benzene metabolite, affects circulating neutrophils, making them unresponsive to a subsequent bacterial infection. In order to understand the action of toxic molecular mechanisms on neutrophil functions, in vitro HQ actions on pro-inflammatory mediator secretions evoked by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated. Neutrophils from male Wistar rats were cultured with vehicle or HQ (5 or 10 μM; 2 h) and subsequently incubated with LPS (5 μg/ml; 18 h). Hydroquinone treatment impaired LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 secretions by neutrophils. The toxic effect was not dependent on cell death, reduced expression of the LPS receptor or toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) or cell priming, as HQ did not induce reactive oxygen species generation or β(2)integrin membrane expression. The action of toxic mechanisms on cytokine secretion was dependent on reduced gene synthesis, which may be due to decreased nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Conversely, this intracellular pathway was not involved in impaired NO production because HQ treatments only affected inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression and activity, suggesting posttranscriptional and/or posttranslational mechanisms of action. Altogether, our data show that HQ alters the action of different LPS-activated pathways on neutrophils, which may contribute to the impaired triggering of the host innate immune reaction detected during in vivo HQ exposure. PMID:22717997

  14. The Canonical Notch Signaling Pathway: Unfolding the Activation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kopan, Raphael; Ilagan, Ma. Xenia G.

    2009-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates many aspects of metazoan development and tissue renewal. Accordingly, misregulation or loss of Notch signaling underlies multiple human disorders, from developmental syndromes to adult onset diseases and cancer. Notch receptor activation is irreversible as it involves proteolysis-mediated release of the Notch intracellular domain, translocation to the nucleus, and association with a DNA-bound protein. Even though each Notch molecule signals only once without amplification by secondary messenger cascades, Notch signaling is remarkably robust in most tissues. In this review, we highlight the recent studies that reveal new molecular details involved in regulating ligand-mediated activation, receptor proteolysis and target selection. PMID:19379690

  15. Coupling mechanical forces to electrical signaling: molecular motors and the intracellular transport of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-04-01

    Proper localization of various ion channels is fundamental to neuronal functions, including postsynaptic potential plasticity, dendritic integration, action potential initiation and propagation, and neurotransmitter release. Microtubule-based forward transport mediated by kinesin motors plays a key role in placing ion channel proteins to correct subcellular compartments. PDZ- and coiled-coil-domain proteins function as adaptor proteins linking ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors to various kinesin motors, respectively. Recent studies show that several voltage-gated ion channel/transporter proteins directly bind to kinesins during forward transport. Three major regulatory mechanisms underlying intracellular transport of ion channels are also revealed. These studies contribute to understanding how mechanical forces are coupled to electrical signaling and illuminating pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22910031

  16. Coupling Mechanical Forces to Electrical Signaling: Molecular Motors and the Intracellular Transport of Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Proper localization of various ion channels is fundamental to neuronal functions, including postsynaptic potential plasticity, dendritic integration, action potential initiation and propagation, and neurotransmitter release. Microtubule-based forward transport mediated by kinesin motors plays a key role in placing ion channel proteins to correct subcellular compartments. PDZ- and coiled-coil-domain proteins function as adaptor proteins linking ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors to various kinesin motors, respectively. Recent studies show that several voltage-gated ion channel/transporter proteins directly bind to kinesins during forward transport. Three major regulatory mechanisms underlying intracellular transport of ion channels are also revealed. These studies contribute to understanding how mechanical forces are coupled to electrical signaling and illuminating pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22910031

  17. α-Arrestins Aly1 and Aly2 Regulate Intracellular Trafficking in Response to Nutrient Signaling

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Allyson F.; Apffel, Alex; Gardner, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular signals regulate trafficking events to reorganize proteins at the plasma membrane (PM); however, few effectors of this regulation have been identified. β-Arrestins relay signaling cues to the trafficking machinery by controlling agonist-stimulated endocytosis of G-protein–coupled receptors. In contrast, we show that yeast α-arrestins, Aly1 and Aly2, control intracellular sorting of Gap1, the general amino acid permease, in response to nutrients. These studies are the first to demonstrate association of α-arrestins with clathrin and clathrin adaptor proteins (AP) and show that Aly1 and Aly2 interact directly with the γ-subunit of AP-1, Apl4. Aly2-dependent trafficking of Gap1 requires AP-1, which mediates endosome-to-Golgi transport, and the nutrient-regulated kinase, Npr1, which phosphorylates Aly2. During nitrogen starvation, Npr1 phosphorylation of Aly2 may stimulate Gap1 incorporation into AP-1/clathrin-coated vesicles to promote Gap1 trafficking from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. Ultimately, increased Aly1-/Aly2-mediated recycling of Gap1 from endosomes results in higher Gap1 levels within cells and at the PM by diverting Gap away from trafficking pathways that lead to vacuolar degradation. This work defines a new role for arrestins in membrane trafficking and offers insight into how α-arrestins coordinate signaling events with protein trafficking. PMID:20739461

  18. Intracellular-activated Notch1 can reactivate Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus from latency

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Ke; Murakami, Masanao; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Kuppers, Daniel A.; Robertson, Erle S. . E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes a predominantly latent infection in the infected host. Importantly, during latency, only a small number of viral encoded genes are expressed. This viral gene expression pattern contributes to the establishment of long-term infection as well as the ability of the virus to evade the immune system. Previous studies have been shown that the replication and transcription activator (RTA) encoded by ORF50 activates it downstream genes and initiates viral lytic reactivation through functional interaction with RBP-J{kappa}, the major downstream effector of the Notch signaling pathway. This indicates that RTA can usurp the conserved Notch signaling pathway and mimic the activities of intracellular Notch1 to modulate gene expression. In this report, we show that the activated intracellular domain of Notch1 (ICN) is aberrantly accumulated in KSHV latently infected pleural effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells. ICN activated the RTA promoter in a dose-dependent manner, and forced expression of ICN in latently infected KSHV-positive cells initiated full blown lytic replication with the production of infectious viral progeny. However, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) which is predominantly expressed during latency can specifically down-modulate ICN-mediated transactivation of RTA and so control KSHV for lytic reactivation. These results demonstrate that LANA can inhibit viral lytic replication by antagonizing ICN function and suggest that LANA is a critical component of the regulatory control mechanism for switching between viral latent and lytic replication by directly interacting with effectors of the conserved cellular Notch1 pathway.

  19. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo applications. Further

  20. Intracellular signaling pathways required for rat vascular smooth muscle cell migration. Interactions between basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bilato, C; Pauly, R R; Melillo, G; Monticone, R; Gorelick-Feldman, D; Gluzband, Y A; Sollott, S J; Ziman, B; Lakatta, E G; Crow, M T

    1995-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways activated by both PDGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) have been implicated in the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), a key step in the pathogenesis of many vascular diseases. We demonstrate here that, while bFGF is a weak chemoattractant for VSMCs, it is required for the PDGF-directed migration of VSMCs and the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKinase II), an intracellular event that we have previously shown to be important in the regulation of VSMC migration. Neutralizing antibodies to bFGF caused a dramatic reduction in the size of the intracellular calcium transient normally seen after PDGF stimulation and inhibited both PDGF-directed VSMC migration and CamKinase II activation. Partially restoring the calcium transient with ionomycin restored migration and CamKinase II activation as did the forced expression of a mutant CamKinase II that had been "locked" in the active state by site-directed mutagenesis. These results suggest that bFGF links PDGF receptor stimulation to changes in intracellular calcium and CamKinase II activation, reinforcing the central role played by CamKinase II in regulating VSMC migration. Images PMID:7560082

  1. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  2. Hyperoside regulates the level of thymic stromal lymphopoietin through intracellular calcium signalling.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Go, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-07-01

    Hyperoside (HYP) is the principle active component of Crataegus pinnatifida. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions. Here, we investigated how HYP regulates the levels of TSLP in a human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. We analyzed the levels of TSLP by treatment with HYP in phorbol myristate acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated HMC-1 cells with ELISA and a polymerase chain reaction analysis. We also analyzed the pathway that HYP regulates TSLP by measuring the level of fluorescent intracellular calcium and using a Western blot analysis. HYP decreased the level of intracellular calcium in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It also significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of TSLP in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It significantly decreased the levels of receptor-interacting protein 2 and active caspase-1 in stimulated HMC-1 cells. HYP significantly decreased the translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus and degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Furthermore, it significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Taken together, our findings establish HYP as a potential agent for the treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:24338918

  3. Blockade of intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus erases recognition memory via impairment of maintained LTP.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Haruna; Minamino, Tatsuya; Fujii, Hiroaki; Takada, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ando, Masaki; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    There is no evidence on the precise role of synaptic Zn2+ signaling on the retention and recall of recognition memory. On the basis of the findings that intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition, short-term memory, the present study deals with the effect of spatiotemporally blocking Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus after LTP induction and learning. Three-day-maintained LTP was impaired 1 day after injection of clioquinol into the dentate gyrus, which transiently reduced intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus. The irreversible impairment was rescued not only by co-injection of ZnCl2 , which ameliorated the loss of Zn2+ signaling, but also by pre-injection of Jasplakinolide, a stabilizer of F-actin, prior to clioquinol injection. Simultaneously, 3-day-old space recognition memory was impaired 1 day after injection of clioquinol into the dentate gyrus, but not by pre-injection of Jasplakinolide. Jasplakinolide also rescued both impairments of 3-day-maintained LTP and 3-day-old memory after injection of ZnAF-2DA into the dentate gyrus, which blocked intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus. The present paper indicates that the blockade and/or loss of intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus coincidently impair maintained LTP and recognition memory. The mechanism maintaining LTP via intracellular Zn2+ signaling in dentate granule cells, which may be involved in the formation of F-actin, may retain space recognition memory. PMID:25603776

  4. Activation of NADPH oxidase 1 increases intracellular calcium and migration of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Matthew C; Takapoo, Maysam; Jagadeesha, Dammanahalli K; Stanic, Bojana; Banfi, Botond; Bhalla, Ramesh C; Miller, Francis J

    2011-09-01

    Redox-dependent migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are central events in the development of vascular proliferative diseases; however, the underlying intracellular signaling mechanisms are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that activation of Nox1 NADPH oxidase modulates intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) levels. Using cultured SMCs from wild-type and Nox1 null mice, we confirmed that thrombin-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species requires Nox1. Thrombin rapidly increased [Ca(2+)](i), as measured by fura-2 fluorescence ratio imaging, in wild-type but not Nox1 null SMCs. The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in wild-type SMCs was inhibited by antisense to Nox1 and restored by expression of Nox1 in Nox1 null SMCs. Investigation into potential mechanisms by which Nox1 modulates [Ca(2+)](i) showed that thrombin-induced inositol triphosphate generation and thapsigargin-induced intracellular calcium mobilization were similar in wild-type and Nox1 null SMCs. To examine the effects of Nox1 on Ca(2+) entry, cells were either bathed in Ca(2+)-free medium or exposed to dihydropyridines to block L-type Ca(2+) channel activity. Treatment with nifedipine or removal of extracellular Ca(2+) reduced the thrombin-mediated increase of [Ca(2+)](i) in wild-type SMCs, whereas the response in Nox1 null SMCs was unchanged. Sodium vanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases, restored the thrombin-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](i) in Nox1 null SMCs. Migration of SMCs was impaired with deficiency of Nox1 and restored with expression of Nox1 or the addition of sodium vanadate. In summary, we conclude that Nox1 NADPH oxidase modulates Ca(2+) mobilization in SMCs, in part through regulation of Ca(2+) influx, to thereby promote cell migration. PMID:21810651

  5. Intracellular Osteopontin inhibits toll-like receptor signaling and impedes liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoyu; He, Chunyan; Jing, Wei; Zhou, Xuyu; Chen, Rui; Cao, Lei; Zhu, Minhui; Jia, Rongjie; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun; Zhao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) has been implicated widely in tumor growth and metastasis, but the range of its contributions is not yet fully understood. In this study, we show that genetic ablation of Opn in mice sensitizes them to diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Opn-deficient mice (Opn(-/-) mice) exhibited enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines and compensatory proliferation. Administering OPN antibody or recombinant OPN protein to wild-type or Opn(-/-) mice-derived macrophages, respectively, had little effect on cytokine production. In contrast, overexpression of intracellular OPN (iOPN) in Opn-deficient macrophages strongly suppressed production of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, we found that iOPN was able to interact with the pivotal Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling protein MyD88 in macrophages after stimulation with cellular debris, thereby disrupting TLR signaling in macrophages. Our results indicated that iOPN was capable of functioning as an endogenous negative regulator of TLR-mediated immune responses, acting to ameliorate production of proinflammatory cytokines and curtail DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Together, our results expand the important role of OPN in inflammation-associated cancers and deepen its relevance for novel treatment strategies in liver cancer. PMID:25398438

  6. Structural asymmetry in a conserved signaling system that regulates division, replication, and virulence of an intracellular pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Jonathan W.; Herrou, Julien; Briegel, Ariane; Rotskoff, Grant; Crosson, Sean

    2015-01-01

    We have functionally and structurally defined an essential protein phosphorelay that regulates expression of genes required for growth, division, and intracellular survival of the global zoonotic pathogen Brucella abortus. Our study delineates phosphoryl transfer through this molecular pathway, which initiates from the sensor kinase CckA and proceeds through the ChpT phosphotransferase to two regulatory substrates: CtrA and CpdR. Genetic perturbation of this system results in defects in cell growth and division site selection, and a specific viability deficit inside human phagocytic cells. Thus, proper control of B. abortus division site polarity is necessary for survival in the intracellular niche. We further define the structural foundations of signaling from the central phosphotransferase, ChpT, to its response regulator substrate, CtrA, and provide evidence that there are at least two modes of interaction between ChpT and CtrA, only one of which is competent to catalyze phosphoryltransfer. The structure and dynamics of the active site on each side of the ChpT homodimer are distinct, supporting a model in which quaternary structure of the 2:2 ChpT–CtrA complex enforces an asymmetric mechanism of phosphoryl transfer between ChpT and CtrA. Our study provides mechanistic understanding, from the cellular to the atomic scale, of a conserved transcriptional regulatory system that controls the cellular and infection biology of B. abortus. More generally, our results provide insight into the structural basis of two-component signal transduction, which is broadly conserved in bacteria, plants, and fungi. PMID:26124143

  7. Structural asymmetry in a conserved signaling system that regulates division, replication, and virulence of an intracellular pathogen.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan W; Herrou, Julien; Briegel, Ariane; Rotskoff, Grant; Crosson, Sean

    2015-07-14

    We have functionally and structurally defined an essential protein phosphorelay that regulates expression of genes required for growth, division, and intracellular survival of the global zoonotic pathogen Brucella abortus. Our study delineates phosphoryl transfer through this molecular pathway, which initiates from the sensor kinase CckA and proceeds through the ChpT phosphotransferase to two regulatory substrates: CtrA and CpdR. Genetic perturbation of this system results in defects in cell growth and division site selection, and a specific viability deficit inside human phagocytic cells. Thus, proper control of B. abortus division site polarity is necessary for survival in the intracellular niche. We further define the structural foundations of signaling from the central phosphotransferase, ChpT, to its response regulator substrate, CtrA, and provide evidence that there are at least two modes of interaction between ChpT and CtrA, only one of which is competent to catalyze phosphoryltransfer. The structure and dynamics of the active site on each side of the ChpT homodimer are distinct, supporting a model in which quaternary structure of the 2:2 ChpT-CtrA complex enforces an asymmetric mechanism of phosphoryl transfer between ChpT and CtrA. Our study provides mechanistic understanding, from the cellular to the atomic scale, of a conserved transcriptional regulatory system that controls the cellular and infection biology of B. abortus. More generally, our results provide insight into the structural basis of two-component signal transduction, which is broadly conserved in bacteria, plants, and fungi. PMID:26124143

  8. Intracellular activity of antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse peritonitis model.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Anne; Hessler, Jonas H R; Skov, Robert L; Blom, Jens; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2009-05-01

    Antibiotic treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections is often problematic due to the slow response to therapy and the high frequency of infection recurrence. The intracellular persistence of staphylococci has been recognized and could offer a good explanation for these treatment difficulties. Knowledge of the interplay between intracellular antibiotic activity and the overall outcome of infection is therefore important. Several intracellular in vitro models have been developed, but few experimental animal models have been published. The mouse peritonitis/sepsis model was used as the basic in vivo model exploring a quantitative ex vivo extra- and intracellular differentiation assay. The intracellular presence of S. aureus was documented by electron microscopy. Five antibiotics, dicloxacillin, cefuroxime, gentamicin, azithromycin, and rifampin (rifampicin), were tested in the new in vivo model; and the model was able to distinguish between their extra- and intracellular effects. The intracellular effects of the five antibiotics could be ranked as follows as the mean change in the log(10) number of CFU/ml (Delta log(10) CFU/ml) between treated and untreated mice after 4 h of treatment: dicloxacillin (3.70 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > cefuroxime (3.56 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > rifampin (1.86 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > gentamicin (0.61 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > azithromycin (0.21 Delta log(10) CFU/ml). We could also show that the important factors during testing of intracellular activity in vivo are the size, number, and frequency of doses; the time of exposure; and the timing between the start of infection and treatment. A poor correlation between the intracellular accumulation of the antibiotics and the actual intracellular effect was found. This stresses the importance of performing experimental studies, like those with the new in vivo model described here, to measure actual intracellular activity instead of making predictions based on cellular pharmacokinetic and MICs. PMID

  9. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24709904

  10. Modulation of Macrophage Inflammatory Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling by Intracellular Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Hayes, James B; Sircy, Linda M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Ding, Wandi; Leander, Rachel N; McClelland, Erin E; Nelson, David E

    2016-07-22

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a common facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause life-threatening fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. Shortly after infection, Cn is detectable as both extra- and intracellular yeast particles, with Cn being capable of establishing long-lasting latent infections within host macrophages. Although recent studies have shown that shed capsular polysaccharides and intact extracellular Cn can compromise macrophage function through modulation of NF-κB signaling, it is currently unclear whether intracellular Cn also affects NF-κB signaling. Utilizing live cell imaging and computational modeling, we find that extra- and intracellular Cn support distinct modes of NF-κB signaling in cultured murine macrophages. Specifically, in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages treated with extracellular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major Cn capsular polysaccharide, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is inhibited, whereas in cells with intracellular Cn, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is both amplified and sustained. Mathematical simulations and quantification of nascent protein expression indicate that this is a possible consequence of Cn-induced "translational interference," impeding IκBα resynthesis. We also show that long term Cn infection induces stable nuclear localization of p65 and IκBα proteins in the absence of additional pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this case, nuclear localization of p65 is not accompanied by TNFα or inducible NOS (iNOS) expression. These results demonstrate that capsular polysaccharides and intact intracellular yeast manipulate NF-κB via multiple distinct mechanisms and provide new insights into how Cn might modulate cellular signaling at different stages of an infection. PMID:27231343

  11. Endocannabinoid signaling enhances visual responses through modulation of intracellular chloride levels in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Miraucourt, Loïs S; Tsui, Jennifer; Gobert, Delphine; Desjardins, Jean-François; Schohl, Anne; Sild, Mari; Spratt, Perry; Castonguay, Annie; De Koninck, Yves; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Wiseman, Paul W; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) are widely expressed in the vertebrate retina, but the role of endocannabinoids in vision is not fully understood. Here, we identified a novel mechanism underlying a CB1R-mediated increase in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) intrinsic excitability acting through AMPK-dependent inhibition of NKCC1 activity. Clomeleon imaging and patch clamp recordings revealed that inhibition of NKCC1 downstream of CB1R activation reduces intracellular Cl− levels in RGCs, hyperpolarizing the resting membrane potential. We confirmed that such hyperpolarization enhances RGC action potential firing in response to subsequent depolarization, consistent with the increased intrinsic excitability of RGCs observed with CB1R activation. Using a dot avoidance assay in freely swimming Xenopus tadpoles, we demonstrate that CB1R activation markedly improves visual contrast sensitivity under low-light conditions. These results highlight a role for endocannabinoids in vision and present a novel mechanism for cannabinoid modulation of neuronal activity through Cl− regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15932.001 PMID:27501334

  12. Crucial involvement of xanthine oxidase in the intracellular signalling networks associated with human myeloid cell function

    PubMed Central

    Abooali, Maryam; Lall, Gurprit S.; Coughlan, Karen; Lall, Harjinder S.; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) is an enzyme which plays a central role in purine catabolism by converting hypoxanthine into xanthine and then further into uric acid. Here we report that XOD is activated in THP-1 human myeloid cells in response to pro-inflammatory and growth factor stimulation. This effect occurred following stimulation of THP-1 cells with ligands of plasma membrane associated TLRs 2 and 4, endosomal TLRs 7 and 8 as well as stem cell growth factor (SCF). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription complexes were found to be responsible for XOD upregulation. Importantly, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major myeloid cell translation regulator, was also found to be essential for XOD activation. Specific inhibition of XOD by allopurinol and sodium tungstate led to an increase in intracellular AMP levels triggering downregulation of mTOR activation by phosphorylation of its T2446 residue. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that XOD is not only activated by pro-inflammatory stimuli or SCF but also plays an important role in maintaining mTOR-dependent translational control during the biological responses of human myeloid cells. PMID:25200751

  13. Crucial involvement of xanthine oxidase in the intracellular signalling networks associated with human myeloid cell function.

    PubMed

    Abooali, Maryam; Lall, Gurprit S; Coughlan, Karen; Lall, Harjinder S; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) is an enzyme which plays a central role in purine catabolism by converting hypoxanthine into xanthine and then further into uric acid. Here we report that XOD is activated in THP-1 human myeloid cells in response to pro-inflammatory and growth factor stimulation. This effect occurred following stimulation of THP-1 cells with ligands of plasma membrane associated TLRs 2 and 4, endosomal TLRs 7 and 8 as well as stem cell growth factor (SCF). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription complexes were found to be responsible for XOD upregulation. Importantly, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major myeloid cell translation regulator, was also found to be essential for XOD activation. Specific inhibition of XOD by allopurinol and sodium tungstate led to an increase in intracellular AMP levels triggering downregulation of mTOR activation by phosphorylation of its T2446 residue. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that XOD is not only activated by pro-inflammatory stimuli or SCF but also plays an important role in maintaining mTOR-dependent translational control during the biological responses of human myeloid cells. PMID:25200751

  14. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  15. Activation of Notch-Mediated Protective Signaling in the Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Gude, Natalie A.; Emmanuel, Gregory; Wu, Weitao; Cottage, Christopher T.; Fischer, Kimberlee; Quijada, Pearl; Muraski, John A.; Alvarez, Roberto; Rubio, Marta; Schaefer, Eric; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The Notch network regulates multiple cellular processes, including cell fate determination, development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and regeneration. These processes are regulated via Notch-mediated activity that involves hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met receptor and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling cascades. The impact of HGF on Notch signaling was assessed following myocardial infarction as well as in cultured cardiomyocytes. Notch1 is activated in border zone cardiomyocytes coincident with nuclear c-Met following infarction. Intramyocardial injection of HGF enhances Notch1 and Akt activation in adult mouse myocardium. Corroborating evidence in cultured cardiomyocytes shows treatment with HGF or insulin increases levels of Notch effector Hes1 in immunoblots, whereas overexpression of activated Notch intracellular domain prompts a 3-fold increase in phosphorylated Akt. Infarcted hearts injected with adenoviral vector expressing Notch intracellular domain treatment exhibit improved hemodynamic function in comparison with control mice after 4 weeks, implicating Notch signaling in a cardioprotective role following cardiac injury. These results indicate Notch activation in cardiomyocytes is mediated through c-Met and Akt survival signaling pathways, and Notch1 signaling in turn enhances Akt activity. This mutually supportive crosstalk suggests a positive survival feedback mechanism between Notch and Akt signaling in adult myocardium following injury. PMID:18369158

  16. Identification of the nuclear export signals that regulate the intracellular localization of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Akiko; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken. E-mail: kitajima@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    The CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSS) catalyzes the activation of sialic acid (Sia) to CMP-Sia which is a donor substrate of sialyltransferases. The vertebrate CSSs are usually localized in nucleus due to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) on the molecule. In this study, we first point out that a small, but significant population of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase (mCSS) is also present in cytoplasm, though mostly in nucleus. As a mechanism for the localization in cytoplasm, we first identified two nuclear export signals (NESs) in mCSS, based on the localization studies of the potential NES-deleted mCSS mutants as well as the potential NES-tagged eGFP proteins. These two NESs are conserved among mammalian and fish CSSs, but not present in the bacterial or insect CSS. These results suggest that the intracellular localization of vertebrate CSSs is regulated by not only the NLS, but also the NES sequences.

  17. Effect of introduction of chondroitin sulfate into polymer-peptide conjugate responding to intracellular signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, Tetsuro; Toita, Riki; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Koga, Haruka; Shiosaki, Shujiro; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2011-09-01

    We recently developed a novel tumor-targeted gene delivery system responding to hyperactivated intracellular signals. Polymeric carrier for gene delivery consists of hydrophilic neutral polymer as main chains and cationic peptide substrate for target enzyme as side chains, and was named polymer-peptide conjugate (PPC). Introduction of chondroitin sulfate (CS), which induces receptor-medicated endocytosis, into polymers mainly with a high cationic charge density such as polyethylenimine can increase tumor-targeted gene delivery. In the present study, we examined whether introduction of CS into PPC containing five cationic amino acids can increase gene expression in tumor cells. Size and zeta potential of plasmid DNA (pDNA)/PPC/CS complex were <200 nm and between -10 and -15 mV, respectively. In tumor cell experiments, pDNA/PPC/CS complex showed lower stability and gene regulation, compared with that of pDNA/PPC. Moreover, no difference in gene expression was identified between positive and negative polymer. These results were caused by fast disintegration of pDNA/PPC/CS complexes in the presence of serum. Thus, we suggest that introduction of negatively charged CS into polymers with a low charge density may lead to low stability and gene regulation of complexes.

  18. Cytokine Combination Therapy Prediction for Bone Remodeling in Tissue Engineering Based on the Intracellular Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Su, Jing; Bao, Jiguang; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Le; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yunzhi; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    The long-term performance of tissue-engineered bone grafts is determined by a dynamic balance between bone regeneration and resorption. We proposed using embedded cytokine slow-releasing hydrogels to tune this balance toward a desirable final bone density. In this study we established a systems biology model, and quantitatively explored the combinatorial effects of delivered cytokines from hydrogels on final bone density. We hypothesized that: 1) bone regeneration was driven by transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix, which responded to released cytokines, such as Wnt, BMP2, and TGFβ, drove the development of osteoblast lineage, and contributed to bone mass generation; and 2) the osteoclast lineage, on the other hand, governed the bone resorption, and communications between these two lineages determined the dynamics of bone remodeling. In our model, Intracellular signaling pathways were represented by ordinary differential equations, while the intercellular communications and cellular population dynamics were modeled by stochastic differential equations. Effects of synergistic cytokine combinations were evaluated by Loewe index and Bliss index. Simulation results revealed that the Wnt/BMP2 combinations released from hydrogels showed best control of bone regeneration and synergistic effects, and suggested optimal dose ratios of given cytokine combinations released from hydrogels to most efficiently control the long-term bone remodeling. We revealed the characteristics of cytokine combinations of Wnt/BMP2 which could be used to guide the design of in vivo bone scaffolds and the clinical treatment of some diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:22910219

  19. Interplay of the physical microenvironment, contact guidance, and intracellular signaling in cell decision making.

    PubMed

    Paul, Colin D; Shea, Daniel J; Mahoney, Megan R; Chai, Andreas; Laney, Victoria; Hung, Wei-Chien; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    The peritumoral physical microenvironment consists of complex topographies that influence cell migration. Cell decision making, upon encountering anisotropic, physiologically relevant physical cues, has yet to be elucidated. By integrating microfabrication with cell and molecular biology techniques, we provide a quantitative and mechanistic analysis of cell decision making in a variety of well-defined physical microenvironments. We used MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma and HT1080 fibrosarcoma as cell models. Cell decision making after lateral confinement in 2-dimensional microcontact printed lines is governed by branch width at bifurcations. Cells confined in narrow feeder microchannels prefer to enter wider branches at bifurcations. In contrast, in feeder channels that are wider than the cell body, cells elongate along one side wall of the channel and are guided by contact with the wall to the contiguous branch channel independent of its width. Knockdown of β1-integrins or inhibition of cellular contractility suppresses contact guidance. Concurrent, but not individual, knockdown of nonmuscle myosin isoforms IIA and IIB also decreases contact guidance, which suggests the existence of a compensatory mechanism between myosin IIA and myosin IIB. Conversely, knockdown or inhibition of cell division control protein 42 homolog promotes contact guidance-mediated decision making. Taken together, the dimensionality, length scales of the physical microenvironment, and intrinsic cell signaling regulate cell decision making at intersections.-Paul, C. D., Shea, D. J., Mahoney, M. R., Chai, A., Laney, V., Hung, W.-C., Konstantopoulos, K. Interplay of the physical microenvironment, contact guidance, and intracellular signaling in cell decision making. PMID:26902610

  20. Identification of phenolics in litchi and evaluation of anticancer cell proliferation activity and intracellular antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lingrong; You, Lijun; Yang, Xiaoman; Yang, Jiali; Chen, Feng; Jiang, Yueming; Yang, Bao

    2015-07-01

    Litchi leaf is a good resource for phenolics, which are good candidates for medicines. In this work, three phenolics were isolated from litchi leaf by column chromatography. Their structures were identified by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as secoisolariciresinol 9'-O-β-D-xyloside (1), 4,7,7',8',9,9'-hexahydroxy-3,3'-dimethoxy-8,4'-oxyneolignan (2), and cinnamtannin B1 (3). Cinnamtannin B1 showed better extra- and intracellular antioxidant activities than Compounds 1 and 2. The intracellular antioxidant activity of cinnamtannin B1 was related to the upregulation of endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase), and inhibition of ROS generation. Furthermore, cinnamtannin B1 exhibited strong antiproliferative effects against HepG2 and Siha cell lines with no significant cytotoxicities. In the case of the HepG2 cell line, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction were the underlying anticancer mechanisms of cinnamtannin B1. The results indicated that cinnamtannin B1 was a potent cancer cell proliferation inhibitor and a good intracellular antioxidant. PMID:25857215

  1. Pharmacology of the intracellular pathways activated by amyloid beta protein.

    PubMed

    Balleza-Tapia, Hugo; Peña, Fernando

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a late-life cognitive disorder associated, among other things, to the presence of extracellular aggregates of fibrillar amyloid beta protein (Abeta). However, there is growing evidence that early stages of AD may be due to neuronal network dysfunction produced by the actions of soluble forms of Abeta. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat AD, at least during its first stages, may be focused on preventing or reversing, the deleterious effects that soluble Abeta exerts on neuronal circuit function. In order to do so, it is necessary to elucidate the pathophysiological processes involved in Abeta-induced neuronal network dysfunction and the molecular processes underlying such dysfunction. Over the last decades, there has been extensive research about the molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of Abeta as well as possible neuroprotective strategies against such effects. Here we are going to review some of the intracellular pathways triggered by Abeta, which involve membrane receptors such as nicotinic-R, NMDA-R, integrins, TNF-R1, RAGE, FPRL and p75NTR and their intracellular mediators such as GSK3, PKC, PI3K, Akt, FAK, MAPK family, Src family and cdk5. Several of these pathways may constitute therapeutic targets for the treatment of the Abeta-induced neuronal network dysfunction which is, at least in part, the basis for cognitive dysfunction in AD. PMID:19519498

  2. Depollution potential of three macrophytes: exudated, wall-bound and intracellular peroxidase activities plus intracellular phenol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Larue, Camille; Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Wang, Runying; Mévy, Jean-Philippe

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of three macrophyte species (Iris pseudacorus, Typha latifolia and Phragmites australis) for detoxication of xenobiotics, and to study their variations with seasons or concentrations of sewage sludge from the food industry. For this purpose, some aspects of the green liver concept were explored through peroxidase measurements in three compartments in roots: intracellular, cell wall and extracellular. In addition, phenol concentrations were also measured in order to assess heavy metal detoxication potential. Enzyme activities and phenol concentrations were overall lower in winter according to the phenological stages and some sludge effects occurred. Results show that P. australis roots exuded and contained more peroxidase in all seasons: 17 U/g (1373 U/g protein), 0.8 U/g (613 U/g protein) and 4.8 U/g (1329 U/g protein) in intracellular compartments, cell wall and exudates, respectively. In contrast, the highest phenol concentration was found in I. pseudacorus roots: 3.58 mg eq. [corrected] gallic acid/g. Hence, in constructed wetlands, P. australis is suitable for organic waste water treatment, while I. pseudacorus should be used in the case of waters highly charged with heavy metals. PMID:20570142

  3. Nonsecreted cytoplasmic alpha-fetoprotein: a newly discovered role in intracellular signaling and regulation. An update and commentary.

    PubMed

    Mizejewski, G J

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a non-secreted cytoplasmic-bound form of alpha-fetoprotein is not a new notion in AFP biological activities. Cytoplasmic AFP (CyAFP) is a long known but forgotten protein in search of a function other than a histochemical biomarker. In this report, CyAFP is presented as an "old" protein with a newly described intracellular function. In 1976, CyAFP was shown to be a product of hepatoma cells utilizing 14Cleucine incorporation and demonstrated by autoradiographic procedures. The synthesis of CyAFP without secretion was demonstrated to occur in both malignant and non-malignant cells encompassing hepatomas, ascite fluid cells, immature rodent uterus, MCF-7 breast cancers, and cytosols from human breast cancer patients. Using computer protein matching and alignments in AFP versus members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, a consecutive series of leucine zipper (heptad) repeats in AFP was previously reported, suggesting the possibility for protein-to-protein interactions. The potential for heptad heterodimerization between protein-binding partners provided the rationale for proposing that CyAFP might have the capability to form molecular hetero-complexes with cytoplasmic based transcription factors. More recent investigations have now provided experimental evidence that CyAFP is capable of colocalizing and interacting with transcription-associated factors. Such proteins can modulate intracellular signaling leading to regulation of transcription factors and initiation of growth in human cancer cells. Although circulating serum AFP is known as a growth-enhancing factor during development, cytoplasmic AFP has a lethal role in the oncogenesis, growth, and metastasis of adult liver cancer. PMID:26162540

  4. Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) MyD88 and Tollip: intracellular localization and signal transduction function.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Wei; Wang, Zheng; Mo, Ze-Quan; Li, Xia; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Dan, Xue-Ming; Li, An-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll-interacting protein (Tollip) are two important regulatory proteins of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. In this paper, a Tollip sequence of grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was identified and the signal transduction functions of Tollip and MyD88 were studied. The full length of E. coioides Tollip (EcTollip) cDNA with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1734 nucleotides encoded a putative protein of 274 amino acid residues. The EcTollip protein had conservative domains with mammalian homologous proteins, and high identity (78%-95%) with other vertebrates. MyD88 and Tollip were distributed in the HeLa cytoplasm in a highly condensed form. Over-expression of MyD88 could activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its function was dependent on the death domain and ID domain on the N-terminal. Some important functional sites of mammalian MyD88 also affected fish MyD88 signal transduction. Tollip impaired NF-κB signals activated by MyD88, and its activity was dependent on the coupling of ubiquitin to the endoplasmic reticulum degradation (CUE) domain on the C-terminal. These results suggest that MyD88 and Tollip of fish and mammals are conservative on function during evolution. PMID:25449381

  5. Intracellular Complement Activation Sustains T Cell Homeostasis and Mediates Effector Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G.; Fara, Antonella F.; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C.; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T. Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P.; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While “tonic” intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance. PMID:24315997

  6. Intracellular complement activation sustains T cell homeostasis and mediates effector differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, M Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G; Fara, Antonella F; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-12

    Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While "tonic" intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance. PMID:24315997

  7. Intracellular signaling in the regulation of renal Na-K-ATPase. II. Role of eicosanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, T; Cohen, H T; Katz, A I

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported a novel intracellular mechanism of renal Na-K-ATPase regulation by agents that increase cell cAMP, which involves protein kinase A-phospholipase A2 and is mediated by one or more arachidonic acid metabolites (Satoh, T., H. T. Cohen, and A. I. Katz. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 89:1496). The present studies were, therefore, designed to assess the role of eicosanoids in the modulation of Na-K-ATPase activity in the rat cortical collecting duct. The effect of various cAMP agonists (dopamine, fenoldopam, vasopressin, forskolin, and dibutyryl cAMP), which inhibited the pump to a similar extent (approximately 50%), was independent of altered Na entry as it was elicited in the presence of amiloride or nystatin, or when NaCl was replaced with choline Cl. This effect was completely blocked by SKF 525A or ethoxyresorufin, two inhibitors of the cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase pathway, or by pretreating the animals with CoCl2, which depletes cytochrome P450. Equimolar concentrations (10(-7) M) of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin or meclofenamate caused only a partial inhibition of the cAMP agonists' effect on the pump, whereas nordihydroguaiaretic acid or A 63162, two inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway, were without effect. Furthermore, two products of this pathway, leukotriene B4 and leukotriene D4, had no effect on Na-K-ATPase activity, and ICI 198615, a leukotriene receptor antagonist, did not alter pump inhibition by cAMP agonists. Several P450 monoxygenase arachidonic acid metabolites (5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid; 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid; 11,12-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid; and 12(R)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid) as well as PGE2 inhibited the Na:K pump in dose-dependent manner, but the effect of PGE2 was blocked when Na availability was altered, whereas that of 12(R)-HETE remained unchanged. We conclude that the cytochrome P450-monooxygenase pathway of the arachidonic acid cascade plays a major role in the modulation of Na

  8. Fluoxetine induces alkalinization of astroglial cytosol through stimulation of sodium-hydrogen exchanger 1: dissection of intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jienan; Song, Dan; Bai, Qiufang; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Peng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggest astrocytic abnormality in major depression (MD) while treatment with anti-psychotic drugs affects astroglial functions. Astroglial cells are involved in pH homeostasis of the brain by transporting protons (through sodium-proton transporter 1, NHE1, glutamate transporters EAAT1/2 and proton-lactate co-transporter MCT1) and bicarbonate (through the sodium-bicarbonate co-transporter NBC or the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger AE). Here we show that chronic treatment with fluoxetine increases astroglial pHi by stimulating NHE1-mediated proton extrusion. At a clinically relevant concentration of 1 μM, fluoxetine significantly increased astroglial pHi from 7.05 to 7.34 after 3 weeks and from 7.18 to 7.58 after 4 weeks of drug treatment. Stimulation of NHE1 is a result of transporter phosphorylation mediated by several intracellular signaling cascades that include MAPK/ERK1/2, PI3K/AKT and ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK). Fluoxetine stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, AKT and RSK in a concentration dependent manner. Positive crosstalk exists between two signal pathways, MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT activated by fluoxetine since ERK1/2 phosphrylation could be abolished by inhibitors of PI3K, LY294002 and AKT, triciribine, and AKT phosphorylation by inhibitor of MAPK, U0126. As a result, RSK phosphorylation was not only inhibited by U0126 but also by inhibitor of LY294002. The NHE1 phoshorylation resulted in stimulation of NHE1 activity as revealed by the NH4Cl-prepulse technique; the increase of NHE1 activity was dependent on fluoxetine concentration, and could be inhibited by both U0126 and LY294002. Our findings suggest that regulation of astrocytic pHi and brain pH may be one of the mechanisms underlying fluoxetine action. PMID:25784857

  9. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and DNA damage response with analysis of intracellular ATM signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Sriram; Viswanathan, Preeti; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity by preventing and overcoming DNA damage is critical for cell survival. Deficiency or aberrancy in the DNA damage response, for example, through ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling, lead to pathophysiological perturbations in organs throughout the body. Therefore, control of DNA damage is of major interest for development of therapeutic agents. Such efforts will greatly benefit from convenient and simple diagnostic and/or drug development tools to demonstrate whether ATM and related genes have been activated and to then determine whether these have been returned to normal levels of activity because pathway members sense and also repair DNA damage. To overcome difficulties in analyzing differences in multitudinous ATM pathway members following DNA damage, we measured ATM promoter activity with a fluorescent td-Tomato reporter gene to interrogate the global effects of ATM signaling pathways. In cultured HuH-7 cell line derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma, cis-platinum, acetaminophen, or hydrogen peroxide caused DNA strand breaks and ATM pathway activation as shown by γH2AX expression, which in turn, led to rapid and sustained increases in ATM promoter activity. This assay of ATM promoter activity identified biological agents capable of controlling cellular DNA damage in toxin-treated HuH-7 cells and in mice after onset of drug-induced acute liver failure. Therefore, the proposed assay of ATM promoter activity in HuH-7 cells was appropriately informative for treating DNA damage. High-throughput screens using ATM promoter activation will be helpful for therapeutic development in DNA damage-associated abnormal ATM signaling in various cell types and organs. PMID:24927134

  10. Intracellular Signaling and Desmoglein 2 Shedding Triggered by Human Adenoviruses Ad3, Ad14, and Ad14P1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Ducournau, Corinne; Saydaminova, Kamola; Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Ho, Martin; Carter, Darrick; Zubieta, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently discovered that desmoglein 2 (DSG2) is a receptor for human adenovirus species B serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14. Ad3 is considered to be a widely distributed human pathogen. Ad3 binding to DSG2 triggers the transient opening of epithelial junctions. Here, we further delineate the mechanism that leads to DSG2-mediated epithelial junction opening in cells exposed to Ad3 and recombinant Ad3 fiber proteins. We identified an Ad3 fiber knob-dependent pathway that involves the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases triggering the activation of the matrix-metalloproteinase ADAM17. ADAM17, in turn, cleaves the extracellular domain of DSG2 that links epithelial cells together. The shed DSG2 domain can be detected in cell culture supernatant and also in serum of mice with established human xenograft tumors. We then extended our studies to Ad14 and Ad14P1. Ad14 is an important research and clinical object because of the recent appearance of a new, more pathogenic strain (Ad14P1). In a human epithelial cancer xenograft model, Ad14P1 showed more efficient viral spread and oncolysis than Ad14. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a mutation in the Ad14P1 fiber knob could account for the differences between the two strains. While our X-ray crystallography studies suggested an altered three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Ad14P1 fiber knob in the F-G loop region, this did not significantly change the fiber knob affinity to DSG2 or the intracellular signaling and DSG2 shedding in epithelial cancer cells. IMPORTANCE A number of widely distributed adenoviruses use the epithelial junction protein DSG2 as a receptor for infection and lateral spread. Interaction with DSG2 allows the virus not only to enter cells but also to open epithelial junctions which form a physical barrier to virus spread. Our study elucidates the mechanism beyond virus-triggered junction opening with a focus on adenovirus serotype 3. Ad3 binds to DSG2 with its fiber

  11. Intracellular disassembly and activity of pertussis toxin require interaction with ATP.

    PubMed

    Plaut, Roger D; Scanlon, Karen M; Taylor, Michael; Teter, Ken; Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2016-08-01

    The active subunit (S1) of pertussis toxin (PT), a major virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis, ADP-ribosylates Gi proteins in the mammalian cell cytosol to inhibit GPCR signaling. The intracellular pathway of PT includes endocytosis and retrograde transport to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Subsequent translocation of S1 to the cytosol is presumably preceded by dissociation from the holotoxin. In vitro, such dissociation is stimulated by interaction of PT with ATP. To investigate the role of this interaction in cellular events, we engineered a form of PT (PTDM) with changes to two amino acids involved in the interaction with ATP. PTDM was reduced in (1) binding to ATP, (2) dissociability by interaction with ATP, (3) in vitro enzymatic activity and (4) cellular ADP-ribosylation activity. In cells treated with PTDM carrying target sequences for organelle-specific modifications, normal transport to the TGN and ER occurred, but N-glycosylation patterns of the S1 and S4 subunits were consistent with an inability of PTDM to dissociate in the ER. These results indicate a requirement for interaction with ATP for PT dissociation in the ER and cellular activity. They also indicate that the retrograde transport route is the cellular intoxication pathway for PT. PMID:27369899

  12. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  13. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    SciTech Connect

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  14. A new dye uptake assay to test the activity of antibiotics against intracellular Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Sutera, Vivien; Caspar, Yvan; Boisset, Sandrine; Maurin, Max

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the aetiological agent of tularaemia. Antibiotic treatment of this zoonosis is based on the administration of a fluoroquinolone or a tetracycline for cases with mild to moderate severity, whereas an aminoglycoside (streptomycin or gentamicin) is advocated for severe cases. However, treatment failures and relapses remain frequent, especially in patients suffering from chronic lymph node suppuration. Therefore, new treatment alternatives are needed. We have developed a dye uptake assay for determination of minimal inhibitory extracellular concentrations (MIECs) of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis, and validated the method by comparing the results obtained using a CFU-enumerating method. We also compared MIECs with MICs of the same compounds determined using a CLSI broth microdilution method. We tested the activity of 11 antibiotics against two clinical strains of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolated in France. Both strains displayed low MICs (≤1 μg/mL) to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin), gentamicin, doxycycline and rifampicin. Higher MICs (≥8 μg/mL) were found for carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem), daptomycin and linezolid. Erythromycin MICs were 4.0 and 16.0 μg/mL, respectively, for the two clinical strains. MIECs were almost the same with the two methods used. They were concordant with MICs, except for erythromycin and linezolid (respectively, four and eight times more active against intracellular F. tularensis) and gentamicin (four to eight times less active against intracellular F. tularensis). This study validated the dye uptake assay as a new tool for determination of the activity of a large panel of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis. This test confirmed the intracellular activity of first-line antibiotics used for tularaemia treatment, but also revealed significant activity of linezolid against intracellular F. tularensis

  15. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups modify the risk of osteoarthritis by altering mitochondrial function and intracellular mitochondrial signals.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hezhi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Li, Fengjie; Shi, Hao; Ma, Lin; Du, Miaomiao; You, Yanting; Qiu, Ruyi; Nie, Hezhongrong; Shen, Lijun; Bai, Yidong; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-04-01

    Haplogroup G predisposes one to an increased risk of osteoarthritis (OA) occurrence, while haplogroup B4 is a protective factor against OA onset. However, the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, by using trans-mitochondrial technology, we demonstrate that the activity levels of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and III are higher in G cybrids than in haplogroup B4. Increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) promotes mitochondrial-related ATP generation in G cybrids, thereby shifting the ATP generation from glycolysis to OXPHOS. Furthermore, we found that lower glycolysis in G cybrids decreased cell viability under hypoxia (1% O2) compared with B4 cybrids. In contrast, G cybrids have a lower NAD(+)/NADH ratio and less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under both hypoxic (1% O2) and normoxic (20% O2) conditions than B4 cybrids, indicating that mitochondrial-mediated signaling pathways (retrograde signaling) differ between these cybrids. Gene expression profiling of G and B4 cybrids using next-generation sequencing technology showed that 404 of 575 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between G and B4 cybrids are enriched in 17 pathways, of which 11 pathways participate in OA. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses confirmed that G cybrids had lower glycolysis activity than B4 cybrids. In addition, we confirmed that the rheumatoid arthritis pathway was over-activated in G cybrids, although the remaining 9 pathways were not further tested by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mtDNA haplogroup G may increase the risk of OA by shifting the metabolic profile from glycolysis to OXPHOS and by over-activating OA-related signaling pathways. PMID:26705675

  16. Targets and Intracellular Signaling Mechanisms for Deoxynivalenol-Induced Ribosomal RNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a known translational inhibitor, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage. Here, we characterized this process relative to (1) specific 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA cleavage sites and (2) identity of specific upstream signaling elements in this pathway. Capillary electrophoresis indicated that DON at concentrations as low as 200 ng/ml evoked selective rRNA cleavage after 6 h and that 1000 ng/ml caused cleavage within 2 h. Northern blot analysis revealed that DON exposure induced six rRNA cleavage fragments from 28S rRNA and five fragments from 18S rRNA. When selective kinase inhibitors were used to identify potential upstream signals, RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and p38 were found to be required for rRNA cleavage, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase were not. Furthermore, rRNA fragmentation was suppressed by the p53 inhibitors pifithrin-α and pifithrin-μ as well as the pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Concurrent apoptosis was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and flow cytometry. DON activated caspases 3, 8, and 9, thus suggesting the possible coinvolvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in rRNA cleavage. Satratoxin G (SG), anisomycin, and ricin also induced specific rRNA cleavage profiles identical to those of DON, suggesting that ribotoxins might share a conserved rRNA cleavage mechanism. Taken together, DON-induced rRNA cleavage is likely to be closely linked to apoptosis activation and appears to involve the sequential activation of PKR/Hck →p38→p53→caspase 8/9→caspase 3. PMID:22491426

  17. Targets and intracellular signaling mechanisms for deoxynivalenol-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2012-06-01

    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a known translational inhibitor, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage. Here, we characterized this process relative to (1) specific 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA cleavage sites and (2) identity of specific upstream signaling elements in this pathway. Capillary electrophoresis indicated that DON at concentrations as low as 200 ng/ml evoked selective rRNA cleavage after 6 h and that 1000 ng/ml caused cleavage within 2 h. Northern blot analysis revealed that DON exposure induced six rRNA cleavage fragments from 28S rRNA and five fragments from 18S rRNA. When selective kinase inhibitors were used to identify potential upstream signals, RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and p38 were found to be required for rRNA cleavage, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase were not. Furthermore, rRNA fragmentation was suppressed by the p53 inhibitors pifithrin-α and pifithrin-μ as well as the pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Concurrent apoptosis was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and flow cytometry. DON activated caspases 3, 8, and 9, thus suggesting the possible coinvolvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in rRNA cleavage. Satratoxin G (SG), anisomycin, and ricin also induced specific rRNA cleavage profiles identical to those of DON, suggesting that ribotoxins might share a conserved rRNA cleavage mechanism. Taken together, DON-induced rRNA cleavage is likely to be closely linked to apoptosis activation and appears to involve the sequential activation of PKR/Hck →p38→p53→caspase 8/9→caspase 3. PMID:22491426

  18. Cross-talk among intracellular signaling pathways mediates the diphenyl ditelluride actions on the hippocampal cytoskeleton of young rats.

    PubMed

    Heimfarth, Luana; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Reis, Karina Pires; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Zamboni, Fernanda; Gandolfi, Talita; Narvaes, Rodrigo; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2011-10-17

    In the present report, we showed that diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)(2) induced in vitro hyperphosphorylation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin and neurofilament (NF) subunits in hippocampus of 21 day-old rats. Hyperphosphorylation was dependent on L-voltage dependent Ca(2+) channels (L-VDCC), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and metabotropic glutamate receptors, as demonstrated by the specific inhibitors verapamil, DL-AP5 and MCPG, respectively. Also, dantrolene, a ryanodine channel blocker, EGTA and Bapta-AM, extra and intracellular Ca(2+) chelators respectively, totally prevented this effect. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors by (PhTe)(2) upregulates phospholipase C (PLC), producing inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Therefore, high Ca(2+) levels and DAG directly activate Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (PKCaMII) and protein kinase C (PCK), resulting in the hyperphosphorylation of Ser-57 in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of the low molecular weight NF subunit (NF-L). Also, the activation of Erk1/2, and p38MAPK resulted in hyperphosphorylation of KSP repeats of the medium molecular weight NF subunit (NF-M). It is noteworthy that PKCaMII and PKC inhibitors prevented (PhTe)(2)-induced Erk1/2MAPK and p38MAPK activation as well as hyperphosphorylation of KSP repeats on NF-M, suggesting that PKCaMII and PKC could be upstream of this activation. Taken together, our results highlight the role of Ca(2+) as a mediator of the (PhTe)(2)-elicited signaling targeting specific phosphorylation sites on IF proteins of neural cells of rat hippocampus. Interestingly, this action shows a significant cross-talk among signaling pathways elicited by (PhTe)(2), connecting glutamate metabotropic cascade with activation of Ca(2+) channels. The extensively phosphorylated amino- and carboxyl- terminal sites could explain, at least in part, the neural dysfunction associated with (PhTe)(2) exposure. PMID:21879721

  19. CCK independently activates intracellular trypsinogen and NF-kappaB in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Han, B; Ji, B; Logsdon, C D

    2001-03-01

    In the cholecystokinin (CCK) hyperstimulation model of acute pancreatitis, two early intracellular events, activation of trypsinogen and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), are thought to be important in the development of the disease. In this study, the relationship between these two events was investigated. NF-kappaB activity was monitored by using a DNA binding assay and mob-1 chemokine gene expression. Intracellular trypsin activity was measured by using a fluorogenic substrate. Protease inhibitors including FUT-175, Pefabloc, and E-64d prevented CCK stimulation of intracellular trypsinogen and NF-kappaB activation. Likewise, the NF-kappaB inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited CCK stimulation of NF-kappaB and intracellular trypsinogen activation. These results suggested a possible codependency of these two events. However, CCK stimulated NF-kappaB activation in Chinese hamster ovary-CCK(A) cells, which do not express trypsinogen, indicating that trypsin is not necessary for CCK activation of NF-kappaB. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression in acinar cells of active p65 subunits to stimulate NF-kappaB, or of inhibitory kappaB-alpha molecules to inhibit NF-kappaB, did not affect either basal or CCK-mediated trypsinogen activation. Thus trypsinogen and NF-kappaB activation are independent events stimulated by CCK. PMID:11171565

  20. Intracellular signalling mechanism responsible for modulation of sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels by nitric oxide in ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dai-Min; Chai, Yongping; Erickson, Jeffrey R; Brown, Joan Heller; Bers, Donald M; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2014-03-01

    The ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are crucial for stress adaptation in the heart. It has previously been suggested that the function of KATP channels is modulated by nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous messenger known to be cytoprotective; however, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here we sought to delineate the intracellular signalling mechanism responsible for NO modulation of sarcolemmal KATP (sarcKATP) channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Cell-attached patch recordings were performed in transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and ventricular cardiomyocytes freshly isolated from adult rabbits or genetically modified mice, in combination with pharmacological and biochemical approaches. Bath application of the NO donor NOC-18 increased the single-channel activity of Kir6.2/SUR2A (i.e., the principal ventricular-type KATP) channels in HEK293 cells, whereas the increase was abated by KT5823 [a selective cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor], mercaptopropionyl glycine [MPG; a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger], catalase (an H2O2-degrading enzyme), myristoylated autocamtide-2 related inhibitory peptide (mAIP) selective for Ca2+ / calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and U0126 [an extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) inhibitor], respectively. The NO donors NOC-18 and N-(2-deoxy-α,β-d-glucopyranose-2-)-N2-acetyl-S-nitroso-d,l-penicillaminamide (glycol-SNAP-2) were also capable of stimulating native sarcKATP channels preactivated by the channel opener pinacidil in rabbit ventricular myocytes, through reducing the occurrence and the dwelling time of the long closed states whilst increasing the frequency of channel opening; in contrast, all these changes were reversed in the presence of inhibitors selective for soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), PKG, calmodulin, CaMKII or ERK1/2. Mimicking the action of NO donors, exogenous H2O2 potentiated pinacidil-preactivated sarcKATP channel activity in

  1. Intracellular signalling mechanism responsible for modulation of sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels by nitric oxide in ventricular cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dai-Min; Chai, Yongping; Erickson, Jeffrey R; Brown, Joan Heller; Bers, Donald M; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are crucial for stress adaptation in the heart. It has previously been suggested that the function of KATP channels is modulated by nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous messenger known to be cytoprotective; however, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here we sought to delineate the intracellular signalling mechanism responsible for NO modulation of sarcolemmal KATP (sarcKATP) channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Cell-attached patch recordings were performed in transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and ventricular cardiomyocytes freshly isolated from adult rabbits or genetically modified mice, in combination with pharmacological and biochemical approaches. Bath application of the NO donor NOC-18 increased the single-channel activity of Kir6.2/SUR2A (i.e. the principal ventricular-type KATP) channels in HEK293 cells, whereas the increase was abated by KT5823 [a selective cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor], mercaptopropionyl glycine [MPG; a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger], catalase (an H2O2-degrading enzyme), myristoylated autocamtide-2 related inhibitory peptide (mAIP) selective for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and U0126 [an extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) inhibitor], respectively. The NO donors NOC-18 and N-(2-deoxy-α,β-d-glucopyranose-2-)-N2-acetyl-S-nitroso-d,l-penicillaminamide (glycol-SNAP-2) were also capable of stimulating native sarcKATP channels preactivated by the channel opener pinacidil in rabbit ventricular myocytes, through reducing the occurrence and the dwelling time of the long closed states whilst increasing the frequency of channel opening; in contrast, all these changes were reversed in the presence of inhibitors selective for soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), PKG, calmodulin, CaMKII or ERK1/2. Mimicking the action of NO donors, exogenous H2O2 potentiated pinacidil-preactivated sarcKATP channel activity in

  2. Candida albicans actively modulates intracellular membrane trafficking in mouse macrophage phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Arenas, Elena; Bleck, Christopher K E; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha; Griffiths, Gareth; Diez-Orejas, Rosalía

    2009-04-01

    The intracellular trafficking/survival strategies of the opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans are poorly understood. Here we investigated the infection of RAW264.7 macrophages with a virulent wild-type (WT) filamentous C. albicans strain and a hyphal signalling-defective mutant (efg1Delta/cph1Delta). A comparative analysis of the acquisition by phagosomes of actin, and of early/late endocytic organelles markers of the different fungal strains was performed and related to Candida's survival inside macrophages. Our results show that both fungal strains have evolved a similar mechanism to subvert the 'lysosomal' system, as seen by the inhibition of the phagosome fusion with compartments enriched in the lysobisphosphatidic acid and the vATPase, and thereby the acquisition of a low pH from the outset of infection. Besides, the virulent WT strain displayed additional specific survival strategies to prevent its targeting to compartmentsdisplaying late endosomal/lysosomal features, such as induction of active recycling out of phagosomes of the lysosomal membrane protein LAMP-1, the lysosomal protease cathepsin D and preinternalized colloidal gold. Finally, both virulent and efg1Delta/cph1Delta mutant fungal strains actively suppressed the production of macrophage nitric oxide (NO), although their cell wall extracts were potent inducers of NO. PMID:19134116

  3. Dysregulated intracellular signaling in the striatum in a pathophysiologically grounded model of Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Frick, Luciana R.; Pogorelov, Vladimir; Ota, Kristie T.; Abbasi, Eeman; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Pittenger, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Tic disorders produce substantial morbidity, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Convergent evidence suggests that dysregulation of the cortico-basal ganglia circuitry is central to the pathogenesis of tics. Tourette syndrome (TS), the most severe end of the continuum of tic disorders, is substantially genetic, but causative mutations have been elusive. We recently described a mouse model, the histidine decarboxylase (Hdc) knockout mouse, that recapitulates a rare, highly penetrant mutation found in a single family; these mice exhibit TS-like phenomenology. These animals have a global deficit in brain histamine and a consequent dysregulation of DA in the basal ganglia. Histamine modulation of DA effects is increasingly appreciated, but the mechanisms underlying this modulation remain unclear; the consequences of modest DA elevation in the context of profound HA deficiency are difficult to predict, but understanding them in the Hdc knockout mouse may provide generalizable insights into the pathophysiology of TS. Here we characterized signaling pathways in striatal cells in this model system, at baseline and after amphetamine challenge. In vivo microdialysis confirms elevated DA in Hdc-KO mice. We find dephosphorylation of Akt and its target GSK3β and activation of the MAPK signaling cascade and its target rpS6; these are characteristic of the effects of DA on D2- and D1-expressing striatal neurons, respectively. Strikingly, there is no alteration in mTOR signaling, which can be regulated by DA in both cell types. These cellular effects help elucidate striatal signaling abnormalities in a uniquely validated mouse model of TS and move towards the identification of new potential therapeutic targets for tic disorders. PMID:25464894

  4. Intracellular mechanochemical waves in an active poroelastic model.

    PubMed

    Radszuweit, Markus; Alonso, Sergio; Engel, Harald; Bär, Markus

    2013-03-29

    Many processes in living cells are controlled by biochemical substances regulating active stresses. The cytoplasm is an active material with both viscoelastic and liquid properties. We incorporate the active stress into a two-phase model of the cytoplasm which accounts for the spatiotemporal dynamics of the cytoskeleton and the cytosol. The cytoskeleton is described as a solid matrix that together with the cytosol as an interstitial fluid constitutes a poroelastic material. We find different forms of mechanochemical waves including traveling, standing, and rotating waves by employing linear stability analysis and numerical simulations in one and two spatial dimensions. PMID:23581377

  5. Intracellular localization of mevalonate-activating enzymes in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, L. J.; Shah, S. P. J.; Goodwin, T. W.

    1966-01-01

    Mevalonate-activating enzymes are shown to be present in the chloroplasts of French-bean leaves. The chloroplast membrane is impermeable to mevalonic acid. Mevalonate-activating enzymes also appear to be found outside the chloroplast. These results support the view that terpenoid biosynthesis in the plant cell is controlled by a combination of enzyme segregation and specific membrane permeability. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:5947149

  6. Single-cell codetection of metabolic activity, intracellular functional proteins, and genetic mutations from rare circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Yin; Sun, Shuai; Wang, Zhihua; Wu, Wenjun; Zhao, Xiaodong; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Li, Yan; Tian, Jianhui; Xu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Deng, Yuliang; Shi, Qihui

    2015-10-01

    The high glucose uptake and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways in cancer cells has long made these features, together with the mutational spectrum, prime diagnostic targets of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Further, an ability to characterize these properties at a single cell resolution is widely believed to be essential, as the known extensive heterogeneity in CTCs can obscure important correlations in data obtained from cell population-based methods. However, to date, it has not been possible to quantitatively measure metabolic, proteomic, and genetic data from a single CTC. Here we report a microchip-based approach that allows for the codetection of glucose uptake, intracellular functional proteins, and genetic mutations at the single-cell level from rare tumor cells. The microchip contains thousands of nanoliter grooves (nanowells) that isolate individual CTCs and allow for the assessment of their glucose uptake via imaging of a fluorescent glucose analog, quantification of a panel of intracellular signaling proteins using a miniaturized antibody barcode microarray, and retrieval of the individual cell nuclei for subsequent off-chip genome amplification and sequencing. This approach integrates molecular-scale information on the metabolic, proteomic, and genetic status of single cells and permits the inference of associations between genetic signatures, energy consumption, and phosphoproteins oncogenic signaling activities in CTCs isolated from blood samples of patients. Importantly, this microchip chip-based approach achieves this multidimensional molecular analysis with minimal cell loss (<20%), which is the bottleneck of the rare cell analysis. PMID:26378744

  7. In Vitro and Intracellular Activities of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitor GSK1322322 against Legionella pneumophila Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Jacques; Dubois, Maïtée; Martel, Jean-François; Aubart, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    GSK1322322, a novel peptide deformylase inhibitor currently in development as an oral and intravenous agent for the treatment of hospitalized community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, showed poor in vitro activity against a panel of 50 Legionella pneumophila strains, with MICs ranging from 1 to 16 μg/ml and an MIC90 of 16 μg/ml, but very potent intracellular activity, with the minimum extracellular concentrations capable of inhibiting intracellular proliferation (MIECs) ranging from 0.12 to 2 μg/ml and 98% of the strains being inhibited by concentrations of ≤1 μg/ml. PMID:25348534

  8. The Potential of Vitamin D-Regulated Intracellular Signaling Pathways as Targets for Myeloid Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Studzinski, George P.

    2015-01-01

    The current standard regimens for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are curative in less than half of patients; therefore, there is a great need for innovative new approaches to this problem. One approach is to target new treatments to the pathways that are instrumental to cell growth and survival with drugs that are less harmful to normal cells than to neoplastic cells. In this review, we focus on the MAPK family of signaling pathways and those that are known to, or potentially can, interact with MAPKs, such as PI3K/AKT/FOXO and JAK/STAT. We exemplify the recent studies in this field with specific relevance to vitamin D and its derivatives, since they have featured prominently in recent scientific literature as having anti-cancer properties. Since microRNAs also are known to be regulated by activated vitamin D, this is also briefly discussed here, as are the implications of the emerging acquisition of transcriptosome data and potentiation of the biological effects of vitamin D by other compounds. While there are ongoing clinical trials of various compounds that affect signaling pathways, more studies are needed to establish the clinical utility of vitamin D in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26239344

  9. p120-catenin differentially regulates cell migration by Rho-dependent intracellular and secreted signals

    PubMed Central

    Epifano, Carolina; Megias, Diego; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    The adherens junction protein p120-catenin is implicated in the regulation of cadherin stability, cell migration and inflammatory responses in mammalian epithelial tissues. How these events are coordinated to promote wound repair is not understood. We show that p120 catenin regulates the intrinsic migratory properties of primary mouse keratinocytes, but also influences the migratory behavior of neighboring cells by secreted signals. These events are rooted in the ability of p120-catenin to regulate RhoA GTPase activity, which leads to a two-tiered control of cell migration. One restrains cell motility via an increase in actin stress fibers, reduction in integrin turnover and an increase in the robustness of focal adhesions. The other is coupled to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-24, which causally enhances randomized cell movements. Taken together, our results indicate that p120-RhoA-GTPase-mediated signaling can differentially regulate the migratory behavior of epidermal cells, which has potential implications for chronic wound responses and cancer. PMID:24639556

  10. p120-catenin differentially regulates cell migration by Rho-dependent intracellular and secreted signals.

    PubMed

    Epifano, Carolina; Megias, Diego; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-05-01

    The adherens junction protein p120-catenin is implicated in the regulation of cadherin stability, cell migration and inflammatory responses in mammalian epithelial tissues. How these events are coordinated to promote wound repair is not understood. We show that p120 catenin regulates the intrinsic migratory properties of primary mouse keratinocytes, but also influences the migratory behavior of neighboring cells by secreted signals. These events are rooted in the ability of p120-catenin to regulate RhoA GTPase activity, which leads to a two-tiered control of cell migration. One restrains cell motility via an increase in actin stress fibers, reduction in integrin turnover and an increase in the robustness of focal adhesions. The other is coupled to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-24, which causally enhances randomized cell movements. Taken together, our results indicate that p120-RhoA-GTPase-mediated signaling can differentially regulate the migratory behavior of epidermal cells, which has potential implications for chronic wound responses and cancer. PMID:24639556

  11. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed Central

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-01-01

    1. Cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells adhering to the cell body of neurones in situ within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The underlying neurone was under current or voltage-clamp control. 2. Neuronal firing induced a delayed (20-30 s) persistent (3-4 min) increase in the opening probability of glial K+ channels. The channels were also activated by perfusing the ganglion with a depolarizing high-K+ saline, except when the underlying neurone was prevented from depolarizing under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Two K(+)-selective channels were detected in the glial membrane. The channel responding to neuronal firing was present in 95% of the patches (n = 393). It had a unitary conductance of 56 pS, a Na+ :K+ permeability ratio < 0.02 and displayed slight inward rectification in symmetrical [K+] conditions. It was sensitive to TEA, Ba2+ and Cs+. The following results refer to this channel as studied in the cell-attached configuration. 4. The glial K+ channel was activated by bath application of the membrane-permeant cyclic AMP derivatives 8-bromo-cAMP and dibutyryl-cAMP, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the diesterase inhibitors IBMX, theophylline and caffeine. It was insensitive to cyclic GMP activators and to conditions that might alter the intracellular [Ca2+] (ionomycin, low-Ca2+ saline and Ca2+ channel blockers). 5. The forskolin-induced changes in channel behaviour (open and closed time distributions, burst duration, short and long gaps within bursts) could be accounted for by a four-state model (3 closed states, 1 open state) by simply changing one of the six rate parameters. 6. The present results suggest that the signal sent by an active neurone to satellite glial cells is confined to the glial cells round that neurone. The effect of this signal on the class of glial K+ channels studied can be mimicked by an increase in glial cAMP concentration. The subsequent delayed opening

  12. Crystal structure of the plexin A3 intracellular region reveals an autoinhibited conformation through active site sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    He, Huawei; Yang, Taehong; Terman, Jonathan R.; Zhang, Xuewu

    2010-01-20

    Plexin cell surface receptors bind to semaphorin ligands and transduce signals for regulating neuronal axon guidance. The intracellular region of plexins is essential for signaling and contains a R-Ras/M-Ras GTPase activating protein (GAP) domain that is divided into two segments by a Rho GTPase-binding domain (RBD). The regulation mechanisms for plexin remain elusive, although it is known that activation requires both binding of semaphorin to the extracellular region and a Rho-family GTPase (Rac1 or Rnd1) to the RBD. Here we report the crystal structure of the plexin A3 intracellular region. The structure shows that the N- and C-terminal portions of the GAP homologous regions together form a GAP domain with an overall fold similar to other Ras GAPs. However, the plexin GAP domain adopts a closed conformation and cannot accommodate R-Ras/M-Ras in its substrate-binding site, providing a structural basis for the autoinhibited state of plexins. A comparison with the plexin B1 RBD/Rnd1 complex structure suggests that Rnd1 binding alone does not induce a conformational change in plexin, explaining the requirement of both semaphorin and a Rho GTPase for activation. The structure also identifies an N-terminal segment that is important for regulation. Both the N-terminal segment and the RBD make extensive interactions with the GAP domain, suggesting the presence of an allosteric network connecting these three domains that integrates semaphorin and Rho GTPase signals to activate the GAP. The importance of these interactions in plexin signaling is shown by both cell-based and in vivo axon guidance assays.

  13. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue exendin-4 reverses impaired intracellular Ca(2+) signalling in steatotic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Eunüs S; Hua, Jin; Wilson, Claire H; Tallis, George A; Zhou, Fiona H; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Barritt, Greg J

    2016-09-01

    The release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and subsequent replenishment of ER Ca(2+) by Ca(2+) entry through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCE) play critical roles in the regulation of liver metabolism by adrenaline, glucagon and other hormones. Both ER Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) entry are severely inhibited in steatotic hepatocytes. Exendin-4, a slowly-metabolised glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, is known to reduce liver glucose output and liver lipid, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether exendin-4 alters intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in steatotic hepatocytes, and to evaluate the mechanisms involved. Exendin-4 completely reversed lipid-induced inhibition of SOCE in steatotic liver cells, but did not reverse lipid-induced inhibition of ER Ca(2+) release. The action of exendin-4 on Ca(2+) entry was rapid in onset and was mimicked by GLP-1 or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. In steatotic liver cells, exendin-4 caused a rapid decrease in lipid (half time 6.5min), inhibited the accumulation of lipid in liver cells incubated in the presence of palmitate plus the SOCE inhibitor BTP-2, and enhanced the formation of cyclic AMP. Hormone-stimulated accumulation of extracellular glucose in glycogen replete steatotic liver cells was inhibited compared to that in non-steatotic cells, and this effect of lipid was reversed by exendin-4. It is concluded that, in steatotic hepatocytes, exendin-4 reverses the lipid-induced inhibition of SOCE leading to restoration of hormone-regulated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signalling. The mechanism may involve GLP-1 receptors, cyclic AMP, lipolysis, decreased diacylglycerol and decreased activity of protein kinase C. PMID:27178543

  14. Multimodal function of the sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic β-cells: generation of diverse patterns of intracellular signals by sweet agonists.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Mogami, Hideo; Lohse, Martin; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru

    2013-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste bud and is activated by numerous sweet molecules with diverse chemical structures. It is, however, not known whether these sweet agonists induce a similar cellular response in target cells. Using MIN6 cells, a pancreatic β-cell line expressing endogenous sweet taste receptor, we addressed this question by monitoring changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and cAMP ([cAMP]i) induced by four sweet taste receptor agonists. Glycyrrhizin evoked sustained elevation of [Ca2+]i but [cAMP]i was not affected. Conversely, an artificial sweetener saccharin induced sustained elevation of [cAMP]i but did not increase [Ca2+]i. In contrast, sucralose and acesulfame K induced rapid and sustained increases in both [Ca2+]i and [cAMP]i. Although the latter two sweeteners increased [Ca2+]i and [cAMP]i, their actions were not identical: [Ca2+]i response to sucralose but not acesulfame K was inhibited by gurmarin, an antagonist of the sweet taste receptor which blocks the gustducin-dependent pathway. In addition, [Ca2+]i response to acesulfame K but not to sucralose was resistant to a Gq inhibitor. These results indicate that four types of sweeteners activate the sweet taste receptor differently and generate distinct patterns of intracellular signals. The sweet taste receptor has amazing multimodal functions producing multiple patterns of intracellular signals. PMID:23933592

  15. Leishmania major MPK7 Protein Kinase Activity Inhibits Intracellular Growth of the Pathogenic Amastigote Stage ▿

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Pescher, Pascale; Späth, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    During the infectious cycle, protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania undergo several adaptive differentiation steps that are induced by environmental factors and crucial for parasite infectivity. Genetic analyses of signaling proteins underlying Leishmania stage differentiation are often rendered difficult due to lethal null mutant phenotypes. Here we used a transgenic strategy to gain insight into the functions of the mitogen-activated Leishmania major protein kinases LmaMPK7 and LmaMPK10 in parasite virulence. We established L. major and Leishmania donovani lines expressing episomal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LmaMPK7 and GFP-LmaMPK10 fusion proteins. The transgenic lines were normal in promastigote morphology, growth, and the ability to differentiate into metacyclic and amastigote stages. While parasites expressing GFP-LmaMPK10 showed normal infectivity by mouse footpad analysis and macrophage infection assays, GFP-LmaMPK7 transgenic parasites displayed a strong delay in lesion formation and reduced intracellular parasite growth. Significantly, the effects of GFP-LmaMPK7 on virulence and proliferation were due exclusively to protein kinase activity, as the overexpression of two kinase-dead mutants had no effect on parasite infectivity. GFP-LmaMPK7 transgenic L. donovani cells revealed a reversible, stage-specific growth defect in axenic amastigotes that was independent of cell death but linked to nonsynchronous growth arrest and a significant reduction of de novo protein biosynthesis. Our data suggest that LmaMPK7 protein kinase activity may be implicated in parasite growth control and thus relevant for the development of nonproliferating stages during the infectious cycle. PMID:19801421

  16. The phosphatidylethanolamine derivative diDCP-LA-PE mimics intracellular insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki; Gotoh, Akinobu; Shimizu, Tadashi; Tanaka, Akito

    2016-01-01

    Insulin facilitates glucose uptake into cells by translocating the glucose transporter GLUT4 towards the cell surface through a pathway along an insulin receptor (IR)/IR substrate 1 (IRS-1)/phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1)/Akt axis. The newly synthesized phosphatidylethanolamine derivative 1,2-O-bis-[8-{2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl}-octanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (diDCP-LA-PE) has the potential to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and to directly activate PKCζ, an atypical isozyme, and PKCε, a novel isozyme. PTP1B inhibition enhanced insulin signaling cascades downstream IR/IRS-1 by preventing tyrosine dephosphorylation. PKCζ and PKCε directly activated Akt2 by phosphorylating at Thr309 and Ser474, respectively. diDCP-LA-PE increased cell surface localization of GLUT4 and stimulated glucose uptake into differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, still with knocking-down IR or in the absence of insulin. Moreover, diDCP-LA-PE effectively reduced serum glucose levels in type 1 diabetes (DM) model mice. diDCP-LA-PE, thus, may enable type 1 DM therapy without insulin injection. PMID:27251941

  17. The phosphatidylethanolamine derivative diDCP-LA-PE mimics intracellular insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki; Gotoh, Akinobu; Shimizu, Tadashi; Tanaka, Akito

    2016-01-01

    Insulin facilitates glucose uptake into cells by translocating the glucose transporter GLUT4 towards the cell surface through a pathway along an insulin receptor (IR)/IR substrate 1 (IRS-1)/phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1)/Akt axis. The newly synthesized phosphatidylethanolamine derivative 1,2-O-bis-[8-{2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl}-octanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (diDCP-LA-PE) has the potential to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and to directly activate PKCζ, an atypical isozyme, and PKCε, a novel isozyme. PTP1B inhibition enhanced insulin signaling cascades downstream IR/IRS-1 by preventing tyrosine dephosphorylation. PKCζ and PKCε directly activated Akt2 by phosphorylating at Thr309 and Ser474, respectively. diDCP-LA-PE increased cell surface localization of GLUT4 and stimulated glucose uptake into differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, still with knocking-down IR or in the absence of insulin. Moreover, diDCP-LA-PE effectively reduced serum glucose levels in type 1 diabetes (DM) model mice. diDCP-LA-PE, thus, may enable type 1 DM therapy without insulin injection. PMID:27251941

  18. The Analysis of Intracellular and Intercellular Calcium Signaling in Human Anterior Lens Capsule Epithelial Cells with Regard to Different Types and Stages of the Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Gosak, Marko; Markovič, Rene; Fajmut, Aleš; Marhl, Marko; Hawlina, Marko; Andjelić, Sofija

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigated how modifications of the Ca2+ homeostasis in anterior lens epithelial cells (LECs) are associated with different types of cataract (cortical or nuclear) and how the progression of the cataract (mild or moderate) affects the Ca2+ signaling. We systematically analyzed different aspects of intra- and inter-cellular Ca2+ signaling in the human LECs, which are attached to surgically isolated lens capsule (LC), obtained during cataract surgery. We monitored the temporal and spatial changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration after stimulation with acetylcholine by means of Fura-2 fluorescence captured with an inverted microscope. In our analysis we compared the features of Ca2+ signals in individual cells, synchronized activations, spatio-temporal grouping and the nature of intercellular communication between LECs. The latter was assessed by using the methodologies of the complex network theory. Our results point out that at the level of individual cells there are no significant differences when comparing the features of the signals with regard either to the type or the stage of the cataract. On the other hand, noticeable differences are observed at the multicellular level, despite inter-capsule variability. LCs associated with more developed cataracts were found to exhibit a slower collective response to stimulation, a less pronounced spatio-temporal clustering of LECs with similar signaling characteristics. The reconstructed intercellular networks were found to be sparser and more segregated than in LCs associated with mild cataracts. Moreover, we show that spontaneously active LECs often operate in localized groups with quite well aligned Ca2+ activity. The presence of spontaneous activity was also found to affect the stimulated Ca2+ responses of individual cells. Our findings indicate that the cataract progression entails the impairment of intercellular signaling thereby suggesting the functional importance of altered Ca2+ signaling of

  19. Dexamethasone enhances insulin-like growth factor-I effects on skeletal muscle cell proliferation. Role of specific intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Giorgino, F; Smith, R J

    1995-01-01

    IGF-I stimulation of cell proliferation and c-Fos expression in skeletal muscle cells is markedly enhanced by dexamethasone. The effect of dexamethasone is not mediated by changes in IGF-binding proteins, as evidenced by similar effects of dexamethasone on the actions of insulin, PDGF-BB, and the IGF-I analogue long R3IGF-I. Dexamethasone also does not alter autocrine IGF-II secretion by muscle cells. To investigate the mechanism of the augmentation of IGF-I action, the effects of dexamethasone on intracellular IGF-I signaling pathways were determined. In dexamethasone-treated cells, the levels of IGF-I receptor tyrosine phosphorylation and receptor-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity were increased. Dexamethasone-treated cells also showed increased and prolonged tyrosine phosphorylation of the Shc proteins. In contrast, dexamethasone decreased both tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity. Thus, distinct signaling pathways activated by the IGF-I receptor in skeletal muscle cells are differentially regulated by dexamethasone. Potentiation of IGF-I action correlates with increased IGF-I receptor-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc, but appears to be independent of activation of the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway. Images PMID:7544807

  20. Intracellular acidification is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by miraculin.

    PubMed

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Nirasawa, Satoru; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    Acidification of the glycoprotein, miraculin (MCL), induces sweet taste in humans, but not in mice. The sweet taste induced by MCL is more intense when acidification occurs with weak acids as opposed to strong acids. MCL interacts with the human sweet receptor subunit hTAS1R2, but the mechanisms by which the acidification of MCL activates the sweet taste receptor remain largely unexplored. The work reported here speaks directly to this activation by utilizing a sweet receptor TAS1R2 + TAS1R3 assay. In accordance with previous data, MCL-applied cells displayed a pH dependence with citric acid (weak acid) being right shifted to that with hydrochloric acid (strong acid). When histidine residues in both the intracellular and extracellular region of hTAS1R2 were exchanged for alanine, taste-modifying effect of MCL was reduced or abolished. Stronger intracellular acidification of HEK293 cells was induced by citric acid than by HCl and taste-modifying effect of MCL was proportional to intracellular pH regardless of types of acids. These results suggest that intracellular acidity is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by MCL. PMID:26960429

  1. Intracellular acidification is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Nirasawa, Satoru; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    Acidification of the glycoprotein, miraculin (MCL), induces sweet taste in humans, but not in mice. The sweet taste induced by MCL is more intense when acidification occurs with weak acids as opposed to strong acids. MCL interacts with the human sweet receptor subunit hTAS1R2, but the mechanisms by which the acidification of MCL activates the sweet taste receptor remain largely unexplored. The work reported here speaks directly to this activation by utilizing a sweet receptor TAS1R2 + TAS1R3 assay. In accordance with previous data, MCL-applied cells displayed a pH dependence with citric acid (weak acid) being right shifted to that with hydrochloric acid (strong acid). When histidine residues in both the intracellular and extracellular region of hTAS1R2 were exchanged for alanine, taste-modifying effect of MCL was reduced or abolished. Stronger intracellular acidification of HEK293 cells was induced by citric acid than by HCl and taste-modifying effect of MCL was proportional to intracellular pH regardless of types of acids. These results suggest that intracellular acidity is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by MCL. PMID:26960429

  2. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators.

    PubMed

    Akam, Eman A; Chang, Tsuhen M; Astashkin, Andrei V; Tomat, Elisa

    2014-10-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  3. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Eman A.; Chang, Tsuhen M.; Astashkin, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  4. Functional and Intracellular Signaling Differences Associated with the Helicobacter pylori AlpAB Adhesin from Western and East Asian Strains*☒

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Wu, Jeng Yih; Beswick, Ellen J.; Ohno, Tomoyuki; Odenbreit, Stefan; Haas, Rainer; Reyes, Victor E.; Kita, Masakazu; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Following adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastric epithelial cells, intracellular signaling leads to cytokine production, which causes H. pylori-related gastric injury. Two adjacent homologous genes (alpA and alpB), which encode H. pylori outer membrane proteins, are thought to be associated with adhesion and cytokine induction. We co-cultured gastric epithelial cells with wild type H. pylori strains and their corresponding alpA/alpB-deleted mutants (ΔalpAB). Results were confirmed by complementation. Flow cytometry confirmed that AlpAB was involved in cellular adhesion. Deletion of alpAB reduced interleukin (IL)-6 induction in gastric epithelial cells. Deletion of alpAB reduced IL-8 induction with East Asian but not with Western strains. All AlpAB-positive strains tested activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Fos, and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein. Activation of the Jun-N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and NF-κB was exclusive to AlpAB from East Asian strains. ΔalpAB mutants poorly colonized the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice and were associated with lower mucosal levels of KC and IL-6. Our results suggest that AlpAB may induce gastric injury by mediating adherence to gastric epithelial cells and by modulating proinflammatory intracellular signaling cascades. Known geographical differences in H. pylori-related clinical outcomes may relate to differential effects of East Asian and Western types of AlpAB on NF-κB-related proinflammatory signaling pathways. PMID:17202133

  5. Intracellular lipid flux and membrane microdomains as organizing principles in inflammatory cell signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Michael B.; Parks, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts and caveolae play a pivotal role in organization of signaling by Toll-like Receptor (TLR)4 and several other immune receptors. Beyond the simple cataloguing of signaling events compartmentalized by these membrane microdomains, recent studies have revealed the surprisingly central importance of dynamic remodeling of membrane lipid domains to immune signaling. Simple interventions upon membrane lipid, such as changes in cholesterol loading or crosslinking of raft lipids, are sufficient to induce micron-scale reordering of membranes and their protein cargo with consequent signal transduction. In this review, using TLR signaling in the macrophage as a central focus, we discuss emerging evidence that environmental and genetic perturbations of membrane lipid regulate protein signaling, illustrate how homeostatic flow of cholesterol and other lipids through rafts regulates the innate immune response, and highlight recent attempts to harness these insights towards therapeutic development. PMID:21810617

  6. Intracellular Shigella remodels its LPS to dampen the innate immune recognition and evade inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Paciello, Ida; Silipo, Alba; Lembo-Fazio, Luigi; Curcurù, Laura; Zumsteg, Anna; Noël, Gaëlle; Ciancarella, Valeria; Sturiale, Luisa; Molinaro, Antonio; Bernardini, Maria Lina

    2013-01-01

    LPS is a potent bacterial effector triggering the activation of the innate immune system following binding with the complex CD14, myeloid differentiation protein 2, and Toll-like receptor 4. The LPS of the enteropathogen Shigella flexneri is a hexa-acylated isoform possessing an optimal inflammatory activity. Symptoms of shigellosis are produced by severe inflammation caused by the invasion process of Shigella in colonic and rectal mucosa. Here we addressed the question of the role played by the Shigella LPS in eliciting a dysregulated inflammatory response of the host. We unveil that (i) Shigella is able to modify the LPS composition, e.g., the lipid A and core domains, during proliferation within epithelial cells; (ii) the LPS of intracellular bacteria (iLPS) and that of bacteria grown in laboratory medium differ in the number of acyl chains in lipid A, with iLPS being the hypoacylated; (iii) the immunopotential of iLPS is dramatically lower than that of bacteria grown in laboratory medium; (iv) both LPS forms mainly signal through the Toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 pathway; (v) iLPS down-regulates the inflammasome-mediated release of IL-1β in Shigella-infected macrophages; and (vi) iLPS exhibits a reduced capacity to prime polymorfonuclear cells for an oxidative burst. We propose a working model whereby the two forms of LPS might govern different steps of the invasive process of Shigella. In the first phases, the bacteria, decorated with hypoacylated LPS, are able to lower the immune system surveillance, whereas, in the late phases, shigellae harboring immunopotent LPS are fully recognized by the immune system, which can then successfully resolve the infection. PMID:24167293

  7. Dual intracellular signaling pathways mediated by the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Calandra, B; Portier, M; Kernéis, A; Delpech, M; Carillon, C; Le Fur, G; Ferrara, P; Shire, D

    1999-06-25

    It has long been established that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor transduces signals through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/Go inhibitory pathway. Although there have been reports that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor can also mediate an increase in cyclic AMP levels, in most cases the presence of an adenylyl cyclase costimulant or the use of very high amounts of agonist was necessary. Here, we present evidence for dual coupling of the cannabinoid CB receptor to the classical pathway and to a pertussis toxin-insensitive adenylyl cyclase stimulatory pathway initiated with low quantities of agonist in the absence of any costimulant. Treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor with the cannabinoid CP 55,940, {(-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hyd roxypropyl) cyclohexan-1-ol} resulted in cyclic AMP accumulation in a dose-response manner, an accumulation blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor-specific antagonist SR 141716A, {N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-me thyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride}. In CHO cells coexpressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and a cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-luciferase reporter gene system, CP 55,940 induced luciferase expression by a pathway blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-89). Under the same conditions the peripheral cannabinoid CB2 receptor proved to be incapable of inducing cAMP accumulation or luciferase activity. This incapacity allowed us to study the luciferase activation mediated by CB /CB2 chimeric constructs, from which we determined that the first and second internal loop regions of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were involved in transducing the pathway leading to luciferase gene expression. PMID:10422789

  8. Identification of intracellular signaling pathways that induce myotonic dystrophy protein kinase expression during myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Marta; Canicio, Judith; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Kaliman, Perla

    2002-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common inherited adult neuromuscular disorder. DM is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of a protein kinase gene (DMPK). Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM, as revealed by gene target studies. However, the postnatal regulation of DMPK expression and its pathophysiological role remain undefined. We studied the regulation of DMPK protein and mRNA expression during myogenesis in rat L6E9 myoblasts, mouse C2C12 myoblasts, and 10T1/2 fibroblasts stably expressing the myogenic transcription factor MyoD (10T1/2-MyoD). We detected DMPK as an 80-kDa protein mainly localized to the cytosolic fraction of skeletal muscle cells. DMPK expression and protein kinase activity were enhanced in IGF-II-differentiated cells. In L6E9 and C2C12 cells, DMPK expression was regulated through the same signaling pathways (i.e. phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB, nitric oxide synthase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) that had been described as being crucial for the myogenesis induced by either low serum or IGF-II. However, in 10T1/2-MyoD cells, p38 MAPK inhibition blocked cell fusion and caveolin-3 expression without affecting DMPK up-regulation. These results suggest that although DMPK is induced during myogenesis, its expression cannot be totally associated with the development of a fully differentiated phenotype. PMID:12130568

  9. A Novel Role of the L-Type Calcium Channel α1D Subunit as a Gatekeeper for Intracellular Zinc Signaling: Zinc Wave

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Satoru; Hasegawa, Aiko; Hojyo, Shintaro; Ohashi, Wakana; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Nishida, Keigo; Hirano, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that zinc ion (Zn) can behave as an intracellular signaling molecule. We previously demonstrated that mast cells stimulated through the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) rapidly release intracellular Zn from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and we named this phenomenon the “Zn wave”. However, the molecules responsible for releasing Zn and the roles of the Zn wave were elusive. Here we identified the pore-forming α1 subunit of the Cav1.3 (α1D) L-type calcium channel (LTCC) as the gatekeeper for the Zn wave. LTCC antagonists inhibited the Zn wave, and an agonist was sufficient to induce it. Notably, α1D was mainly localized to the ER rather than the plasma membrane in mast cells, and the Zn wave was impaired by α1D knockdown. We further found that the LTCC-mediated Zn wave positively controlled cytokine gene induction by enhancing the DNA-binding activity of NF- κB. Consistent with this finding, LTCC antagonists inhibited the cytokine-mediated delayed-type allergic reaction in mice without affecting the immediate-type allergic reaction. These findings indicated that the LTCC α1D subunit located on the ER membrane has a novel function as a gatekeeper for the Zn wave, which is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling and the delayed-type allergic reaction. PMID:22745805

  10. Acidic intracellular Ca(2+) stores and caveolae in Ca(2+) signaling and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Gallegos-Gomez, Martin Leonardo; Sanchez-Vazquez, Victor Hugo; Lopez-Mendez, Maria Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Acidic Ca(2+) stores, particularly lysosomes, are newly discovered players in the well-orchestrated arena of Ca(2+) signaling and we are at the verge of understanding how lysosomes accumulate Ca(2+) and how they release it in response to different chemical, such as NAADP, and physical signals. Additionally, it is now clear that lysosomes play a key role in autophagy, a process that allows cells to recycle components or to eliminate damaged structures to ensure cellular well-being. Moreover, lysosomes are being unraveled as hubs that coordinate both anabolism via insulin signaling and catabolism via AMPK. These acidic vesicles have close contact with the ER and there is a bidirectional movement of information between these two organelles that exquisitely regulates cell survival. Lysosomes also connect with plasma membrane where caveolae are located as specialized regions involved in Ca(2+) and insulin signaling. Alterations of all these signaling pathways are at the core of insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:25182518

  11. Intracellular Activation of Tenofovir Alafenamide and the Effect of Viral and Host Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Birkus, Gabriel; Bam, Rujuta A; Willkom, Madeleine; Frey, Christian R; Tsai, Luong; Stray, Kirsten M; Yant, Stephen R; Cihlar, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF) is an oral phosphonoamidate prodrug of the HIV reverse transcriptase nucleotide inhibitor tenofovir (TFV). Previous studies suggested a principal role for the lysosomal serine protease cathepsin A (CatA) in the intracellular activation of TAF. Here we further investigated the role of CatA and other human hydrolases in the metabolism of TAF. Overexpression of CatA or liver carboxylesterase 1 (Ces1) in HEK293T cells increased intracellular TAF hydrolysis 2- and 5-fold, respectively. Knockdown of CatA expression with RNA interference (RNAi) in HeLa cells reduced intracellular TAF metabolism 5-fold. Additionally, the anti-HIV activity and the rate of CatA hydrolysis showed good correlation within a large set of TFV phosphonoamidate prodrugs. The covalent hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitors (PIs) telaprevir and boceprevir potently inhibited CatA-mediated TAF activation (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 0.27 and 0.16 μM, respectively) in vitro and also reduced its anti-HIV activity in primary human CD4(+) T lymphocytes (21- and 3-fold, respectively) at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. In contrast, there was no inhibition of CatA or any significant effect on anti-HIV activity of TAF observed with cobicistat, noncovalent HIV and HCV PIs, or various prescribed inhibitors of host serine proteases. Collectively, these studies confirm that CatA plays a pivotal role in the intracellular metabolism of TAF, whereas the liver esterase Ces1 likely contributes to the hepatic activation of TAF. Moreover, this work demonstrates that a wide range of viral and host PIs, with the exception of telaprevir and boceprevir, do not interfere with the antiretroviral activity of TAF. PMID:26503655

  12. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  13. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery.

  14. Raster image cross-correlation analysis for spatiotemporal visualization of intracellular degradation activities against exogenous DNAs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Jin, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Reducing intracellular DNA degradation is critical to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy. Exogenous DNA incorporation into cells is strictly blocked by the defense machinery of intracellular nuclease activity. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (cross-correlation RICS; ccRICS) are image-based correlation methods. These powerful tools allow the study of spatiotemporal molecular dynamics. Here we performed spatiotemporal ccRICS analyses of fluorescent DNA and directly monitored the process of exogenous DNA degradation in living cell cytoplasm. Such direct monitors of DNA degradation allow us to determine the fate of the exogenous DNA in living cells. On comparing the process in living cells, our study shows that cytoplasmic nuclease activity differs between cell lines; therefore, we propose that the difference of nuclease activity in cytoplasm dictates a different resistance to exogenous DNA incorporation. New insight on efficient gene delivery can be provided with our study. PMID:26400011

  15. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  16. Raster image cross-correlation analysis for spatiotemporal visualization of intracellular degradation activities against exogenous DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Jin, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Reducing intracellular DNA degradation is critical to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy. Exogenous DNA incorporation into cells is strictly blocked by the defense machinery of intracellular nuclease activity. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (cross-correlation RICS; ccRICS) are image-based correlation methods. These powerful tools allow the study of spatiotemporal molecular dynamics. Here we performed spatiotemporal ccRICS analyses of fluorescent DNA and directly monitored the process of exogenous DNA degradation in living cell cytoplasm. Such direct monitors of DNA degradation allow us to determine the fate of the exogenous DNA in living cells. On comparing the process in living cells, our study shows that cytoplasmic nuclease activity differs between cell lines; therefore, we propose that the difference of nuclease activity in cytoplasm dictates a different resistance to exogenous DNA incorporation. New insight on efficient gene delivery can be provided with our study. PMID:26400011

  17. Single-cell mass cytometry reveals intracellular survival/proliferative signaling in FLT3-ITD-mutated AML stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Qiu, Peng; Zeng, Zhihong; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Mak, Duncan H; Burks, Jared K; Schober, Wendy; McQueen, Teresa J; Cortes, Jorge; Tanner, Scott D; Roboz, Gail J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Guzman, Monica L; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the unique phenotypes and complex signaling pathways of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) will provide insights and druggable targets that can be used to eradicate acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current work on AML LSCs is limited by the number of parameters that conventional flow cytometry (FCM) can analyze because of cell autofluorescence and fluorescent dye spectral overlap. Single-cell mass cytometry (CyTOF) substitutes rare earth elements for fluorophores to label antibodies, which allows measurements of up to 120 parameters in single cells without correction for spectral overlap. The aim of this study was the evaluation of intracellular signaling in antigen-defined stem/progenitor cell subsets in primary AML. CyTOF and conventional FCM yielded comparable results on LSC phenotypes defined by CD45, CD34, CD38, CD123, and CD99. Intracellular phosphoprotein responses to ex vivo cell signaling inhibitors and cytokine stimulation were assessed in myeloid leukemia cell lines and one primary AML sample. CyTOF and conventional FCM results were confirmed by western blotting. In the primary AML sample, we investigated the cell responses to ex vivo stimulation with stem cell factor and BEZ235-induced inhibition of PI3K and identified activation patterns in multiple PI3K downstream signaling pathways including p-4EBP1, p-AKT, and p-S6, particularly in CD34(+) subsets. We evaluated multiple signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD mutations. The data demonstrated the heterogeneity of cell phenotype distribution and distinct patterns of signaling activation across AML samples and between AML and normal samples. The mTOR targets p-4EBP1 and p-S6 were exclusively found in FLT3-ITD stem/progenitor cells, but not in their normal counterparts, suggesting both as novel targets in FLT3 mutated AML. Our data suggest that CyTOF can identify functional signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML, which may

  18. Single-cell mass cytometry reveals intracellular survival/proliferative signaling in FLT3-ITD-mutated AML stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lina; Qiu, Peng; Zeng, Zhihong; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Mak, Duncan H; Burks, Jared K; Schober, Wendy; McQueen, Teresa J; Cortes, Jorge; Tanner, Scott D; Roboz, Gail J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Guzman, Monica L; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the unique phenotypes and complex signaling pathways of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) will provide insights and druggable targets that can be used to eradicate acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current work on AML LSCs is limited by the number of parameters that conventional flow cytometry (FCM) can analyze because of cell autofluorescence and fluorescent dye spectral overlap. Single-cell mass cytometry (CyTOF) substitutes rare earth elements for fluorophores to label antibodies, which allows measurements of up to 120 parameters in single cells without correction for spectral overlap. The aim of this study was the evaluation of intracellular signaling in antigen-defined stem/progenitor cell subsets in primary AML. CyTOF and conventional FCM yielded comparable results on LSC phenotypes defined by CD45, CD34, CD38, CD123, and CD99. Intracellular phosphoprotein responses to ex vivo cell signaling inhibitors and cytokine stimulation were assessed in myeloid leukemia cell lines and one primary AML sample. CyTOF and conventional FCM results were confirmed by western blotting. In the primary AML sample, we investigated the cell responses to ex vivo stimulation with stem cell factor (SCF) and BEZ235-induced inhibition of PI3K and identified activation patterns in multiple PI3K downstream signaling pathways including p-4EBP1, p-AKT, and p-S6, particularly in CD34+ subsets. We evaluated multiple signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD mutations. The data demontrated the heterogeneity of cell phenotype distribution and distinct patterns of signaling activation across AML samples and between AML and normal samples. The mTOR targets p-4EBP1 and p-S6 were exclusively found in FLT3-ITD stem/progenitor cells, but not in their normal counterparts, suggesting both as novel targets in FLT3 mutated AML. Our data suggest that CyTOF can identify functional signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML, which

  19. Modelling intracellular competition for calcium: kinetic and thermodynamic control of different molecular modes of signal decoding

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Gabriela; Roque, Antonio C.; Simoes de Souza, Fabio M.

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, a common chemical entity triggers opposite cellular processes, which implies that the components of signalling networks must detect signals not only through their chemical natures, but also through their dynamic properties. To gain insights on the mechanisms of discrimination of the dynamic properties of cellular signals, we developed a computational stochastic model and investigated how three calcium ion (Ca2+)-dependent enzymes (adenylyl cyclase (AC), phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1), and calcineurin (CaN)) differentially detect Ca2+ transients in a hippocampal dendritic spine. The balance among AC, PDE1 and CaN might determine the occurrence of opposite Ca2+-induced forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). CaN is essential for LTD. AC and PDE1 regulate, indirectly, protein kinase A, which counteracts CaN during LTP. Stimulations of AC, PDE1 and CaN with artificial and physiological Ca2+ signals demonstrated that AC and CaN have Ca2+ requirements modulated dynamically by different properties of the signals used to stimulate them, because their interactions with Ca2+ often occur under kinetic control. Contrarily, PDE1 responds to the immediate amplitude of different Ca2+ transients and usually with the same Ca2+ requirements observed under steady state. Therefore, AC, PDE1 and CaN decode different dynamic properties of Ca2+ signals. PMID:27033299

  20. Modelling intracellular competition for calcium: kinetic and thermodynamic control of different molecular modes of signal decoding.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Roque, Antonio C; Simoes de Souza, Fabio M

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, a common chemical entity triggers opposite cellular processes, which implies that the components of signalling networks must detect signals not only through their chemical natures, but also through their dynamic properties. To gain insights on the mechanisms of discrimination of the dynamic properties of cellular signals, we developed a computational stochastic model and investigated how three calcium ion (Ca((2+)))-dependent enzymes (adenylyl cyclase (AC), phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1), and calcineurin (CaN)) differentially detect Ca((2+)) transients in a hippocampal dendritic spine. The balance among AC, PDE1 and CaN might determine the occurrence of opposite Ca((2+))-induced forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). CaN is essential for LTD. AC and PDE1 regulate, indirectly, protein kinase A, which counteracts CaN during LTP. Stimulations of AC, PDE1 and CaN with artificial and physiological Ca((2+)) signals demonstrated that AC and CaN have Ca((2+)) requirements modulated dynamically by different properties of the signals used to stimulate them, because their interactions with Ca((2+)) often occur under kinetic control. Contrarily, PDE1 responds to the immediate amplitude of different Ca((2+)) transients and usually with the same Ca((2+)) requirements observed under steady state. Therefore, AC, PDE1 and CaN decode different dynamic properties of Ca((2+)) signals. PMID:27033299

  1. Deciphering the effect of an oxovanadium(iv) complex with the flavonoid chrysin (VOChrys) on intracellular cell signalling pathways in an osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    León, Ignacio E; Díez, Paula; Etcheverry, Susana B; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium complexes were studied during recent years and considered as a representative of a new class of non-platinum metal antitumor agents in combination with their low toxicity. However, a few challenges still remain in the discovery of new molecular targets for these novel metal-based drugs. The study of cell signaling pathways related to vanadium drugs, which is highly critical for identifying specific targets that play an important role in the antitumor activity of vanadium compounds, is scarce. This research deals with the alterations in intracellular signaling pathways promoted by an oxovanadium(iv) complex with the flavonoid chrysin [VO(chrysin)2EtOH]2 (VOChrys) in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63). Herein we report for the first time the effect of [VO(chrysin)2EtOH]2 on the relative abundance of 224 proteins, which are involved in the most common intracellular pathways. Besides, full-length human recombinant (FAK and AKT1) kinases are produced using an in situ IVTT system and then we have evaluated the variation of relative tyrosine-phosphorylation levels caused by the [VO(chrysin)2EtOH]2 compound. The results of the differential protein expression levels reveal that several proteins such as PKB/AKT, PAK, DAPK, Cdk 4, 6 and 7, FADD, AP2, NAK, and JNK, among others, were altered. Moreover, cell signaling pathways related to the PTK2B, FAK, PKC families suggests an important role associated with the antitumor activity of [VO(chrysin)2EtOH]2 was demonstrated. Finally, the effect of this compound on in situ expressed FAK and AKT1 is validated by determining the phosphorylation level, which decreased in the former and increased in the latter. PMID:27175625

  2. [Phagocytosis of Mycobacterium leprae down-regulates anti-microbial activity of murine macrophages against Mycobacterium intracellulare].

    PubMed

    Tatano, Yutaka; Sano, Chiaki; Emori, Masako; Saito, Hajime; Sato, Katsumasa; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Tomioka, Haruaki

    2012-09-01

    Patients with highly bacillated lepromatous leprosy (LL) essentially lack T cell-mediated immune responses specific to Mycobacterium leprae (ML) antigens, resulting in severely impaired host resistance to leprosy bacilli. Such type of immune unresponsiveness characteristic of LL patients is mainly attributable to markedly depressed T cell ability to activate/expand in response to ML antigens. In this study, we examined profiles of antimycobacterial activity of macrophages, which phagocytized leprosy bacilli, because there is another possibility that, in LL patients, host macrophages in the leprosy lesions are impaired in their antimicrobial activity due to their interaction with infected leprosy bacilli, particularly cellular events through binding with and/or internalization of the pathogens, thereby causing the reduction in host resistance to ML pathogens. The present study indicated the following. First, the anti-M. avium complex activity of murine peritoneal macrophages was significantly reduced when they had phagocytosed heat-killed leprosy bacilli. Second, infection of macrophages with leprosy bacilli did not affect macrophage-mediated suppressor activity against T cell proliferative response to Concanavalin A. These findings indicate that macrophage's intracellular signaling pathways that are up-regulated in response to phagocytosis of leprosy bacilli are linked to the signaling cascades participating in macrophage antimicrobial functions, but not cross-talk with those allowing the expression of macrophage's suppressor activity against T cell functions. PMID:23012845

  3. Activation of cell signaling via optical manipulation of gold-coated liposomes encapsulating signaling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Many diseases involve changes in cell signaling cascades, as seen commonly in drug resistant cancers. To better understand these intricate signaling events in diseased cells and tissues, experimental methods of probing cellular communication at a single to multi-cell level are required. We recently introduced a general platform for activation of selected signaling pathways by optically controlled delivery and release of water soluble factors using gold-coated liposomes. In the example presented here, we encapsulated inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger involved in GPCR and Akt signaling cascades, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes. The high polarizability of the liposome's unique gold pseudo-shell allows stable optical trapping for subcellular manipulation in the presence of cells. We take this optical manipulation further by optically injecting IP3-containing liposomes into the cytosol of a single cell to initiate localized cell signaling. Upon optical injection of liposomal IP3 into a single ovarian carcinoma cell, we observed localized activation as reported by changes in Indo-1 fluorescence intensity. With established gap junctions between the injected cell and neighboring cells, we monitored propagation of this signaling to and through nearby cells.

  4. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  5. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular water is an important pool of oxygen and hydrogen atoms for biosynthesis. Intracellular water is usually assumed to be isotopically identical to extracellular water, but an unexpected experimental result caused us to question this assumption. Heme O isolated from Escherichia coli cells grown in 95% H218O contained only a fraction of the theoretical value of labeled oxygen at a position where the O atom was known to be derived from water. In fact, fewer than half of the oxygen atoms were labeled. In an effort to explain this surprising result, we developed a method to determine the isotope ratios of intracellular water in cultured cells. The results of our experiments showed that during active growth, up to 70% of the oxygen atoms and 50% of the hydrogen atoms in the intracellular water of E. coli are generated during metabolism and can be isotopically distinct from extracellular water. The fraction of isotopically distinct atoms was substantially less in stationary phase and chilled cells, consistent with our hypothesis that less metabolically-generated water would be present in cells with lower metabolic activity. Our results were consistent with and explained the result of the heme O labeling experiment. Only about 40% of the O atoms on the heme O molecule were labeled because, presumably, only about 40% of the water inside the cells was 18O water that had diffused in from the culture medium. The rest of the intracellular water contained 16O atoms derived from either nutrients or atmospheric oxygen. To test whether we could also detect metabolically-derived hydrogen atoms in cellular constituents, we isolated fatty acids from log-phase and stationary phase E. coli and determined the H isotope ratios of individual fatty acids. The results of these experiments showed that environmental water contributed more H atoms to fatty acids isolated in stationary phase than to the same fatty acids isolated from log-phase cells. Stable isotope analyses of

  6. Plasma reciprocal pool specific activity predicts that of intracellular free leucine for protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Horber, F.F.; Horber-Feyder, C.M.; Krayer, S.; Schwenk, W.F.; Haymond, M.W. )

    1989-09-01

    We previously proposed that, during the infusion of either labeled leucine or its alpha-ketoacid, alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC), the plasma specific activity (SA) of the transaminated product of the infused tracer (reciprocal pool SA) may better reflect the intracellular leucine SA than the plasma SA of either infused tracer (primary pool SA). To test this hypothesis, 14 dogs were simultaneously infused intravenously with (3H)leucine and (14C)KIC, and blood and tissue compartments were sampled. The ratios of (3H)-leucine to (14C)leucine (3H)/(14C)leucine in mixed tissue proteins and in the intracellular space of striated muscle were the same as the ratio of the isotope infusion rates and similar, although slightly lower (P less than 0.01), than (3H)KIC/(14C)leucine SA (ratio of reciprocal pool SA) in plasma. Plasma (3H)KIC/(14C)leucine SA were essentially identical to the (3H)/(14C) of leucine in (1) mixed liver proteins, (2) intrahepatic free leucine, and (3) fibrin. The (3H)/(14C)leucine in mixed renal proteins and in the intracellular space of kidney and erythrocytes were similar to those of the venous plasma (3H)/(14C)leucine SA. The plasma (3H)KIC and (14C)leucine SA (the reciprocal pool SA) were similar to the SA of (3H)- and (14C)leucine in the intracellular space of all organs investigated with the exception of kidney. Therefore, in postabsorptive dogs, the plasma SA of the transaminated product of the infused labeled KIC or leucine is an excellent predictor of the intracellular leucine SA in all tissues investigated with the exception of kidney.

  7. Active intracellular transport in metastatic cells studied by spatial light interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Majeed, Hassaan; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular transport are very difficult to quantify and, consequently, continue to be insufficiently understood. While it is well documented that mass trafficking inside living cells consists of both random and deterministic motions, quantitative data over broad spatiotemporal scales are lacking. We studied the intracellular transport in live cells using spatial light interference microscopy, a high spatiotemporal resolution quantitative phase imaging tool. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (directed, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). Furthermore, we studied the behavior of the two-dimensional mass density over 30 h in HeLa cells and focused on the active component. We determined the standard deviation of the velocity distribution at the point of cell division for each cell and compared the standard deviation velocity inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found that the velocity distribution in the cytoplasm is consistently broader than in the nucleus, suggesting mechanisms for faster transport in the cytosol versus the nucleus. Future studies will focus on improving phase measurements by applying a fluorescent tag to understand how particular proteins are transported inside the cell.

  8. In vitro activity of artemisone and artemisinin derivatives against extracellular and intracellular Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Francesca; Scaltrito, Maria Maddalena; Masia, Carla; Bonomi, Arianna; Coccè, Valentina; Marano, Giuseppe; Haynes, Richard K; Miani, Alessandro; Farronato, Giampietro; Taramelli, Donatella

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro activity of the new artemisinin derivative artemisone as well as other molecules of the same class against Helicobacter pylori and their effects when combined with standard antibiotics were evaluated. Since H. pylori can be internalised into gastric epithelial cells, the effects of artemisinin, dihydroartemisinin and artemisone against intracellular H. pylori were also investigated. Bacteriostatic [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)] and bactericidal [minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)] activities were assessed against 24 clinical strains of H. pylori with different antibiotics susceptibilities. Artemisone showed MIC50 and MIC90 values of 0.25 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L, respectively, and an MBC50 value of 0.5 mg/L. Artemisone was synergistic with amoxicillin in 60% of strains, with clarithromycin in 40% and with metronidazole in 20%. There was no interaction between artemisone and omeprazole or bismuth citrate. Against intracellular H. pylori, only dihydroartemisinin at 2× MIC caused a 1 log10 CFU decrease after 18 h and 24 h of incubation. This is the first demonstration in vitro of the activity of artemisinin derivatives against intracellular H. pylori and indicates that artemisone has the potential to be efficacious for the treatment of H. pylori infection, especially in combination with antibiotics. PMID:27216383

  9. Catalytic activity of human carbonic anhydrase isoform IX is displayed both extra- and intracellularly.

    PubMed

    Klier, Michael; Jamali, Somayeh; Ames, Samantha; Schneider, Hans-Peter; Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    Most carbonic anhydrases catalyse the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate, either as soluble cytosolic enzymes, in or at intracellular organelles, or at the extracellular face of the cell membrane as membrane-anchored proteins. Carbonic anhydrase isoform IX (CA IX), a membrane-bound enzyme with catalytic activity at the extracellular membrane surface, has come to prominence in recent years because of its association with hypoxic tissue, particularly tumours, often indicating poor prognosis. We have evaluated the catalytic activity of CA IX heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by measuring the amplitude and rate of cytosolic pH changes as well as pH changes at the outer membrane surface (pHs ) during addition and removal of 5% CO2 /25 mm HCO3-, and by mass spectrometry. Our results indicate both extracellular and intracellular catalytic activity of CA IX. Reduced rates of CO2 -dependent intracellular pH changes after knockdown of CA IX confirmed these findings in two breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Our results demonstrate a new function of CA IX that may be important in the search for therapeutic cancer drugs targeting CA IX. PMID:26470855

  10. Active intracellular transport in metastatic cells studied by spatial light interference microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Majeed, Hassaan; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular transport are very difficult to quantify and, consequently, continue to be insufficiently understood. While it is well documented that mass trafficking inside living cells consists of both random and deterministic motions, quantitative data over broad spatiotemporal scales are lacking. We studied the intracellular transport in live cells using spatial light interference microscopy, a high spatiotemporal resolution quantitative phase imaging tool. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (directed, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). Furthermore, we studied the behavior of the two-dimensional mass density over 30 h in HeLa cells and focused on the active component. We determined the standard deviation of the velocity distribution at the point of cell division for each cell and compared the standard deviation velocity inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found that the velocity distribution in the cytoplasm is consistently broader than in the nucleus, suggesting mechanisms for faster transport in the cytosol versus the nucleus. Future studies will focus on improving phase measurements by applying a fluorescent tag to understand how particular proteins are transported inside the cell. PMID:26271006

  11. Multi-State Transition Kinetics of Intracellular Signaling Molecules by Single-Molecule Imaging Analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Satomi; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The chemotactic signaling of eukaryotic cells is based on a chain of interactions between signaling molecules diffusing on the cell membrane and those shuttling between the membrane and cytoplasm. In this chapter, we describe methods to quantify lateral diffusion and reaction kinetics on the cell membrane. By the direct visualization and statistic analyses of molecular Brownian movement achieved by single-molecule imaging techniques, multiple states of membrane-bound molecules are successfully revealed with state transition kinetics. Using PTEN, a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3) 3'-phosphatase, in Dictyostelium discoideum undergoing chemotaxis as a model, each process of the analysis is described in detail. The identified multiple state kinetics provides an essential clue to elucidating the molecular mechanism of chemoattractant-induced dynamic redistribution of the signaling molecule asymmetrically on the cell membrane. Quantitative parameters for molecular reactions and diffusion complement a conventional view of the chemotactic signaling system, where changing a static network of molecules connected by causal relationships into a spatiotemporally dynamic one permits a mathematical description of stochastic migration of the cell along a shallow chemoattractant gradient. PMID:27271914

  12. Systems analysis in cell biology: from the phenomenological description towards a computer model of the intracellular signal transduction network.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M; Lais, P; Wolf, B

    1993-03-15

    In this paper we introduce a systematic approach for the modelling of complex biological systems which is especially useful for the analysis of signal transduction mechanisms in cell biology. It is shown that systems analysis in form of top-down levelled dataflow diagrams provides a powerful tool for the mathematical modelling of the system in terms of a stochastic formulation. Due to the exact formulation, the consistency of the model with the experimental results can be tested by means of a computer simulation. The method termed Structured Biological Modelling (SBM) is illustrated by modelling some aspects of the second messenger network which regulates cell proliferation. As an example for the straightforward development of a mathematical description a stochastic computer model for intracellular Ca2+ oscillations is presented. PMID:8458410

  13. Role of Calcium Signaling in B Cell Activation and Biology.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Increase in intracellular levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) is one of the key triggering signals for the development of B cell response to the antigen. The diverse Ca2+ signals finely controlled by multiple factors participate in the regulation of gene expression, B cell development, and effector functions. B cell receptor (BCR)-initiated Ca2+ mobilization is sourced from two pathways: one is the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and other is the prolonged influx of extracellular Ca2+ induced by depleting the stores via store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The identification of stromal interaction molecule 1(STIM1), the ER Ca2+ sensor, and Orai1, a key subunit of the CRAC channel pore, has now provided the tools to understand the mode of Ca2+ influx regulation and physiological relevance. Herein, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BCR-triggered Ca2+ signaling as well as its contribution to the B cell biological processes and diseases. PMID:26369772

  14. Magneto-optical cellular chip model for intracellular orientational-dynamic-activity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a magneto-optical cellular chip model (MoCCM) was developed to detect intracellular dynamics in macromolecules by using magneto-optical effects. For the purpose of cell-measurement under strong static magnetic fields of up to 10 T, we constructed a cellular chip model, which was a thin glass plate with a well for a cell culture. A cell line of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 was incubated in the glass well, and the well, 0.3 mm in depth, was sealed by a cover glass when the MoCCM was set in a fiber optic system. An initial intensity change of the polarized light transmission, which dispersed perpendicular to the cell's attaching surface, was collected for 10 to 60 min, and then magnetic fields were applied parallel and perpendicular to the surface and light direction, respectively. The magnetic birefringence signals that originated from the magnetic orientation of intracellular molecules such as cytoskeletons apparently appeared when the magnetic fields were constant at 10 T. A statistical analysis with 15 experiments confirmed that the cellular components under 10 T magnetic fields caused a stronger alignment, which was transferred into polarizing light intensity that increased more than the case before exposure. Cellular conditions such as generation and cell density affected the magnetic birefringence signals.

  15. Localization of the Intracellular Activity Domain of Pasteurella multocida Toxin to the N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ho, Mengfei

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) directly causes transient activation of Gqα protein that is coupled to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cβ1 in Xenopus oocytes (B. A. Wilson, X. Zhu, M. Ho, and L. Lu, J. Biol. Chem. 272:1268–1275, 1997). We found that antibodies directed against an N-terminal peptide of PMT inhibited the toxin-induced response in Xenopus oocytes, but antibodies against a C-terminal peptide did not. To test whether the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N terminus, we conducted a deletion mutational analysis of the PMT protein, using the Xenopus oocyte system as a means of screening for toxin activity. Using PCR and conventional cloning techniques, we cloned from a toxinogenic strain of P. multocida the entire toxA gene, encoding the 1,285-amino-acid PMT protein, and expressed the recombinant toxin as a His-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We subsequently generated a series of N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants and expressed the His-tagged PMT fragments in E. coli. These proteins were screened for cytotoxic activity on cultured Vero cells and for intracellular activity in the Xenopus oocyte system. Only the full-length protein without the His tag exhibited activity on Vero cells. The full-length PMT and N-terminal fragments containing the first 500 residues elicited responses in oocytes, but the C-terminal 780 amino acid fragment did not. Our results confirm that the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N-terminal 500 amino acids of the protein and that the C terminus is required for entry into cells. PMID:9864199

  16. Calcium-dependent intracellular signal pathways in primary cultured adipocytes and ANK3 gene variation in patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, A; Le Gal, K; Södersten, K; Vizlin-Hodzic, D; Ågren, H; Funa, K

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder of public health importance affecting >1% of the Swedish population. Despite progress, patients still suffer from chronic mood switches with potential severe consequences. Thus, early detection, diagnosis and initiation of correct treatment are critical. Cultured adipocytes from 35 patients with BD and 38 healthy controls were analysed using signal pathway reporter assays, that is, protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA), mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)), Myc, Wnt and p53. The levels of activated target transcriptional factors were measured in adipocytes before and after stimulation with lithium and escitalopram. Variations were analysed in the loci of 25 different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Activation of intracellular signals in several pathways analysed were significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls upon drug stimulation, especially with escitalopram stimulation of PKC, JNK and Myc, as well as lithium-stimulated PKC, whereas no meaningful difference was observed before stimulation. Univariate analyses of contingency tables for 80 categorical SNP results versus diagnoses showed a significant link with the ANK3 gene (rs10761482; likelihood ratio χ2=4.63; P=0.031). In a multivariate ordinal logistic fit for diagnosis, a backward stepwise procedure selected ANK3 as the remaining significant predictor. Comparison of the escitalopram-stimulated PKC activity and the ANK3 genotype showed them to add their share of the diagnostic variance, with no interaction (15% of variance explained, P<0.002). The study is cross-sectional with no longitudinal follow-up. Cohorts are relatively small with no medication-free patients, and there are no ‘ill patient' controls. It takes 3 to 4 weeks of culture to expand adipocytes that may change epigenetic profiles but remove the possibility of medication effects

  17. Calcium-dependent intracellular signal pathways in primary cultured adipocytes and ANK3 gene variation in patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, A; Le Gal, K; Södersten, K; Vizlin-Hodzic, D; Ågren, H; Funa, K

    2015-08-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder of public health importance affecting >1% of the Swedish population. Despite progress, patients still suffer from chronic mood switches with potential severe consequences. Thus, early detection, diagnosis and initiation of correct treatment are critical. Cultured adipocytes from 35 patients with BD and 38 healthy controls were analysed using signal pathway reporter assays, that is, protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA), mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)), Myc, Wnt and p53. The levels of activated target transcriptional factors were measured in adipocytes before and after stimulation with lithium and escitalopram. Variations were analysed in the loci of 25 different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Activation of intracellular signals in several pathways analysed were significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls upon drug stimulation, especially with escitalopram stimulation of PKC, JNK and Myc, as well as lithium-stimulated PKC, whereas no meaningful difference was observed before stimulation. Univariate analyses of contingency tables for 80 categorical SNP results versus diagnoses showed a significant link with the ANK3 gene (rs10761482; likelihood ratio χ(2)=4.63; P=0.031). In a multivariate ordinal logistic fit for diagnosis, a backward stepwise procedure selected ANK3 as the remaining significant predictor. Comparison of the escitalopram-stimulated PKC activity and the ANK3 genotype showed them to add their share of the diagnostic variance, with no interaction (15% of variance explained, P<0.002). The study is cross-sectional with no longitudinal follow-up. Cohorts are relatively small with no medication-free patients, and there are no 'ill patient' controls. It takes 3 to 4 weeks of culture to expand adipocytes that may change epigenetic profiles but remove the possibility of medication effects

  18. Activation of intracellular serine proteinase in Bacillus subtilis cells during sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T J; Shankweiler, G W; Hageman, J H

    1986-01-01

    Cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 (trpC2) growing and sporulating in a single chemically defined medium carried out intracellular protein degradation and increased their levels of intracellular serine protease-1 in a manner very similar to what had previously been reported for cells sporulating in nutrient broth. The results were interpreted to mean that these processes are intrinsic to sporulation rather than medium dependent. To determine the cause of these increases in specific activity of proteinases, we purified the protease, prepared rabbit immunoglobulins directed against it, and monitored changes in protease antigen levels by performing rocket immunoelectrophoresis. In cells sporulating in nutrient broth, the protease antigen levels increased about 7-fold, whereas the specific activity increased about 150-fold, for an activation of about 20-fold. In cells sporulating in the single chemically defined sporulation medium, the protease antigen increased about 10-fold, whereas the specific activity increased at least 400-fold, for an activation of about 40-fold. These results were interpreted to mean that a posttranslational event activated the protease in vivo; a previously described endogenous proteinase inhibitor was confirmed to be present in the strain used. Chloramphenicol added to the cultures inhibited both the increases in antigen levels and in the specific activity of the proteinase. PMID:3079745

  19. Screening of new antileukemic agents from essential oils of algae extracts and computational modeling of their interactions with intracellular signaling nodes.

    PubMed

    Atasever-Arslan, Belkis; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Kalkan, Zeynep; Timucin, Ahmet Can; Gür, Hazal; Isik, Fatma Busra; Deniz, Emre; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2016-02-15

    Microalgae are very rich in bioactive compounds, minerals, polysaccharides, poly-unsaturated fatty acids and vitamins, and these rich constituents make microalgae an important resource for the discovery of new bioactive compounds with applications in biotechnology. In this study, we studied the antileukemic activity of several chosen microalgae species at the molecular level and assessed their potential for drug development. Here we identified Stichococcus bacillaris, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Microcystis aeruginosa and Nannochloropsis oculata microalgae extracts with possible antileukemic agent potentials. Specifically we studied the effects of these extracts on intracellular signal nodes and apoptotic pathways. We characterized the composition of essential oils of these fifteen different algae extracts using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Finally, to identify potential molecular targets causing the phenotypic changes in leukemic cell lines, we docked a selected group of these essential oils to several key intracellular proteins. According to results of rank score algorithm, five of these essential oils analyzed might be considered as in silico plausible candidates to be used as antileukemic agents. PMID:26709080

  20. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC(50)=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca(2+) current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPgamma channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPgamma channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  1. The Satiety Signaling Neuropeptide Perisulfakinin Inhibits the Activity of Central Neurons Promoting General Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  2. Intracellular ATP Decrease Mediates NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation upon Nigericin and Crystal Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Johji; So, Alexander; Tamura, Mizuho; Busso, Nathalie

    2015-12-15

    Activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome initiates an inflammatory response, which is associated with host defense against pathogens and the progression of chronic inflammatory diseases such as gout and atherosclerosis. The NLRP3 inflammasome mediates caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β processing in response to various stimuli, including extracellular ATP, although the roles of intracellular ATP (iATP) in NLRP3 activation remain unclear. In this study, we found that in activated macrophages artificial reduction of iATP by 2-deoxyglucose, a glycolysis inhibitor, caused mitochondrial membrane depolarization, leading to IL-1β secretion via NLRP3 and caspase-1 activation. Additionally, the NLRP3 activators nigericin and monosodium urate crystals lowered iATP through K(+)- and Ca(2+)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting a feedback loop between iATP loss and lowering of mitochondrial membrane potential. These results demonstrate the fundamental roles of iATP in the maintenance of mitochondrial function and regulation of IL-1β secretion, and they suggest that maintenance of the intracellular ATP pools could be a strategy for countering NLRP3-mediated inflammation. PMID:26546608

  3. Intracellular alkalization causes pain sensation through activation of TRPA1 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Fumitaka; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Tomoko; Shima, Asako; Shibasaki, Koji; Inada, Hitoshi; Sokabe, Takaaki; Tominaga, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate cells require a very narrow pH range for survival. Cells accordingly possess sensory and defense mechanisms for situations where the pH deviates from the viable range. Although the monitoring of acidic pH by sensory neurons has been attributed to several ion channels, including transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), the mechanisms by which these cells detect alkaline pH are not well understood. Here, using Ca2+ imaging and patch-clamp recording, we showed that alkaline pH activated transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) and that activation of this ion channel was involved in nociception. In addition, intracellular alkalization activated TRPA1 at the whole-cell level, and single-channel openings were observed in the inside-out configuration, indicating that alkaline pH activated TRPA1 from the inside. Analyses of mutants suggested that the two N-terminal cysteine residues in TRPA1 were involved in activation by intracellular alkalization. Furthermore, intraplantar injection of ammonium chloride into the mouse hind paw caused pain-related behaviors that were not observed in TRPA1-deficient mice. These results suggest that alkaline pH causes pain sensation through activation of TRPA1 and may provide a molecular explanation for some of the human alkaline pH–related sensory disorders whose mechanisms are largely unknown. PMID:19033673

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  5. Crosstalk between intracellular and extracellular signals regulating interneuron production, migration and integration into the cortex

    PubMed Central

    Peyre, Elise; Silva, Carla G.; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    During embryogenesis, cortical interneurons are generated by ventral progenitors located in the ganglionic eminences of the telencephalon. They travel along multiple tangential paths to populate the cortical wall. As they reach this structure they undergo intracortical dispersion to settle in their final destination. At the cellular level, migrating interneurons are highly polarized cells that extend and retract processes using dynamic remodeling of microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. Different levels of molecular regulation contribute to interneuron migration. These include: (1) Extrinsic guidance cues distributed along migratory streams that are sensed and integrated by migrating interneurons; (2) Intrinsic genetic programs driven by specific transcription factors that grant specification and set the timing of migration for different subtypes of interneurons; (3) Adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal elements/regulators that transduce molecular signalings into coherent movement. These levels of molecular regulation must be properly integrated by interneurons to allow their migration in the cortex. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the interplay between microenvironmental signals and cell autonomous programs that drive cortical interneuron porduction, tangential migration, and intergration in the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:25926769

  6. [The regulation of the activation in BCR signaling by ZIP9 transporter].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masanari; Enomoto, Shuichi; Hiromura, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is the essential trace element and important for all living organisms. Zinc functions not only as a nutritional factor, but also as a second messenger. However, the effects of intracellular zinc on the B cell-receptor (BCR) signaling pathway are not poorly understood. Here, we indicate that the ZIP9 induces increase in intracellular zinc level and plays an important role in the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in response to BCR activation. In DT40 cells, the enhancement of Akt and Erk phosphorylation requires intracellular zinc. To clarify this event, we used chicken Zip9-knockout DT40 (cZip9KO) cells. The levels of Akt and Erk phosphorylation significantly decreased in cZip9KO cells treated with zinc pyrithione (ZnPy), and overexpressing the human Zip9 gene restored these biochemical events. Moreover, we found that the increase in intracellular zinc level depends on the expression of ZIP9. Additionally, intracellular zinc was localized at the Golgi, even if it was treated with ZnPy in cZip9KO cells. We concluded that ZIP9 regulates cytosolic zinc level, resulting in the enhancement of Akt and Erk phosphorylation. Our observations provide new mechanistic insights into the BCR signaling pathway underlying the regulation of intracellular zinc level by ZIP9 in response to the BCR activation. PMID:24989471

  7. Intracellular activity of clinical concentrations of phenothiazines including thioridiazine against phagocytosed Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane; Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Arroz, Maria Jorge; Amaral, Leonard

    2002-07-01

    The effect of thioridazine (TZ) was studied on the killing activity of human peripheral blood monocyte derived macrophages (HPBMDM) and of human macrophage cell line THP-1 at extracellular concentrations below those achievable clinically. These macrophages have nominal killing activity against bacteria and therefore, would not influence any activity that the compounds may have against intracellular localised Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicated that whereas TZ has an in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the strains of S. aureus of 18, 0.1 mg/l of TZ in the medium completely inhibits the growth of S. aureus that has been phagocytosed by macrophages. The latter concentration was non-toxic to macrophages, did not cause cellular expression of activation marker CD69 nor induction of CD3+ T cell production of IFN-gamma, but blocked cellular proliferation and down-regulated the production of T cell-derived cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-5). These results suggest that TZ induces intracellular bactericidal activities independent of the capacity to generate Type 1 responses against S. aureus. PMID:12127709

  8. Glucose enhances insulin promoter activity in MIN6 beta-cells independently of changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, H J; Rafiq, I; Pouli, A E; Rutter, G A

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that glucose may activate insulin gene transcription through increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, possibly acting via the release of stored insulin. We have investigated this question by dynamic photon-counting imaging of insulin- and c-fos-promoter-firefly luciferase reporter construct activity. Normalized to constitutive viral promoter activity, insulin promoter activity in MIN6 beta-cells was increased 1.6-fold after incubation at 30 mM compared with 3 mM glucose, but was unaltered at either glucose concentration by the presence of insulin (100 nM) or the Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, verapamil (100 microM). Increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] achieved by plasma membrane depolarization with KCl failed to enhance either insulin or c-fos promoter activity in MIN6 cells, but increased c-fos promoter activity 5-fold in AtT20 cells. Together, these results demonstrate that glucose can exert a direct effect on insulin promoter activity in islet beta-cells, via a signalling pathway which does not require increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] nor insulin release and insulin receptor activation. PMID:10455011

  9. Superoxide dismutase activity of Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, B K; Falkinham, J O

    1986-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (SOD) activity has been detected in crude cell extracts of representative strains of the Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum (MAIS) group. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated a single SOD activity band for each of the MAIS strains, though there were differences in mobility. All M. avium and M. intracellulare and two of five M. scrofulaceum strains demonstrated a single activity band of identical mobility (Rf = 0.83), while the SOD activity band for the three remaining M. scrofulaceum strains migrated farther (Rf = 0.85). The differences in mobility correlated with differences in sensitivity to NaN3 and H2O2. The SOD activities of the majority of the MAIS strains which displayed the slower-migrating activity band were inhibited 22 to 81% after 15 min of exposure to 5 mM H2O2, suggesting that both iron and manganese may be present in a single enzyme. The SOD activities of the three M. scrofulaceum strains which had the faster-migrating activity band were inhibited 100% after only 5 min of exposure to 5 mM H2O2 and exhibited greater sensitivity to 5 and 10 mM NaN3, characteristics of an iron-containing SOD. A concentration of 1 mM KCN did not cause inhibition of enzyme activity in any of the MAIS strains tested. Extracellular SOD activity was detected in four of six MAIS strains and was shown to be identical in mobility to the SOD activity of the crude extracts. Images PMID:3744555

  10. Nonlinear Dynamic Modeling of Synaptically Driven Single Hippocampal Neuron Intracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W.

    2011-01-01

    A high-order nonlinear dynamic model of the input–output properties of single hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was developed based on synaptically driven intracellular activity. The purpose of this study is to construct a model that: 1) can capture the nonlinear dynamics of both subthreshold activities [postsynaptic potentials (PSPs)] and suprathreshold activities (action potentials) in a single formalism; 2) is sufficiently general to be applied to any spike-input and spike-output neurons (point process input and point process output neural systems); and 3) is computationally efficient. The model consisted of three major components: 1) feedforward kernels (up to third order) that transform presynaptic action potentials into PSPs; 2) a constant threshold, above which action potentials are generated; and 3) a feedback kernel (first order) that describes spike-triggered after-potentials. The model was applied to CA1 pyramidal cells, as they were electrically stimulated with broadband Poisson random impulse trains through the Schaffer collaterals. The random impulse trains used here have physiological properties similar to spiking patterns observed in CA3 hippocampal neurons. PSPs and action potentials were recorded from the soma of CA1 pyramidal neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We evaluated the model performance separately with respect to PSP waveforms and the occurrence of spikes. The average normalized mean square error of PSP prediction is 14.4%. The average spike prediction error rate is 18.8%. In summary, although prediction errors still could be reduced, the model successfully captures the majority of high-order nonlinear dynamics of the single-neuron intracellular activity. The model captures the general biophysical processes with a small set of open parameters that are directly constrained by the intracellular recording, and thus, can be easily applied to any spike-input and spike-output neuron. PMID:21233041

  11. Intracellular signaling pathways involved in the relaxin-induced proliferation of rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Aline Rosa; Pimenta, Maristela Taliari; Lucas, Thais F G; Royer, Carine; Porto, Catarina Segreti; Lazari, Maria Fatima Magalhaes

    2012-09-15

    Regulation of Sertoli cell number is a key event to determine normal spermatogenesis. We have previously shown that relaxin and its G-protein coupled receptor RXFP1 are expressed in rat Sertoli cells, and that relaxin stimulates Sertoli cell proliferation. This study examined the mechanisms underlying the mitogenic effect of relaxin in a primary culture of Sertoli cells removed from testes of immature rats. Stimulation with exogenous relaxin increased Sertoli cell number and the expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), but did not affect the mRNA level of the differentiation markers cadherins 1 and 2. Relaxin-induced Sertoli cell proliferation was blocked by inhibition of MEK/ERK1/2 or PI3K/AKT pathways, but not by inhibition of PKC or EGFR activity. Relaxin induced a rapid and transient activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which was MEK and SRC-dependent, and involved upstream activation of G(i). AKT activation could be detected 5 min after relaxin stimulation, and was still detected after 24h of stimulation with relaxin. Relaxin-induced AKT phosphorylation was G(i)- but not PKA-dependent, and it was blocked by both PI3K and MEK inhibitors. In conclusion, the mitogenic effect of relaxin in Sertoli cell involves coupling to G(i) and activation of both MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT pathways. PMID:22819701

  12. Contradictory effects of short- and long-term hyperglycemias on ischemic injury of myocardium via intracellular signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang; Takashi, En; Kudo, Mitsuhiro; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Naito, Zenya

    2004-02-01

    Although clinical diabetes mellitus is obviously a high risk factor for myocardial infarction, there is disagreement about the sensitivity of ischemic injury of an infarcted myocardium in experimental studies. The present study evaluated the influences of different durations of hyperglycemia on ischemic and reperfusion injuries of the myocardium, and focused on extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), which plays an important role in the intracellular signaling pathway and is reported to be associated with myocardial protection against heart injury. Short- and long-term hyperglycemias were induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ) injection and the rats were examined 4 (4WDM) and 20 weeks (20WDM) after the treatment. Ischemia and reperfusion were induced by occlusion and reperfusion (I/R) of the left coronary artery (LCA). I/R-induced infarct size was determined using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. After 20 weeks of STZ treatment (20WDM+I/R), the infarct size in the rat heart increased by 65.2 +/- 4.3%, whereas after 4 weeks of STZ treatment (4WDM+I/R), the infarct size decreased compared with the time-matched I/R group (43.1 +/- 3.6% and 59.5 +/- 5.6%, respectively). The number of dead myocytes including necrotic and apoptotic cells was determined using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and terminal deoxynucleotide nick-end labeling (TUNEL) methods. The number of dead myocytes decreased in the 4WDM+I/R group, while the number of dead myocytes increased markedly in the 20WDM+I/R group, compared with the time-matched I/R group. The increment of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the 4WDM group and the slight enhancement of this phosphorylation by I/R treatment were observed by western blotting. However, in the 20WDM group, the level of ERK1/2 phosphorylation reduced by approximately 1/3 compared with the time-matched control group; moreover, I/R treatment did not enhance the phosphorylation level. This study demonstrated that short- and long

  13. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes as targets of the intracellular signalling network: benefits of PDE inhibitors in various diseases and perspectives for future therapeutic developments

    PubMed Central

    Keravis, Thérèse; Lugnier, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that specifically inactivate the intracellular messengers cAMP and cGMP in a compartmentalized manner represent an important enzyme class constituted by 11 gene-related families of isozymes (PDE1 to PDE11). Downstream receptors, PDEs play a major role in controlling the signalosome at various levels of phosphorylations and protein/protein interactions. Due to the multiplicity of isozymes, their various intracellular regulations and their different cellular and subcellular distributions, PDEs represent interesting targets in intracellular pathways. Therefore, the investigation of PDE isozyme alterations related to various pathologies and the design of specific PDE inhibitors might lead to the development of new specific therapeutic strategies in numerous pathologies. This manuscript (i) overviews the different PDEs including their endogenous regulations and their specific inhibitors; (ii) analyses the intracellular implications of PDEs in regulating signalling cascades in pathogenesis, exemplified by two diseases affecting cell cycle and proliferation; and (iii) discusses perspectives for future therapeutic developments. PMID:22014080

  14. The α-Arrestin ARRDC3 Regulates the Endosomal Residence Time and Intracellular Signaling of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xufan; Irannejad, Roshanak; Bowman, Shanna L; Du, Yang; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A; von Zastrow, Mark; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Arrestin domain-containing protein 3 (ARRDC3) is a member of the mammalian α-arrestin family, which is predicted to share similar tertiary structure with visual-/β-arrestins and also contains C-terminal PPXY motifs that mediate interaction with E3 ubiquitin ligases. Recently, ARRDC3 has been proposed to play a role in regulating the trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors, although mechanistic insight into this process is lacking. Here, we focused on characterizing the role of ARRDC3 in regulating the trafficking of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). We find that ARRDC3 primarily localizes to EEA1-positive early endosomes and directly interacts with the β2AR in a ligand-independent manner. Although ARRDC3 has no effect on β2AR endocytosis or degradation, it negatively regulates β2AR entry into SNX27-occupied endosomal tubules. This results in delayed recycling of the receptor and a concomitant increase in β2AR-dependent endosomal signaling. Thus, ARRDC3 functions as a switch to modulate the endosomal residence time and subsequent intracellular signaling of the β2AR. PMID:27226565

  15. Anti-infective Activity of 2-Cyano-3-Acrylamide Inhibitors with Improved Drug-Like Properties against Two Intracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Karla D; Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Sun, Duxin; Wen, Bo; He, Miao; Sun, Hanshi; O'Riordan, Mary X D; Wobus, Christiane E

    2016-07-01

    Due to the rise of antibiotic resistance and the small number of effective antiviral drugs, new approaches for treating infectious diseases are urgently needed. Identifying targets for host-based therapies represents an emerging strategy for drug discovery. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a central mode of signaling in the eukaryotic cell and may be a promising target for therapies that bolster the host's ability to control infection. Deubiquitinase (DUB) enzymes are key regulators of the host inflammatory response, and we previously demonstrated that a selective DUB inhibitor and its derivative promote anti-infective activities in host cells. To find compounds with anti-infective efficacy but improved toxicity profiles, we tested a library of predominantly 2-cyano-3-acrylamide small-molecule DUB inhibitors for anti-infective activity in macrophages against two intracellular pathogens: murine norovirus (MNV) and Listeria monocytogenes We identified compound C6, which inhibited DUB activity in human and murine cells and reduced intracellular replication of both pathogens with minimal toxicity in cell culture. Treatment with C6 did not significantly affect the ability of macrophages to internalize virus, suggesting that the anti-infective activity interferes with postentry stages of the MNV life cycle. Metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic assays showed that C6 has a half-life in mouse liver microsomes of ∼20 min and has a half-life of approximately 4 h in mice when administered intravenously. Our results provide a framework for targeting the host ubiquitin system in the development of host-based therapies for infectious disease. Compound C6 represents a promising tool with which to elucidate the role of DUBs in the macrophage response to infection. PMID:27139470

  16. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  17. Members of the Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel Protein Family Demonstrate Glutaredoxin-Like Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J.; Hossain, Khondker R.; Hudson, Amanda L.; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A.; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L.; Hare, Joanna E.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Davey, Mary W.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function. PMID:25581026

  18. The regulation and function of the striated muscle activator of rho signaling (STARS) protein

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Lamon, Séverine; Russell, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy living throughout the lifespan requires continual growth and repair of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle. To effectively maintain these processes muscle cells detect extracellular stress signals and efficiently transmit them to activate appropriate intracellular transcriptional programs. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) protein, also known as Myocyte Stress-1 (MS1) protein and Actin-binding Rho-activating protein (ABRA) is highly enriched in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle. STARS binds actin, co-localizes to the sarcomere and is able to stabilize the actin cytoskeleton. By regulating actin polymerization, STARS also controls an intracellular signaling cascade that stimulates the serum response factor (SRF) transcriptional pathway; a pathway controlling genes involved in muscle cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth. Understanding the activation, transcriptional control and biological roles of STARS in cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle, will improve our understanding of physiological and pathophysiological muscle development and function. PMID:23248604

  19. Aroclor 1254, a developmental neurotoxicant, alters energy metabolism- and intracellular signaling-associated protein networks in rat cerebellum and hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Osorio, Cristina; Royland, Joyce E.; Ramabhadran, Ram; Alzate, Oscar

    2011-11-15

    The vast literature on the mode of action of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) indicates that PCBs are a unique model for understanding the mechanisms of toxicity of environmental mixtures of persistent chemicals. PCBs have been shown to adversely affect psychomotor function and learning and memory in humans. Although the molecular mechanisms for PCB effects are unclear, several studies indicate that the disruption of Ca{sup 2+}-mediated signal transduction plays significant roles in PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Culminating events in signal transduction pathways include the regulation of gene and protein expression, which affects the growth and function of the nervous system. Our previous studies showed changes in gene expression related to signal transduction and neuronal growth. In this study, protein expression following developmental exposure to PCB is examined. Pregnant rats (Long Evans) were dosed with 0.0 or 6.0 mg/kg/day of Aroclor-1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21, and the cerebellum and hippocampus from PND14 animals were analyzed to determine Aroclor 1254-induced differential protein expression. Two proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the cerebellum following PCB exposure while 18 proteins were differentially expressed in the hippocampus. These proteins are related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP synthase, sub unit {beta} (ATP5B), creatine kinase, and malate dehydrogenase), calcium signaling (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1) and ryanodine receptor type II (RyR2)), and growth of the nervous system (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4 (DPYSL4), valosin-containing protein (VCP)). Results suggest that Aroclor 1254-like persistent chemicals may alter energy metabolism and intracellular signaling, which might result in developmental neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed brain proteomic analysis of rats exposed to the neurotoxicant

  20. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Biosynthesis of Glucosylceramide by Reducing Intracellular Sugar Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The membrane glycolipid glucosylceramide (GlcCer) plays a critical role in cellular homeostasis. Its intracellular levels are thought to be tightly regulated. How cells regulate GlcCer levels remains to be clarified. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a crucial cellular energy sensor, regulates glucose and lipid metabolism to maintain energy homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether AMPK affects GlcCer metabolism. AMPK activators (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside and metformin) decreased intracellular GlcCer levels and synthase activity in mouse fibroblasts. AMPK inhibitors or AMPK siRNA reversed these effects, suggesting that GlcCer synthesis is negatively regulated by an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Although AMPK did not affect the phosphorylation or expression of GlcCer synthase, the amount of UDP-glucose, an activated form of glucose required for GlcCer synthesis, decreased under AMPK-activating conditions. Importantly, the UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase Nudt14, which degrades UDP-glucose, generating UMP and glucose 1-phosphate, was phosphorylated and activated by AMPK. On the other hand, suppression of Nudt14 by siRNA had little effect on UDP-glucose levels, indicating that mammalian cells have an alternative UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase that mainly contributes to the reduction of UDP-glucose under AMPK-activating conditions. Because AMPK activators are capable of reducing GlcCer levels in cells from Gaucher disease patients, our findings suggest that reducing GlcCer through AMPK activation may lead to a new strategy for treating diseases caused by abnormal accumulation of GlcCer. PMID:26048992

  1. Nicotine enhances murine airway contractile responses to kinin receptor agonists via activation of JNK- and PDE4-related intracellular pathways

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nicotine plays an important role in cigarette-smoke-associated airway disease. The present study was designed to examine if nicotine could induce airway hyperresponsiveness through kinin receptors, and if so, explore the underlying mechanisms involved. Methods Murine tracheal segments were cultured for 1, 2 or 4 days in serum-free DMEM medium in presence of nicotine (1 and 10 μM) or vehicle (DMSO). Contractile responses induced by kinin B1 receptor agonist, des-Arg9-bradykinin, and B2 receptor agonist, bradykinin, were monitored with myographs. The B1 and B2 receptor mRNA expressions were semi-quantified using real-time PCR and their corresponding protein expressions assessed with confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Various pharmacological inhibitors were used for studying intracellular signaling pathways. Results Four days of organ culture with nicotine concentration-dependently increased kinin B1 and B2 receptor-mediated airway contractions, without altering the kinin receptor-mediated relaxations. No such increase was seen at day 1 or day 2. The airway contractile responses to 5-HT, acetylcholine and endothelin receptor agonists remained unaffected by nicotine. Two different neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonists MG624 and hexamethonium blocked the nicotine-induced effects. The enhanced contractile responses were accompanied by increased mRNA and protein expression for both kinin receptors, suggesting the involvement of transcriptional mechanisms. Confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry showed that 4 days of nicotine treatment induced activation (phosphorylation) of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38. Inhibition of JNK with its specific inhibitor SP600125 abolished the nicotine-induced effects on kinin receptor-mediated contractions and reverted the enhanced receptor mRNA expression. Administration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors (YM976 and theophylline

  2. Knockdown of GnT-Va expression inhibits ligand-induced downregulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and intracellular signaling by inhibiting receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Lee, Intaek; Pierce, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the expression of N-glycan branching glycosyltransferases can alter cell surface receptor functions, involving their levels of cell surface retention, rates of internalization into the endosomal compartment, and subsequent intracellular signaling. To study in detail the regulation of signaling of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by GlcNAcβ(1,6)Man branching, we utilized specific siRNA to selectively knockdown GnT-Va expression in the highly invasive human breast carcinoma line MDA-MB231, which resulted in the attenuation of its invasiveness-related phenotypes. Compared to control cells, ligand-induced downregulation of EGFR was significantly inhibited in GnT-Va-suppressed cells. This effect could be reversed by re-expression of GnT-Va, indicating that changes in ligand-induced receptor downregulation were dependent on GnT-Va activity. Knockdown of GnT-Va had no significant effect on c-Cbl mediated receptor ubiquitination and degradation, but did cause the inhibition of receptor internalization, showing that altered signaling and delayed ligand-induced downregulation of EGFR expression resulted from decreased EGFR endocytosis. Similar results were obtained with HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells treated with GnT-Va siRNA. Inhibited receptor internalization caused by the expression of GnT-Va siRNA appeared to be independent of galectin binding since decreased EGFR internalization in the knockdown cells was not affected by the treatment of the cells with lactose, a galectin inhibitor. Our results show that decreased GnT-Va activity due to siRNA expression in human carcinoma cells inhibits ligand-induced EGFR internalization, consequently resulting in delayed downstream signal transduction and inhibition of the EGF-induced, invasiveness-related phenotypes. PMID:19225046

  3. Intracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticle by actinobacteria and its antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otari, S. V.; Patil, R. M.; Ghosh, S. J.; Thorat, N. D.; Pawar, S. H.

    2015-02-01

    Intracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Rhodococcus spp. is demonstrated. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier trans-form infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy study of microorganisms' revealed synthesis of nanoparticle was occurring inside the cell, in the cytoplasm. AgNPs ranged from 5 to 50 nm. Formed nanoparticles were stable in the colloidal solution due to presence of proteins on the surface. AgNPs showed excellent bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity against pathogenic microorganisms.

  4. The Peptide Microarray-Based Resonance Light Scattering Assay for Sensitively Detecting Intracellular Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    The peptide microarray technology is a robust, reliable, and efficient technique for large-scale determination of enzyme activities, and high-throughput profiling of substrate/inhibitor specificities of enzymes. Here, the activities of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in different cell lysates have been detected by a peptide microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes. Highly sensitive detection of PKA activity in 0.1 μg total cell proteins of SHG-44 (human glioma cell) cell lysate (corresponding to 200 cells) is achieved by a selected peptide substrate. The experimental results also demonstrate that the RLS assay can be employed to evaluate the chemical regulation of intracellular kinase activity. PMID:26490469

  5. Biosynthesis of B2-integrin, intracellular calcium signalling and functional responses of normal and CD18-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Higuchi, H; Nochi, H; Tamoto, K; Araiso, T; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1996-09-01

    1Biosynthesis of CD11/CD18 in bovine leucocytes, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) signalling, chemiluminescent responses and membrane fluidity of neutrophils and the effects of D-mannose on neutrophils from control heifers and a heifer with bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were measured. The synthesis of CD11/CD18 complex was clearly detected in leucocytes from a normal heifer, but not in a BLAD-affected heifer. The transient phase of increased [Ca2+]i was clearly detected in neutrophils from a heifer with BLAD stimulated with opsonised zymosan, aggregated bovine immunoglobulin G or concanavalin A, whereas the sustained phase was deficient or significantly decreased compared with control heifers. [Ca2+]i signalling of neutrophils from control heifers and a heifer with BLAD stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate via an 11b/CD18-independent pathway showed no transient phase, and the subsequent increase in [Ca2+]i was almost identical in neutrophils from affected and control heifers. [Ca2+]i concentration and chemiluminescent responses of neutrophils from a control heifer were clearly decreased by treatment with anti-CD18 and anti-IgG antibodies. No differences in membrane fluidity were detected between neutrophils derived from control and CD18-deficient cattle. D-mannose binds mainly to Fc rather than CD18 receptors, and decreased Agg-IgG induced [Ca2+]i and the chemiluminescent response of neutrophils. The [Ca2+]i responses and Agg-IgG induced chemiluminescent responses of neutrophils from control heifers and a BLAD-affected heifer were inhibited by D-mannose. The characteristic changes of [Ca2+]i signalling and functional responses of B2-integrin-deficient neutrophils were demonstrated. PMID:8880976

  6. Intracellular Aggregation of Polypeptides with Expanded Polyglutamine Domain Is Stimulated by Stress-Activated Kinase Mekk1

    PubMed Central

    Meriin, Anatoli B.; Mabuchi, Katsuhide; Gabai, Vladimir L.; Yaglom, Julia A.; Kazantsev, Alex; Sherman, Michael Y.

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal proteins, which escape chaperone-mediated refolding or proteasome-dependent degradation, aggregate and form inclusion bodies (IBs). In several neurodegenerative diseases, such IBs can be formed by proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domains (e.g., huntingtin). This work studies the regulation of intracellular IB formation using an NH2-terminal fragment of huntingtin with expanded polyQ domain. We demonstrate that the active form of MEKK1, a protein kinase that regulates several stress-activated signaling cascades, stimulates formation of the IBs. This function of MEKK1 requires kinase activity, as the kinase-dead mutant of MEKK1 cannot stimulate this process. Exposure of cells to UV irradiation or cisplatin, both of which activate MEKK1, also augmented the formation of IBs. The polyQ-containing huntingtin fragment exists in cells in two distinct forms: (a) in a discrete soluble complex, and (b) in association with insoluble fraction. MEKK1 strongly stimulated recruitment of polyQ polypeptides into the particulate fraction. Notably, a large portion of the active form of MEKK1 was associated with the insoluble fraction, concentrating in discrete sites, and polyQ-containing IBs always colocalized with them. We suggest that MEKK1 is involved in a process of IB nucleation. MEKK1 also stimulated formation of IBs with two abnormal polypeptides lacking the polyQ domain, indicating that this kinase has a general effect on protein aggregation. PMID:11352944

  7. Platelet Activating Factor Enhances Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Via PKC, Elevated Intracellular Calcium, and Modulation of Synapsin 1 Dynamics and Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jennetta W.; Lu, Shao-Ming; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is an inflammatory phospholipid signaling molecule implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and neurotoxicity during neuroinflammation. However, little is known about the intracellular mechanisms mediating PAF’s physiological or pathological effects on synaptic facilitation. We show here that PAF receptors are localized at the synapse. Using fluorescent reporters of presynaptic activity we show that a non-hydrolysable analog of PAF (cPAF) enhances synaptic vesicle release from individual presynaptic boutons by increasing the size or release of the readily releasable pool and the exocytosis rate of the total recycling pool. cPAF also activates previously silent boutons resulting in vesicle release from a larger number of terminals. The underlying mechanism involves elevated calcium within presynaptic boutons and protein kinase C activation. Furthermore, cPAF increases synapsin I phosphorylation at sites 1 and 3, and increases dispersion of synapsin I from the presynaptic compartment during stimulation, freeing synaptic vesicles for subsequent release. These findings provide a conceptual framework for how PAF, regardless of its cellular origin, can modulate synapses during normal and pathologic synaptic activity. PMID:26778968

  8. Delineation of Diverse Macrophage Activation Programs in Response to Intracellular Parasites and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Kim, Charles C.; Batra, Sajeev; McKerrow, James H.; Loke, P'ng

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease) and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis). Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. Methodology/Principal Findings To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. Conclusions/Significance This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and

  9. Intracellular signaling mechanisms responsive to laser-induced photochemical and thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Natarajan, Mohan; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Denton, Michael; Maswadi, Saher; Kumar, Neeru; Nieves-Roldan, Francis

    2005-04-01

    The cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are subject to photo-oxidative stress arising from the interaction of incident light with lipofuscin, melanin, and other pigment granules in the RPE cytoplasm. Specific genotypic responses to these stressors are controlled by transcription factors, such as NF-κB (RelA/p50 dimer). The effects of CW laser exposures on NF-κB nuclear translocation have been studied in a line of human-derived RPE cells (hTERT-RPE) that develop melanin pigmentation in culture. The cells were exposed to the CW emission of an Argon-ion laser for 10 m at 0.5 W/cm2, a range previously shown to produce oxidation of cellular proteins, DNA, and antioxidants. NF-κB dimer was measured in nuclear extracts by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. NF-κB nuclear translocation exhibited a modest, early peak at 1 h, and a larger, late peak at 24 h. NF-κB activation could be reduced only by some antioxidants; for example, 20 mM N-acetyl-L-cysteine or 100 μM pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate were ineffective, while 500 μM ascorbic acid was highly effective. These results indicate that interaction of the laser with the RPE melanin granules is a likely source of oxidative reactions, and that the induction of photoxidative stress activates NF-κB, but it remains to be determined if NF-κB is pro- or anti-apoptotic in the RPE cell.

  10. Modulation of intracellular calcium waves and triggered activities by mitochondrial ca flux in mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenghang; Gordan, Richard; Wen, Hairuo; Fefelova, Nadezhda; Zang, Wei-Jin; Xie, Lai-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that mitochondria may play important roles in the Ca(2+) homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. However, it is still unclear if mitochondrial Ca(2+) flux can regulate the generation of Ca(2+) waves (CaWs) and triggered activities in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, intracellular/cytosolic Ca(2+) (Cai (2+)) was imaged in Fluo-4-AM loaded mouse ventricular myocytes. Spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release and CaWs were induced in the presence of high (4 mM) external Ca(2+) (Cao (2+)). The protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) reversibly raised basal Cai (2+) levels even after depletion of SR Ca(2+) in the absence of Cao (2+) , suggesting Ca(2+) release from mitochondria. FCCP at 0.01 - 0.1 µM partially depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m ) and increased the frequency and amplitude of CaWs in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous recording of cell membrane potentials showed the augmentation of delayed afterdepolarization amplitudes and frequencies, and induction of triggered action potentials. The effect of FCCP on CaWs was mimicked by antimycin A (an electron transport chain inhibitor disrupting Δψ m ) or Ru360 (a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter inhibitor), but not by oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor) or iodoacetic acid (a glycolytic inhibitor), excluding the contribution of intracellular ATP levels. The effects of FCCP on CaWs were counteracted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporine A, or the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter activator kaempferol. Our results suggest that mitochondrial Ca(2+) release and uptake exquisitely control the local Ca(2+) level in the micro-domain near SR ryanodine receptors and play an important role in regulation of intracellular CaWs and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:24348912

  11. Choline-releasing glycerophosphodiesterase EDI3 links the tumor metabolome to signaling network activities.

    PubMed

    Marchan, Rosemarie; Lesjak, Michaela S; Stewart, Joanna D; Winter, Roland; Seeliger, Janine; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-12-15

    Recently, EDI3 was identified as a key factor for choline metabolism that controls tumor cell migration and is associated with metastasis in endometrial carcinomas. EDI3 cleaves glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to form choline and glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Choline is then further metabolized to phosphatidylcholine (PtdC), the major lipid in membranes and a key player in membrane-mediated cell signaling. The second product, G3P, is a precursor molecule for several lipids with central roles in signaling, for example lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), phosphatidic acid (PA) and diacylglycerol (DAG). LPA activates intracellular signaling pathways by binding to specific LPA receptors, including membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptors and the intracellular nuclear receptor, PPARγ. Conversely, PA and DAG mediate signaling by acting as lipid anchors that bind and activate several signaling proteins. For example, binding of GTPases and PKC to PA and DAG, respectively, increases the activation of signaling networks, mediating processes such as migration, adhesion, proliferation or anti-apoptosis-all relevant for tumor development. We present a concept by which EDI3 either directly generates signaling molecules or provides "membrane anchors" for downstream signaling factors. As a result, EDI3 links choline metabolism to signaling activities resulting in a more malignant phenotype. PMID:23114620

  12. Role of receptor desensitization, phosphatase induction and intracellular cyclic AMP in the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in UTP-stimulated EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, A; McLees, A; Malarkey, K; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms that bring about the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) activation in response to UTP in EAhy 926 endothelial cells. UTP-stimulated MAP kinase activity was transient, returning to basal values by 60 min. At this time MAP kinase activation was desensitized; re-application of UTP did not further activate MAP kinase, full re-activation of MAP kinase being only apparent after a 1-2 h wash period. However, activation of MAP kinase by UTP could be sustained beyond 60 min by preincubation of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. UTP also stimulated expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 and this was abolished after pretreatment with cycloheximide. Pretreatment of cells with forskolin abolished the initial activation of MAP kinase kinase or c-Raf-1 by UTP, but only affected MAP kinase activity during prolonged stimulation. The effect of forskolin on prolonged MAP kinase activation was also prevented by cycloheximide. These results suggest that the termination of MAP kinase activity in response to UTP involves a number of interacting mechanisms including receptor desensitization and the induction of a phosphatase. However, several pieces of evidence do not support a major role for MAP kinase phosphatase-1 in termination of the MAP kinase signal. Raising intracellular cyclic AMP may also be involved but only after an initial protein-synthesis step and by a mechanism that does not involve the inactivation of c-Raf-1 or MAP kinase kinase. PMID:8615830

  13. Role of receptor desensitization, phosphatase induction and intracellular cyclic AMP in the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in UTP-stimulated EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Graham, A; McLees, A; Malarkey, K; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-04-15

    We have investigated the mechanisms that bring about the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) activation in response to UTP in EAhy 926 endothelial cells. UTP-stimulated MAP kinase activity was transient, returning to basal values by 60 min. At this time MAP kinase activation was desensitized; re-application of UTP did not further activate MAP kinase, full re-activation of MAP kinase being only apparent after a 1-2 h wash period. However, activation of MAP kinase by UTP could be sustained beyond 60 min by preincubation of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. UTP also stimulated expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 and this was abolished after pretreatment with cycloheximide. Pretreatment of cells with forskolin abolished the initial activation of MAP kinase kinase or c-Raf-1 by UTP, but only affected MAP kinase activity during prolonged stimulation. The effect of forskolin on prolonged MAP kinase activation was also prevented by cycloheximide. These results suggest that the termination of MAP kinase activity in response to UTP involves a number of interacting mechanisms including receptor desensitization and the induction of a phosphatase. However, several pieces of evidence do not support a major role for MAP kinase phosphatase-1 in termination of the MAP kinase signal. Raising intracellular cyclic AMP may also be involved but only after an initial protein-synthesis step and by a mechanism that does not involve the inactivation of c-Raf-1 or MAP kinase kinase. PMID:8615830

  14. Acid phosphatase activity and intracellular collagen degradation by fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yajima, T

    1986-01-01

    Human gingival fibroblasts were cultured with collagen fibrils. The precise process of collagen phagocytosis and the relationship between acid phosphatase activity and intracellular degradation of collagen were investigated by cytochemical methods at the ultrastructural level. The collagen fibrils were first engulfed at one end by cellular processes, or the cell membrane wrapped itself around the middle of the fibrils. Collagen phagocytosis induced acid phosphatase activity in the fibroblast Golgi-endoplasmic reticulum-lysosome system. By application of the tracer lanthanum, deposits were observed in the intercellular spaces and along the fibrils being phagocytosed. At this stage, primary lysosomes were seen in close proximity to the collagen being engulfed, but no signs of fusion were observed. When the fibrils had been interiorized in whole or in part, they ultimately became enclosed within phagosomes, and no tracer was observed along the interiorized portion of the fibrils. Primary lysosomes then fused with these collagen-containing phagosomes to form phagolysosomes. Collagen degradation occurred within these bodies even though the end of a fibril might have protruded outside of the cell. These results suggest that selective and controlled phagocytosis of collagen and intracellular digestion of it may play a central role in the physiological remodeling and metabolic breakdown of the collagen of connective tissues. PMID:3742560

  15. Rotenone Decreases Intracellular Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Sullivan, Patti; Cooney, Adele; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Kopin, Irwin J.; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated systemic administration of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone produces a rodent model of Parkinson disease (PD). Mechanisms of relatively selective rotenone-induced damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons remain incompletely understood. According to the “catecholaldehyde hypothesis,” buildup of the autotoxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) contributes to PD pathogenesis. Vesicular uptake blockade increases DOPAL levels, and DOPAL is detoxified mainly by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We tested whether rotenone interferes with vesicular uptake and intracellular ALDH activity. Endogenous and F-labeled catechols were measured in PC12 cells incubated with rotenone (0-1000 nM, 180 minutes), without or with F-dopamine (2 μM) to track vesicular uptake and catecholamine metabolism. Rotenone dose-dependently increased DOPAL, F-DOPAL, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) levels while decreasing dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels and the ratio of dopamine to the sum of its deaminated metabolites. In test tubes, rotenone did not affect conversion of DOPAL to DOPAC by ALDH when NAD+ was supplied, whereas the direct-acting ALDH inhibitor benomyl markedly increased DOPAL and decreased DOPAC concentrations in the reaction mixtures. We propose that rotenone builds up intracellular DOPAL by decreasing ALDH activity and attenuating vesicular sequestration of cytoplasmic catecholamines. The results provide a novel mechanism for selective rotenone-induced toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25645689

  16. Intracellular Oxidant Activity, Antioxidant Enzyme Defense System, and Cell Senescence in Fibroblasts with Trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Vilches, Ángel; Sánchez, Olga; Audí, Laura; Domínguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F), this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS. PMID:25852816

  17. Intracellular oxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme defense system, and cell senescence in fibroblasts with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Vilches, Ángel; Sánchez, Olga; Audí, Laura; Domínguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F), this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS. PMID:25852816

  18. Merlin, a “Magic” Linker Between the Extracellular Cues and Intracellular Signaling Pathways that Regulate Cell Motility, Proliferation, and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Stamenkovic, Ivan; Yu, Qin

    2010-01-01

    Genetic alterations of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene lead to the development of schwannomas, meningiomas, and ependymomas. Mutations of NF2 gene were also found in thyroid cancer, mesothelioma, and melanoma, suggesting that it functions as a tumor suppressor in a wide spectrum of cells. The product of NF2 gene is merlin (moesinezrin-radixin-like protein), a member of the Band 4.1 superfamily proteins. Merlin shares significant sequence homology with the ERM (Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin) family proteins and serves as a linker between transmembrane proteins and the actin-cytoskeleton. Merlin is a multifunctional protein and involved in integrating and regulating the extracellular cues and intracellular signaling pathways that control cell fate, shape, proliferation, survival, and motility. Recent studies showed that merlin regulates the cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions and functions of the cell surface adhesion/extracellular matrix receptors including CD44 and that merlin and CD44 antagonize each other's function and work upstream of the mammalian Hippo signaling pathway. Furthermore, merlin plays important roles in stabilizing the contact inhibition of proliferation and in regulating activities of several receptor tyrosine kinases. Accumulating data also suggested an emerging role of merlin as a negative regulator of growth and progression of several non-NF2 associated cancer types. Together, these recent advances have improved our basic understanding about merlin function, its regulation, and the major signaling pathways regulated by merlin and provided the foundation for future translation of these findings into the clinic for patients bearing the cancers in which merlin function and/or its downstream signaling pathways are impaired or altered. PMID:20491622

  19. Calcium influx, but not intracellular calcium release, supports PACAP-mediated ERK activation in HEK PAC1 receptor cells.

    PubMed

    May, Victor; Clason, Todd A; Buttolph, Thomas R; Girard, Beatrice M; Parsons, Rodney L

    2014-11-01

    In HEK cells expressing GFP-tagged PAC1Hop1 receptors, PACAP augments ERK phosphorylation through two parallel pathways: one through PACAP/PAC1 receptor internalization/endosome MEK/ERK signaling and the other through PLC/DAG/PKC activation. We examined whether elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) was required for either of the PACAP/PAC1 receptor-mediated ERK activation mechanisms. The PACAP (25 nM)-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)]i was greater with cells maintained in Ca(2+)-containing than in Ca(2+)-deficient solution, suggesting that both calcium release from internal stores and calcium influx contributed to the rise in [Ca(2+)]i. A thapsigargin-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i also was greater with calcium in the external solution. OAG, the cell permeable analogue of DAG, increased [Ca(2+)]i, but only in Ca(2+)-containing solution. Decreasing external calcium or depleting internal calcium stores did not block PACAP-induced PAC1 receptor internalization. Omission of calcium from the external solution, but not thapsigargin pretreatment, significantly blunted PACAP-stimulated ERK phosphorylation. The PKC inhibitor BimI decreased PACAP-mediated ERK activation in both Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-deficient solutions. In contrast, following Pitstop 2 pretreatment to block endocytic mechanisms, PACAP activated ERK only when calcium was present in the external solution. We conclude that the endosome signaling pathway is largely calcium-independent whereas calcium influx appears necessary for the PLC/DAG/PKC component of PACAP-induced ERK activation. PMID:24723666

  20. Biomechanical Signals Inhibit IKK Activity to Attenuate NF-κB Transcription Activity in Inflamed Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dossumbekova, Anar; Anghelina, Mirela; Madhavan, Shashi; He, Lingli; Quan, Ning; Knobloch, Thomas; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Objective While the effects of biomechanical signals in the form of joint movement and exercise are known to be beneficial to inflamed joints, limited information is available regarding the intracellular mechanisms of their actions. This study was undertaken to examine the intracellular mechanisms by which biomechanical signals suppress proinflammatory gene induction by the interleukin-1-β (IL-1β)–induced NF-κB signaling cascade in articular chondrocytes. Methods Primary rat articular chondrocytes were exposed to biomechanical signals in the form of cyclic tensile strain, and the effects on the NF-κB signaling cascade were examined by Western blot analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Results Cyclic tensile strain rapidly inhibited the IL-1β–induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, but not its IL-1β–induced phosphorylation at serine 276 and serine 536, which are necessary for its transactivation and transcriptional efficacy, respectively. Examination of upstream events revealed that cyclic tensile strain also inhibited the cytoplasmic protein degradation of IκBβ and IκBα, as well as repressed their gene transcription. Additionally, cyclic tensile strain induced a rapid nuclear translocation of IκBα to potentially prevent NF-κB binding to DNA. Furthermore, the inhibition of IL-1β–induced degradation of IκB by cyclic tensile strain was mediated by down-regulation of IκB kinase activity. Conclusion These results indicate that the signals generated by cyclic tensile strain act at multiple sites within the NF-κB signaling cascade to inhibit IL-1β–induced proinflammatory gene induction. Taken together, these findings provide insight into how biomechanical signals regulate and reduce inflammation, and underscore their potential in enhancing the ability of chondrocytes to curb inflammation in diseased joints. PMID:17907174

  1. Nesfatin-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration by protein kinase C activation in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Gok, Zeynep Betul; Kacar, Emine; Serhatlioglu, Ihsan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2016-04-21

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently identified anorexigenic hypothalamic polypeptide derived from the posttranslational processing of nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2). Several studies have indicated that this neuropeptide may be participated in somatosensory and visceral transmission including pain signals in addition to energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of nesfatin-1 in the transmission of peripheral neural signals by investigating the effects of nesfatin-1 on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i in DRG neurons were investigated by using an in vitro calcium imaging system. DRG neurons were grown in primary culture following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 1-or 2-day-old neonatal Wistar rats. Using the fura-2-based calcium imaging technique, the effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i and role of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway in nesfatin-1 effect were assessed. Nesfatin-1 elevated [Ca(2+)]i in cultured DRG neurons. The response was prevented by pretreating the cells with pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed nesfatin-1-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. The result shows that nesfatin-1 interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor, leading to an increase of [Ca(2+)]i, which is linked to protein kinase C activation in cultured rat DRG neurons. PMID:26975784

  2. Intracellular coenzymes as natural biomarkers for metabolic activities and mitochondrial anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Heikal, Ahmed A

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria play a pivotal role in energy metabolism, programmed cell death and oxidative stress. Mutated mitochondrial DNA in diseased cells compromises the structure of key enzyme complexes and, therefore, mitochondrial function, which leads to a myriad of health-related conditions such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes and aging. Early detection of mitochondrial and metabolic anomalies is an essential step towards effective diagnoses and therapeutic intervention. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) play important roles in a wide range of cellular oxidation–reduction reactions. Importantly, NADH and FAD are naturally fluorescent, which allows noninvasive imaging of metabolic activities of living cells and tissues. Furthermore, NADH and FAD autofluorescence, which can be excited using distinct wavelengths for complementary imaging methods and is sensitive to protein binding and local environment. This article highlights recent developments concerning intracellular NADH and FAD as potential biomarkers for metabolic and mitochondrial activities. PMID:20406068

  3. Intracellular Potassium Activity in Guinea Pig Papillary Muscle during Prolonged Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Thomas; Strauss, Harold C.

    1982-01-01

    During prolonged hypoxia, intracellular potassium concentration, [K]i has been reported to fall by 70% with a concomitant decrease in the calculated potassium equilibrium potential, EK. Nevertheless, resting membrane potential, Vm, declined only slightly. Because Vm depolarized very little in relation to the calculated EK, it was hypothesized that electrogenic Na-K pumping contributed up to 40 mV to Vm during prolonged hypoxia. To further test this hypothesis we studied what changes prolonged hypoxia makes in the thermodynamically active fraction of cellular potassium, intracellular potassium activity, αKi, and how change in αKi affects the relationship between Vm, EK and, by inference, the Na-K pump. Using double-barrel K-selective electrodes, Vm and αKi were measured in quiescent guinea pig right ventricular papillary muscles superfused for 8 h with hypoxic Tyrode's solution. Over the 8-h period both Vm and αKi decreased. However, the decline in Vm was paralleled by a decrease in the EK calculated from αKi. At no time was there hyperpolarization of Vm beyond EK. After 8 h the Na-K pump was inhibited by exposing the muscles to 0.1 mM ouabain. The onset of an increase in extracellular potassium activity, measured with a double-barrel electrode, was used to mark the amount of depolarization of Vm due solely to pump inhibition. After hypoxia, Vm depolarized 8.4±4.4 mV before extracellular potassium activity (αKe) increased. Thus, the decrease in αKi during hypoxia is much less than that reported for [K]i. The parallel decline in Vm and EK and the small depolarization of Vm with ouabain suggest that after prolonged hypoxia the Na-K pump continues to contribute to Vm, but the amount of this contribution is substantially less than previously reported. PMID:6276442

  4. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells.

    PubMed

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  5. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  6. Signal integration by Ca2+ regulates intestinal stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hansong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic stem cells (SCs) maintain tissue homeostasis by dynamically adjusting proliferation and differentiation in response to stress and metabolic cues. Here, we identify Ca2+ signaling as a central regulator of intestinal SC (ISC) activity in Drosophila. We find that dietary L-glutamate stimulates ISC division and gut growth. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) is required in ISCs for this response and for an associated modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that results in sustained high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. High cytosolic Ca2+ induces ISC proliferation by regulating Calcineurin and CREB - regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC). In response to a wide range of dietary and stress stimuli, ISCs reversibly transition between Ca2+ oscillation states that represent poised or activated modes of proliferation, respectively. We propose that the dynamic regulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels allows effective integration of diverse mitogenic signals in ISCs to tailor their proliferative activity to the needs of the tissue. PMID:26633624

  7. Nerve Growth Factor Mediates a Switch in Intracellular Signaling for PGE2-Induced Sensitization of Sensory Neurons from Protein Kinase A to Epac

    PubMed Central

    Vasko, Michael R.; Habashy Malty, Ramy; Guo, Chunlu; Duarte, Djane B.; Zhang, Yihong; Nicol, Grant D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether nerve growth factor (NGF), an inflammatory mediator that contributes to chronic hypersensitivity, alters the intracellular signaling that mediates the sensitizing actions of PGE2 from activation of protein kinase A (PKA) to exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epacs). When isolated sensory neurons are grown in the absence of added NGF, but not in cultures grown with 30 ng/ml NGF, inhibiting protein kinase A (PKA) activity blocks the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of the neuropeptide CGRP and to increase the number of action potentials (APs) evoked by a ramp of current. Growing sensory neurons in culture in the presence of increasing concentrations of NGF increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1. An intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the rat hindpaw also increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord: an effect blocked by intraplantar administration of NGF antibodies. Treating cultures grown in the presence of 30 ng/ml NGF with Epac1siRNA significantly reduced the expression of Epac1, but not Epac2, and did not block the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from sensory neurons. Exposing neuronal cultures grown in NGF to Epac2siRNAreduced the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 and prevented the PGE2-induced augmentation of capsaicin and potassium-evoked CGRP release in sensory neurons and the PGE2-induced increase in the number of APs generated by a ramp of current. In neurons grown with no added NGF, Epac siRNAs did not attenuate PGE2-induced sensitization. These results demonstrate that NGF, through increasing Epac2 expression, alters the signaling cascade that mediates PGE2-induced sensitization of sensory neurons, thus providing a novel mechanism for maintaining PGE2-induced hypersensitivity during inflammation. PMID:25126967

  8. PKCζ regulates Notch receptor routing and activity in a Notch signaling-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Sjöqvist, Marika; Antfolk, Daniel; Ferraris, Saima; Rraklli, Vilma; Haga, Cecilia; Antila, Christian; Mutvei, Anders; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Holmberg, Johan; Jin, Shaobo; Eriksson, John E; Lendahl, Urban; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Activation of Notch signaling requires intracellular routing of the receptor, but the mechanisms controlling the distinct steps in the routing process is poorly understood. We identify PKCζ as a key regulator of Notch receptor intracellular routing. When PKCζ was inhibited in the developing chick central nervous system and in cultured myoblasts, Notch-stimulated cells were allowed to undergo differentiation. PKCζ phosphorylates membrane-tethered forms of Notch and regulates two distinct routing steps, depending on the Notch activation state. When Notch is activated, PKCζ promotes re-localization of Notch from late endosomes to the nucleus and enhances production of the Notch intracellular domain, which leads to increased Notch activity. In the non-activated state, PKCζ instead facilitates Notch receptor internalization, accompanied with increased ubiquitylation and interaction with the endosomal sorting protein Hrs. Collectively, these data identify PKCζ as a key regulator of Notch trafficking and demonstrate that distinct steps in intracellular routing are differentially modulated depending on Notch signaling status. PMID:24662486

  9. Intercellular and intracellular signalling systems that globally control the expression of virulence genes in plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jong Hyun

    2013-04-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize complex signalling systems to control the expression of virulence genes at the cellular level and within populations. Quorum sensing (QS), an important intercellular communication mechanism, is mediated by different types of small molecules, including N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), fatty acids and small proteins. AHL-mediated signalling systems dependent on the LuxI and LuxR family proteins play critical roles in the virulence of a wide range of Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Xanthomonas spp. and Xylella fastidiosa, members of the Gammaproteobacteria, however, possess QS systems that are mediated by fatty acid-type diffusible signal factors (DSFs). Recent studies have demonstrated that Ax21, a 194-amino-acid protein in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, plays dual functions in activating a rice innate immune pathway through binding to the rice XA21 pattern recognition receptor and in regulating bacterial virulence and biofilm formation as a QS signal molecule. In xanthomonads, DSF-mediated QS systems are connected with the signalling pathways mediated by cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which functions as a second messenger for the control of virulence gene expression in these bacterial pathogens. PMID:23186372

  10. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities of intracellular polysaccharide from Pleurotus eryngii SI-04.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Shangshang; Zhang, Jianjun; Hu, Chunlong; Che, Gen; Zhou, Meng; Jia, Le

    2016-10-01

    In present study, the intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) and its two fractions of IPS-1 and IPS-2 were obtained and purified by DEAE-52 cellulose chromatography from Pleurotus eryngii SI-04 mycelia, and their hepatoprotective effects were also investigated. The results showed that the IPS-2 had superior hepatoprotective effects by increasing the serum enzyme activities and bilirubin (BIL) levels, decreasing the serum albumin (ALB) and triglyceride (TG) levels, improving the hepatic antioxidant status, and ameliorating the hepatic structure damage. Furthermore, the monosaccharide composition and main bond types were also analyzed. These conclusions demonstrated that the both IPS and its fractions might be suitable for functional foods and natural drugs in preventing the acute liver damage. PMID:27259648

  11. Characterization and antioxidant activities of extracellular and intracellular polysaccharides from Fomitopsis pinicola.

    PubMed

    Hao, Limin; Sheng, Zhicun; Lu, Jike; Tao, Ruyu; Jia, Shiru

    2016-05-01

    Fomitopsis pinicola (F. pinicola) is a kind of medicinal fungi, and few studies has been carried out on F. pinicola polysaccharides from liquid submerged cultivation. The characterization and antioxidant activities of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) isolated from F. pinicola were investigated. The results showed that the molecular weight of EPS was 2.30×10(4)Da, and EPS was composed of mannose, rhamnose, xylose and galactose with the molar ratio of 0.1:1.0:0.3:0.5. The molecular weight of IPS was 4.07×10(5)Da, and the monosaccharide compositions included glucose, mannose, rhamnose, xylose and galactose with the molar ratio of 1.0:0.9:0.9:0.8:1.1. Antioxidant activities of both EPS and IPS including in vitro scavenging activities on 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radicals, cellular protective effects on yeast cells from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and H2O2 oxidative damage were tested. Both EPS and IPS showed antioxidant activities in a dose dependent manner, and IPS had higher antioxidant activity than EPS. So EPS and IPS could be potential novel antioxidants for functional food. PMID:26876995

  12. An optimized multiplex flow cytometry protocol for the analysis of intracellular signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Davies, Richard; Vogelsang, Petra; Jonsson, Roland; Appel, Silke

    2016-09-01

    Phosphoflow cytometry is increasingly being used as a tool for the discovery of biomarkers used in the treatment and monitoring of disease and therapy. The ability to measure numerous phospho-protein targets simultaneously at a single cell level accurately and rapidly provides significant advantages over other methods. We here discuss important considerations required to successfully implement these methods. Three different blood collection tubes (lithium-heparin tubes, CPT with sodium citrate and CPT with sodium heparin) were evaluated, with PBMC isolated through lithium-heparin tubes/lymphoprep displaying reduced basal and increased stimulation induced phosphorylation compared to the other two methods. Further, we provide a protocol outlining an 8 color assay developed for the study of intracellular signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The assay allows for the quantitative measurement of the phospho-proteins ERK1/2, NF-κB p65, Stat1 (Y701), Stat1 (S727), Stat3 (Y705), Stat3 (S727), Stat4 (Y693), p38 and Stat5 (Y694), as well as the identification of T cells, B cells, natural killer cells and monocytes. The assay additionally incorporates fluorescent cell barcoding, reducing assay costs and increasing throughput while increasing data robustness. Inter-assay precision was assessed over a month long period for all experimental variables (phospho-protein measured, cell type and stimulant). Coefficient of variations (CVs) calculated from process triplicates of normalized median fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the phospho-proteins displayed median CVs under 10% when grouped according to cell type, stimulation agent and phospho-protein measured, while the CV for each triplicate did not exceed 20%. PMID:27369043

  13. Involvement of PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway and Its Downstream Intracellular Targets in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Creatine.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Budni, Josiane; Ludka, Fabiana K; Pazini, Francis L; Rosa, Julia Macedo; Oliveira, Ágatha; Lopes, Mark W; Tasca, Carla I; Leal, Rodrigo B; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2016-07-01

    Creatine has been proposed to exert beneficial effects in the management of depression, but the cell signaling pathways implicated in its antidepressant effects are not well established. This study investigated the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and its downstream intracellular targets in the antidepressant-like effect of creatine. The acute treatment of mice with creatine (1 mg/kg, po) increased the Akt and P70S6K phosphorylation, and HO-1, GPx and PSD95 immunocontents. The pretreatment of mice with LY294002 (10 nmol/mouse, icv, PI3K inhibitor), wortmannin (0.1 μg/mouse, icv, PI3K inhibitor), ZnPP (10 μg/mouse, icv, HO-1 inhibitor), or rapamycin (0.2 nmol/mouse, icv, mTOR inhibitor) prevented the antidepressant-like effect of creatine (1 mg/kg, po) in the TST. In addition, the administration of subeffective dose of either the selective GSK3 inhibitor AR-A014418 (0.01 μg/mouse, icv), the nonselective GSK3 inhibitor lithium chloride (10 mg/kg, po), or the HO-1 inductor CoPP (0.01 μg/mouse, icv), in combination with a subeffective dose of creatine (0.01 mg/kg, po) reduced the immobility time in the TST as compared with either drug alone. No treatment caused significant changes in the locomotor activity of mice. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of creatine in the TST depends on the activation of Akt, Nrf2/HO-1, GPx, and mTOR, and GSK3 inhibition. PMID:25943184

  14. Inhibition of type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase blocks intracellular TLR signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Watkins, Amanda A; Freeman, Benjamin B; Meyers, John A; Rifkin, Ian R; Lerner, Adam

    2015-01-01

    A subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) BCRs interacts with Ags expressed on apoptotic cells, suggesting that CLL BCRs have the potential to internalize apoptotic cell RNA- or DNA-containing fragments with resultant activation of TLR7 or TLR9, respectively. By blocking cAMP degradation, type 4 cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE4) inhibitors activate cAMP-mediated signaling and induce apoptosis in CLL cells. In this study, we show that autologous irradiated leukemic cells induce proliferation in CLL cells and that such proliferation is blocked by a TLR7/8/9 inhibitor, by DNase, and by the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram. Rolipram also inhibited CLL cell proliferation induced by synthetic TLR7 and TLR9 agonists, as well as TLR agonist-induced costimulatory molecule expression and TNF-a (but not IL-6 or IL-10) production. Whereas treatment with a TLR9 agonist protected IgH V region unmutated, but not mutated, CLL cells from apoptosis, PDE4 inhibitors augmented apoptosis in both subtypes, suggesting that cAMP-mediated signaling may abrogate a TLR9-mediated survival signal in prognostically unfavorable IGHV unmutated CLL cells. Rolipram inhibited both TLR7/8- and TLR9-induced IFN regulatory factor 5 and NF-kB p65 nuclear translocation. PDE4 inhibitors also blocked TLR signaling in normal human immune cells. In PBMC and CD14-positive monocytes, PDE4 inhibitors blocked IFN-a or TNF-a (but not IL-6) production, respectively, following stimulation with synthetic TLR agonists or RNA-containing immune complexes. These results suggest that PDE4 inhibitors may be of clinical utility in CLL or autoimmune diseases that are driven by TLR-mediated signaling. PMID:25416804

  15. Disrupted Membrane Structure and Intracellular Ca2+ Signaling in Adult Skeletal Muscle with Acute Knockdown of Bin1

    PubMed Central

    Tjondrokoesoemo, Andoria; Park, Ki Ho; Ferrante, Christopher; Komazaki, Shinji; Lesniak, Sebastian; Brotto, Marco; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Zhou, Jingsong; Weisleder, Noah; Ma, Jianjie

    2011-01-01

    Efficient intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis in skeletal muscle requires intact triad junctional complexes comprised of t-tubule invaginations of plasma membrane and terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Bin1 consists of a specialized BAR domain that is associated with t-tubule development in skeletal muscle and involved in tethering the dihydropyridine receptors (DHPR) to the t-tubule. Here, we show that Bin1 is important for Ca2+ homeostasis in adult skeletal muscle. Since systemic ablation of Bin1 in mice results in postnatal lethality, in vivo electroporation mediated transfection method was used to deliver RFP-tagged plasmid that produced short –hairpin (sh)RNA targeting Bin1 (shRNA-Bin1) to study the effect of Bin1 knockdown in adult mouse FDB skeletal muscle. Upon confirming the reduction of endogenous Bin1 expression, we showed that shRNA-Bin1 muscle displayed swollen t-tubule structures, indicating that Bin1 is required for the maintenance of intact membrane structure in adult skeletal muscle. Reduced Bin1 expression led to disruption of t-tubule structure that was linked with alterations to intracellular Ca2+ release. Voltage-induced Ca2+ released in isolated single muscle fibers of shRNA-Bin1 showed that both the mean amplitude of Ca2+ current and SR Ca2+ transient were reduced when compared to the shRNA-control, indicating compromised coupling between DHPR and ryanodine receptor 1. The mean frequency of osmotic stress induced Ca2+ sparks was reduced in shRNA-Bin1, indicating compromised DHPR activation. ShRNA-Bin1 fibers also displayed reduced Ca2+ sparks' amplitude that was attributed to decreased total Ca2+ stores in the shRNA-Bin1 fibers. Human mutation of Bin1 is associated with centronuclear myopathy and SH3 domain of Bin1 is important for sarcomeric protein organization in skeletal muscle. Our study showing the importance of Bin1 in the maintenance of intact t-tubule structure and ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis in adult skeletal muscle

  16. Identification of several intracellular carbohydrate-degrading activities from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, F; Díaz, S; Bautista, V; Pire, C; Bravo, G; Esclapez, J; Zafrilla, B; Bonete, María-José

    2009-07-01

    Three different amylolytic activities, designated AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3 were detected in the cytoplasm of the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei grown in a starch containing medium. This organism had also been reported to excrete an alpha-amylase into the external medium in such conditions. The presence of these different enzymes which are also able to degrade starch may be related to the use of the available carbohydrates and maltodextrins, including the products obtained by the action of the extracellular amylase on starch that may be transported to the cytoplasm of the organism. The behavior of these intracellular hydrolytic enzymes on starch is reported here and compared with their extracellular counterpart. Two of these glycosidic activities (AMY1, AMY3) have also been purified and further characterized. As with other halophilic enzymes, they were salt dependent and displayed maximal activity at 3 M NaCl, and 50 degrees C. The purification steps and molecular masses have also been reported. The other activity (AMY2) was also detected in extracts from cells grown in media with glycerol instead of starch and in a yeast extract medium. This enzyme was able to degrade starch yielding small oligosaccharides and displayed similar halophilic behavior with salt requirement in the range 1.5-3 M NaCl. PMID:19396510

  17. Kinetic and sensitive analysis of tyrosinase activity using electron transfer complexes: in vitro and intracellular study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianglong; Hu, Juan; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Sun, Mingjun; Chi, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-02-18

    Tyrosinase is an important marker of human diseases such as the neurodegeneration associated with Parkinson's disease and melanoma. Sensitive detection of tyrosinase activity in vitro and inside cells is of great significance to medical diagnostics and skin disorder treatments. With unique photophysical properties, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are employed as photoluminescent platforms for various biosensing, in particular for the detection of enzyme activities. In this work, QDs are functionalized with tyrosine and zwitterionic molecules to construct a nanometer-scale scaffold (QD-Tyr conjugate), and this is used to test tyrosinase activity in vitro and inside cells. Tyrosinase oxidizes tyrosine to dopachrome and switches on the electron-transfer access, which relates to fluorescence quenching. High quenching efficiency is achieved by shortening the distance between the electron donors and acceptors, which is attributed to the small size of the conjugated tyrosine. Enzymatic process curves reveal the enhanced enzymatic activity on the conjugated nanoparticle substrate, which leads to highly sensitive detection of tyrosinase (as low as 1 nM). It is also demonstrated that QD-Tyr conjugates can sensitively probe intracellular tyrosinase in melanoma cells, which promises great potential in disease monitoring and medical diagnostics. PMID:25285706

  18. Prediction of hammerhead ribozyme intracellular activity with the catalytic core fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Gabryelska, Marta Magdalena; Wyszko, Eliza; Szymański, Maciej; Popenda, Mariusz; Barciszewski, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Hammerhead ribozyme is a versatile tool for down-regulation of gene expression in vivo. Owing to its small size and high activity, it is used as a model for RNA structure-function relationship studies. In the present paper we describe a new extended hammerhead ribozyme HH-2 with a tertiary stabilizing motif constructed on the basis of the tetraloop receptor sequence. This ribozyme is very active in living cells, but shows low activity in vitro. To understand it, we analysed tertiary structure models of substrate-ribozyme complexes. We calculated six unique catalytic core geometry parameters as distances and angles between particular atoms that we call the ribozyme fingerprint. A flanking sequence and tertiary motif change the geometry of the general base, general acid, nucleophile and leaving group. We found almost complete correlation between these parameters and the decrease of target gene expression in the cells. The tertiary structure model calculations allow us to predict ribozyme intracellular activity. Our approach could be widely adapted to characterize catalytic properties of other RNAs. PMID:23418809

  19. Redox and pH-responsive degradable micelles for dually activated intracellular anticancer drug release.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhong, Ping; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-08-10

    Redox and pH dual-responsive biodegradable micelles were developed based on poly(ethylene glycol)-SS-poly(2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-pentaerythritol carbonate) (PEG-SS-PTMBPEC) copolymer and investigated for intracellular doxorubicin (DOX) release. PEG-SS-PTMBPEC copolymer with an Mn of 5.0-4.1kg/mol formed micellar particles with an average diameter of 140nm and a low polydispersity of 0.12. DOX was loaded into PEG-SS-PTMBPEC micelles with a decent drug loading content of 11.3wt.%. The in vitro release studies showed that under physiological conditions only ca. 24.5% DOX was released from DOX-loaded micelles in 21h. The release of DOX was significantly accelerated at pH5.0 or in the presence of 10mM glutathione (GSH) at pH7.4, in which 62.8% and 74.3% of DOX was released, respectively, in 21h. The drug release was further boosted under 10mM GSH and pH 5.0 conditions, with 94.2% of DOX released in 10h. Notably, DOX release was also facilitated by 2 or 4h incubation at pH 5.0 and then at pH 7.4 with 10mM GSH, which mimics the intracellular pathways of endocytosed micellar drugs. Confocal microscopy observation indicated that DOX was delivered and released into the nuclei of HeLa cells following 8h incubation with DOX-loaded PEG-SS-PTMBPEC micelles, while DOX was mainly located in the cytoplasm for reduction-insensitive PEG-PTMBPEC controls. MTT assays revealed that DOX-loaded PEG-SS-PTMBPEC micelles had higher anti-tumor activity than reduction-insensitive controls, with low IC50 of 0.75 and 0.60μg/mL for HeLa and RAW 264.7 cells, respectively, following 48h incubation. PEG-SS-PTMBPEC micelles displayed low cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 1.0mg/mL. These redox and pH dual-bioresponsive degradable micelles have appeared as a promising platform for targeted intracellular anticancer drug release. PMID:23306022

  20. The Drosophila FTZ-F1 nuclear receptor mediates juvenile hormone activation of E75A gene expression through an intracellular pathway.

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, Edward B; Dubrovskaya, Veronica A; Bernardo, Travis; Otte, Valerie; DiFilippo, Robert; Bryan, Heather

    2011-09-23

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates a wide variety of biological activities in holometabolous insects, ranging from vitellogenesis and caste determination in adults to the timing of metamorphosis in larvae. The mechanism of JH signaling in such a diverse array of processes remains either unknown or contentious. We previously found that the nuclear receptor gene E75A is activated in S2 cells as a primary response to JH. Here, by expressing an intracellular form of JH esterase, we demonstrate that JH must enter the cell in order to activate E75A. To find intracellular receptors involved in the JH response, we performed an RNAi screen against nuclear receptor genes expressed in this cell line and identified the orphan receptor FTZ-F1. Removal of FTZ-F1 prevents JH activation of E75A, whereas overexpression enhances activation, implicating FTZ-F1 as a critical component of the JH response. FTZ-F1 is bound in vivo to multiple enhancers upstream of E75A, suggesting that it participates in direct JH-mediated gene activation. To better define the role of FTZ-F1 in JH signaling, we investigated interactions with candidate JH receptors and found that the bHLH-PAS proteins MET and GCE both interact with FTZ-F1 and can activate transcription through the FTZ-F1 response element. Removal of endogenous GCE, but not MET, prevents JH activation of E75A. We propose that FTZ-F1 functions as a competence factor by loading JH signaling components to the promoter, thus facilitating the direct regulation of E75A gene expression by JH. PMID:21832074

  1. The Drosophila FTZ-F1 Nuclear Receptor Mediates Juvenile Hormone Activation of E75A Gene Expression through an Intracellular Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovsky, Edward B.; Dubrovskaya, Veronica A.; Bernardo, Travis; Otte, Valerie; DiFilippo, Robert; Bryan, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates a wide variety of biological activities in holometabolous insects, ranging from vitellogenesis and caste determination in adults to the timing of metamorphosis in larvae. The mechanism of JH signaling in such a diverse array of processes remains either unknown or contentious. We previously found that the nuclear receptor gene E75A is activated in S2 cells as a primary response to JH. Here, by expressing an intracellular form of JH esterase, we demonstrate that JH must enter the cell in order to activate E75A. To find intracellular receptors involved in the JH response, we performed an RNAi screen against nuclear receptor genes expressed in this cell line and identified the orphan receptor FTZ-F1. Removal of FTZ-F1 prevents JH activation of E75A, whereas overexpression enhances activation, implicating FTZ-F1 as a critical component of the JH response. FTZ-F1 is bound in vivo to multiple enhancers upstream of E75A, suggesting that it participates in direct JH-mediated gene activation. To better define the role of FTZ-F1 in JH signaling, we investigated interactions with candidate JH receptors and found that the bHLH-PAS proteins MET and GCE both interact with FTZ-F1 and can activate transcription through the FTZ-F1 response element. Removal of endogenous GCE, but not MET, prevents JH activation of E75A. We propose that FTZ-F1 functions as a competence factor by loading JH signaling components to the promoter, thus facilitating the direct regulation of E75A gene expression by JH. PMID:21832074

  2. Deferoxamine-induced increase in the intracellular iron levels in highly aggressive breast cancer cells leads to increased cell migration by enhancing TNF-α-dependent NF-κB signaling and TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; He, Kun; Song, Hongjiao; Ma, Zhufeng; Yin, Weihai; Xu, Lisa X

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested that excess iron accumulation may be a risk factor for breast cancer. However the role of iron in breast cancer metastasis has remained unclear. The major goal of our study is to investigate the roles of iron in breast cancer metastasis. We modulated the intracellular iron levels of human breast cancer cells, including the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells and non-aggressive MCF-7 cells, by using Deferoxamine (DFO) - a most widely used iron chelator. We found that DFO treatment could deplete intracellular iron in MCF-7 cells. In contrast, DFO treatment led to a significant increase in the intracellular iron level in MDA-MB-231 cells. The MDA-MB-231 cells with the increased intracellular iron level exhibited increases in both mesenchymal markers and cell migration. Furthermore, the DFO-treated MDA-MB-231 cells showed increases in both tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, which could contribute to the enhanced cell migration. Collectively, our study has provided the first evidence suggesting that increased intracellular iron levels could lead to enhanced migration of aggressive breast cancer cells by increasing TNF-α-dependent NF-κB signaling and TGF-β signaling. Our study has also suggested that caution should be taken when DFO is applied for treating breast cancer cells, since DFO could produce differential effects on the intracellular iron levels for aggressive breast cancer cells and non-aggressive breast cancer cells. PMID:27138103

  3. Relationships among antibacterial activity, inhibition of DNA gyrase, and intracellular accumulation of 11 fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Bazile, S; Moreau, N; Bouzard, D; Essiz, M

    1992-01-01

    A series of 11 fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents, including 8 newly synthesized molecules and 3 reference compounds (pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and sparfloxacin), were tested for their MICs against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The intracellular accumulation of fluoroquinolones by these microorganisms was measured by centrifugation through silicone oil and a fluorescence assay. The minimal effective dose (MED) was determined for all agents in a supercoiling assay with E. coli DNA gyrase. The hydrophobicities of the quinolones were determined and expressed as the logarithm of the coefficient of distribution (log D) between 1-octanol and phosphate buffer (pH 7.2). No correlation was found between MICs and cell accumulation for the quinolones studied. A correlation was found between log D and accumulation by S. aureus (r = 0.71, n = 11), and an inverse correlation was found between log D and accumulation by E. coli (r = 0.73, n = 11) and P. aeruginosa (r = 0.64, n = 10). The correlation coefficients between MICs and MED for E. coli, which were 0.60, 0.64, and 0.74 (n = 11) for E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus, respectively, rose to 0.85, 0.74, and 0.74 (n = 11) for the same microorganisms, respectively, when the accumulation of the drug by the cell was taken into account. It was concluded that the inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase remains the most important parameter for quinolone potency, but that intracellular accumulation must be taken into account, since, for a given organism, both parameters are under the control of the physicochemical properties of the quinolones. PMID:1336340

  4. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bhatter, Purva D.; Gupta, Pooja D.; Birdi, Tannaz J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  5. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays.

    PubMed

    Bhatter, Purva D; Gupta, Pooja D; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  6. Paired inhibitory and activating receptor signals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L S; Paul, S P; McVicar, D W

    2000-01-01

    The immunological literature has become inundated with reports regarding paired inhibitory receptors. Paired inhibitory receptor systems are highly conserved families that contain receptors involved in either cellular inhibition or activation. In most cases the paired putative biochemical antagonists are co-expressed on a given cell and thought to bind similar, if not identical, ligands making their biological role difficult to understand. Examples of these systems include immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptors (Killer Ig Receptors, Immunoglobulin-like Transcripts/Leukocyte Ig-like Receptors/Monocyte Macrophage Ig Receptors, and Paired Ig-like Receptors), and type II lectin-like receptor systems (NKG2 and Ly49). General characteristics of these inhibitory receptors include a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The ITIM is phosphorylated upon engagement and recruits protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate cellular substrates that would otherwise mediate activation. In contrast, the activating receptors of these pairs use charged residues within their transmembrane domains to associate with various signal transduction chains including the gamma chain of the receptor for the Fc portion of IgE, DAP12 or DAP10. Once phosphorylated, these chains direct the signal transduction cascade resulting in cellular activation. Here we review the signaling of several paired systems and present the current models for their signal transduction cascades. PMID:11258418

  7. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ryan C; Fees, Colby P; Holland, William L; Winger, Courtney C; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca](i)). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 min after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca](i) and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA specifically bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca](i), PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca](i) release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca](i) release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  8. Intracellular mechanisms modulating gamma band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN).

    PubMed

    Luster, Brennon R; Urbano, Francisco J; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2016-06-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus is a part of the reticular activating system, and is active during waking and REM sleep. Previous results showed that all PPN cells tested fired maximally at gamma frequencies when depolarized. This intrinsic membrane property was shown to be mediated by high-threshold N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels. Recent studies show that the PPN contains three independent populations of neurons which can generate gamma band oscillations through only N-type channels, only P/Q-type channels, or both N- and P/Q-type channels. This study investigated the intracellular mechanisms modulating gamma band activity in each population of neurons. We performed in vitro patch-clamp recordings of PPN neurons from Sprague-Dawley rat pups, and applied 1-sec ramps to induce intrinsic membrane oscillations. Our results show that there are two pathways modulating gamma band activity in PPN neurons. We describe populations of neurons mediating gamma band activity through only N-type channels and the cAMP/PKA pathway (presumed "REM-on" neurons), through only P/Q-type channels and the CaMKII pathway (presumed "Wake-on" neurons), and a third population which can mediate gamma activity through both N-type channels and cAMP/PK and P/Q-type channels and CaMKII (presumed "Wake/REM-on" neurons). These novel results suggest that PPN gamma oscillations are modulated by two independent pathways related to different Ca(2+) channel types. PMID:27354537

  9. Activation of Src and release of intracellular calcium by phosphatidic acid during Xenopus laevis fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Ryan C.; Fees, Colby P.; Holland, William L.; Winger, Courtney C.; Batbayar, Khulan; Ancar, Rachel; Bergren, Todd; Petcoff, Douglas; Stith, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new step in the fertilization in Xenopus laevis which has been found to involve activation of Src tyrosine kinase to stimulate phospholipase C-γ (PLC- γ) which increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to release intracellular calcium ([Ca]i). Molecular species analysis and mass measurements suggested that sperm activate phospholipase D (PLD) to elevate phosphatidic acid (PA). We now report that PA mass increased 2.7 fold by 1 minute after insemination and inhibition of PA production by two methods inhibited activation of Src and PLCγ, increased [Ca]i and other fertilization events. As compared to 14 other lipids, PA strongly bound Xenopus Src but not PLCγ. Addition of synthetic PA activated egg Src (an action requiring intact lipid rafts) and PLCγ as well as doubling the amount of PLCγ in rafts. In the absence of elevated [Ca]i, PA addition elevated IP3 mass to levels equivalent to that induced by sperm (but twice that achieved by calcium ionophore). Finally, PA induced [Ca]i release that was blocked by an IP3 receptor inhibitor. As only PLD1b message was detected, and Western blotting did not detect PLD2, we suggest that sperm activate PLD1b to elevate PA which then binds to and activates Src leading to PLCγ stimulation, IP3 elevation and [Ca]i release. Due to these and other studies, PA may also play a role in membrane fusion events such as sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis, the elevation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and the large, late increase in sn 1,2-diacylglycerol in fertilization. PMID:24269904

  10. The role of substrate specificity and metal binding in defining the activity and structure of an intracellular subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Michael; Künze, Georg; Brancale, Andrea; Wilson, Keith S; Jones, D Dafydd

    2012-01-01

    The dimeric intracellular subtilisin proteases (ISPs) found throughout Gram-positive bacteria are a structurally distinct class of the subtilase family. Unlike the vast majority of subtilisin-like proteases, the ISPs function exclusively within the cell, contributing the majority of observed cellular proteolytic activity. Given that they are active within the cell, little is known about substrate specificity and the role of stress signals such as divalent metal ions in modulating ISP function. We demonstrate that both play roles in defining the proteolytic activity of Bacillus clausii ISP and propose the molecular basis of their effects. Enzyme kinetics reveal that one particular synthetic tetrapeptide substrate, Phe-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA, is hydrolysed with a catalytic efficiency ∼100-fold higher than any other tested. Heat-denatured whole proteins were found to be better substrates for ISP than the native forms. Substrate binding simulations suggest that the S1, S2 and S4 sites form defined binding pockets. The deep S1 cavity and wide S4 site are fully occupied by the hydrophobic aromatic side-chains of Phe. Divalent metal ions, probably Ca(2+), are proposed to be important for ISP activity through structural changes. The presence of >0.01 mM EDTA inactivates ISP, with CD and SEC suggesting that the protein becomes less structured and potentially monomeric. Removal of Ca(2+) at sites close to the dimer interface and the S1 pocket are thought to be responsible for the effect. These studies provide a new insight into the potential physiological function of ISPs, by reconciling substrate specificity and divalent metal binding to associate ISP with the unfolded protein response under stress conditions. PMID:23650602

  11. In vivo optical microprobe imaging for intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in response to dopaminergic signaling in deep brain evoked by cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhongchi; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Ca2+ plays a vital role as second messenger in signal transduction and the intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) change is an important indicator of neuronal activity in the brain, including both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Due to the highly scattering and absorption of brain tissue, it is challenging to optically access the deep brain regions (e.g., striatum at >3mm under the brain surface) and image [Ca2+]i changes with cellular resolutions. Here, we present two micro-probe approaches (i.e., microlens, and micro-prism) integrated with a fluorescence microscope modified to permit imaging of neuronal [Ca2+]i signaling in the striatum using a calcium indicator Rhod2(AM). While a micro-prism probe provides a larger field of view to image neuronal network from cortex to striatum, a microlens probe enables us to track [Ca2+]i dynamic change in individual neurons within the brain. Both techniques are validated by imaging neuronal [Ca2+]i changes in transgenic mice with dopamine receptors (D1R, D2R) expressing EGFP. Our results show that micro-prism images can map the distribution of D1R- and D2R-expressing neurons in various brain regions and characterize their different mean [Ca2+]i changes induced by an intervention (e.g., cocaine administration, 8mg/kg., i.p). In addition, microlens images can characterize the different [Ca2+]i dynamics of D1 and D2 neurons in response to cocaine, including new mechanisms of these two types of neurons in striatum. These findings highlight the power of the optical micro-probe imaging for dissecting the complex cellular and molecular insights of cocaine in vivo.

  12. Protein tyrosine kinase activity is essential for Fc gamma receptor-mediated intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L; Nibbering, P H; Zomerdijk, T P; van Furth, R

    1994-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that the intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma receptor I (Fc gamma RI) or Fc gamma RII is a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent process. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity plays a role in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of bacteria and activation of PLC in these cells. The results showed that phagocytosis of bacteria by monocytes was not affected by the PTK inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin-47. The intracellular killing of S. aureus by monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma RII or Fc gamma RII with anti-Fc gamma R monoclonal antibody and a bridging antibody or with human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was inhibited by these compounds in a dose-dependent fashion. The production of O2- by monocytes after stimulation with IgG or IgG-opsonized S. aureus was almost completely blocked by the PTK inhibitor. These results indicate that inhibition of PTK impairs the oxygen-dependent bactericidal mechanisms of monocytes. Genistein and tyrphostin-47, which do not affect the enzymatic activity of purified PLC, prevented activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII, measured as an increase in the intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate concentration. Cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII induced rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in monocytes, one of which was identified as PLC-gamma 1, and the phosphorylation could be completely blocked by PTK inhibitors, leading to the conclusion that activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma R in monocytes is regulated by PTK activity. Together, these results demonstrate that PTK activity is essential for the activation of PLC which is involved in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of S. aureus by human monocytes. Images PMID:7927687

  13. α-Galactosidase-A Loaded-Nanoliposomes with Enhanced Enzymatic Activity and Intracellular Penetration.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ingrid; Abasolo, Ibane; Corchero, José L; Elizondo, Elisa; Gil, Pilar Rivera; Moreno, Evelyn; Faraudo, Jordi; Sala, Santi; Bueno, Dolores; González-Mira, Elisabet; Rivas, Merche; Melgarejo, Marta; Pulido, Daniel; Albericio, Fernando; Royo, Miriam; Villaverde, Antonio; García-Parajo, Maria F; Schwartz, Simó; Ventosa, Nora; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are caused by lysosomal dysfunction usually as a consequence of deficiency of a single enzyme required for the metabolism of macromolecules, such as lipids, glycoproteins, and mucopolysaccharides. For instance, the lack of α-galactosidase A (GLA) activity in Fabry disease patients causes the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in the vasculature leading to multiple organ pathology. Enzyme replacement therapy, which is the most common treatment of LSD, exhibits several drawbacks mainly related to the instability and low efficacy of the exogenously administered therapeutic enzyme. In this work, the unprecedented increased enzymatic activity and intracellular penetration achieved by the association of a human recombinant GLA to nanoliposomes functionalized with Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid (RGD) peptides is reported. Moreover, these new GLA loaded nanoliposomes lead to a higher efficacy in the reduction of the GLA substrate named globotriasylceramide in a cellular model of Fabry disease, than that achieved by the same concentration of the free enzyme. The preparation of these new liposomal formulations by DELOS-SUSP, based on the depressurization of a CO2 -expanded liquid organic solution, shows the great potential of this CO2 -based methodology for the one-step production of protein-nanoliposome conjugates as bioactive nanomaterials with therapeutic interest. PMID:26890358

  14. SorLA regulates the activity of lipoprotein lipase by intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Stine C; Glerup, Simon; Raarup, Merete K; Mari, Muriel C; Nyegaard, Mette; Koster, Gerbrand; Prabakaran, Thaneas; Nilsson, Stefan K; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Bakke, Oddmund; Nykjær, Anders; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Petersen, Claus Munck; Nielsen, Morten S

    2011-04-01

    Many different tissues and cell types exhibit regulated secretion of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). However, the sorting of LPL in the trans Golgi network has not, hitherto, been understood in detail. Here, we characterize the role of SorLA (officially known as SorLA-1 or sortilin-related receptor) in the intracellular trafficking of LPL. We found that LPL bound to SorLA under neutral and acidic conditions, and in cells this binding mainly occurred in vesicular structures. SorLA expression changed the subcellular distribution of LPL so it became more concentrated in endosomes. From the endosomes, LPL was further routed to the lysosomes, which resulted in a degradation of newly synthesized LPL. Consequently, an 80% reduction of LPL activity was observed in cells that expressed SorLA. By analogy, SorLA regulated the vesicle-like localization of LPL in primary neuronal cells. Thus, LPL binds to SorLA in the biosynthetic pathway and is subsequently transported to endosomes. As a result of this SorLA mediated-transport, newly synthesized LPL can be routed into specialized vesicles and eventually sent to degradation, and its activity thereby regulated. PMID:21385844

  15. Influence of cucumariosides upon intracellular [Ca2+]i and lysosomal activity of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Agafonova, Irina G; Aminin, Dmitry L; Avilov, Sergey A; Stonik, Valentin A

    2003-11-19

    Biological effects of the triterpene glycosides, cucumariosides A(2)-2 and A(7)-1 from the edible sea cucumber Cucumaria japonica and their aglycones were investigated using embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and the BALB/C line mouse peritoneal macrophages. Cucumariosides were highly cytotoxic in a sea urchin embryo development test with EC(50) values of 0.3 and 1.98 microg/mL, respectively. The aglycone was completely lacking in cytotoxicity. In subtoxic concentrations (0.001-0.1 microg/mL), cucumarioside A(2)-2 showed more then 2-fold stimulation of lysosomal activity and induced a rapid short-term increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) content in mouse macrophages. The maximal stimulatory effect was detected after 1-2 h of cultivation of cells with this glycoside. Cucumarioside A(7)-1 demonstrated more weak effects and even slightly inhibited lysosomal activity, while the aglycone was completely ineffective. At the toxic concentration (1 microg/mL), cucumarioside A(2)-2 induced the sharp irreversable increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. We suggested that cucumariosides, especially A(2)-2, may act as Ca(2+) agonists due to their membranolytic properties. PMID:14611158

  16. Crystal structure of TRAF1 TRAF domain and its implications in the TRAF1-mediated intracellular signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Min; Choi, Jae Young; Bhat, Eijaz Ahmed; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Son, Young-Jin; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Hyun Ho

    2016-01-01

    TNF-receptor associated factor (TRAF) proteins are key adaptor molecules containing E3 ubiquitin ligase activity that play a critical role in immune cell signaling. TRAF1 is a unique family of TRAF lacking the N-terminal RING finger domain. TRAF1 is an important scaffold protein that participates in TNFR2 signaling in T cells as a negative or positive regulator via direct interaction with TRAF2, which has recently been identified as a pro-apoptotic regulator in neuronal cell death. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the TRAF1 TRAF domain containing both the TRAF-N coiled-coil domain and the TRAF-C domain. Our structure reveals both similarities and differences with other TRAF family members, which may be functionally relevant to TRAFs. We also found that the TRAF-N coiled-coil domain of TRAF1 is critical for the trimer formation and stability of the protein. Finally, we found that conserved surface residues on the TRAF1 TRAF domain that might be binding hot spots that are critical for interaction with signaling molecules. PMID:27151821

  17. Crystal structure of TRAF1 TRAF domain and its implications in the TRAF1-mediated intracellular signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Min; Choi, Jae Young; Bhat, Eijaz Ahmed; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Son, Young-Jin; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Hyun Ho

    2016-01-01

    TNF-receptor associated factor (TRAF) proteins are key adaptor molecules containing E3 ubiquitin ligase activity that play a critical role in immune cell signaling. TRAF1 is a unique family of TRAF lacking the N-terminal RING finger domain. TRAF1 is an important scaffold protein that participates in TNFR2 signaling in T cells as a negative or positive regulator via direct interaction with TRAF2, which has recently been identified as a pro-apoptotic regulator in neuronal cell death. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the TRAF1 TRAF domain containing both the TRAF-N coiled-coil domain and the TRAF-C domain. Our structure reveals both similarities and differences with other TRAF family members, which may be functionally relevant to TRAFs. We also found that the TRAF-N coiled-coil domain of TRAF1 is critical for the trimer formation and stability of the protein. Finally, we found that conserved surface residues on the TRAF1 TRAF domain that might be binding hot spots that are critical for interaction with signaling molecules. PMID:27151821

  18. Diethyldithiocarbamate induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells by raising the intracellular copper level, triggering cytochrome c release and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Matias, Andreza C; Manieri, Tânia M; Cipriano, Samantha S; Carioni, Vivian M O; Nomura, Cassiana S; Machado, Camila M L; Cerchiaro, Giselle

    2013-02-01

    Dithiocarbamates are nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds commonly used in pharmacology, medicine and agriculture. The molecular effects of dithiocarbamates on neuronal cell systems are not fully understood, especially in terms of their ability to accumulate copper ions inside the cell. In this work, the molecular effects of N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC) were studied in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to determine the role of copper in the DEDTC toxicity and the pathway trigged in cell by the complex Cu-DEDTC. From concentration-dependent studies, we found that 5 μM of this compound induced a drastic decrease in viable cells with a concomitant accumulation in intracellular copper resulted from complexation with DEDTC, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The mechanism of DEDTC-induced apoptosis in neuronal model cells is thought to occur through the death receptor signaling triggered by DEDTC-copper complex in low concentration that is associated with the activation of caspase 8. Our results indicated that the mechanism of cell death involves cytochrome c release forming the apoptosome together with Apaf-1 and caspase 9, converting the caspase 9 into its active form, allowing it to activate caspase 3 as observed by immunofluorescence. This pathway is induced by the cytotoxic effects that occur when DEDTC forms a complex with the copper ions present in the culture medium and transports them into the cell, suggesting that the DEDTC by itself was not able to cause cell death and the major effect is from its copper-complex in neuroblastoma cells. The present study suggests a role for the influence of copper by low concentrations of DEDTC in the extracellular media, the absorption and accumulation of copper in the cell and apoptotic events, induced by the cytotoxic effects that occur when DEDTC forms a complex with the copper ions. PMID:22951949

  19. Ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate inhibit ubiquitin activation through intracellular metal transport and increased oxidative stress in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Kathleen E; Valentine, William M

    2015-04-20

    Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional

  20. Ziram and Sodium N,N-Dimethyldithiocarbamate Inhibit Ubiquitin Activation through Intracellular Metal Transport and Increased Oxidative Stress in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional

  1. Zn2+ induces hyperpolarization by activation of a K+ channel and increases intracellular Ca2+ and pH in sea urchin spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Granados-González, Gisela; de De la Torre, Lucia García; Nishigaki, Takuya; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn2+) has been recently recognized as a crucial element for male gamete function in many species although its detailed mechanism of action is poorly understood. In sea urchin spermatozoa, Zn2+ was reported as an essential trace ion for efficient sperm motility initiation and the acrosome reaction by modulating intracellular pH (pHi). In this study we found that submicromolar concentrations of free Zn2+ change membrane potential (Em) and increase the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and cAMP in Lytechinus pictus sperm. Our results indicate that the Zn2+ response in sperm of this species mainly involves an Em hyperpolarization caused by K+ channel activation. The pharmacological profile of the Zn2+-induced hyperpolarization indicates that the cGMP-gated K+ selective channel (tetraKCNG/CNGK), which is crucial for speract signaling, is likely a main target for Zn2+. Considering that Zn2+ also induces [Ca2+]i fluctuations, our observations suggest that Zn2+ activates the signaling cascade of speract, except for an increase in cGMP, and facilitates sperm motility initiation upon spawning. These findings provide new insights about the role of Zn2+ in male gamete function. PMID:25092071

  2. Diquafosol promotes corneal epithelial healing via intracellular calcium-mediated ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Byun, Yong-Soo; Yoo, Young-Sik; Kwon, Ji-Young; Joo, Jong-Soo; Lim, Sung-A; Whang, Woong-Joo; Mok, Jee-Won; Choi, Jun-Sub; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2016-02-01

    Diquafosol is known as a purinergic P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) agonist that stimulates water and mucin secretion from conjunctival epithelial cells and goblet cells, leading to tear film stability in dry eye. However, its effect on corneal epithelial healing has not yet been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of diquafosol on corneal epithelial healing in vivo and on P2Y2R-related downstream signaling pathways in vitro. We administered 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution on 3 mm-diameter epithelial defects made in rat corneas and assessed the wound closure over time. Corneal epithelial healing was significantly accelerated in diquafosol-treated eyes compared to control eyes at 12 and 24 h. During wound healing, P2Y2R staining appeared stronger in the re-epithelized margin near the wound defect. To evaluate whether diquafosol stimulates epidermal growth factor receptor/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (EGFR/ERK)-related cell proliferation and migration, simian virus 40-transfected human corneal epithelial (THCE) cells were used for in vitro experiments. Cell proliferation was accelerated by diquafosol at concentrations from 20 to 200 μM during 48 h, but inhibited at concentrations over 2000 μM. The intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) elevation was measured in diquafosol (100 μM)-stimulated cells using Fluo-4/AM ([Ca(2+)]i indicator). [Ca(2+)]i elevation was observed in diquafosol-stimulated cells regardless of the presence of calcium in media, and suramin pretreatment inhibited the calcium response. The effect of diquafosol on phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK and Akt, and cell migration was determined by western blotting and in vitro cell migration assay. Diquafosol induced phosphorylation of EGFR at 2 min post-stimulation, and phosphorylation of ERK at 5 min post-stimulation. Phosphorylation of ERK was attenuated in cells pretreated with suramin or BAPTA/AM ([Ca(2+)]i chelator), and partially with AG1478 (EGFR inhibitor

  3. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  4. The Polarized Effect of Intracellular Calcium on the Renal Epithelial Sodium Channel Occurs as a Result of Subcellular Calcium Signaling Domains Maintained by Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Thai, Tiffany L; Yu, Ling; Galarza-Paez, Laura; Wu, Ming Ming; Lam, Ho Yin Colin; Bao, Hui Fang; Duke, Billie Jeanne; Al-Khalili, Otor; Ma, He-Ping; Liu, Bingchen; Eaton, Douglas C

    2015-11-27

    The renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) provides regulated sodium transport in the distal nephron. The effects of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) on this channel are only beginning to be elucidated. It appears from previous studies that the [Ca(2+)]i increases downstream of ATP administration may have a polarized effect on ENaC, where apical application of ATP and the subsequent [Ca(2+)]i increase have an inhibitory effect on the channel, whereas basolateral ATP and [Ca(2+)]i have a stimulatory effect. We asked whether this polarized effect of ATP is, in fact, reflective of a polarized effect of increased [Ca(2+)]i on ENaC and what underlying mechanism is responsible. We began by performing patch clamp experiments in which ENaC activity was measured during apical or basolateral application of ionomycin to increase [Ca(2+)]i near the apical or basolateral membrane, respectively. We found that ENaC does indeed respond to increased [Ca(2+)]i in a polarized fashion, with apical increases being inhibitory and basolateral increases stimulating channel activity. In other epithelial cell types, mitochondria sequester [Ca(2+)]i, creating [Ca(2+)]i signaling microdomains within the cell that are dependent on mitochondrial localization. We found that mitochondria localize in bands just beneath the apical and basolateral membranes in two different cortical collecting duct principal cell lines and in cortical collecting duct principal cells in mouse kidney tissue. We found that inhibiting mitochondrial [Ca(2+)]i uptake destroyed the polarized response of ENaC to [Ca(2+)]i. Overall, our data suggest that ENaC is regulated by [Ca(2+)]i in a polarized fashion and that this polarization is maintained by mitochondrial [Ca(2+)]i sequestration. PMID:26451045

  5. Microfluidic glucose stimulation reveals limited coordination of intracellular Ca2+ activity oscillations in pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Walker, Glenn M.; Head, W. Steven; McGuinness, Owen P.; Piston, David W.

    2004-01-01

    The pancreatic islet is a functional microorgan involved in maintaining normoglycemia through regulated secretion of insulin and other hormones. Extracellular glucose stimulates insulin secretion from islet β cells through an increase in redox state, which can be measured by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. Glucose concentrations over ≈7 mM generate synchronous oscillations in β cell intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), which lead to pulsatile insulin secretion. Prevailing models assume that the pancreatic islet acts as a functional syncytium, and the whole islet [Ca2+]i response has been modeled in terms of islet bursting and pacemaker models. To test these models, we developed a microfluidic device capable of partially stimulating an islet, while allowing observation of the NAD(P)H and [Ca2+]i responses. We show that β cell [Ca2+]i oscillations occur only within regions stimulated with more than ≈6.6 mM glucose. Furthermore, we show that tolbutamide, an antagonist of the ATP-sensitive K+ channel, allows these oscillations to travel farther into the nonstimulated regions of the islet. Our approach shows that the extent of Ca2+ propagation across the islet depends on a delicate interaction between the degree of coupling and the extent of ATP-sensitive K+-channel activation and illustrates an experimental paradigm that will have utility for many other biological systems. PMID:15317941

  6. Cationic triblock copolymer micelles enhance antioxidant activity, intracellular uptake and cytotoxicity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, Krassimira; Kamenova, Katya; Perperieva, Teodora; Hadjimitova, Vera; Donchev, Petar; Kaloyanov, Kaloyan; Konstantinov, Spiro; Kondeva-Burdina, Magdalena; Tzankova, Virginia; Petrov, Petar

    2015-07-25

    The aim of the present study was to develop curcumin loaded cationic polymeric micelles and to evaluate their loading, preservation of curcumin antioxidant activity and intracellular uptake ability. The micelles were prepared from a triblock copolymer consisting of poly(ϵ-caprolactone) and very short poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) segments (PDMAEMA9-PCL70-PDMAEMA9). The micelles showed monomodal size distribution, mean diameter of 145 nm, positive charge (+72 mV), critical micellar concentration around 0.05 g/l and encapsulation efficiency of 87%. The ability of the micellar curcumin to scavenge the ABTS radical and hypochlorite ions was higher than that of the free curcumin. Confocal microscopy revealed that the uptake of curcumin by chronic myeloid leukemia derived K-562 cells and human multiple myeloma cells U-266 was more intensive when curcumin was loaded into the micelles. These results correlated with the higher cytotoxicity of the micellar curcumin compared to free curcumin. Intraperitoneal treatment of Wistar rats indicated that PDMAEMA-PCL-PDMAEMA copolymer, comprising very short cationic chains, did not change the levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione in livers indicating an absence of oxidative stress. Thus, PDMAEMA-PCL-PDMAEMA triblock micelles could be considered efficient and safe platform for curcumin delivery. PMID:26026253

  7. Anti-cancer effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles and its intracellular redox activity.

    PubMed

    Pešić, Milica; Podolski-Renić, Ana; Stojković, Sonja; Matović, Branko; Zmejkoski, Danica; Kojić, Vesna; Bogdanović, Gordana; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Mojović, Miloš; Savić, Aleksandar; Milenković, Ivana; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Radotić, Ksenija

    2015-05-01

    Data on medical applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles CeO2 (CONP) are promising, yet information regarding their action in cells is incomplete and there are conflicting reports about in vitro toxicity. Herein, we have studied cytotoxic effect of CONP in several cancer and normal cell lines and their potential to change intracellular redox status. The IC50 was achieved only in two of eight tested cell lines, melanoma 518A2 and colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29. Self-propagating room temperature method was applied to produce CONP with an average crystalline size of 4 nm. The results confirmed presence of Ce(3+) and O(2-) vacancies. The induction of cell death by CONP and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were analyzed by flow-cytometry. Free radicals related antioxidant capacity of the cells was studied by the reduction of stable free radical TEMPONE using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. CONP showed low or moderate cytotoxicity in cancer cell lines: adenocarcinoma DLD1 and multi-drug resistant DLD1-TxR, non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H460 and multi-drug resistant NCI-H460/R, while normal cell lines (keratinocytes HaCaT, lung fetal fibroblasts MRC-5) were insensitive. The most sensitive were 518A2 melanoma and HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines, with the IC50 values being between 100 and 200 μM. Decreased rate of TEMPONE reduction and increased production of certain ROS species (peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide anion) indicates that free radical metabolism, thus redox status was changed, and antioxidant capacity damaged in the CONP treated 518A2 and HT-29 cells. In conclusion, changes in intracellular redox status induced by CONP are partly attributed to the prooxidant activity of the nanoparticles. Further, ROS induced cell damages might eventually lead to the cell death. However, low inhibitory potential of CONP in the other human cell lines tested indicates that CONP may be safe for human usage in industry and medicine. PMID

  8. K+ efflux agonists induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation independently of Ca2+ signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Katsnelson, Michael A.; Rucker, L. Graham; Russo, Hana M.; Dubyak, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of intracellular ion homeostasis is a major cellular stress signal for activation of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling that results in caspase-1 mediated production of IL-1β and pyroptosis. However, the relative contributions of decreased cytosolic [K+] versus increased cytosolic [Ca2+] remain disputed and incompletely defined. We investigated roles for elevated cytosolic [Ca2+] in NLRP3 activation and downstream inflammasome signaling responses in primary murine dendritic cells and macrophages in response to two canonical NLRP3 agonists (ATP and nigericin) that facilitate primary K+ efflux by mechanistically distinct pathways or the lysosome-destabilizing agonist Leu-Leu-O-methyl ester (LLME). The study provides three major findings relevant to this unresolved area of NLRP3 regulation. First, increased cytosolic [Ca2+] was neither a necessary nor sufficient signal for the NLRP3 inflammasome cascade during activation by endogenous ATP-gated P2X7 receptor channels, the exogenous bacterial ionophore nigericin, or the lysosomotropic agent LLME. Second, agonists for three Ca2+-mobilizing G protein-coupled receptors (formyl peptide receptor/FPR; P2Y2 purinergic receptor/P2Y2R; calcium-sensing receptor/CaSR) expressed in murine dendritic cells were ineffective as activators of rapidly induced NLRP3 signaling when directly compared to the K+ efflux agonists. Third, the intracellular Ca2+ buffer, BAPTA, and the channel blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), widely used reagents for disruption of Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways, strongly suppressed nigericin-induced NLRP3 inflammasome signaling via mechanisms dissociated from their canonical or expected effects on Ca2+ homeostasis. The results indicate that the ability of K+ efflux agonists to activate NLRP3 inflammasome signaling can be dissociated from changes in cytosolic [Ca2+] as a necessary or sufficient signal. PMID:25762778

  9. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2011-10-14

    Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy. PMID:21945932

  10. Parathyroid hormone inhibition of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 transcription: Intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, Elida Adalgisa; Bezerra, Camila Nogueira Alves Queiroz-Leite, Gabriella Duarte; Polidoro, Juliano Zequini; Rebouças, Nancy Amaral

    2015-06-12

    The main transport mechanism of reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate and fluid in the renal proximal tubules involves Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 (NHE3), which is acutely and chronically downregulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although PTH is known to exert an inhibitory effect on NHE3 expression and transcription, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that, in opossum kidney proximal tubule (OKP) cells, PTH-induced inhibition of Nhe3 gene promoter occurs even in the core promoter that controls expression of the reporter gene. We found that inhibition of the protein kinase A (PKA) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways transformed PTH from an inhibitor of promoter activity into an activator of that same activity, as did point mutations in the EGR1, Sp1, and Sp3 binding consensus elements in the promoter. In nuclear extracts of PTH-treated OKP cells, we also observed increased expression of EGR1 mRNA and of some Sp3 isoforms. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed a supershift of the −61 to −42-bp probe with an anti-EGR1 antibody in PTH-treated cells, suggesting that EGR1 binding is relevant for the inhibitory activity of PTH. We conclude that PTH-induced inhibition of NHE3 transcription is related to higher EGR1 expression; to EGR1 binding to the proximal and core promoters; and to PKA and JAK/STAT pathway activation. This mechanism might be responsible, at least in part, for lower NHE3 expression and sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubules in the presence of high PTH levels. - Highlights: • PTH regulation of Nhe3 promoter depends on EGR1 binding. • EGR1, PKA and JAK/STAT are involved in PTH inhibition of the Nhe3 promoter. • PTH alters expression of EGR1 and Sp3. • PTH inhibits the Nhe3 promoter by regulating PKA and JAK/STAT signaling.

  11. The cell-penetrating peptide, Pep-1, has activity against intracellular chlamydial growth but not extracellular forms of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Narae; Yamanaka, Kinrin; Tran, Dat; Chandrangsu, Pete; Akers, Johnny C.; de Leon, Jessica C.; Morrissette, Naomi S.; Selsted, Michael E.; Tan, Ming

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In the course of studies to identify novel treatment strategies against the pathogenic bacterium, Chlamydia, we tested the carrier peptide, Pep-1, for activity against an intracellular infection. Methods Using a cell culture model of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, the effect of Pep-1 was measured by incubating the peptide with extracellular chlamydiae prior to infection, or by adding Pep-1 to the medium at varying times after infection, and assaying for inhibition of inclusion formation. Results Pep-1 had a concentration-dependent effect on chlamydial growth with 100% inhibition of inclusion formation at 8 mg/L peptide. There was a window of susceptibility during the chlamydial developmental cycle with a maximal effect when treatment was begun within 12 h of infection. Pep-1 treatment caused a severe reduction in the production of infectious progeny even when started later, when the effect on inclusion formation was minimal. Furthermore, electron micrographs showed a paucity of progeny elementary bodies (EBs) in the inclusion. In contrast, pre-incubation of EBs with Pep-1 prior to infection did not affect inclusion formation. Taken together, these findings indicate that the antichlamydial effect was specific for the intracellular stage of chlamydial infection. By comparison, Pep-1 had no antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus or the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Conclusions Pep-1 has antichlamydial activity by preventing intracellular chlamydial growth and replication but has no effect on extracellular chlamydiae. PMID:18957395

  12. Identification of an endocytosis motif in an intracellular loop of Wntless protein, essential for its recycling and the control of Wnt protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Gasnereau, Isabelle; Herr, Patrick; Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Basler, Konrad; Gleeson, Paul A

    2011-12-16

    The secretion of Wnt signaling proteins is dependent upon the transmembrane sorting receptor, Wntless (Wls), which recycles between the trans-Golgi network and the cell surface. Loss of Wls results in impairment of Wnt secretion and defects in development and homeostasis in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and the mouse. The sorting signals for the internalization and trafficking of Wls have not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Wls internalization requires clathrin and dynamin I, components of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Moreover, we have identified a conserved YXXϕ endocytosis motif in the third intracellular loop of the multipass membrane protein Wls. Mutation of the tyrosine-based motif YEGL to AEGL (Y425A) resulted in the accumulation of human mutant Wls on the cell surface of transfected HeLa cells. The cell surface accumulation of Wls(AEGL) was rescued by the insertion of a classical YXXϕ motif in the cytoplasmic tail. Significantly, a Drosophila Wls(AEGL) mutant displayed a wing notch phenotype, with reduced Wnt secretion and signaling. These findings demonstrate that YXXϕ endocytosis motifs can occur in the intracellular loops of multipass membrane proteins and, moreover, provide direct evidence that the trafficking of Wls is required for efficient secretion of Wnt signaling proteins. PMID:22027831

  13. Parathyroid hormone inhibition of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 transcription: Intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factor expression.

    PubMed

    Neri, Elida Adalgisa; Bezerra, Camila Nogueira Alves; Queiroz-Leite, Gabriella Duarte; Polidoro, Juliano Zequini; Rebouças, Nancy Amaral

    2015-06-12

    The main transport mechanism of reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate and fluid in the renal proximal tubules involves Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), which is acutely and chronically downregulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although PTH is known to exert an inhibitory effect on NHE3 expression and transcription, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that, in opossum kidney proximal tubule (OKP) cells, PTH-induced inhibition of Nhe3 gene promoter occurs even in the core promoter that controls expression of the reporter gene. We found that inhibition of the protein kinase A (PKA) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways transformed PTH from an inhibitor of promoter activity into an activator of that same activity, as did point mutations in the EGR1, Sp1, and Sp3 binding consensus elements in the promoter. In nuclear extracts of PTH-treated OKP cells, we also observed increased expression of EGR1 mRNA and of some Sp3 isoforms. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed a supershift of the -61 to -42-bp probe with an anti-EGR1 antibody in PTH-treated cells, suggesting that EGR1 binding is relevant for the inhibitory activity of PTH. We conclude that PTH-induced inhibition of NHE3 transcription is related to higher EGR1 expression; to EGR1 binding to the proximal and core promoters; and to PKA and JAK/STAT pathway activation. This mechanism might be responsible, at least in part, for lower NHE3 expression and sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubules in the presence of high PTH levels. PMID:25888790

  14. Methylmercury-induced toxicity is mediated by enhanced intracellular calcium through activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Mi Sun; Jeong, Ju Yeon; Seo, Ji Heui; Jeon, Hyung Jun; Jung, Kwang Mook; Chin, Mi-Reyoung; Moon, Chang-Kiu; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Jung, Sung Yun; Kim, Dae Kyong . E-mail: proteinlab@hanmail.net

    2006-10-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant to which humans can be exposed by ingestion of contaminated food. MeHg has been suggested to exert its toxicity through its high reactivity to thiols, generation of arachidonic acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevation of free intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). However, the precise mechanism has not been fully defined. Here we show that phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is a critical pathway for MeHg-induced toxicity in MDCK cells. D609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC, significantly reversed the toxicity in a time- and dose-dependent manner with concomitant inhibition of the diacylglycerol (DAG) generation and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-breakdown. MeHg activated the group IV cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) and acidic form of sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) downstream of PC-PLC, but these enzymes as well as protein kinase C (PKC) were not linked to the toxicity by MeHg. Furthermore, MeHg produced ROS, which did not affect the toxicity. Addition of EGTA to culture media resulted in partial decrease of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and partially blocked the toxicity. In contrast, when the cells were treated with MeHg in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} in the culture media, D609 completely prevented cell death with parallel decrease in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Our results demonstrated that MeHg-induced toxicity was linked to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} through activation of PC-PLC, but not attributable to the signaling pathways such as cPLA{sub 2}, A-SMase, and PKC, or to the generation of ROS.

  15. Intracellular Signal Transduction and Modification of the Tumor Microenvironment Induced by RET/PTCs in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Menicali, Elisa; Moretti, Sonia; Voce, Pasquale; Romagnoli, Serena; Avenia, Nicola; Puxeddu, Efisio

    2012-01-01

    RET gene rearrangements (RET/PTCs) represent together with BRAF point mutations the two major groups of mutations involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) initiation and progression. In this review, we will examine the mechanisms involved in RET/PTC-induced thyroid cell transformation. In detail, we will summarize the data on the molecular mechanisms involved in RET/PTC formation and in its function as a dominant oncogene, on the activated signal transduction pathways and on the induced gene expression modifications. Moreover, we will report on the effects of RET/PTCs on the tumor microenvironment. Finally, a short review of the literature on RET/PTC prognostic significance will be presented. PMID:22661970

  16. Evaluation of potential implication of membrane estrogen binding sites on ERE-dependent transcriptional activity and intracellular estrogen receptor-alpha regulation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye Sook; Leclercq, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The potential involvement of membrane estrogen binding sites in the induction of ERE-dependent transcriptional activity as well as in the regulation of intracellular estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) level under estradiol (E2) stimulation was investigated. Our approach relied upon the use of two DCC-treated E2-BSA (bovine serum albumin) solutions (E2-6-BSA and E2-17-BSA). The absence of detectable free E2 in these solutions was established. Both E2-BSA conjugates led to a transient dose-dependent stimulation of the expression of ERE-luciferase (LUC) reporter gene in MVLN cells (MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a pVit-tk-LUC reporter plasmid), a property not recorded with free E2, which maintained enhanced transcriptional activity during the whole experiment. A very low concentration of E2 (10 pM) synergistically acted with E2-BSA conjugates. Hence, ERE-dependent transcriptional activity induced by these conjugates appeared to result from their known interactions with membrane estrogen binding sites. Anti-estrogens (AEs: 4-OH-TAM and RU 58,668), which antagonize genomic ER responses, abrogated the luciferase activity induced by E2-BSA conjugates, confirming a potential relationship between membrane-related signals and intracellular ER. Moreover, induction of luciferase was recorded when the cells were exposed to IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) and cyclic nucleotides (cAMP/cGMP), suggesting the implication of the latter in the signal transduction pathway leading to the expression of the reporter gene. Growth factors (IGF-I, EGF and TGF-alpha) also slightly stimulated luciferase and synergistically acted with 10 pM E2, or 1 microM E2-BSA conjugates, in agreement with the concept of a cross-talk between steroids and peptides acting on the cell membrane. Remarkably, E2-BSA conjugates, IBMX and all investigated growth factors failed to down-regulate intracellular ER in MCF-7 cells, indicating the need for a direct intracellular interaction of the ligand with the

  17. Activation of Na-H exchange by intracellular lithium in barnacle muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Davis, B A; Hogan, E M; Boron, W F

    1992-07-01

    We internally dialyzed single barnacle muscle fibers (BMF) for 90 min with a dialysis fluid (DF) containing no Na+ and either 0 or 100 mM Li+ and measured intracellular pH (pHi) with a microelectrode. During dialysis, the pH 8.0 artificial seawater (ASW) contained neither Na+ nor HCO3-. After we halted dialysis with a Li(+)-free/low-pH DF and allowed pHi to stabilize at approximately 6.8, adding 440 mM Na(+)-10 mM HCO3- to the ASW caused pHi to recover rapidly and stabilize at 7.32. In contrast, when the DF contained 100 mM Li+, pHi stabilized at 7.49. In fibers dialyzed to a pHi of approximately 7.2, Li+ stimulated a component of acid extrusion that was dependent on Na+ but not affected by SITS. Thus Li+ activates a Na(+)-dependent acid-extrusion mechanism other than the well characterized Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchanger. To study the Li(+)-activated mechanism, we minimized Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchange by raising pHDF to 7.35 and pretreated BMFs with SITS. We found that dialysis with Li+ elicits a Na(+)-dependent pHi increase that is largely blocked by amiloride, consistent with the hypothesis that Li+ activates a latent Na-H exchanger even at a normal pHi. In the absence of Li+, the Na-H exchanger is relatively inactive at pHi 7.35 (net acid-extrusion rate, Jnet = 9.5 microM/min) but modestly stimulated by reducing pHi to 6.8 (Jnet = 64 microM/min). In the presence of Li+, the Na-H exchanger is very active at pHi values of both 7.35 (Jnet = 141 microM/min) and 6.8 (Jnet = 168 microM/min). Thus Li+ alters the pHi sensitivity of the Na-H exchanger. Because the Na-H exchanger is only approximately 6% as active as the Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchanger in the absence of Li+ at a pHi of approximately 6.8, we suggest that the major role of the Na-H exchanger may not be in pHi regulation but in another function such as cell-volume regulation. PMID:1322042

  18. Effects of PACAP on intracellular signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Reglodi, D; Mester, L; Szabo, A; Szabadfi, K; Tamas, A; Toth, G; Kovacs, K

    2012-11-01

    The integrity of retinal pigment epithelial cells is critical for photoreceptor survival and vision. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) exerts retinoprotective effects against several types of injuries in vivo, including optic nerve transection, retinal ischemia, excitotoxic injuries, UVA-induced lesion, and diabetic retinopathy. In a recent study, we have proven that PACAP is also protective in oxidative stress-induced injury in human pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanisms of this protection. ARPE cells were exposed to a 24-h hydrogen peroxide treatment. Expressions of kinases and apoptotic markers were studied by complex array kits and Western blot. Oxidative stress induced the activation of several apoptotic markers, including Bad, Bax, HIF-1α, several heat shock proteins, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and Fas-associated protein with death domain, while PACAP treatment decreased them. The changes in the expression of MAP kinases showed that PACAP activated the protective ERK1/2 and downstream CREB, and decreased the activation of the pro-apoptotic p38MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, an effect opposite to that observed with only oxidative stress. Furthermore, PACAP increased the activation of the protective Akt pathway. In addition, the effects of oxidative stress on several other signaling molecules were counteracted by PACAP treatment (Chk2, Yes, Lyn, paxillin, p53, PLC, STAT4, RSK). These play a role in cell death, cell cycle, inflammation, adhesion, differentiation and proliferation. In summary, PACAP, acting at several levels, influences the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors in favor of anti-apoptosis, thereby providing protection in oxidative stress-induced injury of human retinal pigment epithelial cells. PMID:22644900

  19. Cadmium Induces Apoptosis in Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense through Activating Calcium Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Pingping; Liu, Na; Wang, Qian; Luo, Jixian; Wang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) is one of the key intracellular signals, which is implicated in the regulation of cell functions such as impregnation, cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic environmental pollutant that can disturb cell functions and even lead to cell death. Recently, we have found that Cd induced apoptosis in gill cells of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense via caspase activation. In the present study, we further investigated the role of calcium signaling in the Cd-induced apoptosis in the animals. Our data showed that Cd triggered gill cell apoptosis which is evidenced by apoptotic DNA fragmentation, activations of caspases-3, -8 and -9 and the presence of apoptotic morphological features. Moreover, Cd elevated the intracellular concentration of Ca2+, the protein concentration of calmodulin (CaM) and the activity of Ca2+-ATPase in the gill cells of the crabs. Pretreatment of the animals with ethylene glycol-bis-(b-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N’,N’-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), Ca2+ chelator, inhibited Cd-induced activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 as well as blocked the Cd-triggered apoptotic DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic morphological features were no longer observed in gill cells pretreated with the Ca2+ signaling inhibitors before Cd treatment. Our results indicate that Cd evokes gill cell apoptosis through activating Ca2+-CaM signaling transduction pathway. PMID:26714174

  20. A peptide biosensor for detecting intracellular Abl kinase activity using MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Placzek, Ekaterina A.; Plebanek, Michael P.; Lipchik, Andrew M.; Kidd, Stephanie R.; Parker, Laurie L.

    2009-01-01

    Many cancers are characterized by changes in protein phosphorylation as a result of kinase dysregulation. Disruption of Abl kinase signaling through the Philadelphia chromosome (causing the Bcr-Abl mutation) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has provided a paradigm for development of kinase inhibitor drugs such as the specific inhibitor imatinib (also known as STI571 or Gleevec). However, since patients are treated indefinitely with this drug to maintain remission, resistance is increasingly becoming an issue. While there are many ways to detect kinase activity, most lack the ability to ‘multiplex’ the analysis (to detect more than one substrate simultaneously). Here we report a novel biosensor for detecting Abl kinase activity and sensitivity to inhibitor in live, intact cells overexpressing a CML model Abl kinase construct. This straightforward methodology could eventually provide a new tool for detecting kinase activity and inhibitor drug response in cancer cells that overexpress oncogenic kinases. PMID:19818327

  1. Focal Activation of Cells by Plasmon Resonance Assisted Optical Injection of Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Experimental methods for single cell intracellular delivery are essential for probing cell signaling dynamics within complex cellular networks, such as those making up the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show a quantitative and general method of interrogation of signaling pathways. We applied highly focused near-infrared laser light to optically inject gold-coated liposomes encapsulating bioactive molecules into single cells for focal activation of cell signaling. For this demonstration, we encapsulated either inositol trisphosphate (IP3), an endogenous cell signaling second messenger, or adenophostin A (AdA), a potent analogue of IP, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes, and injected these gold-coated liposomes and their contents into the cytosol of single ovarian carcinoma cells to initiate calcium (Ca2+) release from intracellular stores. Upon optical injection of IP3 or AdA at doses above the activation threshold, we observed increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration within the injected cell initiating the propagation of a Ca2+ wave throughout nearby cells. As confirmed by octanol-induced inhibition, the intercellular Ca2+ wave traveled via gap junctions. Optical injection of gold-coated liposomes represents a quantitative method of focal activation of signaling cascades of broad interest in biomedical research. PMID:24877558

  2. Number and brightness analysis of sFRP4 domains in live cells demonstrates vesicle association signal of the NLD domain and dynamic intracellular responses to Wnt3a.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Vanathi; Krishnan, Kannan; Gratton, Enrico; Dharmarajan, Arun M; Fox, Simon A

    2015-07-01

    The Wnts are secreted, lipidated glycoproteins that play a role in cellular processes of differentiation, proliferation, migration, survival, polarity and stem cell self-renewal. The majority of Wnts biological effects are through binding to specific frizzled (Fzd) receptor complexes leading to activation of downstream pathways. Secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs) were first identified as antagonists of Wnt signalling by binding directly to Wnts. They comprise two domains, a Fzd-like cysteine rich domain (CRD) and a netrin-like domain (NLD). Subsequently sFRPs have been shown to also interact with Fzd receptors and more diverse functions have been identified, including potentiation of Wnt signalling. Many aspects of the biology of this family remain to be elucidated. We used the number and brightness (N&B) method, a technique based on fluorescence fluctuation analysis, to characterise the intracellular aggregation and trafficking of sFRP4 domains. We expressed sFRP4 and its' domains as EGFP fusions and then characterised the effect of endogenous Wnt3a by fluorescence confocal imaging. We observed vesicular trafficking of sFRP4 and that the NLD domain has a vesicular association signal. We found that sFRP4 and the CRD formed oligomeric aggregates in the perinuclear region while the NLD was distributed evenly throughout the cell with a larger proportion of aggregates. Most significantly we observed intracellular redistribution of sFRP4 in response to Wnt3a suggesting that Wnt3a can modulate intracellular localisation and secretion of sFRP4. Our results reveal a number of novel findings regarding sFRP4 which are likely to have relevance to this wider family. PMID:25805505

  3. Supramolecular organizing centers (SMOCs) as signaling machines in innate immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, QIAO; Hao, WU

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity offers the first line of defense against infections and other types of danger such as tumorigenesis. Its discovery provides tremendous therapeutic opportunities for numerous human diseases. Delving into the structural basis of signal transduction by innate immune receptors, our lab has recently helped to establish the new paradigm in which innate immune receptors transduce ligand-binding signals through formation of higher-order assemblies containing intracellular adapters, signaling enzymes and their substrates. These large signalosome assemblies may be visible under light microscopy as punctate structures in the μm scale, connecting to the underlying molecular structures in the nm scale. They drive proximity-induced enzyme activation, and provide a mechanism for signaling amplification by nucleated polymerization. These supramolecular signaling complexes also open new questions on their cellular organization and mode of regulation, pose challenges to our methodology, and afford valuable implications in drug discovery against these medically important pathways. PMID:26511517

  4. Supramolecular organizing centers (SMOCs) as signaling machines in innate immune activation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Qi; Wu, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Innate immunity offers the first line of defense against infections and other types of danger such as tumorigenesis. Its discovery provides tremendous therapeutic opportunities for numerous human diseases. Delving into the structural basis of signal transduction by innate immune receptors, our lab has recently helped to establish the new paradigm in which innate immune receptors transduce ligand-binding signals through formation of higher-order assemblies containing intracellular adapters, signaling enzymes and their substrates. These large signalosome assemblies may be visible under light microscopy as punctate structures in the µm scale, connecting to the underlying molecular structures in the nm scale. They drive proximity-induced enzyme activation, and provide a mechanism for signaling amplification by nucleated polymerization. These supramolecular signaling complexes also open new questions on their cellular organization and mode of regulation, pose challenges to our methodology, and afford valuable implications in drug discovery against these medically important pathways. PMID:26511517

  5. Detection of Intracellular Selenol-Containing Molecules Using a Fluorescent Probe with Near-Zero Background Signal.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Yang, Shu-Hou; Wu, Lei; Dong, Qing-Jian; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-06-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec), encoded as the 21st amino acid, is the predominant chemical form of selenium that is closely related to various human diseases. Thus, it is of high importance to identify novel probes for sensitive and selective recognition of Sec and Sec-containing proteins. Although a few probes have been reported to detect artificially introduced selenols in cells or tissues, none of them has been shown to be sensitive enough to detect endogenous selenols. We report the characterization and application of a new fluorogenic molecular probe for the detection of intracellular selenols. This probe exhibits near-zero background fluorescence but produces remarkable fluorescence enhancement upon reacting with selenols in a fast chemical reaction. It is highly specific and sensitive for intracellular selenium-containing molecules such as Sec and selenoproteins. When combined with flow cytometry, this probe is able to detect endogenous selenols in various human cancer cells. It is also able to image endogenous selenol-containing molecules in zebrafish under a fluorescence microscope. These results demonstrate that this molecular probe can function as a useful molecular tool for intracellular selenol sensing, which is valuable in the clinical diagnosis for human diseases associated with Sec-deficiency or overdose. PMID:27161304

  6. Notum deacylates Wnts to suppress signalling activity

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Steve; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O’Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Signalling by Wnts is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnts from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity since glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which likely help Notum colocalise with Wnts. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnts and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  7. The roles of serine protease, intracellular and extracellular phenoloxidase in activation of prophenoloxidase system, and characterization of phenoloxidase from shrimp haemocytes induced by lipopolysaccharide or dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Peng; Pan, Luqing; Xu, Wujie; Yue, Feng

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dopamine (DA) on the activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system of Litopenaeus vannamei. LPS and DA were shown with a negative dose-dependent effect on hyalne cells (HC), semi-granular cells (SGC), large granular cells (LGC), and total haemocyte count (THC). When haemocytes were treated with LPS or DA, serine proteinase activity and intracellular phenoloxidase (PO) activity were significantly reduced, but extracellular PO activity increased significantly. These findings indicated that the reduction in haemocyte counts was mainly because of the degranulation and activation of the proPO system from semi-granule and large granule cells. The PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine, and the TPK inhibitor, genistein, had an inhibitory effect on extracellular PO activity, while serine proteinase and intracellular PO activity increased. This suggests that the LPS and DA induce the activation of proPO in haemocytes via PKC and TPK-related signaling pathways, but serine proteinase may be activated only by PKC, as the genistein effects were not statistically significant. Electrophoresis analysis revealed that POs induced by LPS or DA have the same molecular mass and high diphenolase activity. Two PO bands at 526 kDa and 272 kDa were observed in PAGE, while in the haemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS), only a 272-kDa band was observed. This band was resolved after SDS-PAGE under non-reducing and reducing conditions into two groups of POs, 166 kDa and 126 kDa, and 78.1 kDa and 73.6 kDa, respectively, suggesting that PO in L. vannamei is an oligomer, which may have different compositions intra- and extracellularly.

  8. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway as a Discovery Target in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Nan, Guangxian

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases are critical modulators of a variety of intracellular and extracellular signal transduction pathways, and abnormal phosphorylation events can contribute to disease progression in a variety of diseases. As a result, protein kinases have emerged as important new drug targets for small molecule therapeutics. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway transmits signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to a variety of different stimuli. Because this pathway controls a broad spectrum of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and stress responses, it is accepted as a therapeutic target for cancer and peripheral inflammatory disorders. There is also increasing evidence that MAPK is an important regulator of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral vascular disease, raising the possibility that it might be a drug discovery target for stroke. In this review, we discuss the MAPK signaling pathway in association with its activation in stroke-induced brain injury. PMID:26842916

  9. Intracellular redox-activated anticancer drug delivery by functionalized hollow mesoporous silica nanoreservoirs with tumor specificity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhong; Hu, Yan; Cai, Kaiyong; Ding, Xingwei; Zhang, Quan; Li, Menghuan; Ma, Xing; Zhang, Beilu; Zeng, Yongfei; Li, Peizhou; Li, Jinghua; Liu, Junjie; Zhao, Yanli

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a type of intracellular redox-triggered hollow mesoporous silica nanoreservoirs (HMSNs) with tumor specificity was developed in order to deliver anticancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin (DOX)) to the target tumor cells with high therapeutic efficiency and reduced side effects. Firstly, adamantanamine was grafted onto the orifices of HMSNs using a redox-cleavable disulfide bond as an intermediate linker. Subsequently, a synthetic functional molecule, lactobionic acid-grafted-β-cyclodextrin (β-CD-LA), was immobilized on the surface of HMSNs through specific complexation with the adamantyl group, where β-CD served as an end-capper to keep the loaded drug within HMSNs. β-CD-LA on HMSNs could also act as a targeting agent towards tumor cells (i.e., HepG2 cells), since the lactose group in β-CD-LA is a specific ligand binding with the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) on HepG2 cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that DOX-loaded nanoreservoirs could be selectively endocytosed by HepG2 cells, releasing therapeutic DOX into cytoplasm and efficiently inducing the apoptosis and cell death. In vivo investigations further confirmed that DOX-loaded nanoreservoirs could permeate into the tumor sites and actively interact with tumor cells, which inhibited the tumor growth with the minimized side effect. On the whole, this drug delivery system exhibits a great potential as an efficient carrier for targeted tumor therapy in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24930850

  10. Intracellular staining and detection of cytokines by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Freer, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    The detection of cytokines inside cells producing them has made a tremendous impact on the way immune reactivity is measured. Intracellular cytokine staining is the only immunological technique allowing determination of antigen-specific T cell function and phenotype at the same time; for this reason, it is one of the most popular methods to measure antigenicity in the evaluation of vaccine efficacy and in the study of infectious diseases. It is a flow cytometric technique based on staining of intracellular cytokines and cell markers (surface or cytoplasmic) with fluorescent antibodies after short term culture of stimulated immune cells in the presence of a protein secretion inhibitor, followed by fixation and permeabilization. Most experiments involve detection of five to ten different colors but many more can be detected by modern flow cytometers. Here, we discuss our experience using a standard protocol for intracellular cytokine staining. PMID:24908309

  11. Unique intracellular activation of the potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus agent 1592U89.

    PubMed

    Faletto, M B; Miller, W H; Garvey, E P; St Clair, M H; Daluge, S M; Good, S S

    1997-05-01

    The anabolism of 1592U89, (-)-(1S,4R)-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl]-2-cyclo pentene-1-methanol, a selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), was characterized in human T-lymphoblastoid CD4+ CEM cells. 1592U89 was ultimately anabolized to the triphosphate (TP) of the guanine analog (-)-carbovir (CBV), a potent inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. However, less than 2% of intracellular 1592U89 was converted to CBV, an amount insufficient to account for the CBV-TP levels observed. 1592U89 was anabolized to its 5'-monophosphate (MP) by the recently characterized enzyme adenosine phosphotransferase, but neither its diphosphate (DP) nor its TP was detected. The MP, DP, and TP of CBV were found in cells incubated with either 1592U89 or CBV, with CBV-TP being the major phosphorylated species. We confirmed that CBV is phosphorylated by 5'-nucleotidase and that mycophenolic acid increased the formation of CBV-TP from CBV 75-fold. However, mycophenolic acid did not stimulate 1592U89 anabolism to CBV-TP. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) did not inhibit CBV-TP formation from CBV or 1592U89, whereas the adenylate deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin selectively inhibited 1592U89 anabolism to CBV-TP and reversed the antiviral activity of 1592U89. 1592U89-MP was not a substrate for adenylate deaminase but was a substrate for a distinct cytosolic deaminase that was inhibited by 2'-deoxycoformycin-5'-MP. Thus, 1592U89 is phosphorylated by adenosine phosphotransferase to 1592U89-MP, which is converted by a novel cytosolic enzyme to CBV-MP. CBV-MP is then further phosphorylated to CBV-TP by cellular kinases. This unique activation pathway enables 1592U89 to overcome the pharmacokinetic and toxicological deficiencies of CBV while maintaining potent and selective anti-HIV activity. PMID:9145876

  12. A molecular signature in the pannexin1 intracellular loop confers channel activation by the α1 adrenoreceptor in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Billaud, Marie; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Lohman, Alexander W.; Parpaite, Thibaud; Butcher, Joshua T.; Mutchler, Stephanie M.; DeLalio, Leon J.; Artamonov, Mykhaylo V.; Sandilos, Joanna K.; Best, Angela K.; Somlyo, Avril V.; Thompson, Roger J.; Le, Thu H.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Isakson, Brant E.

    2015-01-01

    Both purinergic signaling through nucleotides such as ATP (adenosine 5′-triphosphate) and noradrenergic signaling through molecules such as norepinephrine regulate vascular tone and blood pressure. Pannexin1 (Panx1), which forms large-pore, ATP-releasing channels, is present in vascular smooth muscle cells in peripheral blood vessels and participates in noradrenergic responses. Using pharmacological approaches and mice conditionally lacking Panx1 in smooth muscle cells, we found that Panx1 contributed to vaso-constriction mediated by the α1 adrenoreceptor (α1AR), whereas vasoconstriction in response to serotonin or endothelin-1 was independent of Panx1. Analysis of the Panx1-deficient mice showed that Panx1 contributed to blood pressure regulation especially during the night cycle when sympathetic nervous activity is highest. Using mimetic peptides and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified a specific amino acid sequence in the Panx1 intracellular loop that is essential for activation by α1AR signaling. Collectively, these data describe a specific link between noradrenergic and purinergic signaling in blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:25690012

  13. Intracellular calcium dynamics and membrane conductance changes evoked by Deiters' cell purinoceptor activation in the organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Lagostena, L; Mammano, F

    2001-03-01

    Deiters' cells function as supporting cells for the sensory-motor outer hair cells of the mammalian cochlea and are interconnected by gap junctions. Here the electrical and Ca2+ responses of Deiters' cells evoked by purinergic stimulation were investigated in the organ of Corti, the auditory sensory epithelium. Adenosine 59-triphosphate (ATP, 50-100 microM) applied focally by pressure increased the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). At the same time ATP evoked an early inward current that was followed by an outward component, reflecting a sustained Ca2+-dependent reduction of the pre-stimulus offset current. These responses were maintained when Ca2+ was removed from the extracellular medium (0 [Ca2+]o), indicating a contribution to Ca2+ signalling from P2Y metabotropic receptors. UV photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3, 16 microM) produced Ca2+ responses similar to those evoked by exogenous ATP, accompanied by reduction of the offset current. In Deiters' cells uncoupled by octanol (1mM), ATP activated only the early inward current, suggesting that functional gap junctions are required in the late phase of the current responses. Following the delivery of UV flashes to pairs of Deiters' cells loaded with caged InsP3, the electrical coupling ratio (CR), monitored by double patch-clamp recordings, was strongly attenuated. These data support the idea that, by promoting inflow of cations and by controlling gap-junction conductance in a Ca2+-and InsP3-dependent way, ATP might serve a protective role in the cochlea. PMID:11162856

  14. Spatio-temporal activity patterns of odor-induced synchronized potentials revealed by voltage-sensitive dye imaging and intracellular recording in the antennal lobe of the cockroach.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Ai, Hiroyuki; Yokohari, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    In animals, odor qualities are represented as both spatial activity patterns of glomeruli and temporal patterns of synchronized oscillatory signals in the primary olfactory centers. By optical imaging of a voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) and intracellular recording from secondary olfactory interneurons, we examined possible neural correlates of the spatial and temporal odor representations in the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), of the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging revealed that all used odorants induced odor-specific temporal patterns of depolarizing potentials in specific combinations of anterior glomeruli of the AL. The depolarizing potentials evoked by different odorants were temporally synchronized across glomeruli and were termed "synchronized potentials." These observations suggest that odor qualities are represented by spatio-temporal activity patterns of the synchronized potentials across glomeruli. We also performed intracellular recordings and stainings from secondary olfactory interneurons, namely projection neurons and local interneurons. We analyzed the temporal structures of enanthic acid-induced action potentials of secondary olfactory interneurons using simultaneous paired intracellular recording from two given neurons. Our results indicated that the multiple local interneurons synchronously fired in response to the olfactory stimulus. In addition, all stained enanthic acid-responsive projection neurons exhibited dendritic arborizations within the glomeruli where the synchronized potentials were evoked. Since multiple local interneurons are known to synapse to a projection neuron in each glomerulus in the cockroach AL, converging inputs from local interneurons to the projection neurons appear to contribute the odorant specific spatio-temporal activity patterns of the synchronized potentials. PMID:22848191

  15. Efficient Intracellular Delivery of Molecules with High Cell Viability Using Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser-Activated Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5–9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:24547946

  16. Short inter-set rest blunts resistance exercise-induced increases in myofibrillar protein synthesis and intracellular signalling in young males.

    PubMed

    McKendry, James; Pérez-López, Alberto; McLeod, Michael; Luo, Dan; Dent, Jessica R; Smeuninx, Benoit; Yu, Jinglei; Taylor, Angela E; Philp, Andrew; Breen, Leigh

    2016-07-01

    phosphorylation of eEF2(Thr56) , TSC2(Thr1462) , AMPK(Thr172) and REDD1 protein were greater for 1 compared with 5 min inter-set rest. Serum testosterone was greater at 20-40 min postexercise and plasma lactate greater immediately postexercise for 1 versus 5 min inter-set rest. Resistance exercise with short (1 min) inter-set rest duration attenuated myofibrillar protein synthesis during the early postexercise recovery period compared with longer (5 min) rest duration, potentially through compromised activation of intracellular signalling. PMID:27126459

  17. Intracellular and membrane-damaging activities of methyl gallate isolated from Terminalia chebula against multidrug-resistant Shigella spp.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Saurabh; Sarkar, Prodipta; Saha, Dhira R; Patra, Amarendra; Ramamurthy, T; Bag, Prasanta K

    2015-08-01

    Shigella spp. (Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Shigella boydii and Shigella sonnei) cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis), which is characterized by bloody mucous diarrhoea. Although a variety of antibiotics have been effective for treatment of shigellosis, options are becoming limited due to globally emerging drug resistance. In the present study, in vitro antibacterial activity of methyl gallate (MG) isolated from Terminalia chebula was determined by performing MIC, minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill kinetic studies. Bacterial membrane-damaging activity of MG was determined by membrane perturbation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cellular drug accumulation, cell infection and assessment of intracellular activities of MG and reference antibiotics were performed using HeLa cell cultures. The bactericidal activity of MG against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Shigella spp. in comparison with other commonly used drugs including fluoroquinolone was demonstrated here. TEM findings in the present study revealed that MG caused the total disintegration of inner and outer membranes, and leakage of the cytoplasmic contents of S. dysenteriae. The level of accumulation of MG and tetracycline in HeLa cells incubated for 24  h was relatively higher than that of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid (ratio of intracellular concentration/extracellular concentration of antibiotic for MG and tetracycline>ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid). The viable number of intracellular S. dysenteriae was decreased in a time-dependent manner in the presence of MG (4 × MBC) and reduced to zero within 20  h. The significant intracellular activities of MG suggested that it could potentially be used as an effective antibacterial agent for the treatment of severe infections caused by MDR Shigella spp. PMID:26272388

  18. Homocysteine thiolactone induces apoptotic DNA damage mediated by increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide and caspase 3 activation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, R F; Huang, S M; Lin, B S; Wei, J S; Liu, T Z

    2001-05-11

    The cytotoxicity of homocysteine derivatives on chromosomal damage in somatic cells is not well established. The present study used reactive homocysteine derivative of homocysteine thiolactone (Hcy) to investigate its causal effect on apoptotic DNA injury in human promyeloid HL-60 cells. Our results demonstrated that Hcy induced cell death and features of apoptosis including increased phosphotidylserine exposure on the membrane surface, increased apoptotic cells with hypoploid DNA contents, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, all of which occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hcy treatment also significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species H2O2, which coincided with the elimination of caspase 3 proenzyme levels and increased caspase 3 activity at the time of the appearance of apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Preincubation of Hcy-treated HL-60 cells with catalase completely scavenged intracellular H2O2, thus inhibiting caspase 3 activity and protecting cells from apoptotic DNA damage. In contrast, superoxide dismutase failed to inhibit Hcy-induced DNA damage. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Hcy exerted its genotoxic effects on HL-60 cells through an apoptotic pathway, which is mediated by the activation of caspase 3 activity induced by an increase in intracellular hydrogen peroxide. PMID:11432446

  19. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C.; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher P.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Nerve transection increased Notch signaling in paralyzed muscle. {yields} Nandrolone prevented denervation-induced Notch signaling. {yields} Nandrolone induced the expression of an inhibitor of the Notch signaling, Numb. {yields} Reduction of denervation-induced Notch signaling by nandrolone is likely through upregulation of Numb. -- Abstract: Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  20. Human T cell lymphotropic virus type I genomic expression and impact on intracellular signaling pathways during neurodegenerative disease and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yao, J; Wigdahl, B

    2000-01-01

    HTLV-I has been identified as the etiologic agent of neoplasia within the human peripheral blood T lymphocyte population, and a progressive neurologic disorder based primarily within the central nervous system. We have examined the role of HTLV-I in these two distinctly different clinical syndromes by examining the life cycle of the virus, with emphasis on the regulation of viral gene expression within relevant target cell populations. In particular, we have examined the impact of specific viral gene products, particularly Tax, on cellular metabolic function. Tax is a highly promiscuous and pleiotropic viral oncoprotein, and is the most important factor contributing to the initial stages of viral-mediated transformation of T cells after HTLV-I infection. Tax, which weakly binds to Tax response element 1 (TRE-1) in the viral long terminal repeat (LTR), can dramatically trans-activate viral gene expression by interacting with cellular transcription factors, such as activated transcription factors and cyclic AMP response element binding proteins (ATF/CREB), CREB binding protein (CBP/p300), and factors involved with the basic transcription apparatus. At the same time, Tax alters cellular gene expression by directly or indirectly interacting with a variety of cellular transcription factors, cell cycle control elements, and cellular signal transduction molecules ultimately resulting in dysregulated cell proliferation. The mechanisms associated with HTLV-I infection, leading to tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) are not as clearly resolved. Possible explanations of viral-induced neurologic disease range from central nervous system (CNS) damage caused by direct viral invasion of the CNS to bystander CNS damage caused by the immune response to HTLV-I infection. It is interesting to note that it is very rare for an HTLV-I infected individual to develop both adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and TSP in his/her life time, suggesting that the mechanisms governing development of these

  1. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  2. Impact of intracellular domain flexibility upon properties of activated human 5-HT3 receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kozuska, J L; Paulsen, I M; Belfield, W J; Martin, I L; Cole, D J; Holt, A; Dunn, S M J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been proposed that arginine residues lining the intracellular portals of the homomeric 5-HT3A receptor cause electrostatic repulsion of cation flow, accounting for a single-channel conductance substantially lower than that of the 5-HT3AB heteromer. However, comparison of receptor homology models for wild-type pentamers suggests that salt bridges in the intracellular domain of the homomer may impart structural rigidity, and we hypothesized that this rigidity could account for the low conductance. Experimental Approach Mutations were introduced into the portal region of the human 5-HT3A homopentamer, such that putative salt bridges were broken by neutralizing anionic partners. Single-channel and whole cell currents were measured in transfected tsA201 cells and in Xenopus oocytes respectively. Computational simulations of protein flexibility facilitated comparison of wild-type and mutant receptors. Key Results Single-channel conductance was increased substantially, often to wild-type heteromeric receptor values, in most 5-HT3A mutants. Conversely, introduction of arginine residues to the portal region of the heteromer, conjecturally creating salt bridges, decreased conductance. Gating kinetics varied significantly between different mutant receptors. EC50 values for whole-cell responses to 5-HT remained largely unchanged, but Hill coefficients for responses to 5-HT were usually significantly smaller in mutants. Computational simulations suggested increased flexibility throughout the protein structure as a consequence of mutations in the intracellular domain. Conclusions and Implications These data support a role for intracellular salt bridges in maintaining the quaternary structure of the 5-HT3 receptor and suggest a role for the intracellular domain in allosteric modulation of cooperativity and agonist efficacy. Linked Article This article is commented on by Vardy and Kenakin, pp. 1614–1616 of volume 171 issue 7. To view this commentary

  3. Human Macrophage SCN5A Activates an Innate Immune Signaling Pathway for Antiviral Host Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexis; Kainz, Danielle; Khan, Faatima; Lee, Cara; Carrithers, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors contain a binding domain for pathogen-associated molecular patterns coupled to a signaling domain that regulates transcription of host immune response genes. Here, a novel mechanism that links pathogen recognition to channel activation and downstream signaling is proposed. We demonstrate that an intracellular sodium channel variant, human macrophage SCN5A, initiates signaling and transcription through a calcium-dependent isoform of adenylate cyclase, ADCY8, and the transcription factor, ATF2. Pharmacological stimulation with a channel agonist or treatment with cytoplasmic poly(I:C), a mimic of viral dsRNA, activates this pathway to regulate expression of SP100-related genes and interferon β. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that the SCN5A variant mediates nonselective outward currents and a small, but detectable, inward current. Intracellular poly(I:C) markedly augments an inward voltage-sensitive sodium current and inhibits the outward nonselective current. These results suggest human macrophage SCN5A initiates signaling in an innate immune pathway relevant to antiviral host defense. It is postulated that SCN5A is a novel pathogen sensor and that this pathway represents a channel activation-dependent mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:25368329

  4. Bem3, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, traffics to an intracellular compartment and recruits the secretory Rab GTPase Sec4 to endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Sen, Arpita; Boettner, Douglas R.; Fairn, Gregory D.; Schlam, Daniel; Bonilla Valentin, Fernando J.; Michael McCaffery, J.; Hazbun, Tony; Staiger, Chris J.; Grinstein, Sergio; Lemmon, Sandra K.; Claudio Aguilar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell polarity is essential for many cellular functions including division and cell-fate determination. Although RhoGTPase signaling and vesicle trafficking are both required for the establishment of cell polarity, the mechanisms by which they are coordinated are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the yeast RhoGAP (GTPase activating protein), Bem3, is targeted to sites of polarized growth by the endocytic and recycling pathways. Specifically, deletion of SLA2 or RCY1 led to mislocalization of Bem3 to depolarized puncta and accumulation in intracellular compartments, respectively. Bem3 partitioned between the plasma membrane and an intracellular membrane-bound compartment. These Bem3-positive structures were polarized towards sites of bud emergence and were mostly observed during the pre-mitotic phase of apical growth. Cell biological and biochemical approaches demonstrated that this intracellular Bem3 compartment contained markers for both the endocytic and secretory pathways, which were reminiscent of the Spitzenkörper present in the hyphal tips of growing fungi. Importantly, Bem3 was not a passive cargo, but recruited the secretory Rab protein, Sec4, to the Bem3-containing compartments. Moreover, Bem3 deletion resulted in less efficient localization of Sec4 to bud tips during early stages of bud emergence. Surprisingly, these effects of Bem3 on Sec4 were independent of its GAP activity, but depended on its ability to efficiently bind endomembranes. This work unveils unsuspected and important details of the relationship between vesicle traffic and elements of the cell polarity machinery: (1) Bem3, a cell polarity and peripherally associated membrane protein, relies on vesicle trafficking to maintain its proper localization; and (2) in turn, Bem3 influences secretory vesicle trafficking. PMID:23943876

  5. Calcium-dependent regulation of Rab activation and vesicle fusion by an intracellular P2X ion channel.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Katie; Baines, Abigail E; Keller, Thomas; Gruenheit, Nicole; Bragg, Laricia; North, R Alan; Thompson, Christopher R L

    2014-01-01

    Rab GTPases play key roles in the delivery, docking and fusion of intracellular vesicles. However, the mechanism by which spatial and temporal regulation of Rab GTPase activity is controlled is poorly understood. Here we describe a mechanism by which localized calcium release through a vesicular ion channel controls Rab GTPase activity. We show that activation of P2XA, an intracellular ion channel localized to the Dictyostelium discoideum contractile vacuole system, results in calcium efflux required for downregulation of Rab11a activity and efficient vacuole fusion. Vacuole fusion and Rab11a downregulation require the activity of CnrF, an EF-hand-containing Rab GAP found in a complex with Rab11a and P2XA. CnrF Rab GAP activity for Rab11a is enhanced by the presence of calcium and the EF-hand domain. These findings suggest that P2XA activation results in vacuolar calcium release, which triggers activation of CnrF Rab GAP activity and subsequent downregulation of Rab11a to allow vacuole fusion. PMID:24335649

  6. A novel nuclear export signal in Smad1 is essential for its signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhan; Brownawell, Amy M; Macara, Ian G; Lodish, Harvey F

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the subcellular distributions of Smad proteins, the intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor-beta family cytokines, we examined their sequences for nuclear export signals (NES). We found a leucine-rich NES-like motif (termed NES2) in the central linker region of the receptor-regulated Smads that is absent from the other two classes of Smads (Co-Smads and I-Smads). In microinjection assays, NES2 peptide caused nuclear export of a fused glutathione S-transferase protein. Mutations in NES2 converted Smad1 from an even distribution throughout the cells into an exclusive nuclear localization in both transiently and stably expressing cell lines, and this nuclear enrichment was more pronounced than that induced by mutations in NES1. Furthermore, overexpression of CRM1, the cellular export receptor, transforms Smad1 into a mostly cytoplasmic profile by enhancing its nuclear export. The Smad1 NES2 mutant but not the Smad1 NES1 mutant is mostly resistant to this cytoplasmic targeting, indicating that NES2, not NES1, is the major target for CRM1 in Smad1. We further confirmed the functionality of NES2 by a heterokaryon assay. The Smad1 NES1 mutant displays good ligand responsiveness and moderately lowered transcriptional activity compared with wild type Smad1. In contrast, the Smad1 NES2 mutant shows a severe disruption in reporter gene activation, minimal response to bone morphogenetic protein stimulation, and significantly lowered bone morphogenetic protein-induced phosphorylation, which may be the reason for its deficient transcription activity. Thus, we have defined a major NES in Smad1 that is essential for its ligand-induced coupling with cell surface receptors and hence, transcriptional activity. Our study, along with recent studies of the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Smad2 and Smad3 proteins, demonstrate that continued nucleocytoplasmic shuttling is a common requisite for the active signaling of R-Smads. Although conserved in other R

  7. Effect of prolonged depolarizations on twitch tension and intracellular sodium activity in sheep cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Brill, D M; Fozzard, H A; Makielski, J C; Wasserstrom, J A

    1987-01-01

    1. Twitch tension and intracellular Na+ activity (aiNa) were measured in voltage-clamped sheep cardiac Purkinje fibres. aiNa was measured using Na+-sensitive micro-electrodes filled with the liquid ion exchange resin. ETH 227. The stimulus for contraction was a constant 200 ms depolarizing pulse to 0 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV delivered at 0.25 Hz. Prolonged test pulses for 1.8 s (post-pulses) were applied at the end of the stimulus pulse. The effects of post-pulses on twitch tension and aiNa were examined. 2. Post-pulses in the range of -40 mV reduced twitch tension below control force produced without post-pulse. Progressively more positive post-pulses to levels above 0 mV profoundly increased twitch tension, with a greater than 400% rise in tension at +50 to +60 mV compared to control tension. aiNa declined at positive post-pulse potentials by more than 2 mM at +30 to +40 mV. 3. Tetrodotoxin (100 microM) did not affect the post-pulse voltage-tension or voltage-aiNa relation. Ca2+ channel modulation with nitrendipine (1 microM) similarly did not alter the post-pulse voltage-tension relation. 4. Removal of extracellular Na+ eliminated the nadir in tension at post-pulses to -40 mV and the augmentation of tension at post-pulses above 0 mV. 5. We interpret these findings as evidence of voltage-sensitive Na-Ca exchange promoting net Ca2+ influx and net Na+ efflux during positive post-pulses. The unusual shape of the post-pulse voltage-tension relation curve can be accounted for by a charged-carrier model of electrogenic Na-Ca exchange. The inverse relation between aiNa and twitch tension probably reflects the combined effects of reduced aiNa leak and changes in Na+ and Ca2+ flux via voltage-sensitive Na-Ca exchange. PMID:2443661

  8. The intracellular calcium increase at fertilization in Urechis caupo oocytes: activation without waves.

    PubMed

    Stephano, J L; Gould, M C

    1997-11-01

    The intracellular Ca2+ (Cai) increase at fertilization of the marine worm Urechis caupo (Echiura) was studied with conventional and confocal epifluorescence microscopy in oocytes microinjected with calcium green dextran or dually labeled with the calcium-insensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine dextran. Calcium green fluorescence was also measured with a photomultiplier system while the oocyte membrane potential was recorded and manipulated. The results show that Cai rises simultaneously around the oocyte cortex and peaks slightly later in the nucleoplasm. The Cai rise coincides with the initiation of the fertilization potential and we conclude that it is due primarily to external Ca2+ entering through the voltage-gated Ca2+ action potential channels that open during the fertilization potential because: (1) current clamping the oocyte membrane potential to positive values in the absence of sperm produces a similar Cai increase, (2) external Ca2+ is required, (3) and the confocal images are consistent with this mechanism. External application of sperm acrosomal peptide (P23) also caused a Cai increase that was inhibited in the presence of CoCl2. Cai and pHi (measured with BCECF dextran) were manipulated in experiments employing microinjection of BAPTA (to chelate Cai), external application of NH4Cl (to increase pHi) and CoCl2 (to block Ca2+ channels), and fertilization of eggs in pH 7 seawater (Cai increase without pHi increase). The results showed that increases in both Cai and pHi are required for GVBD; neither alone is sufficient. However, although nuclear and cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels tended to parallel each other in oocytes fertilized at pH 7, and during the initial Cai response in oocytes fertilized at pH 8, there was a disproportionate fluorescence increase in the nucleoplasm of the latter prior to GVBD which could not be explained by any artifact we tested, suggesting there may be a selective increase in nuclear Ca2+ associated with GVBD. Finally

  9. Activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis by intracellular delivery of cytochrome c-based nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome c is an essential mediator of apoptosis when it is released from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. This process normally takes place in response to DNA damage, but in many cancer cells (i.e., cancer stem cells) it is disabled due to various mechanisms. However, it has been demonstrated that the targeted delivery of Cytochrome c directly to the cytoplasm of cancer cells selective initiates apoptosis in many cancer cells. In this work we designed a novel nano-sized smart Cytochrome c drug delivery system to induce apoptosis in cancer cells upon delivery. Results Cytochrome c was precipitated with a solvent-displacement method to obtain protein nanoparticles. The size of the Cytochrome c nanoparticles obtained was 100-300 nm in diameter depending on the conditions used, indicating good potential to passively target tumors by the Enhanced Permeability and Retention effect. The surface of Cytochrome c nanoparticles was decorated with poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid-SH via the linker succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate to prevent premature dissolution during delivery. The linker connecting the polymer to the protein nanoparticle contained a disulfide bond thus allowing polymer shedding and subsequent Cytochrome c release under intracellular reducing conditions. A cell-free caspase-3 assay revealed more than 80% of relative caspase activation by Cytochrome c after nanoprecipitation and polymer modification when compared to native Cytochrome c. Incubation of HeLa cells with the Cytochrome c based-nanoparticles showed significant reduction in cell viability after 6 hours while native Cytochrome c showed none. Confocal microscopy confirmed the induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells when they were stained with 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide after incubation with the Cytochrome c-based nanoparticles. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the coating with a hydrophobic polymer stabilizes Cytochrome c nanoparticles allowing

  10. Intracellular sodium activity and its regulation in guinea-pig atrial myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G X; Schmied, R; Ebner, F; Korth, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Intracellular Na+ activity (aNai) and membrane resting potential were studied in quiescent guinea-pig atrial and papillary muscles by means of Na(+)-sensitive and conventional microelectrodes. The effects of the cardioactive steroid dihydroouabain (DHO) on aiNa, force of contraction and sarcolemmal Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity were also investigated. 2. In thirty atria and twenty-two papillary muscles, aNai amounted to 8.0 +/- 0.2 and 4.7 +/- 0.3 mM, respectively (mean +/- S.E.M.). When both tissues were from the same animal, with the same ion-sensitive microelectrode mean aNai values of 7.9 +/- 0.2 and 5.1 +/- 0.5 mM (P < 0.01) were obtained from eight atrial and eight papillary muscles, respectively. 3. Membrane resting potentials (Em) were significantly (P < 0.001) more negative in the papillary muscles (-83.5 +/- 0.7 mV; n = 8) than in the atrium (-78.1 +/- 0.5 mV; n = 8). Deviation of Em from EK (determined by K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes) was 3.0 +/- 0.2 mV in ventricular (P < 0.05) and 6.1 +/- 0.3 mV in atrial preparations (P < 0.05). 4. Inhibition of the Na+ pump by DHO increased aNai of the atrium within 10 min by 0.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 7), 1.3 +/- 0.1 (n = 5) and 3.2 +/- 0.2 mM (n = 5) at 5, 10 and 30 microM, respectively. In the papillary muscle, 10 microM DHO was without effect while aNai rose by 1.0 +/- 0.1 (n = 5) and 2.9 +/- 0.2 mM (n = 6) at 30 and 120 microM DHO. 5. Consistent with the aNai measurements, the potency of DHO to increase force of the isometric contraction was three times higher in atrium than in papillary muscle (stimulation frequency 0.2 Hz). 6. Hydrolytic activity of sarcolemmal Na+,K(+)-ATPase isolated from atria amounted to only one third of that detected in ventricles (0.07 +/- 0.01, n = 6, versus 0.2 +/- 0.01 mumol phosphate released min-1 (g tissue)-1, n = 5). The inhibitory potencies of DHO on sarcolemmal Na+,K(+)-ATPase preparations were found to be identical in the enzymes from either tissue. 7. It is concluded that a lower Na

  11. Plasma-activated medium-induced intracellular zinc liberation causes death of SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirokazu; Taniguchi, Miko; Kobayashi, Mari; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2015-10-15

    Plasma is an ionized gas consisting of ions, electrons, free radicals, neutral particles, and photons. Plasma-activated medium (PAM), which is prepared by the irradiation of cell-free medium with non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma, induces cell death in various types of cancer cell. Since PAM contains reactive oxygen species (ROS), its anti-cancer effects are thought to be attributable to oxidative stress. Meanwhile, oxidative stress has been shown to induce the liberation of zinc (Zn(2+)) from intracellular Zn(2+) stores and to provoke Zn(2+)-dependent cell death. In this study, we thus examined whether Zn(2+) is involved in PAM-induced cell death using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Exposure to PAM triggered cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. The cell-permeable Zn(2+) chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridinylmethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine (TPEN) protected against PAM-induced cell death. Zn(2+) imaging using the fluorescent Zn(2+) probe FluoZin-3 revealed that PAM elicited a rise of intracellular free Zn(2+). In addition, PAM stimulated PARP-1 activation, mitochondrial ROS generation, and the depletion of intracellular NAD(+) and ATP. These findings suggest that PAM-induced PARP-1 activation causes energy supply exhaustion. Moreover, TPEN suppressed all of these events elicited by PAM. Taken together, we demonstrated here that Zn(2+) released from intracellular Zn(2+) stores serves as a key mediator of PAM-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:26319292

  12. Mitofusin 2 decreases intracellular lipids in macrophages by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun; Ge, Beihai; He, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Kejian; Qian, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Wenzhong; Guo, Xiaomei

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Mfn2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation by activating cholesterol transporters. • PPARγ is involved in the Mfn2-mediated increase of cholesterol transporter expressions. • Inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 is involved in Mfn2-induced PPARγ expression. - Abstract: Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to reveal how Mfn2 functions in the atherosclerosis. Mfn2 expression was found to be significantly reduced in arterial atherosclerotic lesions of both mice and human compared with healthy counterparts. Here, we observed that Mfn2 increased cellular cholesterol transporter expression in macrophages by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, an effect achieved at least partially by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated alterations in cholesterol transporter expression, which may have significant implications for the treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease.

  13. Signal transduction pathways in mast cell granule-mediated endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Smirnova, Irina; Stechschulte, Daniel J; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that incubation of human endothelial cells with mast cell granules results in potentiation of lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. AIMS: The objective of the present study was to identify candidate molecules and signal transduction pathways involved in the synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide on endothelial cell activation. METHODS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with rat mast cell granules in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and IL-6 production was quantified. The status of c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation and intracellular calcium levels were determined to identify the mechanism of synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccaride. RESULTS: Mast cell granules induced low levels of interleukin-6 production by endothelial cells, and this effect was markedly enhanced by lipopolysaccharide. The results revealed that both serine proteases and histamine present in mast cell granules were involved in this activation process. Mast cell granules increased intracellular calcium, and activated c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. The combination of lipopolysaccharide and mast cell granules prolonged c-Jun amino-terminal kinase activity beyond the duration of induction by either stimulant alone and was entirely due to active proteases. However, both proteases and histamine contributed to calcium mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB proteins was of greater magnitude in endothelial cells treated with the combination of mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide. CONCLUSIONS:Mast cell granule serine proteases and histamine can amplify lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial cell activation, which involves calcium mobilization, mitogen-activated

  14. Intracellular signal transduction of PBAN action in the silkworm, Bombyx mori: involvement of acyl CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, R; Matsumoto, S

    1996-03-01

    In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, production of the sex pheromone bombykol is regulated by a neurohormone termed PBAN. We have detected the activity of acyl CoA reductase in the pheromone gland of B. mori by using palmitoyl CoA as a substrate. The acyl CoA reductase requires NADPH, but not NADH, as a proton dono. When the pheromone gland was incubated with the PBAN fragment peptide TKYFSPRLamide, palmitoyl CoA was incorporated and converted into the corresponding C16 alcohols. Radio HPLC analysis revealed that these C16 alcohols were hexadecan-1-ol (81.2%), (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol (12.3%), and (E, Z)-10, 12-hexadecadien-1-ol (= bombykol, 6.5%). The production of C16 alcohols in the pheromone gland was inhibited by the known bombykol biosynthesis inhibitors EDTA, LaCl3, W-7, trifluoperazine, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, NaF and compactin. By contrast, when the pheromone gland homogenate was incubated in the presence of palmitoyl CoA and NADPH, production of C16 alcohols was affected by compactin, W-7 and trifluoperazine, but not by EDTA, LaCl3, p-nitrophenyl phosphate and NaF. These results indicate that compactin, W-7 and trifluoperazine directly suppress the step catalyzed by acyl CoA reductase, whereas EDTA, LaCl3, pNPP, and NaF inhibit bombykol production by affecting other biochemical steps in the signal transduction of PBAN action. The present results also imply that PBAN regulates the step catalyzed by acyl CoA reductase and that palmitoyl CoA could be used as a substrate of the acyl CoA reductase that regulates bombykol biosynthesis. PMID:8900596

  15. Calmodulin activity regulates group I metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signal transduction and synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Ferzin; Zhang, Ming; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Klann, Eric; Autio, Dawn; Cox, Charles L; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), including mGluR1 and mGluR 5 (mGluR1/5), are coupled to Gq and modulate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Direct activation of mGluR1/5 causes protein translation-dependent long-term depression (LTD). Although it has been established that intracellular Ca(2+) and the Gq-regulated signaling molecules are required for mGluR1/5 LTD, whether and how Ca(2+) regulates Gq signaling and upregulation of protein expression remain unknown. Through pharmacological inhibition, we tested the function of the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin (CaM) in intracellular signaling triggered by the activation of mGluR1/5. CaM inhibitor N-[4-aminobutyl]-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W13) suppressed the mGluR1/5-stimulated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p70-S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) in hippocampal neurons. W13 also blocked the mGluR1/5 agonist-induced synaptic depression in hippocampal slices and in anesthetized mice. Consistent with the function of CaM, inhibiting the downstream targets Ca(2+) /CaM-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) blocked ERK1/2 and S6K1 activation. Furthermore, disruption of the CaM-CaMK-ERK1/2 signaling cascade suppressed the mGluR1/5-stimulated upregulation of Arc expression. Altogether, our data suggest CaM as a new Gq signaling component for coupling Ca(2+) and protein upregulation and regulating mGluR1/5-mediated synaptic modification. PMID:26864654

  16. Prostaglandin E2 Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through EP4 Receptor and Intracellular Cyclic AMP in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sokolowska, Milena; Chen, Li-Yuan; Liu, Yueqin; Martinez-Anton, Asuncion; Qi, Hai-Yan; Logun, Carolea; Alsaaty, Sara; Park, Yong Hwan; Kastner, Daniel L; Chae, Jae Jin; Shelhamer, James H

    2015-06-01

    PGE2 is a potent lipid mediator involved in maintaining homeostasis but also promotion of acute inflammation or immune suppression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat-containing protein (NLR)P3 inflammasome plays an important role in host defense. Uncontrolled activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, owing to mutations in the NLRP3 gene, causes cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. In this study, we showed that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is inhibited by PGE2 in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. This effect was mediated through PGE2 receptor subtype 4 (EP4) and an increase in intracellular cAMP, independently of protein kinase A or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP. A specific agonist of EP4 mimicked, whereas its antagonist or EP4 knockdown reversed, PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. PGE2 caused an increase in intracellular cAMP. Blockade of adenylate cyclase by its inhibitor reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Increase of intracellular cAMP by an activator of adenylate cyclase or an analog of cAMP, or a blockade of cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase inhibitor decreased NLRP3 activation. Protein kinase A or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP agonists did not mimic, and their antagonists did not reverse, PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Additionally, constitutive IL-1β secretion from LPS-primed PBMCs of cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes patients was substantially reduced by high doses of PGE2. Moreover, blocking cytosolic phospholipase A2α by its inhibitor or small interfering RNA or inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2, resulting in inhibition of endogenous PGE2 production, caused an increase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 might play a role in maintaining homeostasis during the resolution phase of inflammation and might serve as an autocrine and paracrine regulator. PMID:25917098

  17. Effects of chronic sleep deprivation on autonomic activity by examining heart rate variability, plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium levels.

    PubMed

    Takase, Bonpei; Akima, Takashi; Satomura, Kimio; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Mastui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kurita, Akira

    2004-10-01

    Chronic sleep deprivation is associated with cardiovascular events. In addition, autonomic activity determined from the levels of the heart rate variability (HRV), plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium (Mg) are important in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular events. This study therefore aimed to determine the effects of chronic sleep deprivation on autonomic activity by examining the HRV, plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium levels. Thirty (30) healthy male college students ranging in age from 20 to 24 years of age (average 22 +/- 1 years; mean +/- SD) with no coronary risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia or a family history of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) were included in the study. Over a 4-week period, the volunteers' plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and erythrocyte-Mg were measured. The study was made during the 4 weeks before and immediately after college finals exams. HRV, obtained from 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitoring, included time and frequency domain indices. The HRV indices and erythrocyte-Mg decreased while norepinephrine increased during chronic sleep deprivation. It is concluded that chronic sleep deprivation causes an autonomic imbalance and decreases intracellular Mg, which could be associated with chronic sleep deprivation-induced cardiovascular events. PMID:15754837

  18. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Wang, Minge; Ribeiro, Denise; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Cole, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. This study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on activation of nuclear factor (NF) -κB, a transcription factor that serves a critical role in the inflammatory signaling cascade. Methods In 14 healthy adults (7 females; 7 males), peripheral blood mononuclear cell NF-κB was repeatedly assessed, along with enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, in the morning after baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 h to 03:00 h), and recovery sleep. Results In the morning after a night of sleep loss, mononuclear cell NF-κB activation was significantly greater compared with morning levels following uninterrupted baseline or recovery sleep, in which the response was found in females but not in males. Conclusions These results identify NF-κB activation as a molecular pathway by which sleep disturbance may influence leukocyte inflammatory gene expression and the risk of inflammation-related disease. PMID:18561896

  19. Proteomes of Host Cell Membranes Modified by Intracellular Activities of Salmonella enterica*

    PubMed Central

    Vorwerk, Stephanie; Krieger, Viktoria; Deiwick, Jörg; Hensel, Michael; Hansmeier, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens need to establish a growth-stimulating host niche for survival and replication. A unique feature of the gastrointestinal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is the creation of extensive membrane networks within its host. An understanding of the origin and function of these membranes is crucial for the development of new treatment strategies. However, the characterization of this compartment is very challenging, and only fragmentary knowledge of its composition and biogenesis exists. Here, we describe a new proteome-based approach to enrich and characterize Salmonella-modified membranes. Using a Salmonella mutant strain that does not form this unique membrane network as a reference, we identified a high-confidence set of host proteins associated with Salmonella-modified membranes. This comprehensive analysis allowed us to reconstruct the interactions of Salmonella with host membranes. For example, we noted that Salmonella redirects endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane trafficking to its intracellular niche, a finding that has not been described for Salmonella previously. Our system-wide approach therefore has the potential to rapidly close gaps in our knowledge of the infection process of intracellular pathogens and demonstrates a hitherto unrecognized complexity in the formation of Salmonella host niches. PMID:25348832

  20. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  1. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jeffrey K; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-08-18

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  2. Functionally Active T1-T1 Interfaces Revealed by the Accessibility of Intracellular Thiolate Groups in Kv4 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A.; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K+ channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn2+ coordination. Also, added Zn2+ or a potent Zn2+ chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is ∼200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact α-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1–T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn2+ binding. PMID:15955876

  3. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    1998-12-11

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical ''signatures'' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration, the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can detect, recognize, and

  4. pH-regulated activation and release of a bacteria-associated phospholipase C during intracellular infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Marquis, H; Hager, E J

    2000-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes grows in the cytosol of mammalian cells and spreads from cell to cell without exiting the intracellular milieu. During cell-cell spread, bacteria become transiently entrapped in double-membrane vacuoles. Escape from these vacuoles is mediated in part by a bacterial phospholipase C (PC-PLC), whose activation requires cleavage of an N-terminal peptide. PC-PLC activation occurs in the acidified vacuolar environment. In this study, the pH-dependent mechanism of PC-PLC activation was investigated by manipulating the intracellular pH of the host. PC-PLC secreted into infected cells was immunoprecipitated, and both forms of the protein were identified by SDS-PAGE fluorography. PC-PLC activation occurred at pH 7.0 and lower, but not at pH 7.3. Total amounts of PC-PLC secreted into infected cells increased several-fold over controls within 5 min of a decrease in intracellular pH, and the active form of PC-PLC was the most abundant species detected. Bacterial release of active PC-PLC was dependent on Mpl, a bacterial metalloprotease that processes the proform (proPC-PLC), and did not require de novo protein synthesis. The amount of proPC-PLC released in response to a decrease in pH was the same in wild-type and Mpl-minus-infected cells. Immunofluorescence detection of PC-PLC in infected cells was performed. When fixed and permeabilized infected cells were treated with a bacterial cell wall hydrolase, over 97% of wild-type and Mpl-minus bacteria stained positively for PC-PLC, in contrast to less than 5% in untreated cells. These results indicate that intracellular bacteria carry pools of proPC-PLC. Upon cell-cell spread, a decrease in vacuolar pH triggers Mpl activation of proPC-PLC, resulting in bacterial release of active PC-PLC. PMID:10652090

  5. Microglia Activate Migration of Glioma Cells through a Pyk2 Intracellular Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rolón-Reyes, Kimberleve; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V.; Cubano, Luis A.; Inyushin, Mikhail; Skatchkov, Serguei N.; Eaton, Misty J.; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive and fatal brain cancers due to the highly invasive nature of glioma cells. Microglia infiltrate most glioma tumors and, therefore, make up an important component of the glioma microenvironment. In the tumor environment, microglia release factors that lead to the degradation of the extracellular matrix and stimulate signaling pathways to promote glioma cell invasion. In the present study, we demonstrated that microglia can promote glioma migration through a mechanism independent of extracellular matrix degradation. Using western blot analysis, we found upregulation of proline rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) protein phosphorylated at Tyr579/580 in glioma cells treated with microglia conditioned medium. This upregulation occurred in rodent C6 and GL261 as well as in human glioma cell lines with varying levels of invasiveness (U-87MG, A172, and HS683). siRNA knock-down of Pyk2 protein and pharmacological blockade by the Pyk2/focal-adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor PF-562,271 reversed the stimulatory effect of microglia on glioma migration in all cell lines. A lower concentration of PF-562,271 that selectively inhibits FAK, but not Pyk2, did not have any effect on glioma cell migration. Moreover, with the use of the CD11b-HSVTK microglia ablation mouse model we demonstrated that elimination of microglia in the implanted tumors (GL261 glioma cells were used for brain implantation) by the local in-tumor administration of Ganciclovir, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of Pyk2 at Tyr579/580 in implanted tumor cells. Taken together, these data indicate that microglial cells activate glioma cell migration/dispersal through the pro-migratory Pyk2 signaling pathway in glioma cells. PMID:26098895

  6. Microglia Activate Migration of Glioma Cells through a Pyk2 Intracellular Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rolón-Reyes, Kimberleve; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V; Cubano, Luis A; Inyushin, Mikhail; Skatchkov, Serguei N; Eaton, Misty J; Harrison, Jeffrey K; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive and fatal brain cancers due to the highly invasive nature of glioma cells. Microglia infiltrate most glioma tumors and, therefore, make up an important component of the glioma microenvironment. In the tumor environment, microglia release factors that lead to the degradation of the extracellular matrix and stimulate signaling pathways to promote glioma cell invasion. In the present study, we demonstrated that microglia can promote glioma migration through a mechanism independent of extracellular matrix degradation. Using western blot analysis, we found upregulation of proline rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) protein phosphorylated at Tyr579/580 in glioma cells treated with microglia conditioned medium. This upregulation occurred in rodent C6 and GL261 as well as in human glioma cell lines with varying levels of invasiveness (U-87MG, A172, and HS683). siRNA knock-down of Pyk2 protein and pharmacological blockade by the Pyk2/focal-adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor PF-562,271 reversed the stimulatory effect of microglia on glioma migration in all cell lines. A lower concentration of PF-562,271 that selectively inhibits FAK, but not Pyk2, did not have any effect on glioma cell migration. Moreover, with the use of the CD11b-HSVTK microglia ablation mouse model we demonstrated that elimination of microglia in the implanted tumors (GL261 glioma cells were used for brain implantation) by the local in-tumor administration of Ganciclovir, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of Pyk2 at Tyr579/580 in implanted tumor cells. Taken together, these data indicate that microglial cells activate glioma cell migration/dispersal through the pro-migratory Pyk2 signaling pathway in glioma cells. PMID:26098895

  7. Splice cassette II of Na+,HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 (slc4a7) interacts with calcineurin A: implications for transporter activity and intracellular pH control during rat artery contractions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Andreas A; Parker, Mark D; Lee, Soojung; Boron, Walter F; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2013-03-22

    Activation of Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to intracellular pH (pH(i)) control during artery contraction, but the signaling pathways involved have been unknown. We investigated whether physical and functional interactions between the Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 (slc4a7) and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin exist and play a role for pHi control in VSMCs. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that splice cassette II from the N terminus of NBCn1 interacts with calcineurin Aβ. When cassette II was truncated or mutated to disrupt the putative calcineurin binding motif PTVVIH, the interaction was abolished. Native NBCn1 and calcineurin Aβ co-immunoprecipitated from A7r5 rat VSMCs. A peptide (acetyl-DDIPTVVIH-amide), which mimics the putative calcineurin binding motif, inhibited the co-immunoprecipitation whereas a mutated peptide (acetyl-DDIATAVAA-amide) did not. Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity was investigated in VSMCs of mesenteric arteries after an NH4(+) prepulse. During depolarization with 50 mM extracellular K(+) to raise intracellular [Ca(2+)], Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity was inhibited 20-30% by calcineurin inhibitors (FK506 and cyclosporine A). FK506 did not affect Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity in VSMCs when cytosolic [Ca(2+)] was lowered by buffering, nor did it disrupt binding between NBCn1 and calcineurin Aβ. FK506 augmented the intracellular acidification of VSMCs during norepinephrine-induced artery contractions. No physical or functional interactions between calcineurin Aβ and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 were observed in VSMCs. In conclusion, we demonstrate a physical interaction between calcineurin Aβ and cassette II of NBCn1. Intracellular Ca(2+) activates Na(+),HCO3(-) cotransport activity in VSMCs in a calcineurin-dependent manner which is important for protection against intracellular acidification. PMID:23382378

  8. Chemical development of intracellular protein heterodimerizers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Dominik; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Jacques, Olivier; Wittwer, Matthias B; Ernst, Beat; Constable, Edwin; Zvelebil, Marketa; Beaufils, Florent; Wymann, Matthias P

    2013-04-18

    Cell activation initiated by receptor ligands or oncogenes triggers complex and convoluted intracellular signaling. Techniques initiating signals at defined starting points and cellular locations are attractive to elucidate the output of selected pathways. Here, we present the development and validation of a protein heterodimerization system based on small molecules cross-linking fusion proteins derived from HaloTags and SNAP-tags. Chemical dimerizers of HaloTag and SNAP-tag (HaXS) show excellent selectivity and have been optimized for intracellular reactivity. HaXS force protein-protein interactions and can translocate proteins to various cellular compartments. Due to the covalent nature of the HaloTag-HaXS-SNAP-tag complex, intracellular dimerization can be easily monitored. First applications include protein targeting to cytoskeleton, to the plasma membrane, to lysosomes, the initiation of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, and multiplexed protein complex formation in combination with the rapamycin dimerization system. PMID:23601644

  9. Activation of the rat renin promoter by HOXD10.PBX1b.PREP1, Ets-1, and the intracellular domain of notch.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li; Glenn, Sean T; Jones, Craig A; Gross, Kenneth W

    2005-05-27

    Renin gene expression is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. A comparison of the promoter sequences of the human, rat, and mouse renin genes has revealed a highly conserved sequence homologous to the DNA recognition sequence for CBF1 (CSL/RBP-Jkappa/Su(H)/LAG1/RBPSUH). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays document that As4.1 cell nuclear protein complex binding to the putative rat renin CBF1-binding site (-175 to -168 bp) contains CBF1. Transient transfection analyses in COS-7 cells further document that a CBF1-VP16 fusion protein and the intracellular domain of Notch1 robustly activate a promoter containing multiple copies of the rat renin CBF1-binding site. An Ets-binding site (-143 to -138 bp) has also been identified in the rat renin promoter by sequence comparisons and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Transcription factor Ets-1 is capable of activating the rat renin promoter through the Ets-binding site. Mutation of the CBF-binding site significantly increases transcriptional activity of the rat renin promoter in Calu-6 and COS-7 cells but not in As4.1 cells, whereas mutation of the Ets-binding site reduces promoter activity of the rat renin gene in all three cell lines. Finally, we show that the intracellular domain of Notch1, Ets-1, and HOXD10.PBX1b.PREP1 activate the rat renin promoter cooperatively in COS-7 cells. These results strongly suggest that the renin gene is a downstream target of the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:15792957

  10. Fluorescence Biomembrane Force Probe: Concurrent Quantitation of Receptor-ligand Kinetics and Binding-induced Intracellular Signaling on a Single Cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunfeng; Liu, Baoyu; Ju, Lining; Hong, Jinsung; Ji, Qinghua; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Membrane receptor-ligand interactions mediate many cellular functions. Binding kinetics and downstream signaling triggered by these molecular interactions are likely affected by the mechanical environment in which binding and signaling take place. A recent study demonstrated that mechanical force can regulate antigen recognition by and triggering of the T-cell receptor (TCR). This was made possible by a new technology we developed and termed fluorescence biomembrane force probe (fBFP), which combines single-molecule force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy. Using an ultra-soft human red blood cell as the sensitive force sensor, a high-speed camera and real-time imaging tracking techniques, the fBFP is of ~1 pN (10(-12) N), ~3 nm and ~0.5 msec in force, spatial and temporal resolution. With the fBFP, one can precisely measure single receptor-ligand binding kinetics under force regulation and simultaneously image binding-triggered intracellular calcium signaling on a single live cell. This new technology can be used to study other membrane receptor-ligand interaction and signaling in other cells under mechanical regulation. PMID:26274371

  11. Inflammatory muscle pain is dependent on the activation of kinin B1 and B2 receptors and intracellular kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Meotti, FC; Campos, R; da Silva, KABS; Paszcuk, AF; Costa, R; Calixto, JB

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE B1 and B2 kinin receptors are involved in pain transmission but they may have different roles in the muscle pain induced by intense exercise or inflammation. We investigated the contribution of each of these receptors, and the intracellular pathways involved, in the initial development and maintenance of the muscle pain associated with inflammation-induced tissue damage. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured using the Randall–Selitto apparatus after injecting 5% formalin solution into the gastrocnemius muscle in mice treated with selective antagonists for B1 or B2 receptors. The expression of kinin receptors and cytokines and the activation of intracellular kinases were monitored by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. KEY RESULTS The i.m. injection of formalin induced an overexpression of B1 and B2 receptors. This overexpression was associated with the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by formalin because treatment with B1 receptor antagonists (des-Arg9[Leu8]-BK, DALBK, and SSR240612) or B2 receptor antagonists (HOE 140 and FR173657) prevented the hyperalgesia. Formalin increased myeloperoxidase activity, and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in gastrocnemius. Myeloperoxidase activity and TNF-α mRNA expression were inhibited by either DALBK or HOE 140, whereas IL-6 was inhibited only by HOE 140. The hyperalgesia induced by i.m. formalin was dependent on the activation of intracellular MAPKs p38, JNK and PKC. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Inflammatory muscle pain involves a cascade of events that is dependent on the activation of PKC, p38 and JNK, and the synthesis of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 associated with the up-regulation of both B1 and B2 kinin receptors. PMID:22220695

  12. Functionalized Carbon Quantum Dots with Dopamine for Tyrosinase Activity Monitoring and Inhibitor Screening: In Vitro and Intracellular Investigation.

    PubMed

    Chai, Lujing; Zhou, Jin; Feng, Hui; Tang, Cong; Huang, Yuanyuan; Qian, Zhaosheng

    2015-10-28

    Sensitive assay of tyrosinase (TYR) activity is in urgent demand for both fundamental research and practical application, but the exploration of functional materials with good biocompatibility for its activity evaluation at the intracellular level is still challenging until now. In this work, we develop a convenient and real-time assay with high sensitivity for TYR activity/level monitoring and its inhibitor screening based on biocompatible dopamine functionalized carbon quantum dots (Dopa-CQDs). Dopamine with redox property was functionalized on the surface of carbon quantum dots to construct a Dopa-CQDs conjugate with strong bluish green fluorescence. When the dopamine moiety in Dopa-CQDs conjugate was oxidized to a dopaquinone derivative under specific catalysis of TYR, an intraparticle photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process between CQDs and dopaquinone moiety took place, and then the fluorescence of the conjugate could be quenched simultaneously. Quantitative evaluation of TYR activity was established in terms of the relationship between fluorescence quenching efficiency and TYR activity. The assay covered a broad linear range of up to 800 U/L with a low detection limit of 7.0 U/L. Arbutin, a typical inhibitor of TYR, was chosen as an example to assess its function of inhibitor screening, and positive results were observed that fluorescence quenching extent of the probe was reduced in the presence of arbutin. It is also demonstrated that Dopa-CQD conjugate possesses excellent biocompatibility, and can sensitively monitor intracellular tyrosinase level in melanoma cells and intracellular pH changes in living cells, which provides great potential in application of TYR/pH-associated disease monitoring and medical diagnostics. PMID:26440479

  13. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia. PMID:26946972

  14. Effects of intracellular K+ and Rb+ on gating of embryonic rat telencephalon Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Mienville, J M; Clay, J R

    1996-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of intracellular K+ and Rb+ on single-channel currents recorded from the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ (BK) channel of the embryonic rat telencephalon using the inside-out patch-clamp technique. Our novel observation concerns the effects of these ions on rapid flickering of channel openings. Specifically, flicker gating was voltage dependent, i.e., it was reduced by depolarization in the -60 to -10 mV range with equimolar concentrations of K+ ions (150 Ko+/150 Ki+). Removal of Ki+ resulted in significant flickering at all potentials in this voltage range. In other words, the voltage dependence of flicker gating was effectively eliminated by the removal of Ki+. This suggests that a K+ ion entering the channel from the intracellular medium binds, in a voltage-dependent manner, at a site that locks the flicker gate in its open position. No effects of changes in Ki+ were observed on the primary, voltage-dependent gate of the channel. The change in flickering did not cause a change in the mean burst duration, which indicates that the primary gate is stochastically independent of the flicker gate. Intracellular Rb+ can substitute for--and is even more effective than--Ki+ with regard to suppression of flickering. Substitution of Rbi+ for Ki+ also increased the mean burst duration for V > or = -30 mV. Both effects of Rbi+ were removed by membrane hyperpolarization. PMID:8789094

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Differentially Activates cGAS- and Inflammasome-Dependent Intracellular Immune Responses through ESX-1.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Ruth; Gulen, Muhammet F; Sala, Claudia; Perin, Sonia Garcia; Lou, Ye; Rybniker, Jan; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Cole, Stewart T; Ablasser, Andrea

    2015-06-10

    Cytosolic detection of microbial products is essential for the initiation of an innate immune response against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). During Mtb infection of macrophages, activation of cytosolic surveillance pathways is dependent on the mycobacterial ESX-1 secretion system and leads to type I interferon (IFN) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Whereas the inflammasome regulates IL-1β secretion, the receptor(s) responsible for the activation of type I IFNs has remained elusive. We demonstrate that the cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is essential for initiating an IFN response to Mtb infection. cGAS associates with Mtb DNA in the cytosol to stimulate cyclic GAMP (cGAMP) synthesis. Notably, activation of cGAS-dependent cytosolic host responses can be uncoupled from inflammasome activation by modulating the secretion of ESX-1 substrates. Our findings identify cGAS as an innate sensor of Mtb and provide insight into how ESX-1 controls the activation of specific intracellular recognition pathways. PMID:26048138

  16. An In Vivo Selection Identifies Listeria monocytogenes Genes Required to Sense the Intracellular Environment and Activate Virulence Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an environmental saprophyte and facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen with a well-defined life-cycle that involves escape from a phagosome, rapid cytosolic growth, and ActA-dependent cell-to-cell spread, all of which are dependent on the master transcriptional regulator PrfA. The environmental cues that lead to temporal and spatial control of L. monocytogenes virulence gene expression are poorly understood. In this study, we took advantage of the robust up-regulation of ActA that occurs intracellularly and expressed Cre recombinase from the actA promoter and 5’ untranslated region in a strain in which loxP sites flanked essential genes, so that activation of actA led to bacterial death. Upon screening for transposon mutants that survived intracellularly, six genes were identified as necessary for ActA expression. Strikingly, most of the genes, including gshF, spxA1, yjbH, and ohrA, are predicted to play important roles in bacterial redox regulation. The mutants identified in the genetic selection fell into three broad categories: (1) those that failed to reach the cytosolic compartment; (2) mutants that entered the cytosol, but failed to activate the master virulence regulator PrfA; and (3) mutants that entered the cytosol and activated transcription of actA, but failed to synthesize it. The identification of mutants defective in vacuolar escape suggests that up-regulation of ActA occurs in the host cytosol and not the vacuole. Moreover, these results provide evidence for two non-redundant cytosolic cues; the first results in allosteric activation of PrfA via increased glutathione levels and transcriptional activation of actA while the second results in translational activation of actA and requires yjbH. Although the precise host cues have not yet been identified, we suggest that intracellular redox stress occurs as a consequence of both host and pathogen remodeling their metabolism upon infection. PMID:27414028

  17. An In Vivo Selection Identifies Listeria monocytogenes Genes Required to Sense the Intracellular Environment and Activate Virulence Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Reniere, Michelle L; Whiteley, Aaron T; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an environmental saprophyte and facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen with a well-defined life-cycle that involves escape from a phagosome, rapid cytosolic growth, and ActA-dependent cell-to-cell spread, all of which are dependent on the master transcriptional regulator PrfA. The environmental cues that lead to temporal and spatial control of L. monocytogenes virulence gene expression are poorly understood. In this study, we took advantage of the robust up-regulation of ActA that occurs intracellularly and expressed Cre recombinase from the actA promoter and 5' untranslated region in a strain in which loxP sites flanked essential genes, so that activation of actA led to bacterial death. Upon screening for transposon mutants that survived intracellularly, six genes were identified as necessary for ActA expression. Strikingly, most of the genes, including gshF, spxA1, yjbH, and ohrA, are predicted to play important roles in bacterial redox regulation. The mutants identified in the genetic selection fell into three broad categories: (1) those that failed to reach the cytosolic compartment; (2) mutants that entered the cytosol, but failed to activate the master virulence regulator PrfA; and (3) mutants that entered the cytosol and activated transcription of actA, but failed to synthesize it. The identification of mutants defective in vacuolar escape suggests that up-regulation of ActA occurs in the host cytosol and not the vacuole. Moreover, these results provide evidence for two non-redundant cytosolic cues; the first results in allosteric activation of PrfA via increased glutathione levels and transcriptional activation of actA while the second results in translational activation of actA and requires yjbH. Although the precise host cues have not yet been identified, we suggest that intracellular redox stress occurs as a consequence of both host and pathogen remodeling their metabolism upon infection. PMID:27414028

  18. ROS and intracellular ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kiselyov, Kirill; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known driver of numerous pathological processes involving protein and lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The resulting increase of pro-apoptotic pressure drives tissue damage in a host of conditions, including ischemic stroke and reperfusion injury, diabetes, death in acute pancreatitis and neurodegenerative diseases. Somewhat less frequently discussed, but arguably as important, is the signaling function of oxidative stress stemming from the ability of oxidative stress to modulate ion channel activity. The evidence for the modulation of the intracellular ion channels and transporters by oxidative stress is constantly emerging and such evidence suggests new regulatory and pathological circuits that can be explored towards new treatments for diseases in which oxidative stress is an issue. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the effects of oxidative stress on the intracellular ion channels and transporters and their role in cell function. PMID:26995054

  19. A highly calcium-selective cation current activated by intracellular calcium release in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Delles, C; Haller, T; Dietl, P

    1995-08-01

    1. The whole-cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence microscopy with the Ca2+ indicators fura-2 and fluo-3 were used to measure the whole-cell current and the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. 2. In a Ca(2+)-free bath solution, thapsigargin (TG) caused a transient increase of [Ca2+]i. Subsequent addition of Ca2+ caused a long lasting elevation of [Ca2+]i. 3. In a Ca(2+)-free bath solution, extracellular application of TG, ATP or ionomycin, or intracellular application of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), caused a small but significant inward current (Iin) and a transient outward Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), consistent with intracellular Ca2+ release. Subsequent addition of Ca2+ induced a prominent Iin with a current density of -4.2 +/- 0.7 pA pF-1. This Iin was unaffected by inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (IP4). 4. Na+ replacement by mannitol, N-methyl-D-glucamine+ (NMG+), aminomethylidin-trimethanol+ (Tris+) or choline+ reduced Iin by 54, 65, 52 and 56%, respectively. This indicates an apparent Ca2+ selectivity over Na+ of 26:1. Iin was, however, unaffected by replacing Cl- with gluconate- or by the K+ channel blocker charybdotoxin (CTX). 5. Iin was completely blocked by La3+ (IC50 = 0.77 microM). Consistently, La3+ completely reversed the TG-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. SK&F 96365 (1-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-propoxyl]-1-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-ethyl-1H-im idazole) HCl did not inhibit the TG-induced Iin. It did, however, exhibit a biphasic effect on [Ca2+]i, consisting of an initial Ca2+ decay and a subsequent Ca2+ elevation. La3+ completely reversed the SK&F 96365-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i. 6. In the absence of Na+, Iin was dependent on the bath Ca2+ concentration (EC50 = 1.02 mM). Ca2+ replacement by Ba2+ or Mn2+ resulted in a reduction of Iin by 95 and 94%, respectively. 7. From these experiments we conclude that Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, induced by different independent

  20. New Constitutively Active Phytochromes Exhibit Light-Independent Signaling Activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, A-Reum; Lee, Si-Seok; Han, Yun-Jeong; Shin, Ah-Young; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Young Soon; Lee, Keun Woo; Nagatani, Akira; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-08-01

    Plant phytochromes are photoreceptors that mediate a variety of photomorphogenic responses. There are two spectral photoisomers, the red light-absorbing Pr and far-red light-absorbing Pfr forms, and the photoreversible transformation between the two forms is important for the functioning of phytochromes. In this study, we isolated a Tyr-268-to-Val mutant of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsYVA) that displayed little photoconversion. Interestingly, transgenic plants of AsYVA showed light-independent phytochrome signaling with a constitutive photomorphogenic (cop) phenotype that is characterized by shortened hypocotyls and open cotyledons in the dark. In addition, the corresponding Tyr-303-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phytochrome B (AtYVB) exhibited nuclear localization and interaction with phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3) independently of light, conferring a constitutive photomorphogenic development to its transgenic plants, which is comparable to the first constitutively active version of phytochrome B (YHB; Tyr-276-to-His mutant). We also found that chromophore ligation was required for the light-independent interaction of AtYVB with PIF3. Moreover, we demonstrated that AtYVB did not exhibit phytochrome B activity when it was localized in the cytosol by fusion with the nuclear export signal and that AsYVA exhibited the full activity of phytochrome A when localized in the nucleus by fusion with the nuclear localization signal. Furthermore, the corresponding Tyr-269-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis phytochrome A (AtYVA) exhibited similar cop phenotypes in transgenic plants to AsYVA. Collectively, these results suggest that the conserved Tyr residues in the chromophore-binding pocket play an important role during the Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion of phytochromes, providing new constitutively active alleles of phytochromes by the Tyr-to-Val mutation. PMID:27325667

  1. High-intensity physical exercise disrupts implicit memory in mice: involvement of the striatal glutathione antioxidant system and intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, A S; Boemer, G; Rial, D; Cordova, F M; Mancini, G; Walz, R; de Bem, A F; Latini, A; Leal, R B; Pinho, R A; Prediger, R D S

    2010-12-29

    Physical exercise is a widely accepted behavioral strategy to enhance overall health, including mental function. However, there is controversial evidence showing brain mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage and decreased neurotrophin levels after high-intensity exercise, which presumably worsens cognitive performance. Here we investigated learning and memory performance dependent on different brain regions, glutathione antioxidant system, and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), serine/threonine protein kinase (AKT), cAMP response element binding (CREB) and dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP)-32 signaling in adult Swiss mice submitted to 9 weeks of high-intensity exercise. The exercise did not alter the animals' performance in the reference and working memory versions of the water maze task. On the other hand, we observed a significant impairment in the procedural memory (an implicit memory that depends on basal ganglia) accompanied by a reduced antioxidant capacity and ERK1/2 and CREB signaling in this region. In addition, we found increased striatal DARPP-32-Thr-75 phosphorylation in trained mice. These findings indicate an increased vulnerability of the striatum to high-intensity exercise associated with the disruption of implicit memory in mice and accompanied by alteration of signaling proteins involved in the plasticity of this brain structure. PMID:20888397

  2. Cooperativity between MAPK and PI3K signaling activation is required for glioblastoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vitucci, Mark; Karpinich, Natalie O.; Bash, Ryan E.; Werneke, Andrea M.; Schmid, Ralf S.; White, Kristen K.; McNeill, Robert S.; Huff, Byron; Wang, Sophie; Van Dyke, Terry; Miller, C. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) genomes feature recurrent genetic alterations that dysregulate core intracellular signaling pathways, including the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint and the MAPK and PI3K effector arms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Elucidation of the phenotypic consequences of activated RTK effectors is required for the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Methods Genetically defined, G1/S checkpoint-defective cortical murine astrocytes with constitutively active Kras and/or Pten deletion mutations were used to systematically investigate the individual and combined roles of these 2 RTK signaling effectors in phenotypic hallmarks of glioblastoma pathogenesis, including growth, migration, and invasion in vitro. A novel syngeneic orthotopic allograft model system was used to examine in vivo tumorigenesis. Results Constitutively active Kras and/or Pten deletion mutations activated both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Their combination led to maximal growth, migration, and invasion of G1/S-defective astrocytes in vitro and produced progenitor-like transcriptomal profiles that mimic human proneural GBM. Activation of both RTK effector arms was required for in vivo tumorigenesis and produced highly invasive, proneural-like GBM. Conclusions These results suggest that cortical astrocytes can be transformed into GBM and that combined dysregulation of MAPK and PI3K signaling revert G1/S-defective astrocytes to a primitive gene expression state. This genetically-defined, immunocompetent model of proneural GBM will be useful for preclinical development of MAPK/PI3K-targeted, subtype-specific therapies. PMID:23814263

  3. Intracellular Zn2+ accumulation enhances suppression of synaptic activity following spreading depolarization.

    PubMed

    Carter, Russell E; Seidel, Jessica L; Lindquist, Britta E; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C William

    2013-06-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a feed-forward wave that propagates slowly throughout brain tissue and recovery from SD involves substantial metabolic demand. Presynaptic Zn(2+) release and intracellular accumulation occurs with SD, and elevated intracellular Zn(2+) ([Zn(2+) ]i ) can impair cellular metabolism through multiple pathways. We tested here whether increased [Zn(2+) ]i could exacerbate the metabolic challenge of SD, induced by KCl, and delay recovery in acute murine hippocampal slices. [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD, by transient ZnCl2 application with the Zn(2+) ionophore pyrithione (Zn/Pyr), delayed recovery of field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a concentration-dependent manner, prolonged DC shifts, and significantly increased extracellular adenosine accumulation. These effects could be due to metabolic inhibition, occurring downstream of pyruvate utilization. Prolonged [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation prior to SD was required for effects on fEPSP recovery and consistent with this, endogenous synaptic Zn(2+) release during SD propagation did not delay recovery from SD. The effects of exogenous [Zn(2+) ]i loading were also lost in slices preconditioned with repetitive SDs, implying a rapid adaptation. Together, these results suggest that [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD can provide significant additional challenge to brain tissue, and could contribute to deleterious effects of [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation in a range of brain injury models. PMID:23495967

  4. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  5. Subcellular optogenetic activation of Cdc42 controls local and distal signaling to drive immune cell migration

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Patrick R.; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N.

    2016-01-01

    Migratory immune cells use intracellular signaling networks to generate and orient spatially polarized responses to extracellular cues. The monomeric G protein Cdc42 is believed to play an important role in controlling the polarized responses, but it has been difficult to determine directly the consequences of localized Cdc42 activation within an immune cell. Here we used subcellular optogenetics to determine how Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell affects both cell behavior and dynamic molecular responses throughout the cell. We found that localized Cdc42 activation is sufficient to generate polarized signaling and directional cell migration. The optically activated region becomes the leading edge of the cell, with Cdc42 activating Rac and generating membrane protrusions driven by the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 also exerts long-range effects that cause myosin accumulation at the opposite side of the cell and actomyosin-mediated retraction of the cell rear. This process requires the RhoA-activated kinase ROCK, suggesting that Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell triggers increased RhoA signaling at the opposite side. Our results demonstrate how dynamic, subcellular perturbation of an individual signaling protein can help to determine its role in controlling polarized cellular responses. PMID:26941336

  6. Subcellular optogenetic activation of Cdc42 controls local and distal signaling to drive immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Patrick R; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N

    2016-05-01

    Migratory immune cells use intracellular signaling networks to generate and orient spatially polarized responses to extracellular cues. The monomeric G protein Cdc42 is believed to play an important role in controlling the polarized responses, but it has been difficult to determine directly the consequences of localized Cdc42 activation within an immune cell. Here we used subcellular optogenetics to determine how Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell affects both cell behavior and dynamic molecular responses throughout the cell. We found that localized Cdc42 activation is sufficient to generate polarized signaling and directional cell migration. The optically activated region becomes the leading edge of the cell, with Cdc42 activating Rac and generating membrane protrusions driven by the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 also exerts long-range effects that cause myosin accumulation at the opposite side of the cell and actomyosin-mediated retraction of the cell rear. This process requires the RhoA-activated kinase ROCK, suggesting that Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell triggers increased RhoA signaling at the opposite side. Our results demonstrate how dynamic, subcellular perturbation of an individual signaling protein can help to determine its role in controlling polarized cellular responses. PMID:26941336

  7. Intracellular Antioxidant Activity of Grape Skin Polyphenolic Extracts in Rat Superficial Colonocytes: In situ Detection by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, M Elena; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Schettino, Trifone; Caricato, Roberto; Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Lionetto, M Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Colon is exposed to a number of prooxidant conditions and several colon diseases are associated with increased levels of reactive species. Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in the diet, but to date no information is available about their absorption and potential intracellular antioxidant activity on colon epithelial cells. The work was addressed to study the intracellular antioxidant activity of red grape polyphenolic extracts on rat colon epithelium experimentally exposed to prooxidant conditions. The experimental model chosen was represented by freshly isolated colon explants, which closely resemble the functional, and morphological characteristics of the epithelium in vivo. The study was carried out by in situ confocal microscopy observation on CM-H2DCFDA charged explants exposed to H2O2 (5, 10, and 15 min). The qualitative and quantitative polyphenolic composition of the extracts as well as their in vitro oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) was determined. The incubation of the explants with the polyphenolic extracts for 1 h produced a significant decrease of the H2O2 induced fluorescence. This effect was more pronounced following 15 min H2O2 exposure with respect to 5 min and it was also more evident for extracts obtained from mature grapes, which showed an increased ORAC value and qualitative peculiarities in the polyphenolic composition. The results demonstrated the ability of red grape polyphenols to cross the plasma membrane and exert a direct intracellular antioxidant activity in surface colonocytes, inducing a protection against pro-oxidant conditions. The changes in the polyphenol composition due to ripening process was reflected in a more effective antioxidant protection. PMID:27303304

  8. Intracellular Antioxidant Activity of Grape Skin Polyphenolic Extracts in Rat Superficial Colonocytes: In situ Detection by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, M. Elena; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Schettino, Trifone; Caricato, Roberto; Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Lionetto, M. Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Colon is exposed to a number of prooxidant conditions and several colon diseases are associated with increased levels of reactive species. Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in the diet, but to date no information is available about their absorption and potential intracellular antioxidant activity on colon epithelial cells. The work was addressed to study the intracellular antioxidant activity of red grape polyphenolic extracts on rat colon epithelium experimentally exposed to prooxidant conditions. The experimental model chosen was represented by freshly isolated colon explants, which closely resemble the functional, and morphological characteristics of the epithelium in vivo. The study was carried out by in situ confocal microscopy observation on CM-H2DCFDA charged explants exposed to H2O2 (5, 10, and 15 min). The qualitative and quantitative polyphenolic composition of the extracts as well as their in vitro oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) was determined. The incubation of the explants with the polyphenolic extracts for 1 h produced a significant decrease of the H2O2 induced fluorescence. This effect was more pronounced following 15 min H2O2 exposure with respect to 5 min and it was also more evident for extracts obtained from mature grapes, which showed an increased ORAC value and qualitative peculiarities in the polyphenolic composition. The results demonstrated the ability of red grape polyphenols to cross the plasma membrane and exert a direct intracellular antioxidant activity in surface colonocytes, inducing a protection against pro-oxidant conditions. The changes in the polyphenol composition due to ripening process was reflected in a more effective antioxidant protection. PMID:27303304

  9. Arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular calcium homeostasis induces head kidney macrophage apoptosis involving the activation of calpain-2 and ERK in Clarias batrachus

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Goswami, Ramansu; Datta, Soma; Rajagopal, R.; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2011-10-01

    We had earlier shown that exposure to arsenic (0.50 {mu}M) caused caspase-3 mediated head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis involving the p38-JNK pathway in Clarias batrachus. Here we examined the roles of calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) and extra-cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), the other member of MAPK-pathway on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involved increased expression of ERK and calpain-2. Nifedipine, verapamil and EGTA pre-treatment inhibited the activation of calpain-2, ERK and reduced arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis as evidenced from reduced caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-FITC-propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining. Pre-incubation with ERK inhibitor U 0126 inhibited the activation of calpain-2 and interfered with arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Additionally, pre-incubation with calpain-2 inhibitor also interfered with the activation of ERK and inhibited arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and diphenyleneiodonium chloride also inhibited ERK activation indicating activation of ERK in arsenic-exposed HKM also depends on signals from NADPH oxidase pathway. Our study demonstrates the critical role of Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. We suggest that arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels initiates pro-apoptotic ERK and calpain-2; the two pathways influence each other positively and induce caspase-3 mediated HKM apoptosis. Besides, our study also indicates the role of ROS in the activation of ERK pathway in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis in C. batrachus. - Highlights: > Altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis leads to arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Calpain-2 plays a critical role in the process. > ERK is pro-apoptotic in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involves cross talk between calpain-2 and ERK.

  10. Coincident signalling between the Gi/Go-coupled delta-opioid receptor and the Gq-coupled m3 muscarinic receptor at the level of intracellular free calcium in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Yeo, A; Samways, D S; Fowler, C E; Gunn-Moore, F; Henderson, G

    2001-03-01

    In SH-SY5Y cells, activation of delta-opioid receptors with [D-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE; 1 microM) did not alter the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i). However, when DPDPE was applied during concomitant Gq-coupled m3 muscarinic receptor stimulation by carbachol or oxotremorine-M, it produced an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). The DPDPE-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was abolished when the carbachol-sensitive intracellular Ca(2+) store was emptied. There was a marked difference between the concentration-response relationship for the elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) by carbachol (EC(50) 13 microM, Hill slope 1) and the concentration-response relationship for carbachol's permissive action in revealing the delta-opioid receptor-mediated elevation of [Ca(2+)] (EC(50) 0.7 mM; Hill slope 1.8). Sequestration of free G protein beta gamma dimers by transient transfection of cells with a beta gamma binding protein (residues 495-689 of the C terminal tail of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2) reduced the ability of delta opioid receptor activation to elevate [Ca(2+)](i). However, DPDPE did not elevate either basal or oxotremorine-M-evoked inositol phosphate production indicating that delta-opioid receptor activation did not stimulate phospholipase C. Furthermore, delta-opioid receptor activation did not result in the reversal of muscarinic receptor desensitization, membrane hyperpolarization or stimulation of sphingosine kinase. There was no coincident signalling between the delta-opioid receptor and the lysophosphatidic acid receptor which couples to elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in SH-SY5Y cells by a PLC-independent mechanism. In SH-SY5Y cells the coincident signalling between the endogenously expressed delta-opioid and m3 muscarinic receptors appears to occur in the receptor activation-Ca(2+) release signalling pathway at a step after the activation of phospholipase C. PMID:11259487

  11. Conjugated Bilirubin Differentially Regulates CD4+ T Effector Cells and T Regulatory Cell Function through Outside-In and Inside-Out Mechanisms: The Effects of HAV Cell Surface Receptor and Intracellular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Corral-Jara, Karla F; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge L; Realpe, Mauricio; Panduro, Arturo; Gómez-Leyva, Juan F; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported an immune-modulatory role of conjugated bilirubin (CB) in hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. During this infection the immune response relies on CD4+ T lymphocytes (TLs) and it may be affected by the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor (HAVCR1/TIM-1) on T cell surface. How CB might affect T cell function during HAV infection remains to be elucidated. Herein, in vitro stimulation of CD4+ TLs from healthy donors with CB resulted in a decrease in the degree of intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation and an increase in the activity of T regulatory cells (Tregs) expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1. A comparison between CD4+ TLs from healthy donors and HAV-infected patients revealed changes in the TCR signaling pathway relative to changes in CB levels. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ TLs increased in patients with low CB serum levels and an increase in the percentage of Tregs expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1 was found in HAV-infected patients relative to controls. A low frequency of 157insMTTTVP insertion in the viral receptor gene HAVCR1/TIM-1 was found in patients and controls. Our data revealed that, during HAV infection, CB differentially regulates CD4+ TLs and Tregs functions by modulating intracellular pathways and by inducing changes in the proportion of Tregs expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1. PMID:27578921

  12. Conjugated Bilirubin Differentially Regulates CD4+ T Effector Cells and T Regulatory Cell Function through Outside-In and Inside-Out Mechanisms: The Effects of HAV Cell Surface Receptor and Intracellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Corral-Jara, Karla F.; Gómez-Leyva, Juan F.; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Roman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported an immune-modulatory role of conjugated bilirubin (CB) in hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. During this infection the immune response relies on CD4+ T lymphocytes (TLs) and it may be affected by the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor (HAVCR1/TIM-1) on T cell surface. How CB might affect T cell function during HAV infection remains to be elucidated. Herein, in vitro stimulation of CD4+ TLs from healthy donors with CB resulted in a decrease in the degree of intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation and an increase in the activity of T regulatory cells (Tregs) expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1. A comparison between CD4+ TLs from healthy donors and HAV-infected patients revealed changes in the TCR signaling pathway relative to changes in CB levels. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ TLs increased in patients with low CB serum levels and an increase in the percentage of Tregs expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1 was found in HAV-infected patients relative to controls. A low frequency of 157insMTTTVP insertion in the viral receptor gene HAVCR1/TIM-1 was found in patients and controls. Our data revealed that, during HAV infection, CB differentially regulates CD4+ TLs and Tregs functions by modulating intracellular pathways and by inducing changes in the proportion of Tregs expressing HAVCR1/TIM-1. PMID:27578921

  13. Interaction between cAMP and intracellular Ca(2+)-signaling pathways during odor-perception and adaptation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Meena Sriti; Martin, Jean-René

    2016-09-01

    Binding of an odorant to olfactory receptors triggers cascades of second messenger systems in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). Biochemical studies indicate that the transduction mechanism at ORNs is mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and/or inositol,1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3)-signaling pathways in an odorant-dependent manner. However, the interaction between these two second messenger systems during olfactory perception or adaptation processes is much less understood. Here, we used interfering-RNAi to disrupt the level of cAMP alone or in combination with the InsP3-signaling pathway cellular targets, InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) or ryanodine receptor (RyR) in ORNs, and quantify at ORN axon terminals in the antennal lobe, the odor-induced Ca(2+)-response. In-vivo functional bioluminescence Ca(2+)-imaging indicates that a single 5s application of an odor increased Ca(2+)-transients at ORN axon terminals. However, compared to wild-type controls, the magnitude and duration of ORN Ca(2+)-response was significantly diminished in cAMP-defective flies. In a behavioral assay, perception of odorants was defective in flies with a disrupted cAMP level suggesting that the ability of flies to correctly detect an odor depends on cAMP. Simultaneous disruption of cAMP level and InsP3R or RyR further diminished the magnitude and duration of ORN response to odorants and affected the flies' ability to detect an odor. In conclusion, this study provides functional evidence that cAMP and InsP3-signaling pathways act in synergy to mediate odor processing within the ORN axon terminals, which is encoded in the magnitude and duration of ORN response. PMID:27212269

  14. Bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) selectively stimulate intracellular calcium signaling in different cat iris sphincter cells.

    PubMed

    Spada, Clayton S; Krauss, Achim H-P; Woodward, David F; Chen, June; Protzman, Charles E; Nieves, Amelia L; Wheeler, Larry A; Scott, David F; Sachs, George

    2005-01-01

    Bimatoprost is a synthetic analog of prostaglandin F(2 alpha) ethanolamide (prostamide F(2 alpha)), and shares a pharmacological profile consistent with that of the prostamides. Like prostaglandin F(2 alpha) carboxylic acid, bimatoprost potently lowers intraocular pressure in dogs, primates and humans. In order to distinguish its mechanism of action from prostaglandin F(2 alpha), fluorescence confocal microscopy was used to examine the effects of bimatoprost, prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and 17-phenyl prostaglandin F(2 alpha) on calcium signaling in resident cells of digested cat iris sphincter, a tissue which exhibits contractile responses to both agonists. Constant superfusion conditions obviated effective conversion of bimatoprost. Serial challenge with 100 nM bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) consistently evoked responses in different cells within the same tissue preparation, whereas prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and 17-phenyl prostaglandin F(2 alpha) elicited signaling responses in the same cells. Bimatoprost-sensitive cells were consistently re-stimulated with bimatoprost only, and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) sensitive cells could only be re-stimulated with prostaglandin F(2 alpha). The selective stimulation of different cells in the same cat iris sphincter preparation by bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha), along with the complete absence of observed instances in which the same cells respond to both agonists, strongly suggests the involvement of distinct receptors for prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and bimatoprost. Further, prostaglandin F(2 alpha) but not bimatoprost potently stimulated calcium signaling in isolated human embryonic kidney cells stably transfected with the feline- and human-prostaglandin F(2 alpha) FP-receptor and in human dermal fibroblast cells, and only prostaglandin F(2 alpha) competed with radioligand binding in HEK-feFP cells. These studies provide further evidence for the existence of a bimatoprost-sensitive receptor that is distinct from

  15. A novel exon in the human Ca2+-activated Cl- channel Ano1 imparts greater sensitivity to intracellular Ca2.

    PubMed

    Strege, Peter R; Bernard, Cheryl E; Mazzone, Amelia; Linden, David R; Beyder, Arthur; Gibbons, Simon J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-11-01

    Anoctamin 1 (Ano1; TMEM16A) is a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CACC) expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal. The mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates Ano1 are incompletely understood. In the gastrointestinal tract, Ano1 is required for normal slow wave activity and is involved in regulating cell proliferation. Splice variants of Ano1 have varying electrophysiological properties and altered expression in disease states. Recently, we identified a transcript for human Ano1 containing a novel exon-"exon 0" upstream of and in frame with exon 1. The electrophysiological properties of this longer Ano1 isoform are unknown. Our aim was to determine the functional contribution of the newly identified exon to the Ca(2+) sensitivity and electrophysiological properties of Ano1. Constructs with [Ano1(+0)] or without [Ano1(-0)] the newly identified exon were transfected into human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology was used to determine voltage- and time-dependent parameters of whole cell Cl(-) currents between isoforms with varying concentrations of intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular anions, or Cl(-) channel inhibitors. We found that exon 0 did not change voltage sensitivity and had no impact on the relative permeability of Ano1 to most anions. Ano1(+0) exhibited greater changes in current density but lesser changes in kinetics than Ano1(-0) in response to varying intracellular Ca(2+). The CACC inhibitor niflumic acid inhibited current with greater efficacy and higher potency against Ano1(+0) compared with Ano1(-0). Likewise, the Ano1 inhibitor T16Ainh-A01 reduced Ano1(+0) more than Ano1(-0). In conclusion, human Ano1 containing exon 0 imparts its Cl(-) current with greater sensitivity to intracellular Ca(2+) and CACC inhibitors. PMID:26359375

  16. Disfacilitation and active inhibition in the neocortex during the natural sleep-wake cycle: An intracellular study

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Igor; Grenier, François; Steriade, Mircea

    2001-01-01

    Earlier extracellular recordings during natural sleep have shown that, during slow-wave sleep (SWS), neocortical neurons display long-lasting periods of silence, whereas they are tonically active and discharge at higher rates during waking and sleep with rapid eye movements (REMs). We analyzed the nature of long-lasting periods of neuronal silence in SWS and the changes in firing rates related to ocular movements during REM sleep and waking using intracellular recordings from electrophysiologically identified neocortical neurons in nonanesthetized and nonparalyzed cats. We found that the silent periods during SWS are associated with neuronal hyperpolarizations, which are due to a mixture of K+ currents and disfacilitation processes. Conventional fast-spiking neurons (presumably local inhibitory interneurons) increased their firing rates during REMs and eye movements in waking. During REMs, the firing rates of regular-spiking neurons from associative areas decreased and intracellular traces revealed numerous, short-lasting, low-amplitude inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs), that were reversed after intracellular chloride infusion. In awake cats, regular-spiking neurons could either increase or decrease their firing rates during eye movements. The short-lasting IPSPs associated with eye movements were still present in waking; they preceded the spikes and affected their timing. We propose that there are two different forms of firing rate control: disfacilitation induces long-lasting periods of silence that occur spontaneously during SWS, whereas active inhibition, consisting of low-amplitude, short-lasting IPSPs, is prevalent during REMs and precisely controls the timing of action potentials in waking. PMID:11172052

  17. Viral binding-induced signaling drives a unique and extended intracellular trafficking pattern during infection of primary monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Heon; Collins-McMillen, Donna; Caposio, Patrizia; Yurochko, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    We initiated experiments to examine the infection of monocytes postentry. New data show that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA is detected in the nucleus beginning only at 3 d postinfection in monocytes, compared with 30 min postinfection in fibroblasts and endothelial cells, suggesting that HCMV nuclear translocation in monocytes is distinct from that seen in other cell types. We now show that HCMV is initially retained in early endosomes and then moves sequentially to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes before nuclear translocatio