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Sample records for activate mapks ap-1

  1. Tiron Inhibits UVB-Induced AP-1 Binding Sites Transcriptional Activation on MMP-1 and MMP-3 Promoters by MAPK Signaling Pathway in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Guo, Jia-Hui; Tu, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Zhang, Quan-Wu; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Recent research found that Tiron was an effective antioxidant that could act as the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger or alleviate the acute toxic metal overload in vivo. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Tiron on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 expression in human dermal fibroblast cells. Western blot and ELISA analysis revealed that Tiron inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced protein expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed that Tiron could inhibit UVB-induced mRNA expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Furthermore, Tiron significantly blocked UVB-induced activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and activator protein (AP)-1 in the downstream of this transduction pathway in fibroblasts. Through the AP-1 binding site mutation, it was found that Tiron could inhibit AP-1-induced upregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression through blocking AP-1 binding to the AP-1 binding sites in the MMP-1 and MMP-3 promoter region. In conclusion, Tiron may be a novel antioxidant for preventing and treating skin photoaging UV-induced. PMID:27486852

  2. Tiron Inhibits UVB-Induced AP-1 Binding Sites Transcriptional Activation on MMP-1 and MMP-3 Promoters by MAPK Signaling Pathway in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Zhang, Quan-Wu; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Recent research found that Tiron was an effective antioxidant that could act as the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger or alleviate the acute toxic metal overload in vivo. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Tiron on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 expression in human dermal fibroblast cells. Western blot and ELISA analysis revealed that Tiron inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced protein expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed that Tiron could inhibit UVB-induced mRNA expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Furthermore, Tiron significantly blocked UVB-induced activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and activator protein (AP)-1 in the downstream of this transduction pathway in fibroblasts. Through the AP-1 binding site mutation, it was found that Tiron could inhibit AP-1-induced upregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression through blocking AP-1 binding to the AP-1 binding sites in the MMP-1 and MMP-3 promoter region. In conclusion, Tiron may be a novel antioxidant for preventing and treating skin photoaging UV-induced. PMID:27486852

  3. IL-1β and IL-6 activate inflammatory responses of astrocytes against Naegleria fowleri infection via the modulation of MAPKs and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-H; Song, A-R; Sohn, H-J; Lee, J; Yoo, J-K; Kwon, D; Shin, H-J

    2013-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba, has been found in diverse habitats throughout the world. It causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in children and young adults. The amoeba attaches to nasal mucosa, migrates along olfactory nerves and enters the brain. Astrocytes are involved in the defence against infection and produce inflammatory responses. In this study, we focus on the mechanism of immune responses in astrocytes. We showed, using RNase protection assay, RT-PCR and ELISA in an in vitro culture system, that N. fowleri lysates induce interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and IL-6 expression of astrocytes. In addition, cytokine levels of astrocytes gradually decreased due to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 inhibitors. To determine the transcription factor, we used transcription inhibitor (AP-1 inhibitor), which downregulated IL-1β and IL-6 expression. These results show that AP-1 is related to IL-1β and IL-6 production. N. fowleri-mediated IL-1β and IL-6 expression requires ERK, JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation in astrocytes. These findings show that N. fowleri-stimulated astrocytes in an in vitro culture system lead to AP-1 activation and the subsequent expressions of IL-1β and IL-6, which are dependent on ERK, JNK and p38 MAPKs activation. These results may imply that proinflammatory cytokines have important roles in inflammatory responses to N. fowleri infection.

  4. Citrus bergamia Juice Extract Attenuates β-Amyloid-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Activation of THP-1 Cells Through MAPK and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Currò, Monica; Risitano, Roberto; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Cirmi, Santa; Gangemi, Chiara; Caccamo, Daniela; Ientile, Riccardo; Navarra, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to be effective in protecting against age-related cognitive and motor decline in both in vitro and in vivo models. Recently, a flavonoid-rich extract of Citrus bergamia juice (BJe) has been shown to display anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties against LPS-induced activation of human THP-1 monocytes. In the light of these observations, we wondered whether BJe may be beneficial against neuroinflammatory processes, such as those observed in Alzheimer’s disease. To this aim we used THP-1 monocytes to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial potential of BJe against amyloid-beta1–42 (Aβ1−42) -mediated inflammation. Exposure of THP-1 cells to Aβ1−42 significantly induced the expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β in THP-1 cells and increased the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 as well as p46 and p54 members of JNK family. Moreover, Aβ1−42 raises AP-1 DNA binding activity in THP-1-treated cells. Interestingly, all these effects were reduced in the presence of BJe. Our data indicate that BJe may effectively counteract the pro-inflammatory activation of monocytes/microglial cells exposed to amyloid fibrils, suggesting a promising role as a natural drug against neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:26853104

  5. Citrus bergamia Juice Extract Attenuates β-Amyloid-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Activation of THP-1 Cells Through MAPK and AP-1 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Currò, Monica; Risitano, Roberto; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Cirmi, Santa; Gangemi, Chiara; Caccamo, Daniela; Ientile, Riccardo; Navarra, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to be effective in protecting against age-related cognitive and motor decline in both in vitro and in vivo models. Recently, a flavonoid-rich extract of Citrus bergamia juice (BJe) has been shown to display anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties against LPS-induced activation of human THP-1 monocytes. In the light of these observations, we wondered whether BJe may be beneficial against neuroinflammatory processes, such as those observed in Alzheimer's disease. To this aim we used THP-1 monocytes to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial potential of BJe against amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42) -mediated inflammation. Exposure of THP-1 cells to Aβ1-42 significantly induced the expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β in THP-1 cells and increased the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 as well as p46 and p54 members of JNK family. Moreover, Aβ1-42 raises AP-1 DNA binding activity in THP-1-treated cells. Interestingly, all these effects were reduced in the presence of BJe. Our data indicate that BJe may effectively counteract the pro-inflammatory activation of monocytes/microglial cells exposed to amyloid fibrils, suggesting a promising role as a natural drug against neuroinflammatory processes.

  6. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits AP-1 activation by basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Toru; Higa, Shinji; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Maezaki, Naoyoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio . E-mail: ttanak@imed3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    Flavonoids including luteolin, apigenin, and fisetin are inhibitors of IL-4 synthesis and CD40 ligand expression by basophils. This study was done to search for compounds with greater inhibitory activity of IL-4 expression and to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which flavonoids inhibit their expression. Of the 37 flavonoids and related compounds examined, ayanin, luteolin, and apigenin were the strongest inhibitors of IL-4 production by purified basophils in response to anti-IgE antibody plus IL-3. Luteolin did not suppress Syk or Lyn phosphorylation in basophils, nor did suppress p54/46 SAPK/JNK, p38 MAPK, and p44/42 MAPK activation by a basophilic cell line, KU812 cells, stimulated with A23187 and PMA. However, luteolin did inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun and DNA binding activity of AP-1 in nuclear lysates from stimulated KU812 cells. These results provide a fundamental structure of flavonoids for IL-4 inhibition and demonstrate a novel action of flavonoids that suppresses the activation of AP-1.

  7. Retinoic acid receptors inhibit AP1 activation by regulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase and CBP recruitment to an AP1-responsive promoter.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, Madjid; Brand, Céline; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-07-01

    Retinoids exhibit antineoplastic activities that may be linked to retinoid receptor-mediated transrepression of activating protein 1 (AP1), a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of fos- and jun-related proteins. Here we show that transcriptional activation of an AP1-regulated gene through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (MAPK(ERK)) is characterized, in intact cells, by a switch from a fra2-junD dimer to a junD-fosB dimer loading on its promoter and by simultaneous recruitment of ERKs, CREB-binding protein (CBP), and RNA polymerase II. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) receptor (RAR) was tethered constitutively to the AP1 promoter. AP1 transrepression by retinoic acid was concomitant to glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation, negative regulation of junD hyperphosphorylation, and to decreased RNA polymerase II recruitment. Under these conditions, fra1 loading to the AP1 response element was strongly increased. Importantly, CBP and ERKs were excluded from the promoter in the presence of atRA. AP1 transrepression by retinoids was RAR and ligand dependent, but none of the functions required for RAR-mediated transactivation was necessary for AP1 transrepression. These results indicate that transrepressive effects of retinoids are mediated through a mechanism unrelated to transcriptional activation, involving the RAR-dependent control of transcription factors and cofactor assembly on AP1-regulated promoters.

  8. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  9. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and response to pathogen infection in the Hong Kong oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis).

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Li, Jun; Qi, Lin; Yang, Zhang; Kong, Xiaoyu; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), a downstream target of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, plays a major role in stimulating the synthesis of immune effector molecules during innate immune responses. We have characterized ChAP-1, an AP-1-like protein in Crassostrea hongkongensis that is a member of the AP-1 family of proteins. ChAP-1 is composed of 290 amino acid residues with a Jun and bZIP domain at the N- and C-termini, respectively, a structure similar to that of known Ap-1 proteins. ChAP-1 mRNA is expressed in several tissues analyzed, with highest expression in the mantle. Expression of ChAP-1 increases in response to Vibrio alginolyticus, Salmo haemolyticus or Salmo cerevisiae infection and, despite the location of GFP-tagged full-length ChAP-1 protein in the cytoplasm, ChAP-1 activates the transcription of an L8G5-luc reporter gene, and its over-expression can also activate the AP-1-Luc reporter gene in HEK293T cells.

  10. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Firoze . E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu; Kannan, Subburaj; Wang Jianling

    2006-01-15

    Signaling mechanisms in aniline-induced fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen are not known. Previous studies have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron accumulation and oxidative stress in the spleen, which may cause activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and regulate the transcription of genes involved in fibrosis and/or tumorigenesis. To test this, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline via drinking water for 30 days, and activation of transcription factor AP-1 was determined in the splenocyte nuclear extracts (NEs). AP-1 DNA-binding activity in the NEs of freshly isolated splenocytes from aniline-treated rats increased in comparison to the controls, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). AP-1 binding was also determined in the NEs of cultured splenocytes (2 h and 24 h), which showed even a greater increase in binding activity at 2 h. The specificity of AP-1 binding for relevant DNA motifs was confirmed by competition EMSA and by supershift EMSA using antibodies specific to c-Jun and c-Fos. To further explore the signaling mechanisms in the AP-1 activation, phosphorylation patterns of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Aniline exposure induced increases in the phosphorylation of the three classes of MAPKs: extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2), and p38 MAPKs. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression showed a 3-fold increase in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. These observations suggest a strong association among MAPK phosphorylation, AP-1 activation, and enhanced TGF-{beta}1 gene expression. The observed sequence of events subsequent to aniline exposure could regulate genes that lead to fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  11. Phosphorylation of c-Fos by members of the p38 MAPK family. Role in the AP-1 response to UV light.

    PubMed

    Tanos, Tamara; Marinissen, Maria Julia; Leskow, Federico Coluccio; Hochbaum, Daniel; Martinetto, Horacio; Gutkind, J Silvio; Coso, Omar A

    2005-05-13

    Exposure to sources of UV radiation, such as sunlight, induces a number of cellular alterations that are highly dependent on its ability to affect gene expression. Among them, the rapid activation of genes coding for two subfamilies of proto-oncoproteins, Fos and Jun, which constitute the AP-1 transcription factor, plays a key role in the subsequent regulation of expression of genes involved in DNA repair, cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, death by apoptosis, and tissue and extracellular matrix remodeling proteases. Besides being regulated at the transcriptional level, Jun and Fos transcriptional activities are also regulated by phosphorylation as a result of the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. In this regard, the phosphorylation of c-Jun by UV-induced JNK has been readily documented, whereas a role for Fos proteins in UV-mediated responses and the identification of Fos-activating kinases has remained elusive. Here we identify p38 MAPKs as proteins that can associate with c-Fos and phosphorylate its transactivation domain both in vitro and in vivo. This phosphorylation is transduced into changes in its transcriptional ability as p38-activated c-Fos enhances AP1-driven gene expression. Our findings indicate that as a consequence of the activation of stress pathways induced by UV light, endogenous c-Fos becomes a substrate of p38 MAPKs and, for the first time, provide evidence that support a critical role for p38 MAPKs in mediating stress-induced c-Fos phosphorylation and gene transcription activation. Using a specific pharmacological inhibitor for p38alpha and -beta, we found that most likely these two isoforms mediate UV-induced c-Fos phosphorylation in vivo. Thus, these newly described pathways act concomitantly with the activation of c-Jun by JNK/MAPKs, thereby contributing to the complexity of AP1-driven gene transcription regulation.

  12. ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN UROTSA CELLS BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN UROTSA CELLS BY METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS. Z Drobna1, I Jaspers2, D J Thomas3 and M Styblo1. 1Department of Pediatrics; 2Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

  13. AP-1-Targeting Anti-Inflammatory Activity of the Methanolic Extract of Persicaria chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Young-Jin; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Yang, Woo Seok; Park, Jae Gwang; Kim, Han Gyung; Chung, Woo-Jae; Yoon, Keejung; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, Persicaria chinensis L. has been prescribed to cure numerous inflammatory disorders. We previously analyzed the bioactivity of the methanol extract of this plant (Pc-ME) against LPS-induced NO and PGE2 in RAW264.7 macrophages and found that it prevented HCl/EtOH-induced gastric ulcers in mice. The purpose of the current study was to explore the molecular mechanism by which Pc-ME inhibits activator protein- (AP-) 1 activation pathway and mediates its hepatoprotective activity. To investigate the putative therapeutic properties of Pc-ME against AP-1-mediated inflammation and hepatotoxicity, lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW264.7 and U937 cells, a monocyte-like human cell line, and an LPS/D-galactosamine- (D-GalN-) induced acute hepatitis mouse model were employed. The expression of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was significantly diminished by Pc-ME. Moreover, Pc-ME reduced AP-1 activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation in both LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and differentiated U937 cells. Additionally, we highlighted the hepatoprotective and curative effects of Pc-ME pretreated orally in a mouse model of LPS/D-GalN-intoxicated acute liver injury by demonstrating the significant reduction in elevated serum AST and ALT levels and histological damage. Therefore, these results strongly suggest that Pc-ME could function as an antihepatitis remedy suppressing MAPK/AP-1-mediated inflammatory events. PMID:25878717

  14. Geniposide suppresses LPS-induced nitric oxide, PGE2 and inflammatory cytokine by downregulating NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qinghai; Cao, Jinjun; Fang, Li; Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Zhengxiang; Ran, Jihua; Zheng, Xinchuan; Li, Xiaoling; Zhou, Yu; Ge, Di; Zhang, Hongming; Wang, Li; Ran, Ying; Fu, Jianfeng

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory responses are important to host immune reactions, but uncontrolled inflammatory mediators may aid in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory diseases. Geniposide, an iridoid glycoside found in the herb gardenia, is believed to have broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory effects in murine models but its mechanism of action is unclear. We investigated the action of this compound in murine macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as the stimulation of macrophages by LPS is known to induce inflammatory reactions. We determined the effect of geniposide on LPS-induced production of the inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the mRNA and protein expression of the NO and PGE2 synthases, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively, and the mRNA and protein expression of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and activator protein (AP)-1 activity were assayed. To understand the action of geniposide on the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, we studied the effect of NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors on the LPS-induced production of NO, PGE2 and TNF-α. Our findings clearly showed that geniposide mainly exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the LPS-induced NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages, which subsequently reduces overexpression of the inducible enzymes iNOS and COX-2 and suppresses the expression and release of the inflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6, NO and PGE2. Thus, geniposide shows promise as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24735815

  15. Geniposide suppresses LPS-induced nitric oxide, PGE2 and inflammatory cytokine by downregulating NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qinghai; Cao, Jinjun; Fang, Li; Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Zhengxiang; Ran, Jihua; Zheng, Xinchuan; Li, Xiaoling; Zhou, Yu; Ge, Di; Zhang, Hongming; Wang, Li; Ran, Ying; Fu, Jianfeng

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory responses are important to host immune reactions, but uncontrolled inflammatory mediators may aid in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory diseases. Geniposide, an iridoid glycoside found in the herb gardenia, is believed to have broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory effects in murine models but its mechanism of action is unclear. We investigated the action of this compound in murine macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as the stimulation of macrophages by LPS is known to induce inflammatory reactions. We determined the effect of geniposide on LPS-induced production of the inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the mRNA and protein expression of the NO and PGE2 synthases, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively, and the mRNA and protein expression of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and activator protein (AP)-1 activity were assayed. To understand the action of geniposide on the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, we studied the effect of NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors on the LPS-induced production of NO, PGE2 and TNF-α. Our findings clearly showed that geniposide mainly exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the LPS-induced NF-κB, MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in macrophages, which subsequently reduces overexpression of the inducible enzymes iNOS and COX-2 and suppresses the expression and release of the inflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6, NO and PGE2. Thus, geniposide shows promise as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases.

  16. Cinnamoyloxy-mammeisin Isolated from Geopropolis Attenuates Inflammatory Process by Inhibiting Cytokine Production: Involvement of MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Marcelo; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Silva, Rangel Leal; Colón, David F; Bassi, Gabriel Shimizu; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Alves-Filho, José C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Beutler, John A; Cunha, Thiago Mattar

    2016-07-22

    Chemical compounds belonging to the class of coumarins have promising anti-inflammatory potential. Cinnamoyloxy-mammeisin (CNM) is a 4-phenylcoumarin that can be isolated from Brazilian geopropolis. To our knowledge, its anti-inflammatory activity has never been studied. Therefore, the present study investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of CNM and elucidated its mechanism of action on isolated macrophages. Pretreatment with CNM reduced neutrophil migration into the peritoneal and joint cavity of mice. Likewise, CNM reduced the in vitro and in vivo release of TNF-α and CXCL2/MIP-2. Regarding the possible molecular mechanism of action, CNM reduced the phosphorylation of proteins ERK 1/2, JNK, p38 MAPK, and AP-1 (subunit c-jun) in PG-stimulated macrophages. Pretreatment with CNM also reduced NF-κB activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages stably expressing the NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene. On the other hand, it did not alter IκBα degradation or nuclear translocation of p65. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate promising anti-inflammatory activity of CNM and provide an explanation of its mechanism of action in macrophages via inhibition of MAPK signaling, AP-1, and NF-κB. PMID:27367493

  17. The FUS3 MAPK signaling pathway of the citrus pathogen Alternaria alternata functions independently or cooperatively with the fungal redox-responsive AP1 regulator for diverse developmental, physiological and pathogenic processes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Yang, Siwy Ling; Wang, Nan-Yi; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2010-04-01

    Alternaria alternata, the fungus that causes citrus brown spot, invades its hosts primarily through the production and action of a host-selective ACT toxin that kills citrus cells prior to invasion. In this study, we show that, in the tangerine pathotype of A. alternata, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signaling pathway governs a number of biological functions, either separately or in a cooperative manner, with the AaAP1 gene encoding a transcription regulator. The reported MAPK is encoded by the AaFUS3 gene, which we show to be necessary for conidial development, resistance to copper fungicides, melanin biosynthesis, and particularly, for elaboration of the penetration process. In contrast, AaFUS3 negatively controls salt tolerance and production of several hydrolytic enzymes. AaFUS3 has no apparent role in the biosynthesis of host-selective toxin or in resistance to oxidative stress. Both AaAP1 and AaFUS3 are required for fungal resistance to 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP), diethyl maleate (DEM), and many pyridine-containing compounds. A strain with mutations in both AaAP1 and AaFUS3 displayed an increased sensitivity to these compounds. Expression of the AaAP1 and AaFUS3 genes and phosphorylation of AaFUS3 were also induced by CHP, DEM, or TIBA. Expression of two genes coding for a putative MFS transporter was coordinately regulated by AaAP1 and AaFUS3. The AaAP1::sGFP (synthetic green fluorescent protein) fusion protein became localized in the nucleus in response to CHP or TIBA. Inactivation of the AaAP1 gene, however, promoted phosphorylation of AaFUS3. Taken together, our results indicate that A. alternata utilizes specialized or synergistic regulatory interactions between the AP1 and MAPK signaling pathways for diverse physiological functions.

  18. Retinoic acid-induced AP-1 transcriptional activity regulates B16 mouse melanoma growth inhibition and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Boskovic, Goran; Niles, Richard M

    2003-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) inhibits growth and induces differentiation of B16 mouse melanoma cells. These effects are accompanied by a large increase in PKCalpha mRNA and protein levels and surprisingly an increase in activating protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional activity. To further investigate the RA-induced AP-1 activity we established clones of B16 cells stably expressing an AP-1-luciferase reporter gene. Treatment of these clones with phorbol dibutyrate increased AP-1 activity which peaked at 2-4 h and returned to baseline level by 24 h. In contrast, RA treatment resulted in a slow increase in AP-1 activity that reached a maximum level at 48 h and was maintained for the duration of the treatment. We tested the importance of the RA-induced AP-1 activity by establishing clones which stably express a dominant negative fos gene (A-fos) and have greatly diminished AP-1 activity. Growth rates of untreated A-fos expressing cells were similar to wt B16 and clones not expressing A-fos. However, clones expressing the dominant-negative fos had a markedly decreased sensitivity to RA-induced inhibition of anchorage-dependent and -independent growth. Treatment of wt B16 cells for 48 h with RA increased melanin production by two to fourfold, but this effect was completely lost in the A-fos clones. The ability of RA to induce RARbeta and PKCalpha expression was retained in A-fos clones, suggesting that A-fos was not interfering with RAR transcription activation functions. We tested whether the RA-induced AP-1 activity might be mediated by the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation stimulated AP-1 activity, which was not additive to that induced by RA. This finding raises the possibility that this MAPK pathway may be a target of retinoid action. Our observations suggest that AP-1 transcriptional activity induced by RA likely plays an important role in the biological changes mediated by this retinoid in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:12494454

  19. Human TMEM174 that is highly expressed in kidney tissue activates AP-1 and promotes cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pingzhang; Sun, Bo; Hao, Dongxia; Zhang, Xiujun; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2010-04-16

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play an important role in regulation of AP-1 activity through the phosphorylation of distinct substrates. In the present study, we identified a novel protein, TMEM174, whose RNA transcripts are highly expressed in human kidney tissue. TMEM174 is comprised of 243 amino acids, and contains two predicted transmembrane helices which determine its subcellular localization in endoplasmic reticulum and influences its functions. Over-expression of TMME174 enhanced the transcriptional activity of AP-1 and promoted cell proliferation, whereas the truncated mutant TMEM174{Delta}TM without the transmembrane regions did not retain these functions. The possible mechanism of activation of AP-1 by TMEM174 was further examined. Our results suggest the potential role of TMEM174 in renal development and physiological function.

  20. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation. PMID:26404494

  1. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-09-25

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation.

  2. Activation of transcriptional activities of AP-1 and SRE by a new zinc-finger protein ZNF641

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Xingzhu; Li Yongqing; Xiao Jing; Yuan Wuzhou; Yan Yan; Wang Yuequn; Liang Shuyuan; Zhu Chuanbing; Chen Yingduan; Liu Mingyao . E-mail: mliu@ibt.tamhsc.edu; Wu Xiushan

    2006-01-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are evolutionarily conserved enzymes in cell signal transduction connecting cell-surface receptors to critical regulatory targets within cells and control cell survival, adaptation, and proliferation. Previous studies revealed that zinc-finger proteins are involved in the regulation of the MAPK signaling pathways. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel human zinc-finger protein, ZNF641. The cDNA of ZNF641 is 4.9 kb, encoding 438 amino acids in the nucleus. The protein is highly conserved in evolution across different vertebrate species from mouse to human. Northern blot analysis indicates that ZNF641 is expressed in most of the examined human tissues, with a high level in skeletal muscle. Overexpression of pCMV-Tag2B-ZNF641 in the COS-7 cells activates the transcriptional activities of AP-1 and SRE. Deletion analysis indicates that the linker between KRAB box and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-type zinc-fingers represents the basal activation domain. These results suggest that ZNF641 may be a positive regulator in MAPK-mediated signaling pathways that lead to the activation of AP-1 and SRE.

  3. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Trim7 mediates c-Jun/AP-1 activation by Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Diefenbacher, Markus E.; Mylona, Anastasia; Kassel, Olivier; Behrens, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun/AP-1 transcription factor controls key cellular behaviours, including proliferation and apoptosis, in response to JNK and Ras/MAPK signalling. While the JNK pathway has been well characterised, the mechanism of activation by Ras was elusive. Here we identify the uncharacterised ubiquitin ligase Trim7 as a critical component of AP-1 activation via Ras. We found that MSK1 directly phosphorylates Trim7 in response to direct activation by the Ras–Raf–MEK–ERK pathway, and this modification stimulates Trim7 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Trim7 mediates Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the AP-1 coactivator RACO-1, leading to RACO-1 protein stabilisation. Consequently, Trim7 depletion reduces RACO-1 levels and AP-1-dependent gene expression. Moreover, transgenic overexpression of Trim7 increases lung tumour burden in a Ras-driven cancer model, and knockdown of Trim7 in established xenografts reduces tumour growth. Thus, phosphorylation-ubiquitination crosstalk between MSK1, Trim7 and RACO-1 completes the long sought-after mechanism linking growth factor signalling and AP-1 activation. PMID:25851810

  4. DEP-induced fra-1 expression correlates with a distinct activation of AP-1-dependent gene transcription in the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Kleeberger, Steven R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies indicate a potential role for Fra-1, a heterodimeric partner of activator protein (AP)-1, in toxicant-induced epithelial injury, repair, and cellular transformation. Here we have investigated the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on fra-1 expression in C10 cells, a murine lung epithelial cell line. DEP markedly upregulated fra-1, but not fra-2, expression. The increase in fra-1 mRNA expression correlated well with its protein- and DNA-binding activity. DNA-binding assays also revealed a predominant presence of Jun-B and Jun-D in the AP-1 complex. Interestingly, DEP did not alter Jun-B and Jun-D protein levels. Transcriptional analysis revealed that fra-1 induction is regulated in part at the transcriptional level. The -379 to +32 bp 5'-flanking region mediated this induction. Furthermore, inhibitors of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) significantly suppressed DEP-stimulated fra-1 transcription, suggesting their involvement in the induction process. Consistent with this finding, DEP stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 MAPKs with a distinct activation pattern. Overexpression of Fra-1 downregulated c-Jun and Nrf2 enhanced AP-1- and ARE-mediated reporter gene expression, respectively. In contrast, Fra-1 had the opposite effect on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 promoter activity. In particular, it bound to the functional AP-1 site of the MMP-9 promoter after DEP stimulation. Consistent with this result, DEP also markedly upregulated MMP-9 promoter activity. Collectively, these findings suggest that fra-1 induction by DEP may play a role in selectively regulating gene expression involved in alveolar epithelial cell injury and repair. PMID:14565943

  5. 5-Methoxyl Aesculetin Abrogates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation by Suppressing MAPK and AP-1 Pathways in RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Li, Xueqin; Wu, Haifeng; Long, Wei; Jiang, Xiaojian; Shen, Ting; Qiang, Qian; Si, Chuanling; Wang, Xinfeng; Jiang, Yunyao; Hu, Weicheng

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a pale amorphous coumarin derivative, 5-methoxyl aesculetin (MOA), was isolated from the dried bark of Fraxinus rhynchophylla Hance (Oleaceae). MOA modulates cytokine expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, but the precise mechanisms are still not fully understood. We determined the effects of MOA on the production of inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the LPS-induced inflammatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophages. MOA significantly inhibited the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. It also effectively attenuated inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression and significantly decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. It inhibited phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), thus blocking nuclear translocation of activation protein (AP)-1. In a molecular docking study, MOA was shown to target the binding site of ERK via the formation of three hydrogen bonds with two residues of the kinase, which is sufficient for the inhibition of ERK. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of MOA in RAW 264.7 macrophages derive from its ability to block both the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and one of their downstream transcription factors, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Our observations support the need for further research into MOA as a promising therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases. PMID:26938526

  6. Up-regulation of interleukin-4 production via NF-AT/AP-1 activation in T cells by biochanin A, a phytoestrogen and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin; Chung, Su Wol; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung . E-mail: tskim@korea.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Phytoestrogens are naturally occurring compounds derived from plants. Although phytoestrogens exhibit many biological functions including estrogen agonist/antagonist properties, the effect on allergic responses remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether biochanin A, a phytoestrogen and its metabolites, genistein, p-ethylphenol and phenolic acid, affect production of IL-4, a pro-inflammatory cytokine closely associated with allergic immune responses, in primary CD4{sup +} T cells and EL4 T lymphoma cells. Biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol significantly enhanced IL-4 production from both CD4{sup +} T cells and EL4 cells in a dose-dependent manner, while phenolic acid did not. Biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol also enhanced IL-4 gene promoter activity in EL4 cells transiently transfected with IL-4 promoter constructs, but this effect was impaired in EL4 cells transfected with an IL-4 promoter construct deleted of a P4 site carrying NF-AT and AP-1 binding sites. In addition, biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol increased both NF-AT and AP-1 DNA binding activities, indicating that they might enhance IL-4 production via NF-AT/AP-1 activation. Furthermore, biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and PKC activity, while they did not affect ERK phosphorylation. The enhanced NF-AT DNA binding activities were suppressed by inhibitors for PI3-K and PKC, but not by p38 MAPK inhibitors. In contrast, the enhanced AP-1 DNA binding activities and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were significantly suppressed by specific inhibitors for PKC and p38 MAPK, but not by PI3-K inhibitors. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol enhance IL-4 production in activated T cells by two independent pathways, PI3-K/PKC/NF-AT and PKC/p38 MAPK/AP-1.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of proanthocyanidin-rich red rice extract via suppression of MAPK, AP-1 and NF-κB pathways in Raw 264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yodkeeree, Supachai; Pitchakarn, Pornsiri; Punfa, Wanisa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Several pharmacological properties of red rice extract have been reported including anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and reduced cancer cell invasion. This study was conducted to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of red rice extract on the production of inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced Raw 264.7 macrophages. MATERIALS/METHODS Pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 were determined by ELISA and cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was evaluated using western blot analysis. In addition, the signaling pathway controlling the inflammatory cascade such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), activator proteins-1 (AP-1), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was determined. RESULTS Our results showed that red rice polar extract fraction (RR-P), but not non-polar extract fraction, inhibited interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and nitric oxide production in LPS-induced Raw 264.7 cells. RR-P also reduced the expression of inflammatory enzymes, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2. In addition, activation of AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factor in the nucleus was abrogated by RR-P. RR-P inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK signaling responsible for the expression of inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells. Based on chemical analysis, high amounts of proanthocyanidin and catechins were detected in the RR-P fraction. However, only proanthocyanidin reduced NF-κB and AP-1 activation in LPS-activated Raw 264.7 cells. CONCLUSION These observations suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of RR-P may stem from the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators via suppression of the AP-1, NF-κB, and MAPKs pathways. PMID:27247720

  8. Coactivator MBF1 preserves the redox-dependent AP-1 activity during oxidative stress in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Marek; Gaziova, Ivana; Uhlirova, Mirka; Okabe, Masataka; Hiromi, Yasushi; Hirose, Susumu

    2004-01-01

    Basic leucine zipper proteins Jun and Fos form the dimeric transcription factor AP-1, essential for cell differentiation and immune and antioxidant defenses. AP-1 activity is controlled, in part, by the redox state of critical cysteine residues within the basic regions of Jun and Fos. Mutation of these cysteines contributes to oncogenic potential of Jun and Fos. How cells maintain the redox-dependent AP-1 activity at favorable levels is not known. We show that the conserved coactivator MBF1 is a positive modulator of AP-1. Via a direct interaction with the basic region of Drosophila Jun (D-Jun), MBF1 prevents an oxidative modification (S-cystenyl cystenylation) of the critical cysteine and stimulates AP-1 binding to DNA. Cytoplasmic MBF1 translocates to the nucleus together with a transfected D-Jun protein, suggesting that MBF1 protects nascent D-Jun also in Drosophila cells. mbf1-null mutants live shorter than mbf1+ controls in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). An AP-1-dependent epithelial closure becomes sensitive to H2O2 in flies lacking MBF1. We conclude that by preserving the redox-sensitive AP-1 activity, MBF1 provides an advantage during oxidative stress. PMID:15306851

  9. Expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) family members in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor is believed to be important in tumorigenesis and altered AP-1 activity was associated with cell transformation. We aimed to assess the potential role of AP-1 family members as novel biomarkers in breast cancer. Methods We studied the expression of AP-1 members at the mRNA level in 72 primary breast tumors and 37 adjacent non-tumor tissues and evaluated its correlation with clinicopathological parameters including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu status. Expression levels of Ubiquitin C (UBC) were used for normalization. Protein expression of AP-1 members was assessed using Western blot analysis in a subset of tumors. We used student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, logistic regression and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for statistical analyses. Results We found significant differences in the expression of AP-1 family members between tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues for all AP-1 family members except Fos B. Fra-1, Fra-2, Jun-B and Jun-D mRNA levels were significantly higher in tumors compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001), whilst c-Fos and c-Jun mRNA levels were significantly lower in tumors compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001). In addition, Jun-B overexpression had outstanding discrimination ability to differentiate tumor tissues from adjacent non-tumor tissues as determined by ROC curve analysis. Moreover, Fra-1 was significantly overexpressed in the tumors biochemically classified as ERα negative (p = 0.012) and PR negative (p = 0.037). Interestingly, Fra-1 expression was significantly higher in triple-negative tumors compared with luminal carcinomas (p = 0.01). Conclusions Expression levels of Fra-1 and Jun-B might be possible biomarkers for prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:24073962

  10. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN HUMAN BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY INORGANIC AND METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential Activation of AP-1 in Human Bladder Epithelial Cells by Inorganic and Methylated Arsenicals

    Zuzana Drobna, Ilona Jaspers, David J. Thomas, and Miroslav Styblo

    ABSTRACT

    Epidemiological studies have linked chronic ingestion of drinking water contai...

  11. Eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol suppress LPS-induced iNOS expression by down-regulating NF-kappaB AND AP-1 through inhibition of MAPKS and AKT/IkappaBalpha signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J L; Hsu, J H; Hong, Y S; Wu, J R; Liang, J C; Wu, B N; Chen, I J; Liou, S F

    2011-01-01

    Eugenol and isoeugenol, two components of clover oil, have been reported to possess several biomedical properties, such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects. This study aims to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol, isoeugenol and four of their derivatives on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7), and to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. We found that two derivatives, eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol, had potent inhibitory effects on LPS-induced upregulation of nitrite levels, iNOS protein and iNOS mRNA. In addition, they both suppressed the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induced by LPS. Moreover, they both attenuated the DNA binding of NF-kB and AP-1, phosphorylation of inhibitory kB-alpha (IkB-alpha), and nuclear translocation of p65 protein induced by LPS. Finally, we demonstrated that glyceryl-isoeugenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK, whereas eugenolol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these results suggest that that eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol suppress LPS-induced iNOS expression by down-regulating NF-kB and AP-1 through inhibition of MAPKs and Akt/IkB-alpha signaling pathways. Thus, this study implies that eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol may provide therapeutic benefits for inflammatory diseases.

  12. Molecular targets of the antiinflammatory Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw): inhibition of TNFα and COX-2 gene expression by preventing activation of AP-1.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, Bernd L; Muñoz, Eduardo; Rose, Thorsten; Weiss, Gabriele; McGregor, Gerard P

    2012-06-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens (Hp) is often used in the supportive treatment of inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the skeletal system. Although the clinical efficacy in osteoarthritis has been demonstrated in clinical trials, the molecular target(s) of Hp are unclear. This study quantified the effects of the ethanol Hp extract (60% v/v ethanol, sole active ingredient of Pascoe®-Agil), on the expression and release of the major pro-inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated human monocytes and the intracellular signalling pathways involved in inflammation. The Hp extract dose-dependently inhibited the release of TNFα as well as that of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂). The Hp prevented TNFα and IL-6 mRNA expression in human monocytes and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, the Hp extract inhibited LPS-stimulated AP-1-mediated gene transcription activity and binding to the AP-1 response elements. The extract had no effect on the LPS-induced binding of nuclear factor-κB in RAW 264.7 cells, on LPS-induced degradation of IκBα or on LPS-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), p38MAPK and JNK in human monocytes. The data indicate that a standardized ethanol Hp extract inhibits induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression, possibly by blocking the AP-1 pathway. This is novel evidence of a possible mechanism of action of this antiinflammatory drug. PMID:22072539

  13. o,p'-DDT induces cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in murine macrophages: Role of AP-1 and CRE promoter elements and PI3-kinase/Akt/MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hyung-Kyun; Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-12-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been used as an insecticide to prevent the devastation of malaria in tropical zones. However, many reports suggest that DDT may act as an endocrine disruptor and may have possible carcinogenic effects. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) acts as a link between inflammation and carcinogenesis through its involvement in tumor promotion. In the present study, we examined the effect of o,p'-DDT on COX-2 gene expression and analyzed the molecular mechanism of its activity in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. Exposure to o,p'-DDT markedly enhanced the production of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major COX-2 metabolite, in murine macrophages. Furthermore, o,p'-DDT dose-dependently increased the levels of COX-2 protein and mRNA. Transfection with human COX-2 promoter construct, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNA-affinity protein-binding assay experiments revealed that o,p'-DDT activated the activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cyclic AMP response element (CRE) sites, but not the NF-{kappa}B site. Phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3)-kinase, its downstream signaling molecule, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) were also significantly activated by the o,p'-DDT-induced AP-1 and CRE activation. These results demonstrate that o,p'-DDT induced COX-2 expression via AP-1 and CRE activation through the PI3-K/Akt/ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinase pathways. These findings provide further insight into the signal transduction pathways involved in the carcinogenic effects of o,p'-DDT.

  14. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies. PMID:23293292

  15. Exogenous avian leukosis virus-induced activation of the ERK/AP1 pathway is required for virus replication and correlates with virus-induced tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Manman; Feng, Min; Ye, Yu; Wu, Xiaochan; Liu, Di; Liao, Ming; Cao, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    A proteomics approach was used to reveal the up-regulated proteins involved in the targeted mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway in DF-1 cells after ALV subgroup J (ALV-J) infection. Next, we found that ALV-J CHN06 strain infection of DF-1 cells correlated with extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) activation, which was mainly induced within 15 min, a very early stage of infection, and at a late infection stage, from 108 h to 132 h post-infection. Infection with other ALV subgroup (A/B) strains also triggered ERK/MAPK activation. Moreover, when activating ERK2, ALV subgroups A, B and J simultaneously induced the phosphorylation of c-Jun, an AP1 family member and p38 activation but had no obvious effect on JNK activation at either 15 min or 120 h. Interestingly, only PD98059 inhibited the ALV-induced c-Jun phosphorylation while SP600125 or SB203580 had no influence on c-Jun activation. Furthermore, the viral gp85 and gag proteins were found to contribute to ERK2/AP1 activation. Additionally, the specific ERK inhibitor, PD980509, significantly suppressed ALV replication, as evidenced by extremely low levels of ALV promoter activity and ALV-J protein expression. In vivo analysis of ERK2 activation in tumor cells derived from ALV-J-infected chicken demonstrated a strong correlation between ERK/MAPK activation and virus-associated tumorigenesis. PMID:26754177

  16. Src Tyrosine Kinase Activation by 4-Hydroxynonenal Upregulates p38, ERK/AP-1 Signaling and COX-2 Expression in YPEN-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Ji; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Park, Daeui; Kim, Dae Hyun; Choi, Yeon Ja; Chung, Ki Wung; Park, Min Hi; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2015-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major end product of lipid peroxidation, is highly reactive and involved in various cellular processes, such as inflammatory signaling. However, to date, the mechanistic roles of 4-HNE in inflammatory signaling related to protein tyrosine kinases have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between 4-HNE and Src (a non-receptor tyrosine kinase) for its involvement in the molecular modulation of the inflammatory signaling pathway utilizing the YPEN-1 cell system. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that 4-HNE phosphorylates (activates) Src at Tyr416 via adduct formation. In addition, LC-MS/MS and a docking simulation model revealed an addiction site at the Cys248 residue of Src, resulting in the stimulation of downstream p38, ERK/AP-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) signaling in YPEN-1 cells. The role of 4-HNE-activated Src in downstream inflammatory signaling was further investigated using dasatinib (a Src inhibitor) and by siRNA knockdown of Src. p38 and ERK were directly regulated by Src, as revealed by immunoblotting of the phosphorylated forms of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are key elements in the signaling transduction pathway initiated by Src. The study also shows that Src modulates the HNE-enhanced activation of AP-1 and the expression of COX-2 (a target gene of AP-1). Together, the results of this study show that 4-HNE stimulates Src tyrosine kinase in activation of the inflammation process. PMID:26466383

  17. [6]-Gingerol induces caspase-dependent apoptosis and prevents PMA-induced proliferation in colon cancer cells by inhibiting MAPK/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, E K; Bava, Smitha V; Narayanan, Sai Shyam; Nath, Lekshmi R; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan; Anto, Ruby John

    2014-01-01

    We report mechanism-based evidence for the anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy of [6]-gingerol, the major active principle of the medicinal plant, Ginger (Zingiber officinale), in colon cancer cells. The compound was evaluated in two human colon cancer cell lines for its cytotoxic effect and the most sensitive cell line, SW-480, was selected for the mechanistic evaluation of its anticancer and chemopreventive efficacy. The non-toxic nature of [6]-gingerol was confirmed by viability assays on rapidly dividing normal mouse colon cells. [6]-gingerol inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by externalization of phosphatidyl serine in SW-480, while the normal colon cells were unaffected. Sensitivity to [6]-gingerol in SW-480 cells was associated with activation of caspases 8, 9, 3 &7 and cleavage of PARP, which attests induction of apoptotic cell death. Mechanistically, [6]-gingerol down-regulated Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA) induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK MAP kinases and activation of AP-1 transcription factor, but had only little effects on phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and activation of NF-kappa B. Additionally, it complemented the inhibitors of either ERK1/2 or JNK MAP kinase in bringing down the PMA-induced cell proliferation in SW-480 cells. We report the inhibition of ERK1/2/JNK/AP-1 pathway as a possible mechanism behind the anticancer as well as chemopreventive efficacy of [6]-gingerol against colon cancer.

  18. Simian virus 40 small t antigen cooperates with mitogen-activated kinases to stimulate AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Alberts, A S; Sontag, E; Guan, K; Mumby, M C; Feramisco, J R

    1994-01-01

    The simian virus 40 small tumor antigen (small t) specifically interacts with protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) in vivo and alters its catalytic activity in vitro. Among the substrates for PP2A in vitro are the activated forms of MEK and ERK kinases. Dephosphorylation of the activating phosphorylation sites on MEK and ERKs by PP2A in vitro results in a decrease in their respective kinase activities. Recently, it has been shown that overexpression of small t in CV-1 cells results in an inhibition of PP2A activity toward MEK and ERK2 and a constitutive upregulation of MEK and ERK2 activity. Previously, we have observed that overexpression of either ERK1, MEK1, or a constitutively active truncated form of c-Raf-1 (BXB) is insufficient to activate AP-1 in REF52 fibroblasts. We therefore examined whether overexpression of small t either alone or in conjunction with ERK1, MEK1, or BXB could activate AP-1. We found that coexpression of small t and either ERK1, MEK1, or BXB resulted in an increase in AP-1 activity, whereas expression of either small t or any of the kinases alone did not have any effect. Similarly, coexpression of small t and ERK1 activated serum response element-regulated promoters. Coexpression of kinase-deficient mutants of ERK1 and ERK2 inhibited the activation of AP-1 caused by expression of small t and either MEK1 or BXB. Coexpression of an interfering MEK, which inhibited AP-1 activation by small t and BXB, did not inhibit the activation of AP-1 caused by small t and ERK1. In contrast to REF52 cells, we observed that overexpression of either small or ERK1 alone in CV-1 cells was sufficient to stimulate AP-1 activity and that this stimulation was not enhanced by expression of small t and ERK1 together. These results show that the effects of small t on immediate-early gene expression depend on the cell type examined and suggest that the mitogen-activated protein kinase activation pathway is distinctly regulated in different cell types. Images PMID

  19. Sargahydroquinoic acid inhibits TNFα-induced AP-1 and NF-κB signaling in HaCaT cells through PPARα activation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Youngsic; Jung, Yujung; Kim, Min Cheol; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Yong Kee; Kim, Su-Nam

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • SHQA increases PPARα/γ transactivation and inhibits MMP-2/-9 expression. • SHQA inhibits TNFα-induced AP-1 and MAPK signaling. • SHQA inhibits TNFα-induced p65 translocation and IκBα phosphorylation. • SHQA inhibits TNFα-induced AP-1 and NF-κB signaling via PPARα. - Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and expressed in various cell types in the skin, including keratinocytes, fibroblasts and infiltrating immune cells. Thus, their ligands are targets for the treatment of various skin disorders, such as photo-aging and chronological aging of skin. Intensive studies have revealed that PPARα/γ functions in photo-aging and age-related inflammation by regulating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) via activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). However, the detailed mechanism of PPARα/γ’s role in skin aging has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we confirmed that sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA) as a PPARα/γ ligand significantly decreased Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFα)-induced MMP-2/-9 expression by downregulating TNFα-induced transcription factors, subsequently reducing IκBα degradation and blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in HaCaT human epidermal keratinocyte cells. Treatment of cells with SHQA and GW6471 (PPARα antagonist) not bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (PPARγ antagonists), reversed the effect on TNFα-induced inflammatory signaling pathway activation. Taken together, our data suggest that SHQA inhibit TNFα-induced MMP-2/-9 expression and age-related inflammation by suppressing AP-1 and NF-κB pathway via PPARα.

  20. Transcription factor AP-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Alterations in activity and expression during Human Papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) region of India. A substantial proportion of esophageal carcinoma is associated with infection of high-risk HPV type 16 and HPV18, the oncogenic expression of which is controlled by host cell transcription factor Activator Protein-1 (AP-1). We, therefore, have investigated the role of DNA binding and expression pattern of AP-1 in esophageal cancer with or without HPV infection. Methods Seventy five histopathologically-confirmed esophageal cancer and an equal number of corresponding adjacent normal tissue biopsies from Kashmir were analyzed for HPV infection, DNA binding activity and expression of AP-1 family of proteins by PCR, gel shift assay and immunoblotting respectively. Results A high DNA binding activity and elevated expression of AP-1 proteins were observed in esophageal cancer, which differed between HPV positive (19%) and HPV negative (81%) carcinomas. While JunB, c-Fos and Fra-1 were the major contributors to AP-1 binding activity in HPV negative cases, Fra-1 was completely absent in HPV16 positive cancers. Comparison of AP-1 family proteins demonstrated high expression of JunD and c-Fos in HPV positive tumors, but interestingly, Fra-1 expression was extremely low or nil in these tumor tissues. Conclusion Differential AP-1 binding activity and expression of its specific proteins between HPV - positive and HPV - negative cases indicate that AP-1 may play an important role during HPV-induced esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:19758438

  1. TAK1 regulates NF-{Kappa}B and AP-1 activation in airway epithelial cells following RSV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Nilay; Liu Tianshuang; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2011-09-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory diseases in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and AP-1. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to activation of these two transcription factors in response to RSV infection. Our results show that IKK{beta} plays a key role in viral-induced NF-{kappa}B activation, while JNK regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription, as demonstrated by using kinase inactive proteins and chemical inhibitors of the two kinases. Inhibition of TAK1 activation, by overexpression of kinase inactive TAK1 or using cells lacking TAK1 expression, significantly reduced RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity, as well as NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, identifying TAK1 as an important upstream signaling molecule regulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 activation. - Highlights: > IKK{beta} is a major kinase involved in RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. > JNK regulates AP-1-dependent gene transcription in RSV infection. > TAK1 is a critical upstream signaling molecule for both pathways in infected cells.

  2. The AP-1 family member FOS blocks transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, Rosa; Nogueira, Edson; Bassett, Mary H.; Carr, Bruce R.; Suzuki, Takashi; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Andò, Sebastiano; Rainey, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid production in the adrenal zona glomerulosa is under the control of angiotensin II (Ang II), which, upon binding to its receptor, activates protein kinase C (PKC) within these cells. PKC is a potent inhibitor of the steroidogenic enzyme CYP17. We have demonstrated that, in the ovary, PKC activates expression of FOS, a member of the AP-1 family, and increased expression of this gene is linked to CYP17 downregulation. However, the pathway and the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of PKC on CYP17 expression are not defined. Herein, we demonstrated that Ang II inhibited CYP17 through PKC and ERK1/2-activated FOS and that blocking FOS expression decreased PKC-mediated inhibition. Although CYP17 transcription was activated by the nuclear receptor SF-1, expression of FOS resulted in a decrease in SF-1-mediated gene transcription. FOS physically interacted with the hinge region of SF-1 and modulated its transactivity, thus preventing binding of cofactors such as SRC1 and CBP, which were necessary to fully activate CYP17 transcription. Collectively, these results indicate a new regulatory mechanism for SF-1 transcriptional activity that might influence adrenal zone-specific expression of CYP17, a mechanism that can potentially be applied to other steroidogenic tissues. PMID:20980388

  3. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  4. Cadmium induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and the cell invasiveness of human gastric cancer cells via the ERK-1/2, NF-κB, and AP-1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Xia, Yong; Lian, Sen; Kim, Ho Dong; Kim, Do Hyun; Joo, Young Eun; Chay, Kee-Oh; Kim, Kyung Keun; Jung, Young Do

    2014-10-01

    Cadmium exposure has been linked to human cancers, including stomach cancer. In this study, the effects of cadmium on urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression in human gastric cancer cells and the underlying signal transduction pathways were investigated. Cadmium induced uPAR expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Cadmium also induced uPAR promoter activity. Additionally, cadmium induced the activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and the activation of c-Jun amino terminal kinase (JNK). A specific inhibitor of MEK-1 (PD98059) inhibited cadmium-induced uPAR expression, while JNK and p38 MAPK inhibitors did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant-negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) also prevented cadmium-induced uPAR promoter activity. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift studies showed that sites for the transcription factors nuclear factor (NF)-κB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) were involved in cadmium-induced uPAR transcription. Suppression of the cadmium-induced uPAR promoter activity by a mutated-type NF-κB-inducing kinase and I-κB and an AP-1 decoy oligonucleotide confirmed that the activation of NF-κB and AP-1 are essential for cadmium-induced uPAR upregulation. Cells pretreated with cadmium showed markedly enhanced invasiveness and this effect was partially abrogated by uPAR-neutralizing antibodies and by inhibitors of ERK-1/2, NF-κB, and AP-1. These results suggest that cadmium induces uPAR expression via ERK-1/2, NF-κB, and AP-1 signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates cell invasiveness in human gastric cancer AGS cells.

  5. Intracellular pathways linking hypoxia to activation of c-fos and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, D R; Adhikary, G; Overholt, J L; Simonson, M S; Cherniack, N S; Prabhakar, N R

    2000-01-01

    Organisms respond to hypoxia through detection of blood oxygen levels by sensors at peripheral chemoreceptors and by receptors in certain key cells of the body. The pathways over which peripheral chemoreceptor signals are transmitted to respiratory muscles are well established. However, the intracellular pathways that transmit hypoxic stimulus to gene activation are just being identified. Using anti-sense c-fos strategy, we have shown that c-fos is essential for the activation of activator protein-1 transcription factor complex (AP-1) and subsequent stimulation of downstream genes such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; Mishra et al. 1998). The purpose of the present study was to identify intracellular pathways that link hypoxia to activation of c-fos. The results of the present study show that hypoxia causes Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage gated Ca2+ channels and that hypoxia-induced c-fos gene expression is Ca2+/calmodulin dependent. We also demonstrate that hypoxia activates the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, but not JNK. Further, phosphorylation of ERK is essential for c-fos activation via SRE cis-element. Further characterization of nuclear signalling pathways provides evidence for the involvement of Src, a non receptor protein tyrosine kinase, and Ras, a small G protein, in the hypoxia-induced c-fos gene expression. These results suggest a possible role for non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases in propagating signals from G-protein coupled receptors to the activation of immediate early genes such as c-fos during hypoxia.

  6. The mucin MUC4 is a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras oncogene in pancreatic cancer. Implication of MAPK/AP-1, NF-κB and RalB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Romain; Skrypek, Nicolas; Duchêne, Belinda; Renaud, Florence; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Vincent, Audrey; Porchet, Nicole; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The membrane-bound mucinMUC4 is a high molecularweight glycoprotein frequently deregulated in cancer. In pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, MUC4 is neo-expressed in the preneoplastic stages and thereafter is involved in cancer cell properties leading to cancer progression and chemoresistance. K-ras oncogene is a small GTPase of the RAS superfamily, highly implicated in cancer. K-ras mutations are considered as an initiating event of pancreatic carcinogenesis and K-ras oncogenic activities are necessary components of cancer progression. However, K-ras remains clinically undruggable. Targeting early downstream K-ras signaling in cancer may thus appear as an interesting strategy and MUC4 regulation by K-ras in pancreatic carcinogenesis remains unknown. Using the Pdx1-Cre; LStopL-K-rasG12D mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we show that the in vivo early neo-expression of the mucin Muc4 in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplastic lesions (PanINs) induced by mutated K-ras is correlated with the activation of ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In vitro, transfection of constitutively activated K-rasG12V in pancreatic cancer cells led to the transcriptional upregulation of MUC4. This activation was found to be mediated at the transcriptional level by AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factors via MAPK, JNK and NF-κB pathways and at the posttranscriptional level by a mechanism involving the RalB GTPase. Altogether, these results identify MUC4 as a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras in pancreatic cancer. This opens avenues in developing new approaches to target the early steps of this deadly cancer.

  7. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex modulates peripheral T cell activation and proliferation by controlling AP-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Min; Lee, Changjin; Lee, Sung Kyu; Kim, Jieun; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2010-01-22

    The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex has been implicated in the activation and proliferation of T cells. After T cell receptor signaling, the SWI/SNF complex rapidly associates with chromatin and controls gene expression in T cells. However, the process by which the SWI/SNF complex regulates peripheral T cell activation has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that the SWI/SNF complex regulates cytokine production and proliferation of T cells. During T cell activation, the SWI/SNF complex is recruited to the promoter of the transcription factor AP-1, and it increases the expression of AP-1. Increased expression of the SWI/SNF complex resulted in enhanced AP-1 activity, cytokine production, and proliferation of peripheral T cells, whereas knockdown of the SWI/SNF complex expression impaired the AP-1 expression and reduced the activation and proliferation of T cells. Moreover, mice that constitutively expressed the SWI/SNF complex in T cells were much more susceptible to experimentally induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis than the normal mice were. These results suggest that the SWI/SNF complex plays a critical role during T cell activation and subsequent immune responses.

  8. Omega 3 but not omega 6 fatty acids inhibit AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangming; Bibus, Douglas M.; Bode, Ann M.; Ma, Wei-Ya; Holman, Ralph T.; Dong, Zigang

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal-based investigations have indicated that the development of skin cancer is in part associated with poor dietary practices. Lipid content and subsequently the derived fatty acid composition of the diet are believed to play a major role in the development of tumorigenesis. Omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can effectively reduce the risk of skin cancer whereas omega 6 (ω6) fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) reportedly promote risk. To investigate the effects of fatty acids on tumorigenesis, we performed experiments to examine the effects of the ω3 fatty acids EPA and DHA and of the ω6 fatty acid AA on phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced or epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription activator protein 1 (AP-1) transactivation and on the subsequent cellular transformation in a mouse epidermal JB6 cell model. DHA treatment resulted in marked inhibition of TPA- and EGF-induced cell transformation by inhibiting AP-1 transactivation. EPA treatment also inhibited TPA-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation but had no effect on EGF-induced transformation. AA treatment had no effect on either TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation or transformation, but did abrogate the inhibitory effects of DHA on TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of ω3 fatty acids on tumorigenesis are more significant for DHA than for EPA and are related to an inhibition of AP-1. Similarly, because AA abrogates the beneficial effects of DHA, the dietary ratio of ω6 to ω3 fatty acids may be a significant factor in mediating tumor development. PMID:11416221

  9. Identification and characterization of Ref-1, a nuclear protein that facilitates AP-1 DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Xanthoudakis, S; Curran, T

    1992-01-01

    Fos and Jun form a heterodimeric complex that regulates gene transcription by binding to the activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA sequence motif. Previously, we demonstrated that the DNA-binding activity of Fos and Jun is regulated in vitro by a novel redox (reduction-oxidation) mechanism. Reduction of a conserved cysteine (cys) residue in the DNA-binding domains of Fos and Jun by chemical reducing agents or by a nuclear redox factor stimulates DNA-binding activity. Here, we describe purification and characterization of a 37 kDa protein (Ref-1) corresponding to the redox factor. Although Ref-1 does not bind to the AP-1 site in association with Fos and Jun, it partially copurifies with a subset of AP-1 proteins. Purified Ref-1 protein stimulates AP-1 DNA-binding activity through the conserved Cys residues in Fos and Jun, but it does not alter the DNA-binding specificity of Fos and Jun. Ref-1 may represent a novel redox component of the signal transduction processes that regulate eukaryotic gene expression. Images PMID:1537340

  10. Heparin (GAG-hed) inhibits LCR activity of Human Papillomavirus type 18 by decreasing AP1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Rita; Morales-Peza, Néstor; Castelán-Sánchez, Irma; García-Villa, Enrique; Tapia, Rocio; Cid-Arregui, Ángel; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; López-Bayghen, Esther; Gariglio, Patricio

    2006-01-01

    Background High risk HPVs are causative agents of anogenital cancers. Viral E6 and E7 genes are continuously expressed and are largely responsible for the oncogenic activity of these viruses. Transcription of the E6 and E7 genes is controlled by the viral Long Control Region (LCR), plus several cellular transcription factors including AP1 and the viral protein E2. Within the LCR, the binding and activity of the transcription factor AP1 represents a key regulatory event in maintaining E6/E7 gene expression and uncontrolled cell proliferation. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin, can inhibit tumour growth; they have also shown antiviral effects and inhibition of AP1 transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study was to test the heparinoid GAG-hed, as a possible antiviral and antitumoral agent in an HPV18 positive HeLa cell line. Methods Using in vivo and in vitro approaches we tested GAG-hed effects on HeLa tumour cell growth, cell proliferation and on the expression of HPV18 E6/E7 oncogenes. GAG-hed effects on AP1 binding to HPV18-LCR-DNA were tested by EMSA. Results We were able to record the antitumoral effect of GAG-hed in vivo by using as a model tumours induced by injection of HeLa cells into athymic female mice. The antiviral effect of GAG-hed resulted in the inhibition of LCR activity and, consequently, the inhibition of E6 and E7 transcription. A specific diminishing of cell proliferation rates was observed in HeLa but not in HPV-free colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Treated HeLa cells did not undergo apoptosis but the percentage of cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle was increased. We also detected that GAG-hed prevents the binding of the transcription factor AP1 to the LCR. Conclusion Direct interaction of GAG-hed with the components of the AP1 complex and subsequent interference with its ability to correctly bind specific sites within the viral LCR may contribute to the inhibition of E6/E7 transcription and cell proliferation. Our data

  11. HIV-1 Nef Induces CCL5 production in astrocytes through p38-MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathway and utilizes NF-kB, CEBP and AP-1 transcription factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xun; Shah, Ankit; Gangwani, Mohitkumar R.; Silverstein, Peter S.; Fu, Mingui; Kumar, Anil

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high in patients infected with HIV-1. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by astrocytes/microglia exposed to viral proteins is thought to be one of the mechanisms leading to HIV-1- mediated neurotoxicity. In the present study we examined the effects of Nef on CCL5 induction in astrocytes. The results demonstrate that CCL5 is significantly induced in Nef-transfected SVGA astrocytes. To determine the mechanisms responsible for the increased CCL5 caused by Nef, we employed siRNA and chemical antagonists. Antagonists of NF-κB, PI3K, and p38 significantly reduced the expression levels of CCL5 induced by Nef transfection. Furthermore, specific siRNAs demonstrated that the Akt, p38MAPK, NF-κB, CEBP, and AP-1 pathways play a role in Nef-mediated CCL5 expression. The results demonstrated that the PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways, along with the transcription factors NF-κB, CEBP, and AP-1, are involved in Nef-induced CCL5 production in astrocytes.

  12. Amitriptyline up-regulates connexin43-gap junction in rat cultured cortical astrocytes via activation of the p38 and c-Fos/AP-1 signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Morioka, N; Suekama, K; Zhang, F F; Kajitani, N; Hisaoka-Nakashima, K; Takebayashi, M; Nakata, Y

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intercellular communication via gap junctions, comprised of connexin (Cx) proteins, allow for communication between astrocytes, which in turn is crucial for maintaining CNS homeostasis. The expression of Cx43 is decreased in post-mortem brains from patients with major depression. A potentially novel mechanism of tricyclic antidepressants is to increase the expression and functioning of gap junctions in astrocytes. Experimental Approach The effect of amitriptyline on the expression of Cx43 and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in rat primary cultured cortical astrocytes was investigated. We also investigated the role of p38 MAPK intracellular signalling pathway in the amitriptyline-induced expression of Cx43 and GJIC. Key Results Treatment with amitriptyline for 48 h significantly up-regulated Cx43 mRNA, protein and GJIC. The up-regulation of Cx43 was not monoamine-related since noradrenaline, 5-HT and dopamine did not induce Cx43 expression and pretreatment with α- and β-adrenoceptor antagonists had no effect. Intracellular signalling involved p38 MAPK, as amitriptyline significantly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and Cx43 expression and GJIC were significantly blocked by the p38 inhibitor SB 202190. Furthermore, amitriptyline-induced Cx43 expression and GJIC were markedly reduced by transcription factor AP-1 inhibitors (curcumin and tanshinone IIA). The translocation of c-Fos from the cytosol and the nucleus of cortical astrocytes was increased by amitriptyline, and this response was dependent on p38 activity. Conclusion and Implication These findings indicate a novel mechanism of action of amitriptyline through cortical astrocytes, and further suggest that targeting this mechanism could lead to the development of a new class of antidepressants. PMID:24641259

  13. c-fos/c-jun expression and AP-1 activation in skin fibroblasts from centenarians.

    PubMed

    Grassilli, E; Bellesia, E; Salomoni, P; Croce, M A; Sikora, E; Radziszewska, E; Tesco, G; Vergelli, M; Latorraca, S; Barbieri, D; Fagiolo, U; Santacaterina, S; Amaducci, L; Tiozzo, R; Sorbi, S; Franceschi, C

    1996-09-13

    In vitro replicative senescence is characterized by an irreversible growth arrest due to the inability of the cell to induce some key regulators of cell cycle progression, such as c-fos and AP-1, in response to mitogenic stimuli. In vitro replicative senescence and in vivo aging have been assumed to be two related phenomena, likely controlled by overlapping or interacting genes. As a corollary, fibroblasts from centenarians, which have undergone a long process of senescence in vivo should have very limited proliferative capability. On the contrary, in a previous work we found that fibroblasts from centenarians exhibited the same capacity to respond to different mitogenic stimuli as fibroblasts from young donors. Here we provide evidences that the well preserved proliferative response is likely due to the fact that some pivotal regulators- c-fos, c-jun and AP-1-are still fully inducible, despite a long process of in vivo senescence. Our data therefore suggest that in vivo and in vitro aging are separate phenomena whose possible relationships, if any, have to be ascertained very carefully. PMID:8806666

  14. Cdk3-promoted epithelial-mesenchymal transition through activating AP-1 is involved in colorectal cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Na; Li, Yuejin; Peng, Zhengke; Lu, Chengrong; Dong, Zigang; Tang, Faqing

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase-3 (Cdk3) is a positive regulator of the G1 mammalian cell cycle phase. Cdk3 is involved in cancer progression, but very little is known about its mechanism in cancer development and progression. Herein, we found that Cdk3 increased colorectal cancer metastasis through promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) shift. Cdk3 was found to highly express in metastatic cancer and induce cell motility and invasion. Cdk3 was shown to phosphorylate c-Jun at Ser 63 and Ser 73 in vitro and ex vivo. Cdk3-phosphorylated c-Jun at Ser 63 and Ser 73 resulted in an increased AP-1 activity. Ectopic expression of Cdk3 promoted colorectal cancer from epithelial to mesenchymal transition conjugating AP-1 activation, while AP-1 inhibition dramatically decreased Cdk3-increased EMT shift. These results showed that the Cdk3/c-Jun signaling axis mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition plays an important role in colorectal cancer metastasis. PMID:26755651

  15. Cannabinoids inhibit the activation of ERK MAPK in PMA/Io-stimulated mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Faubert Kaplan, Barbara L; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2003-10-01

    The mechanism of action of immune suppression by cannabinoids involves suppression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) production in phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-stimulated lymphocytes. This decrease in IL-2 was due to inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) transcription factors, both of which depend on proteins that are regulated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase subgroup of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK MAPK). Thus, the objective of the present study was to characterize the effects of cannabinoid compounds on ERK MAPK under conditions where IL-2 expression was suppressed. Using the MEK inhibitor PD098059 in order to assess the role of ERK MAPK in PMA/Io-stimulated splenocytes (SPLC), it was determined that IL-2 production and expression of c-fos and c-jun nuclear protein expression depended on activation of ERK MAPK. In response to PMA/Io, expression of nuclear phosphorylated ERK MAPK was rapidly induced, peaked at approximately 15 min, and was sustained for up to 240 min. Pretreatment with cannabinol (CBN) inhibited expression of phosphorylated ERK MAPK at several time points up to 240 min post cellular activation. Furthermore, WIN-55212-2, a synthetic cannabinoid, inhibited expression of phosphorylated ERK MAPK at 240 min post cellular activation. CBN did not induce activation of ERK MAPK in the absence of PMA/Io. Collectively, these studies suggest that cannabinoid-induced inhibition of IL-2 in PMA/Io-stimulated splenocytes might be due, in part, to inhibition of ERK MAPK activation.

  16. Pseudoephedrine inhibits T-cell activation by targeting NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, Bernd L; Collado, Juan A; Stratz, Cristian; Valina, Christian; Hochholzer, Willibald; Muñoz, Eduardo; Bellido, Luz M

    2012-02-01

    Pseudoephedrine (PSE) is a stereoisomer of ephedrine that is commonly used as a nasal decongestant in combination with other anti-inflammatory drugs for the symptomatic treatment of some common pathologies such as common cold. Herein, we describe for the first time the effects of PSE on T-cell activation events. We found that PSE inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha-gene transcription in stimulated Jurkat cells, a human T-cell leukemia cell line. To further characterize the inhibitory mechanisms of PSE at the transcriptional level, we examined the transcriptional activities of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors and found that PSE inhibited NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity without affecting either the phosphorylation, the degradation of the cytoplasmic NF-κB inhibitory protein, IκBα or the DNA-binding activity. However, phosphorylation of the p65/RelA subunit was clearly inhibited by PSE in stimulated cells. In addition, PSE inhibited the transcriptional activity of NFAT without interfering with the calcium-induced NFAT dephosphorylation event, which represents the major signaling pathway for its activation. NFAT cooperates with c-Jun, a compound of the AP-1 complex, to activate target genes, and we also found that PSE inhibited both JNK activation and AP-1 transcriptional activity. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the potential immunomodulatory activities of PSE and highlight their potential in designing novel therapeutic strategies to manage inflammatory diseases.

  17. Advanced glycation end products upregulate lysyl oxidase and endothelin-1 in human aortic endothelial cells via parallel activation of ERK1/2-NF-κB and JNK-AP-1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Adamopoulos, Christos; Piperi, Christina; Gargalionis, Antonios N; Dalagiorgou, Georgia; Spilioti, Eliana; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction involves deregulation of the key extracellular matrix (ECM) enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) and the vasoconstrictor protein, endothelin-1 (ET-1), whose gene expression can be modulated by the transcriptional activators nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) present an aggravating factor of endothelial dysfunction which upon engagement to their receptor RAGE induce upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), leading to NF-κB and AP-1 potentiation. We hypothesized that AGEs could induce NF-κΒ- and AP-1-dependent regulation of LOX and ET-1 expression via the AGE/RAGE/MAPK signaling axis. Western blot, real-time qRT-PCR, FACS analysis and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays were employed in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) following treatment with AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) to investigate the signaling pathway towards this hypothesis. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis of AGEs, RAGE, LOX and ET-1 expression was conducted in aortic endothelium of a rat experimental model exposed to high- or low-AGE content diet. HAECs exposed to AGE-BSA for various time points exhibited upregulation of LOX and ET-1 mRNA levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Exposure of HAECs to AGE-BSA also showed specific elevation of phospho(p)-ERK1/2 and p-JNK levels in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGE administration significantly increased NF-κΒ- and AP-1-binding activity to both LOX and ET-1 cognate promoter regions. Moreover, LOX and ET-1 overexpression in rat aortic endothelium upon high-AGE content diet confirmed the functional interrelation of these molecules. Our findings demonstrate that AGEs trigger NF-κΒ- and AP-1-mediated upregulation of LOX and ET-1 via the AGE/RAGE/MAPK signaling cascade in human endothelial cells, thus contributing to distorted endothelial homeostasis by impairing endothelial barrier function, altering ECM biomechanical properties

  18. c-Fos: an AP-1 transcription factor with an additional cytoplasmic, non-genomic lipid synthesis activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Caputto, Beatriz L; Cardozo Gizzi, Andrés M; Gil, Germán A

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms that co-ordinately activate lipid synthesis when high rates of membrane biogenesis are needed to support cell growth are largely unknown. c-Fos, a well known AP-1 transcription factor, has emerged as a unique protein with the capacity to associate to specific enzymes of the pathway of synthesis of phospholipids at the endoplasmic reticulum and activate their synthesis to accompany genomic decisions of growth. Herein, we discuss this cytoplasmic, non-genomic effect of c-Fos in the context of other mechanisms that have been proposed to regulate lipid synthesis.

  19. A requirement for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) function in the activation of AP-1 by Ha-Ras, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Geppert, T D; Cobb, M H; Feramisco, J R

    1994-01-01

    The role of ERK-1 and ERK-2 in wild-type (wt) Ha-Ras, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and serum-induced AP-1 activity was studied. Microinjection of ERK-specific substrate peptides inhibited the induction of AP-1 activity by all three stimuli, whereas a control peptide had no effect. By using eukaryotic expression constructs encoding wt ERK-1 and kinase-deficient mutants of ERKs 1 and 2, it was found that ERK-1 and ERK-2 activities are required for AP-1 activation stimulated by either wt Ha-Ras, PMA, or serum. Overexpression of ERK-1 augmented wt Ha-Ras stimulation of AP-1, while having no effect upon PMA or serum stimulation. Overexpression of either kinase-deficient ERK-1 or kinase-deficient ERK-2 partially inhibited AP-1 activation by wt Ha-Ras but had no effect on PMA or serum-induced activation. Coexpression of both interfering mutants abolished AP-1 induction by wt Ha-Ras, PMA, or serum. We conclude that ERKs are necessary components in the pathway leading to the activation of AP-1 stimulated by these agents. Images PMID:8170999

  20. The Synonymous Ala87 Mutation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Modifies Transcriptional Activation Through Both ERE and AP1 Sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Flouriot, Gilles; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) exerts regulatory actions through genomic mechanisms. In the classical pathway, ligand-activated ERα binds directly to DNA through estrogen response elements (ERE) located in the promoter of target genes. ERα can also exert indirect regulation of transcription via protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors such as AP-1.S everal ERα synonymous polymorphisms have been identified and efforts to understand their implications have been made. Nevertheless effects of synonymous polymorphisms are still neglected. This chapter focuses on the experimental procedure employed in order to characterize the transcriptional activity of a synonymous polymorphism of the ERα (rs746432) called Alanine 87 (Ala87). Activity of both WT and Ala87 ERα isoforms on transcriptional pathways can be analyzed in transiently transfected cells using different reporter constructs. ERα efficiency on the classical genomic pathway can be analyzed by determining its transactivation activity on an ERE-driven thymidine kinase (TK) promoter controlling the expression of the luciferase reporter gene. Transcriptional activity through the indirect genomic pathway can be analyzed by employing an AP-1 DNA response element-driven promoter also controlling the expression of luciferase reporter gene.

  1. The Synonymous Ala87 Mutation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Modifies Transcriptional Activation Through Both ERE and AP1 Sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Flouriot, Gilles; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) exerts regulatory actions through genomic mechanisms. In the classical pathway, ligand-activated ERα binds directly to DNA through estrogen response elements (ERE) located in the promoter of target genes. ERα can also exert indirect regulation of transcription via protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors such as AP-1.S everal ERα synonymous polymorphisms have been identified and efforts to understand their implications have been made. Nevertheless effects of synonymous polymorphisms are still neglected. This chapter focuses on the experimental procedure employed in order to characterize the transcriptional activity of a synonymous polymorphism of the ERα (rs746432) called Alanine 87 (Ala87). Activity of both WT and Ala87 ERα isoforms on transcriptional pathways can be analyzed in transiently transfected cells using different reporter constructs. ERα efficiency on the classical genomic pathway can be analyzed by determining its transactivation activity on an ERE-driven thymidine kinase (TK) promoter controlling the expression of the luciferase reporter gene. Transcriptional activity through the indirect genomic pathway can be analyzed by employing an AP-1 DNA response element-driven promoter also controlling the expression of luciferase reporter gene. PMID:26585143

  2. Glycosylation defects activate filamentous growth Kss1 MAPK and inhibit osmoregulatory Hog1 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Yu; Tatebayashi, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Katsuyoshi; Saito, Haruo

    2009-05-20

    The yeast filamentous growth (FG) MAP kinase (MAPK) pathway is activated under poor nutritional conditions. We found that the FG-specific Kss1 MAPK is activated by a combination of an O-glycosylation defect caused by disruption of the gene encoding the protein O-mannosyltransferase Pmt4, and an N-glycosylation defect induced by tunicamycin. The O-glycosylated membrane proteins Msb2 and Opy2 are both essential for activating the FG MAPK pathway, but only defective glycosylation of Msb2 activates the FG MAPK pathway. Although the osmoregulatory HOG (high osmolarity glycerol) MAPK pathway and the FG MAPK pathway share almost the entire upstream signalling machinery, osmostress activates only the HOG-specific Hog1 MAPK. Conversely, we now show that glycosylation defects activate only Kss1, while activated Kss1 and the Ptp2 tyrosine phosphatase inhibit Hog1. In the absence of Kss1 or Ptp2, however, glycosylation defects activate Hog1. When Hog1 is activated by glycosylation defects in ptp2 mutant, Kss1 activation is suppressed by Hog1. Thus, the reciprocal inhibitory loop between Kss1 and Hog1 allows only one or the other of these MAPKs to be stably activated under various stress conditions. PMID:19369942

  3. Activation of NF-κB and AP-1 Mediates Hyperproliferation by Inducing β-Catenin and c-Myc in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eunyoung; Park, Bohye; Lim, Joo Weon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected patients with gastritis or adenocarcinoma, proliferation of gastric epithelial cells is increased. Hyperproliferation is related to induction of oncogenes, such as β-catenin and c-myc. Even though transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 are activated in H. pylori-infected cells, whether NF-κB or AP-1 regulates the expression of β-catenein or c-myc in H. pylori-infected cells has not been clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 mediates the expression of oncogenes and hyperproliferation of gastric epithelial cells. Materials and Methods Gastric epithelial AGS cells were transiently transfected with mutant genes for IκBα (MAD3) and c-Jun (TAM67) or treated with a specific NF-κB inhibitor caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) or a selective AP-1 inhibitor SR-11302 to suppress activation of NF-κB or AP-1, respecively. As reference cells, the control vector pcDNA was transfected to the cells. Wild-type cells or transfected cells were cultured with or without H. pylori. Results H. pylori induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, cell proliferation, and expression of oncogenes (β-catenein, c-myc) in AGS cells, which was inhibited by transfection of MAD3 and TAM67. Wild-type cells and the cells transfected with pcDNA showed similar activities of NF-κB and AP-1, proliferation, and oncogene expression regardless of treatment with H. pylori. Both CAPE and SR-11302 inhibited cell proliferation and expression of oncogenes in H. pylori-infected cells. Conclusion H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1 regulates transcription of oncogenes and mediates hyperproliferation in gastric epithelial cells. PMID:26996564

  4. A cluster region of AP-1 responsive elements is required for transcriptional activity of mouse ODC gene by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Tacchini, Lorenza; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2002-05-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity is regulated by a variety of mechanisms including transcription, translation, and RNA and protein half-life. Since in mouse B16-F1 melanoma cells an early and remarkable (about 6-fold) increase in steady state mRNA levels was observed after hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) treatment, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of mouse ODC promoter. Transient transfection of various ODC-luciferase promoter constructs into the B16-Fl cells in combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified the HGF-responsive element as a cluster of three AP-1 binding sites (-1660 to -1572). Even if each site differs from the canonical TPA responsive element for one nucleotide, only the first two AP-1 consensus sequences seemed to be functional since allowed DNA-binding activity of nuclear proteins after HGF treatment. Comparison of the results of transfection assays with the pOD2.5-luc (2.5 kb gene fragment) and with the construct deprived of the AP-1 cluster pOD-B-luc showed that this 50 bp region was required for ODC transactivating activity in response to HGF. Since in B16-F1 cells HGF increased AP-1 activity and the mRNA expression of various AP-1 subunits, we may conclude that HGF-induced transcription of mouse ODC was largely due to triggering of AP-1 pathway. PMID:12054494

  5. Multiple doses of diacylglycerol and calcium ionophore are necessary to activate AP-1 enhancer activity and induce markers of macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    William, F; Wagner, F; Karin, M; Kraft, A S

    1990-10-25

    In contrast to phorbol esters, multiple doses of diacylgycerols are needed to differentiate U937 human monoblastic leukemic cells to a macrophage-like phenotype. Although both of these agents similarly activate protein kinase C in vitro, it is not known why these agents appear to have differing biologic effects. One possibility is that they regulate gene transcription in slightly different ways. Regulation of gene transcription by phorbol esters is complex and involves the stimulation of the transactivating proteins Jun and Fos which form dimers and bind to the AP-1 enhancer elements (5'-TGAGTCA-3'). To understand whether diacylglycerols regulate gene transcription similarly to phorbol esters and to examine whether activation of AP-1 enhancer activity is correlated with differentiation, we have treated U937 human monoblastic leukemic cells with these agents and examined activation of transcription from AP-1 enhancer elements. We find that, although a single dose of diacylglycerol, like phorbol esters, is sufficient to elevate mRNA levels of both the c-jun and c-fos protooncogenes, in contrast to phorbol esters there is no increase in either Jun protein or activation of AP-1 enhancer activity. However, multiple doses of this agent given over 24 h stimulate repeated elevations in c-jun and c-fos mRNA, increases in Jun protein, and enhancer activation. Treatment of U937 cells with ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, also stimulates an increase in c-jun mRNA, but neither activates AP-1 enhancer activity nor stimulates differentiation of these cells. However ionomycin functions to enhance the effects of diacylglycerols both on transcriptional activation and U937 differentiation. These results suggest a complex regulation of AP-1 enhancer activity in U937 cells by diacylglycerols involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Maximal activation of AP-1 enhancer elements, and not changes in jun and fos mRNA, is correlated with increases in

  6. SUMOylation of the inducible (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex occurs on target promoters to limit transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tempé, D; Vives, E; Brockly, F; Brooks, H; De Rossi, S; Piechaczyk, M; Bossis, G

    2014-02-13

    The inducible proto-oncogenic (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex binds 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-responsive elements (TRE) in its target genes. It is tightly controlled at multiple levels to avoid the deleterious effects of its inappropriate activation. In particular, SUMOylation represses its transactivation capacity in transient reporter assays using constitutively expressed proteins. This led to the presumption that (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation would be required to turn-off transcription of its target genes, as proposed for various transcription factors. Instead, thanks to the generation of an antibody specific for SUMO-modified c-Fos, we provide here direct evidence that SUMOylated c-Fos is present on a stably integrated reporter TPA-inducible promoter at the onset of transcriptional activation and colocalizes with RNA polymerase II within chromatin. Interestingly, (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation limits reporter gene induction, as well as the appearance of active transcription-specific histone marks on its promoter. Moreover, non-SUMOylatable mutant (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 dimers accumulate to higher levels on their target promoter, suggesting that SUMOylation might facilitate the release of (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 from promoters. Finally, activation of GADD153, an AP-1 target gene, is also associated with a rapid increase in SUMOylation at the level of its TRE and c-Fos SUMOylation dampens its induction by TPA. Taken together, our data suggest that SUMOylation could serve to buffer transcriptional activation of AP-1 target genes.

  7. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits MAP kinases and AP-1 activation via potent MKK inhibition: the role in TNF-alpha inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Kyung; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Young Choong; Kim, Sang Geon

    2004-10-01

    Arctigenin, naturally occurring in Bardanae fructus, Saussurea medusa, Arctium lappa L., Torreya nucifera and Ipomea cairica, is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we showed that arctigenin potently inhibited the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which involved suppression of NF-kappaB activation. In the present study, we examined the effects of arctigenin on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in Raw264.7 cells and MAP kinase kinase (MKK) activity. The effect of arctigenin on activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation was also studied in association with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. Immunoblot analysis showed that arctigenin inhibited phosphorylation of MAP kinases ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK and their activities in Raw264.7 cells treated with LPS. Arctigenin potently inhibited the activity of MKK1 in vitro with the IC(50) value of 1 nM. Gel shift and reporter gene analyses revealed that arctigenin inhibited LPS-inducible AP-1 binding to the AP-1 consensus oligonucleotide and AP-1-mediated reporter gene expression. In view of the potential role of AP-1 in the induction of TNF-alpha, we next examined the inhibitory effects of arctigenin on the expression of TNF-alpha. Arctigenin blocked TNF-alpha production and decreased the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the cells exposed to LPS. These results showed that arctigenin inhibited activation of MAP kinases including ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK through the inhibition of MKK activities, leading to AP-1 inactivation, which might, at least in part, contribute to the inhibition of TNF-alpha production.

  8. Inhibitory effect of panduratin A on UV-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Seok; Kwon, Yi-Young; Han, Young-Sun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2008-10-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) induces photoaging associated with up-regulated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activities and decreased collagen synthesis. We previously reported that panduratin A, a chalcone compound isolated from KAEMPFERIA PANDURATA Roxb ., decreased MMP-1 expression in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts. Here, we have investigated the effect of panduratin A on UV-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling modules such as extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK), Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. Treatment with panduratin A in the range of 0.001 - 0.1 microM significantly inhibited UV-induced ERK, JNK and p38 activation. Moreover, inhibition of ERK, JNK and p38 by panduratin A resulted in decreased c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation induced by UV, which led to inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding activity. Panduratin A showed stronger activity than epigallocatechin 3- O-gallate (EGCG) known as a natural anti-aging agent. The results suggest that panduratin A can down-regulate UV-induced MMP-1 expression by inhibiting the MAPKs pathways and AP-1 activation. AP-1:activator protein-1 EGCG:epigallocatechin 3- O-gallate ERK:extracellular-regulated protein kinase JNK:c-Jun N-terminal kinase MAPK:mitogen-activated protein kinase MMP:matrix metalloproteinase UV:ultraviolet.

  9. Visualization of Fra-1/AP-1 activation during LPS-induced inflammatory lung injury using fluorescence optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Tamatam, Chandramohan R.; Potteti, Haranatha R.; Raman, Venu; Lee, Jae-Woo; Matthay, Michael A.; Mehta, Dolly; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate lung inflammatory response following oxidant and toxicant exposure can lead to abnormal repair and disease pathogenesis, including fibrosis. Thus early detection of molecular and cellular processes and mediators promoting lung inflammation is necessary to develop better strategies for therapeutic intervention and disease management. Previously, we have shown that transcription factor Fra-1/AP-1 plays key roles in lung inflammatory response, as Fra-1-null mice are less susceptible than wild-type mice to LPS-induced lung injury and mortality. Herein, we developed a transgenic reporter mouse model expressing tdTomato under the control of FRA-1 (human) promoter (referred to as FRA-1TdTg mice) to monitor its activation during inflammatory lung injury using fluorescence protein-based optical imaging and molecular analysis in vivo and ex vivo. A higher red fluorescent signal was observed in the lungs of LPS-treated FRA-1TdTg mice compared with vehicle controls, and Western blot and qRT-PCR analyses revealed a significant correlation with the FRA-1-tdTomato reporter expression. Immunocolocalization demonstrated expression of FRA-1-tdTomato largely in lung alveolar macrophages and to some extent in epithelial cells. Moreover, we validated these results with a second reporter mouse model that expressed green fluorescent protein upon activation of endogenous Fra-1 promoter. Additionally, we demonstrated increased expression of FRA-1 in alveolar macrophages in human lung instilled with Escherichia coli ex vivo. Collectively, our data obtained from two independent reporter mouse models and from human samples underscore the significance of Fra-1 activation in alveolar macrophages during inflammatory lung injury and may aid in developing strategies to target this transcription factor in lung injury and repair. PMID:26071555

  10. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C Krishna; Meyers, Craig; Zhan, De-Jin; You, Hong; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mehta, Jawahar L; Liu, Yong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2003-09-15

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process.

  11. UVB exposure enhanced benzanthrone-induced inflammatory responses in SKH-1 mouse skin by activating the expression of COX-2 and iNOS through MAP kinases/NF-κB/AP-1 signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sabiya; Alam, Shamshad; Pal, Anu; Kumar, Mahadeo; Singh, Dhirendra; Ansari, Kausar Mahmood

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to explore the role of UVB on benzanthrone (BA)-induced skin inflammation and its mechanism/s. SKH-1 hairless mice were topically exposed with BA (25 and 50 mg/kg b.wt) either alone or along with UVB (50 mJ/cm(2)) for 24 h and estimation of ROS, histopathological analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, mast cell staining, immunohistochemistry for COX-2 and iNOS as well as western blotting for MAPKs, p-NF-κB, c-jun, c-fos COX-2 and iNOS were carried out. Enhanced ROS generation, increased epidermal thickness, mast cell number, MPO activity, enhanced expression of COX-2 and iNOS, MAPKs, c-jun, c-fos, NF-κB were found in BA either alone or when followed by UVB treatment, compared to the control groups. Expression of COX-2, iNOS and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were found to be more enhanced in BA and UVB- exposed group compared to BA and UVB only group, while phosphorylation of JNK1/2, p38, NF-κB and expression of c-jun and c-fos were comparable with BA and UVB only groups. In summary, we suggest that UVB exposure enhanced BA-induced SKH-1 skin inflammation possibly via oxidative stress-mediated activation of MAPKs-NF-κB/AP-1 signalling, which subsequently increased the expression of COX-2 and iNOS and led to inflammation in SKH-1 mouse skin.

  12. MAPK-Activated Protein Kinases (MKs): Novel Insights and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Gaestel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Downstream of MAPKs, such as classical/atypical ERKs and p38 MAPKs, but not of JNKs, signaling is often mediated by protein kinases which are phosphorylated and activated by MAPKs and, therefore, designated MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Recently, novel insights into the specificity of the assembly of MAPK/MAPKAPK hetero-dimeric protein kinase signaling complexes have been gained. In addition, new functional aspects of MKs have been described and established functions have been challenged. This short review will summarize recent developments including the linear motif (LM) in MKs, the ERK-independent activation of RSK, the RSK-independent effects of some RSK-inhibitors and the challenged role of MK5/PRAK in tumor suppression. PMID:26779481

  13. HIV-1 Nef-induced FasL induction and bystander killing requires p38 MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Choo, Andrew Y.; Hwang, Daniel S.; Premkumar, Arumugam; Dayes, Nathanael S.; Harris, Crafford; Green, Douglas R.; Wadsworth, Scott A.; Siekierka, John J.; Weiner, David B.

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been reported to target noninfected CD4 and CD8 cells for destruction. This effect is manifested in part through up-regulation of the death receptor Fas ligand (FasL) by HIV-1 negative factor (Nef), leading to bystander damage. However, the signal transduction and transcriptional regulation of this process remains elusive. Here, we provide evidence that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is required for this process. Loss-of-function experiments through dominant-negative p38 isoform, p38 siRNA, and chemical inhibitors of p38 activation suggest that p38 is necessary for Nef-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, as inhibition leads to an attenuation of AP-1-dependent transcription. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the FasL promoter reveals that its AP-1 enhancer element is required for Nef-mediated transcriptional activation. Therefore, a linear pathway for Nef-induced FasL expression that encompasses p38 and AP-1 has been elucidated. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of the p38 pathway attenuates HIV-1-mediated bystander killing of CD8 cells in vitro. (Blood. 2005;106:2059-2068) PMID:15928037

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of α-Galactosylceramide Analogs in Activated Microglia: Involvement of the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young Sun; Park, Seung Bum; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Microglial activation plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, anti-inflammatory agents that control microglial activation can serve as potential therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we designed and synthesized α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) analogs to exert anti-inflammatory effects in activated microglia. We performed biological evaluations of 25 α-GalCer analogs and observed an interesting preliminary structure-activity relationship in their inhibitory influence on NO release and TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. After identification of 4d and 4e as hit compounds, we further investigated the underlying mechanism of their anti-inflammatory effects using RT-PCR analysis. We confirmed that 4d and 4e regulate the expression of iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, and IL-6 at the mRNA level and the expression of TNF-α at the post-transcriptional level. In addition, both 4d and 4e inhibited LPS-induced DNA binding activities of NF-κB and AP-1 and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK without affecting other MAP kinases. When we examined the anti-inflammatory effect of a p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor, SB203580, on microglial activation, we observed an identical inhibitory pattern as that of 4d and 4e, not only on NO and TNF-α production but also on the DNA binding activities of NF-κB and AP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that p38 MAPK plays an important role in the anti-inflammatory effects of 4d and 4e via the modulation of NF-κB and AP-1 activities. PMID:24523867

  15. Berberine modulates AP-1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background- Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) plays a central role in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis, we explored the possibility of its therapeutic targeting by berberine, a natural alkaloid derived from a medicinal plant species, Berberis which has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties with no known toxicity; however, the effect of berberine against HPV has not been elucidated. Results- We studied the effect of berberine on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line, SiHa and HPV18-positive cervical cancer cell line, HeLa using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays, western and northern blotting which showed that berberine could selectively inhibit constitutively activated AP-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and downregulates HPV oncogenes expression. Inhibition of AP-1 was also accompanied by changes in the composition of their DNA-binding complex. Berberine specifically downregulated expression of oncogenic c-Fos which was also absent in the AP-1 binding complex. Treatment with berberine resulted in repression of E6 and E7 levels and concomitant increase in p53 and Rb expression in both cell types. Berberine also suppressed expression of telomerase protein, hTERT, which translated into growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, a higher concentration of berberine was found to reduce the cell viability through mitochondria-mediated pathway and induce apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Conclusion- These results indicate that berberine can effectively target both the host and viral factors responsible for development of cervical cancer through inhibition of AP-1 and

  16. A mimic of phosphorylated prolactin induces apoptosis by activating AP-1 and upregulating p21/waf1 in human prostate cancer PC3 cells

    PubMed Central

    DU, LIANLIAN; WU, WEI

    2012-01-01

    A mimic of phosphorylated prolactin (S179D PRL) has been demonstrated to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo; however, the mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. In this study, we identified that a four-day treatment of S179D PRL (1 μg/ml) in human prostate PC3 cancer cells activated JNK, c-fos and c-jun, and led to apoptosis. We also demonstrated that p21/waf1 was upregulated in cells transfected with the human PRL receptor (S1b) following a four-day incubation with S179D PRL (1 μg/ml). Once the cells were cotransfected with S1b and either c-fos, c-jun or the c-fos/c-jun constructs for 24 h, S17D PRL activated JNK, c-fos and c-jun, and induced apoptosis in the c-fos/c-jun transfected cells. Additionally, S179D PRL upregulated p21 luciferase activity in the cells transfected with the S1b, activating protein-1 (AP-1) (7x) Luc or p21 Luc constructs. SP600125 (25 μM), a JNK blocker, inhibited the upregulation of AP-1 Luc and p21 Luc in the c-fos/c-jun transfected cells. These results demonstrate that S179D PRL activates JNK and AP-1, which leads to p21 upregulation and apoptosis in human prostate PC3 cancer cells. PMID:23162652

  17. Extracellular histones induce tissue factor expression in vascular endothelial cells via TLR and activation of NF-κB and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyu; Li, Lin; Liu, Jin; Lv, Ben; Chen, Fangping

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular histones have been recognized recently as proinflammatory mediators; they are released from dying cells in response to inflammatory challenge, contributing to endothelial cell dysfunction, thrombin formation, organ failure, and death during sepsis. Clinical studies suggest that the plasma concentration of the histone-DNA complex is correlated with the severity of DIC and is a poor independent prognostic marker in sepsis. In addition, platelet activation stimulates thrombus formation. Whether histones contribute to procoagulant activity in other ways remains elusive. In this study, we confirmed that histones induce tissue factor (TF) expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and macrophages. However, histones did not affect TF pathway inhibitor expression. Moreover, blocking the cell surface receptors TLR4 and TLR2 with specific neutralizing antibodies significantly reduced histone-induced TF expression. Furthermore, histones enhanced the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (c-Rel/p65) and AP-1 expression in a time-dependent manner in ECs. Mutating NF-κB and AP-1 significantly reduced histone-induced TF expression. Altogether, our experiments suggest that histone induces TF expression in ECs via cell surface receptors TLR4 and TLR2, simultaneously depending on the activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1.

  18. A novel tribasic Golgi export signal directs cargo protein interaction with activated Rab11 and AP-1–dependent Golgi–plasma membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Hirendrasinh B.; Duncan, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The reovirus fusion–associated small transmembrane (FAST) proteins comprise a unique family of viral membrane fusion proteins dedicated to inducing cell–cell fusion. We recently reported that a polybasic motif (PBM) in the cytosolic tail of reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein functions as a novel tribasic Golgi export signal. Using coimmunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays, we now show the PBM directs interaction of p14 with GTP-Rab11. Overexpression of dominant-negative Rab11 and RNA interference knockdown of endogenous Rab11 inhibited p14 plasma membrane trafficking and resulted in p14 accumulation in the Golgi complex. This is the first example of Golgi export to the plasma membrane that is dependent on the interaction of membrane protein cargo with activated Rab11. RNA interference and immunofluorescence microscopy further revealed that p14 Golgi export is dependent on AP-1 (but not AP-3 or AP-4) and that Rab11 and AP-1 both colocalize with p14 at the TGN. Together these results imply the PBM mediates interactions of p14 with activated Rab11 at the TGN, resulting in p14 sorting into AP1-coated vesicles for anterograde TGN–plasma membrane transport. PMID:26941330

  19. Early activation of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus RTA, RAP, and MTA promoters by the tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-induced AP1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhen Emily; Wu, Frederick Y; Chen, Honglin; Shamay, Meir; Zheng, Qizhi; Hayward, Gary S

    2004-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) maintains a latent infection in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells, but treatment with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) can trigger the full lytic-cycle replication in some of these cells. During lytic-cycle replication, the KSHV-encoded replication and transcription activator (RTA or ORF50), the mRNA transport and accumulation protein (MTA), and the replication-associated protein (RAP) all play crucial roles in expression of downstream viral genes as well as in mediation of viral DNA replication. The cellular CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) is induced in TPA-treated PEL cells and contributes to transactivation of the promoters for all of these genes through both direct binding and cooperative interactions with RTA and RAP targeted to upstream C/EBP sites. However, little is known about how RTA expression is triggered initially at the earliest stages after TPA induction when the C/EBP alpha levels are still limited. Treatment with TPA proved to significantly induce both AP1 DNA-binding activity and levels of activated phosphorylated cJUN in PEL cells and ectopic expression of cJUN-plus-cFOS-induced RTA protein expression in PEL cells. Cotransfected cJUN plus cFOS or TPA treatment transactivated the KSHV RTA, RAP, and MTA promoters in an AP1-binding site-dependent manner in all three promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that cJUN associates with these KSHV target promoters in PEL cells as early as 4 h after TPA treatment. Furthermore, the KSHV RTA and RAP proteins both interact with cJUN or both cJUN and cFOS in vitro or by coimmunoprecipitation from induced PEL cells and enhance cJUN-plus-cFOS-mediated transactivation of these viral promoters. Both increased phosphorylated cJUN and AP1 DNA-binding activity was detected as early as 1 h after TPA treatment in PEL cells, suggesting that AP1 activity may be crucial for very early activation of the RAP, MTA, and RTA promoters

  20. Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Ursolic Acid, a Triterpenoid Antioxidant, Is Mediated through Suppression of NF-κB, AP-1 and NF-AT

    PubMed Central

    Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K.; Sharma, Deepak; Patwardhan, Raghavendra S.; Jayakumar, S.; Kohli, Vineet; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Sainis, Krishna B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid, is the major component of many plants including apples, basil, cranberries, peppermint, rosemary, oregano and prunes and has been reported to possess antioxidant and anti-tumor properties. These properties of UA have been attributed to its ability to suppress NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B) activation. Since NF-κB, in co-ordination with NF-AT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) and AP-1(activator protein-1), is known to regulate inflammatory genes, we hypothesized that UA might exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects. Methodology/Principal Findings The anti-inflammatory effects of UA were assessed in activated T cells, B cells and macrophages. Effects of UA on ERK, JNK, NF-κB, AP-1 and NF-AT were studied to elucidate its mechanism of action. In vivo efficacy of UA was studied using mouse model of graft-versus-host disease. UA inhibited activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion in T cells, B cells and macrophages. UA inhibited mitogen-induced up-regulation of activation markers and co-stimulatory molecules in T and B cells. It inhibited mitogen-induced phosphorylation of ERK and JNK and suppressed the activation of immunoregulatory transcription factors NF-κB, NF-AT and AP-1 in lymphocytes. Treatment of cells with UA prior to allogenic transplantation significantly delayed induction of acute graft-versus-host disease in mice and also significantly reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IFN-γ. UA treatment inhibited T cell activation even when added post-mitogenic stimulation demonstrating its therapeutic utility as an anti-inflammatory agent. Conclusions/Significance The present study describes the detailed mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of UA. Further, UA may find application in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:22363615

  1. Molecular Weight-Dependent Immunostimulative Activity of Low Molecular Weight Chitosan via Regulating NF-κB and AP-1 Signaling Pathways in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; Wen, Zheng-Shun; Huang, Yun-Juan; Xia, Mei-Sheng; Xiang, Xing-Wei; Qu, You-Le

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives such as low molecular weight chitosans (LMWCs) have been found to possess many important biological properties, such as antioxidant and antitumor effects. In our previous study, LMWCs were found to elicit a strong immunomodulatory response in macrophages dependent on molecular weight. Herein we further investigated the molecular weight-dependent immunostimulative activity of LMWCs and elucidated its mechanism of action on RAW264.7 macrophages. LMWCs (3 kDa and 50 kDa of molecular weight) could significantly enhance the mRNA expression levels of COX-2, IL-10 and MCP-1 in a molecular weight and concentration-dependent manner. The results suggested that LMWCs elicited a significant immunomodulatory response, which was dependent on the dose and the molecular weight. Regarding the possible molecular mechanism of action, LMWCs promoted the expression of the genes of key molecules in NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, including IKKβ, TRAF6 and JNK1, and induced the phosphorylation of protein IKBα in RAW264.7 macrophage. Moreover, LMWCs increased nuclear translocation of p65 and activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1, C-Jun and C-Fos) in a molecular weight-dependent manner. Taken together, our findings suggested that LMWCs exert immunostimulative activity via activation of NF-κB and AP-1 pathways in RAW264.7 macrophages in a molecular weight-dependent manner and that 3 kDa LMWC shows great potential as a novel agent for the treatment of immune suppression diseases and in future vaccines. PMID:27657093

  2. A new APE1/Ref-1-dependent pathway leading to reduction of NF-kappaB and AP-1, and activation of their DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kozue; Hirao, Satoshi; Kabe, Yasuaki; Ogura, Yuji; Sato, Iwao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    APE1/Ref-1 is thought to be a multifunctional protein involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) regulation and base excision DNA repair, and is required for early embryonic development in mice. APE1/Ref-1 has redox activity and AP endonuclease activity, and is able to enhance DNA-binding activity of several transcription factors, including NF-kappaB, AP-1 and p53, through reduction of their critical cysteine residues. However, it remains elusive exactly how APE1/Ref-1 carries out its essential functions in vivo. Here, we show that APE1/Ref-1 not only reduces target transcription factors directly but also facilitates their reduction by other reducing molecules such as glutathione or thioredoxin. The new activity of APE1/Ref-1, termed redox chaperone activity, is exerted at concentration significantly lower than that required for its redox activity and is neither dependent on its redox activity nor on its AP endonuclease activity. We also show evidence that redox chaperone activity of APE1/Ref-1 is critical to NF-kappaB-mediated gene expression in human cells and is mediated through its physical association with target transcription factors. Thus, APE1/Ref-1 may play multiple roles in an antioxidative stress response pathway through its different biochemical activities. These findings also provide new insight into the mechanism of intracellular redox regulation.

  3. Two tobacco AP1-like gene promoters with highly specific, tightly regulated and uniquely expressed activity during floral transition, initiation and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotech engineering of agronomic traits requires an array of highly specific and tightly regulated promoters in flower or other tissues. In this study, we isolated and characterized two tobacco AP1-like promoters (termed NtAP1La and NtAP1Lb1) in transgenic plants using GUS reporter and tissue-speci...

  4. Prednisone inhibits the IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 in HEI-OC1 murine auditory cells through the inhibition of ERK-1/2, JNK-1 and AP-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hua; Jang, Byeong-Churl

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss can be induced by multiple causes, including cochlear inflammation. Prednisone (PDN) is a well-known steroid clinically used in the treatment of hearing loss. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects and the mechanisms of action of PDN on the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, an inflammatory enzyme involved in the production of prostaglandins (PGs), in House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 (HEI-OC1) cells (a murine auditory cell line) treated with the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-1β. The exposure of HEI-OC1 cells to IL-1β increased COX-2 protein and mRNA expression, COX-2 promoter-driven luciferase activity and COX-2 enzymatic activity [as indicated by the increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major COX-2 metabolite]. However, PDN markedly inhibited the IL-1β-induced COX-2 protein and mRNA expression, COX-2 promoter activity and PGE2 production in the HEI-OC1 cells without affecting COX-2 protein and mRNA stability. PDN further inhibited the IL-1β-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-1, but had no effect on the cytokine-induced activation of p38 MAPK and proteolysis of IκB-α, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitory protein. PDN also partially suppressed the IL-1β‑induced activation of activator protein (AP)-1 (but not that of NF-κB) promoter-driven luciferase activity. Of note, the inhibitory effects of PDN on the IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and the activation of ERK-1/2 and JNK-1 in the HEI-OC1 cells were significantly diminished by RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, suggesting that PDN exerts its inhibitory effects through GR. To the best of our knowledge, our study demonstrates for the first time that PDN inhibits the IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression and activity in HEI-OC1 cells by COX-2 transcriptional repression, which is partly associated with the inhibition of ERK-1/2, JNK-1 and AP-1 activation.

  5. Low doses of LPS and minimally oxidized LDL cooperatively activate macrophages via NF-kappaB and AP-1: Possible mechanism for acceleration of atherosclerosis by subclinical endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Philipp; Choi, Soo-Ho; Almazan, Felicidad; Benner, Christopher; Huang, Wendy; Diehl, Cody J.; Gonen, Ayelet; Butler, Susan; Witztum, Joseph L.; Glass, Christopher K.; Miller, Yury I.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is an important determinant of inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions. It has also been documented that certain chronic infectious diseases, such as periodontitis and chlamydial infection, exacerbate clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis. In addition, low-level but persistent metabolic endotoxemia is often found in diabetic and obese subjects and is induced in mice fed a high-fat diet. Objective In this study, we examined cooperative macrophage activation by low levels of bacterial LPS and by minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL), as a model for subclinical endotoxemia-complicated atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We found that both in vitro and in vivo, mmLDL and LPS (Kdo2-LipidA) cooperatively activated macrophages to express pro-inflammatory cytokines Cxcl2 (MIP-2), Ccl3 (MIP-1alpha), and Ccl4 (MIP-1beta). Importantly, the mmLDL and LPS cooperative effects were evident at a threshold LPS concentration (1 ng/ml) at which LPS alone induced only a limited macrophage response. Analyzing microarray data with a de novo motif discovery algorithm, we found that genes transcribed by promoters containing an AP-1 binding site were significantly upregulated by co-stimulation with mmLDL and LPS. In a nuclear factor-DNA binding assay, the cooperative effect of mmLDL and LPS co-stimulation on c-Jun and c-Fos DNA binding, but not on p65 or p50, was dependent on mmLDL-induced activation of ERK1/2. In addition, mmLDL induced JNK-dependent derepression of AP-1 by removing the corepressor NCoR from the chemokine promoters. Conclusions The cooperative engagement of AP-1 and NF-kappaB by mmLDL and LPS may constitute a mechanism of increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines within atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:20489162

  6. Nobiletin and tangeretin ameliorate scratching behavior in mice by inhibiting the action of histamine and the activation of NF-κB, AP-1 and p38.

    PubMed

    Jang, Se-Eun; Ryu, Kwon-Ryeol; Park, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Suna; Teruya, Yuto; Han, Myung Joo; Woo, Je-Tae; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Nobiletin and tangeretin are polymethoxy flavonoids that are abundantly present in the pericarp of Citrus unshiu (family Rutaceae) and the fruit of Citrus depressa (family Rutaceae). They exhibit various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and anti-asthmatic effects. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of nobiletin and tangeretin, we measured their inhibitory effects in histamine- or compound 48/80-induced scratching behavioral mice. Nobiletin and tangeretin potently inhibited scratching behavior, as well as histamine-induced vascular permeability. Furthermore, they inhibited the expression of the allergic cytokines, IL-4 and TNF-α as well as the activation of their transcription factors NF-κB, AP-1 and p38 in histamine-stimulated skin tissues. They also inhibited the expression of IL-4 and TNF-α and the activation of NF-κB and c-jun in PMA-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. Furthermore, nobiletin and tangeretin inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) activity and the IgE-induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells. These agents showed potent anti-histamine effect through the Magnus test when guinea pig ileum was used. Based on these results, nobiletin and tangeretin may ameliorate scratching behavioral reactions by inhibiting the action of histamine as well as the activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 via PKC.

  7. Treatment of melanoma cells with the synthetic retinoid CD437 induces apoptosis via activation of AP-1 in vitro, and causes growth inhibition in xenografts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Human malignant melanoma is notoriously resistant to pharmacological modulation. We describe here for the first time that the synthetic retinoid CD437 has a strong dose-dependent antiproliferative effect on human melanoma cells (IC50: 5 x 10(-6) M) via the induction of programmed cell death, as judged by analysis of cell morphology, electron microscopical features, and DNA fragmentation. Programmed cell death was preceded by a strong activation of the AP-1 complex in CD437- treated cells as demonstrated by gel retardation and chloramphenicol transferase (CAT) assays. Northern blot analysis showed a time- dependent increase in the expression of c-fos and c-jun encoding components of AP-1, whereas bcl-2 and p53 mRNA levels remained constant. CD437 also exhibited a strong growth inhibitory effect on MeWo melanoma cells in a xenograft model. In tissue sections of CD437- treated MeWo tumors from these animals, apoptotic melanoma cells and c- fos overexpressing cells were colocalized by TdT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and in situ hybridization. Taken together, this report identifies CD437 as a retinoid that activates and upregulates the transcription factor AP-1, leading eventually to programmed cell death of exposed human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether synthetic retinoids such as CD437 represent a new class of retinoids, which may open up new ways to a more effective therapy of malignant melanoma. PMID:8991099

  8. Sargahydroquinoic acid inhibits TNFα-induced AP-1 and NF-κB signaling in HaCaT cells through PPARα activation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Youngsic; Jung, Yujung; Kim, Min Cheol; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Yong Kee; Kim, Su-Nam

    2014-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and expressed in various cell types in the skin, including keratinocytes, fibroblasts and infiltrating immune cells. Thus, their ligands are targets for the treatment of various skin disorders, such as photo-aging and chronological aging of skin. Intensive studies have revealed that PPARα/γ functions in photo-aging and age-related inflammation by regulating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) via activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). However, the detailed mechanism of PPARα/γ's role in skin aging has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we confirmed that sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA) as a PPARα/γ ligand significantly decreased Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFα)-induced MMP-2/-9 expression by downregulating TNFα-induced transcription factors, subsequently reducing IκBα degradation and blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in HaCaT human epidermal keratinocyte cells. Treatment of cells with SHQA and GW6471 (PPARα antagonist) not bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (PPARγ antagonists), reversed the effect on TNFα-induced inflammatory signaling pathway activation. Taken together, our data suggest that SHQA inhibit TNFα-induced MMP-2/-9 expression and age-related inflammation by suppressing AP-1 and NF-κB pathway via PPARα. PMID:25019995

  9. Dehydrocorydaline promotes myogenic differentiation via p38 MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Miran; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Yong Kee; Seo, Dong-Wan; Baek, Nam-In; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kang, Jong-Sun; Bae, Gyu-Un

    2016-01-01

    Muscle regeneration is a coordinated process that involves proliferation and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells. Activation of MyoD is a key event in myogenic differentiation, which is regulated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). In a screen of natural compounds for the enhancement of MyoD activity, dehydrocorydaline (DHC) from the Corydalis tuber was identified. Treatment of C2C12 myoblasts with DHC increased the expression levels of muscle-specific proteins, including MyoD, myogenin and myosin heavy chain. In addition, C2C12 myoblasts exhibited enhanced multinucleated myotube formation without any cytotoxicity. Treatment with DHC elevated p38 MAPK activation and the interaction of MyoD with an E protein, which is likely to result in activation of MyoD and promotion of myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, defects in differentiation-induced p38 MAPK activation and myoblast differentiation induced by depletion of the promyogenic receptor protein Cdo in C2C12 myoblasts were restored by DHC treatment. In conclusion, these results indicated that DHC stimulates p38 MAPK activation, which can enhance heterodimerization of MyoD and E proteins, thus resulting in MyoD activation and myoblast differentiation. These findings suggested that DHC may be considered a potential therapeutic compound for the improvement of muscle stem cell regenerative capacity in injured muscle. PMID:27573543

  10. Curcumin suppresses activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 induced by phorbol ester in cultured human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong-Su; Keum, Young-Sam; Seo, Hyo-Joung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2002-05-31

    Many components that are derived from medicinal or dietary plants possess potential chemopreventive properties. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn, Zingiberaceae), possesses strong antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. In this study, we have found that curcumin inhibits the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced nuclear factor kB (NF-kappaB) activation by preventing the degradation of the inhibitory protein IkBalpa; and the subsequent translocation of the p65 subunit in cultured human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Alternatively, curcumin repressed the TPA-induced activation of NF-kappaB through direct interruption of the binding of NF-kappaB to its consensus DNA sequences. Likewise, the TPA-induced DNA binding of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) was inhibited by curcumin pretreatment. PMID:12297018

  11. Glutathione depletion exacerbates impairment by oxidative stress of phosphoinositide hydrolysis, AP-1, and NF-kappaB activation by cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Song, L; Jope, R S

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative stress appears to contribute to neuronal dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease and other CNS neurodegenerative disorders. This investigation examined if oxidative stress might contribute to impairments in cholinergic receptor-linked signaling systems and if intracellular glutathione levels modulated responses to oxidative stress. To do this the activation of the AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors and of the phosphoinositide second-messenger system was measured in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after exposure to the oxidants H2O2 or diamide, with or without prior depletion of cellular glutathione. H2O2 concentration-dependently inhibited carbachol-stimulated AP-1 activation and this inhibition was potentiated in glutathione-depleted cells. Carbachol-stimulated NF-kappaB activation was unaffected by H2O2 unless glutathione was depleted, in which case there was a H2O2 concentration-dependent inhibition. Glutathione depletion also potentiated the inhibition by H2O2 of carbachol- or G-protein (NaF)-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis, whereas phospholipase C activated by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was not inhibited. The thiol-oxidizing agent diamide also inhibited phosphoinositide hydrolysis stimulated by carbachol or NaF, and glutathione depletion potentiated the diamide concentration-dependent inhibition. Unlike H2O2, diamide also inhibited ionomycin-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis. Activation of both AP-1 and NF-kappaB stimulated by carbachol was inhibited by diamide, and glutathione depletion potentiated the inhibitory effects of diamide. Thus, diamide inhibited a wider range of signaling processes than did H2O2, but glutathione depletion increased the susceptibility of phosphoinositide hydrolysis and of transcription factor activation to inhibition by both H2O2 and diamide. These results demonstrate that the vulnerability of signaling systems to oxidative stress is influenced by intracellular glutathione levels

  12. Transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3)-induced activation of AP-1 requires Ca2+ ions and the transcription factors c-Jun, ATF2, and ternary complex factor.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Andrea; Hui, Xin; Lipp, Peter; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    The steroid pregnenolone sulfate activates the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) via stimulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3) channels. Here, we show that the signaling pathway requires an influx of Ca(2+) ions into the cells and a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The upregulation of AP-1 was attenuated in cells that overexpressed mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatase-1, indicating that Ca(2+) ions prolong the signaling cascade via activation of mitogen activated protein kinases. On the transcriptional level, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of the basic region leucine zipper protein c-Jun, a major constituent of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, or expression of a c-Jun-specific short hairpin RNA attenuated pregnenolone sulfate-induced AP-1 activation. In addition, stimulation of TRPM3 channels increased the transcriptional activation potential of the basic region leucine zipper protein ATF2. Inhibition of ATF2 target gene expression via expression of a dominant-negative mutant of ATF2 or expression of an ATF2-specific short hairpin RNA interfered with TRPM3-mediated stimulation of AP-1. Moreover, we show that a dominant-negative mutant of the ternary complex factor (TCF) Elk-1 attenuated the upregulation of AP-1 following stimulation of TRPM3 channels. Thus, c-Jun, ATF2, and TCFs are required to connect the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by activation of TRPM3 channels with enhanced transcription of AP-1-regulated genes. We conclude that pregnenolone sulfate-induced TRPM3 channel activation changes the gene expression pattern of the cells by activating transcription of c-Jun-, ATF2-, and TCF-controlled genes.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide mediates hyperglycemia-induced invasive activity via ERK and p38 MAPK in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiguang; Li, Xuqi; Xu, Qinhong; Duan, Wanxing; Chen, Xin; Lv, Yunfu; Zhou, Shuang; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong; Huo, Xiongwei

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer are intimately related, as approximately 85% of pancreatic cancer patients suffer from glucose intolerance or even diabetes. In this study, we evaluate the underlying mechanism by which hyperglycemia modulates the invasive potential of cancer cells and contributes to their enhanced metastatic behavior. Here we show that hyperglycemia increases the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration through up-regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression, which further activates the ERK and p38 MAPK pathways, as well as the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1, in a time-dependent manner. The invasion of pancreatic cancer cells resulting from the activation of the H2O2/MAPK axis under high glucose conditions is effectively inhibited by PD 98059 (ERK inhibitor), SB 203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor), polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT), or the siRNA specific to SOD2. In addition, streptozotocin-treated diabetic nude mice exhibit a stronger tumor invasive ability in renal capsule xenografts which could be suppressed by PEG-CAT treatment. Furthermore, the integrated optical density (IOD) of SOD2 and uPA stainings is higher in the tumor tissues of pancreatic cancer patients with diabetes compared with pancreatic cancer patients with euglycemia. Taken together, our results demonstrate that hyperglycemia enhances cell invasive ability through the SOD2/H2O2/MAPK axis in human pancreatic cancer. Thus, SOD2/H2O2/MAPK axis may represent a promising therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer patients combined with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26439801

  14. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W.; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D.; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J.; Modlin, Robert L.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Lo, Roger S.; McBride, William H.; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAFV600-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  15. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J; Modlin, Robert L; Herschman, Harvey R; Lo, Roger S; McBride, William H; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-08-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAF(V600)-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds.

  16. Global Expression Analysis Identified a Preferentially Nerve Growth Factor-induced Transcriptional Program Regulated by Sustained Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) and AP-1 Protein Activation during PC12 Cell Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Mullenbrock, Steven; Shah, Janki; Cooper, Geoffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells in response to NGF is a prototypical model in which signal duration determines a biological response. Sustained ERK activity induced by NGF, as compared with transient activity induced by EGF, is critical to the differentiation of these cells. To characterize the transcriptional program activated preferentially by NGF, we compared global gene expression profiles between cells treated with NGF and EGF for 2–4 h, when sustained ERK signaling in response to NGF is most distinct from the transient signal elicited by EGF. This analysis identified 69 genes that were preferentially up-regulated in response to NGF. As expected, up-regulation of these genes was mediated by sustained ERK signaling. In addition, they were up-regulated in response to other neuritogenic treatments (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus dbcAMP) and were enriched for genes related to neuronal differentiation/function. Computational analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified binding of CREB and AP-1 family members (Fos, FosB, Fra1, JunB, JunD) upstream of >30 and 50%, respectively, of the preferentially NGF-induced genes. Expression of several AP-1 family members was induced by both EGF and NGF, but their induction was more robust and sustained in response to NGF. The binding of Fos family members to their target genes was similarly sustained in response to NGF and was reduced upon MEK inhibition, suggesting that AP-1 contributes significantly to the NGF transcriptional program. Interestingly, Fra1 as well as two other NGF-induced AP-1 targets (HB-EGF and miR-21) function in positive feedback loops that may contribute to sustained AP-1 activity. PMID:22065583

  17. The ether lipid 1-octadecyl-2-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine induces expression of fos and jun proto-oncogenes and activates AP-1 transcription factor in human leukaemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, F; Gajate, C; Modolell, M

    1994-01-01

    The ether lipid analogue 1-octadecyl-2-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3) has been recently shown to induce apoptosis in the human leukaemic HL-60 and U937 myeloid cell lines [Mollinedo, Martinez-Dalmau and Modolell (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 192, 603-609]. We have found that ET-18-OCH3 is also able to promote apoptosis in the human leukaemic Jurkat T lymphoid cell line. This lymphoid cell line as well as the two myeloid HL-60 and U937 cell lines incorporated significant amounts of exogenously added radiolabelled ET-18-OCH3. Addition of ET-18-OCH3 to these human leukaemic cells induced an increase in the steady-state mRNA levels of fos and jun proto-oncogenes, components of the transcription factor AP-1. These increases in fos and jun mRNA levels were associated with the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor after addition of ET-18-OCH3 to human leukaemic cells, as assessed by an enhanced binding activity of transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate DNA sequence as well as by stimulation of transcription from an AP-1 enhancer element. These data demonstrate that the ether lipid ET-18-OCH3 can affect gene expression by inducing expression of fos and jun proto-oncogenes and by modulating the activity of transcription factor AP-1. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8092982

  18. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 gene product interacts with and trans-activates the AP1 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Antinore, M J; Birrer, M J; Patel, D; Nader, L; McCance, D J

    1996-01-01

    The E7 gene product of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds to the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) and dissociates pRb-E2F complexes. However, the observation that the ability of E7 to bind pRb is not required for the HPV16-induced immortalization of primary keratinocytes prompted a search for other cellular factors bound by E7. Using a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein system, we show that E7 complexes with AP1 transcription factors including c-Jun, JunB, JunD and c-Fos. The ability of E7 to complex with c-Jun in vivo is demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and the yeast two-hybrid system. An analysis of E7 point mutants in the GST system indicates that the E7 zinc-finger motif, but not the pRb binding domain, is involved in these interactions. Using c-Jun deletion mutants, E7 binding maps between amino acids 224 and 286 of c-Jun. E7 trans-activates c-Jun-induced transcription from a Jun responsive promoter, and this activity correlates with the ability of E7 mutants to bind Jun proteins. Finally, a transcriptionally inactive c-Jun deletion, which can bind E7, interferes with the E7-induced transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts in cooperation with an activated ras, indicating that the Jun-E7 interaction is physiologically relevant and that Jun factors may be targeted in the E7 transformation pathway. Images PMID:8617242

  19. p38γ and p38δ Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs), New Stars in the MAPK Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Escós, Alejandra; Risco, Ana; Alsina-Beauchamp, Dayanira; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases p38γ and p38δ belong to the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. p38MAPK signaling controls many cellular processes and is one of the most conserved mechanisms in eukaryotes for the cellular response to environmental stress and inflammation. Although p38γ and p38δ are widely expressed, it is likely that they perform specific functions in different tissues. Their involvement in human pathologies such as inflammation-related diseases or cancer is starting to be uncovered. In this article we give a general overview and highlight recent advances made in defining the functions of p38γ and p38δ, focusing in innate immunity and inflammation. We consider the potential of the pharmacological targeting of MAPK pathways to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27148533

  20. p38γ and p38δ Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs), New Stars in the MAPK Galaxy

    PubMed Central

    Escós, Alejandra; Risco, Ana; Alsina-Beauchamp, Dayanira; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases p38γ and p38δ belong to the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. p38MAPK signaling controls many cellular processes and is one of the most conserved mechanisms in eukaryotes for the cellular response to environmental stress and inflammation. Although p38γ and p38δ are widely expressed, it is likely that they perform specific functions in different tissues. Their involvement in human pathologies such as inflammation-related diseases or cancer is starting to be uncovered. In this article we give a general overview and highlight recent advances made in defining the functions of p38γ and p38δ, focusing in innate immunity and inflammation. We consider the potential of the pharmacological targeting of MAPK pathways to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27148533

  1. A novel synthetic derivative of the natural product berbamine inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells, associated with activation of JNK/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Nam, Sangkil; Zhao, Robin; Tian, Yan; Liu, Lucy; Horne, David A; Jove, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents. There is a critical need to find more potent drugs for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease. Berbamine (BBM) is a natural compound derived from the Berberis amurensis plants. BBM and its derivatives have been shown to have antitumor effects in several cancers. Here, we report that a novel synthetic berbamine derivative, BBMD3, inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of G292, KHOS, and MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Induction of apoptosis in these tumor cells depends on activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Since pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and caspase-9 inhibitor (Z-LEHD-FMK) could block the cleavage of PARP, the apoptosis induced by BBMD3 is through intrinsic signaling pathway. BBMD3 increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), resulting in increase of phosphorylated c-Jun and total c-Fos, the major components of transcriptional factor AP-1. JNK inhibitor could partially suppress antitumor effect of BBMD3 on osteosarcoma cells. BBMD3 increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), could block the phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun induced by BBMD3. BBMD3 increased the expression of the pro-apototic gene Bad, associated with apoptosis induction. Finally, BBMD3 also decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and D2, the positive cell cycle regulators, which is correlated with growth inhibition in osteosarcoma cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that BBMD3 is a potentially promising drug for the treatment of human osteosarcoma.

  2. Identification of GATA2 and AP-1 activator elements within the enhancer VNTR occurring in intron 5 of the human SIRT3 gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human SIRT3 gene contains an intronic VNTR enhancer. A T > C transition occurring in the second repeat of each VNTR allele implies the presence/absence of a putative GATA binding motif. A partially overlapping AP-1 site, not affected by the transition, was also identified. Aims of the present study ...

  3. Evolutionary history of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in Lotus, Medicago, and Phaseolus

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P; Benson, Benjamin V; MacArthur, Kenton J; Piya, Sarbottam

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) genes encode proteins that mediate various signaling pathways associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses in eukaryotes. The MAPK genes form a 3-tier signal transduction cascade between cellular stimuli and physiological responses. Recent identification of soybean MAPKs and availability of genome sequences from other legume species allowed us to identify their MAPK genes. The main objectives of this study were to identify MAPKs in 3 legume species, Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, and to assess their phylogenetic relationships. We used approaches in comparative genomics for MAPK gene identification and named the newly identified genes following Arabidopsis MAPK nomenclature model. We identified 19, 18, and 15 MAPKs and 7, 4, and 9 MAPKKs in the genome of Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, respectively. Within clade placement of MAPKs and MAPKKs in the 3 legume species were consistent with those in soybean and Arabidopsis. Among 5 clades of MAPKs, 4 founder clades were consistent to MAPKs of other plant species and orthologs of MAPK genes in the fifth clade-"Clade E" were consistent with those in soybean. Our results also indicated that some gene duplication events might have occurred prior to eudicot-monocot divergence. Highly diversified MAPKs in soybean relative to those in 3 other legume species are attributable to the polyploidization events in soybean. The identification of the MAPK genes in the legume species is important for the legume crop improvement; and evolutionary relationships and functional divergence of these gene members provide insights into plant genome evolution. PMID:24317362

  4. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein induces transcription factor AP-1 by activation of extracellular signal-regulated and c-Jun N-terminal mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Su, F; Doria, M; Schneider, R J

    1996-01-01

    The HBx protein of hepatitis B virus is a dual-specificity activator of transcription, stimulating signal transduction pathways in the cytoplasm and transcription factors in the nucleus, when expressed in cell lines in culture. In the cytoplasm, HBx was shown to stimulate the Ras-Raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) cascade, which is essential for activation of transcription factor AP-1. Here we show that HBx protein stimulates two independently regulated members of the MAP kinase family when expressed transiently in cells. HBx protein stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). HBx activation of ERKs and JNKs leads to induction and activation of AP-1 DNA binding activity involving transient de novo synthesis of c-Fos protein and prolonged synthesis of c-Jun, mediated by N-terminal phosphorylation of c-Jun carried out by HBx-activated JNK. New c-Jun synthesis was blocked by coexpression with a dominant-negative MAP kinase kinase (MEK kinase, MEKK-1), confirming that HBx stimulates the prolonged synthesis of c-Jun by activating JNK signalling pathways. Activation of the c-fos gene was blocked by coexpression with a Raf-C4 catalytic mutant, confirming that HBx induces c-Fos by acting on Ras-Raf linked pathways. HBx activation of ERK and JNK pathways resulted in prolonged accumulation of AP-1-c-Jun dimer complexes. HBx activation of JNK and sustained activation of c-jun, should they occur in the context of hepatitis B virus infection, might play a role in viral transformation and pathogenesis. PMID:8764004

  5. Identification, Nomenclature, and Evolutionary Relationships of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P.; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S.; Reese, R. Neil; Benson, Benjamin V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution. PMID:24137047

  6. Pycnogenol Attenuates the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Expression of Perilipin 2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglia in Part via Inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Dun, Sai-Hong; Gu, Jian-Qiu; Guo, Yang; Ikuyama, Shoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Over activation of microglia results in the production of proinflammatory agents that have been implicated in various brain diseases. Pycnogenol is a patented extract from French maritime pine bark (Pinus pinaster Aiton) with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potency. The present study investigated whether pycnogenol may be associated with the production of proinflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 (mouse-derived) microglia. It was found that pycnogenol treatment was dose-dependently associated with significantly less release of nitricoxide (NO), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, and lower levels of intercellular adhesion molecule1 (ICAM-1) and perilipin 2 (PLIN2). Furthermore, this effect was replicated in primary brain microglia. Levels of inducible NO synthase mRNA and protein were attenuated, whereas there was no change in the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Further evidence indicated that pycnogenol treatment led to the suppression of NF-κB activation through inhibition of p65 translocation into the nucleus and inhibited DNA binding of AP-1, suggesting that these proinflammatory factors are associated with NF-κB and AP-1. We conclude that pycnogenol exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of the NF-κB and AP-1pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic agent in the prevention of diseases caused by over activation of microglia. PMID:26367267

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichi; Goto, Motomitsu; Onoue, Takeshi; Tsunekawa, Taku; Shibata, Miyuki; Hagimoto, Shigeru; Ito, Yoshihiro; Banno, Ryoichi; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2014-05-21

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) is shown to negatively regulate MAPK signaling in various peripheral tissues as well as the central nervous system such as cortex, striatum and hippocampus. In this study, we examined whether MKP-1 regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus. Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα significantly increased MKP-1 mRNA expression in paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in the hypothalamus. TNFα treatment induced increases in MKP-1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, accompanied by the inactivation of MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamic explants. Inhibition of MKP-1 by its inhibitor or siRNA increased MAPK activity in the explants. Our data indicate that MKP-1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus.

  8. An Estrogen Receptor-α/p300 Complex Activates the BRCA-1 Promoter at an AP-1 Site That Binds Jun/Fos Transcription Factors: Repressive Effects of p53 on BRCA-1 Transcription1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffy, Brandon D; Hockings, Jennifer K; Kemp, Michael Q; Morgan, Sherif S; Hager, Jill A; Beliakoff, Jason; Whitesell, Luke J; Bowden, G. Timothy; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2005-01-01

    Abstract One of the puzzles in cancer predisposition is that women carrying BRCA-1 mutations preferentially develop tumors in epithelial tissues of the breast and ovary. Moreover, sporadic breast tumors contain lower levels of BRCA-1 in the absence of mutations in the BRCA-1 gene. The problem of tissue specificity requires analysis of factors that are unique to tissues of the breast. For example, the expression of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) is inversely correlated with breast cancer risk, and 90% of BRCA-1 tumors are negative for ERα. Here, we show that estrogen stimulates BRCA-1 promoter activity in transfected cells and the recruitment of ERα and its cofactor p300 to an AP-1 site that binds Jun/Fos transcription factors. The recruitment of ERα/p300 coincides with accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle and is antagonized by the antiestrogen tamoxifen. Conversely, we document that overexpression of wild-type p53 prevents the recruitment of ERα to the AP-1 site and represses BRCA-1 promoter activity. Taken together, our findings support a model in which an ERα/AP-1 complex modulates BRCA-1 transcription under conditions of estrogen stimulation. Conversely, the formation of this transcription complex is abrogated in cells overexpressing p53. PMID:16229810

  9. Role of amygdala MAPK activation on immobility behavior of forced swim rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tung-Yi; Lin, Chih-Hung

    2006-10-01

    The role of amygdala mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in rats during a forced swim test was investigated. The variation of amygdala MAPK level was studied in control rats and early-life maternally deprived rats. A forced swim test was carried out to estimate the immobility level. The data showed that the immobility time of rats that received maternal deprivation in early life was longer than that of control rats and Western blot analysis also showed that the amygdala phospho-MAPK level in maternally deprived rats was almost two times higher than in control rats. Intra-amygdala infusion of PD098059 or U0126, MEK inhibitors, suppressed immobility behavior during the forced swim test in both rats. Western blot analysis also showed that the amygdala MAPK activities in both rats infused with MEK inhibitors were also suppressed in parallel with expression of immobility behavior. The suppressed MAPK activities as well as the restoration of immobility time returned to the original level 48 h later. These results suggest that amygdala MAPK activation might play a role in the regulation of immobility behavior in rats during the forced swim test. Moreover, it could provide a hint that amygdala MAPK activation might be involved in the formation of depression-like behavior.

  10. Calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for sperm activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bin; He, Ruijun; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long

    2014-02-01

    In nematode, sperm activation (or spermiogenesis), a process in which the symmetric and non-motile spermatids transform into polarized and crawling spermatozoa, is critical for sperm cells to acquire fertilizing competence. SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent pathways function redundantly during sperm activation in both males and hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the downstream signaling for both pathways remains unclear. Here we show that calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for both SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent sperm activation, implying that both pathways share common downstream signaling components during sperm activation. We demonstrate that activation of the MAPK cascade is sufficient to activate spermatids derived from either wild-type or spe-8 group mutant males and that activation of the MAPK cascade bypasses the requirement of calcium signal to induce sperm activation, indicating that the MAPK cascade functions downstream of or parallel with the calcium signaling during sperm activation. Interestingly, the persistent activation of MAPK in activated spermatozoa inhibits Major Sperm Protein (MSP)-based cytoskeleton dynamics. We demonstrate that MAPK plays dual roles in promoting pseudopod extension during sperm activation but also blocking the MSP-based, amoeboid motility of the spermatozoa. Thus, though nematode sperm are crawling cells, morphologically distinct from flagellated sperm, and the molecular machinery for motility of amoeboid and flagellated sperm is different, both types of sperm might utilize conserved signaling pathways to modulate sperm maturation.

  11. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.

  12. Ras-GTP dimers activate the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li-Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors. PMID:26080442

  13. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore » to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  14. Activation of the transcription factor FosB/activating protein-1 (AP-1) is a prominent downstream signal of the extracellular nucleotide receptor P2RX7 in monocytic and osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Gavala, Monica L; Hill, Lindsay M; Lenertz, Lisa Y; Karta, Maya R; Bertics, Paul J

    2010-10-29

    Activation of the ionotropic P2RX7 nucleotide receptor by extracellular ATP has been implicated in modulating inflammatory disease progression. Continuous exposure of P2RX7 to ligand can result in apoptosis in many cell types, including monocytic cells, whereas transient activation of P2RX7 is linked to inflammatory mediator production and the promotion of cell growth. Given the rapid hydrolysis of ATP in the circulation and interstitial space, transient activation of P2RX7 appears critically important for its action, yet its effects on gene expression are unclear. The present study demonstrates that short-term stimulation of human and mouse monocytic cells as well as mouse osteoblasts with P2RX7 agonists substantially induces the expression of several activating protein-1 (AP-1) members, particularly FosB. The potent activation of FosB after P2RX7 stimulation is especially noteworthy considering that little is known concerning the role of FosB in immunological regulation. Interestingly, the magnitude of FosB activation induced by P2RX7 stimulation appears greater than that observed with other known inducers of FosB expression. In addition, we have identified a previously unrecognized role for FosB in osteoblasts with respect to nucleotide-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis from arachidonic acid and is critical for osteoblastic differentiation and immune behavior. The present studies are the first to link P2RX7 action to FosB/AP-1 regulation in multiple cell types, including a role in nucleotide-induced COX-2 expression, and support a role for FosB in the control of immune and osteogenic function by P2RX7. PMID:20813842

  15. Id-1 is induced in MDCK epithelial cells by activated Erk/MAPK pathway in response to expression of the Snail and E47 transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, Mireia; Vinyals, Antonia; Marazuela, Anna; Cubillo, Eva; Olmeda, David; Valero, Eva; Cano, Amparo; Fabra, Angels . E-mail: afabra@idibell.org

    2007-07-01

    Id-1, a member of the helix-loop-helix transcription factor family has been shown to be involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis and invasion of many types of human cancers. We have previously shown that stable expression of E47 and Snail repressors of the E-cadherin promoter in MDCK epithelial cell line triggers epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) concomitantly with changes in gene expression. We show here that both factors activate the Id-1 gene promoter and induce Id-1 mRNA and protein. The upregulation of the Id-1 gene occurs through the transactivation of the promoter by the Erk/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, oncogenic Ras is also able to activate Id-1 promoter in MDCK cells in the absence of both E47 and Snail transcription factors. Several transcriptionally active regulatory elements have been identified in the proximal promoter, including AP-1, Sp1 and four putative E-boxes. By EMSA, we only detected an increased binding to Sp1 and AP-1 elements in E47- and Snail-expressing cells. Binding is affected by the treatment of cells with PD 98059 MEK inhibitor, suggesting that MAPK/Erk contributes to the recruitment or assembly of proteins to Id-1 promoter. Small interfering RNA directed against Sp1 reduced Id-1 expression and the upregulation of the promoter, indicating that Sp1 is required for Id-1 induction in E47- and Snail-expressing cells. Our results provide new insights into how some target genes are activated during and/or as a consequence of the EMT triggered by both E47 and Snail transcription factors.

  16. A genomic and expression study of AP-1 in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: evidence for dysregulated expression of JUNB and JUND in MF and SS.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xin; Orchard, Guy; Mitchell, Tracey J; Oyama, Noritaka; Russell-Jones, Robin; Vermeer, Maarten H; Willemze, Rein; van Doorn, Remko; Tensen, Cornelis P; Young, Bryan D; Whittaker, Sean J

    2008-10-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) consists of a group of transcription factors including the JUN and FOS family proteins with diverse biological functions. This study assessed the genomic and expression status of the AP-1 transcription factors in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) by using immunohistochemistry (IHC), Affymetrix expression microarray, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). IHC showed JUNB protein expression in tumor cells from 17 of 33 cases of Sezary syndrome (SS) and JUND protein expression in 16 of 23 mycosis fungoides cases. There was no correlation between JUNB and CD30 expression. However, 7 of 12 JUNB-positive SS cases expressed both phosphorylated and total extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proteins. Expression microarray showed over threefold increased expression of JUNB in three of six SS patients and similar findings were also noted after re-analysis of previously published data. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed the overexpression of JUNB in four SS cases and of JUND in three of four cases. FISH showed increased JUNB copy number in four of seven SS cases. These findings suggest that deregulation of AP-1 expression in CTCL is the result of aberrant expression of JUNB and possible JUND resulting from genomic amplification and constitutive activation of ERK1/2 MAPK in this type of lymphoma.

  17. p38α MAPK is required for arsenic-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Gyum; Shi, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure has been reported to cause neoplastic transformation through the activation of PcG proteins. In the present study, we show that activation of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation. Exposure of cells to 0.5 μM arsenic increased CRE and c-Fos promoter activities that were accompanied by increases in p38α MAPK and CREB phosphorylation and expression levels concurrently with AP-1 activation. Introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNA-p38α into BALB/c 3T3 cells markedly suppressed arsenic-induced colony formation compared with wildtype cells. CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation were decreased in p38α knockdown cells after arsenic treatment. Arsenic-induced AP-1 activation, measured as c-Fos and CRE promoter activities, and CREB phosphorylation were attenuated by p38 inhibition in BALB/c 3T3 cells. Thus, p38α MAPK activation is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation mediated through CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation.

  18. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and c-Fos/AP-1.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Shunichi; Tsumiyama, Ken

    2009-05-15

    c-Fos/AP-1 controls the expression of inflammatory cytokines and matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) important in arthritis via promoter AP-1 binding motif. Among inflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta is the most important inducer of a variety of MMPs, and mainly responsible for cartilage breakdown and osteoclastogenesis. IL-1beta and c-Fos/AP-1 influence each other's gene expression and activity, resulting in an orchestrated cross-talk that is crucial to arthritic joint destruction, where TNFalpha can act synergistically with them. While how to stop the degradation of bone and cartilage, i.e., to control MMP, has long been the central issue in the research of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), selective inhibition of c-Fos/AP-1 does resolve arthritic joint destruction. Thus, the blockade of IL-1beta and/or c-Fos/AP-1 can be promising as an effective therapy for rheumatoid joint destruction in addition to the currently available TNFalpha blocking agents that act mainly on arthritis.

  19. Molecular Basis for Enhancement of the Meiotic DMCI Recombinase by RAD51AP1

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Dunlop, Myun Hwa; Kauppi, Liisa; San Filippo, Joseph San; Wiese, Claudia; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Begovic, Sead; Schild, David; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Sung, Patrick

    2010-11-05

    Homologous recombination is needed for meiotic chromosome segregation, genome maintenance, and tumor suppression. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) has been shown to interact with and enhance the recombinase activity of RAD51. Accordingly, genetic ablation of RAD51AP1 leads to enhanced sensitivity to and also chromosome aberrations upon DNA damage, demonstrating a role for RAD51AP1 in mitotic homologous recombination. Here we show physical association of RAD51AP1 with the meiosis-specific recombinase DMC1 and a stimulatory effect of RAD51AP1 on the DMC1-mediated D-loop reaction. Mechanistic studies have revealed that RAD51AP1 enhances the ability of the DMC1 presynaptic filament to capture the duplex DNA partner and to assemble the synaptic complex, in which the recombining DNA strands are homologously aligned. We also provide evidence that functional co-operation is dependent on complex formation between DMC1 and RAD51AP1, and that distinct epitopes in RAD51AP1 mediate interactions with RAD51 and DMC1. Finally, we show that RAD51AP1 is expressed in mouse testes, and that RAD51AP1 foci co-localize with a subset of DMC1 foci in spermatocytes. These results suggest that RAD51AP1 also serves an important role in meiotic homologous recombination.

  20. Molecular Changes Involving MEK3-p38 MAPK Activation in Chronic Masticatory Myalgia.

    PubMed

    Meng, H; Gao, Y; Kang, Y F; Zhao, Y P; Yang, G J; Wang, Y; Cao, Y; Gan, Y H; Xie, Q F

    2016-09-01

    The exact mechanism underlying chronic masticatory myalgia (CMM), a conspicuous symptom in temporomandibular disorders, remains unclear. This investigation compared gene expression profiles between CMM patients and healthy subjects. Peripheral blood leukocytes were collected in 8 cases and 8 controls and subjected to whole genome microarray analyses. Data were analyzed with Gene Ontology and interactive pathways analyses. According to Gene Ontology analysis, categories such as ion transport, response to stimuli, and metabolic process were upregulated. The pathway analysis suggested overexpression of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in CMM patients and to a higher degree in a pathway network. Overexpression of representative members of the MAPK pathway-including MAPK kinase 3 (MEK3), calcium voltage-gated channel auxiliary subunit gamma 2 (CACNG2), and growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gamma (GADD45G)-was validated with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The upregulation of MEK3 was negatively correlated with the age of the CMM group. In the next step, the authors focused on MEK3, the gene that exhibited the greatest degree of differential expression, and its downstream target protein p38 MAPK. The results revealed upregulation of MEK3, as well as phosphorylated MEK3 and phosphorylated p38 MAPK, in CMM patients. These results provide a "fingerprint" for mechanistic studies of CMM in the future and highlight the importance of MEK3-p38 MAPK activation in CMM. PMID:27418173

  1. Reciprocal actions of NCAM and tPA via a Ras-dependent MAPK activation in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeon; Seuk Kim, Jin; Mogg Kim, Jung; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Yong-Sung

    2002-10-25

    In an attempt to identify the functions of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, we investigated the relationship between the two molecules by focusing on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), an essential enzyme in this process. NCAM clustering in cultured hippocampal neurons transiently induced MAPK within 10min. Moreover, soluble NCAM also induced a Ras-dependent MAPK activation. Conversely, MAPK activation led to an increase in the expressions of all three isoforms of NCAM. Treatment of neurons with tPA and plasminogen induced a Ras-dependent MAPK activation and tPA-plasmin degradation of NCAM was mediated in a MAPK-dependent manner. Soluble NCAM transiently inhibited tPA mRNA expression levels in a MAPK-dependent manner, while stimulation of MAPK alone induced tPA reduction in cells. These results collectively indicate that NCAM and tPA reciprocally act as important regulators in the modulation of synaptic plasticity via a Ras-MAPK-involved signaling pathway. In turn, MAPK activation may cause tPA degradation or a decrease in expression to promote synaptic plasticity.

  2. Thrombin Enhances NGF-Mediated Neurite Extension via Increased and Sustained Activation of p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Rania E.; Sarker, Krishna; Jin, Yan; Fu, Songbin; Rosales, Jesusa L.; Lee, Ki-Young

    2014-01-01

    Rapid neurite remodeling is fundamental to nervous system development and plasticity. It involves neurite extension that is regulated by NGF through PI3K/AKT, p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. It also involves neurite retraction that is regulated by the serine protease, thrombin. However, the intracellular signaling pathway by which thrombin causes neurite retraction is unknown. Using the PC12 neuronal cell model, we demonstrate that thrombin utilizes the PI3K/AKT pathway for neurite retraction in NGF-differentiated cells. Interestingly, however, we found that thrombin enhances NGF-induced neurite extension in differentiating cells. This is achieved through increased and sustained activation of p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. Thus, thrombin elicits opposing effects in differentiated and differentiating cells through activation of distinct signaling pathways: neurite retraction in differentiated cells via PI3K/AKT, and neurite extension in differentiating cells via p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. These findings, which also point to a novel cooperative role between thrombin and NGF, have significant implications in the development of the nervous system and the disease processes that afflicts it as well as in the potential of combined thrombin and NGF therapy for impaired learning and memory, and spinal cord injury which all require neurite extension and remodeling. PMID:25061982

  3. Evaluating the Activity of the Filamentous Growth MAPK Pathway in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways that regulate diverse processes in eukaryotes. One such pathway regulates filamentous growth, a nutrient limitation response in budding yeast and other fungal species. This protocol describes three assays used to measure the activity of the filamentous growth pathway. First, western blotting for phosphorylated (activated) MAPKs (P~MAPKs; Slt2p, Kss1p, Fus3p, and Hog1p) provides a measure of MAPK activity in yeast and other fungal species. Second, the PGU1 gene is a transcriptional target of the filamentous growth pathway. Cells that undergo filamentous growth secrete Pgu1, an endopolygalacturonase that degrades the plant-specific polysaccharide pectin. We describe an assay that measures secreted pectinase activity, which reflects an active filamentous growth pathway. Finally, in yeast, two mucin-like glycoproteins, Msb2 and Flo11, regulate filamentous growth. Secretion of the processed and shed glycodomain of Msb2 is an indicator of MAPK activity. Flo11, the major adhesion molecule that controls filamentous growth and biofilm/mat formation, is also shed from cells. Detecting shed mucins with epitope-tagged versions of the proteins (secretion profiling) provides information about the regulation of filamentous growth across fungal species. PMID:25734070

  4. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Bae, Yong Soo; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  5. Inhibitory and activating functions for MAPK Kss1 in the S. cerevisiae filamentous-growth signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cook, J G; Bardwell, L; Thorner, J

    1997-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved signalling modules that regulate responses to diverse extracellular stimuli, developmental cues and environmental stresses. A MAPK is phosphorylated and activated by a MAPK kinase (MAPKK), which is activated by an upstream protein kinase, such as Raf, Mos or a MAPKK kinase. Ste7, a MAPKK in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for two developmental pathways: mating and invasive (filamentous) growth. Kss1 and Fus3, the MAPK targets of Ste7, are required for mating, but their role in invasive growth has been unclear. Because no other S. cerevisiae MAPK has been shown to function in invasive growth, it was proposed that Ste7 may have non-MAPK targets. We show instead that Kss1 is the principal target of Ste7 in the invasive-growth response in both haploids and diploids. We demonstrate further that Kss1 in its inactive form is a potent negative regulator of invasive growth. Ste7 acts to relieve this negative regulation by switching Kss1 from an inhibitor to an activator. These results indicate that this MAPK has a physiologically important function in its unactivated state. Comparison of normal and MAPK-deficient cells indicates that nitrogen starvation and activated Ras stimulate filamentous growth through both MAPK-independent and MAPK-dependent means. PMID:9363895

  6. TGF-β2 induces Grb2 to recruit PI3-K to TGF-RII that activates JNK/AP-1-signaling and augments invasiveness of Theileria-transformed macrophages.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Malak; Whitworth, Jessie; Noé, Gaelle; Liu, Wang Qing; Vidal, Michel; Langsley, Gordon

    2015-10-29

    Theileria-infected macrophages display many features of cancer cells such as heightened invasive capacity; however, the tumor-like phenotype is reversible by killing the parasite. Moreover, virulent macrophages can be attenuated by multiple in vitro passages and so provide a powerful model to elucidate mechanisms related to transformed macrophage virulence. Here, we demonstrate that in two independent Theileria-transformed macrophage cell lines Grb2 expression is down-regulated concomitant with loss of tumor virulence. Using peptidimer-c to ablate SH2 and SH3 interactions of Grb2 we identify TGF-receptor II and the p85 subunit of PI3-K, as Grb2 partners in virulent macrophages. Ablation of Grb2 interactions reduces PI3-K recruitment to TGF-RII and decreases PIP3 production, and dampens JNK phosphorylation and AP-1-driven transcriptional activity down to levels characteristic of attenuated macrophages. Loss of TGF-R>PI3-K>JNK>AP-1 signaling negatively impacts on virulence traits such as reduced JAM-L/ITG4A and Fos-B/MMP9 expression that contribute to virulent macrophage adhesion and invasiveness.

  7. Molecular characterization of Helicobacter pylori VacA induction of IL-8 in U937 cells reveals a prominent role for p38MAPK in activating transcription factor-2, cAMP response element binding protein, and NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Nakayama, Masaaki; Isomoto, Hajime; Kurazono, Hisao; Mukaida, Naofumi; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Azuma, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Sap, Jan; Yamasaki, Eiki; Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Moss, Joel; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2008-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori VacA induces multiple effects on susceptible cells, including vacuolation, mitochondrial damage, inhibition of cell growth, and enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. To assess the ability of H. pylori to modulate the production of inflammatory mediators, we examined the mechanisms by which VacA enhanced IL-8 production by promonocytic U937 cells, which demonstrated the greatest VacA-induced IL-8 release of the cells tested. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580), ERK1/2 (PD98059), IkappaBalpha ((E)-3-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-2-propenenitrile), Ca(2+) entry (SKF96365), and intracellular Ca(2+) channels (dantrolene) blocked VacA-induced IL-8 production. Furthermore, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator (BAPTA-AM), which inhibited VacA-activated p38 MAPK, caused a dose-dependent reduction in VacA-induced IL-8 secretion by U937 cells, implying a role for intracellular Ca(2+) in mediating activation of MAPK and the canonical NF-kappaB pathway. VacA stimulated translocation of NF-kappaBp65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA of activating transcription factor (ATF)-2 or CREB, which is a p38MAPK substrate and binds to the AP-1 site of the IL-8 promoter, inhibited VacA-induced IL-8 production. VacA activated an IL-8 promoter containing an NF-IL-6 site, but not a mutated AP-1 or NF-kappaB site, suggesting direct involvement of the ATF-2/CREB binding region or NF-kappaB-binding regions in VacA-induced IL-8 promoter activation. Thus, in U937 cells, VacA directly increases IL-8 production by activation of the p38 MAPK via intracellular Ca(2+) release, leading to activation of the transcription factors, ATF-2, CREB, and NF-kappaB.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Helicobacter pylori VacA Induction of IL-8 in U937 Cells Reveals a Prominent Role for p38MAPK in Activating Transcription Factor-2, cAMP Response Element Binding Protein, and NF-κB Activation1

    PubMed Central

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Nakayama, Masaaki; Isomoto, Hajime; Kurazono, Hisao; Mukaida, Naofumi; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Azuma, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Sap, Jan; Yamasaki, Eiki; Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Moss, Joel; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori VacA induces multiple effects on susceptible cells, including vacuolation, mitochondrial damage, inhibition of cell growth, and enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. To assess the ability of H. pylori to modulate the production of inflammatory mediators, we examined the mechanisms by which VacA enhanced IL-8 production by promonocytic U937 cells, which demonstrated the greatest VacA-induced IL-8 release of the cells tested. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580), ERK1/2 (PD98059), IκBα ((E)-3-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-2-propenenitrile), Ca2+ entry (SKF96365), and intracellular Ca2+ channels (dantrolene) blocked VacA-induced IL-8 production. Furthermore, an intracellular Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA-AM), which inhibited VacA-activated p38 MAPK, caused a dose-dependent reduction in VacA-induced IL-8 secretion by U937 cells, implying a role for intracellular Ca2+ in mediating activation of MAPK and the canonical NF-κB pathway. VacA stimulated translocation of NF-κBp65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA of activating transcription factor (ATF)-2 or CREB, which is a p38MAPK substrate and binds to the AP-1 site of the IL-8 promoter, inhibited VacA-induced IL-8 production. VacA activated an IL-8 promoter containing an NF-IL-6 site, but not a mutated AP-1 or NF-κB site, suggesting direct involvement of the ATF-2/CREB binding region or NF-κB-binding regions in VacA-induced IL-8 promoter activation. Thus, in U937 cells, VacA directly increases IL-8 production by activation of the p38 MAPK via intracellular Ca2+ release, leading to activation of the transcription factors, ATF-2, CREB, and NF-κB. PMID:18354227

  9. Suppression of B-Raf(V600E) cancers by MAPK hyper-activation

    PubMed Central

    Eldad, Sophia; Smeir, Elia; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf(V600E) activates MEK/MAPK signalling and acts as oncogenic driver of a variety of cancers, including melanoma, colorectal and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Specific B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors (e.g., Vemurafenib) prove initial efficacy in melanoma followed shortly by acquired resistance, while failing in most other B-Raf(V600E) cancers due to primary resistance. Resistance is due to acquired mutations in the Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway and/or other oncogenic drivers that bypass B-Raf(V600E). Surprisingly, hyper-activation of MAPK by inhibiting its protein phosphatase 2A by a synthetic long-chain fatty acid analogue (MEDICA), results in oncogene-induced growth arrest and apoptosis of B-Raf(V600E) cancer cells. Growth arrest is accompanied by MAPK-mediated serine/threonine phosphorylation and suppression of a variety of oncogenic drivers that resist treatment by B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors, including ErbB members, c-Met, IGFR, IRS, STAT3 and Akt. The combined activities of mutated B-Raf and MEDICA are required for generating hyper-activated MAPK, growth arrest and apoptosis, implying strict specificity for mutated B-Raf cancer cells. PMID:26959890

  10. Suppression of B-Raf(V600E) cancers by MAPK hyper-activation.

    PubMed

    Atiq, Rawan; Hertz, Rachel; Eldad, Sophia; Smeir, Elia; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    B-Raf(V600E) activates MEK/MAPK signalling and acts as oncogenic driver of a variety of cancers, including melanoma, colorectal and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Specific B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors (e.g., Vemurafenib) prove initial efficacy in melanoma followed shortly by acquired resistance, while failing in most other B-Raf(V600E) cancers due to primary resistance. Resistance is due to acquired mutations in the Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway and/or other oncogenic drivers that bypass B-Raf(V600E). Surprisingly, hyper-activation of MAPK by inhibiting its protein phosphatase 2A by a synthetic long-chain fatty acid analogue (MEDICA), results in oncogene-induced growth arrest and apoptosis of B-Raf(V600E) cancer cells. Growth arrest is accompanied by MAPK-mediated serine/threonine phosphorylation and suppression of a variety of oncogenic drivers that resist treatment by B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors, including ErbB members, c-Met, IGFR, IRS, STAT3 and Akt. The combined activities of mutated B-Raf and MEDICA are required for generating hyper-activated MAPK, growth arrest and apoptosis, implying strict specificity for mutated B-Raf cancer cells. PMID:26959890

  11. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates osteoclastogenesis via regulation of p44/42 MAPK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, TacGhee; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cho, Je-Yoel; Woo, Kyung Mi; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Kim, Gwan-Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa . E-mail: baekjh@snu.ac.kr

    2006-08-18

    Tetraspanin CD9 has been shown to regulate cell-cell fusion in sperm-egg fusion and myotube formation. However, the role of CD9 in osteoclast, another multinucleated cell type, is not still clear. Therefore, we investigated the role of CD9 in osteoclast differentiation. CD9 was expressed in osteoclast lineage cells and its expression level increased during the progression of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. KMC8, a neutralizing antibody specific to CD9, significantly suppressed RANKL-induced multinucleated osteoclast formation and the mRNA expression of osteoclast differentiation marker genes. To define CD9-regulated osteoclastogenic signaling pathway, MAPK pathways were examined. KMC8 induced long-term phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK, but not of p38 MAPK. Constitutive activation of p44/42 MAPK by overexpressing constitutive-active mutant of MEK1 almost completely blocked osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that CD9 expressed on osteoclast lineage cells might positively regulate osteoclastogenesis via the regulation of p44/42 MAPK activity.

  12. Genome-wide survey of yeast mutations leading to activation of the yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway: Novel insights into diverse MAPK outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast cell wall integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (CWI-MAPK) pathway is the main regulator of adaptation responses to cell wall stress in yeast. Here, we adopt a genomic approach to shed light on two aspects that are only partially understood, namely, the characterization of the gene functional catalog associated with CWI pathway activation and the extent to which MAPK activation correlates with transcriptional outcomes. Results A systematic yeast mutant deletion library was screened for constitutive transcriptional activation of the CWI-related reporter gene MLP1. Monitoring phospho-Slt2/Mpk1 levels in the identified mutants revealed sixty-four deletants with high levels of phosphorylation of this MAPK, including mainly genes related to cell wall construction and morphogenesis, signaling, and those with unknown function. Phenotypic analysis of the last group of mutants suggests their involvement in cell wall homeostasis. A good correlation between levels of Slt2 phosphorylation and the magnitude of the transcriptional response was found in most cases. However, the expression of CWI pathway-related genes was enhanced in some mutants in the absence of significant Slt2 phosphorylation, despite the fact that functional MAPK signaling through the pathway was required. CWI pathway activation was associated to increased deposition of chitin in the cell wall - a known survival compensatory mechanism - in about 30% of the mutants identified. Conclusion We provide new insights into yeast genes related to the CWI pathway and into how the state of activation of the Slt2 MAPK leads to different outcomes, discovering the versatility of this kind of signaling pathways. These findings potentially have broad implications for understanding the functioning of other eukaryotic MAPKs. PMID:21810245

  13. Kappa Opioid Receptor-Induced Aversion Requires p38 MAPK Activation in VTA Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Jonathan M.; Messinger, Daniel I.; Knakal, Cerise R.; Kuhar, Jamie R.; Schattauer, Selena S.; Bruchas, Michael R.; Zweifel, Larry S.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Phillips, Paul E.M.

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous dynorphin-κ opioid receptor (KOR) system encodes the dysphoric component of the stress response and controls the risk of depression-like and addiction behaviors; however, the molecular and neural circuit mechanisms are not understood. In this study, we report that KOR activation of p38α MAPK in ventral tegmental (VTA) dopaminergic neurons was required for conditioned place aversion (CPA) in mice. Conditional genetic deletion of floxed KOR or floxed p38α MAPK by Cre recombinase expression in dopaminergic neurons blocked place aversion to the KOR agonist U50,488. Selective viral rescue by wild-type KOR expression in dopaminergic neurons of KOR−/− mice restored U50,488-CPA, whereas expression of a mutated form of KOR that could not initiate p38α MAPK activation did not. Surprisingly, while p38α MAPK inactivation blocked U50,488-CPA, p38α MAPK was not required for KOR inhibition of evoked dopamine release measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens. In contrast, KOR activation acutely inhibited VTA dopaminergic neuron firing, and repeated exposure attenuated the opioid response. This adaptation to repeated exposure was blocked by conditional deletion of p38α MAPK, which also blocked KOR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK) subunit Kir3.1 in VTA dopaminergic neurons. Consistent with the reduced response, GIRK phosphorylation at this amino terminal tyrosine residue (Y12) enhances channel deactivation. Thus, contrary to prevailing expectations, these results suggest that κ opioid-induced aversion requires regulation of VTA dopaminergic neuron somatic excitability through a p38α MAPK effect on GIRK deactivation kinetics rather than by presynaptically inhibiting dopamine release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonists have the potential to be effective, nonaddictive analgesics, but their therapeutic utility is greatly limited by adverse effects on mood

  14. Dehydrocorydaline promotes myogenic differentiation via p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Miran; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Yong Kee; Seo, Dong-Wan; Baek, Nam-In; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kang, Jong-Sun; Bae, Gyu-Un

    2016-10-01

    Muscle regeneration is a coordinated process that involves proliferation and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells. Activation of MyoD is a key event in myogenic differentiation, which is regulated by p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPK). In a screen of natural compounds for the enhancement of MyoD activity, dehydrocorydaline (DHC) from the Corydalis tuber was identified. Treatment of C2C12 myoblasts with DHC increased the expression levels of muscle‑specific proteins, including MyoD, myogenin and myosin heavy chain. In addition, C2C12 myoblasts exhibited enhanced multinucleated myotube formation without any cytotoxicity. Treatment with DHC elevated p38 MAPK activation and the interaction of MyoD with an E protein, which is likely to result in activation of MyoD and promotion of myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, defects in differentiation‑induced p38 MAPK activation and myoblast differentiation induced by depletion of the promyogenic receptor protein Cdo in C2C12 myoblasts were restored by DHC treatment. In conclusion, these results indicated that DHC stimulates p38 MAPK activation, which can enhance heterodimerization of MyoD and E proteins, thus resulting in MyoD activation and myoblast differentiation. These findings suggested that DHC may be considered a potential therapeutic compound for the improvement of muscle stem cell regenerative capacity in injured muscle.

  15. Dehydrocorydaline promotes myogenic differentiation via p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Miran; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Yong Kee; Seo, Dong-Wan; Baek, Nam-In; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kang, Jong-Sun; Bae, Gyu-Un

    2016-10-01

    Muscle regeneration is a coordinated process that involves proliferation and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells. Activation of MyoD is a key event in myogenic differentiation, which is regulated by p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPK). In a screen of natural compounds for the enhancement of MyoD activity, dehydrocorydaline (DHC) from the Corydalis tuber was identified. Treatment of C2C12 myoblasts with DHC increased the expression levels of muscle‑specific proteins, including MyoD, myogenin and myosin heavy chain. In addition, C2C12 myoblasts exhibited enhanced multinucleated myotube formation without any cytotoxicity. Treatment with DHC elevated p38 MAPK activation and the interaction of MyoD with an E protein, which is likely to result in activation of MyoD and promotion of myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, defects in differentiation‑induced p38 MAPK activation and myoblast differentiation induced by depletion of the promyogenic receptor protein Cdo in C2C12 myoblasts were restored by DHC treatment. In conclusion, these results indicated that DHC stimulates p38 MAPK activation, which can enhance heterodimerization of MyoD and E proteins, thus resulting in MyoD activation and myoblast differentiation. These findings suggested that DHC may be considered a potential therapeutic compound for the improvement of muscle stem cell regenerative capacity in injured muscle. PMID:27573543

  16. [Studies on cell signaling immunomodulated murine peritoneal suppressor macrophages: LPS and PMA mediate the activation of RAF-1, MAPK p44 and MAPK p42 and p38 MAPK].

    PubMed

    Chang, Z L; Lin, M Q; Wang, M Z; Yao, Z

    1997-03-01

    Monocytes-macrophages which serve as host immune cells to kill pathogens can often be "activated" after exposing to viruses, bacteria, cytokines as well as chemical substances, However, it is paradoxical that highly activated macrophages can be induced to become the suppressor ones by live microbes, microbial products, tumor, and autoimmune disease, although the mechanism remains unknown. Our previous experimental studies have shown that immuno-suppressor activities of suppressor macrophages on T, B and NK cells can be prevented by the treatment with LPS or supernatant in vitro from mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes, while, at the same time, the tumoricidal activities of those macrophages can be kept or even enhanced following the same treatment. This phenomenon was then termed as "immune modulation" For the understanding of its mechanism, we are now undertaking signal transduction in modulated macrophages. Since mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is an integration point of different signal transduction pathways, its cascade and regulation of activation are being investigated extensively by the assay of electrophoresis mobility shift. Recent results suggested that interaction of ligand-receptor triggers protein tyrosine kinase(PTK) activation leading to Ras-GTP binding with Raf-1 to phosphorylate MAPK kinase (MAPKK), the specific activator of MAPK. It is reported that PKC-alpha can directly phosphorylate or activate Raf-1 in NIH3 T3 cells. Raf-1 (74 KDa), with an intrinsic serine (Ser)-threonine (The) kinase activity, becomes hyperphosphorylated after activation which can be followed by gel mobility shift test. It has also been shown that a variety of extracellular factors stimulate a pair of MAPK p44 and MAPK p42 of MAPK family members. A significant property of activation of ERK 1 and ERK 2 is the requirement for the phosphorylation of both Thr-183 and Tyr-185 (at TEY motif) within in its protein kinase subdomain VIII. More recently, two other MAPK subtypes, p

  17. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 Promotes AP-1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zongling; Donaldson, Ian J.; Liu, Jingru; Hayes, Andrew; Zeef, Leo A. H.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional control circuitry in eukaryotic cells is complex and is orchestrated by combinatorially acting transcription factors. Forkhead transcription factors often function in concert with heterotypic transcription factors to specify distinct transcriptional programs. Here, we demonstrate that FOXK2 participates in combinatorial transcriptional control with the AP-1 transcription factor. FOXK2 binding regions are widespread throughout the genome and are often coassociated with AP-1 binding motifs. FOXK2 acts to promote AP-1-dependent gene expression changes in response to activation of the AP-1 pathway. In this context, FOXK2 is required for the efficient recruitment of AP-1 to chromatin. Thus, we have uncovered an important new molecular mechanism that controls AP-1-dependent gene expression. PMID:22083952

  18. EPAS1 trans-activation during hypoxia requires p42/p44 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Freeman, T L; Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1999-11-19

    Hypoxia is a common environmental stress that regulates gene expression and cell function. A number of hypoxia-regulated transcription factors have been identified and have been shown to play critical roles in mediating cellular responses to hypoxia. One of these is the endothelial PAS-domain protein 1 (EPAS1/HIF2-alpha/HLF/HRF). This protein is 48% homologous to hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1-alpha). To date, virtually nothing is known about the signaling pathways that lead to either EPAS1 or HIF1-alpha activation. Here we show that EPAS1 is phosphorylated when PC12 cells are exposed to hypoxia and that p42/p44 MAPK is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, completely blocked hypoxia-induced trans-activation of a hypoxia response element (HRE) reporter gene by transfected EPAS1. Likewise, expression of a constitutively active MEK1 mimicked the effects of hypoxia on HRE reporter gene expression. However, pretreatment with PD98059 had no effect on EPAS1 phosphorylation during hypoxia, suggesting that MAPK targets other proteins that are critical for the trans-activation of EPAS1. We further show that hypoxia-induced trans-activation of EPAS1 is independent of Ras. Finally, pretreatment with calmodulin antagonists nearly completely blocked both the hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and the EPAS1 trans-activation of HRE-Luc. These results demonstrate that the MAPK pathway is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation and that activation of MAPK and EPAS1 occurs through a calmodulin-sensitive pathway and not through the GTPase, Ras. These results are the first to identify a specific signaling pathway involved in EPAS1 activation. PMID:10559262

  19. Pheromone-Induced Morphogenesis Improves Osmoadaptation Capacity by Activating the HOG MAPK Pathway**

    PubMed Central

    Baltanás, Rodrigo; Bush, Alan; Couto, Alicia; Durrieu, Lucía; Hohmann, Stefan; Colman-Lerner, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Environmental and internal conditions expose cells to a multiplicity of stimuli whose consequences are difficult to predict. Here, we investigate the response to mating pheromone of yeast cells adapted to high osmolarity. Events downstream of pheromone binding involve two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades: the pheromone response (PR) and the cell-wall integrity response (CWI). Although these MAPK pathways share components with each and a third MAPK pathway, the high osmolarity response (HOG), they are normally only activated by distinct stimuli, a phenomenon called insulation. We found that in cells adapted to high osmolarity, PR activated the HOG pathway in a pheromone- and osmolarity- dependent manner. Activation of HOG by the PR was not due to loss of insulation, but rather a response to a reduction in internal osmolarity, which resulted from an increase in glycerol release caused by the PR. By analyzing single-cell time courses, we found that stimulation of HOG occurred in discrete bursts that coincided with the “shmooing” morphogenetic process. Activation required the polarisome, the cell wall integrity MAPK Slt2, and the aquaglyceroporin Fps1. HOG activation resulted in high glycerol turnover that improved adaptability to rapid changes in osmolarity. Our work shows how a differentiation signal can recruit a second, unrelated sensory pathway to enable responses to yeast to multiple stimuli. PMID:23612707

  20. Distal Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Response Element of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) Binds Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) Transcription Factors and Regulates Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Adam C.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.; Brinckerhoff, Constance E.

    2012-01-01

    The collagenase matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) plays an important role in the destruction of cartilage in arthritic joints. MMP-13 expression is strongly up-regulated in arthritis, largely because of stimulation by inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β. Treatment of chondrocytes with IL-1β induces transcription of MMP-13 in vitro. IL-1β signaling converges upon the activator protein-1 transcription factors, which have been shown to be required for IL-1β-induced MMP-13 gene expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we detected activator protein-1 binding within an evolutionarily conserved DNA sequence ∼20 kb 5′ relative to the MMP-13 transcription start site (TSS). Also using ChIP, we detected histone modifications and binding of RNA polymerase II within this conserved region, all of which are consistent with transcriptional activation. Chromosome conformation capture indicates that chromosome looping brings this region in close proximity with the MMP-13 TSS. Finally, a luciferase reporter construct driven by a component of the conserved region demonstrated an expression pattern similar to that of endogenous MMP-13. These data suggest that a conserved region at 20 kb upstream from the MMP-13 TSS includes a distal transcriptional response element of MMP-13, which contributes to MMP-13 gene expression. PMID:22102411

  1. Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) interrupts signal transduction between the Kss1 MAPK and the Tec1 transcription factor to maintain pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Shock, Teresa R; Thompson, James; Yates, John R; Madhani, Hiten D

    2009-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mating, filamentous growth (FG), and high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways share components and yet mediate distinct responses to different extracellular signals. Cross talk is suppressed between the mating and FG pathways because mating signaling induces the destruction of the FG transcription factor Tec1. We show here that HOG pathway activation results in phosphorylation of the FG MAPK, Kss1, and the MAPKK, Ste7. However, FG transcription is not activated because HOG signaling prevents the activation of Tec1. In contrast to the mating pathway, we find that the mechanism involves the inhibition of DNA binding by Tec1 rather than its destruction. We also find that nuclear accumulation of Tec1 is not affected by HOG signaling. Inhibition by Hog1 is apparently indirect since it does not require any of the consensus S/TP MAPK phosphorylation sites on Tec1, its DNA-binding partner Ste12, or the associated regulators Dig1 or Dig2. It also does not require the consensus MAPK sites of the Ste11 activator Ste50, in contrast to a recent proposal for a role for negative feedback in specificity. Our results demonstrate that HOG signaling interrupts the FG pathway signal transduction between the phosphorylation of Kss1 and the activation of DNA binding by Tec1. PMID:19218425

  2. FGFR2c-mediated ERK-MAPK activity regulates coronal suture development.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Miles J; Xue, Ke; Li, Li; Horowitz, Mark C; Steinbacher, Derek M; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P

    2016-07-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) signaling is critical for proper craniofacial development. A gain-of-function mutation in the 2c splice variant of the receptor's gene is associated with Crouzon syndrome, which is characterized by craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial vault sutures, leading to craniofacial maldevelopment. Insight into the molecular mechanism of craniosynostosis has identified the ERK-MAPK signaling cascade as a critical regulator of suture patency. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of FGFR2c-induced ERK-MAPK activation in the regulation of coronal suture development. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function Fgfr2c mutant mice have overlapping phenotypes, including coronal synostosis and craniofacial dysmorphia. In vivo analysis of coronal sutures in loss-of-function and gain-of-function models demonstrated fundamentally different pathogenesis underlying coronal suture synostosis. Calvarial osteoblasts from gain-of-function mice demonstrated enhanced osteoblastic function and maturation with concomitant increase in ERK-MAPK activation. In vitro inhibition with the ERK protein inhibitor U0126 mitigated ERK protein activation levels with a concomitant reduction in alkaline phosphatase activity. This study identifies FGFR2c-mediated ERK-MAPK signaling as a key mediator of craniofacial growth and coronal suture development. Furthermore, our results solve the apparent paradox between loss-of-function and gain-of-function FGFR2c mutants with respect to coronal suture synostosis. PMID:27034231

  3. Activation of MAPK Is Necessary for Long-Term Memory Consolidation Following Food-Reward Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Maria J.; Schofield, Michael G.; Kemenes, Ildiko; O'Shea, Michael; Kemenes, Gyorgy; Benjamin, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    Although an important role for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been established for memory consolidation in a variety of learning paradigms, it is not known if this pathway is also involved in appetitive classical conditioning. We address this question by using a single-trial food-reward conditioning paradigm in the freshwater…

  4. The Clathrin Adaptor Complex AP-1 Binds HIV-1 and MLV Gag and Facilitates Their Budding

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Grégory; Segura-Morales, Carolina; Molle, Dorothee; Lopez-Vergès, Sandra; Begon-Pescia, Christina; Cazevieille, Chantal; Schu, Peter; Bertrand, Edouard

    2007-01-01

    Retroviral assembly is driven by Gag, and nascent viral particles escape cells by recruiting the machinery that forms intralumenal vesicles of multivesicular bodies. In this study, we show that the clathrin adaptor complex AP-1 is involved in retroviral release. The absence of AP-1μ obtained by genetic knock-out or by RNA interference reduces budding of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and HIV-1, leading to a delay of viral propagation in cell culture. In contrast, overexpression of AP-1μ enhances release of HIV-1 Gag. We show that the AP-1 complex facilitates retroviral budding through a direct interaction between the matrix and AP-1μ. Less MLV Gag is found associated with late endosomes in cells lacking AP-1, and our results suggest that AP-1 and AP-3 could function on the same pathway that leads to Gag release. In addition, we find that AP-1 interacts with Tsg101 and Nedd4.1, two cellular proteins known to be involved in HIV-1 and MLV budding. We propose that AP-1 promotes Gag release by transporting it to intracellular sites of active budding, and/or by facilitating its interactions with other cellular partners. PMID:17538020

  5. Porcine circovirus type 2 activates PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways to promote interleukin-10 production in macrophages via Cap interaction of gC1qR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongtong; Zhang, Xiujuan; Chen, Yu; Cui, Beibei; Li, Delong; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection caused PCV2-associated diseases (PCVAD) is one of the major emerging immunosuppression diseases in pig industry. In this study, we investigated how PCV2 inoculation increases interleukin (IL)-10 expression in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). PCV2 inoculation significantly upregulated IL-10 expression compared with PCV1. Upon initial PCV2 inoculation, PI3K/Akt cooperated with NF-κB pathways to promote IL-10 transcription via p50, CREB and Ap1 transcription factors, whereas inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation blocked Ap1 and CREB binding to the il10 promoter, and decreased the binding level of NF-κB1 p50 with il10 promoter, leading to great reduction in early IL-10 transcription. In the later phase of inoculation, PCV2 further activated p38 MAPK and ERK pathways to enhance IL-10 production by promoting Sp1 binding to the il10 promoter. For PCV2-induced IL-10 production in macrophages, PCV2 capsid protein Cap, but not the replicase Rep or ORF3, was the critical component. Cap activated PI3K/Akt, p38 MAPK, and ERK signaling pathways to enhance IL-10 expression. In the whole process, gC1qR mediated PCV2-induced PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK activation to enhance IL-10 induction by interaction with Cap. Depletion of gC1qR blocked PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK activation, resulting in significant decrease in IL-10 production in PCV2-inoculated cells. Thus, gC1qR might be a critical functional receptor for PCV2-induced IL-10 production. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Cap protein binding with host gC1qR induction of PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK signalings activation is a critical process in enhancing PCV2-induced IL-10 production in porcine alveolar macrophages. PMID:26883107

  6. Porcine circovirus type 2 activates PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways to promote interleukin-10 production in macrophages via Cap interaction of gC1qR.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Huang, Yong; Wang, Tongtong; Zhang, Xiujuan; Chen, Yu; Cui, Beibei; Li, Delong; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2016-04-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection caused PCV2-associated diseases (PCVAD) is one of the major emerging immunosuppression diseases in pig industry. In this study, we investigated how PCV2 inoculation increases interleukin (IL)-10 expression in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). PCV2 inoculation significantly upregulated IL-10 expression compared with PCV1. Upon initial PCV2 inoculation, PI3K/Akt cooperated with NF-κB pathways to promote IL-10 transcription via p50, CREB and Ap1 transcription factors, whereas inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation blocked Ap1 and CREB binding to the il10 promoter, and decreased the binding level of NF-κB1 p50 with il10 promoter, leading to great reduction in early IL-10 transcription. In the later phase of inoculation, PCV2 further activated p38 MAPK and ERK pathways to enhance IL-10 production by promoting Sp1 binding to the il10 promoter. For PCV2-induced IL-10 production in macrophages, PCV2 capsid protein Cap, but not the replicase Rep or ORF3, was the critical component. Cap activated PI3K/Akt, p38 MAPK, and ERK signaling pathways to enhance IL-10 expression. In the whole process, gC1qR mediated PCV2-induced PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK activation to enhance IL-10 induction by interaction with Cap. Depletion of gC1qR blocked PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK activation, resulting in significant decrease in IL-10 production in PCV2-inoculated cells. Thus, gC1qR might be a critical functional receptor for PCV2-induced IL-10 production. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Cap protein binding with host gC1qR induction of PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK signalings activation is a critical process in enhancing PCV2-induced IL-10 production in porcine alveolar macrophages. PMID:26883107

  7. Regulation of osteosarcoma cell lung metastasis by the c-Fos/AP-1 target FGFR1

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Daniel; Zandueta, Carolina; Perurena, Naiara; Thomas, David P; Sunters, Andrew; Vuillier, Céline; Bozec, Aline; El-Emir, Ethaar; Miletich, Isabelle; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Lecanda, Fernando; Grigoriadis, Agamemnon E

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of the skeleton and is prevalent in children and adolescents. Survival rates are poor and have remained stagnant due to chemoresistance and the high propensity to form lung metastases. In this study, we used in vivo transgenic models of c-fos oncogene-induced osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma in addition to c-Fos-inducible systems in vitro to investigate downstream signaling pathways that regulate osteosarcoma growth and metastasis. Fgfr1 was identified as a novel c-Fos/AP-1 regulated gene. Induction of c-Fos in vitro in osteoblasts and chondroblasts caused an increase in Fgfr1 RNA and FGFR1 protein expression levels that resulted in increased and sustained activation of MAPKs, morphological transformation and increased anchorage-independent growth in response to FGF2 ligand treatment. High levels of FGFR1 protein and activated pFRS2α signalling were observed in murine and human osteosarcomas. Pharmacological inhibition of FGFR1 signalling blocked MAPK activation and colony growth of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Orthotopic injection in vivo of FGFR1 silenced osteosarcoma cells caused a marked 2- to 5-fold decrease in spontaneous lung metastases. Similarly, inhibition of FGFR signalling in vivo with the small molecule inhibitor AZD4547 markedly reduced the number and size of metastatic nodules. Thus, deregulated FGFR signalling plays an important role in osteoblast transformation and osteosarcoma formation and regulates the development of lung metastases. Our findings support the development of anti-FGFR inhibitors as potential antimetastatic therapy. PMID:26387545

  8. TRAF6 Autoubiquitination-Independent Activation of the NFκB and MAPK Pathways in Response to IL-1 and RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew C.; Kim, Gregory K.; Maurizio, Paul L.; Molnar, Elizabeth E.; Choi, Yongwon

    2008-01-01

    The adapter protein TRAF6 is critical for mediating signal transduction from members of the IL-1R/TLR and TNFR superfamilies. The TRAF6 RING finger domain functions as an ubiquitin E3 ligase capable of generating non-degradative K63-linked ubiquitin chains. It is believed that these chains serve as docking sites for formation of signaling complexes, and that K63-linked autoubiquitination of TRAF6 is essential for formation and activation of a complex involving the kinase TAK1 and its adapters, TAB1 and TAB2. In order to assess independently the E3 ligase and ubiquitin substrate functions of TRAF6, we generated, respectively, RING domain and complete lysine-deficient TRAF6 mutants. We found that while the TRAF6 RING domain is required for activation of TAK1, it is dispensable for interaction between TRAF6 and the TAK1-TAB1-TAB2 complex. Likewise, lysine-deficient TRAF6 was found to interact with the TAK1-TAB1-TAB2 complex, but surprisingly was also found to be fully competent to activate TAK1, as well as NFκB and AP-1 reporters. Furthermore, lysine-deficient TRAF6 rescued IL-1-mediated NFκB and MAPK activation, as well as IL-6 elaboration in retrovirally-rescued TRAF6-deficient fibroblasts. Lysine-deficient TRAF6 also rescued RANKL-mediated NFκB and MAPK activation, and osteoclastogenesis in retrovirally-rescued TRAF6-deficient bone marrow macrophages. While incapable of being ubiquitinated itself, we demonstrate that lysine-deficient TRAF6 remains competent to induce ubiquitination of IKKγ/NEMO. Further, this NEMO modification contributes to TRAF6-mediated activation of NFκB. Collectively, our results suggest that while TRAF6 autoubiquitination may serve as a marker of activation, it is unlikely to underpin RING finger-dependent TRAF6 function. PMID:19112497

  9. Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside, abrogates platelet activation through PLC γ 2-PKC and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Lu, Wan-Jung; Lien, Li-Ming; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Amarogentin, an active principle of Gentiana lutea, possess antitumorigenic, antidiabetic, and antioxidative properties. Activation of platelets is associated with intravascular thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases. The present study examined the effects of amarogentin on platelet activation. Amarogentin treatment (15~60  μM) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not thrombin, arachidonic acid, and U46619. Amarogentin inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). It also inhibits in vivo thrombus formation in mice. In addition, neither the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ nor the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 affected the amarogentin-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation, which suggests that amarogentin does not regulate the levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. In conclusion, amarogentin prevents platelet activation through the inhibition of PLC γ2-PKC cascade and MAPK pathway. Our findings suggest that amarogentin may offer therapeutic potential for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders.

  10. Prodigiosin isolated from Hahella chejuensis suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production by inhibiting p38 MAPK, JNK and NF-kappaB activation in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jung-Eun; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Moon, Eun-Yi; Rhee, Dong-Kwon; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2007-12-15

    Prodigiosin was isolated from marine bacteria Hahella chejuensis which has been recently discovered from Marado, Cheju Island, Republic of Korea. Immunosuppressive properties have been reported for prodigiosin members such as undecylprodigiosin, metacycloprodigiosin, prodigiosin and its synthetic analogue PNU156804 (PNU). However, the effect of this agent on macrophage function has not been characterized in detail. In the present study, we examined the effects of prodigiosin on the production of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage. When thioglycollate-elicited macrophages pre-exposed to prodigiosin (1-100 ng/ml) were stimulated with LPS, pretreatment with prodigiosin resulted in the inhibition of NO production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein and mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 was not altered. Inhibition of iNOS protein expression appears to be at the transcriptional level, since prodigiosin decreased LPS-induced NF-kappaB activity through preventing the degradation of IkBalpha, with significant inhibition achieved following pretreatment with prodigiosin. However, prodigiosin did not exert any effect on AP-1 activity. Prodigiosin blocked phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). These results indicate that the inhibition of these signaling molecules expression was correlated with the reduced production of NO in macrophages. Taken together, the present data suggest that prodigiosin reduces NO production and iNOS expression by inhibiting LPS-triggered p38 MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation, thereby implicating a mechanism by which prodigiosin may exert its immunosuppressive effects.

  11. Brominated Flame Retardants, Tetrabromobisphenol A and Hexabromocyclododecane, Activate Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 µM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA. PMID:25341744

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Mangostenone F in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Macrophages by Suppressing NF-κB and MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byoung Ok; Ryu, Hyung Won; So, Yangkang; Lee, Chang Wook; Jin, Chang Hyun; Yook, Hong Sun; Jeong, Yong Wook; Park, Jong Chun; Jeong, Il Yun

    2014-01-01

    Mangostenone F (MF) is a natural xanthone isolated from Garcinia mangostana. However, little is known about the biological activities of MF. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect and underlying molecular mechanisms of MF in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. MF dose-dependently inhibited the production of NO, iNOS, and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, MF decreased the NF-κB luciferase activity and NF-κB DNA binding capacity in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, MF suppressed the NF-κB activation by inhibiting the degradation of IκBα and nuclear translocation of p65 subunit of NF-κB. In addition, MF attenuated the AP-1 luciferase activity and phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of MF is associated with the suppression of NO production and iNOS expression through the down-regulation of NF-κB activation and MAPK signaling pathway in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. PMID:25143806

  13. Factors from Trypanosoma cruzi interacting with AP-1 sequences.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, J; Martinetto, H; Portal, D; D'Angelo, M; Torres, H N; Flawiá, M M

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between factors from Trypanosoma cruzi extracts and AP-1 sequences was studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Using a double-stranded probe carrying the AP-1 sequence from the SV40 promoter, three specific complexes designated A, B, and C were detected. Complexes A and C were formed when using single-stranded probes. The relative amount of complex B, specific for double-stranded DNA, increased as a function of probe length. Complexes were stabilized by cross-linking with UVC irradiation and resolved on denaturing SDS-PAGE. Complex A generated bands of 60- and 39 kDa; complex B produced two bands of 46- and 43 kDa; and complex C generated one band of 43 kDa. The AP-1 binding activity was much higher in purified nuclear preparations than in soluble fractions, and was detected in crude extracts from the three forms of the parasite. The binding signal, however, was much stronger in amastigote and trypomastigote than in the epimastigote forms. Specific binding was increased by oxidative stress. Antibodies raised against peptides corresponding to conserved domains of mammalian c-Jun and c-Fos detected bands of 40- and 60 kDa, respectively, in a nuclear epimastigote preparation. PMID:10519220

  14. MAPK specificity in the yeast pheromone response independent of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, A; Boucher, L; Tyers, M

    2001-08-21

    The mechanisms whereby different external cues stimulate the same mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, yet trigger an appropriately distinct biological response, epitomize the conundrum of specificity in cell signaling. In yeast, shared upstream components of the mating pheromone and filamentous growth pathways activate two related MAPKs, Fus3 and Kss1, which in turn regulate programs of gene expression via the transcription factor Ste12. As fus3, but not kss1, strains are impaired for mating, Fus3 exhibits specificity for the pheromone response. To account for this specificity, it has been suggested that Fus3 physically occludes Kss1 from pheromone-activated signaling complexes, which are formed on the scaffold protein Ste5. However, we find that genome-wide expression profiles of pheromone-treated wild-type, fus3, and kss1 deletion strains are highly correlated for all induced genes and, further, that two catalytically inactive versions of Fus3 fail to abrogate the pheromone-induced transcriptional response. Consistently, Fus3 and Kss1 kinase activity is induced to an equivalent extent in pheromone-treated cells. In contrast, both in vivo and in an in vitro-reconstituted MAPK system, Fus3, but not Kss1, exhibits strong substrate selectivity toward Far1, a bifunctional protein required for polarization and G(1) arrest. This effect accounts for the failure to repress G(1)-S specific transcription in fus3 strains and, in part, explains the mating defect of such strains. MAPK specificity in the pheromone response evidently occurs primarily at the substrate level, as opposed to specific kinase activation by dedicated signaling complexes. PMID:11525741

  15. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel 2-thiophen-5-yl-3H-quinazolin-4-one analogues as inhibitors of transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation: Their possible utilization as anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Giri, Rajan S; Thaker, Hardik M; Giordano, Tony; Williams, Jill; Rogers, Donna; Vasu, Kamala K; Sudarsanam, Vasudevan

    2010-04-01

    In an attempt to discover novel inhibitors of NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation utilizing the concept of chemical lead based medicinal chemistry and bioisosterism a series of 2-(2,3-disubstituted-thiophen-5-yl)-3H-quinazolin-4-one analogs was designed. A facile and simple route for the synthesis of the designed molecules was developed. Synthesized molecules were evaluated for their activity as inhibitors towards NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation in a cell line report-based assay. This series provides us with a substantial number of compounds inhibiting the activity of NF-kappaB and/or AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation. These compounds also exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity in in vivo models of inflammation and cancer. The 4-pyridyl group is found to be the most important pharmacophore on the third position of thiophene ring for inhibiting NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation. The relationships between the activities shown by these compounds in the in vivo and in vitro models have been established by using FVB transgenic mice model. These results suggest the suitability of the designed molecular framework as a potential scaffold for the design of molecules with inhibitory activity towards NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation, which may also exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. This series of molecules warrants further study to explore their potential as therapies for use in chronic inflammatory conditions and cancer. Development of the synthetic protocol for the synthesis of this series of molecules, biological activities and a structure-activity relationship (SAR) have been discussed herein.

  16. Neferine induces autophagy of human ovarian cancer cells via p38 MAPK/ JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Limei; Zhang, Xiyu; Li, Yinuo; Lu, Shuhua; Lu, Shan; Li, Jieyin; Wang, Yuqiong; Tian, Xiaoxue; Wei, Jian-Jun; Shao, Changshun; Liu, Zhaojian

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Patients usually have poor prognosis because of late diagnosis, relapse, and chemoresistance. It is pressing to seek novel agent for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Neferine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the embryos of lotus (Nelumbo nucifera). In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of neferine on ovarian cancer cells. We found that neferine exhibited growth-inhibitory effect on human ovarian cancer cells, whereas showing less cytotoxic to non-malignant fallopian tube epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that neferine induced autophagy and inactivated the mTOR pathway. Finally, we found that both p38 MAPK and JNK signaling pathways were activated by neferine treatment and contributed to the induction of autophagy in ovarian cancer cells. In conclusion, our findings showed that neferine induced autophagy of human ovarian cancer cells via p38 MAPK/JNK activation. Neferine may be explored as a promising antitumoral agent in ovarian cancer. PMID:26738868

  17. Atractylodin Inhibits Interleukin-6 by Blocking NPM-ALK Activation and MAPKs in HMC-1.

    PubMed

    Chae, Hee-Sung; Kim, Young-Mi; Chin, Young-Won

    2016-09-02

    Atractylodin is one of the major constituents of the rhizome of Atractylodes lancea, which is widely used in Korean traditional medicine as a remedy for the treatment of gastritis and gastric ulcers. Despite of a major constituent of widely used botanical to treat inflammatory responses little is known about anti-inflammatory effect of atractylodin in the human mast cell (HMC-1). Hence, we evaluated the effect of atractylodin on the release of IL-6, the involvement of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187-induced HMC-1. In addition, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), phospholipase C (PLC) gamma 1, and AKT phosphorylation relevant to NPM-ALK signal pathway were assessed. IL-6 levels in the HMC-1 stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187 were apparently decreased by the treatment of atractylodin. Concurrently, atractylodin not only inhibited the phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, but also suppressed the phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT3, PLC gamma 1, and AKT. Furthermore, the activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187 were inhibited by atractylodin. These results suggested that atractylodin might have a potential regulatory effect on inflammatory mediator expression through blockade of both the phosphorylation of MAPKs and the NPM-ALK signaling pathway.

  18. Atractylodin Inhibits Interleukin-6 by Blocking NPM-ALK Activation and MAPKs in HMC-1.

    PubMed

    Chae, Hee-Sung; Kim, Young-Mi; Chin, Young-Won

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodin is one of the major constituents of the rhizome of Atractylodes lancea, which is widely used in Korean traditional medicine as a remedy for the treatment of gastritis and gastric ulcers. Despite of a major constituent of widely used botanical to treat inflammatory responses little is known about anti-inflammatory effect of atractylodin in the human mast cell (HMC-1). Hence, we evaluated the effect of atractylodin on the release of IL-6, the involvement of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187-induced HMC-1. In addition, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), phospholipase C (PLC) gamma 1, and AKT phosphorylation relevant to NPM-ALK signal pathway were assessed. IL-6 levels in the HMC-1 stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187 were apparently decreased by the treatment of atractylodin. Concurrently, atractylodin not only inhibited the phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, but also suppressed the phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT3, PLC gamma 1, and AKT. Furthermore, the activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187 were inhibited by atractylodin. These results suggested that atractylodin might have a potential regulatory effect on inflammatory mediator expression through blockade of both the phosphorylation of MAPKs and the NPM-ALK signaling pathway. PMID:27598116

  19. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharide exerts anti-tumor activity via MAPK pathways in HL-60 acute leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guohua; Yang, Lei; Zhuang, Yun; Qian, Xifeng; Shen, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo of a polysaccharide obtained from Ganoderma lucidum on HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia cells, and focused on its targeting effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. It was found by the methods such as western blot and flow cytometry (FCM), that G. lucidum polysaccharide (GLP) blocked the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/MAPK signaling pathway, simultaneously activated p38 and JNK MAPK pathways, and therefore regulated their downstream genes and proteins, including p53, c-myc, c-fos, c-jun, Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and cyclin D1. As a result, cycle arrest and apoptosis of HL-60 cells were induced. Therefore, GLP exerted anti-tumor activity via MAPK pathways in HL-60 acute leukemia cells.

  20. Rice GDP dissociation inhibitor 3 inhibits OsMAPK2 activity through physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jae Bok; Yi, Young Byung; Bahk, Jeong Dong

    2011-11-01

    GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) plays an essential role in regulating the state of bound nucleotides and subcellular localizations of Rab proteins. In our previous study, we showed that OsGDI3 facilitates the recycling of OsRab11 with a help of OsGAP1. In this study, we show that OsGDI3 complement the yeast sec19-1 mutant, a temperature-sensitive allele of the yeast GDI gene, suggesting that OsGDI3 is a functional ortholog of yeast GDI. To obtain further knowledge on the function of OsGDI3, candidate OsGDI3-interacting proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid screens. OsMAPK2 is one of OsGDI3 interacting proteins from yeast two-hybrid screens and subject to further analysis. A kinase assay showed that the autophosphorylation activity of OsMAPK2 is inhibited by OsGDI3 in vitro. In addition, ectopic expressions of OsGDI3-in Arabidopsis cause reductions at the level of phosphorylated AtMPK in phosphorylation activity. Taken together, OsGDI3 functions as a negative regulator of OsMAPK2 through modulating its kinase activity.

  1. Impact of MAPK Pathway Activation in BRAF(V600) Melanoma on T Cell and Dendritic Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Ott, Patrick A; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2013-10-28

    Constitutive upregulation of the MAPK pathway by a BRAF(V600) mutation occurs in about half of melanomas. This leads to increased oncogenic properties such as tumor cell invasion, metastatic potential, and resistance to apoptosis. Blockade of the MAPK pathway with highly specific kinase inhibitors induces unprecedented tumor response rates in patients with advanced BRAF(V600) mutant melanoma. Immune checkpoint blockade with monoclonal antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programed death-1/PD-L1 has also demonstrated striking anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced melanoma. Tumor responses are likely limited by multiple additional layers of immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. There is emerging preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting that MAPK inhibition has a beneficial effect on the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, providing a strong rationale for combined immunotherapy and MAPK pathway inhibition in melanoma. The T cell response has been the main focus in the studies reported to date. Since dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the induction of tumor-specific T cell responses, the impact of MAPK pathway activation in melanoma on DC function is critical for the melanoma directed immune response. BRAF(V600E) melanoma cells modulate DCs through the MAPK pathway because its blockade in melanoma cells can reverse suppression of DC function. As both MEK/BRAF inhibition and immune checkpoint blockade have recently taken center stage in the treatment of melanoma, a deeper understanding of how MAPK pathway inhibition affects the tumor immune response is needed.

  2. Leptin Promotes cPLA₂ Gene Expression through Activation of the MAPK/NF-κB/p300 Cascade.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Pei-Sung; Wu, Chi-Sheng; Chang, Jia-Feng; Lin, Wei-Ning

    2015-11-18

    Hyperplasia or hypertrophy of adipose tissues plays a crucial role in obesity, which is accompanied by the release of leptin. Recently, obesity was determined to be associated with various pulmonary diseases including asthma, acute lung injury, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, how obesity contributes to pulmonary diseases and whether leptin directly regulates lung inflammation remains unclear. We used cell and animal models to study the mechanisms of leptin mediation of pulmonary inflammation. We found that leptin activated de novo synthesis of cytosolic phospholipase A₂-α (cPLA₂-α) in vitro in the lung alveolar type II cells, A549, and in vivo in ICR mice. Upregulated cPLA₂-α protein was attenuated by pretreatment with an OB-R blocking antibody, U0126, SB202190, SP600125, Bay11-7086, garcinol, and p300 siRNA, suggesting roles of p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK, JNK1/2, NF-κB, and p300 in leptin effects. Leptin enhanced the activities of p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK, JNK1/2, and p65 NF-κB in a time-dependent manner. Additional studies have suggested the participation of OB-R, p42/p44 MAPK, and JNK1/2 in leptin-increased p65 phosphorylation. Furthermore, p300 phosphorylation and histone H4 acetylation were reduced by blockage of OB-R, p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK, JNK1/2, and NF-κB in leptin-stimulated cells. Similarly, blockage of the MAPKs/NF-κB/p300 cascade significantly inhibited leptin-mediated cPLA₂-α mRNA expression. Our data as a whole showed that leptin contributed to lung cPLA₂-α expression through OB-R-dependent activation of the MAPKs/NF-κB/p300 cascade.

  3. A novel p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitor suppresses respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus replication by inhibiting virus-induced p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Soo; Heo, Jinyuk; Yi, Chae-Min; Ban, Junsu; Lee, Noh-Jin; Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2016-08-26

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus are leading causes of acute lower respiratory infectious disease. Respiratory diseases caused by RSV and influenza A virus result in serious economic burden and life-threatening disease for immunocompromised people. With the revelation that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in host cells is crucial for infection and replication of RSV and influenza A virus, inhibition of p38 MAPK activity has been suggested as a potential antiviral therapeutic strategy. However, the low selectivity and high toxicity of the p38 MAPK inhibitors necessitate the development of better inhibitors. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel p38 MAPK inhibitor, NJK14047, with high kinase selectivity. In this work, it was demonstrated that NJK14047 inhibits RSV- and influenza A-mediated p38 MAPK activation in epithelial cells. Subsequently, NJK14047 treatment resulted in decreased viral replication and viral mRNA synthesis. In addition, secretion of interleukin-6 from infected cells was greatly diminished by NJK14047, suggesting that it can ameliorate immunopathological responses to RSV and influenza A. Collectively, the results suggest that NJK14047 has therapeutic potential to treat respiratory viral infection through the suppression of p38 MAPK activation, which is suggested to be an essential step for respiratory virus infection. PMID:27346133

  4. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jun-Ha; Byun, Mi Ran; Kim, A. Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hang Jun; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Juwon; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM) through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation. PMID:26262877

  5. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jun-Ha; Byun, Mi Ran; Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hang Jun; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Juwon; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM) through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  6. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway: Role in Immune Evasion by Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Soares-Silva, Mercedes; Diniz, Flavia F; Gomes, Gabriela N; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi are the causative agents of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, two neglected tropical diseases that affect about 25 million people worldwide. These parasites belong to the family Trypanosomatidae, and are both obligate intracellular parasites that manipulate host signaling pathways and the innate immune system to establish infection. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are serine and threonine protein kinases that are highly conserved in eukaryotes, and are involved in signal transduction pathways that modulate physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. This mini-review highlights existing knowledge concerning the mechanisms that Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have evolved to target the host's MAPK signaling pathways and highjack the immune response, and, in this manner, promote parasite maintenance in the host. PMID:26941717

  7. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway: Role in Immune Evasion by Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Silva, Mercedes; Diniz, Flavia F.; Gomes, Gabriela N.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi are the causative agents of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, two neglected tropical diseases that affect about 25 million people worldwide. These parasites belong to the family Trypanosomatidae, and are both obligate intracellular parasites that manipulate host signaling pathways and the innate immune system to establish infection. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are serine and threonine protein kinases that are highly conserved in eukaryotes, and are involved in signal transduction pathways that modulate physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. This mini-review highlights existing knowledge concerning the mechanisms that Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have evolved to target the host’s MAPK signaling pathways and highjack the immune response, and, in this manner, promote parasite maintenance in the host. PMID:26941717

  8. The activation of p38MAPK and JNK pathways in bovine herpesvirus 1 infected MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqian; Yuan, Chen; Huang, Liyuan; Ding, Xiuyan; Wang, Jianye; Zhang, Dong; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    We have shown previously that BHV-1 infection activates Erk1/2 signaling. Here, we show that BHV-1 provoked an early-stage transient and late-stage sustained activation of JNK, p38MAPK and c-Jun signaling in MDBK cells. C-Jun phosphorylation was dependent on JNK. These early events were partially due to the viral entry process. Unexpectedly, reactive oxygen species were not involved in the later activation phase. Interestingly, only activated JNK facilitated the viral multiplication identified through both chemical inhibitor and siRNA. Collectively, this study provides insight into our understanding of early stages of BHV-1 infection. PMID:27590675

  9. Ribosome Synthesis and MAPK Activity Modulate Ionizing Radiation-Induced Germ Cell Apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Ralf; Stergiou, Lilli; Hofmann, E. Randal; Hofmann, Jen; Haenni, Simon; Teo, Youjin; Furger, André; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomal RNA by RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I) is an elemental biological process and is key for cellular homeostasis. In a forward genetic screen in C. elegans designed to identify DNA damage-response factors, we isolated a point mutation of RNA pol I, rpoa-2(op259), that leads to altered rRNA synthesis and a concomitant resistance to ionizing radiation (IR)-induced germ cell apoptosis. This weak apoptotic IR response could be phenocopied when interfering with other factors of ribosome synthesis. Surprisingly, despite their resistance to DNA damage, rpoa-2(op259) mutants present a normal CEP-1/p53 response to IR and increased basal CEP-1 activity under normal growth conditions. In parallel, rpoa-2(op259) leads to reduced Ras/MAPK pathway activity, which is required for germ cell progression and physiological germ cell death. Ras/MAPK gain-of-function conditions could rescue the IR response defect in rpoa-2(op259), pointing to a function for Ras/MAPK in modulating DNA damage-induced apoptosis downstream of CEP-1. Our data demonstrate that a single point mutation in an RNA pol I subunit can interfere with multiple key signalling pathways. Ribosome synthesis and growth-factor signalling are perturbed in many cancer cells; such an interplay between basic cellular processes and signalling might be critical for how tumours evolve or respond to treatment. PMID:24278030

  10. Involvement of p38 MAPK in the Anticancer Activity of Cultivated Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shang-Min; Lai, Wan-Jung; Hong, Tzuwen; Tsai, Sheng-Hong; Chen, Yen-Hsun; Kao, Cheng-Hsiang; Chu, Richard; Shen, Tang-Long; Li, Tsai-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a traditional Chinese medicine frequently used for tonic and therapeutic purposes. Reports from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that extracts of the cultivated fruiting bodies of C. militaris (CM) exhibit a potent cytotoxic effect against many cancer cell lines, especially human leukemia cells. Here, we further investigated the underlying mechanism through which CM is cytotoxic to cancer cells. The CM-mediated induction of PARP cleavage and its related DNA damage signal (γH2AX) was diminished by caspase inhibitor I. In contrast, a ROS scavenger failed to prevent CM-mediated leukemia cell death. Moreover, two signaling molecules, AKT and p38 MAPK, were activated during the course of apoptosis induction. Employing MTT analysis, we found that a p38 MAPK inhibitor but not an AKT inhibitor could rescue cells from CM-mediated cell death, as well as inhibit the cleavage of PARP, formation of apoptotic bodies and up-regulation of the γH2AX signal. These results suggest that CM-mediated leukemia cell death occurs through the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway, indicating its potential therapeutic effects against human leukemia. PMID:26205966

  11. BMP9-Induced Survival Effect in Liver Tumor Cells Requires p38MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvaro, María; Addante, Annalisa; Roncero, Cesáreo; Fernández, Margarita; Fabregat, Isabel; Sánchez, Aránzazu; Herrera, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    The study of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) role in tumorigenic processes, and specifically in the liver, has gathered importance in the last few years. Previous studies have shown that BMP9 is overexpressed in about 40% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In vitro data have also shown evidence that BMP9 has a pro-tumorigenic action, not only by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration, but also by promoting proliferation and survival in liver cancer cells. However, the precise mechanisms driving these effects have not yet been established. In the present work, we deepened our studies into the intracellular mechanisms implicated in the BMP9 proliferative and pro-survival effect on liver tumor cells. In HepG2 cells, BMP9 induces both Smad and non-Smad signaling cascades, specifically PI3K/AKT and p38MAPK. However, only the p38MAPK pathway contributes to the BMP9 growth-promoting effect on these cells. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that p38MAPK activation, although dispensable for the BMP9 proliferative activity, is required for the BMP9 protective effect on serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the signaling pathways involved in the BMP9 pro-tumorigenic role in liver tumor cells. PMID:26343646

  12. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B adaptor-proteins differentially regulate neuronal early endosome maturation via the Rab5/Vps34-pathway

    PubMed Central

    Candiello, Ermes; Kratzke, Manuel; Wenzel, Dirk; Cassel, Dan; Schu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The σ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin-coated-vesicle adaptor-protein complex is expressed as three isoforms. Tissues express σ1A and one of the σ1B and σ1C isoforms. Brain is the tissue with the highest σ1A and σ1B expression. σ1B-deficiency leads to severe mental retardation, accumulation of early endosomes in synapses and fewer synaptic vesicles, whose recycling is slowed down. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B regulate maturation of these early endosomes into multivesicular body late endosomes, thereby controlling synaptic vesicle protein transport into a degradative pathway. σ1A binds ArfGAP1, and with higher affinity brain-specific ArfGAP1, which bind Rabex-5. AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complex formation leads to more endosomal Rabex-5 and enhanced, Rab5GTP-stimulated Vps34 PI3-kinase activity, which is essential for multivesicular body endosome formation. Formation of AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complexes is prevented by σ1B binding of Rabex-5 and the amount of endosomal Rabex-5 is reduced. AP-1 complexes differentially regulate endosome maturation and coordinate protein recycling and degradation, revealing a novel molecular mechanism by which they regulate protein transport besides their established function in clathrin-coated-vesicle formation. PMID:27411398

  13. Cadmium induces vascular permeability via activation of the p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Fengyun; Guo, Fang; Li, Liqun; Guo, Ling; Hou, Yinglong; Hao, Enkui; Yan, Suhua; Allen, Thaddeus D.; Liu, Ju

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Low-dose cadmium (Cd) induces vascular hyper-permeability. • p38 MAPK mediates Cd-induced disruption of endothelial cell barrier function. • SB203850 inhibits Cd-induced membrane dissociation of VE-cadherin and β-catenin. • SB203850 reduces Cd-induced expression and secretion of TNF-α. - Abstract: The vasculature of various organs is a targeted by the environmental toxin, cadmium (Cd). However, mechanisms leading to pathological conditions are poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At 4 μM, CdCl{sub 2} induced a hyper-permeability defect in HUVECs, but not the inhibition of cell growth up to 24 h. This effect of CdCl{sub 2} was dependent on the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203850 suppressed the CdCl{sub 2}-induced alteration in trans-endothelial electrical resistance in HUVEC monolayers, a model measurement of vascular endothelial barrier integrity. SB203850 also inhibited the Cd-induced membrane dissociation of vascular endothelial (VE) cadherin and β-catenin, the important components of the adherens junctional complex. In addition, SB203850 reduces the Cd-induced expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Taken together, our findings suggest that Cd induces vascular hyper-permeability and disruption of endothelial barrier integrity through stimulation of p38 MAPK signaling.

  14. Halofuginone inhibits NF-kappaB and p38 MAPK in activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Leiba, M; Cahalon, L; Shimoni, A; Lider, O; Zanin-Zhorov, A; Hecht, I; Sela, U; Vlodavsky, I; Nagler, A

    2006-08-01

    Halofuginone, a low molecular weight plant alkaloid, inhibits collagen alpha1 (I) gene expression in several animal models and in patients with fibrotic disease, including scleroderma and graft-versus-host disease. In addition, halofuginone has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor progression. It was demonstrated recently that halofuginone inhibits transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), an important immunomodulator. The present study was undertaken to explore the effects of halofuginone on activated T cells. Peripheral blood T cells were activated by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies in the absence and presence of halofuginone and assessed for nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activity, production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), T cell apoptosis, chemotaxis, and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) model was applied to investigate the effect of halofuginone on T cells in vivo. Preincubation of activated peripheral blood T cells with 10-40 ng/ml halofuginone resulted in a significant dose-dependent decrease in NF-kappaB activity (80% inhibition following incubation with 40 ng halofuginone, P = 0.002). In addition, 40 ng/ml halofuginone inhibited secretion of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, and TGF-beta (P < 0.005). Similarly, halofuginone inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and apoptosis in activated T cells (P = 0.0001 and 0.005, respectively). In contrast, T cell chemotaxis was not affected. Halofuginone inhibited DTH response in mice, indicating suppression of T cell-mediated inflammation in vivo. Halofuginone inhibits activated peripheral blood T cell functions and proinflammatory cytokine production through inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. It also inhibited DTH response in vivo, making it an attractive immunomodulator and anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:16769768

  15. BMP7 retards peripheral myelination by activating p38 MAPK in Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Yahong; Peng, Su; Zhang, Shuqiang; Wang, Meihong; Chen, Yeyue; Zhang, Shan; Yang, Yumin; Sun, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) myelination is pivotal for the proper physiological functioning of the nervous system, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains less well understood. Here, we showed that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) inversely correlates with myelin gene expression during peripheral myelination, which suggests that BMP7 is likely a negative regulator for myelin gene expression. Our experiments further showed that the application of BMP7 attenuates the cAMP induced myelin gene expression in SCs. Downstream pathway analysis suggested that both p38 MAPK and SMAD are activated by exogenous BMP7 in SCs. The pharmacological intervention and gene silence studies revealed that p38 MAPK, not SMAD, is responsible for BMP7-mediated suppression of myelin gene expression. In addition, c-Jun, a potential negative regulator for peripheral myelination, was up-regulated by BMP7. In vivo experiments showed that BMP7 treatment greatly impaired peripheral myelination in newborn rats. Together, our results established that BMP7 is a negative regulator for peripheral myelin gene expression and that p38 MAPK/c-Jun axis might be the main downstream target of BMP7 in this process. PMID:27491681

  16. BMP7 retards peripheral myelination by activating p38 MAPK in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Yahong; Peng, Su; Zhang, Shuqiang; Wang, Meihong; Chen, Yeyue; Zhang, Shan; Yang, Yumin; Sun, Cheng

    2016-08-05

    Schwann cell (SC) myelination is pivotal for the proper physiological functioning of the nervous system, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains less well understood. Here, we showed that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) inversely correlates with myelin gene expression during peripheral myelination, which suggests that BMP7 is likely a negative regulator for myelin gene expression. Our experiments further showed that the application of BMP7 attenuates the cAMP induced myelin gene expression in SCs. Downstream pathway analysis suggested that both p38 MAPK and SMAD are activated by exogenous BMP7 in SCs. The pharmacological intervention and gene silence studies revealed that p38 MAPK, not SMAD, is responsible for BMP7-mediated suppression of myelin gene expression. In addition, c-Jun, a potential negative regulator for peripheral myelination, was up-regulated by BMP7. In vivo experiments showed that BMP7 treatment greatly impaired peripheral myelination in newborn rats. Together, our results established that BMP7 is a negative regulator for peripheral myelin gene expression and that p38 MAPK/c-Jun axis might be the main downstream target of BMP7 in this process.

  17. OsMAPK6, a mitogen-activated protein kinase, influences rice grain size and biomass production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuying; Hua, Lei; Dong, Sujun; Chen, Hongqi; Zhu, Xudong; Jiang, Jun'e; Zhang, Fang; Li, Yunhai; Fang, Xiaohua; Chen, Fan

    2015-11-01

    Grain size is an important agronomic trait in determining grain yield. However, the molecular mechanisms that determine the final grain size are not well understood. Here, we report the functional analysis of a rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant, dwarf and small grain1 (dsg1), which displays pleiotropic phenotypes, including small grains, dwarfism and erect leaves. Cytological observations revealed that the small grain and dwarfism of dsg1 were mainly caused by the inhibition of cell proliferation. Map-based cloning revealed that DSG1 encoded a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), OsMAPK6. OsMAPK6 was mainly located in the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was ubiquitously distributed in various organs, predominately in spikelets and spikelet hulls, consistent with its role in grain size and biomass production. As a functional kinase, OsMAPK6 interacts strongly with OsMKK4, indicating that OsMKK4 is likely to be the upstream MAPK kinase of OsMAPK6 in rice. In addition, hormone sensitivity tests indicated that the dsg1 mutant was less sensitive to brassinosteroids (BRs). The endogenous BR levels were reduced in dsg1, and the expression of several BR signaling pathway genes and feedback-inhibited genes was altered in the dsg1 mutant, with or without exogenous BRs, indicating that OsMAPK6 may contribute to influence BR homeostasis and signaling. Thus, OsMAPK6, a MAPK, plays a pivotal role in grain size in rice, via cell proliferation, and BR signaling and homeostasis. PMID:26366992

  18. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-01-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes. PMID:26096612

  19. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor-induced MAPK phosphatase-1 (MPK-1) expression inhibits paclitaxel-associated MAPK activation and contributes to breast cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Pew, Travis; Zou, Min; Pang, Diana; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2005-02-11

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation has recently been shown to inhibit apoptosis in breast epithelial cells. We have previously described a group of genes that is rapidly up-regulated in these cells following dexamethasone (Dex) treatment. In an effort to dissect the mechanisms of GR-mediated breast epithelial cell survival, we now examine the molecular events downstream of GR activation. Here we show that GR activation leads to both the rapid induction of MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) mRNA and its sustained expression. Induction of the MKP-1 protein in the MCF10A-Myc and MDA-MB-231 breast epithelial cell lines was also seen. Paclitaxel treatment resulted in MAPK activation and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and both processes were inhibited by Dex pretreatment. Furthermore, induction of MKP-1 correlated with the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity, whereas p38 activity was minimally affected. Blocking Dex-induced MKP-1 induction using small interfering RNA increased ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation and decreased cell survival. ERK1/2 and JNK inactivation was associated with Ets-like transcription factor-1 (ELK-1) dephosphorylation. To explore the gene expression changes that occur downstream of ELK-1 dephosphorylation, we used a combination of temporal gene expression data and promoter element analyses. This approach revealed a previously unrecognized transcriptional target of ELK-1, the human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). We verified the predicted ELK-1--> tPA transcriptional regulatory relationship using a luciferase reporter assay. We conclude that GR-mediated MAPK inactivation contributes to cell survival and that the potential transcriptional targets of this inhibition can be identified from large scale gene array analysis.

  1. Thrombin mediates migration of rat brain astrocytes via PLC, Ca²⁺, CaMKII, PKCα, and AP-1-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lee, I-Ta; Wu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Chiung-Ju; Hsieh, Hsi-Lung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chien-Chung; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2013-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a crucial role in pathological processes of brain inflammation, injury, and neurodegeneration. Thrombin has been known as a regulator of MMP-9 expression and cells migration. However, the mechanisms underlying thrombin-induced MMP-9 expression in rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1 cells) remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that thrombin induced the expression of pro-form MMP-9 and migration of RBA-1 cells, which were inhibited by pretreatment with the inhibitor of Gq-coupled receptor (GPAnt2A), Gi/o-coupled receptor (GPAnt2), PC-PLC (D609), PI-PLC (U73122), Ca(2+)-ATPase (thapsigargin, TG), calmodulin (CaMI), CaMKII (KN62), PKC (Gö6976 or GF109203X), MEK1/2 (PD98059), p38 MAPK (SB202190), JNK1/2 (SP600125), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) or the intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM) and transfection with siRNA of PKCα, Erk2, JNK1, p38 MAPK, c-Jun, or c-Fos. In addition, thrombin-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was attenuated by PPACK (a thrombin inhibitor). Thrombin further induced CaMKII phosphorylation and PKCα translocation, which were inhibited by U73122, D609, KN62, TG, or BAPTA/AM. Thrombin also induced PKCα-dependent p42/p44 MAPK and JNK1/2, but not p38 MAPK activation. Finally, we showed that thrombin enhanced c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation. c-Fos mRNA levels induced by thrombin were reduced by PD98059, SP600125, and Gö6976, but not SB202190. Thrombin stimulated in vivo binding of c-Fos to the MMP-9 promoter, which was reduced by pretreatment with SP600125 or PD98059, but not SB202190. These results concluded that thrombin activated a PLC/Ca(2+)/CaMKII/PKCα/p42/p44 MAPK and JNK1/2 pathway, which in turn triggered AP-1 activation and ultimately induced MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells.

  2. EhMAPK, the mitogen-activated protein kinase from Entamoeba histolytica is associated with cell survival.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anupama Sardar; Ray, Doel; Dutta, Suman; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2010-10-08

    Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are a class of serine/threonine kinases that regulate a number of different cellular activities including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival and even death. The pathogen Entamoeba histolytica possess a single homologue of a typical MAPK gene (EhMAPK) whose identification was previously reported by us but its functional implications remained unexplored. EhMAPK, the only mitogen-activated protein kinase from the parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica with Threonine-X-Tyrosine (TXY) phosphorylation motif was cloned, expressed in E. coli and functionally characterized under different stress conditions. The expression profile of EhMAPK at the protein and mRNA level remained similar among untreated, heat shocked and hydrogen peroxide-treated samples in all cases of dose and time. But a significant difference was obtained in the phosphorylation status of the protein in response to different stresses. Heat shock at 43°C or 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) treatment enhanced the phosphorylation status of EhMAPK and augmented the kinase activity of the protein whereas 2.0 mM H(2)O(2) treatment induced dephosphorylation of EhMAPK and loss of kinase activity. 2.0 mM H(2)O(2) treatment reduced parasite viability significantly but heat shock and 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) treatment failed to adversely affect E. histolytica viability. Therefore, a distinct possibility that activation of EhMAPK is associated with stress survival in E. histolytica is seen. Our study also gives a glimpse of the regulatory mechanism of the protein under in vivo conditions. Since the parasite genome lacks any typical homologue of mammalian MEK, the dual specificity kinases which are the upstream activators of MAPK, indications of the existence of some alternate regulatory mechanisms of the EhMAPK activity is perceived. These may include the autophosphorylation activity of the protein itself in combination with some upstream phosphatases which are not yet identified.

  3. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects.

  4. The role of p38 MAPK activation in auranofin-induced apoptosis of human promyelocytic leukaemia HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Joo; Kim, In-Sook

    2005-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported an antileukaemic activity of auranofin (AF), demonstrating its dual effects: on the induction of apoptotic cell death and its synergistic action with retinoic acid on cell differentiation. In this study, we investigated the downstream signalling events of AF-induced apoptosis to determine the molecular mechanisms of AF activity. Treatment of HL-60 cells with AF induced apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that AF-induced apoptosis was accompanied by the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3, and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. The phosphorylation and kinase activities of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) increased gradually until 12 h after AF (2 μM) treatment, and p38 MAPK was also activated concentration-dependently. Pretreatment with SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, significantly blocked DNA fragmentation and the cleavage of procaspase-8, procaspase-3, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), whereas SB203580 alone had no effect. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also detected within 1 h after AF treatment, and the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) effectively protected the cells from apoptosis by inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and the activation of caspases. These results suggest that ROS generation and the subsequent activation of p38 MAPK are essential for the proapoptotic effects of AF in human promyelocytic leukaemia HL-60 cells. PMID:16086031

  5. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects. PMID:27086143

  6. Increase of mesenchymal stem cell migration by cannabidiol via activation of p42/44 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Schmuhl, Ellen; Ramer, Robert; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Hinz, Burkhard

    2014-02-01

    Migration and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to be involved in various regenerative processes such as bone healing. However, little is known about the pharmacotherapeutical options aiming at the mobilization and differentiation of MSCs. The present study therefore focussed on cannabinoids which have been demonstrated to exhibit tissue healing properties. Using Boyden chamber assays, the non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) was found to increase the migration of adipose-derived MSCs in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. CBD-induced migration was inhibited by AM-630 (CB₂ receptor antagonist) and O-1602 (G protein-coupled receptor 55 [GRP55] agonist). Moreover, the promigratory effect of CBD was antagonized by inhibition of the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway which became activated upon CBD treatment. In line with this data, AM-630 and O-1602 attenuated CBD-induced p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation. A p42/44 MAPK-dependent promigratory effect was likewise demonstrated for the GPR55 antagonist O-1918 and the selective CB₂ receptor agonist JWH-133. Additional evidence for a functional effect of CBD on MSCs was provided by experiments demonstrating long-term stimulation with CBD to induce differentiation of MSCs into the osteoblastic lineage as evidenced by increased mineralization assessed by cresolphthalein complexone assay and enhanced activity of alkaline phosphatase. Collectively, this study demonstrates CBD to promote the migration of MSCs via activation of the CB₂ receptor and inhibition of GPR55 and to induce osteoblastic differentiation. CBD may therefore recruit MSCs to sites of calcifying tissue regeneration and subsequently support bone regeneration via an osteoanabolic action on MSCs.

  7. Extracellular ATP activates MAPK and ROS signaling during injury response in the fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Castellanos, Elizabeth; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo U.; Heil, Martin; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The response to mechanical damage is crucial for the survival of multicellular organisms, enabling their adaptation to hostile environments. Trichoderma atroviride, a filamentous fungus of great importance in the biological control of plant diseases, responds to mechanical damage by activating regenerative processes and asexual reproduction (conidiation). During this response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by the NADPH oxidase complex. To understand the underlying early signaling events, we evaluated molecules such as extracellular ATP (eATP) and Ca2+ that are known to trigger wound-induced responses in plants and animals. Concretely, we investigated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by eATP, Ca2+, and ROS. Indeed, application of exogenous ATP and Ca2+ triggered conidiation. Furthermore, eATP promoted the Nox1-dependent production of ROS and activated a MAPK pathway. Mutants in the MAPK-encoding genes tmk1 and tmk3 were affected in wound-induced conidiation, and phosphorylation of both Tmk1 and Tmk3 was triggered by eATP. We conclude that in this fungus, eATP acts as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP). Our data indicate the existence of an eATP receptor and suggest that in fungi, eATP triggers pathways that converge to regulate asexual reproduction genes that are required for injury-induced conidiation. By contrast, Ca2+ is more likely to act as a downstream second messenger. The early steps of mechanical damage response in T. atroviride share conserved elements with those known from plants and animals. PMID:25484887

  8. Aluminum Nanoparticles Induce ERK and p38MAPK Activation in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Gyun-Baek; Jo; Lee, Mimi; Shim, Ilseob; Lee, Byung-Woo; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles (Al-NPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterial in cosmetics and medical materials. For this reason, Al-NP exposure is very likely to occur via inhalation in the environment and the workplace. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanism of Al-NP neurotoxicity via inhalation exposure. In this study, we investigated the effect AL-NPs on the brain. Rats were exposed to Al-NPs by nasal instillation at 1 mg/kg body weight (low exposure group), 20 mg/kg body weight (moderate exposure group), and 40 mg/kg body weight (high exposure group), for a total of 3 times, with a 24-hr interval after each exposure. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis indicated that the presence of aluminum was increased in a dose-dependent manner in the olfactory bulb (OFB) and the brain. In microarray analysis, the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activity (GO: 0043405), including Ptprc, P2rx7, Map2k4, Trib3, Trib1, and Fgd4 was significantly over-expressed in the treated mice than in the controls (p = 0.0027). Moreover, Al-NPs induced the activation of ERK1 and p38 MAPK protein expression in the brain, but did not alter the protein expression of JNK, when compared to the control. These data demonstrate that the nasal exposure of Al-NPs can permeate the brain via the olfactory bulb and modulate the gene and protein expression of MAPK and its activity. PMID:24386518

  9. Activated p38 MAPK in Peripheral Blood Monocytes of Steroid Resistant Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-bo; Leung, Donald Y. M.; Goleva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Steroid resistance is a significant problem in management of chronic inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Accessible biomarkers are needed to identify steroid resistant patients to optimize their treatment. This study examined corticosteroid resistance in severe asthma. 24 asthmatics with forced expiratory volume in one second of less then 80% predicted were classified as steroid resistant or steroid sensitive based on changes in their lung function following a week of treatment with oral prednisone. Heparinised blood was collected from patients prior to oral prednisone administration. Phosphorylated mitogen activated kinases (MAPK) (extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and jun kinase (JNK)) were analyzed in whole blood samples using flow cytometry. Activation of phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1) in asthmatics’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were confirmed by Western blot. Dexamethasone suppression of the LPS-induced IL-8 mRNA production by steroid resistant asthmatics PBMC in the presence of p38 and ERK inhibitors was evaluated by real time PCR. Flow cytometry analysis identified significantly stronger p38 phosphorylation in CD14+ monocytes from steroid resistant than steroid sensitive asthmatics (p = 0.014), whereas no difference was found in phosphorylation of ERK or JNK in CD14+ cells from these two groups of asthmatics. No difference in phosphorylated p38, ERK, JNK was detected in CD4+, CD8+ T cells, B cells and NK cells from steroid resistant vs. steroid sensitive asthmatics. P38 MAPK pathway activation was confirmed by Western blot, as significantly higher phospho-p38 and phospho-MSK1 levels were detected in the PBMC lysates from steroid resistant asthmatics. P38 inhibitor significantly enhanced DEX suppression of LPS-induced IL-8 mRNA by PBMC of steroid resistant asthmatics. This is the first report demonstrating selective p38 MAPK pathway activation in blood monocytes of steroid

  10. PKC theta and p38 MAPK activate the EBV lytic cycle through autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Roberta; Granato, Marisa; Farina, Antonella; Santarelli, Roberta; Faggioni, Alberto; Cirone, Mara

    2015-07-01

    PKC activation by combining TPA with sodium butyrate (T/B) represents the most effective and widely used strategy to induce the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle. The results obtained in this study show that novel PKCθ is involved in such process and that it acts through the activation of p38 MAPK and autophagy induction. Autophagy, a mechanism of cellular defense in stressful conditions, is manipulated by EBV to enhance viral replication. Besides promoting the EBV lytic cycle, the activation of p38 and autophagy resulted in a pro-survival effect, as indicated by p38 or ATG5 knocking down experiments. However, this pro-survival role was counteracted by a pro-death activity of PKCθ, due to the dephosphorylation of AKT. In conclusion, this study reports, for the first time, that T/B activates a PKCθ-p38 MAPK axis in EBV infected B cells, that promotes the viral lytic cycle and cell survival and dephosphorylates AKT, balancing cell life and cell death. PMID:25827954

  11. Amarogentin, a Secoiridoid Glycoside, Abrogates Platelet Activation through PLCγ2-PKC and MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Lu, Wan-Jung; Lien, Li-Ming; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Amarogentin, an active principle of Gentiana lutea, possess antitumorigenic, antidiabetic, and antioxidative properties. Activation of platelets is associated with intravascular thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases. The present study examined the effects of amarogentin on platelet activation. Amarogentin treatment (15~60 μM) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not thrombin, arachidonic acid, and U46619. Amarogentin inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). It also inhibits in vivo thrombus formation in mice. In addition, neither the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ nor the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 affected the amarogentin-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation, which suggests that amarogentin does not regulate the levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. In conclusion, amarogentin prevents platelet activation through the inhibition of PLCγ2-PKC cascade and MAPK pathway. Our findings suggest that amarogentin may offer therapeutic potential for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders. PMID:24868545

  12. Hydrogen peroxide signaling mediator in the activation of p38 MAPK in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Lamas, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that a transient increase of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) behaves as an intracellular messenger able to trigger the activation of different signaling pathways. These include phosphatases, protein kinases, and transcription factors among others; however, most of the studies have been performed using supraphysiological levels of H2O2. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs under physiological conditions and different extracellular stimuli including cytokines, growth factors, and shear stress are able to produce both low levels of superoxide anion and H2O2. Here, we explore the redox-dependent activation of key signaling pathways induced by shear stress. We demonstrate that laminar shear stress (LSS) rapidly promotes a transient generation of H2O2 that is necessary for the activation of the stress-activated protein kinase p38 MAPK. We describe p38 MAPK as an early redox sensor in LSS. Our studies show that it is essential for the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, the subsequent nitric oxide generation, and the protection of endothelial function.

  13. PKC theta and p38 MAPK activate the EBV lytic cycle through autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Roberta; Granato, Marisa; Farina, Antonella; Santarelli, Roberta; Faggioni, Alberto; Cirone, Mara

    2015-07-01

    PKC activation by combining TPA with sodium butyrate (T/B) represents the most effective and widely used strategy to induce the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle. The results obtained in this study show that novel PKCθ is involved in such process and that it acts through the activation of p38 MAPK and autophagy induction. Autophagy, a mechanism of cellular defense in stressful conditions, is manipulated by EBV to enhance viral replication. Besides promoting the EBV lytic cycle, the activation of p38 and autophagy resulted in a pro-survival effect, as indicated by p38 or ATG5 knocking down experiments. However, this pro-survival role was counteracted by a pro-death activity of PKCθ, due to the dephosphorylation of AKT. In conclusion, this study reports, for the first time, that T/B activates a PKCθ-p38 MAPK axis in EBV infected B cells, that promotes the viral lytic cycle and cell survival and dephosphorylates AKT, balancing cell life and cell death.

  14. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  15. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  16. Retinoids interfere with the AP1 signalling pathway in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dedieu, Stephane; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    Retinoic acid and its synthetic analogs exert major effects on many biological processes including cell proliferation and differentiation and are now considered as promising pharmacological agents for prevention and treatment of various cancers. The capacity of retinoids to inhibit AP1-responsive genes seems to be the basis for the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of these agents against hyperproliferative diseases. However, the molecular basis of retinoid antiproliferative properties remains to this day largely unknown. Here, we showed that retinoids inhibit phorbol ester-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression in human breast cancer cells. Transcriptional interference was observed for both retinoid agonist and antagonist treatments, revealing separated transactivation and transrepression functions of retinoids. In addition, we examined MAP kinases as potential targets of retinoid signalling in human breast cancer cells and demonstrated that retinoids repress AP1-responsive gene expression by inhibiting MKK6/p38 and mainly MEK/ERK signalling pathways. On the contrary, the JNK-dependent pathway was not identified as a molecular relay for AP1 activity and was insensitive to retinoid treatments. Finally, we established that overexpressed c-fos and c-jun partially abolished the ability of retinoids to inhibit AP1 activity, suggesting that c-jun and/or c-fos containing dimers may constitute one target of retinoids for transrepression of AP1. All together, our data help to improve our understanding of how retinoids antagonize AP1 activity and may regulate tumoral cell proliferation.

  17. Nobiletin suppresses MMP-9 expression through modulation of p38 MAPK activity in human dermal fibrobalsts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Ju; Korm, Sovannarith; Kim, Won-Seok; Kim, Ok-Seon; Lee, Ji-Seon; Min, Hyung-Geun; Chin, Young-Won; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify a novel flavonoid from the in-house natural products to suppress matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), which is responsible for degradation of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins. Total eight natural products were screened for identification of a novel MMP-9 suppressor using MMP-9 reporter system, where the prompt initial screening with multiple samples is readily examined. Among the extracts used in the present study, one extract (Citrus unshiu) was found active in this assay system. Furthermore, three representative flavonoids in this active extract of Citrus unshiu peel were tested in MMP-9 reporter system. Nobiletin (NB) of the tested flavonoids suppressed MMP-9 expression without cytotoxicity, which was validated by both real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and zymography analyses. Sustained p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, closely associated with induction of MMP-9 under stress condition, was markedly reduced by NB treatment, which implies that modulation of p38MAPK by nobiletin is responsible for reduction of MMP9 expression. Hence, nobiletin, identified from MMP-9 reporter system based screening, may be further applied for the purpose of delaying collagen degradation in skin fibroblasts.

  18. MEK Inhibition Overcomes Cisplatin Resistance Conferred by SOS/MAPK Pathway Activation in Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Li Ren; Chua, Kian Ngiap; Sim, Wen Jing; Ng, Hsien Chun; Bi, Chonglei; Ho, Jingshan; Nga, Min En; Pang, Yin Huei; Ong, Weijie Richard; Soo, Ross Andrew; Huynh, Hung; Chng, Wee Joo; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Goh, Boon Cher

    2015-07-01

    Genomic analyses of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) have yet to yield significant strategies against pathway activation to improve treatment. Platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for SCC of different histotypes either as a single-agent or alongside other chemotherapeutic drugs or radiotherapy; however, resistance inevitably emerges, which limits the duration of treatment response. To elucidate mechanisms that mediate resistance to cisplatin, we compared drug-induced perturbations to gene and protein expression between cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant SCC cells, and identified MAPK-ERK pathway upregulation and activation in drug-resistant cells. ERK-induced resistance appeared to be activated by Son of Sevenless (SOS) upstream, and mediated through Bim degradation downstream. Clinically, elevated p-ERK expression was associated with shorter disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced head and neck SCC treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Inhibition of MEK/ERK, but not that of EGFR or RAF, augmented cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in vivo. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of the activated SOS-MAPK-ERK pathway may augment patient responses to cisplatin treatment.

  19. Exocyst Sec10 protects renal tubule cells from injury by EGFR/MAPK activation and effects on endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Buonato, Janine M; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Baek, Jeong-In; Choi, Soo Young; Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Palmyre, Aurélien; Polgar, Noemi; Drummond, Iain; Park, Kwon Moo; Lazzara, Matthew J; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-12-15

    Acute kidney injury is common and has a high mortality rate, and no effective treatment exists other than supportive care. Using cell culture models, we previously demonstrated that exocyst Sec10 overexpression reduced damage to renal tubule cells and speeded recovery and that the protective effect was mediated by higher basal levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. The exocyst, a highly-conserved eight-protein complex, is known for regulating protein trafficking. Here we show that the exocyst biochemically interacts with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is upstream of MAPK, and Sec10-overexpressing cells express greater levels of phosphorylated (active) ERK, the final step in the MAPK pathway, in response to EGF stimulation. EGFR endocytosis, which has been linked to activation of the MAPK pathway, increases in Sec10-overexpressing cells, and gefitinib, a specific EGFR inhibitor, and Dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, both reduce EGFR endocytosis. In turn, inhibition of the MAPK pathway reduces ligand-mediated EGFR endocytosis, suggesting a potential feedback of elevated ERK activity on EGFR endocytosis. Gefitinib also decreases MAPK signaling in Sec10-overexpressing cells to levels seen in control cells and, demonstrating a causal role for EGFR, reverses the protective effect of Sec10 overexpression following cell injury in vitro. Finally, using an in vivo zebrafish model of acute kidney injury, morpholino-induced knockdown of sec10 increases renal tubule cell susceptibility to injury. Taken together, these results suggest that the exocyst, acting through EGFR, endocytosis, and the MAPK pathway is a candidate therapeutic target for acute kidney injury.

  20. Exocyst Sec10 protects renal tubule cells from injury by EGFR/MAPK activation and effects on endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Buonato, Janine M.; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Baek, Jeong-In; Choi, Soo Young; Chacon-Heszele, Maria F.; Palmyre, Aurélien; Polgar, Noemi; Drummond, Iain; Park, Kwon Moo; Lazzara, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is common and has a high mortality rate, and no effective treatment exists other than supportive care. Using cell culture models, we previously demonstrated that exocyst Sec10 overexpression reduced damage to renal tubule cells and speeded recovery and that the protective effect was mediated by higher basal levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. The exocyst, a highly-conserved eight-protein complex, is known for regulating protein trafficking. Here we show that the exocyst biochemically interacts with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is upstream of MAPK, and Sec10-overexpressing cells express greater levels of phosphorylated (active) ERK, the final step in the MAPK pathway, in response to EGF stimulation. EGFR endocytosis, which has been linked to activation of the MAPK pathway, increases in Sec10-overexpressing cells, and gefitinib, a specific EGFR inhibitor, and Dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, both reduce EGFR endocytosis. In turn, inhibition of the MAPK pathway reduces ligand-mediated EGFR endocytosis, suggesting a potential feedback of elevated ERK activity on EGFR endocytosis. Gefitinib also decreases MAPK signaling in Sec10-overexpressing cells to levels seen in control cells and, demonstrating a causal role for EGFR, reverses the protective effect of Sec10 overexpression following cell injury in vitro. Finally, using an in vivo zebrafish model of acute kidney injury, morpholino-induced knockdown of sec10 increases renal tubule cell susceptibility to injury. Taken together, these results suggest that the exocyst, acting through EGFR, endocytosis, and the MAPK pathway is a candidate therapeutic target for acute kidney injury. PMID:25298525

  1. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for the essential signature motif (TDY or TEY) of plant MAPK proteins. Of the 32 BraMAPK genes retrieved from the Brassica Database, 13 exhibited exon splicing errors, excessive splicing of the 5' sequence, excessive retention of the 5' sequence, and sequencing errors of the 3' end. Phylogenetic trees of the 32 corrected MAPKs from B. rapa and of MAPKs from other plants generated by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods suggested that BraMAPKs could be divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D). Gene number expansion was observed for BraMAPK genes in groups A and D, which may have been caused by the tandem duplication and genome triplication of the ancestral genome of the Brassica progenitor. Except for five members of the BraMAPK10 subfamily, the identified BraMAPKs were expressed in most of the tissues examined, including callus, root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that at least six and five BraMAPKs were induced or repressed by various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, respectively, suggesting their potential roles in the abiotic stress response and various hormone signal transduction pathways in B. rapa. This study provides valuable insight into the putative physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK genes in B. rapa. PMID:26173020

  2. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Guo, Wenjin; Lu, Junxing; Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for the essential signature motif (TDY or TEY) of plant MAPK proteins. Of the 32 BraMAPK genes retrieved from the Brassica Database, 13 exhibited exon splicing errors, excessive splicing of the 5' sequence, excessive retention of the 5' sequence, and sequencing errors of the 3' end. Phylogenetic trees of the 32 corrected MAPKs from B. rapa and of MAPKs from other plants generated by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods suggested that BraMAPKs could be divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D). Gene number expansion was observed for BraMAPK genes in groups A and D, which may have been caused by the tandem duplication and genome triplication of the ancestral genome of the Brassica progenitor. Except for five members of the BraMAPK10 subfamily, the identified BraMAPKs were expressed in most of the tissues examined, including callus, root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that at least six and five BraMAPKs were induced or repressed by various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, respectively, suggesting their potential roles in the abiotic stress response and various hormone signal transduction pathways in B. rapa. This study provides valuable insight into the putative physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK genes in B. rapa.

  3. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Guo, Wenjin; Lu, Junxing; Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for the essential signature motif (TDY or TEY) of plant MAPK proteins. Of the 32 BraMAPK genes retrieved from the Brassica Database, 13 exhibited exon splicing errors, excessive splicing of the 5' sequence, excessive retention of the 5' sequence, and sequencing errors of the 3' end. Phylogenetic trees of the 32 corrected MAPKs from B. rapa and of MAPKs from other plants generated by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods suggested that BraMAPKs could be divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D). Gene number expansion was observed for BraMAPK genes in groups A and D, which may have been caused by the tandem duplication and genome triplication of the ancestral genome of the Brassica progenitor. Except for five members of the BraMAPK10 subfamily, the identified BraMAPKs were expressed in most of the tissues examined, including callus, root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that at least six and five BraMAPKs were induced or repressed by various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, respectively, suggesting their potential roles in the abiotic stress response and various hormone signal transduction pathways in B. rapa. This study provides valuable insight into the putative physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK genes in B. rapa. PMID:26173020

  4. Endothelium-Derived 5-Methoxytryptophan Protects Endothelial Barrier Function by Blocking p38 MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Yi-Fu; Cheng, Huei-Hsuan; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Wu, Kenneth K.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial junction is tightly controlled to restrict the passage of blood cells and solutes. Disruption of endothelial barrier function by bacterial endotoxins, cytokines or growth factors results in inflammation and vascular damage leading to vascular diseases. We have identified 5-methoxytryptophan (5-MTP) as an anti-inflammatory factor by metabolomic analysis of conditioned medium of human fibroblasts. Here we postulated that endothelial cells release 5-MTP to protect the barrier function. Conditioned medium of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) prevented endothelial hyperpermeability and VE-cadherin downregulation induced by VEGF, LPS and cytokines. We analyzed the metabolomic profile of HUVEC conditioned medium and detected 5-MTP but not melatonin, serotonin or their catabolites, which was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Addition of synthetic pure 5-MTP preserved VE-cadherin and maintained barrier function despite challenge with pro-inflammatory mediators. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1, an enzyme required for 5-MTP biosynthesis, was downregulated in HUVECs by pro-inflammatory mediators and it was accompanied by reduction of 5-MTP. 5-MTP protected VE-cadherin and prevented endothelial hyperpermeability by blocking p38 MAPK activation. A chemical inhibitor of p38 MAPK, SB202190, exhibited a similar protective effect as 5-MTP. To determine whether 5-MTP prevents vascular hyperpermeability in vivo, we evaluated the effect of 5-MTP administration on LPS-induced murine microvascular permeability with Evans blue. 5-MTP significantly prevented Evans blue dye leakage. Our findings indicate that 5-MTP is a new class of endothelium-derived molecules which protects endothelial barrier function by blocking p38 MAPK. PMID:27002329

  5. Endothelium-Derived 5-Methoxytryptophan Protects Endothelial Barrier Function by Blocking p38 MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Yi-Fu; Cheng, Huei-Hsuan; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Wu, Kenneth K

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial junction is tightly controlled to restrict the passage of blood cells and solutes. Disruption of endothelial barrier function by bacterial endotoxins, cytokines or growth factors results in inflammation and vascular damage leading to vascular diseases. We have identified 5-methoxytryptophan (5-MTP) as an anti-inflammatory factor by metabolomic analysis of conditioned medium of human fibroblasts. Here we postulated that endothelial cells release 5-MTP to protect the barrier function. Conditioned medium of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) prevented endothelial hyperpermeability and VE-cadherin downregulation induced by VEGF, LPS and cytokines. We analyzed the metabolomic profile of HUVEC conditioned medium and detected 5-MTP but not melatonin, serotonin or their catabolites, which was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Addition of synthetic pure 5-MTP preserved VE-cadherin and maintained barrier function despite challenge with pro-inflammatory mediators. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1, an enzyme required for 5-MTP biosynthesis, was downregulated in HUVECs by pro-inflammatory mediators and it was accompanied by reduction of 5-MTP. 5-MTP protected VE-cadherin and prevented endothelial hyperpermeability by blocking p38 MAPK activation. A chemical inhibitor of p38 MAPK, SB202190, exhibited a similar protective effect as 5-MTP. To determine whether 5-MTP prevents vascular hyperpermeability in vivo, we evaluated the effect of 5-MTP administration on LPS-induced murine microvascular permeability with Evans blue. 5-MTP significantly prevented Evans blue dye leakage. Our findings indicate that 5-MTP is a new class of endothelium-derived molecules which protects endothelial barrier function by blocking p38 MAPK.

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces activation of Ras, Raf-1, MEK and MAPK in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Reimann, T; Hempel, U; Krautwald, S; Axmann, A; Scheibe, R; Seidel, D; Wenzel, K W

    1997-02-10

    The transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblast-like cells and the proliferation of the transdifferentiated cells are controlled by TGF-beta1. Little is known about the intracellular signal transducers of TGF-beta1. In this paper we show that in cultured hepatic stellate cells TGF-beta1 induces activation of Ras, Raf-1, MEK and MAPK p42 and p44. The activation of MAPK depends on the activation of MEK. Our data exclude that the observed effects are mediated by a bFGF or PDGF autocrine loop. PMID:9038360

  7. Homology modeling studies of yeast Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKS): structural motifs as a basis for specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Nilar, S H

    2010-06-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key components of cellular signal transduction. It is the objective of this communication to demonstrate that insight into protein-protein interactions in the Common Docking motif of yeast mitogen-activated protein kinases can be obtained based on homology models. Homology models for four yeast MAPKs, FUS3, KSS1, HOG1 and MPK1 were built based on the X-ray structures of active and inactive rat ERK2. The structural motifs required for the basis of specificity were rationalized based on these structures. PMID:19995338

  8. IGF-1 protects tubular epithelial cells during injury via activation of ERK/MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zengbin; Yu, Yang; Niu, Lei; Fei, Aihua; Pan, Shuming

    2016-01-01

    Injury of renal tubular epithelial cells can induce acute renal failure and obstructive nephropathy. Previous studies have shown that administration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) ameliorates the renal injury in a mouse unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Here, we addressed this question. We found that the administration of IGF-1 significantly reduced the severity of the renal fibrosis in UUO. By analyzing purified renal epithelial cells, we found that IGF-1 significantly reduced the apoptotic cell death of renal epithelial cells, seemingly through upregulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, at protein but not mRNA level. Bioinformatics analyses and luciferase-reporter assay showed that miR-429 targeted the 3′-UTR of Bcl-2 mRNA to inhibit its protein translation in renal epithelial cells. Moreover, IGF-1 suppressed miR-429 to increase Bcl-2 in renal epithelial cells to improve survival after UUO. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK/MAPK signaling pathway in renal epithelial cells abolished the suppressive effects of IGF-1 on miR-429 activation, and then the enhanced effects on Bcl-2 in UUO. Thus, our data suggest that IGF-1 may protect renal tubular epithelial cells via activation of ERK/MAPK signaling pathway during renal injury. PMID:27301852

  9. AP-1 and clathrin are essential for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jason; Jauregui, Miluska; Tan, Julie; Rollins, Janet; Lallet, Sylvie; Leventis, Peter A.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Chang, Henry C.; Le Borgne, Roland; Krämer, Helmut; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

     Regulated secretion of hormones, digestive enzymes, and other biologically active molecules requires the formation of secretory granules. Clathrin and the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) are necessary for maturation of exocrine, endocrine, and neuroendocrine secretory granules. However, the initial steps of secretory granule biogenesis are only minimally understood. Powerful genetic approaches available in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were used to investigate the molecular pathway for biogenesis of the mucin-containing “glue granules” that form within epithelial cells of the third-instar larval salivary gland. Clathrin and AP-1 colocalize at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and clathrin recruitment requires AP-1. Furthermore, clathrin and AP-1 colocalize with secretory cargo at the TGN and on immature granules. Finally, loss of clathrin or AP-1 leads to a profound block in secretory granule formation. These findings establish a novel role for AP-1– and clathrin-dependent trafficking in the biogenesis of mucin-containing secretory granules. PMID:21490149

  10. Differential Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, ERK 1/2, p38(MAPK) and JNK p54/p46 During Postnatal Development of Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Paula; Lopes, Mark William; Rieger, Débora K; Barbosa, Sabrina Giovana Rocha; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Xikota, João Carlos; Walz, Roger; Leal, Rodrigo B

    2016-05-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a group of serine-threonine kinases, including p38(MAPK), ERK 1/2 and JNK p54/p46, activated by phosphorylation in response to extracellular stimuli. The early postnatal period is characterized by significant changes in brain structure as well as intracellular signaling. In the hippocampus MAPKs have been involved in the modulation of development and neural plasticity. However, the temporal profile of MAPK activation throughout the early postnatal development is incomplete. An understanding of this profile is important since slight changes in the activity of these enzymes, in response to environmental stress in specific developmental windows, might alter the course of development. The present study was undertaken to investigate the hippocampal differential activation of MAPK during postnatal period. MAPK activation and total content were evaluated by Western blotting of hippocampal tissue obtained from male Wistar rats at postnatal days (P) 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 30 and 60. The total content and phosphorylation of each MAPK was expressed as mean ± SEM and then calculates as a percentile compared to P1 (set at 100 %). The results showed: (1) phosphorylation peaks of p38(MAPK) at PN4 (p = 0.036) and PN10 to PN60; (2) phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2 were increased with age (ERK1 p = 0.0000005 and ERK2 p = 0.003); (3) phosphorylation profile of JNK p54/p46 was not changed during the period analyzed (JNKp56 p = 0.716 and JNKp46 p = 0.192). Therefore, the activity profile of ERK 1/2 and p38(MAPK) during postnatal development of rat hippocampus are differentially regulated. Our results demonstrate that ERK 1/2 and p38(MAPK) are dynamically regulated during postnatal neurodevelopment, suggesting temporal correlation of MAPK activity with critical periods when programmed cell death and synaptogenesis are occurring. This suggests an important role for these MAPKs in postnatal development of rat hippocampus.

  11. Normal Dendrite Growth in Drosophila Motor Neurons Requires the AP-1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Cortnie L.; Worrell, Jason; Levine, Richard B.; Ramaswami, Mani; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    During learning and memory formation, information flow through networks is regulated significantly through structural alterations in neurons. Dendrites, sites of signal integration, are key targets of activity-mediated modifications. Although local mechanisms of dendritic growth ensure synapse-specific changes, global mechanisms linking neural activity to nuclear gene expression may have profound influences on neural function. Fos, being an immediate-early gene, is ideally suited to be an initial transducer of neural activity, but a precise role for the AP-1 transcription factor in dendrite growth remains to be elucidated. Here we measure changes in the dendritic fields of identified Drosophila motor neurons in vivo and in primary culture to investigate the role of the immediate-early transcription factor AP-1 in regulating endogenous and activity-induced dendrite growth. Our data indicate that (a) increased neural excitability or depolarization stimulates dendrite growth, (b) AP-1 (a Fos, Jun heterodimer) is required for normal motor neuron dendritic growth during development and in response to activity induction, and (c) neuronal Fos protein levels are rapidly but transiently induced in motor neurons following neural activity. Taken together, these results show that AP-1 mediated transcription is important for dendrite growth, and that neural activity influences global dendritic growth through a gene-expression dependent mechanism gated by AP-1. PMID:18548486

  12. Neural cell adhesion molecule modulates mesenchymal stromal cell migration via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Xia, Yin-Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Khoo, King-Shung; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2012-10-15

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) represent promising tools for cellular therapy owing to their multipotentiality and ability to localize to injured, inflamed sites and tumor. Various approaches to manipulate expression of MSC surface markers, including adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, have been explored to enhance homing of MSCs. Recently, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) has been found to be expressed on MSCs yet its function remains largely elusive. Herein, we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs from NCAM deficient mice exhibit defective migratory ability and significantly impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. We further explore the mechanism governing NCAM mediated migration of MSCs by showing the interplay between NCAM and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) induces activation of MAPK/ERK signaling, thereby the migration of MSCs. In addition, re-expression of NCAM180, but not NCAM140, could restore the defective MAPK/ERK signaling thereby the migration of NCAM deficient MSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that NCAM180 expression level could be manipulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α treatment. Overall, our data reveal the vital function of NCAM in MSCs migration and differentiation thus raising the possibility of manipulating NCAM expression to enhance homing and therapeutic potential of MSCs in cellular therapy.

  13. MEK1-independent activation of MAPK and MEK1-dependent activation of p70 S6 kinase by stem cell factor (SCF) in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lian; Zhang, Xin; Du, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoning; Hou, Nan; Zhao, Di; Sun, Jianzhi; Li, Li; Wang, Xiuwen; Ma, Chunhong

    2009-05-01

    We discovered a stem cell factor (SCF)-triggered, MEK1-independent, and PI3K-dependent MAPK activation pathway in the Kit-expressing ovarian cancer cell line HEY. When we knocked down MEK1 with RNA interference (RNAi) to study the function of MEK1 on the proliferation and survival of ovarian cancer cells, we found that impaired cell growth still occurred after MEK1 expression had been suppressed, although MAPK activation remained intact. This suggests that there is MEK1-independent activation of MAPK in the SCF-induced ovarian cancer cell growth process, and that MEK1 still plays a crucial role in maintaining the malignant properties of ovarian cancer cells even when it fails to activate MAPK as expected.

  14. Interferon-β counter-regulates its own pro-apoptotic action by activating p38 MAPK signalling in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dedoni, Simona; Olianas, Maria C; Onali, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) induce apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells, but the molecular mechanisms regulating this event have not been completely elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, a key regulator of apoptosis and a known modulator of IFN-induced responses in non-neuronal cells. We show that in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells IFN-β induced a delayed and sustained increase of p38 MAPK activity through a novel mechanism involving the sequential activation of Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 signalling, enhanced expression of the NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit gp91(phox), increased reactive oxygen species production and stimulation of the MAPK kinase kinase transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1. Either blockade of p38 MAPK by the second generation inhibitors BIRB0796 and VX745 or siRNA knockdown of p38α MAPK enhanced IFN-β-induced apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells. Exposure to IFN-β increased the phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein HSP27 at Ser15, Ser78 and Ser82 with a time course similar to p38 MAPK activation and this response was suppressed by either p38α MAPK depletion or pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK and MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2). Either silencing of HSP27 expression by siRNA or MK2 inhibition potentiated IFN-β-induced apoptotic death. These results indicate that IFN-β-induced apoptosis of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells is associated with a long-lasting up-regulation of p38 MAPK activity, stimulation of MK2 and phosphorylation of the pro-survival protein HSP27. Moreover, the data show that inhibition of p38 MAPK signalling potentiates the anti-neuroblastoma activity of the cytokine, indicating that this pathway mediates a counter-regulatory response.

  15. RAS/MAPK activation drives resistance to Smo inhibition, metastasis and tumor evolution in Shh pathway-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K.; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS/MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway-dependency, drives tumor growth and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together these findings reveal a critical role of RAS/MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  16. Michael addition of dehydroalanine-containing MAPK peptides to catalytic lysine inhibits the activity of phosphothreonine lyase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Ru; Huang, Juan; Liang, Qiujin; Guo, Yanmin; Bian, Weixiang; Luo, Lingfei; Li, Hongtao

    2015-11-30

    The phosphothreonine lyases OspF and SpvC irreversibly inactivate host dual-phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) [pThr-X-pTyr motif] through β-elimination. We found that dual-phosphorylated (pSer-X-pTyr) MAPK substrate peptides and their resulting catalytic products cross-link to OspF and SpvC. Mass spectrometry results revealed that these linkages form between lysine, which acts as a general base, and dehydroalanine (Dha) on catalytic products. The nucleophilic addition efficiency is dependent on the K136 residue being in a deprotonated state. Peptide cross-linking inhibits the activity of SpvC and blocks the inactivation of MAPK signaling by SpvC. Small compounds mimicking these sequences may act as phosphothreonine lyase inhibitors. PMID:26519561

  17. CpG- and LPS-activated MAPK signaling in in vitro cultured salmon (Salmo salar) mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Dimitar B; Hansen, Tom; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Krasnov, Aleksei; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2013-10-01

    The Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in transmitting intracellular signals downstream of diverse cell surface receptors and mediate the response to ligands such as growth factors, hormones and cytokines. In addition, MAPK are critically involved in the innate immune response to pathogen-derived substances, commonly referred to as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial DNA rich in CpG dinucleotides. Currently, a great deal of knowledge is available about the involvement of MAPK in the innate immune response to PAMPs in mammals; however, little is known about the role of the different MAPK classes in the immune response to PAMPs in lower vertebrates. In the current study, p38 phosphorylation was induced by CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) and LPS in primary salmon mononuclear phagocytes. Pre-treatment of the cells with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) blocked the PAMP-induced p38 activity and suppressed the upregulation of most of the CpG- and LPS-induced transcripts highlighting the role of this kinase in the salmon innate immune response to PAMPs. In contrast to p38, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a MAPK involved primarily in response to mitogens, was high in resting cells and, surprisingly, incubation with both CpG and control ODNs downregulated the phospho-ERK levels independently of p38 activation. The basal phospho-ERK level and the CpG-inducible p38 phosphorylation were greatly influenced by the length of in vitro incubation. The basal phospho-ERK level increased gradually throughout a 5-day culture period and was PI3K-dependent as demonstrated by its sensitivity to Wortmannin suggesting it is influenced by growth factors. Overall these data indicate that both basal and PAMP-induced activity of MAPKs might be greatly influenced by the differentiation status of salmon mononuclear phagocytes.

  18. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways: a revolving neurochemical axis for therapeutic intervention?

    PubMed

    Haddad, John J

    2005-11-01

    Excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS) is mediated by the release of glutamate from presynaptic terminals onto postsynaptic channels gated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA (AMPA and KA) receptors. Extracellular signals control diverse neuronal functions and are responsible for mediating activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength and neuronal survival. Influx of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](e)) through the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) is required for neuronal activity to change the strength of many synapses. At the molecular level, the NMDAR interacts with signaling modules, which, like the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily, transduce excitatory signals across neurons. Recent burgeoning evidence points to the fact that MAPKs play a crucial role in regulating the neurochemistry of NMDARs, their physiologic and biochemical/biophysical properties, and their potential role in pathophysiology. It is the purpose of this review to discuss: (i) the MAPKs and their role in a plethora of cellular functions; (ii) the role of MAPKs in regulating the biochemistry and physiology of NMDA receptors; (iii) the kinetics of MAPK-NMDA interactions and their biologic and neurochemical properties; (iv) how cellular signaling pathways, related cofactors and intracellular conditions affect NMDA-MAPK interactions and (v) the role of NMDA-MAPK pathways in pathophysiology and the evolution of disease conditions. Given the versatility of the NMDA-MAPK interactions, the NMDA-MAPK axis will likely form a neurochemical target for therapeutic interventions.

  19. Variants of the yeast MAPK Mpk1 are fully functional independently of activation loop phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Goshen-Lago, Tal; Goldberg-Carp, Anat; Melamed, Dganit; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Bai, Chen; Ahn, Natalie G; Admon, Arie; Engelberg, David

    2016-09-01

    MAP kinases of the ERK family are conserved from yeast to humans. Their catalytic activity is dependent on dual phosphorylation of their activation loop's TEY motif, catalyzed by MAPK kinases (MEKs). Here we studied variants of Mpk1, a yeast orthologue of Erk, which is essential for cell wall integrity. Cells lacking MPK1, or the genes encoding the relevant MEKs, MKK1 and MKK2, do not proliferate under cell wall stress, imposed, for example, by caffeine. Mutants of Mpk1, Mpk1(Y268C) and Mpk1(Y268A), function independently of Mkk1 and Mkk2. We show that these variants are phosphorylated at their activation loop in mkk1∆mkk2∆ and mkk1∆mkk2∆pbs2∆ste7∆ cells, suggesting that they autophosphorylate. However, strikingly, when Y268C/A mutations were combined with the kinase-dead mutation, K54R, or mutations at the TEY motif, T190A+Y192F, the resulting proteins still allowed mkk1∆mkk2∆ cells to proliferate under caffeine stress. Mutating the equivalent residue, Tyr-280/Tyr-261, in Erk1/Erk2 significantly impaired Erk1/2's catalytic activity. This study describes the first case in which a MAPK, Erk/Mpk1, imposes a phenotype via a mechanism that is independent of TEY phosphorylation and an unusual case in which an equivalent mutation in a highly conserved domain of yeast and mammalian Erks causes an opposite effect. PMID:27413009

  20. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  1. Trientine, a copper-chelating agent, induced apoptosis in murine fibrosarcoma cells by activation of the p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    KADOWAKI, Shingo; ENDOH, Daiji; OKUI, Toyo; HAYASHI, Masanobu

    2009-11-01

    We have reported that treatment with trientine, Cu-chelating agent, inhibits tumor growth in a murine transplantation model using fibrosarcoma and induces apoptosis in tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. When fibrosarcoma cells were treated with 10 mM trientine, the activities of p38 MAPK in treated cells were approximately 3-4 times higher than those in untreated cells. Proportions of cells in which apoptosis was induced by trientine increased in an incubation time-dependent manner from days 2 to 6. The proportions of apoptotic cells in the cells treated with trientine and SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, were approximately 50% in those of cells treated with trientine alone. The present results showed that the p38 MAPK pathway may play an important role in induction of apoptosis in fibrosarcoma cells by trientine.

  2. Neospora caninum Activates p38 MAPK as an Evasion Mechanism against Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Caroline M.; Oliveira, Ana C. M.; Davoli-Ferreira, Marcela; Silva, Murilo V.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Nadipuram, Santhosh M.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Bradley, Peter J.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence and economic impact of neosporosis, the development of safe and effective vaccines and therapies against this parasite has been a priority in the field and is crucial to limit horizontal and vertical transmission in natural hosts. Limited data is available regarding factors that regulate the immune response against this parasite and such knowledge is essential in order to understand Neospora caninum induced pathogenesis. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) govern diverse cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and immune-mediated responses. In that sense, our goal was to understand the role of MAPKs during the infection by N. caninum. We found that p38 phosphorylation was quickly triggered in macrophages stimulated by live tachyzoites and antigen extracts, while its chemical inhibition resulted in upregulation of IL-12p40 production and augmented B7/MHC expression. In vivo blockade of p38 resulted in an amplified production of cytokines, which preceded a reduction in latent parasite burden and enhanced survival against the infection. Additionally, the experiments indicate that the p38 activation is induced by a mechanism that depends on GPCR, PI3K and AKT signaling pathways, and that the phenomena here observed is distinct that those induced by Toxoplasma gondii’s GRA24 protein. Altogether, these results showed that N. caninum manipulates p38 phosphorylation in its favor, in order to downregulate the host’s innate immune responses. Additionally, those results infer that active interference in this signaling pathway may be useful for the development of a new therapeutic strategy against neosporosis. PMID:27679624

  3. Neospora caninum Activates p38 MAPK as an Evasion Mechanism against Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Caroline M.; Oliveira, Ana C. M.; Davoli-Ferreira, Marcela; Silva, Murilo V.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Nadipuram, Santhosh M.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Bradley, Peter J.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence and economic impact of neosporosis, the development of safe and effective vaccines and therapies against this parasite has been a priority in the field and is crucial to limit horizontal and vertical transmission in natural hosts. Limited data is available regarding factors that regulate the immune response against this parasite and such knowledge is essential in order to understand Neospora caninum induced pathogenesis. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) govern diverse cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and immune-mediated responses. In that sense, our goal was to understand the role of MAPKs during the infection by N. caninum. We found that p38 phosphorylation was quickly triggered in macrophages stimulated by live tachyzoites and antigen extracts, while its chemical inhibition resulted in upregulation of IL-12p40 production and augmented B7/MHC expression. In vivo blockade of p38 resulted in an amplified production of cytokines, which preceded a reduction in latent parasite burden and enhanced survival against the infection. Additionally, the experiments indicate that the p38 activation is induced by a mechanism that depends on GPCR, PI3K and AKT signaling pathways, and that the phenomena here observed is distinct that those induced by Toxoplasma gondii’s GRA24 protein. Altogether, these results showed that N. caninum manipulates p38 phosphorylation in its favor, in order to downregulate the host’s innate immune responses. Additionally, those results infer that active interference in this signaling pathway may be useful for the development of a new therapeutic strategy against neosporosis.

  4. Neospora caninum Activates p38 MAPK as an Evasion Mechanism against Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Mota, Caroline M; Oliveira, Ana C M; Davoli-Ferreira, Marcela; Silva, Murilo V; Santiago, Fernanda M; Nadipuram, Santhosh M; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Bradley, Peter J; Silva, João S; Mineo, José R; Mineo, Tiago W P

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence and economic impact of neosporosis, the development of safe and effective vaccines and therapies against this parasite has been a priority in the field and is crucial to limit horizontal and vertical transmission in natural hosts. Limited data is available regarding factors that regulate the immune response against this parasite and such knowledge is essential in order to understand Neospora caninum induced pathogenesis. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) govern diverse cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and immune-mediated responses. In that sense, our goal was to understand the role of MAPKs during the infection by N. caninum. We found that p38 phosphorylation was quickly triggered in macrophages stimulated by live tachyzoites and antigen extracts, while its chemical inhibition resulted in upregulation of IL-12p40 production and augmented B7/MHC expression. In vivo blockade of p38 resulted in an amplified production of cytokines, which preceded a reduction in latent parasite burden and enhanced survival against the infection. Additionally, the experiments indicate that the p38 activation is induced by a mechanism that depends on GPCR, PI3K and AKT signaling pathways, and that the phenomena here observed is distinct that those induced by Toxoplasma gondii's GRA24 protein. Altogether, these results showed that N. caninum manipulates p38 phosphorylation in its favor, in order to downregulate the host's innate immune responses. Additionally, those results infer that active interference in this signaling pathway may be useful for the development of a new therapeutic strategy against neosporosis. PMID:27679624

  5. GSH1, which encodes gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, is a target gene for yAP-1 transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, A L; Moye-Rowley, W S

    1994-01-01

    Changes in gene dosage of the YAP1 gene, encoding the yAP-1 transcriptional regulatory protein, cause profound alterations in cellular drug and metal resistance. Previous studies on yAP-1 action in yeast cells have used the AP-1 response element (ARE) from simian virus 40 as an artificial site for yAP-1-mediated transcriptional activation. No authentic yeast target sites for control of gene expression by yAP-1 are known. Here we show that the GSH1 gene, encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, is transcriptionally responsive to the yAP-1 protein. GSH1 encodes the rate-limiting step in yeast glutathione biosynthesis and contains within its promoter region a DNA element that matches the ARE in 11 of 12 positions. The GSH1 yAP-1 response element (YRE) was recognized by yAP-1 protein in vitro. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed that GSH1 mRNA levels were responsive to YAP1 gene dosage. A site-directed mutation in the YRE that blocked yAP-1 binding in vitro prevented the mutant GSH1 promoter from responding to elevation in YAP1 gene dosage. A delta gsh1 mutant strain was constructed and unable to grow in the absence of exogenous glutathione. A mutant GSH1 gene lacking the YRE was unable to confer normal cadmium tolerance, although other yAP-1-mediated phenotypes remained normal. Thus, GSH1 is one of several genes that are transcriptionally controlled by yAP-1 and influence drug resistance. Images PMID:7915005

  6. Hypoxia differentially regulates the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases. Role of Ca2+/CaM in the activation of MAPK and p38 gamma.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxic/ischemic trauma is a primary factor in the pathology of various vascular, pulmonary, and cerebral disease states. Yet, the signaling mechanisms by which cells respond and adapt to changes in oxygen levels are not clearly established. The effects of hypoxia on the stress- and mitogen-activated protein kinase (SAPK and MAPK) signaling pathways were studied in PC12 cells. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O2) was found to progressively stimulate phosphorylation and activation of p38 gamma in particular, and also p38 alpha, two isoforms of the p38 family of stress-activated protein kinases. In contrast, hypoxia had no effect on enzyme activity of p38 beta, p38 beta 2, p38 delta, or on JNK, another stress-activated protein kinase. Prolonged hypoxia also induced phosphorylation and activation of p42/p44 MAPK, although this activation was modest when compared to NGF and UV-induced activation. We further showed that activation of p38 gamma and MAPK during hypoxia requires calcium, as treatment with Ca(2+)-free media or the calmodulin antagonist, W13, blocked the activation of p38 gamma and MAPK, respectively. These studies demonstrate that an extremely typical physiological stress (hypoxia) causes selective activation of specific elements of the SAPKs and MAPKs, and identifies Ca+2/CaM as a critical upstream activator. PMID:10849670

  7. CHIP promotes thyroid cancer proliferation via activation of the MAPK and AKT pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Lianyong; He, Xiaohua; Shen, Yunling; Liu, Xuerong; Wei, Jing; Yu, Fang; Tian, Jianqing

    2016-08-26

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a U box-type ubiquitin ligase that plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including tumor progression. To date, the functional mechanism of CHIP in thyroid cancer remains unknown. Here, we obtained evidence of upregulation of CHIP in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. CHIP overexpression markedly enhanced thyroid cancer cell viability and colony formation in vitro and accelerated tumor growth in vivo. Conversely, CHIP knockdown impaired cell proliferation and tumor growth. Notably, CHIP promoted cell growth through activation of MAPK and AKT pathways, subsequently decreasing p27 and increasing cyclin D1 and p-FOXO3a expression. Our findings collectively indicate that CHIP functions as an oncogene in thyroid cancer, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target for this disease.

  8. CONTRIBUTION OF INSPIRATORY FLOW TO ACTIVATION OF EGFR, RAS, MAPK, ATF-2 AND C-JUN DURING LUNG STRETCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contribution of Inspiratory Flow to Activation of EGFR, Ras, MAPK, ATF-2 and c-Jun during Lung Stretch

    R. Silbajoris 1, Z. Li 2, J. M. Samet 1 and Y. C. Huang 1. 1 NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC and 2 CEMALB, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC .

    Mechanical ventilation with larg...

  9. Increases in cAMP, MAPK Activity and CREB Phosphorylation during REM Sleep: Implications for REM Sleep and Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X.; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G.; Storm, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Since mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity and CREB phosphorylation may be elevated during sleep. Here, we report that cAMP, phospho-p44/42 MAPK and phospho-CREB are higher in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared to awake mice but are not elevated in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This peak of activity during REM sleep does not occur in mice lacking calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases, a mouse strain that learns but cannot consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory. We conclude that a preferential increase in cAMP, MAPK activity and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:23575844

  10. Increases in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep: implications for REM sleep and memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G; Storm, Daniel R

    2013-04-10

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Because mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation may be elevated during sleep. Here, we report that cAMP, phospho-p44/42 MAPK, and phospho-CREB are higher in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared with awake mice but are not elevated in non-REM sleep. This peak of activity during REM sleep does not occur in mice lacking calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases, a mouse strain that learns but cannot consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory. We conclude that a preferential increase in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. PMID:23575844

  11. Trimethyltin-Induced Microglial Activation via NADPH Oxidase and MAPKs Pathway in BV-2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da Jung; Kim, Yong Sik

    2015-01-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT) is known as a potent neurotoxicant that causes neuronal cell death and neuroinflammation, particularly in the hippocampus. Microglial activation is one of the prominent pathological features of TMT neurotoxicity. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how microglial activation occurs in TMT intoxication. In this study, we aimed to investigate the signaling pathways in TMT-induced microglial activation using BV-2 murine microglial cells. Our results revealed that TMT generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases the expression of CD11b and nuclear factor-κB- (NF-κB-) mediated nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α in BV-2 cells. We also observed that NF-κB activation was controlled by p38 and JNK phosphorylation. Moreover, TMT-induced ROS generation occurred via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in BV-2 cells. Interestingly, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin significantly suppressed p38 and JNK phosphorylation and NF-κB activation and ultimately the production of proinflammatory mediators upon TMT exposure. These findings indicate that NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation activated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which then stimulated NF-κB to release proinflammatory mediators in the TMT-treated BV-2 cells. PMID:26221064

  12. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the bovine oviduct in vitro: Alteration by heat stress

    PubMed Central

    WIJAYAGUNAWARDANE, Missaka P. B.; HAMBRUCH, Nina; HAEGER, Jan-Dirk; PFARRER, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to be involved in control of the oviductal microenvironment. To elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the detrimental effect of heat stress and to identify the relation with the endocrine status, the effects of EGF on the level of phosphorylated mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MAPK) and proliferation of bovine oviductal epithelial cells (OECs) exposed to different cyclic ovarian steroidal environments (luteal phase (LP), follicular phase (FP) and postovulatory phase (PO)) and temperatures (mild heat stress (40 C) and severe heat stress (43 C)) were investigated. Western blot was performed to evaluate phosphorylated MAPK, while proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay. Stimulation of OECs with EGF alone or with EGF in the PO and FP environments significantly increased the amount of phosphorylated MAPK, with MAPK 44 phosphorylation being highest during exposure to PO conditions. These effects were not observed in the LP. Heat treatment completely blocked effects of EGF on phosphorylated MAPK. Additionally, severe heat stress led to a significantly lower basal level of phosphorylated MAPK. PD98059 (MAPK inhibitor) completely abolished EGF-stimulated MAPK phosphorylation and OECs proliferation. Overall the results indicate that EGF has the potential to increase the amount of phosphorylated MAPK in OECs and therefore could be involved in regulation of the bovine oviductal microenvironment. However, these regulatory mechanisms may be compromised in the presence of heat stress (high ambient temperature), leading to low fertility rates and impaired embryo survival. PMID:26050642

  13. Importin-7 mediates memory consolidation through regulation of nuclear translocation of training-activated MAPK in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Zhang, Xuchen; Hu, Wantong; Liang, Xitong; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Lianzhang; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Zhong, Yi

    2016-03-15

    Translocation of signaling molecules, MAPK in particular, from the cytosol to nucleus represents a universal key element in initiating the gene program that determines memory consolidation. Translocation mechanisms and their behavioral impact, however, remain to be determined. Here, we report that a highly conserved nuclear transporter, Drosophila importin-7 (DIM-7), regulates import of training-activated MAPK for consolidation of long-term memory (LTM). We show that silencing DIM-7 functions results in impaired LTM, whereas overexpression of DIM-7 enhances LTM. This DIM-7-dependent regulation of LTM is confined to a consolidation time window and in mushroom body neurons. Image data show that bidirectional alteration in DIM-7 expression results in proportional changes in the intensity of training-activated MAPK accumulated within the nuclei of mushroom body neurons during LTM consolidation. Such DIM-7-regulated nuclear accumulation of activated MAPK is observed only in the training specified for LTM induction and determines the amplitude, but not the time course, of memory consolidation. PMID:26929354

  14. Importin-7 mediates memory consolidation through regulation of nuclear translocation of training-activated MAPK in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Zhang, Xuchen; Liang, Xitong; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Lianzhang; Zhong, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of signaling molecules, MAPK in particular, from the cytosol to nucleus represents a universal key element in initiating the gene program that determines memory consolidation. Translocation mechanisms and their behavioral impact, however, remain to be determined. Here, we report that a highly conserved nuclear transporter, Drosophila importin-7 (DIM-7), regulates import of training-activated MAPK for consolidation of long-term memory (LTM). We show that silencing DIM-7 functions results in impaired LTM, whereas overexpression of DIM-7 enhances LTM. This DIM-7–dependent regulation of LTM is confined to a consolidation time window and in mushroom body neurons. Image data show that bidirectional alteration in DIM-7 expression results in proportional changes in the intensity of training-activated MAPK accumulated within the nuclei of mushroom body neurons during LTM consolidation. Such DIM-7–regulated nuclear accumulation of activated MAPK is observed only in the training specified for LTM induction and determines the amplitude, but not the time course, of memory consolidation. PMID:26929354

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) regulates the expression of progelatinase B (MMP-9) in breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K B; Krueger, J S; Kondapaka, S B; Diglio, C A

    1999-07-19

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a major role in the mitogenic signal transduction pathway and are essential components of both growth and differentiation. Constitutive activation of the MAPK cascade is associated with the carcinogenesis and metastasis of human breast and renal cell carcinomas. The gelatinases B (MMP-9) and A (MMP-2) are 2 members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) family which are expressed in human cancers and thought to play a critical role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In a previous study, we have shown that EGF and amphiregulin upregulate MMP-9 in metastatic SKBR-3 cells but have no effect on MMP-2 secretion. We now investigated specific step(s) in EGF-induced signalling associated with regulation of cell proliferation and MMP-9 induction. EGF-induced signalling in SKBR-3 cells was blocked by relatively specific inhibitors either on ras (FPT inhibitor-1) or P13 kinase (Wortmannin) or by reduction in EGF-induced tyrosine kinase activity (RG 13022). Blocking these signalling pathways significantly inhibited of EGF-induced cell proliferation but only partially reduced in EGF-induced MMP-9 secretion. In contrast, when SKBR-3 cells were exposed to MEK inhibitor (PD 98059) or MAPK inhibitors (Apigenin or MAPK antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides), EGF-induced cell proliferation, MMP-9 induction and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane were significantly reduced. Our results suggest that interfering with MAPK activity may provide a novel means of controlling growth and invasiveness of tumors in which the signalling cascade is activated.

  16. Luteolin 8-C-β-fucopyranoside inhibits invasion and suppresses TPA-induced MMP-9 and IL-8 via ERK/AP-1 and ERK/NF-κB signaling in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Ho; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Yoon, Do-Young

    2013-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) play major roles in tumor progression and invasion of breast cancer cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of cell invasion by luteolin 8-C-β-fucopyranoside (named as LU8C-FP), a C-glycosylflavone, in human breast cancer cells. We investigated whether LU8C-FP would inhibit MMP-9 activation and IL-8 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells. LU8C-FP suppressed TPA-induced MMP-9 and IL-8 secretion and mRNA expression via inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway and down-regulation of nuclear AP-1 and NF-κB. TPA-induced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 was suppressed by LU8C-FP, whereas JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were unaffected. In addition, LU8C-FP blocked the ERK 1/2 pathways following expression of MMP-9 and IL-8. These results suggest LU8C-FP may function to suppress invasion of breast cancer cells through the ERK/AP-1 and ERK/NF-κB signaling cascades.

  17. cAMP blocks MAPK activation and sclerotial development via Rap-1 in a PKA-independent manner in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changbin; Dickman, Martin B

    2005-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a filamentous ascomycete phytopathogen able to infect an extremely wide range of cultivated plants. Our previous studies have shown that increases in cAMP levels result in the impairment of the development of the sclerotium, a highly differentiated structure important in the disease cycle of this fungus. cAMP also inhibits the activation of a S. sclerotiorum mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which we have previously shown to be required for sclerotial maturation; thus cAMP-mediated sclerotial inhibition is modulated through MAPK. However, the mechanism(s) by which cAMP inhibits MAPK remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that a protein kinase A (PKA)-independent signalling pathway probably mediates MAPK inhibition by cAMP. Expression of a dominant negative form of Ras, an upstream activator of the MAPK pathway, also inhibited sclerotial development and MAPK activation, suggesting that a conserved Ras/MAPK pathway is required for sclerotial development. Evidence from bacterial toxins that specifically inhibit the activity of small GTPases, suggested that Rap-1 or Ras is involved in cAMP action. The Rap-1 inhibitor, GGTI-298, restored MAPK activation in the presence of cAMP, further suggesting that Rap-1 is responsible for cAMP-dependent MAPK inhibition. Importantly, inhibition of Rap-1 is able to restore sclerotial development blocked by cAMP. Our results suggest a novel mechanism involving the requirement of Ras/MAPK pathway for sclerotial development that is negatively regulated by a PKA-independent cAMP signalling pathway. Cross-talk between these two pathways is mediated by Rap-1. PMID:15612936

  18. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module.

  19. Early stimulation and late inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) gene expression by transforming growth factor beta in human aortic smooth muscle cells: role of early growth-response factor-1 (Egr-1), activator protein 1 (AP1) and Smads.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mingui; Zhang, Jifeng; Lin, Yimin; Zhu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Luning; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Ehrengruber, Markus U; Chen, Yuqing E

    2003-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) play major roles in the development of vascular diseases. It has been documented that PPAR gamma activation inhibits the TGF beta signal pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Here we examined whether TGF beta can regulate PPAR gamma expression. Northern blot analyses revealed that both TGF beta 1 and 2 exert a biphasic effect (early stimulation and late repression) on PPAR gamma gene expression in VSMC. TGF beta rapidly and transiently induced early growth-response factor-1 (Egr-1) expression through the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase 1 (MEK1)/ERK-mediated pathway. Inhibition of MEK1/ERK by PD98059 not only abrogated the induction of Egr-1 but also abolished the rapid and transient induction of PPAR gamma by TGF beta. Furthermore, overexpression of NAB2, a repressor of Egr-1 activation, also blocked the induction of PPAR gamma by TGF beta in VSMC, suggesting that Egr-1 mediates the rapid and transient induction of PPAR gamma by TGF beta. With regard to the TGF beta repression of PPAR gamma expression, activator protein 1 (AP1) and Smad3/4 dramatically inhibited the PPAR gamma promoter activity in transient-transfection studies. In contrast, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant-negative form of c-Jun partially rescued the TGF beta-induced PPAR gamma repression in VSMC. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Egr-1, AP1 and Smad are part components of the TGF beta signal transduction pathway that regulates PPAR gamma expression. PMID:12457461

  20. Oridonin upregulates PTEN through activating p38 MAPK and inhibits proliferation in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiu-Xiang; Yuan, Shuang-Xue; Ren, Chun-Mei; Yu, Yu; Sun, Wen-Juan; He, Bai-Cheng; Wu, Ke

    2016-06-01

    Oridonin (ORI) has been reported as an antiproliferation and apoptosis-inducing natural product in various cancer cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated the antiproliferation effect of ORI in HCT116 cells, and analyzed the possible molecular mechanism which mediates this effect. We found that ORI inhibits proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HCT116 cells, thus also tumor growth. Mechanically, we found that ORI has no substantial effect on mRNA expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), but increases the total protein level of PTEN and markedly reduces the phosphorylation of PTEN; Exogenous expression of PTEN potentiates the anticancer effect of ORI, while knockdown of PTEN attenuates it. ORI also increases the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor reduces the antiproliferation effect ORI in HCT116 cells. Moreover, inhibition of p38 MAPK increases the phosphorylation of PTEN, and reverses ORI-induced decrease of PTEN phosphorylation. Our findings suggested that ORI may be a potential anticancer drug for colon cancer, this effect may be mediated by enhancing the function of PTEN through reducing its phosphorylation, which may be resulted from the ORI-induced activation of p38 MAPK.

  1. Immunosuppressant MPA Modulates Tight Junction through Epigenetic Activation of MLCK/MLC-2 Pathway via p38MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niamat; Pantakani, D. V. Krishna; Binder, Lutz; Qasim, Muhammad; Asif, Abdul R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an important immunosuppressive drug (ISD) prescribed to prevent graft rejection in the organ transplanted patients, however, its use is also associated with adverse side effects like sporadic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. Recently, we reported the MPA induced tight junctions (TJs) deregulation which involves MLCK/MLC-2 pathway. Here, we investigated the global histone acetylation as well as gene-specific chromatin signature of several genes associated with TJs regulation in Caco-2 cells after MPA treatment. Results: The epigenetic analysis shows that MPA treatment increases the global histone acetylation levels as well as the enrichment for transcriptional active histone modification mark (H3K4me3) at promoter regions of p38MAPK, ATF-2, MLCK, and MLC-2. In contrast, the promoter region of occludin was enriched for transcriptional repressive histone modification mark (H3K27me3) after MPA treatment. In line with the chromatin status, MPA treatment increased the expression of p38MAPK, ATF-2, MLCK, and MLC-2 both at transcriptional and translational level, while occludin expression was negatively influenced. Interestingly, the MPA induced gene expression changes and functional properties of Caco-2 cells could be blocked by the inhibition of p38MAPK using a chemical inhibitor (SB203580). Conclusions: Collectively, our results highlight that MPA disrupts the structure of TJs via p38MAPK-dependent activation of MLCK/MLC-2 pathway that results in decreased integrity of Caco-2 monolayer. These results led us to suggest that p38MAPK-mediated lose integrity of epithelial monolayer could be the possible cause of GI disturbance (barrier dysfunction) in the intestine, leading to leaky style diarrhea observed in the organ-transplanted patients treated with MPA. PMID:26733876

  2. Fasting potentiates the anticancer activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors by strengthening MAPK signaling inhibition.

    PubMed

    Caffa, Irene; D'Agostino, Vito; Damonte, Patrizia; Soncini, Debora; Cea, Michele; Monacelli, Fiammetta; Odetti, Patrizio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Provenzani, Alessandro; Longo, Valter D; Nencioni, Alessio

    2015-05-20

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are now the mainstay of treatment in many types of cancer. However, their benefit is frequently short-lived, mandating the search for safe potentiation strategies. Cycles of fasting enhance the activity of chemo-radiotherapy in preclinical cancer models and dietary approaches based on fasting are currently explored in clinical trials. Whether combining fasting with TKIs is going to be potentially beneficial remains unknown. Here we report that starvation conditions increase the ability of commonly administered TKIs, including erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib, crizotinib and regorafenib, to block cancer cell growth, to inhibit the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and to strengthen E2F-dependent transcription inhibition. In cancer xenografts models, both TKIs and cycles of fasting slowed tumor growth, but, when combined, these interventions were significantly more effective than either type of treatment alone. In conclusion, cycles of fasting or of specifically designed fasting-mimicking diets should be evaluated in clinical studies as a means to potentiate the activity of TKIs in clinical use.

  3. GNA14 Somatic Mutation Causes Congenital and Sporadic Vascular Tumors by MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Qiu, Jingyao; Straub, Robert; Bruckner, Anna; Bercovitch, Lionel; Narayan, Deepak; McNiff, Jennifer; Ko, Christine; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Antaya, Richard; Halaban, Ruth; Choate, Keith A

    2016-08-01

    Vascular tumors are among the most common neoplasms in infants and children; 5%-10% of newborns present with or develop lesions within the first 3 months of life. Most are benign infantile hemangiomas that typically regress by 5 years of age; other vascular tumors include congenital tufted angiomas (TAs), kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas (KHEs), and childhood lobular capillary hemangiomas (LCHs). Some of these lesions can become locally invasive and unresponsive to pharmacologic intervention, leading to significant complications. Recent investigation has revealed that activating mutations in HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 can cause certain types of rare childhood vascular tumors, and we have now identified causal recurrent somatic activating mutations in GNA14 by whole-exome and targeted sequencing. We found somatic activating GNA14 c.614A>T (p.Gln205Leu) mutations in one KHE, one TA, and one LCH and a GNA11 c.547C>T (p.Arg183Cys) mutation in two LCH lesions. We examined mutation pathobiology via expression of mutant GNA14 or GNA11 in primary human endothelial cells and melanocytes. GNA14 and GNA11 mutations induced changes in cellular morphology and rendered cells growth-factor independent by upregulating the MAPK pathway. Our findings identify GNA14 mutations as a cause of childhood vascular tumors, offer insight into mechanisms of oncogenic transformation by mutations affecting Gaq family members, and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27476652

  4. Control of the segmentation process by graded MAPK/ERK activation in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Marie-Claire; Dubrulle, Julien; Malapert, Pascale; Chal, Jérome; Pourquié, Olivier

    2005-08-01

    The regular spacing of somites during vertebrate embryogenesis involves a dynamic gradient of FGF signaling that controls the timing of maturation of cells in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). How the FGF signal is transduced by PSM cells is unclear. Here, we first show that the FGF gradient is translated into graded activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway along the PSM in the chicken embryo. Using in ovo electroporation of PSM cells, we demonstrate that constitutive activation of ERK signaling in the PSM blocks segmentation by preventing maturation of PSM cells, thus phenocopying the overexpression of FGF8. Conversely, inhibition of ERK phosphorylation mimics a loss of function of FGF signaling in the PSM. Interestingly, video microscopy analysis of cell movements shows that ERK regulates the motility of PSM cells, suggesting that the decrease of cell movements along the PSM enables mesenchymal PSM cells to undergo proper segmentation. Together, our data demonstrate that ERK is the effector of the gradient of FGF in the PSM that controls the segmentation process.

  5. Activation of HuR downstream of p38 MAPK promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Slone, Samuel; Anthony, Sarah R; Wu, Xiaoqing; Benoit, Joshua B; Aube, Jeffrey; Xu, Liang; Tranter, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The RNA binding protein Human antigen R (HuR) interacts with specific AU-rich domains in target mRNAs and is highly expressed in many cell types, including cardiomyocytes. However, the role of HuR in cardiac physiology is largely unknown. Our results show that HuR undergoes cytoplasmic translocation, indicative of its activation, in hypertrophic cardiac myocytes. Specifically, HuR cytoplasmic translocation is significantly increased in NRVMs (neonatal rat ventricular myocytes) following treatment with phenylephrine or angiotensin II, agonists of two independent Gαq-coupled GPCRs known to induce hypertrophy. This Gq-mediated HuR activation is dependent on p38 MAP kinase, but not canonical Gq-PKC signaling. Furthermore, we show that HuR activation is necessary for Gq-mediated hypertrophic growth of NRVMs as siRNA-mediated knockdown of HuR inhibits hypertrophy as measured by cell size and expression of ANF (atrial natriuretic factor). Additionally, HuR overexpression is sufficient to induce hypertrophic cell growth. To decipher the downstream mechanisms by which HuR translocation promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, we assessed the role of HuR in the transcriptional activity of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells), the activation of which is a hallmark of cardiac hypertrophy. Using an NFAT-luciferase reporter assay, we show an acute inhibition of NFAT transcriptional activity following pharmacological inhibition of HuR. In conclusion, our results identify HuR as a novel mediator of cardiac hypertrophy downstream of the Gq-p38 MAPK pathway, and suggest modulation of NFAT activity as a potential mechanism.

  6. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanling; Xu, Sanpeng; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sui; Yan, Weiming; Ning, Qin

    2010-05-28

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  7. Multiple MAPK cascades regulate the transcription of IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kahana-Edwin, Smadar; Stark, Michal; Kassir, Yona

    2013-01-01

    The choice between alternative developmental pathways is primarily controlled at the level of transcription. Induction of meiosis in budding yeasts in response to nutrient levels provides a system to investigate the molecular basis of cellular decision-making. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into meiosis depends on multiple signals converging upon IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis. Here we studied the regulation of the cis-acting regulatory element Upstream Activation Signal (UAS)ru, which resides within the IME1 promoter. Guided by our previous data acquired using a powerful high-throughput screening system, here we provide evidence that UASru is regulated by multiple stimuli that trigger distinct signal transduction pathways as follows: (i) The glucose signal inhibited UASru activity through the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, targeting the transcription factors (TFs), Com2 and Sko1; (ii) high osmolarity activated UASru through the Hog1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and its corresponding TF Sko1; (iii) elevated temperature increased the activity of UASru through the cell wall integrity pathway and the TFs Swi4/Mpk1 and Swi4/Mlp1; (iv) the nitrogen source repressed UASru activity through Sum1; and (v) the absence of a nitrogen source was detected and transmitted to UASru by the Kss1 and Fus3 MAPK pathways through their respective downstream TFs, Ste12/Tec1 and Ste12/Ste12 as well as by their regulators Dig1/2. These signaling events were specific to UASru; they did not affect the mating and filamentation response elements that are regulated by MAPK pathways. The complex regulation of UASru through all the known vegetative MAPK pathways is unique to S. cerevisiae and is specific for IME1, likely because it is the master regulator of gametogenesis. PMID:24236068

  8. Multiple MAPK Cascades Regulate the Transcription of IME1, the Master Transcriptional Activator of Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kahana-Edwin, Smadar; Stark, Michal; Kassir, Yona

    2013-01-01

    The choice between alternative developmental pathways is primarily controlled at the level of transcription. Induction of meiosis in budding yeasts in response to nutrient levels provides a system to investigate the molecular basis of cellular decision-making. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into meiosis depends on multiple signals converging upon IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis. Here we studied the regulation of the cis-acting regulatory element Upstream Activation Signal (UAS)ru, which resides within the IME1 promoter. Guided by our previous data acquired using a powerful high-throughput screening system, here we provide evidence that UASru is regulated by multiple stimuli that trigger distinct signal transduction pathways as follows: (i) The glucose signal inhibited UASru activity through the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, targeting the transcription factors (TFs), Com2 and Sko1; (ii) high osmolarity activated UASru through the Hog1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and its corresponding TF Sko1; (iii) elevated temperature increased the activity of UASru through the cell wall integrity pathway and the TFs Swi4/Mpk1 and Swi4/Mlp1; (iv) the nitrogen source repressed UASru activity through Sum1; and (v) the absence of a nitrogen source was detected and transmitted to UASru by the Kss1 and Fus3 MAPK pathways through their respective downstream TFs, Ste12/Tec1 and Ste12/Ste12 as well as by their regulators Dig1/2. These signaling events were specific to UASru; they did not affect the mating and filamentation response elements that are regulated by MAPK pathways. The complex regulation of UASru through all the known vegetative MAPK pathways is unique to S. cerevisiae and is specific for IME1, likely because it is the master regulator of gametogenesis. PMID:24236068

  9. Arsenite suppression of involucrin transcription through AP1 promoter sites in cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyna, Nadezda N.; Reznikova, Tatiana V.; Qin Qin; Song, Hyukhwan; Phillips, Marjorie A.; Rice, Robert H.

    2010-03-15

    While preserving keratinocyte proliferative ability, arsenite suppresses cellular differentiation markers by preventing utilization of AP1 transcriptional response elements. In present experiments, arsenite had a dramatic effect in electrophoretic mobility supershift analysis of proteins binding to an involucrin promoter AP1 response element. Without arsenite treatment, binding of JunB and Fra1 was readily detected in nuclear extracts from preconfluent cultures and was not detected a week after confluence, while c-Fos was detected only after confluence. By contrast, band shift of nuclear extracts from arsenite treated cultures showed only JunB and Fra1 binding in postconfluent as well as preconfluent cultures. Immunoblotting of cell extracts showed that arsenite treatment prevented the loss of Fra1 and the increase in c-Fos proteins that occurred after confluence in untreated cultures. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated substantial reduction of c-Fos and acetylated histone H3 at the proximal and distal AP1 response elements in the involucrin promoter and of coactivator p300 at the proximal element. Alteration of AP1 transcription factors was also examined in response to treatment with four metal containing compounds (chromate, vanadate, hemin, divalent cadmium) that also suppress involucrin transcription. These agents all influenced transcription at AP1 elements in a transcriptional reporter assay, but exhibited less effect than arsenite on binding activity assessed by mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation and displayed variable effects on AP1 protein levels. These findings help trace a mechanism by which transcriptional effects of arsenite become manifest and help rationalize the unique action of arsenite, compared to the other agents, to preserve proliferative ability.

  10. Caffeine inhibits UV-mediated NF-kappaB activation in A2058 melanoma cells: an ATM-PKCdelta-p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Dashnamoorthy; Muniyappa, Harish; Das, Kumuda C

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian ultraviolet (UV) radiation response is a gene induction cascade activated by several transcription factors, including NF-kappaB. Although NF-kappaB is induced by UV radiation, the signal transduction mechanism remains relatively unclear. In the present study, we show that UV-induced NF-kappaB activation is mediated by the activation of Ataxia telangiecia mutated (ATM) and protein kinase C (PKC). We also show that caffeine specifically inhibits UV-mediated NF-kappaB activation, but not TNFalpha-mediated NF-kappaB activation. In addition, our study shows that ATM, but not ATM-Rad3-related (ATR) or DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is involved in UV-induced NF-kappaB activation. Because SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor), or Calphostin C or rottlerin (PKC inhibitors) was able to inhibit UV-mediated NF-kappaB activation, we evaluated whether caffeine could inhibit p38 MAPK or PKC activity. Caffeine or rottlerin inhibited UV-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not anisomycin-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, suggesting that p38 MAPK is downstream of PKC. Additionally, caffeine could effectively inhibit UV-induced increases in PKC activity. Taken together, our study demonstrates that caffeine is a potent inhibitor of UV-induced NF-kappaB activation. Additionally, this inhibition occurs due to the inhibitory action of caffeine on ATM and PKC, resulting in the inhibition of p38 MAPK activation.

  11. Stress activated protein kinases, JNKs and p38 MAPK, are differentially activated in ganglia and heart of land snail Helix lucorum (L.) during seasonal hibernation and arousal.

    PubMed

    Michaelidis, Basile; Hatzikamari, Maria; Antoniou, Vassiliki; Anestis, Andreas; Lazou, Antigone

    2009-06-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the phosphorylation and hence activation of stress activated protein kinases, p38 MAPK and JNKs in the tissues of the snail Helix lucorum during seasonal hibernation. Snails were put in large glass boxes, which were placed outdoors so that they were exposed to natural conditions of light and temperature. Phosphorylation and hence activation of JNKs and p38 MAPK was determined in both heart and ganglia. Deep hibernation caused significant increases in the levels of the phosphorylated form of JNK and p38-MAPK in both heart and ganglia. Phosphorylation of JNK remained elevated in the ganglia or increased after a transient drop in the heart, when the snails were prepared for arousal. In addition, phosphorylation of p38-MAPK was further increased in the heart during this period. These data support the conclusion that MAPK signalling cascade might contribute in the physiological and biochemical remodelling in the tissues of land snails during hibernation and upon preparation for arousal.

  12. atRA-induced apoptosis of mouse embryonic palate mesenchymal cells involves activation of MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: yuzengli@263.net; Xing Ying . E-mail: xingy@zzu.edu.cn

    2006-08-15

    Our previous studies have shown that atRA treatment resulted in cell-cycle block and growth inhibition in mouse embryonic palatal mesenchymal (MEPM). In the current study, gestation day (GD) 13 MEPM cells were used to test the hypothesis that the growth inhibition by atRA is due to apoptosis. The effects of atRA on apoptosis were assessed by performing MTT assay, Cell Death Detection ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Data analysis confirmed that atRA treatment induced apoptosis-like cell death, as shown by decreased cell viability and increased fragmented DNA and sub-G1 fraction. atRA-induced apoptosis was associated with upregulation of bcl-2, translocation of bax protein to the mitochondria from the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and cytochrome c release into cytosol. atRA-induced apoptosis was abrogated by z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 specific inhibitor, and z-VAD-fmk, a general caspase inhibitor, suggesting that the atRA-induced cell death of MEPM cells occurs through the cytochrome c- and caspase-3-dependent pathways. In addition, atRA treatment caused a strong and sustained activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38), as well as an early but transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Importantly, atRA-induced DNA fragmentation and capase-3 activation were prevented by pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and the p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190), but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitor (U0126). From these results, we suggest that mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways is involved in the atRA-induced apoptosis of MEPM cells.

  13. Maternal Inheritance of Twist and Analysis of MAPK Activation in Embryos of the Polychaete Annelid Platynereis dumerilii

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Schaub, Christoph; Domsch, Katrin; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Wolfstetter, Georg

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the specification of the 4d (mesentoblast) lineage in Platynereis dumerilii. We employ RT-PCR and in situ hybridization against the Platynereis dumerilii twist homolog (Pdu-twist) to reveal mesodermal specification within this lineage. We show that Pdu-twist mRNA is already maternally distributed. After fertilization, ooplasmatic segregation leads to relocation of Pdu-twist transcripts into the somatoblast (2d) lineage and 4d, indicating that the maternal component of Pdu-twist might be an important prerequisite for further mesoderm specification but does not represent a defining characteristic of the mesentoblast. However, after the primordial germ cells have separated from the 4d lineage, zygotic transcription of Pdu-twist is exclusively observed in the myogenic progenitors, suggesting that mesodermal specification occurs after the 4d stage. Previous studies on spiral cleaving embryos revealed a spatio-temporal correlation between the 4d lineage and the activity of an embryonic organizer that is capable to induce the developmental fates of certain micromeres. This has raised the question if specification of the 4d lineage could be connected to the organizer activity. Therefore, we aimed to reveal the existence of such a proposed conserved organizer in Platynereis employing antibody staining against dpERK. In contrast to former observations in other spiralian embryos, activation of MAPK signaling during 2d and 4d formation cannot be detected which questions the existence of a conserved connection between organizer function and specification of the 4d lineage. However, our experiments unveil robust MAPK activation in the prospective nephroblasts as well as in the macromeres and some micromeres at the blastopore in gastrulating embryos. Inhibition of MAPK activation leads to larvae with a shortened body axis, defects in trunk muscle spreading and improper nervous system condensation, indicating a

  14. CYLD Inhibits Tumorigenesis and Metastasis by Blocking JNK/AP1 Signaling at Multiple Levels

    PubMed Central

    de Marval, Paula Miliani; Lutfeali, Shazia; Jin, Jane Y.; Leshin, Benjamin; Selim, M. Angelica; Zhang, Jennifer Y.

    2011-01-01

    CYLD has been recognized as a tumor suppressor due to its dominant genetic linkage to multiple types of epidermal tumors and a range of other cancers. The molecular mechanisms governing CYLD control of skin cancer are still unclear. Here, we demonstrated that K14-driven epidermal expression of a patient relevant and catalytically deficient CYLD truncation mutant (CYLDm) sensitized mice to skin tumor development in response to DMBA/TPA-challenge. Tumors developed on transgenic mice were prone to malignant progression and lymph node metastasis, and displayed increased activation of JNK and the downstream c-Jun and c-Fos proteins. Most importantly, topical application of a pharmacological JNK inhibitor significantly reduced tumor development and abolished metastasis in the transgenic mice. Further in line with these animal data, exogenous expression of CYLDm in A431, a human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line, markedly enhanced cell growth, migration and subcutaneous tumor growth in an AP1-depdendent manner. In contrast, expression of the wild type CYLD inhibited SCC tumorigenesis and AP1 function. Most importantly, CYLDm not only increased JNK activation but also induced an upregulation of K63-ubiquitination on both c-Jun and c-Fos, leading to sustained AP1 activation. Our findings uncovered c-Jun and c-Fos as novel CYLD-targets and underscore that CYLD controls epidermal tumorigenesis through blocking the JNK/AP1 signaling pathway at multiple levels. PMID:21478324

  15. Apoptotic Effects of Cordycepin Through the Extrinsic Pathway and p38 MAPK Activation in Human Glioblastoma U87MG Cells.

    PubMed

    Baik, Ji-Sue; Mun, Seo-Won; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Park, Shin-Ji; Yoon, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Park, Min-Kyu; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2016-02-01

    We first demonstrated that cordycepin inhibited cell growth and triggered apoptosis in U87MG cells with wild-type p53, but not in T98G cells with mutant-type p53. Western blot data revealed that the levels of procaspase-8, -3, and Bcl-2 were downregulated in cordycepintreated U87MG cells, whereas the levels of Fas, FasL, Bak, cleaved caspase-3, -8, and cleaved PARP were upregulated, indicating that cordycepin induces apoptosis by activating the death receptor-mediated pathway in U87MG cells. Cordycepin-induced apoptosis could be suppressed by only SB203580, a p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor. These results suggest that cordycepin triggered apoptosis in U87MG cells through p38 MAPK activation and inhibition of the Akt survival pathway. PMID:26597532

  16. Infectious bursal disease virus infection induces macrophage activation via p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Sharma, Jagdev M

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, we show that infection with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes activation of macrophages, the key cells involved in inflammatory and immune-regulatory functions. Exposure of cultured spleen macrophages (SM) from SPF chickens to IBDV resulted in the production of nitric oxide (NO). In addition, there was upregulation of mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-8 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The signal transduction pathways involved in macrophage activation were examined. The role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) was tested by using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Addition of p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB-203580 and NF-kappaB inhibitor Bay 11-7082, suppressed IBDV-induced NO production and mRNA expression of iNOS, IL-8 and COX-2. The results suggest that IBDV uses cellular signal transduction machinery, in particular the p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways, to elicit macrophage activation. The increased production of NO, IL-8 and COX-2 by macrophages may contribute to bursa inflammatory responses commonly seen during the acute IBDV infection.

  17. Induction of prostaglandin D2 through the p38 MAPK pathway is responsible for the antipruritic activity of sertaconazole nitrate.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simarna; Sur, Runa; Liebel, Frank T; Southall, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    Prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) is known to have antipruritic activity by suppressing histamine release. However, agents that can topically induce PGD(2) for itch relief are not well established. The antimycotic sertaconazole nitrate (STZ) has been shown to exhibit anti-itch properties; however, the mechanism for this activity has not been elucidated. STZ mitigated degranulation of RBL-2H3 (rat basophilic leukemia) mast cells induced by compound 48/80, a pruritogenic agent known to promote the release of histamine, and augmented PGD(2) production in mast cells and macrophages. Addition of exogenous PGD(2) abrogated compound 48/80-induced degranulation by acting through the prostanoid D receptor 1 (DP1). STZ induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation in mast cells and a pharmacological inhibitor of p38 MAPK, SB203580, resulted in the attenuation of PGD(2) levels. Finally, in a murine model of pruritus, the scratching behavior induced by compound 48/80 was mitigated by topical application of STZ. This effect was reversed by the addition of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, ibuprofen, or a DP1 receptor antagonist (MK0524). Collectively, these results suggest that STZ mediates its anti-itch effects by boosting the antipruritic agent, PGD(2), by the activation of the p38-MAPK pathway. This is the first report to demonstrate a promising approach to topically induce PGD(2) for improving pruritus. PMID:20505747

  18. Comparative analysis of MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation and inhibition in human and canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fowles, J S; Denton, C L; Gustafson, D L

    2015-09-01

    The lack of advanced animal models of human cancers is considered a barrier to developing effective therapeutics. Canine and human melanomas are histologically disparate but show similar disease progression and response to therapies. The purpose of these studies was to compare human and canine melanoma tumours and cell lines regarding MAPK and PI3K/AKT signalling dysregulation, and response to select molecularly targeted agents. Pathway activation was investigated via microarray and mutational analysis. Growth inhibition and cell cycle effects were assessed for pathway inhibitors AZD6244 (MAPK) and rapamycin (PI3K/AKT) in human and canine melanoma cells. Human and canine melanoma share similar differential gene expression patterns within the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways. Constitutive pathway activation and similar sensitivity to AZD6244 and rapamycin was observed in human and canine cells. These results show that human and canine melanoma share activation and sensitivity to inhibition of cancer-related signalling pathways despite differences in activating mutations. PMID:23745794

  19. YES oncogenic activity is specified by its SH4 domain and regulates RAS/MAPK signaling in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Fanny; Leroy, Cédric; Simon, Valérie; Benistant, Christine; Roche, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SRC family of tyrosine kinases (SFK) display important functions in human cancer, but their specific role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that YES regulates a unique oncogenic signaling important for colorectal cancer (CRC) progression that is not shared with SRC. Here, we addressed the underlying mechanism involved in this process. We show that YES oncogenic signaling relies on palmitoylation of its SH4 domain that controls YES localization in cholesterol-enriched membrane micro-domains. Specifically, deletion of the palmitoylation site compromised YES transforming activity, while addition of a palmitoylation site in the SH4 domain of SRC was sufficient for SRC to restore the transforming properties of cells in which YES had been silenced. Subsequently, SILAC phosphoproteomic analysis revealed that micro-domain-associated cell adhesive components and receptor tyrosine kinases are major YES substrates. YES also phosphorylates upstream regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling, including EGFR, SHC and SHP2, which were not targeted by SRC due to the absence of palmitoylation. Accordingly, EGFR-induced MAPK activity was attenuated by YES down-regulation, while increased RAS activity significantly restored cell transformation that was lost upon YES silencing. Collectively, these results uncover a critical role for the SH4 domain in the specification of SFK oncogenic activity and a selective role for YES in the induction of RAS/MAPK signaling in CRC cells.

  20. 2-Methoxyestradiol induced Bax phosphorylation and apoptosis in human retinoblastoma cells via p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Min, Hongbo; Ghatnekar, Gautam S; Ghatnekar, Angela V; You, Xiaohong; Bu, Min; Guo, Xinyi; Bu, Shizhong; Shen, Bo; Huang, Qin

    2012-07-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is a common childhood intraocular cancer that affects approximately 300 children each year in the United States alone. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME), an endogenous metabolite of 17-β-estradiol that dose not bind to nuclear estrogen receptor, exhibits potent apoptotic activity against rapidly growing tumor cells. Here, we report that 2ME induction of apoptosis was demonstrated by early fragmented DNA after 48 h of incubation with 10 µM 2ME in Rb cell lines. Subsequently, a decrease of proliferation was observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the mechanism indicates that p38 kinase plays a critical role in 2ME-induced apoptosis in Y79 cells, even though ERK was also activated by 2ME under the same conditions. Activation of p38 kinase also mediates 2ME induced Bax phosphorylated at Thr(167) after a 6 h treatment of 2ME, which in turn prevents formation of the Bcl-2-Bax heterodimer. Both p38 specific inhibitor, SB 203580, or p38 knockdown by specific siRNA, blocked 2ME induction of Bax phosphorylation. Furthermore, only transiently transfected mutant BaxT167A, but not Bax S163A, inhibited 2ME-induced apoptosis. In summary, our data suggest that 2ME induces apoptosis in human Rb cells by causing phosphorylation of p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which appears to be correlated with phosphorlation of Bax. This understanding of 2ME's ability may help develop it as a promising therapeutic candidate by inducing apoptosis in a Rb. PMID:21769948

  1. Induction of Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression by Hypoxia in Human Lung Fibroblasts via the MEKK1/MEK1/ERK1/GLI-1/GLI-2 and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi; Lin, Chien-huang; Chen, Jing-Yun; Li, Chien-Hua; Liu, Yu-Tin; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Several reports have indicated that hypoxia, GLI, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) contribute to pulmonary fibrosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We investigated the participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) kinase 1 (MEKK1)/MEK1/ERK1/GLI-1/2 and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling in hypoxia-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Hypoxia time-dependently increased CTGF expression, which was attenuated by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) of GLI-1 (GLI-1 siRNA) and GLI-2 (GLI-2 siRNA) in both human lung fibroblast cell line (WI-38) and primary human lung fibroblasts (NHLFs). Moreover, GLI-1 siRNA and GLI-2 siRNA attenuated hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity, and the treatment of cells with hypoxia induced GLI-1 and GLI-2 translocation. Furthermore, hypoxia-induced CTGF expression was reduced by an MEK inhibitor (PD98059), MEK1 siRNA, ERK inhibitor (U0126), ERK1 siRNA, and MEKK1 siRNA. Both PD98059 and U0126 significantly attenuated hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity. Hypoxia time-dependently increased MEKK1, ERK, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Moreover, SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) also apparently inhibited hypoxia-induced CTGF expression. The treatment of cells with hypoxia induced ERK, GLI-1, or GLI-2 complex formation. Hypoxia-induced GLI-1 and GLI-2 translocation into the nucleus was significantly attenuated by U0126. In addition, hypoxia-induced ERK Tyr204 phosphorylation was impeded by MEKK1 siRNA. Moreover, hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity was attenuated by cells transfected with AP-1 site mutation in a CTGF construct. Exposure to hypoxia caused a time-dependent phosphorylation of c-Jun, but not of c-Fos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that hypoxia induced the recruitment of c-Jun, GLI-1, and GLI-2 to the AP-1 promoter region of CTGF. Hypoxia-treated cells exhibited an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen production, which was blocked by GLI-1 siRNA and

  2. Secretory pathway retention of mutant prion protein induces p38-MAPK activation and lethal disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C.; Ulbrich, Sarah; Linsenmeier, Luise; Krasemann, Susanne; Chakroun, Karima; Acevedo-Morantes, Claudia Y.; Wille, Holger; Tatzelt, Jörg; Glatzel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding of proteins in the biosynthetic pathway in neurons may cause disturbed protein homeostasis and neurodegeneration. The prion protein (PrPC) is a GPI-anchored protein that resides at the plasma membrane and may be misfolded to PrPSc leading to prion diseases. We show that a deletion in the C-terminal domain of PrPC (PrPΔ214–229) leads to partial retention in the secretory pathway causing a fatal neurodegenerative disease in mice that is partially rescued by co-expression of PrPC. Transgenic (Tg(PrPΔ214–229)) mice show extensive neuronal loss in hippocampus and cerebellum and activation of p38-MAPK. In cell culture under stress conditions, PrPΔ214–229 accumulates in the Golgi apparatus possibly representing transit to the Rapid ER Stress-induced ExporT (RESET) pathway together with p38-MAPK activation. Here we describe a novel pathway linking retention of a GPI-anchored protein in the early secretory pathway to p38-MAPK activation and a neurodegenerative phenotype in transgenic mice. PMID:27117504

  3. Maternal inflammation activated ROS-p38 MAPK predisposes offspring to heart damages caused by isoproterenol via augmenting ROS generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Deng, Yafei; Lai, Wenjing; Guan, Xiao; Sun, Xiongshan; Han, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Pan, Xiaodong; Ji, Yan; Luo, Hongqin; Huang, Pei; Tang, Yuan; Gu, Liangqi; Dan, Guorong; Yu, Jianhua; Namaka, Michael; Zhang, Jianxiang; Deng, Youcai; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Maternal inflammation contributes to the increased incidence of adult cardiovascular disease. The current study investigated the susceptibility of cardiac damage responding to isoproterenol (ISO) in adult offspring that underwent maternal inflammation (modeled by pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) challenge). We found that 2 weeks of ISO treatment in adult offspring of LPS-treated mothers led to augmented heart damage, characterized by left-ventricular systolic dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. Mechanistically, prenatal exposure to LPS led to up-regulated expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases, antioxidant enzymes, and p38 MAPK activity in left ventricular of adult offspring at resting state. ISO treatment exaggerated ROS generation, p38 MAPK activation but down-regulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) elimination capacity in the left ventricular of offspring from LPS-treated mothers, while antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reversed these changes together with improved cardiac functions. The p38 inhibitor SB202190 alleviated the heart damage only via inhibiting the expression of NADPH oxidases. Collectively, our data demonstrated that prenatal inflammation programs pre-existed ROS activation in the heart tissue, which switches on the early process of oxidative damages on heart rapidly through a ROS-p38 MAPK-NADPH oxidase-ROS positive feedback loop in response to a myocardial hypertrophic challenge in adulthood. PMID:27443826

  4. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM). E S Roberts1, R Jaskot2, J Richards2, and K L Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC a...

  5. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Aguado, Andrea; Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice; Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María; Alonso, María Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  6. Butyrate produced by commensal bacteria potentiates phorbol esters induced AP-1 response in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells.

  7. Transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq reveals AP-1 pathway as key regulator that green tea may rely on to inhibit lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Xiong, Donghai; Vedell, Peter; Yan, Ying; Jiang, Hui; Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Tichelaar, Jay W; Wang, Yian; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a promising chemopreventive agent for lung cancer. Multiple signaling events have been reported, however, the relative importance of these mechanisms in mediating the chemopreventive function of green tea is unclear. In the present study, to examine the involvement of AP-1 in green tea polyphenols induced tumor inhibition, human NSCLC cell line H1299 and mouse SPON 10 cells were identified as AP-1 dependent, as these two lines exhibit high constitutive AP-1 activity, and when TAM67 expression was induced with doxycycline, cell growth was inhibited and correlated with suppressed AP-1 activity. RNA-seq was used to determine the global transcriptional effects of AP-1 inhibition and also uncover the possible involvement of AP-1 in tea polyphenols induced chemoprevention. TAM67 mediated changes in gene expression were identified, and within down-regulated genes, AP-1 was identified as a key transcription regulator. RNA-seq analysis revealed that Polyphenon E-treated cells shared 293 commonly down-regulated genes within TAM67 expressing H1299 cells, and by analysis of limited Chip-seq data, over 10% of the down-regulated genes contain a direct AP-1 binding site, indicating that Polyphenon E elicits chemopreventive activity by regulating AP-1 target genes. Conditional TAM67 expressing transgenic mice and NSCLC cell lines were used to further confirm that the chemopreventive activity of green tea is AP-1 dependent. Polyphenon E lost its chempreventive function both in vitro and in vivo when AP-1 was inhibited, indicating that AP-1 inhibition is a major pathway through which green tea exhibits chemopreventive effects.

  8. Thrombosis recanalization by paeoniflorin through the upregulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator via the MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    YE, SONGSHAN; MAO, BINGYU; YANG, LEI; FU, WEIYUN; HOU, JUNRAN

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin, the major component of Paeonia lactiflora pall, has previously been reported to prevent thrombosis. Plasminogen activator urokinase (uPA) is a serine protease that markedly facilitates normal thrombosis resolution. Paeoniflorin and uPA have been linked to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In the current study, the influence of paeoniflorin on the expression of uPA was investigated and the underlying regulatory mechanism was preliminarily determined. The prothrombotic state of the model animals treated with paeoniflorin were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures was estimated using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and the possible pathways involved in the interaction between paeoniflorin and uPA were evaluated using western blot analysis. The ELISA results demonstrated that the levels of 6-keto prostaglandin F1a, fibronectin and uPA were significantly upregulated by treatment with paeoniflorin compared with control (P<0.05). By contrast, the expression of fibrinogen, D-dimer and thromboxane B2 were inhibited. With an increase in the concentration of paeoniflorin the cell viability of HUVECs decreased gradually. The results of western blot analysis demonstrated that paeoniflorin increased the phosphorylation of MAPK 14 (p38) and MAPK 8 (JNK). The present study demonstrated that paeoniflorin has the potential to improve the prethrombotic state and recanalize thrombosis by increasing the expression of uPA, which may be mediated via regulation of the p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. However, this treatment effect was dependent on the concentration of paeoniflorin used, an unsuitable concentration of the agent would result in a negative effect on the anti-thrombosis pathways. PMID:27082639

  9. Role of protein kinase C in the TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Abraham B.; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposures of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminish their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in the NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as MAPK activity. The TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in the inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposures. TBT caused a 2–3 fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50–300 nM (16–98 ng/mL), indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposures. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT. However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including the activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells. PMID:20390410

  10. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Increases Arginase Activity and Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction in Corpora Cavernosa from Angiotensin-II Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toque, Haroldo A.; Romero, Maritza J.; Tostes, Rita C.; Shatanawi, Alia; Chandra, Surabhi; Carneiro, Zidonia N.; Inscho, Edward W.; Webb, R. Clinton; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Caldwell, R. William

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Angiotensin II (AngII) activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and elevates arginase activity in endothelial cells. Upregulation of arginase activity has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability. However, signaling pathways activated by AngII in the penis are largely unknown. Aim We hypothesized that activation of p38 MAPK increases arginase activity and thus impairs penile vascular function in AngII-treated mice. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing saline or AngII (42 μg/kg/h) for 14 days and co-treated with p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB 203580 (5 μg/kg/day), beginning 2 days before minipump implantation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured. Corpus cavernosum (CC) tissue was used for vascular functional studies and protein expression levels of p38 MAPK, arginase and constitutive NOS, and arginase activity. Main Outcome Measures Arginase expression and activity; expression of phospho-p38 MAPK, -eNOS and nNOS proteins; endothelium-dependent and nitrergic nerve-mediated relaxations were determined in CC from control and AngII-infused mice. Results AngII increased SBP (22%) and increased CC arginase activity and expression (~2-fold), and phosphorylated P38 MAPK levels (30%) over control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented these effects. Endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced by AngII and this effect was prevented by SB 203580 (P<0.01). AngII (2-week) did not alter nitrergic function. However, SB 203580 significantly increased nitrergic relaxation in both control and AngII tissue at lower frequencies. Maximum contractile responses for phenylephrine and electrical field stimulation were increased by AngII (56% and 171%, respectively), and attenuated by SB 203580 treated. AngII treatment also decreased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 compared to control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented all these changes. Conclusion p38

  11. Overexpression of members of the AP-1 transcriptional factor family from an early stage of renal carcinogenesis and inhibition of cell growth by AP-1 gene antisense oligonucleotides in the Tsc2 gene mutant (Eker) rat model.

    PubMed

    Urakami, S; Tsuchiya, H; Orimoto, K; Kobayashi, T; Igawa, M; Hino, O

    1997-12-01

    We previously isolated subtracted cDNA clones for genes having increased expression in Tsc2 gene mutant (Eker) rat renal carcinomas (RCs). Among them, fra-1 encoding a transcriptional factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) was identified. We have therefore investigated whether other members of the AP-1 transcription factor family might also be involved in renal carcinogenesis in the Eker rat model. In the present study, overexpression of fra-1, fra-2, c-jun, junB, and junD mRNAs was demonstrated in RCs by Northern blot analysis. Interestingly, AP-1 proteins were highly expressed even in the earliest preneoplastic lesions (e.g., phenotypically altered tubules) as suggested by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-responsive element (TRE)-binding activity of AP-1 proteins was observed in RC cell extracts by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. As a next step, we transfected antisense oligonucleotides targeting AP-1 genes into RC cells and demonstrated that their growth was strongly inhibited. Thus, the data suggest that overexpression of AP-1 genes might play a crucial role in renal carcinogenesis in the Eker rat model. PMID:9405228

  12. Opposing Effects of Zac1 and Curcumin on AP-1-Regulated Expressions of S100A7

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Shu-Ting; Cheng, Hsiao-Chun; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chang, Yung-Lung; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wang, Wei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    ZAC, an encoding gene mapped at chromosome 6q24-q25 within PSORS1, was previously found over-expressed in the lower compartment of the hyperplastic epidermis in psoriatic lesions. Cytokines produced in the inflammatory dermatoses may drive AP-1 transcription factor to induce responsive gene expressions. We demonstrated that mZac1 can enhance AP-1-responsive S100A7 expression of which the encoding gene was located in PSORS4 with HaCaT keratinocytes. However, the mZac1-enhanced AP-1 transcriptional activity was suppressed by curcumin, indicating the anti-inflammatory property of this botanical agent and is exhibited by blocking the AP-1-mediated cross-talk between PSORS1 and PSORS4. Two putative AP-1-binding sites were found and demonstrated to be functionally important in the regulation of S100A7 promoter activity. Moreover, we found curcumin reduced the DNA-binding activity of AP-1 to the recognition element located in the S100A7 promoter. The S100A7 expression was found to be upregulated in the lesioned epidermis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which is where this keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant engaged in the pro-inflammatory feedback loop. Understanding the regulatory mechanism of S100A7 expression will be helpful to develop therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory dermatoses via blocking the reciprocal stimuli between the inflammatory cells and keratinocytes. PMID:26633653

  13. Opposing Effects of Zac1 and Curcumin on AP-1-Regulated Expressions of S100A7.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Shu-Ting; Cheng, Hsiao-Chun; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chang, Yung-Lung; Chiang, Chien-Ping; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wang, Wei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    ZAC, an encoding gene mapped at chromosome 6q24-q25 within PSORS1, was previously found over-expressed in the lower compartment of the hyperplastic epidermis in psoriatic lesions. Cytokines produced in the inflammatory dermatoses may drive AP-1 transcription factor to induce responsive gene expressions. We demonstrated that mZac1 can enhance AP-1-responsive S100A7 expression of which the encoding gene was located in PSORS4 with HaCaT keratinocytes. However, the mZac1-enhanced AP-1 transcriptional activity was suppressed by curcumin, indicating the anti-inflammatory property of this botanical agent and is exhibited by blocking the AP-1-mediated cross-talk between PSORS1 and PSORS4. Two putative AP-1-binding sites were found and demonstrated to be functionally important in the regulation of S100A7 promoter activity. Moreover, we found curcumin reduced the DNA-binding activity of AP-1 to the recognition element located in the S100A7 promoter. The S100A7 expression was found to be upregulated in the lesioned epidermis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which is where this keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant engaged in the pro-inflammatory feedback loop. Understanding the regulatory mechanism of S100A7 expression will be helpful to develop therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory dermatoses via blocking the reciprocal stimuli between the inflammatory cells and keratinocytes. PMID:26633653

  14. Activation of the MAPK11/12/13/14 (p38 MAPK) pathway regulates the transcription of autophagy genes in response to oxidative stress induced by a novel copper complex in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wu; Zhu, Haichuan; Sheng, Fugeng; Tian, Yonglu; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Yingyu; Li, Song; Lin, Jian

    2014-07-01

    Transition metal copper (Cu) can exist in oxidized or reduced states in cells, leading to cytotoxicity in cancer cells through oxidative stress. Recently, copper complexes are emerging as a new class of anticancer compounds. Here, we report that a novel anticancer copper complex (HYF127c/Cu) induces oxidative stress-dependent cell death in cancer cells. Further, transcriptional analysis revealed that oxidative stress elicits broad transcriptional changes of genes, in which autophagy-related genes are significantly changed in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells. Consistently, autophagy was induced in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells and inhibitors of autophagy promoted cell death induced by HYF127c/Cu. Further analysis identified that the MAPK11/12/13/14 (formerly known as p38 MAPK) pathway was also activated in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells. Meanwhile, the MAPK11/12/13/14 inhibitor SB203580 downregulated autophagy by inhibiting the transcription of the autophagy genes MAP1LC3B, BAG3, and HSPA1A, and promoted HYF127c/Cu-induced cell death. These data suggest that copper-induced oxidative stress will induce protective autophagy through transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes by activation of the MAPK11/12/13/14 pathway in HeLa cells.

  15. Dynamic ubiquitination of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) Ste7 determines mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specificity.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jillian H; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2013-06-28

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that tags proteins for proteasomal degradation. In addition, there is a growing appreciation that ubiquitination can influence protein activity and localization. Ste7 is a prototype MAPKK in yeast that participates in both the pheromone signaling and nutrient deprivation/invasive growth pathways. We have shown previously that Ste7 is ubiquitinated upon pheromone stimulation. Here, we show that the Skp1/Cullin/F-box ubiquitin ligase SCF(Cdc4) and the ubiquitin protease Ubp3 regulate Ste7 ubiquitination and signal specificity. Using purified components, we demonstrate that SCF(Cdc4) ubiquitinates Ste7 directly. Using gene deletion mutants, we show that SCF(Cdc4) and Ubp3 have opposing effects on Ste7 ubiquitination. Although SCF(Cdc4) is necessary for proper activation of the pheromone MAPK Fus3, Ubp3 is needed to limit activation of the invasive growth MAPK Kss1. Finally, we show that Fus3 phosphorylates Ubp3 directly and that phosphorylation of Ubp3 is necessary to limit Kss1 activation. These results reveal a feedback loop wherein one MAPK limits the ubiquitination of an upstream MAPKK and thereby prevents spurious activation of a second competing MAPK. PMID:23645675

  16. CyHV-2 ORF104 activates the p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Du, Mi; Chen, Mingliang; Shen, Haifeng; Wang, Wei; Li, Zengpeng; Wang, Weiyi; Huang, Jianhui; Chen, Jianming

    2015-10-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2) is the pathogen responsible for herpesviral hematopoietic necrosis disease, which causes huge losses on aquaculture. So far the studies of CyHV-2 mainly focus on the identification and detection of this virus, but little is known about the role of specific CyHV-2 genes in the infection process. Based on the genomic information, CyHV-2 ORF104 encodes a kinase-like protein, which is highly conserved among the three CyHVs. Our study was initiated to investigate the role of kinase-like protein ORF104 during virus infection. Subcellular localization study showed that ORF104 was mainly expressed in the nucleus in both human HEK293T and fish EPC cells. However, deletion of the putative nuclear localization signal of ORF104 (ORF104M) resulted in the cytoplasmic distribution in HEK293T. We then examined whether MAPKs were involved in the ORF104-mediated signaling pathway by overexpressing ORF104 and ORF104M in HEK293T. Overexpression of ORF104 and ORF104M resulted in the up-regulation of p38 phosphorylation, but not JNK or ERK, indicating that ORF104 specifically activates p38 signaling pathway. In vivo study showed that CyHV-2 infection enhanced p38 phosphorylation in gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio). Interestingly, p38 inhibitor SB203580 strongly reduced fish death caused by CyHV-2 infection. Therefore, our study for the first time reveals the function of ORF104 during CyHV-2 infection, indicating that ORF104 is a potential vaccine candidate for CyHV-2.

  17. Activation of MAPK Is Required for ROS Generation and Exocytosis in HMC-1 Cells Induced by Trichomonas vaginalis-Derived Secretory Products

    PubMed Central

    Narantsogt, Giimaa; Min, Arim; Nam, Young Hee; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Agvaandaram, Gurbadam; Dorjsuren, Temuulen; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes vaginitis and cervicitis in women and asymptomatic urethritis and prostatitis in men. Mast cells have been reported to be predominant in vaginal smears and vaginal walls of patients infected with T. vaginalis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), activated by various stimuli, have been shown to regulate the transcriptional activity of various cytokine genes in mast cells. In this study, we investigated whether MAPK is involved in ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 cells induced by T. vaginalis-derived secretory products (TvSP). We found that TvSP induces the activation of MAPK and NADPH oxidase in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP induced phosphorylation of MAPK and p47phox in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP also induced up-regulation of CD63, a marker for exocytosis, along the surfaces of human mast cells. Pretreatment with MAPK inhibitors strongly inhibited TvSP-induced ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation. Finally, our results suggest that TvSP induces intracellular ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 via MAPK signaling. PMID:26537039

  18. Activation of MAPK Is Required for ROS Generation and Exocytosis in HMC-1 Cells Induced by Trichomonas vaginalis-Derived Secretory Products.

    PubMed

    Narantsogt, Giimaa; Min, Arim; Nam, Young Hee; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Agvaandaram, Gurbadam; Dorjsuren, Temuulen; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes vaginitis and cervicitis in women and asymptomatic urethritis and prostatitis in men. Mast cells have been reported to be predominant in vaginal smears and vaginal walls of patients infected with T. vaginalis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), activated by various stimuli, have been shown to regulate the transcriptional activity of various cytokine genes in mast cells. In this study, we investigated whether MAPK is involved in ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 cells induced by T. vaginalis-derived secretory products (TvSP). We found that TvSP induces the activation of MAPK and NADPH oxidase in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP induced phosphorylation of MAPK and p47(phox) in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP also induced up-regulation of CD63, a marker for exocytosis, along the surfaces of human mast cells. Pretreatment with MAPK inhibitors strongly inhibited TvSP-induced ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation. Finally, our results suggest that TvSP induces intracellular ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 via MAPK signaling.

  19. Anti-cancer effect of snake venom toxin through down regulation of AP-1 mediated PRDX6 expression

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Ju; Song, Ho Sub; Kim, Jung Hyun; Ko, Seong Cheol; Song, Min Jong; Lee, Won Hyoung; Yoon, Joo Hee; Ham, Young Wan; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom toxin (SVT) from Vipera lebetina turanica contains a mixture of different enzymes and proteins. Peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) is known to be a stimulator of lung cancer cell growth. PRDX6 is a member of peroxidases, and has calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) activities. PRDX6 has an AP-1 binding site in its promoter region of the gene. Since AP-1 is implicated in tumor growth and PRDX6 expression, in the present study, we investigated whether SVT inhibits PRDX6, thereby preventing human lung cancer cell growth (A549 and NCI-H460) through inactivation of AP-1. A docking model study and pull down assay showed that SVT completely fits on the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) region of c-Fos of AP-1. SVT (0–10 μg/ml) inhibited lung cancer cell growth in a concentration dependent manner through induction of apoptotic cell death accompanied by induction of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9, Bax, p21 and p53, but decreased cIAP and Bcl2 expression via inactivation of AP-1. In an xenograft in vivo model, SVT (0.5 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg) also inhibited tumor growth accompanied with the reduction of PRDX6 expression, but increased expression of proapoptotic proteins. These data indicate that SVT inhibits tumor growth via inhibition of PRDX6 activity through interaction with its transcription factor AP-1. PMID:26061816

  20. AP-1 (Fos/Jun) transcription factors in hematopoietic differentiation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, D A; Gregory, B; Hoffman, B

    1998-03-01

    A combination of in vitro and in vivo molecular genetic approaches have provided evidence to suggest that AP-1 (Fos/Jun) transcription factors play multiple roles in functional development of hematopoietic precursor cells into mature blood cells along most, if not all, of the hematopoietic cell lineages. This includes the monocyte/macrophage, granulocyte, megakaryocyte, mastocyte and erythroid lineages. In addition, studies using c-fos knockout mice have established a unique role for Fos, as a member of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, in determining the differentiation and activity of progenitors of the osteoclast lineage, a population of bone-forming cells which are of hematopoietic origin as well. Evidence has also accumulated to implicate AP-1 (Fos/Jun) transcription factor complexes as both positive and negative modulators of distinct apoptotic pathways in many cell types, including cells of hematopoietic origin. Fos/Jun have been implicated as positive modulators of apoptosis induced in hematopoietic progenitor cells of the myeloid lineage, a function that may relate to the control of blood cell homeostasis, as well as in programmed cell death associated with terminal differentiation of many other cell types, and apoptosis associated with withdrawal of growth/survival factors. On the other hand, the study of apoptosis induced in mammalian cells has implicated AP-1 in the protection against apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents. However, evidence to the contrary has been obtained as well, suggesting that AP-1 may function to modulate stress-induced apoptosis either positively or negatively, depending on the microenvironment and the cell type in which the stress stimulus is induced.

  1. Activation of p21ras/MAPK signal transduction molecules decreases with age in mitogen-stimulated T cells from rats.

    PubMed

    Pahlavani, M A; Harris, M D; Richardson, A

    1998-04-10

    Signal transduction is ubiquitously involved in the initiation of physiological signals that lead to growth and proliferation of cells. The signaling cascade mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is considered essential for T cell growth and function. Therefore, it was of interest to determine the influence of age on the induction of MAPK in mitogen-activated T cells. T cells from young (4-6 months) and old (24-26 months) rats responded to concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation by increasing MAPK, c-jun amino terminal kinase (JNK), and p21ras activities. The time course of induction of MAPK/JNK and p21ras activities was similar in T cells isolated from young and old rats. The induction of JNK activity did not change significantly with age; however, the induction of MAPK and p21ras activities was significantly less (50 to 65%) in T cells from old rats than in T cells from young rats. Although the relative protein levels of p42 and p44 MAPK did not change with age, the proportion of the phosphorylated p44 MAPK decreased with age. In addition, it was found that the in vitro kinase activities of the T cell receptor-associated protein tyrosine kinase Lck (p56Lck) and ZAP-70 but not Fyn (p59Fyn) were lower in T cells from old rats than in T cells from young rats. The decline in activities of these signaling molecules with age was not associated with changes in their corresponding protein levels. Thus, our results demonstrate that aging alters the activation of the signal transduction cascade that leads to T cell activation.

  2. P38 MAPK inhibitors suppress biomarkers of hypertension end-organ damage, osteopontin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, S S; Olzinski, A R; Frazier, K S; Mirabile, R C; O'Brien, S P; Jing, J; Rajagopalan, D; Yue, T L; Willette, R N

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of target organ damage is important in defining the optimal treatment of hypertension and blood pressure-related cardiovascular disease. The aims of the present study were (1) to investigate candidate biomarkers of target organ damage, osteopontin (OPN) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), in models of malignant hypertension with well characterized end-organ pathology; and (2) to evaluate the effects of chronic treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Gene expression, plasma concentrations, and renal immunohistochemical localization of OPN and PAI-1 were measured in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats on a salt-fat diet (SFD SHR-SP) and in spontaneously hypertensive rats receiving N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME SHR). Plasma concentrations of OPN and PAI-1 increased significantly in SFD SHR-SP and L-NAME SHR as compared with controls, (2.5-4.5-fold for OPN and 2.0-9.0-fold for PAI-1). The plasma levels of OPN and PAI-1 were significantly correlated with the urinary excretion of albumin (p < 0.0001). Elevations in urinary albumin, plasma OPN and PAI-1 were abolished by chronic treatment (4-8 weeks) with a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB-239063AN. OPN immunoreactivity was localized predominantly in the apical portion of tubule epithelium, while PAI-1 immunoreactivity was robust in glomeruli, tubules and renal artery endothelium. Treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced OPN and PAI-1 protein expression in target organs. Kidney gene expression was increased for OPN (4.9- and 7.9-fold) and PAI-1 (2.8- and 11.5-fold) in SFD SHR-SP and L-NAME SHR, respectively. In-silico pathway analysis revealed that activation of p38 MAPK was linked to OPN and PAI-1 via SPI, c-fos and c-jun; suggesting that these pathways may play an important role in p38 MAPK-dependent hypertensive renal dysfunction. The results suggest that enhanced OPN and PAI-1 expression reflects end-organ damage in hypertension and that suppression

  3. Oxidized High-Density Lipoprotein Impairs Endothelial Progenitor Cells' Function by Activation of CD36-MAPK-TSP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianxiang; He, Zhiqing; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Feng; Ding, Ru; Ren, Yusheng; Jiang, Qijun; Fan, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events due to the protective effects on vascular wall and stem cells, which are susceptible to oxidative modifications and then lead to potential pro-atherosclerotic effects. We proposed that oxidized HDL (ox-HDL) might lead to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) dysfunction and investigated underlying mechanisms. Results: ox-HDL was shown to increase apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, but to reduce migration, angiogenesis, and cholesterol efflux of EPCs in a dose-dependent manner. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB were activated after ox-HDL stimulation, which also upregulated thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression without affecting vascular endothelial growth factor. Effects caused by ox-HDL could be significantly attenuated by pretreatment with short hairpin RNA-mediated CD36 knockdown or probucol. Data of in vivo experiments and the inverse correlation of ox-HDL and circulating EPC numbers among patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) or CAD and type 2 diabetes also supported it. Meanwhile, HDL separated from such patients could significantly increase cultured EPC's caspase 3 activity, further supporting our proposal. Innovation: This is the most complete study to date of how ox-HDL would impair EPCs function, which was involved with activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways and proved by not only the inverse relationship between ox-HDL and circulating EPCs in clinic but also pro-apoptotic effects of HDL separated from patients' serum. Conclusion: Activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways contributes to the pathological effects of ox-HDL on EPCs' dysfunction, which might be one of the potential etiological factors responsible for the disturbed neovascularization in chronic ischemic disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 308–324. PMID:25313537

  4. Differential Effects of E2 on MAPK Activity in the Brain and Heart of Aged Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shults, Cody L.; Rao, Yathindar S.; Pak, Toni R.

    2016-01-01

    Aging and the coincident loss of circulating estrogens at menopause lead to increased risks for neurological and cardiovascular pathologies. Clinical studies show that estrogen therapy (ET) can be beneficial in mitigating these negative effects, in both the brain and heart, when it is initiated shortly after the perimenopausal transition. However, this same therapy is detrimental when initiated >10 years postmenopause. Importantly, the molecular mechanisms underlying this age-related switch in ET efficacy are unknown. Estrogen receptors (ERs) mediate the neuroprotective and cardioprotective functions of estrogens by modulating gene transcription or, non-genomically, by activating second messenger signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK). These kinases are critical regulators of cell signaling pathways and have widespread downstream effects. Our hypothesis is that age and estrogen deprivation following menopause alters the expression and activation of the MAPK family members p38 and ERK in the brain and heart. To test this hypothesis, we used a surgically induced model of menopause in 18 month old rats through bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) followed by an acute dose of 17β-estradiol (E2) administered at varying time points post-OVX (1 week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, or 12 weeks). Age and E2 treatment differentially regulated kinase activity in both the brain and heart, and the effects were also brain region specific. MAPK signaling plays an integral role in aging, and the aberrant regulation of those signaling pathways might be involved in age-related disorders. Clinical studies show benefits of ET during early menopause but detrimental effects later, which might be reflective of changes in kinase expression and activation status. PMID:27487271

  5. Differential Effects of E2 on MAPK Activity in the Brain and Heart of Aged Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Pinceti, Elena; Shults, Cody L; Rao, Yathindar S; Pak, Toni R

    2016-01-01

    Aging and the coincident loss of circulating estrogens at menopause lead to increased risks for neurological and cardiovascular pathologies. Clinical studies show that estrogen therapy (ET) can be beneficial in mitigating these negative effects, in both the brain and heart, when it is initiated shortly after the perimenopausal transition. However, this same therapy is detrimental when initiated >10 years postmenopause. Importantly, the molecular mechanisms underlying this age-related switch in ET efficacy are unknown. Estrogen receptors (ERs) mediate the neuroprotective and cardioprotective functions of estrogens by modulating gene transcription or, non-genomically, by activating second messenger signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK). These kinases are critical regulators of cell signaling pathways and have widespread downstream effects. Our hypothesis is that age and estrogen deprivation following menopause alters the expression and activation of the MAPK family members p38 and ERK in the brain and heart. To test this hypothesis, we used a surgically induced model of menopause in 18 month old rats through bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) followed by an acute dose of 17β-estradiol (E2) administered at varying time points post-OVX (1 week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, or 12 weeks). Age and E2 treatment differentially regulated kinase activity in both the brain and heart, and the effects were also brain region specific. MAPK signaling plays an integral role in aging, and the aberrant regulation of those signaling pathways might be involved in age-related disorders. Clinical studies show benefits of ET during early menopause but detrimental effects later, which might be reflective of changes in kinase expression and activation status. PMID:27487271

  6. Kappa Opioid Receptor Activation of p38 MAPK Is GRK3- and Arrestin-dependent in Neurons and Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Macey, Tara A.; Lowe, Janet D.; Chavkin, Charles

    2007-01-01

    AtT-20 cells expressing the wild-type kappa opioid receptor (KOR) increased phospho-p38 MAPK following treatment with the kappa agonist U50,488. The increase was blocked by the kappa antagonist norbinaltorphimine and not evident in untransfected cells. In contrast, U50,488 treatment of AtT-20 cells expressing KOR having alanine substituted for serine-369 (KSA) did not increase phospho-p38. Phosphorylation of serine 369 in the KOR carboxyl terminus by G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) was previously shown to be required for receptor desensitization, and the results suggest that p38 MAPK activation by KOR may require arrestin recruitment. This hypothesis was tested by transfecting arrestin3-(R170E), a dominant positive form of arrestin that does not require receptor phosphorylation for activation. AtT-20 cells expressing both KSA and arrestin3-(R170E) responded to U50,488 treatment with an increase in phospho-p38 consistent with the hypothesis. Primary cultured astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive) and neurons (γ-aminobutyric acid-positive) isolated from mouse striata also responded to U50,488 by increasing phospho-p38 immunolabeling. p38 activation was not evident in either striatal astrocytes or neurons isolated from KOR knock-out mice or GRK3 knock-out mice. Astrocytes pretreated with small interfering RNA for arrestin3 were also unable to activate p38 in response to U50,488 treatment. Furthermore, in striatal neurons, the kappa-mediated phospho-p38 labeling was colocalized with arrestin3. These findings suggest that KOR may activate p38 MAPK in brain by a GRK3 and arrestin-dependent mechanism. PMID:16648139

  7. Activation of neutral-sphingomyelinase, MAPKs, and p75 NTR-mediating caffeic acid phenethyl ester–induced apoptosis in C6 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a component of propolis, is reported to possess anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-tumor activities. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of CAPE and addressed the role of p53 and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in regulating CAPE-induced apoptosis in C6 glioma cells. Results C6 cancer cell lines were exposed to doses of CAPE; DNA fragmentation and MAPKs and NGF/P75NTR levels were then determined. SMase activity and ceramide content measurement as well as western blotting analyses were performed to clarify molecular changes. The present study showed that CAPE activated neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase), which led to the ceramide-mediated activation of MAPKs, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun N-terminus kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. In addition, CAPE increased the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). The addition of an N-SMase inhibitor, GW4869, established that NGF/p75NTR was the downstream target of N-SMase/ceramide. Pretreatment with MAPK inhibitors demonstrated that MEK/ERK and JNK acted upstream and downstream, respectively, of NGF/p75NTR. Additionally, CAPE-induced caspase 3 activation and poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase cleavage were reduced by pretreatment with MAPK inhibitors, a p75NTR peptide antagonist, or GW4869. Conclusions Taken together, N-SMase activation played a pivotal role in CAPE-induced apoptosis by activation of the p38 MAPK pathway and NGF/p75NTR may explain a new role of CAPE induced apoptosis in C6 glioma. PMID:24997497

  8. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activity in response to different immune stimuli in haemocytes of the common periwinkle Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, Nadya V; Gorbushin, Alexander M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-09-01

    The modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in haemocytes of the common periwinkle (Littorina littorea) in response to immune challenges by lipopolysaccharide from Echerichia coli (LPS), mannan from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and secretory-excretory products (SEP) of trematodes Himasthla elongata (Echinostomatidae) or after the treatment with phorbol ester (PMA) has been studied by Western blotting using affinity purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Exposure of the cells in suspension to PMA, LPS and mannan triggered an activation of p38 and ERK2. The JNK-mediated cascade was modulated differently by the elicitors examined. PMA treatment caused a transient activation of the JNK54 isoform, LPS exposure resulted in a decrease in activity of JNK46, and mannan had no effect on JNK phosphorylation status. Incubation of periwinkle haemocytes in culture medium containing trematode SEP did not affect the activity of any MAPK. PMID:16533608

  9. Distinct docking mechanisms mediate interactions between the Msg5 phosphatase and mating or cell integrity mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Lorena; Dickinson, Robin J; Sacristán-Reviriego, Almudena; Didmon, Mark P; Marín, María José; Martín, Humberto; Keyse, Stephen M; Molina, María

    2011-12-01

    MAPK phosphatases (MKPs) are negative regulators of signaling pathways with distinct MAPK substrate specificities. For example, the yeast dual specificity phosphatase Msg5 dephosphorylates the Fus3 and Slt2 MAPKs operating in the mating and cell wall integrity pathways, respectively. Like other MAPK-interacting proteins, most MKPs bind MAPKs through specific docking domains. These include D-motifs, which contain basic residues that interact with acidic residues in the common docking (CD) domain of MAPKs. Here we show that Msg5 interacts not only with Fus3, Kss1, and Slt2 but also with the pseudokinase Slt2 paralog Mlp1. Using yeast two-hybrid and in vitro interaction assays, we have identified distinct regions within the N-terminal domain of Msg5 that differentially bind either the MAPKs Fus3 and Kss1 or Slt2 and Mlp1. Whereas a canonical D-site within Msg5 mediates interaction with the CD domains of Fus3 and Kss1, a novel motif ((102)IYT(104)) within Msg5 is involved in binding to Slt2 and Mlp1. Furthermore, mutation of this site prevents the phosphorylation of Msg5 by Slt2. This motif is conserved in Sdp1, another MKP that dephosphorylates Slt2, as well as in Msg5 orthologs from other yeast species. A region spanning amino acids 274-373 within Slt2 and Mlp1 mediates binding to this Msg5 motif in a CD domain-independent manner. In contrast, Slt2 uses its CD domain to bind to its upstream activator Mkk1. This binding flexibility may allow MAPK pathways to exploit additional regulatory controls in order to provide fine modulation of both pathway activity and specificity. PMID:22006927

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-mediated upregulation of hepatic microRNA-181 family promotes cancer cell migration by targeting MAPK phosphatase-5, regulating the activation of p38 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Park, Yong-Keun; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2013-11-15

    Growing evidence indicates that changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression in cancer induced by chemical carcinogens play an important role in cancer development and progression by regulating related genes. However, the mechanisms underlying miRNA involvement in hepatocarcinogenesis induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remain unclear. Thus, the identification of aberrant miRNA expression during PAH-induced cancer cell migration will lead to a better understanding of the substantial role of miRNAs in cancer progression. In the present study, miRNA expression profiling showed significant upregulation of miR-181a, -181b, and -181d in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 line) exposed to benzo[a]anthracene (BA) and benzo[k]fluoranthene (BF). MAPK phosphatase-5 (MKP-5), a validated miR-181 target that deactivates MAPKs, was markedly suppressed while phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was increased after BA and BF exposure. The migration of HepG2 cells, observed using the scratch wound-healing assay, also increased in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of miR-181 family members by miRNA inhibitors enhanced the expression of MKP-5 and suppressed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Furthermore, the depletion of the miR-181 family inhibited cancer cell migration. Based on these results, we conclude that the miR-181 family plays a critical role in PAH-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by targeting MKP-5, resulting in the regulation of p38 MAPK activation. - Highlights: • We found significant upregulation of miR-181 family in HCC exposed to BA and BF. • We identified the MKP-5 as a putative target of miR-181 family. • MKP-5 was suppressed while p-P38 was increased after BA and BF exposure. • The migration of HepG2 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner.

  11. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M.

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  12. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions.

  13. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  14. Functions of AP1 (Fos/Jun) in bone development.

    PubMed

    Wagner, E F

    2002-11-01

    Genetically modified mice and cells have provided important insights into the biological functions of the dimeric transcription factor complex AP1, in particular into its role in skeletal development. Data obtained from knockout mice revealed that some components, such as c-Fos are key regulators of bone cell differentiation, whereas others, like c-Jun, JunB and Fra-1 are essential in embryonic and/or postnatal development. Apart from identifying the specific roles of AP1 proteins in developmental processes, researchers are beginning to obtain a better molecular understanding of their cell-context dependent functions, their downstream target genes and how they regulate bone cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

  15. Canonical and alternative MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, Genaro; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-11-01

    The archetype of MAPK cascade activation is somewhat challenged by the most recent discovery of unexpected phosphorylation patterns, alternative activation mechanisms and sub-cellular localization, in various members of this protein kinase family. In particular, activation by autophosphorylation pathways has now been described for the three best understood MAPK subgroups: ERK1/2; JNK1/2 and p38 alpha/beta. Also, a form of dosage compensation between homologs has been shown to occur in the case of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. In this paper we summarize the MAPK activation pathway, with an emphasis on non-canonical examples. We use this information to propose a model for MAPK signal transduction that considers a cross-talk between MAPKs with different activation loop sequence motifs and unique C-terminal extensions. We highlight the occurrence of non-canonical substrate specificity during MAPK auto-activation, in strong connection with MAPK homo- and hetero-dimerization events.

  16. Dynamic Regulation of AP-1 Transcriptional Complexes Directs Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Lindsey N.; Rumi, M. A. Karim; Roby, Katherine F.

    2015-01-01

    Placentation is a process that establishes the maternal-fetal interface and is required for successful pregnancy. The epithelial component of the placenta consists of trophoblast cells, which possess the capacity for multilineage differentiation and are responsible for placenta-specific functions. FOS-like antigen 1 (FOSL1), a component of AP-1 transcription factor complexes, contributes to the regulation of placental development. FOSL1 expression is restricted to trophoblast giant cells and invasive trophoblast cells. In the present study, we characterized the FOSL1 regulatory pathway in rat trophoblast cells. Transcriptome profiling in control and FOSL1 knockdown cells identified FOSL1-dependent gene sets linked to endocrine and invasive functions. FOSL1 was shown to occupy AP-1 binding sites within these gene loci, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Complementary in vivo experiments using trophoblast-specific lentiviral delivery of FOSL1 short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) provided in vivo validation of FOSL1 targets. FOSL1 actions require a dimerization partner. Coimmunoprecipitation, coimmunolocalization, and ChIP analyses showed that FOSL1 interacts with JUNB and, to a lesser extent, JUN in differentiating trophoblast cells. Knockdown of FOSL1 and JUNB expression inhibited both endocrine and invasive properties of trophoblast cells. In summary, FOSL1 recruits JUNB to form AP-1 transcriptional complexes that specifically regulate the endocrine and invasive trophoblast phenotypes. PMID:26149388

  17. Requirement of ERα and basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase in Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiulong Wei, Zhengxi; Shaikh, Zahir A.

    2015-08-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental toxicant and an established carcinogen. Epidemiological studies implicate Cd with human breast cancer. Low micromolar concentrations of Cd promote proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The growth promotion of breast cancer cells is associated with the activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. This study explores the mechanism of Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. Specifically, the role of cell surface receptors ERα, EGFR, and Src kinase was evaluated in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells treated with 1–3 μM Cd. The activation of ERK was studied using a serum response element (SRE) luciferase reporter assay. Receptor phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analyses. Cd treatment increased both the SRE reporter activity and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. Cd treatment had no effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, blocking the entry of Cd into the cells with manganese did not diminish Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK. These results suggest that the effect of Cd was likely not caused by intracellular ROS generation, but through interaction with the membrane receptors. While Cd did not appear to activate either EGFR or Src kinase, their inhibition completely blocked the Cd-induced activation of ERK as well as cell proliferation. Similarly, silencing ERα with siRNA or use of ERα antagonist blocked the effects of Cd. Based on these results, it is concluded that not only ERα, but also basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase are essential for Cd-induced signal transduction and activation of MAPK/ERK pathway for breast cancer cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Low micromolar concentrations of Cd rapidly activate ERK1/2 in MCF-7 cells. • Signal transduction and resulting cell proliferation require EGFR, ERα, and Src. • These findings implicate Cd in promotion of breast cancer.

  18. Formin-induced actin cables are required for polarized recruitment of the Ste5 scaffold and high level activation of MAPK Fus3.

    PubMed

    Qi, Maosong; Elion, Elaine A

    2005-07-01

    Little is known about how a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is targeted to specific sites at the plasma membrane during receptor stimulation. In budding yeast, the Ste5 scaffold is recruited to a receptor-coupled G protein during mating pheromone stimulation, allowing the tethered MAPK cascade to be activated by Ste20, a Cdc42-anchored kinase. Here we show that stable recruitment of Ste5 at cortical sites requires the formin Bni1, Bni1-induced actin cables, Rho1 and Myo2. Rho1 directs recruitment of Bni1 via the Rho-binding domain, and Bni1 mediates localization of Ste5 through actin cables and Myo2, which co-immunoprecipitates with Ste5 during receptor stimulation. Bni1 is also required for polarized recruitment and full activation of MAPK Fus3, which must bind Ste5 to be activated, and polarized recruitment of Cdc24, the guanine exchange factor that binds Ste5 and promotes its recruitment to the G protein. In contrast, Bni1 is not important for activation of MAPK Kss1, which can be activated while not bound to Ste5 and does not accumulate at cortical sites. These findings reveal that Bni1 mediates the formation of a Ste5 scaffold/Fus3 MAPK signaling complex at polarized sites, and suggests that a pool of Ste5 may translocate along formin-induced actin cables to the cell cortex. PMID:15961405

  19. An essential role for the intra-oocyte MAPK activity in the NSN-to-SN transition of germinal vesicle chromatin configuration in porcine oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-Ju; Zhu, Shuai; Li, You-Wei; Lin, Juan; Gong, Shuai; Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Chen, Fei; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms for the transition from non-surrounded nucleolus (NSN) to surrounded nucleolus (SN) chromatin configuration during oocyte growth/maturation are unclear. By manipulating enzyme activities and measuring important molecules using small-follicle pig oocytes with a high proportion of NSN configuration and an extended germinal vesicle stage in vitro, this study has the first time up-to-date established the essential role for intra-oocyte mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the NSN-to-SN transition. Within the oocyte in 1–2 mm follicles, a cAMP decline activates MAPK, which prevents the NSN-to-SN transition by activating nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) while inhibiting histone deacetylase (HDAC). In cumulus cells of 1–2 mm follicles, a lower level of estradiol and oocyte-derived paracrine factor (ODPF) reduces natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) while enhancing FSH and cAMP actions. FSH elevates cAMP levels, which decreases NPR2 while activating MAPK. MAPK closes the gap junctions, which, together with the NPR2 decrease, reduces cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) delivery leading to the cAMP decline within oocytes. In 3–6 mm follicles, a higher level of estradiol and ODPF and a FSH shortage initiate a reversion of the above events leading to MAPK inactivation and NSN-to-SN transition within oocytes. PMID:27009903

  20. Pterostilbene Is Equally Potent as Resveratrol in Inhibiting 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate Activated NFkappaB, AP-1, COX-2 and iNOS in Mouse Epidermis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in grapes, has been reported to inhibit multistage mouse skin carcinogenesis. Recent studies showed that topically applied resveratrol significantly inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) induced by tumor promoter...

  1. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitor represses cytokine-induced activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway in embryonic neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Kazuo; Taga, Tetsuya

    2005-09-01

    Neuronal and glial cells in the central nervous system are generated from common neural precursor cells during development. To evaluate the functions of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in neural precursor cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) were prepared from mouse embryos (E14.5), and the effects of an inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthesis, D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP), on NECs was investigated. In PDMP-treated NECs, the expression of GD3, a major ganglioside of NECs, disappeared. We found that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation were repressed in PDMP-treated NECs. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-induced ERK activation was also abolished in PDMP-treated NECs, suggesting that PDMP specifically represses the Ras-MAPK pathway. bFGF-induced activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway in NECs is dependent on GSL-enriched microdomains, lipid rafts. The organization of lipid rafts and the distribution of Ras and Grb2-SOS in the microdomains were not affected. However, Ras activation was repressed in PDMP-treated NECs. In PDMP-treated NECs, some neuronal genes were up-regulated and glial genes were down-regulated. These results suggest that GSLs might be involved in the proliferation, survival, signal transduction and differentiation of NECs.

  2. Hepatitis C virus core+1/ARF protein decreases hepcidin transcription through an AP1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Vassilaki, Niki; Pissas, George; Kakkanas, Athanassios; Bakiri, Latifa; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Mavromara, Penelope

    2013-07-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis C is characterized by iron accumulation in the liver, and hepcidin regulates iron absorption. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core+1/ARFP is a novel protein produced by a second functional ORF within the core gene. Here, using reporter assays and HCV bicistronic replicons, we show that, similarly to core, core+1/ARFP decreases hepcidin expression in hepatoma cells. The activator protein 1 (AP1) binding site of the human hepcidin promoter, shown here to be relevant to basal promoter activity and to the repression by core, is essential for the downregulation by core+1/ARFP while the previously described C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) sites are not. Consistently, expression of the AP1 components c-jun and c-fos obliterated the repressive effect of core and core+1/ARFP. In conclusion, we provide evidence that core+1/ARFP downregulates AP1-mediated transcription, providing new insights into the biological role of core+1/ARFP, as well as the transcriptional modulation of hepcidin, the main regulator of iron metabolism. PMID:23580428

  3. TNF-α-induced depressive-like phenotype and p38(MAPK) activation are abolished by ascorbic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Morgana; Budni, Josiane; Freitas, Andiara Espíndola; Neis, Vivian Binder; Ribeiro, Camille Mertins; de Oliveira Balen, Grasiela; Rieger, Débora Kurrle; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on depressive-like behavior induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in mice. Additionally, we examined the effects of combined administration of ascorbic acid and antidepressants, MK-801 and 7-nitroindazole in mice exposed or not to TNF-α and the capacity of TNF-α and ascorbic acid to modulate hippocampal and cerebrocortical phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38(MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In control animals, ascorbic acid reduced the immobility time in the tail suspension test (TST). Unilateral intracerebroventricular administration of TNF-α produced a depressive-like behavior in the TST, and the treatment with ascorbic acid prevented this effect. Sub-effective dose of ascorbic acid combined with sub-effective doses of fluoxetine, imipramine, bupropion, MK-801 or 7-nitroindazole produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in mice exposed or not to TNF-α. No treatment caused significant alterations in the locomotor activity of mice. Administration of TNF-α increased the phosphorylation of p38(MAPK) in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, and the treatment with ascorbic acid prevented this effect. Ascorbic acid increased phosphorylation of ERK1 in the hippocampus of saline- and TNF-α-treated animals, however it did not produce alterations in the cerebral cortex. No effects on phosphorylation of ERK2 or JNK were found. The observed effect of ascorbic acid seems to be associated, at least partially, with a reduced p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, activation of the monoaminergic systems as well as inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis.

  4. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade controls phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Di Sanza, Cristina; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Eramo, Adriana; Desideri, Marianna; Biagioni, Francesca; Passeri, Daniela; Falcone, Italia; Sette, Giovanni; Bergamo, Paola; Anichini, Andrea; Sabapathy, Kanaga; McCubrey, James A; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Tafuri, Agostino; Blandino, Giovanni; Orlandi, Augusto; De Maria, Ruggero; Cognetti, Francesco; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K pathways are regulated by extensive crosstalk, occurring at different levels. In tumors, transactivation of the alternate pathway is a frequent "escape" mechanism, suggesting that combined inhibition of both pathways may achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Here we show that, in the M14 melanoma model, simultaneous inhibition of both MEK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) achieves synergistic effects at suboptimal concentrations, but becomes frankly antagonistic in the presence of relatively high concentrations of MEK inhibitors. This observation led to the identification of a novel crosstalk mechanism, by which either pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of constitutive MEK signaling restores phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibits downstream signaling through AKT and mTOR, thus bypassing the need for double pathway blockade. This appears to be a general regulatory mechanism and is mediated by multiple mechanisms, such as MAPK-dependent c-Jun and miR-25 regulation. Finally, PTEN upregulation appears to be a major effector of MEK inhibitors' antitumor activity, as cancer cells in which PTEN is inactivated are consistently more resistant to the growth inhibitory and anti-angiogenic effects of MEK blockade. PMID:22215152

  5. A novel cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor in Aplysia facilitates growth, MAPK activation, and long-term synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Pu, Lu; Kopec, Ashley M; Boyle, Heather D; Carew, Thomas J

    2014-04-01

    Neurotrophins are critically involved in developmental processes such as neuronal cell survival, growth, and differentiation, as well as in adult synaptic plasticity contributing to learning and memory. Our previous studies examining neurotrophins and memory formation in Aplysia showed that a TrkB ligand is required for MAPK activation, long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF), and long-term memory (LTM) for sensitization. These studies indicate that neurotrophin-like molecules in Aplysia can act as key elements in a functionally conserved TrkB signaling pathway. Here we report that we have cloned and characterized a novel neurotrophic factor, Aplysia cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor (apCRNF), which shares classical structural and functional characteristics with mammalian neurotrophins. We show that apCRNF (1) is highly enriched in the CNS, (2) enhances neurite elongation and branching, (3) interacts with mammalian TrkB and p75(NTR), (4) is released from Aplysia CNS in an activity-dependent fashion, (5) facilitates MAPK activation in a tyrosine kinase dependent manner in response to sensitizing stimuli, and (6) facilitates the induction of LTF. These results show that apCRNF is a native neurotrophic factor in Aplysia that can engage the molecular and synaptic mechanisms underlying memory formation.

  6. AP-1-mediated invasion requires increased expression of the hyaluronan receptor CD44.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, R F; Hennigan, R F; Turnbull, K; Katsanakis, K D; MacKenzie, E D; Birnie, G D; Ozanne, B W

    1997-01-01

    Fibroblasts transformed by Fos oncogenes display increased expression of a number of genes implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In contrast to normal 208F rat fibroblasts, Fos-transformed 208F fibroblasts are growth factor independent for invasion. We demonstrate that invasion of v-Fos- or epidermal growth factor (EGF)-transformed cells requires AP-1 activity. v-Fos-transformed cell invasion is inhibited by c-jun antisense oligonucleotides and by expression of a c-jun dominant negative mutant, TAM-67. EGF-induced invasion is inhibited by both c-fos and c-jun antisense oligonucleotides. CD44s, the standard form of a transmembrane receptor for hyaluronan, is implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. We demonstrate that increased expression of CD44 in Fos- and EGF-transformed cells is dependent upon AP-1. CD44 antisense oligonucleotides reduce expression of CD44 in v-Fos- or EGF-transformed cells and inhibit invasion but not migration. Expression of a fusion protein between human CD44s and Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) in 208F cells complements the inhibition of invasion by the rat-specific CD44 antisense oligonucleotide. We further show that both v-Fos and EGF transformations result in a concentration of endogenous CD44 or exogenous CD44-GFP at the ends of pseudopodial cell extensions. These results support the hypothesis that one role of AP-1 in transformation is to activate a multigenic invasion program. PMID:9001250

  7. Influence of aging and caloric restriction on activation of Ras/MAPK, calcineurin, and CaMK-IV activities in rat T cells.

    PubMed

    Pahlavani, M A; Vargas, D M

    2000-02-01

    The signaling cascade mediated by Ras (p21ras) and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and calcium/calmodulin regulating enzymes, calcineurin (CaN) and CaMK-IV, are considered to be essential for T-cell growth and function. In the present study, the effect of aging and caloric restriction (CR) on the induction of Ras and MAPK activation by concanavalin A (ConA) was studied. Splenic T cells were isolated from young (4-6 months) and old (22-24 months) rats that had free access to food (control group), and from caloric restricted old (22-24 months) rats that beginning at 6 weeks of age were fed 60%(40% caloric restriction) of the diet consumed by the control rats. We found that the induction of Ras activity in T cells isolated from control old rats was lower (P<0.001) than that in control young rats. However, the levels of Ras activity in T cells isolated from CR old rats were similar to the levels in the age-matched control rats. The induction of MAPK activity in T cells isolated from control old rats and CR old rats was significantly less than in T cells isolated from control young rats, and caloric restriction significantly (P<0.05) reduced the age-related decline in MAPK activation. We also measured the induction of CaN and CaMK-IV activities by ConA in T cells from control young and old and CR old rats. The induction of both CaN and CaMK-IV activity decreased with age. Caloric restriction significantly (P<0.05) reduced the age-related decline in CaN activity, but had no significant effect on CaMK-IV activity. The changes in Ras/MAPK activation and in CaN and CaMK-IV activity with age or with CR were not associated with alterations in their corresponding protein levels. Thus, caloric restriction has a differential effect on the activation of the upstream signaling molecules that are altered with age.

  8. Registered report: RAF inhibitors prime wild-type RAF to activate the MAPK pathway and enhance growth.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Ajay; Pelech, Steven; Woodard, Ben; Kerwin, John; Maherali, Nimet

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'RAF inhibitors prime wild-type RAF to activate the MAPK pathway and enhance growth' by Hatzivassiliou and colleagues, published in Nature in 2010 (Hatzivassiliou et al., 2010). Hatzivassiliou and colleagues examined the paradoxical response of RAF-WT tumors to treatment with RAF inhibitors. The key experiments being replicated include Figure 1A, in which the original authors demonstrated that treatment of a subset of BRAF(WT) tumor cell lines with RAF small molecule inhibitors resulted in an increase in cell viability, Figure 2B, which reported that RAF inhibitor activation of the MAPK pathway was dependent on CRAF but not BRAF, and Figure 4A, where the dimerization of BRAF and CRAF was modulated by the RAF inhibitor PLX4720, but not GDC-0879. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife.

  9. Registered report: RAF inhibitors prime wild-type RAF to activate the MAPK pathway and enhance growth

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Ajay; Pelech, Steven; Woodard, Ben; Kerwin, John; Maherali, Nimet

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'RAF inhibitors prime wild-type RAF to activate the MAPK pathway and enhance growth' by Hatzivassiliou and colleagues, published in Nature in 2010 (Hatzivassiliou et al., 2010). Hatzivassiliou and colleagues examined the paradoxical response of RAF-WT tumors to treatment with RAF inhibitors. The key experiments being replicated include Figure 1A, in which the original authors demonstrated that treatment of a subset of BRAFWT tumor cell lines with RAF small molecule inhibitors resulted in an increase in cell viability, Figure 2B, which reported that RAF inhibitor activation of the MAPK pathway was dependent on CRAF but not BRAF, and Figure 4A, where the dimerization of BRAF and CRAF was modulated by the RAF inhibitor PLX4720, but not GDC-0879. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09976.001 PMID:26882073

  10. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles stimulate sea urchin immune cell phagocytic activity involving TLR/p38 MAPK-mediated signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pinsino, Annalisa; Russo, Roberta; Bonaventura, Rosa; Brunelli, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-09-28

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are one of the most widespread-engineered particles in use for drug delivery, cosmetics, and electronics. However, TiO2NP safety is still an open issue, even for ethical reasons. In this work, we investigated the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immune cell model as a proxy to humans, to elucidate a potential pathway that can be involved in the persistent TiO2NP-immune cell interaction in vivo. Morphology, phagocytic ability, changes in activation/inactivation of a few mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK, ERK), variations of other key proteins triggering immune response (Toll-like receptor 4-like, Heat shock protein 70, Interleukin-6) and modifications in the expression of related immune response genes were investigated. Our findings indicate that TiO2NPs influence the signal transduction downstream targets of p38 MAPK without eliciting an inflammatory response or other harmful effects on biological functions. We strongly recommend sea urchin immune cells as a new powerful model for nano-safety/nano-toxicity investigations without the ethical normative issue.

  11. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles stimulate sea urchin immune cell phagocytic activity involving TLR/p38 MAPK-mediated signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pinsino, Annalisa; Russo, Roberta; Bonaventura, Rosa; Brunelli, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are one of the most widespread-engineered particles in use for drug delivery, cosmetics, and electronics. However, TiO2NP safety is still an open issue, even for ethical reasons. In this work, we investigated the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immune cell model as a proxy to humans, to elucidate a potential pathway that can be involved in the persistent TiO2NP-immune cell interaction in vivo. Morphology, phagocytic ability, changes in activation/inactivation of a few mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK, ERK), variations of other key proteins triggering immune response (Toll-like receptor 4-like, Heat shock protein 70, Interleukin-6) and modifications in the expression of related immune response genes were investigated. Our findings indicate that TiO2NPs influence the signal transduction downstream targets of p38 MAPK without eliciting an inflammatory response or other harmful effects on biological functions. We strongly recommend sea urchin immune cells as a new powerful model for nano-safety/nano-toxicity investigations without the ethical normative issue. PMID:26412401

  12. MAPK pathway activation leads to Bim loss and histone deacetylase inhibitor resistance: rationale to combine romidepsin with an MEK inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arup R; Robey, Robert W; Luchenko, Victoria L; Zhan, Zhirong; Piekarz, Richard L; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Wilkerson, Julia; Showe, Louise C; Gottesman, Michael M; Collie, Nathan L; Bates, Susan E

    2013-05-16

    To identify molecular determinants of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) resistance, we selected HuT78 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cells with romidepsin in the presence of P-glycoprotein inhibitors to prevent transporter upregulation. Resistant sublines were 250- to 385-fold resistant to romidepsin and were resistant to apoptosis induced by apicidin, entinostat, panobinostat, belinostat, and vorinostat. A custom TaqMan array identified increased insulin receptor (INSR) gene expression; immunoblot analysis confirmed increased protein expression and a four- to eightfold increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) phosphorylation in resistant cells compared with parental cells. Resistant cells were exquisitely sensitive to MEK inhibitors, and apoptosis correlated with restoration of proapoptotic Bim. Romidepsin combined with MEK inhibitors yielded greater apoptosis in cells expressing mutant KRAS compared with romidepsin treatment alone. Gene expression analysis of samples obtained from patients with CTCL enrolled on the NCI1312 phase 2 study of romidepsin in T-cell lymphoma suggested perturbation of the MAPK pathway by romidepsin. Immunohistochemical analysis of Bim expression demonstrated decreased expression in some skin biopsies at disease progression. These findings implicate increased activation of MEK and decreased Bim expression as a resistance mechanism to HDIs, supporting combination of romidepsin with MEK inhibitors in clinical trials.

  13. Energy expenditure and bone formation share a common sensitivity to AP-1 transcription in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Glenn C; Vialou, Vincent; Sato, Kazusa; Saito, Hiroaki; Yin, Min; Green, Thomas A; Lotinun, Sutada; Kveiborg, Marie; Horne, William C; Nestler, Eric J; Baron, Roland

    2012-08-01

    The regulation of bone and fat homeostasis and its relationship to energy expenditure has recently been the focus of increased attention because of its potential relevance to osteoporosis, obesity, and diabetes. Although central effectors within the hypothalamus have been shown to contribute to the regulation of both energy balance and bone homeostasis, little is known of the underlying mechanisms, including the possible involvement of transcriptional factors within the hypothalamus. Transgenic mice overexpressing ΔFosB, a splice variant of the AP-1 transcription factor FosB with mixed agonist-antagonistic properties, have increased energy expenditure and bone mass. Because these mice express ΔFosB in bone, fat, and hypothalamus, we sought to determine 1) whether overexpression of ΔFosB within the hypothalamus was sufficient to regulate energy expenditure and whether it would also regulate bone mass, and 2) whether these effects were the result of antagonism to AP-1. Our results show that stereotactic injection of an adeno-associated virus vector to restrict overexpression of ΔFosB to the ventral hypothalamus of wild-type mice induced a profound increase in both energy expenditure and bone formation and bone mass. This effect was phenocopied, at an even stronger level, by overexpression of a dominant-negative DNJunD, a pure AP-1 antagonist. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of AP-1 activity in the hypothalamus profoundly increases energy expenditure and bone formation, leading to both a decrease in adipose mass and an increase in bone mass. These findings may have physiological implications because ΔFosB is expressed and regulated in the hypothalamus.

  14. DNA conformation driven by AP-1 triggers cell-specific expression via a strong epithelial enhancer.

    PubMed

    Virolle, T; Djabari, Z; Ortonne, J P; Aberdam, D

    2000-10-01

    We report here the characterization of the regulatory region of the human LAMA3 gene, coding for the alpha3A chain of laminin-5. A 202 bp fragment is sufficient to confer epithelial-specific expression to a thymidine kinase promoter through the cooperative effect of three AP-1 binding sites. Remarkably, removal of the sequences located between the AP-1 sites does not modify the promoter activity in keratinocytes but allows strong expression in fibroblasts. Replacement of the deleted sequences by non-homologous ones fully restores the restricted enhancement in keratinocytes. Functional analysis and mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that a minimal distance between the AP-1 sites is required for the enhancer DNA fragment to adopt a particular conformation driven by the binding of Jun-Fos heterodimers. In non-permissive cells, this conformation leads to the anchorage of non-DNA-binding fibroblastic cofactors to form an inhibitory ternary complex. Therefore, our results describe for the first time an unusual conformation-dependent epithelial-specific enhancer. PMID:11269498

  15. Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFκB and AP1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cinnamomum cassia bark is the outer skin of an evergreen tall tree belonging to the family Lauraceae containing several active components such as essential oils (cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehyde), tannin, mucus and carbohydrate. They have various biological functions including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic and anti-tumor activity. Previously, we have reported that anti-cancer effect of cinnamon extracts is associated with modulation of angiogenesis and effector function of CD8+ T cells. In this study, we further identified that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is also link with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity by inhibiting the activities NFκB and AP1 in mouse melanoma model. Methods Water soluble cinnamon extract was obtained and quality of cinnamon extract was evaluated by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) analysis. In this study, we tested anti-tumor activity and elucidated action mechanism of cinnamon extract using various types of tumor cell lines including lymphoma, melanoma, cervix cancer and colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Results Cinnamon extract strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induced active cell death of tumor cells by up-regulating pro-apoptotic molecules while inhibiting NFκB and AP1 activity and their target genes such as Bcl-2, BcL-xL and survivin. Oral administration of cinnamon extract in melanoma transplantation model significantly inhibited tumor growth with the same mechanism of action observed in vitro. Conclusion Our study suggests that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is directly linked with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity and inhibition of NFκB and AP1 activities and their target genes in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Hence, further elucidation of active components of cinnamon extract could lead to development of potent anti-tumor agent or complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of

  16. Eupafolin inhibits PGE2 production and COX2 expression in LPS-stimulated human dermal fibroblasts by blocking JNK/AP-1 and Nox2/p47{sup phox} pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ming-Horng; Liang, Chan-Jung; Yen, Feng-Lin; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Lee, Chiang-Wen

    2014-09-01

    Eupafolin, a major active component found in the methanol extracts of Phyla nodiflora, has been used to treat inflammation of skin. We examined its effects on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in LPS-treated human dermal fibroblasts. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) significantly increased prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) production associated with increased COX-2 expression in Hs68 cells. This effect was blocked by eupafolin, TLR-4 antibody, antioxidants (APO and NAC), as well as inhibitors, including U0126 (ERK1/2), SB202190 (p38), SP600125 (JNK1/2), and Tanshinone IIA (AP-1). In gene regulation level, qPCR and promoter assays revealed that COX-2 expression was attenuated by eupafolin. In addition, eupafolin also ameliorated LPS-induced p47 phox activation and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity. Moreover, pretreatment with eupafolin and APO led to reduced LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Further, eupafolin attenuated LPS-induced increase in AP-1 transcription factor binding activity as well as the increase in the phosphorylation of c-Jun and c-Fos. In vivo studies have shown that in dermal fibroblasts of LPS treated mice, eupafolin exerted anti-inflammation effects by decreasing COX-2 protein levels. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of eupafolin that involved inhibition of LPS-induced ROS generation, suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, diminished DNA binding activity of AP-1 and attenuated COX-2 expression leading to reduced production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Our results demonstrate that eupafolin may be used to treat inflammatory responses associated with dermatologic diseases. - Highlights: • LPS activates the Nox2/p47{sup phox}/JNK/AP-1 and induces COX2 expression in Hs68 cells. • Eupafolin inhibits LPS-induced COX-2 expression via Nox2/p47{sup phox} inhibition. • Eupafolin may be used in the treatment of skin diseases involving inflammation.

  17. Antioxidant effect of imperatorin from Angelica dahurica in hypertension via inhibiting NADPH oxidase activation and MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanjun; Zhang, Yanmin; Wang, Nan; He, Langchong

    2014-08-01

    Imperatorin (IMP) is an active furocoumarin in the traditional Chinese medicine Angelica dahurica and has been demonstrated to have vasodilatory activity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of IMP on blood pressure (BP) and antioxidant effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and human embryonic kidney 293 cells. SHR were administered IMP (6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg/d) or tempol (18 mg/kg/d) daily by gavage for 12 weeks. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, proteinuria levels, and superoxide dismutase activity were evaluated with commercial kits. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits of the renal cortical tissues were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Twenty-four hour urinary 8-Iso-prostaglandin F2α was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Systolic BP and diastolic BP were significantly reduced by treatment with IMP (6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg/d) in SHR. Meanwhile, we found that renal cortical superoxide dismutase activities were significantly increased in IMP-treated groups. Renal cortical and urinary thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances' levels, the 24-hour urinary excretion of 8-Iso-prostaglandin F2α, and proteinuria in the IMP-treated group, were lower than SHR group. After that, we found the messenger RNA expressions and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits were markedly reduced after IMP treated in SHR. IMP also reduced the phosphorylation of protein kinase B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in renal cortical in SHR. In addition, H2O2-induced ROS production in human embryonic kidney 293 cells was markedly attenuated by IMP. H2O2-induced activation of MAPK, protein kinase B, and expression of NADPH oxidase were also attenuated by pretreatment of IMP. In summary, IMP showed antihypertensive effect via prevention of renal injury not only by reducing NADPH

  18. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK)-mediated autoimmunity: lessons to learn from ANCA vasculitis and pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, Athanasios; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Liaskos, Christos; Smyk, Daniel S; Billinis, Charalambos; Blank, Miri; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2013-03-01

    Evidence is beginning to accumulate that p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway plays an important role in the regulation of cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. The exact mechanisms and the degree by which the p38 MAPK pathway participates in the immune-mediated induction of diseases have started to emerge. This review discusses the recent advances in the molecular dissection of the p38 MAPK pathway and the findings generated by reports investigating its role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune hepatitis. Application of newly-developed protocols based on sensitive flow cytometric detection has proven to be a useful tool in the investigation of the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK within different peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations and may help us to better understand the enigmatic role of this signaling cascade in the induction of autoimmunity as well as its role in immunosuppressive-induced remission. Special attention is paid to reported data proposing a specific role for autoantibody-induced activation of p38 MAPK-mediated immunopathology in the pathogenesis of autoimmune blistering diseases and anti-neutrophilic antibody-mediated vasculitides.

  19. MALAT1 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of gallbladder cancer cells by activating the ERK/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Song; Wang, Xu-An; Wu, Wen-Guang; Hu, Yun-Ping; Li, Mao-Lan; Ding, Qian; Weng, Hao; Shu, Yi-Jun; Liu, Tian-Yu; Jiang, Lin; Cao, Yang; Bao, Run-Fa; Mu, Jia-Sheng; Tan, Zhu-Jun; Tao, Feng; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), is associated with metastasis and is an independent prognostic factor for lung cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that MALAT1 plays an important role in other malignancies. However, little is known about the role of MALAT1 in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), which is the most common cancer of the biliary tract and has an extremely poor prognosis. In this study, we focused on the expression, biological functions and mechanism of MALAT1 in GBC and found that MALAT1 was significantly upregulated in GBC tissues compared with corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Knockdown of MALAT1 in GBC cell lines using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference significantly inhibited the proliferation and metastasis of the GBC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, ERK/MAPK pathway was found to be inactivated in the GBC cell lines after MALAT1 knockdown. These results indicated that MALAT1 might serve as an oncogenic lncRNA that promotes proliferation and metastasis of GBC and activates the ERK/MAPK pathway.

  20. Tumor suppressor gene ING3 induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of AMPK and activation of p38 MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhiping; Feng, Xiaojun; Gao, Si; Xu, Suowen; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-11-15

    Cardiac hypertrophy, an adaptive growth process that occurs in response to various pathophysiological stimuli, constitutes an important risk factor for the development of heart failure. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate this cardiac growth response are not completely understood. Here we revealed that ING3 (inhibitor of growth family, member 3), a type II tumor suppressor, plays a critical role in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy. ING3 expression was present in relatively high abundance in the heart, and was prominently upregulated in hypertrophic agonists angiotensin II (Ang II), phenylephrine (PE), or isoproterenol (ISO)-stimulated cardiomyocytes and in hearts of rat undergoing abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) surgery. In cardiomyocytes, overexpression of ING3 caused an increase in ANP, BNP and β-MHC mRNA levels and cell surface area, while depletion of ING3 attenuated PE-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Mechanistically, we have demonstrated that overexpression of ING3 could inactivate the AMPK and activate the canonical p38 MAPK signaling. Remarkably, AMPK agonist AICAR or p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 abrogated ING3-induced hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes. In summary, our data disclose a novel role of ING3 as an inducer of pathological cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that silencing of ING3 may be explored as a potential therapeutic target in preventing cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. The Chromone Alkaloid, Rohitukine, Affords Anti-Cancer Activity via Modulating Apoptosis Pathways in A549 Cell Line and Yeast Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Safia; Kamil, Mohd; Jadiya, Pooja; Sheikh, Saba; Haque, Ejazul; Nazir, Aamir; Lakshmi, Vijai; Mir, Snober S.

    2015-01-01

    The field of cancer research and treatment has made significant progress, yet we are far from having completely safe, efficient and specific therapies that target cancer cells and spare the healthy tissues. Natural compounds may reduce the problems related to cancer treatment. Currently, many plant products are being used to treat cancer. In this study, Rohitukine, a natural occurring chromone alkaloid extracted from Dysoxylum binectariferum, was investigated for cytotoxic properties against budding yeast as well as against lung cancer (A549) cells. We endeavored to specifically study Rohitukine in S. cerevisiae in the context of MAPK pathways as yeast probably represents the experimental model where the organization and regulation of MAPK pathways are best understood. MAPK are evolutionarily conserved protein kinases that transfer extracellular signals to the machinery controlling essential cellular processes like growth, migration, differentiation, cell division and apoptosis. We aimed at carrying out hypothesis driven studies towards targeting the important network of cellular communication, a critical process that gets awry in cancer. Employing mutant strains of genetic model system Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae encodes five MAPKs involved in control of distinct cellular responses such as growth, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Our study involves gene knockouts of Slt2 and Hog1 which are functional homologs of human ERK5 and mammalian p38 MAPK, respectively. We performed cytotoxicity assay to evaluate the effect of Rohitukine on cell viability and also determined the effects of drug on generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of apoptosis and expression of Slt2 and Hog1 gene at mRNA level in the presence of drug. The results of this study show a differential effect in the activity of drug between the WT, Slt2 and Hog1 gene deletion strain indicating involvement of MAPK pathway. Further, we investigated Rohitukine induced cytotoxic

  2. Abrogation of NF-κB signaling in human neutrophils induces neutrophil survival through sustained p38-MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Langereis, Jeroen D; Raaijmakers, Hanneke A J A; Ulfman, Laurien H; Koenderman, Leo

    2010-10-01

    NF-κB, an important transcription factor in the regulation of cellular inflammation, is one of the prime targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Nowadays, anti-inflammatory therapies rely mostly on steroids, which among other effects, inhibit NF-κB activity. However, steroids have only limited efficacy in the treatment on neutrophil-driven diseases, such as COPD. Human neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD, and clearance of these cells by apoptosis is an effective pathway for resolution of inflammation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that modulation of the NF-κB pathway in human neutrophils affects survival. Importantly, the pharmacological NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 inhibited NF-κB signaling in human neutrophils as expected. However, we found that complete inhibition of NF-κB activity with 10 μM Bay 11-7082 prolonged neutrophil survival significantly, which was not observed with inhibitors for other signaling pathways. Bay 11-7082-induced neutrophil survival was dependent on p38-MAPK kinase activity, as the p38 kinase activity inhibitor SB203580 abrogated this response completely. Bay 11-7082 induced rapid and sustained p38 activation that correlated with inhibited NF-κB signaling and prolonged neutrophil survival. The precise role of NF-κB in regulation of p38-MAPK activation remains to be established. Under these conditions of survival, the stability of Bcl-xL but not Mcl-1 was enhanced. Although inhibition of NF-κB leads to down-regulation of inflammatory genes in many cell types, our results illustrate that interference with basal NF-κB signaling in neutrophils as a drug target should be used with caution.

  3. 17β-Estradiol induces odontoblastic differentiation via activation of the c-Src/MAPK pathway in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Woo, Su Mi; Seong, Kyung Joo; Oh, Sang Jin; Park, Hong Ju; Kim, Sun Hun; Kim, Won Jae; Jung, Ji Yeon

    2015-12-01

    The present study is aimed at investigating the effects of the exogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) on odontoblastic differentiation in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) immotalized with hTERT gene and their molecular mechanism. Proliferation was detected by BrdU assay, and odontoblast differentiation induction was evaluated by the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization. Estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), c-Src, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were examined and their inhibitors were used to determine the roles on odontogenic induction. E2 significantly promoted the HDPC proliferation, which was mediated by extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2. E2 upregulated DSPP, DSP, and DMP1 as the odontogenic differentiation markers and enhanced ALP activity and mineralization. E2 increased phosphorylation of ER-α and fulvestrant, an ER downregulator, significantly downregulated DSPP, DMP1, and DSP induced by E2. Moreover, E2 treatment activated c-Src and MAPKs upon odontogenic induction, whereas chemical inhibition of c-Src and MAPKs decreased expression of DSPP, DMP1, and DSP and mineralization augmented by E2. Moreover, fulvestrant reduced E2-induced phosphorylation of c-Src and MAPK and inhibition of c-Src by PP2 attenuated activation of MAPKs during E2-induced odontoblastic differentiation. Taken together, these results indicated that E2 stimulates odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via coordinated regulation of ER-α, c-Src, and MAPK signaling pathways, which may play a key role in the regeneration of dentin.

  4. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  5. The Conserved MAPK Site in E(spl)-M8, an Effector of Drosophila Notch Signaling, Controls Repressor Activity during Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Mohna; Bishop, Clifton P.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of patterned R8 photoreceptors at the onset of eye development depends on timely inhibition of Atonal (Ato) by the Enhancer of split (E(spl) repressors. Repression of Ato by E(spl)-M8 requires the kinase CK2 and is inhibited by the phosphatase PP2A. The region targeted by CK2 harbors additional conserved Ser residues, raising the prospect of regulation via multi-site phosphorylation. Here we investigate one such motif that meets the consensus for modification by MAPK, a well-known effector of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling. Our studies reveal an important role for the predicted MAPK site of M8 during R8 birth. Ala/Asp mutations reveal that the CK2 and MAPK sites ensure that M8 repression of Ato and the R8 fate occurs in a timely manner and at a specific stage (stage-2/3) of the morphogenetic furrow (MF). M8 repression of Ato is mitigated by halved EGFR dosage, and this effect requires an intact MAPK site. Accordingly, variants with a phosphomimetic Asp at the MAPK site exhibit earlier (inappropriate) activity against Ato even at stage-1 of the MF, where a positive feedback-loop is necessary to raise Ato levels to a threshold sufficient for the R8 fate. Analysis of deletion variants reveals that both kinase sites (CK2 and MAPK) contribute to ‘cis’-inhibition of M8. This key regulation by CK2 and MAPK is bypassed by the E(spl)D mutation encoding the truncated protein M8*, which potently inhibits Ato at stage-1 of R8 birth. We also provide evidence that PP2A likely targets the MAPK site. Thus multi-site phosphorylation controls timely onset of M8 repressor activity in the eye, a regulation that appears to be dispensable in the bristle. The high conservation of the CK2 and MAPK sites in the insect E(spl) proteins M7, M5 and Mγ, and their mammalian homologue HES6, suggest that this mode of regulation may enable E(spl)/HES proteins to orchestrate repression by distinct tissue-specific mechanisms, and is likely to have broader

  6. Docosahexaenoic Acid Inhibits Tumor Promoter-Induced Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor by Suppressing PKCδ- and MAPKs-Mediated Pathways in ECV304 Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Sen; Xia, Yong; Nguyen, Thi Thinh; Ung, Trong Thuan; Yoon, Hyun Joong; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Jung, Young Do

    2016-01-01

    The overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is associated with inflammation and virtually all human cancers. Despite the fact that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties, the negative regulation of uPAR by DHA is still undefined. Here, we investigated the effect of DHA on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced uPAR expression and the underlying molecular mechanisms in ECV304 human endothelial cells. DHA concentration-dependently inhibited TPA-induced uPAR. Specific inhibitors and mutagenesis studies showed that PKCδ, JNK1/2, Erk1/2, NF-κB, and AP-1 were critical for TPA-induced uPAR expression. Application of DHA suppressed TPA-induced translocation of PKCδ, activation of the JNK1/2 and Erk1/2 signaling pathways, and subsequent AP-1 and NF-κB transactivation. In conclusion, these observations suggest a novel role for DHA in reducing uPAR expression and cell invasion by inhibition of PKCδ, JNK1/2, and Erk1/2, and the reduction of AP-1 and NF-κB activation in ECV304 human endothelial cells. PMID:27654969

  7. TACE release of TNF-α mediates mechanotransduction-induced activation of p38 MAPK and myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Mei; Jin, Bingwen; Chen, Shuen-Ei; Reecy, James M.; Li, Yi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Summary Skeletal muscle responds to mechanical stimulation by activating p38 MAPK, a key signal for myogenesis. However, the mechanotransduction mechanism that activates p38 is unknown. Here we show that mechanical stimulation of myoblasts activates p38 and myogenesis through stimulating TNF-α release by TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE). In C2C12 or mouse primary myoblasts cultured in growth medium, static stretch activated p38 along with ERK1/2, JNK and AKT. Disrupting TNF-α signaling by TNF-α-neutralizing antibody or knocking out TNF-α receptors blocked stretch activation of p38, but not ERK1/2, JNK or AKT. Stretch also activated differentiation markers MEF2C, myogenin, p21 and myosin heavy chain in a TNF-α- and p38-dependent manner. Stretch stimulated the cleavage activity of TACE. Conversely, TACE inhibitor TAPI or TACE siRNA abolished stretch activation of p38. In addition, conditioned medium from stretched myoblast cultures activated p38 in unstretched myoblasts, which required TACE activity in the donor myoblasts, and TNF-α receptors in the recipient myoblasts. These results indicate that posttranscriptional activation of TACE mediates the mechanotransduction that activates p38-dependent myogenesis via the release of TNF-α. PMID:17264149

  8. Apigenin inhibits PMA-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and AP-1 factors in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Hegde, Shubha M; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Chidananda Sharma, S

    2015-05-01

    Acute and chronic alveolar or bronchial inflammation is thought to be central to the pathogenesis of many respiratory disorders. Cytokines and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSF) play an important role in chronic inflammation. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) the superfamily of transcription factors is involved in proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and transformation including inflammation. Understanding the function and regulation of proinflammatory factors involved in inflammation may provide the novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Our aim of the present study is to investigate the pro-inflammatory cytokines and pattern of AP-1 factors expressed during activation of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and to understand the anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin. A549 cells were treated with and without PMA or apigenin, and the cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Expressions of inflammatory mediators and different AP-1 factors were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. IL-6 protein secreted was analyzed by ELISA, and expressions of IL-1β, c-Jun, and c-Fos proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Activation of A549 cells by PMA, induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) mRNAs and secretion of IL-6 and the expression of specific AP-1 factors (c-Jun, c-Fos, and Fra-1). Treatment of cells with apigenin, significantly inhibited PMA-stimulated mRNA expression of above pro-inflammatory cytokines, AP-1 factors, cyclooxygenase-2, and secretion of IL-6 protein. Results suggested that the AP-1 factors may be involved in inflammation and apigenin has anti-inflammatory effect, which may be useful for therapeutic management of lung inflammatory diseases. PMID:25666088

  9. Sphingosine kinase inhibitor suppresses IL-18-induced interferon-gamma production through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation in human NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Soyoung; Song, Seok Bean; Jung, Minkyung; Park, Yoorim; Bang, Jung-Wook; Kim, Tae Sung; Park, Hyunjeong; Kim, Cherl-hyun; Yang, Yool-hee; Bang, Sa Ik; Cho, Daeho

    2008-09-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the innate immune response. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a well-known interferon-gamma (IFN-{gamma} inducing factor, which stimulates immune response in NK and T cells. Sphingosine kinase (SPHK) catalyzes the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which acts as a second messenger to function as an anti-apoptotic factor and proliferation stimulator of immune cells. In this study, to elucidate whether SPHK is involved in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, we measured IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production after pre-treatment with SPHK inhibitor (SKI) in NK-92MI cells. We found that IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} expression was blocked by SKI pre-treatment in both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the increased IFN-{gamma} production by stimulation with IL-18 is mediated through both SPHK and p38 MAPK. To determine the upstream signals of SKI and p38 MAPK in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK was measured after SKI pre-treatment. As a result, inhibition of SPHK by SKI blocked phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, showing that SPHK activation by IL-18 is an upstream signal of p38 MAPK activation. Inhibition of SPHK by SKI also inhibited IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production in human primary NK cells. In conclusion, SPHK activation is an essential factor for IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production via p38 MAPK.

  10. MAPKs in development: insights from Dictyostelium signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play important roles in the development of eukaryotic organisms through the regulation of signal transduction pathways stimulated by external signals. MAPK signaling pathways have been associated with the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and chemotaxis, indicating MAPKs contribute to a diverse set of developmental processes. In most eukaryotes, the diversity of external signals is likely to far exceed the diversity of MAPKs, suggesting that multiple signaling pathways might share MAPKs. Do different signaling pathways converge before MAPK function or can MAPKs maintain signaling specificity through interactions with specific proteins? The genetic and biochemical analysis of MAPK pathways in simple eukaryotes such as Dictyostelium offers opportunities to investigate functional specificity of MAPKs in G protein-mediated signal transduction pathways. This review considers the regulation and specificity of MAPK function in pathways that control Dictyostelium growth and development. PMID:21666837

  11. FGFR2IIIb-MAPK Activity Is Required for Epithelial Cell Fate Decision in the Lower Müllerian Duct.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Jumpei; Rocchi, Altea; Serna, Vanida A; Bottinger, Erwin P; Graff, Jonathan M; Kurita, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell fate of lower Müllerian duct epithelium (MDE), to become uterine or vaginal epithelium, is determined by the absence or presence of ΔNp63 expression, respectively. Previously, we showed that SMAD4 and runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) were independently required for MDE to express ΔNp63. Here, we report that vaginal mesenchyme directs vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE through paracrine activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-MAPK pathway. In the developing reproductive tract, FGF7 and FGF10 were enriched in vaginal mesenchyme, whereas FGF receptor 2IIIb was expressed in epithelia of both the uterus and vagina. When Fgfr2 was inactivated, vaginal MDE underwent uterine cell fate, and this differentiation defect was corrected by activation of MEK-ERK pathway. In vitro, FGF10 in combination with bone morphogenetic protein 4 and activin A (ActA) was sufficient to induce ΔNp63 in MDE, and ActA was essential for induction of RUNX1 through SMAD-independent pathways. Accordingly, inhibition of type 1 receptors for activin in neonatal mice induced uterine differentiation in vaginal epithelium by down-regulating RUNX1, whereas conditional deletion of Smad2 and Smad3 had no effect on vaginal epithelial differentiation. In conclusion, vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE is induced by FGF7/10-MAPK, bone morphogenetic protein 4-SMAD, and ActA-RUNX1 pathway activities, and the disruption in any one of these pathways results in conversion from vaginal to uterine epithelial cell fate. PMID:27164167

  12. Roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, DUSP1, in feedback control of inflammatory gene expression and repression by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  13. CXCL12 induces connective tissue growth factor expression in human lung fibroblasts through the Rac1/ERK, JNK, and AP-1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Shih, Chung-Huang; Tseng, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Yuan-Jhih; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2014-01-01

    CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1) is a potent chemokine for homing of CXCR4+ fibrocytes to injury sites of lung tissue, which contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a critical role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the roles of Rac1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in CXCL12-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. CXCL12 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in CTGF expression and CTGF-luciferase activity. CXCL12-induced CTGF expression was inhibited by a CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100), small interfering RNA of CXCR4 (CXCR4 siRNA), a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (RacN17), a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), a p21-activated kinase inhibitor (PAK18), c-Jun siRNA, and an AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of cells with CXCL12 caused activations of Rac1, Rho, ERK, and c-Jun. The CXCL12-induced increase in ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by RacN17. Treatment of cells with PD98059 and SP600125 both inhibited CXCL12-induced c-Jun phosphorylation. CXCL12 caused the recruitment of c-Jun and c-Fos binding to the CTGF promoter. Furthermore, CXCL12 induced an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, a myofibroblastic phenotype, and actin stress fiber formation. CXCL12-induced actin stress fiber formation and α-SMA expression were respectively inhibited by AMD3100 and CTGF siRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CXCL12, acting through CXCR4, activates the Rac/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, which in turn initiates c-Jun phosphorylation, and recruits c-Jun and c-Fos to the CTGF promoter and ultimately induces CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Moreover, overexpression of CTGF mediates CXCL12-induced α-SMA expression. PMID:25121739

  14. Exocyst Sec10 protects epithelial barrier integrity and enhances recovery following oxidative stress, by activation of the MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwon Moo; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Kim, Jinu; Chung, Daniel C; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2010-03-01

    Cell-cell contacts are essential for epithelial cell function, and disruption is associated with pathological conditions including ischemic kidney injury. We hypothesize that the exocyst, a highly-conserved eight-protein complex that targets secretory vesicles carrying membrane proteins, is involved in maintaining renal epithelial barrier integrity. Accordingly, increasing exocyst expression in renal tubule cells may protect barrier function from oxidative stress resulting from ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. When cultured on plastic, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells overexpressing Sec10, a central exocyst component, formed domes showing increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Transepithelial electric resistance (TER) of Sec10-overexpressing MDCK cells grown on Transwell filters was higher than in control MDCK cells, and the rate of TER decrease following H2O2 treatment was less in Sec10-overexpressing MDCK cells compared with control MDCK cells. After removal of H2O2, TER returned to normal more rapidly in Sec10-overexpressing compared with control MDCK cells. In collagen culture MDCK cells form cysts, and H2O2 treatment damaged Sec10-overexpressing MDCK cell cysts less than control MDCK cell cysts. The MAPK pathway has been shown to protect animals from I/R injury. Levels of active ERK, the final MAPK pathway step, were higher in Sec10-overexpressing compared with control MDCK cells. U0126 inhibited ERK activation, exacerbated the H2O2-induced decrease in TER and cyst disruption, and delayed recovery of TER following H2O2 removal. Finally, in mice with renal I/R injury, exocyst expression decreased early and returned to normal concomitant with functional recovery, suggesting that the exocyst may be involved in the recovery following I/R injury.

  15. ROCK activity affects IL-1-induced signaling possibly through MKK4 and p38 MAPK in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sayantan; McGee, Dennis W

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) accompany inflammatory bowel disease. IL-1-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells can secrete potent chemokines like CXCL8 to exacerbate inflammation. Previously, we found that inhibiting the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) could inhibit IL-1- or TNF-α-induced CXCL8 secretion by the Caco-2 colonic epithelial cell line. This ROCK inhibition did not affect IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, but suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Therefore, ROCK must play an important role in epithelial cell CXCL8 responses through an effect on the JNK signaling pathway. Here, we extend these studies by showing that inhibiting ROCK suppressed the IL-1-induced phosphorylation of MKK4, a known activator of JNK, but not MKK7. Yet, ROCK inhibition had no significant effect on the IL-1-induced phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Inhibiting ROCK also suppressed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK after IL-1 stimulation, but this inhibition had no significant effect on the stability of CXCL8 messenger RNA (mRNA) after IL-1 stimulation. These results suggest that ROCK may be important in IL-1-induced signaling through MKK4 to JNK and the activation of p38 MAPK. Finally, inhibiting ROCK in IL-1 and TNF-α co-stimulated Caco-2 cells also resulted in a significant suppression of CXCL8 secretion and mRNA levels suggesting that inhibiting ROCK may be a mechanism to inhibit the overall response of epithelial cells to both cytokines. These studies indicate a novel signaling event, which could provide a target for suppressing intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) chemokine responses involved in mucosal inflammation.

  16. Deficiency of MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) prevents adverse remodelling and promotes endothelial healing after arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Kapopara, P R; von Felden, J; Soehnlein, O; Wang, Y; Napp, L C; Sonnenschein, K; Wollert, K C; Schieffer, B; Gaestel, M; Bauersachs, J; Bavendiek, U

    2014-12-01

    Maladaptive remodelling of the arterial wall after mechanical injury (e. g. angioplasty) is characterised by inflammation, neointima formation and media hypertrophy, resulting in narrowing of the affected artery. Moreover, mechanical injury of the arterial wall causes loss of the vessel protecting endothelial cell monolayer. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a major downstream target of p38 MAPK, regulates inflammation, cell migration and proliferation, essential processes for vascular remodelling and re-endothelialisation. Therefore, we investigated the role of MK2 in remodelling and re-endothelialisation after arterial injury in genetically modified mice in vivo. Hypercholesterolaemic low-density-lipoprotein-receptor-deficient mice (ldlr-/-) were subjected to wire injury of the common carotid artery. MK2-deficiency (ldlr-/-/mk2-/-) nearly completely prevented neointima formation, media hypertrophy, and lumen loss after injury. This was accompanied by reduced proliferation and migration of MK2-deficient smooth muscle cells. In addition, MK2-deficiency severely reduced monocyte adhesion to the arterial wall (day 3 after injury, intravital microscopy), which may be attributed to reduced expression of the chemokine ligands CCL2 and CCL5. In line, MK2-deficiency significantly reduced the content of monocytes, neutrophiles and lymphocytes of the arterial wall (day 7 after injury, flow cytometry). In conclusion, in a model of endothelial injury (electric injury), MK2-deficiency strongly increased proliferation of endothelial cells and improved re-endothelialisation of the arterial wall after injury. Deficiency of MK2 prevents adverse remodelling and promotes endothelial healing of the arterial wall after injury, suggesting that MK2-inhibition is a very attractive intervention to prevent restenosis after percutaneous therapeutic angioplasty. PMID:25120198

  17. Thrombosis recanalization by paeoniflorin through the upregulation of urokinase‑type plasminogen activator via the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Songshan; Mao, Bingyu; Yang, Lei; Fu, Weiyun; Hou, Junran

    2016-06-01

    Paeoniflorin, the major component of Paeonia lactiflora pall, has previously been reported to prevent thrombosis. Plasminogen activator urokinase (uPA) is a serine protease that markedly facilitates normal thrombosis resolution. Paeoniflorin and uPA have been linked to the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In the current study, the influence of paeoniflorin on the expression of uPA was investigated and the underlying regulatory mechanism was preliminarily determined. The prothrombotic state of the model animals treated with paeoniflorin were assessed by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures was estimated using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and the possible pathways involved in the interaction between paeoniflorin and uPA were evaluated using western blot analysis. The ELISA results demonstrated that the levels of 6‑keto prostaglandin F1a, fibronectin and uPA were significantly upregulated by treatment with paeoniflorin compared with control (P<0.05). By contrast, the expression of fibrinogen, D‑dimer and thromboxane B2 were inhibited. With an increase in the concentration of paeoniflorin the cell viability of HUVECs decreased gradually. The results of western blot analysis demonstrated that paeoniflorin increased the phosphorylation of MAPK 14 (p38) and MAPK 8 (JNK). The present study demonstrated that paeoniflorin has the potential to improve the prethrombotic state and recanalize thrombosis by increasing the expression of uPA, which may be mediated via regulation of the p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. However, this treatment effect was dependent on the concentration of paeoniflorin used, an unsuitable concentration of the agent would result in a negative effect on the anti‑thrombosis pathways. PMID:27082639

  18. ROCK activity affects IL-1-induced signaling possibly through MKK4 and p38 MAPK in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sayantan; McGee, Dennis W

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) accompany inflammatory bowel disease. IL-1-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells can secrete potent chemokines like CXCL8 to exacerbate inflammation. Previously, we found that inhibiting the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) could inhibit IL-1- or TNF-α-induced CXCL8 secretion by the Caco-2 colonic epithelial cell line. This ROCK inhibition did not affect IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, but suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Therefore, ROCK must play an important role in epithelial cell CXCL8 responses through an effect on the JNK signaling pathway. Here, we extend these studies by showing that inhibiting ROCK suppressed the IL-1-induced phosphorylation of MKK4, a known activator of JNK, but not MKK7. Yet, ROCK inhibition had no significant effect on the IL-1-induced phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Inhibiting ROCK also suppressed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK after IL-1 stimulation, but this inhibition had no significant effect on the stability of CXCL8 messenger RNA (mRNA) after IL-1 stimulation. These results suggest that ROCK may be important in IL-1-induced signaling through MKK4 to JNK and the activation of p38 MAPK. Finally, inhibiting ROCK in IL-1 and TNF-α co-stimulated Caco-2 cells also resulted in a significant suppression of CXCL8 secretion and mRNA levels suggesting that inhibiting ROCK may be a mechanism to inhibit the overall response of epithelial cells to both cytokines. These studies indicate a novel signaling event, which could provide a target for suppressing intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) chemokine responses involved in mucosal inflammation. PMID:27173611

  19. Fos/AP-1 proteins in bone and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Erwin F; Eferl, Robert

    2005-12-01

    The skeleton and the immune system share a variety of different cytokines and transcription factors, thereby mutually influencing each other. These interactions are not confined to the bone marrow cavity where bone cells and hematopoietic cells exist in proximity but also occur at locations that are target sites for inflammatory bone diseases. The newly established research area termed 'osteoimmunology' attempts to unravel these skeletal/immunological relationships. Studies towards a molecular understanding of inflammatory bone diseases from an immunological as well as a bone-centered perspective have been very successful and led to the identification of several signaling pathways that are causally involved in inflammatory bone loss. Induction of receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL) signals by activated T cells and subsequent activation of the key transcription factors Fos/activator protein-1 (AP-1), NF-kappaB, and NF for activation of T cells c1 (NFATc1) are in the center of the signaling networks leading to osteoclast-mediated bone loss. Conversely, nature has employed the interferon system to antagonize excessive osteoclast differentiation, although this counteracting activity appears to be overruled under pathological conditions. Here, we focus on Fos/AP-1 functions in osteoimmunology, because this osteoclastogenic transcription factor plays a central role in inflammatory bone loss by regulating genes like NFATc1 as well as the interferon system. We also attempt to put potential therapeutic strategies for inflammatory bone diseases in perspective.

  20. Role of p38 MAPK activation and mitochondrial cytochrome-c release in allicin-induced apoptosis in SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jianhui; Li, Yu; Chi, Yufen

    2016-04-01

    Here, we investigate the apoptotic effect of allicin, the predominant component of freshly crushed garlic, on neuroblastoma cells. In this paper, the authors have first assessed the effect of allicin on human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and then investigated the underlying mechanism. The results indicate that allicin suppresses SK-N-SH cell growth in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner and that 5 μmol/l of allicin leads to a significant increase in apoptotic rate with annexin-V/PI double staining. Western blot analysis shows that treatment with allicin-induced apoptosis through activation of caspases-3 and 9. Phosphorylation of p38 MAPK contributes to allicin-induced apoptosis upstream of caspase activation. Using p38 MAPK inhibitor, the authors discovered that p38 MAPK activation subsequently induces the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria into the cytosol. Taken together, the results demonstrate that allicin can activate the p38 MAPK pathway, which leads to mitochondrial release of cytochrome-c, thus inducing SK-N-SH cell apoptosis. Overall, this study suggests that allicin may be used as one of the novel pharmacological treatment strategies in neuroblastoma. PMID:26771864

  1. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26458100

  2. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases.

  3. Baculovirus p35 gene is oppositely regulated by P53 and AP-1 like factors in Spodoptera frugiperda

    SciTech Connect

    Mohareer, Krishnaveni; Sahdev, Sudhir; Hasnain, Seyed E.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is regulated by both viral and host factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is negatively regulated by SfP53-like factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is positively regulated by SfAP-1-like factor. -- Abstract: Baculovirus p35 belongs to the early class of genes of AcMNPV and requires viral factors like Immediate Early protein-1 for its transcription. To investigate the role of host factors in regulating p35 gene expression, the putative transcription factor binding sites were examined in silico and the role of these factors in influencing the transcription of p35 gene was assessed. We focused our studies on AP-1 and P53-like factors, which are activated under oxidative stress conditions. The AP-1 motif is located at -1401 while P53 motif is at -1912 relative to p35 translation start site. The predicted AP-1 and P53 elements formed specific complexes with Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear extracts. Both AP-1 and P53 motif binding proteins were down regulated as a function of AcMNPV infection in Spodoptera cells. To address the question whether during an oxidative outburst, the p35 transcription is enhanced; we investigated the role of these oxidative stress induced host transcription factors in influencing p35 gene transcription. Reporter assays revealed that AP-1 element enhances the transcription of p35 by a factor of two. Interestingly, P53 element appears to repress the transcription of p35 gene.

  4. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Ni, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Ying; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM). Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM) were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:27635402

  5. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Ni, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM). Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM) were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

  6. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Ni, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM). Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM) were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:27635402

  7. A novel mechanism for momordin Ic-induced HepG2 apoptosis: involvement of PI3K- and MAPK-dependent PPARγ activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yuan, Li; Xiao, Haifang; Wang, Chan; Xiao, Chunxia; Wang, Yutang; Liu, Xuebo

    2014-05-01

    Momordin Ic is a natural triterpenoid saponin found in various Chinese and Japanese natural medicines such as the fruit of Kochia scoparia (L.) Schrad. Momordin Ic has been previously demonstrated to induce HepG2 cell apoptosis in a ROS-mediated PI3K and MAPK pathway-dependent manner. In the present study, the underlying mechanisms of PI3K and MAPK pathway-mediated PPARγ, and PGC-1α co-regulator activation, as well as the effects of downstream proteins, COX-2 and FoxO4, on cell apoptosis were investigated. The results demonstrated that momordin Ic activated PPARγ and inhibited COX-2. PGC-1α and FoxO4 expressions were increased by the PI3K or MAPK pathways. Furthermore, PPARγ inhibition decreased p-p38 and FoxO4 expression, and restored COX-2 expression. ROS inhibition exerted little effect on PPARγ, COX-2 and FoxO4 expression but affected PGC-1α expression. These results revealed the involvement of PI3K and MAPK-dependent PPARγ activation in momordin Ic-induced apoptosis, providing more detailed information underlying the pro-apoptotic mechanism of momordin Ic in HepG2 cell apoptosis. PMID:24584198

  8. Stimulation of Ebola virus production from persistent infection through activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Strong, James E; Wong, Gary; Jones, Shane E; Grolla, Allen; Theriault, Steven; Kobinger, Gary P; Feldmann, Heinz

    2008-11-18

    Human infections with Ebola virus (EBOV) result in a deadly viral disease known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Up to 90% of infected patients die, and there is no available treatment or vaccine. The sporadic human outbreaks are believed to result when EBOV "jumps" from an infected animal to a person and is subsequently transmitted between persons by direct contact with infected blood or body fluids. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which EBOV can persistently infect and then escape from model cell and animal reservoir systems. We report a model system in which infection of mouse and bat cell lines with EBOV leads to persistence, which can be broken with low levels of lipopolysaccharide or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). This reactivation depends on the Ras/MAPK pathway through inhibition of RNA-dependent protein kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha phosphorylation and occurs at the level of protein synthesis. EBOV also can be evoked from mice 7 days after infection by PMA treatment, indicating that a similar mechanism occurs in vivo. Our findings suggest that EBOV may persist in nature through subclinical infection of a reservoir species, such as bats, and that appropriate physiological stimulation may result in increased replication and transmission to new hosts. Identification of a presumptive mechanism responsible for EBOV emergence from its reservoir underscores the "hit-and-run" nature of the initiation of human and/or nonhuman primate EBOV outbreaks and may provide insight into possible countermeasures to interfere with transmission. PMID:18981410

  9. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Keyata N.; Whipple, Rebecca A.; Yoon, Jennifer R.; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S.; Boggs, Amanda E.; Chakrabarti, Kristi R.; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K.; Martin, Stuart S.; Vitolo, Michele I.

    2015-01-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN−/−KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  10. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keyata N; Whipple, Rebecca A; Yoon, Jennifer R; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S; Boggs, Amanda E; Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K; Martin, Stuart S; Vitolo, Michele I

    2015-11-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN-/-KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  11. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators contributes to the anti-inflammatory activity of KYKZL-1 via MAPK and NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Lin; Du, Yi-Fang; Cheng, Jing; Huan, Lin; Chen, Shi-Cui; Wei, Shao-Hua; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Ao, Gui-Zhen

    2013-10-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the anti-inflammatory activity test focusing on its modulation of inflammatory mediators as well as intracellular MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In acute ear edema model, pretreatment with KYKZL-1 (p.o.) dose-dependently inhibited the xylene-induced ear edema in mice with a higher inhibition than diclofenac. In a three-day TPA-induced inflammation, KYKZL-1 also showed significant anti-inflammatory activity with inhibition ranging between 20% and 64%. In gastric lesion test, KYKZL-1 elicited markedly fewer stomach lesions with a low index of ulcer as compared to diclofenac in rats. In further studies, KYKZL-1 was found to significantly inhibit the production of NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} in LPS challenged RAW264.7, which is parallel to its attenuation of the expression of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX mRNAs or proteins and inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. Taken together, our data indicate that KYKZL-1 comprises dual inhibition of COX and 5-LOX and exerts an obvious anti-inflammatory activity with an enhanced gastric safety profile via simultaneous inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 inhibits NO, PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} and iNOS, COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNAs and MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inhibits phosphorylation of MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inactivates NF-κB pathway.

  12. Carbon monoxide alleviates ethanol-induced oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanyan; Gao, Chao; Shi, Yanru; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liang; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Xing, Mingyou; Liu, Liegang; Yao, Ping

    2013-11-15

    Stress-inducible protein heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is well-appreciative to counteract oxidative damage and inflammatory stress involving the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). The potential role and signaling pathways of HO-1 metabolite carbon monoxide (CO), however, still remained unclear. To explore the precise mechanisms, ethanol-dosed adult male Balb/c mice (5.0 g/kg.bw.) or ethanol-incubated primary rat hepatocytes (100 mmol/L) were pretreated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimmer (CORM-2, 8 mg/kg for mice or 20 μmol/L for hepatocytes), as well as other pharmacological reagents. Our data showed that CO released from HO-1 induction by quercetin prevented ethanol-derived oxidative injury, which was abolished by CO scavenger hemoglobin. The protection was mimicked by CORM-2 with the attenuation of GSH depletion, SOD inactivation, MDA overproduction, and the leakage of AST, ALT or LDH in serum and culture medium induced by ethanol. Moreover, CORM-2 injection or incubation stimulated p38 phosphorylation and suppressed abnormal Tnfa and IL-6, accompanying the alleviation of redox imbalance induced by ethanol and aggravated by inflammatory factors. The protective role of CORM-2 was abolished by SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) but not by PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Thus, HO-1 released CO prevented ethanol-elicited hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of gaseous signal molecule on ALD induced by naturally occurring phytochemicals. - Highlights: • CO alleviated ethanol-derived liver oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice. • CO eased ethanol and inflammatory factor-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. • The p38 MAPK is a key signaling mechanism for the protective function of CO in ALD.

  13. A constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway due to BRAFV600E positively regulates AHR pathway in PTC

    PubMed Central

    Regazzo, Daniela; Bertazza, Loris; Galuppini, Francesca; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie Lise; Vianello, Federica; Ciato, Denis; Ceccato, Filippo; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Boscaro, Marco; Scaroni, Carla; Mian, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the toxicity and tumor-promoting properties of dioxin. AHR has been reported to be overexpressed and constitutively active in a variety of solid tumors, but few data are currently available concerning its role in thyroid cancer. In this study we quantitatively explored a series of 51 paired-normal and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues for AHR-related genes. We identified an increased AHR expression/activity in PTC, independently from its nuclear dimerization partner and repressor but strictly related to a constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway. The AHR up-regulation followed by an increased expression of AHR target genes was confirmed by a meta-analysis of published microarray data, suggesting a ligand-independent active AHR pathway in PTC. In-vitro studies using a PTC-derived cell line (BCPAP) and HEK293 cells showed that BRAFV600E may directly modulate AHR localization, induce AHR expression and activity in an exogenous ligand-independent manner. The AHR pathway might represent a potential novel therapeutic target for PTC in the clinical practice. PMID:26392334

  14. Lipopolysaccharide enhances bradykinin-induced signal transduction via activation of Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK in canine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shue-Fen; Wang, Chuan-Chwan; Chiu, Chi-Tso; Chien, Chin-Sung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Lin, Chien-Huang; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was found to induce inflammatory responses and to enhance bronchial hyperreactivity to several contractile agonists. However, the implication of LPS in the pathogenesis of bronchial hyperreactivity was not completely understood. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effect of LPS on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation associated with potentiation of bradykinin (BK)-induced inositol phosphates (IPs) accumulation and Ca2+ mobilization in canine cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells (TSMCs).LPS stimulated phosphorylation of p42/p44 MAPK in a time- and concentration-dependent manner using a Western blot analysis against a specific phosphorylated form of MAPK antibody. Maximal stimulation of the p42 and p44 MAPK isoforms occurred after 7 min-incubation and the maximal effect was achieved with 100 μg ml−1 LPS.Pretreatment of TSMCs with LPS potentiated BK-induced IPs accumulation and Ca2+ mobilization. However, there was no effect on the IPs response induced by endothelin-1, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and carbachol. In addition, pretreatment with PDGF-BB enhanced BK-induced IPs response.These enhancements by LPS and PDGF-BB might be due to an increase in BK B2 receptor density (Bmax) in TSMCs, characterized by competitive inhibition of [3H]-BK binding using B1 and B2 receptor-selective reagents.The enhancing effects of LPS and PDGF-BB were attenuated by PD98059, an inhibitor of MAPK kinase (MEK), suggesting that the effect of LPS may share a common signalling pathway with PDGF-BB in TSMCs.Furthermore, overexpression of dominant negative mutants, H-Ras-15A and Raf-N4, significantly suppressed p42/p44 MAPK activation induced by LPS and PDGF-BB, indicating that Ras and Raf may be required for activation of these kinases.These results suggest that the augmentation of BK-induced responses produced by LPS might be, at least in part, mediated through activation of Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway in TSMCs. PMID:10952668

  15. Duplication of AP1 within the Spinacia oleracea L. AP1/FUL clade is followed by rapid amino acid and regulatory evolution.

    PubMed

    Sather, D Noah; Golenberg, Edward M

    2009-02-01

    The AP1/FUL clade of MADS box genes have undergone multiple duplication events among angiosperm species. While initially identified as having floral meristem identity and floral organ identity function in Arabidopsis, the role of AP1 homologs does not appear to be universally conserved even among eudicots. In comparison, the role of FRUITFULL has not been extensively explored in non-model species. We report on the isolation of three AP1/FUL genes from cultivated spinach, Spinacia oleracea L. Two genes, designated SpAPETALA1-1 (SpAP1-1) and SpAPETALA1-2 (SpAP1-2), cluster as paralogous genes within the Caryophyllales AP1 clade. They are highly differentiated in the 3', carboxyl-end encoding region of the gene following the third amphipathic alpha-helix region, while still retaining some elements of a signature AP1 carboxyl motifs. In situ hybridization studies also demonstrate that the two paralogs have evolved different temporal and spatial expression patterns, and that neither gene is expressed in the developing sepal whorl, suggesting that the AP1 floral organ identity function is not conserved in spinach. The spinach FRUITFULL homolog, SpFRUITFULL (SpFUL), has retained the conserved motif and groups with Caryophyllales FRUITFULL homologs. SpFUL is expressed in leaf as well as in floral tissue, and shows strong expression late in flower development, particularly in the tapetal layer in males, and in the endothecium layer and stigma, in the females. The combined evidence of high rates of non-synonymous substitutions and differential expression patterns supports a scenario in which the AP1 homologs in the spinach AP1/FUL gene family have experienced rapid evolution following duplication.

  16. RNase activity of sialic acid-binding lectin from bullfrog eggs drives antitumor effect via the activation of p38 MAPK to caspase-3/7 signaling pathway in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Yukiko; Tatsuta, Takeo; Sugawara, Shigeki; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nitta, Kazuo; Hosono, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin obtained from bullfrog eggs (SBL) induces cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This antitumor effect is mediated through its ribo-nuclease (RNase) activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We found that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated when SBL induced cell death in three human breast cancer cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-MB231. The suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as short interference RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression significantly decreased cell death and increased the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA-MB231 cells. H103A, an SBL mutant lacking in RNase activity, showed decreased SBL-induced cell death compared with native SBL. However, the loss of RNase activity of SBL had no effect on its internalization into cells. The H103A mutant also displayed decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Moreover, SBL promoted caspase-3/7 activation followed by a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase, whereas the SBL mutant, H103A, lost this ability. The SBL-induced caspase-3/7 activation was suppressed by the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, as well as pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. In the presence of zVAD-fmk, the SBL-induced cell death was decreased. In addition, the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA-MB231 cells recovered by zVAD-fmk treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of SBL leads to breast cancer cell death through the activation of p38 MAPK followed by the activation of caspase-3/7. PMID:27513956

  17. A novel synthetic compound MCAP suppresses LPS-induced murine microglial activation in vitro via inhibiting NF-kB and p38 MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Wook; More, Sandeep Vasant; Yun, Yo-Sep; Ko, Hyun-Myung; Kwak, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Heesoon; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, In-Su; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anti-neuroinflammatory activity of a novel synthetic compound, 7-methylchroman-2-carboxylic acid N-(2-trifluoromethyl) phenylamide (MCAP) against LPS-induced microglial activation in vitro. Methods: Primary mouse microglia and BV2 microglia cells were exposed to LPS (50 or 100 ng/mL). The expression of iNOS and COX-2, proinflammatory cytokines, NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling molecules were analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blot and ELISA. The morphological changes of microglia and nuclear translocation of NF-ĸB were visualized using phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. Results: Pretreatment with MCAP (0.1, 1, 10 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 in BV2 microglia cells. Similar results were obtained in primary microglia pretreated with MCAP (0.1, 0.5 μmol/L). MCAP dose-dependently abated LPS-induced release of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, and mitigated LPS-induced activation of NF-κB by reducing the phosphorylation of IκBα in BV2 microglia cells. Moreover, MCAP attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, whereas SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, significantly potentiated MCAP-caused inhibition on the expression of MEF-2 (a transcription factor downstream of p38 MAPK). Conclusion: MCAP exerts anti-inflammatory effects in murine microglia in vitro by inhibiting the p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways and proinflammatory responses. MCAP may be developed as a novel agent for treating diseases involving activated microglial cells. PMID:26838070

  18. Role of P38 MAPK on MMP Activity in Photothrombotic Stroke Mice as Measured using an Ultrafast MMP Activatable Probe

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Di; Wang, Yuan-Cheng; Bai, Ying-Ying; Lu, Chun-Qiang; Xu, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Lei; Ju, Shenghong

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) exert a dual effect in ischemic stroke and thus represent an ideal target for detection and therapy. However, to date, all clinical trials of MMP inhibitors have failed, and alternative drug candidates and therapeutic targets are urgently required. Nonetheless, further investigations are limited by the lack of non-invasive imaging techniques. Here, we report a novel, fast and ultrasensitive MMP activatable optical imaging probe for the dynamic visualization of MMP activity in photothrombotic stroke mice. This probe provides a significant signal enhancement in as little as 15 min, with the highest signal intensity occurring at 1 h post-injection, and shows high sensitivity in measuring MMP activity alterations, which makes it specifically suitable for the real-time visualization of MMP activity and drug discovery in preclinical research. Moreover, using this probe, we successfully demonstrate that the regulation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway is capable of modulating MMP activity after stroke, revealing a novel regulatory mechanism of postischemic brain damage and overcoming the limitations of traditional therapeutic strategies associated with MMP inhibitors by using a non-invasive molecular imaging method. PMID:26581247

  19. Upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and NO production in BV-activated avian macrophage-like cell line (HD11) requires MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways.

    PubMed

    Han, Yan; Niu, Mingshan; An, Lijia; Li, Wenli

    2009-07-01

    The budded virus (BV) of Antheraea pernyi is a nuclear polyhedrosis virus (ApNPV), that belongs to the baculovirus family. It is capable of stimulating innate immune response in avian macrophage-like cells (HD11). In this study, we used the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-12p40) and production of nitric oxide (NO) as indicators to evaluate the involvement of the signaling cascades in the activation of HD11 cells by BV. Western blot analysis revealed that ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and JNK were phosphorylated followed by activation of p65-NF-kappaB after HD11 cells were challenged with BV. Inhibition of p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB by their respective inhibitors abolished BV-induced expression of IL-12p40, IFN-gamma and production of NO, whereas inhibition of JNK abolished only the induction of cytokines. Additionally, inhibition of ERK1/2 resulted in unexpected increases in both cytokine expression and NO production. Taken together, these findings indicated that in BV-induced HD11 cells, the induction of cytokines was mediated by the p38 MAPK, JNK and NF-kappaB pathways, and NO production was mediated through the p38 MAPK/NF-kappaB pathways.

  20. Hyaluronan Oligosaccharides Induce MMP-1 and -3 via Transcriptional Activation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK in Rheumatoid Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hanabayashi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Nobunori; Sobue, Yasumori; Hirabara, Shinya; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of hyaluronan oligosaccharides (HAoligos) on interactions between HA and its principal receptor, CD44, in rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSFs) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production. Methods RSFs were isolated from rheumatoid synovial tissue. HA distribution was visualized by immunocytochemistry. MMP-1 and MMP-3 induction was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The interaction between HAoligos and their MMP-producing receptors was tested by blocking with anti-CD44 and anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). Phosphorylation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was analyzed by immunoblotting. Results Endogenous HA decreased after treatment with HAoligos, while MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with anti-CD44 or anti-TLR-4 antibody significantly reduced the effect of HAoligos on MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression. NF-κB and p38 MAPK phosphorylation was enhanced by HAoligos pretreated with anti-TLR-4, and HAoligo-induced MMP production was blocked with an inhibitor of NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. Conclusions Disruptive changes in CD44-HA interactions by HAoligos enhanced MMP-1 and MMP-3 production via activation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in RSFs. PMID:27564851

  1. Mammary gland specific expression of Brk/PTK6 promotes delayed involution and tumor formation associated with activation of p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are frequently overexpressed and/or activated in human malignancies, and regulate cancer cell proliferation, cellular survival, and migration. As such, they have become promising molecular targets for new therapies. The non-receptor PTK termed breast tumor kinase (Brk/PTK6) is overexpressed in approximately 86% of human breast tumors. The role of Brk in breast pathology is unclear. Methods We expressed a WAP-driven Brk/PTK6 transgene in FVB/n mice, and analyzed mammary glands from wild-type (wt) and transgenic mice after forced weaning. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) studies were conducted to visualize markers of mammary gland involution, cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as Brk, STAT3, and activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in mammary tissues and tumors from WAP-Brk mice. Human (HMEC) or mouse (HC11) mammary epithelial cells were stably or transiently transfected with Brk cDNA to assay p38 MAPK signaling and cell survival in suspension or in response to chemotherapeutic agents. Results Brk-transgenic dams exhibited delayed mammary gland involution and aged mice developed infrequent tumors with reduced latency relative to wt mice. Consistent with delayed involution, mammary glands of transgenic animals displayed decreased STAT3 phosphorylation, a marker of early-stage involution. Notably, p38 MAPK, a pro-survival signaling mediator downstream of Brk, was activated in mammary glands of Brk transgenic relative to wt mice. Brk-dependent signaling to p38 MAPK was recapitulated by Brk overexpression in the HC11 murine mammary epithelial cell (MEC) line and human MEC, while Brk knock-down in breast cancer cells blocked EGF-stimulated p38 signaling. Additionally, human or mouse MECs expressing Brk exhibited increased anchorage-independent survival and resistance to doxorubicin. Finally, breast tumor biopsies were subjected to IHC analysis for co-expression of Brk and phospho-p38 MAPK

  2. Mutagenesis of cysteine 81 prevents dimerization of the APS1 subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and alters diurnal starch turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, Nadja; Hendriks, Janneke H M; Kötting, Oliver; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Feil, Regina; Zeeman, Samuel C; Gibon, Yves; Schulze, Waltraud X; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John E

    2012-04-01

    Many plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana, retain a substantial portion of their photosynthate in leaves in the form of starch, which is remobilized to support metabolism and growth at night. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyses the first committed step in the pathway of starch synthesis, the production of ADP-glucose. The enzyme is redox-activated in the light and in response to sucrose accumulation, via reversible breakage of an intermolecular cysteine bridge between the two small (APS1) subunits. The biological function of this regulatory mechanism was investigated by complementing an aps1 null mutant (adg1) with a series of constructs containing a full-length APS1 gene encoding either the wild-type APS1 protein or mutated forms in which one of the five cysteine residues was replaced by serine. Substitution of Cys81 by serine prevented APS1 dimerization, whereas mutation of the other cysteines had no effect. Thus, Cys81 is both necessary and sufficient for dimerization of APS1. Compared to control plants, the adg1/APS1(C81S) lines had higher levels of ADP-glucose and maltose, and either increased rates of starch synthesis or a starch-excess phenotype, depending on the daylength. APS1 protein levels were five- to tenfold lower in adg1/APS1(C81S) lines than in control plants. These results show that redox modulation of AGPase contributes to the diurnal regulation of starch turnover, with inappropriate regulation of the enzyme having an unexpected impact on starch breakdown, and that Cys81 may play an important role in the regulation of AGPase turnover.

  3. 6-Hydroxydopamine activates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway through p38 MAPK-mediated, p53-independent activation of Bax and PUMA.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Galindo, Maria F; Concannon, Caoimhín G; Segura, Miguel F; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J; Llecha, Nuria; Comella, Joan X; Prehn, Jochen H M; Jordan, Joaquin

    2008-03-01

    Mitochondrial alterations have been associated with the cytotoxic effect of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a widely used toxin to study Parkinson's disease. In previous work, we have demonstrated that 6-OHDA increases mitochondrial membrane permeability leading to cytochrome c release, but the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. Herein we studied the mechanism of increased mitochondrial permeability of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in response to 6-OHDA. Cytochrome c release induced by 6-OHDA occurred, in both SH-SY5Y cells and primary cultures, in the absence of mitochondrial swelling or a decrease in mitochondrial calcein fluorescence, suggesting little involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in this process. In contrast, 6-OHDA-induced cell death was associated with a significant translocation of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein from the cytosol to mitochondria and with a significant induction of the BH3-only protein PUMA. Experiments in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in Bax or PUMA demonstrated a role for both proteins in 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis. Although 6-OHDA elevated both total and nuclear p53 protein levels, activation of p53 was not essential for subsequent cell death. In contrast, we found that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was activated early during 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SKF86002 potently inhibited PUMA induction, green fluorescent protein-Bax redistribution and apoptosis in response to 6-OHDA. These data demonstrate a critical involvement of p38 MAPK, PUMA, and Bax in 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis.

  4. Selective Activation of Human Dendritic Cells by OM-85 through a NF-kB and MAPK Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Scutera, Sara; Somma, Paolo; Salvi, Valentina; Musso, Tiziana; Tabbia, Giuseppe; Bardessono, Marco; Pasquali, Christian; Mantovani, Alberto; Sozzani, Silvano; Bosisio, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom®, Broncho-Munal®, Ommunal®, Paxoral®, Vaxoral®), a product made of the water soluble fractions of 21 inactivated bacterial strain patterns responsible for respiratory tract infections, is used for the prevention of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and acute exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. OM-85 is able to potentiate both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for OM-85 activation are still largely unknown. Purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of OM-85 stimulation on human dendritic cell functions. We show that OM-85 selectively induced NF-kB and MAPK activation in human DC with no detectable action on the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathway. As a consequence, chemokines (i.e. CXCL8, CXCL6, CCL3, CCL20, CCL22) and B-cell activating cytokines (i.e. IL-6, BAFF and IL-10) were strongly upregulated. OM-85 also synergized with the action of classical pro-inflammatory stimuli used at suboptimal concentrations. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with COPD, a pathological condition often associated with altered PRR expression pattern, fully retained the capability to respond to OM-85. These results provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of OM-85 activation of the immune response and strengthen the rational for its use in clinical settings. PMID:24386121

  5. Trim69 regulates zebrafish brain development by ap-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruiqin; Wang, Renxian; Zhao, Qing; Han, Yongqing; Zong, Shudong; Miao, Shiying; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the TRIM family have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, neurogenesis, muscular physiology and innate immune responses. Trim69, previously identified as a novel gene cloned from a human testis cDNA library, has a homologous gene in zebrafish and this study focused on investigating the function of trim69 in zebrafish neurogenesis. Trim69 was found to be expressed in zebrafish embryo brain at the early stages. Knockdown of trim69 led to deformed brain development, obvious signs of apoptosis present in the head, and decreased expression of neuronal differentiation and stem cell markers. This phenotype was rescued upon co-injection of human mRNA together along with the trim69 knockdown. Results of this study also showed an interaction between TRIM69 and c-Jun in human cells, and upon TRIM69 knock down c-Jun expression subsequently increased, whereas the over-expression of TRIM69 led to the down-regulation of c-Jun. Additionally, knockdown both c-Jun and trim69 can rescue the deformed brain, evident cellular apoptosis in the head and decreased expression of neuronal differentiation and stem cell markers. Overall, our results support a role for trim69 in the development of the zebrafish brain through ap-1 pathway. PMID:27050765

  6. Molecular cloning of the duck mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) gene and the development of a quantitative real-time PCR assay to detect its expression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shoulin; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Tian, Mingxing; Wang, Xiaolan; Hou, Wanwan; Yue, Jiaping; Wang, Guijun; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) acts as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals, and is involved in a wide variety of biological processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation, transcription regulation, and development. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 plays an important role in inducing cell death in bacterial infections. In this study, the duck MAPK1 gene was cloned for the first time from the Cherry Valley duck. Sequence analysis showed that duck MAPK1 cDNA is 1,557 bp long, with an open reading frame of 1,107 bp. It encodes 368 amino acids, with 85.4, 84.5, and 97.3% homology with the human, mouse, and chicken MAPK1 gene, respectively. Furthermore, a SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to detect duck MAPK1 expression. Following Riemerella anatipestifer infection by virulent strain Yb2, MAPK1 mRNA level increased more than 200-fold in the duck spleens, suggesting that increased duck MAPK1 expression can be used as an indicator of bacterial infection. Our results provide ground work to warrant further studies of the duck MAPK1 gene in bacterial pathogenesis.

  7. Molecular cloning of the duck mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) gene and the development of a quantitative real-time PCR assay to detect its expression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shoulin; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Tian, Mingxing; Wang, Xiaolan; Hou, Wanwan; Yue, Jiaping; Wang, Guijun; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) acts as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals, and is involved in a wide variety of biological processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation, transcription regulation, and development. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 plays an important role in inducing cell death in bacterial infections. In this study, the duck MAPK1 gene was cloned for the first time from the Cherry Valley duck. Sequence analysis showed that duck MAPK1 cDNA is 1,557 bp long, with an open reading frame of 1,107 bp. It encodes 368 amino acids, with 85.4, 84.5, and 97.3% homology with the human, mouse, and chicken MAPK1 gene, respectively. Furthermore, a SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to detect duck MAPK1 expression. Following Riemerella anatipestifer infection by virulent strain Yb2, MAPK1 mRNA level increased more than 200-fold in the duck spleens, suggesting that increased duck MAPK1 expression can be used as an indicator of bacterial infection. Our results provide ground work to warrant further studies of the duck MAPK1 gene in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24974389

  8. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  9. PPAR{alpha} agonist fenofibrate protects the kidney from hypertensive injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats via inhibition of oxidative stress and MAPK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Xiaoyang; Shen, Ying H.; Li, Chuanbao; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Cheng; Bu, Peili; Zhang, Yun

    2010-04-09

    Oxidative stress has been shown to play an important role in the development of hypertensive renal injury. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) has antioxidant effect. In this study, we demonstrated that fenofibrate significantly reduced proteinuria, inflammatory cell recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins deposition in the kidney of SHRs without apparent effect on blood pressure. To investigate the mechanisms involved, we found that fenofibrate treatment markedly reduced oxidative stress accompanied by reduced activity of renal NAD(P)H oxidase, increased activity of Cu/Zn SOD, and decreased phosphorylation of p38MAPK and JNK in the kidney of SHRs. Taken together, fenofibrate treatment can protect against hypertensive renal injury without affecting blood pressure by inhibiting inflammation and fibrosis via suppression of oxidative stress and MAPK activity.

  10. Abnormal activity of the MAPK- and cAMP-associated signaling pathways in frontal cortical areas in postmortem brain in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Funk, Adam J; McCullumsmith, Robert E; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2012-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that schizophrenia may result from alterations of integration of signaling mediated by multiple neurotransmitter systems. Abnormalities of associated intracellular signaling pathways may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Proteins and phospho-proteins comprising mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-associated signaling pathways may be abnormally expressed in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia. Using western blot analysis we examined proteins of the MAPK- and cAMP-associated pathways in these two brain regions. Postmortem samples were used from a well-characterized collection of elderly patients with schizophrenia (ACC=36, DLPFC=35) and a comparison (ACC=33, DLPFC=31) group. Near-infrared intensity of IR-dye labeled secondary antisera bound to targeted proteins of the MAPK- and cAMP-associated signaling pathways was measured using LiCor Odyssey imaging system. We found decreased expression of Rap2, JNK1, JNK2, PSD-95, and decreased phosphorylation of JNK1/2 at T183/Y185 and PSD-95 at S295 in the ACC in schizophrenia. In the DLPFC, we found increased expression of Rack1, Fyn, Cdk5, and increased phosphorylation of PSD-95 at S295 and NR2B at Y1336. MAPK- and cAMP-associated molecules constitute ubiquitous intracellular signaling pathways that integrate extracellular stimuli, modify receptor expression and function, and regulate cell survival and neuroplasticity. These data suggest abnormal activity of the MAPK- and cAMP-associated pathways in frontal cortical areas in schizophrenia. These alterations may underlie the hypothesized hypoglutamatergic function in this illness. Together with previous findings, these data suggest that abnormalities of intracellular signaling pathways may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:22048463

  11. Melanoma Expressed-CD70 Is Regulated by RhoA and MAPK Pathways without Affecting Vemurafenib Treatment Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Gallardo, Franck; Gence, Rémi; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    CD70 is a costimulatory molecule member of the Tumor Necrosis Factor family that is expressed on activated immune cells. Its ectopic expression has been described in several types of cancer cells including lymphomas, renal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. We have recently described its expression in a part of tumor cells from the vast majority of melanoma biopsies and human melanoma cell lines, and found that CD70 expression decreased over time as the disease progressed. Here, we show that RhoA, BRAF and Mitogen Activating Protein Kinase pathways are involved in the positive transcriptional regulation of CD70 expression in melanomas. Interestingly, the clinical inhibitor of the common BRAF V600E/D variants, Vemurafenib (PLX-4032), which is currently used to treat melanoma patients with BRAF V600E/D-mutated metastatic melanomas, decreased CD70 expression in human CD70+ melanoma cell lines. This decrease was seen in melanoma cells both with and without the BRAFV600E/D mutation, although was less efficient in those lacking the mutation. But interestingly, by silencing CD70 in CD70+ melanoma cell lines we show that PLX-4032-induced melanoma cell killing and its inhibitory effect on MAPK pathway activation are unaffected by CD70 expression. Consequently, our work demonstrates that CD70 ectopic expression in melanomas is not a valuable biomarker to predict tumor cells sensitivity to BRAF V600 inhibitors. PMID:26828592

  12. Melanoma Expressed-CD70 Is Regulated by RhoA and MAPK Pathways without Affecting Vemurafenib Treatment Activity.

    PubMed

    Pich, Christine; Teiti, Iotefa; Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Gallardo, Franck; Gence, Rémi; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    CD70 is a costimulatory molecule member of the Tumor Necrosis Factor family that is expressed on activated immune cells. Its ectopic expression has been described in several types of cancer cells including lymphomas, renal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. We have recently described its expression in a part of tumor cells from the vast majority of melanoma biopsies and human melanoma cell lines, and found that CD70 expression decreased over time as the disease progressed. Here, we show that RhoA, BRAF and Mitogen Activating Protein Kinase pathways are involved in the positive transcriptional regulation of CD70 expression in melanomas. Interestingly, the clinical inhibitor of the common BRAF V600E/D variants, Vemurafenib (PLX-4032), which is currently used to treat melanoma patients with BRAF V600E/D-mutated metastatic melanomas, decreased CD70 expression in human CD70+ melanoma cell lines. This decrease was seen in melanoma cells both with and without the BRAFV600E/D mutation, although was less efficient in those lacking the mutation. But interestingly, by silencing CD70 in CD70+ melanoma cell lines we show that PLX-4032-induced melanoma cell killing and its inhibitory effect on MAPK pathway activation are unaffected by CD70 expression. Consequently, our work demonstrates that CD70 ectopic expression in melanomas is not a valuable biomarker to predict tumor cells sensitivity to BRAF V600 inhibitors. PMID:26828592

  13. Biphasic activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways in bovine herpesvirus type 1 infection of MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqian; Ding, Xiuyan; Zhu, Xiaofang; Meng, Songshu; Wang, Jianye; Zhou, Hong; Duan, Qiangde; Tao, Jie; Schifferli, Dieter M; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2011-04-14

    Many viruses have been known to control key cellular signaling pathways to facilitate the virus infection. The possible involvement of signaling pathways in bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) infection is unknown. This study indicated that infection of MDBK cells with BoHV-1 induced an early-stage transient and a late-stage sustained activation of both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mitogen activated protein kinases/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/Erk1/2) signaling pathways. Analysis with the stimulation of UV-irradiated virus indicated that the virus binding and/or entry process was enough to trigger the early phase activations, while the late phase activations were viral protein expression dependent. Biphasic activation of both pathways was suppressed by the selective inhibitor, Ly294002 for PI3K and U0126 for MAPK kinase (MEK1/2), respectively. Furthermore, treatment of MDBK cells with Ly294002 caused a 1.5-log reduction in virus titer, while U0126 had little effect on the virus production. In addition, the inhibition effect of Ly294002 mainly occurred at the post-entry stage of the virus replication cycle. This revealed for the first time that BoHV-1 actively induced both PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways, and the activation of PI3K was important for fully efficient replication, especially for the post-entry stage.

  14. Transforming growth factor-beta1-induced activation of the Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling pathway in rat lung fibroblasts via a PKC-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Axmann, A; Seidel, D; Reimann, T; Hempel, U; Wenzel, K W

    1998-08-19

    In fibroblasts transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) regulates cell proliferation and turnover of macromolecular components of the extracellular matrix. Here, intracellular signaling events in growth-inhibited embryonic rat lung fibroblasts (RFL-6) upon stimulation with TGF-beta1 were investigated. TGF-beta1 rapidly induced the activation of c-Raf-1, MEK-1, and MAPK p42 and p44. The activation of this pathway by TGF-beta1 did not depend on autocrine platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Inhibition of the binding of growth factors to their tyrosine kinase receptors did not affect MAPK activation by TGF-beta1. Ras activation by TGF-beta1 was significantly lower compared to the activation by PDGF or bFGF. The intracellular transduction of the TGF-beta1 signal was completely suppressed by depletion or inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC). It is shown that calcium-dependent isoforms of PKC are required for MAPK activation by TGF-beta1. PMID:9712718

  15. Transcription factor AP1 binds the functional region of the promoter and regulates gene expression of human PPARdelta in LoVo cell.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaogang; Yang, Xudong; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2013-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ gene (PPARδ) is correlated with carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer, but the regulation of its gene transcription remains unclear. We herein report that AP1 binds the promoter and regulates PPARδ gene expression. With a luciferase reporter system, we identified a functional promoter region of 30 bp of PPARδ gene by deletion and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using site-directed mutagenesis and decoy analyses, we demonstrated that AP1 bound the functional transcriptional factor binding site in a region extending from -176 to -73 of the PPARδ promoter, which was confirmed using EMSA and supershift assays. Consequently, inhibition of the AP1 binding site led to decreased PPARδ mRNA. Our study demonstrated that AP1 is the transcriptional factor that contributes to PPARδ expression in LoVo cells.

  16. The NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase mimics TCR signalling pathways, inducing NFAT and AP-1 by RAS-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Turner, Suzanne D; Yeung, Debra; Hadfield, Kathryn; Cook, Simon J; Alexander, Denis R

    2007-04-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) expression is associated with the lymphoid malignancy anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and results from a t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. We show that NPM-ALK induces Ras activation and phosphorylation of the ERK MAP Kinase consistent with activation of the Ras-MAP Kinase pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activation of Ras is necessary for inducing transcription via NFAT/AP-1 composite transcriptional binding sites. This activity is dependent on NPM-ALK forming complexes with proteins that bind to autophosphorylated tyrosine residues at positions 156, 567 and 664, associated with binding to IRS-1, Shc and PLCgamma, respectively. Specifically, NPM-ALK activates transcription from the TRE promoter element, an AP-1 binding region, an activity dependent on both Ras and Shc activity. Our results show that NPM-ALK mimics activated T-cell receptor signalling by inducing pathways associated with the activation of NFAT/AP-1 transcription factors that bind to promoter elements found in a broad array of cytokine genes.

  17. Noncanonical Wnt-4 signaling enhances bone regeneration of mesenchymal stem cells in craniofacial defects through activation of p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jia; Sonoyama, Wataru; Wang, Zhuo; Jin, Qiming; Zhang, Chengfei; Krebsbach, Paul H; Giannobile, William; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2007-10-19

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can be differentiated into osteoblasts and provide an excellent cell source for bone regeneration and repair. Recently, the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway has been found to play a critical role in skeletal development and osteogenesis, implying that Wnts can be utilized to improve de novo bone formation mediated by MSCs. However, it is unknown whether noncanonical Wnt signaling regulates osteogenic differentiation. Here, we find that Wnt-4 enhanced in vitro osteogenic differentiation of MSCs isolated from human adult craniofacial tissues and promoted bone formation in vivo. Whereas Wnt-4 did not stabilize beta-catenin, it activated p38 MAPK in a novel noncanonical signaling pathway. The activation of p38 was dependent on Axin and was required for the enhancement of MSC differentiation by Wnt-4. Moreover, using two different models of craniofacial bone injury, we found that MSCs genetically engineered to express Wnt-4 enhanced osteogenesis and improved the repair of craniofacial defects in vivo. Taken together, our results reveal that noncanonical Wnt signaling could also play a role in osteogenic differentiation. Wnt-4 may have a potential use in improving bone regeneration and repair of craniofacial defects.

  18. Neferine, an alkaloid from lotus seed embryo, inhibits human lung cancer cell growth by MAPK activation and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Poornima, Paramasivan; Weng, Ching Feng; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    Neferine is the major bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the seed embryo of a traditional medicinal plant Nelumbo nucifera (Lotus). Epidemiological studies have revealed the therapeutic potential of lotus seed embryo. Although several mechanisms have been proposed, a clear anticancer action mechanism of neferine on lung cancer cells is still not known. Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the world, and the patients with advanced stage of nonsmall lung cancer require adjunct chemotherapy after surgical resection for the eradication of cancer cells. In this study, the effects of neferine were evaluated and characterized in A549 cells. Neferine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner with the hypergeneration of reactive oxygen species, activation of MAPKs, lipid peroxidation, depletion of cellular antioxidant pool, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and intracellular calcium accumulation. Furthermore, neferine treatment leads to the inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB and Bcl2, upregulation of Bax and Bad, release of cytochrome C, activation of caspase cascade, and DNA fragmentation. In addition, neferine could induce p53 and its effector protein p21 and downregulation of cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 thereby inducing G1 cell cycle arrest. These results suggest a novel function of neferine as an apoptosis inducer in lung cancer cells.

  19. Iron induces hepatocytes death via MAPK activation and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway: beneficial role of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Sil, Parames C

    2012-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the beneficial role of glycine in iron (FeSO₄) induced oxidative damage in murine hepatocytes. Exposure of hepatocytes to 20 μM FeSO₄ for 3 hours enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and induced alteration in biochemical parameters related to hepatic oxidative stress. Investigating cell signalling pathway, we observed that iron (FeSO₄) intoxication caused NF-κB activation as well as the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs. Iron (FeSO₄) administration also disrupted Bcl-2/Bad protein balance, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, released cytochrome c and induced the activation of caspases and cleavage of PARP protein. Flow cytometric analysis also confirmed that iron (FeSO₄) induced hepatocytes death is apoptotic in nature. Glycine (10 mM) supplementation, on the other hand, reduced all the iron (FeSO₄) induced apoptotic indices. Combining, results suggest that glycine could be a beneficial agent against iron mediated toxicity in hepatocytes. PMID:22817335

  20. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 induces apoptosis in hippocampus through downregulating PI3K/Akt and upregulating p38 MAPK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jie, P; Hong, Z; Tian, Y; Li, Y; Lin, L; Zhou, L; Du, Y; Chen, L; Chen, L

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a calcium-permeable cation channel that is sensitive to cell swelling, arachidonic acid and its metabolites, epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, which are associated with cerebral ischemia. The activation of TRPV4 induces cytotoxicity in many types of cells, accompanied by an increase in the intracellular free calcium concentration. TRPV4 activation modulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/ protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival. Herein, we examined TRPV4-induced neuronal apoptosis by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of a TRPV4 agonist (GSK1016790A) and assessed its involvement in cerebral ischemic injury. ICV injection of GSK1016790A dose-dependently induced apoptosis in the mouse hippocampi (GSK-injected mice). The protein level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK (p-p38 MAPK) was markedly increased and that of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (p-JNK) was virtually unchanged. TRPV4 activation also decreased Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio and increased the cleaved caspase-3 protein level, and these effects were blocked by a PI3K agonist and a p38 MAPK antagonist, but were unaffected by a JNK antagonist. ICV injection of the TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047 reduced brain infarction after reperfusion for 48 h in mice with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In addition, HC-067047 treatment attenuated the decrease in the phosphorylated Akt protein level and the increase in p-p38 MAPK protein level at 48 h after MCAO, while the increase in p-JNK protein level remained unchanged. Finally, the decreased Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio and the increased cleaved caspase-3 protein level at 48 h after MCAO were markedly attenuated by HC-067047. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 induces apoptosis by downregulating PI3K/Akt and upregulating p38 MAPK signaling pathways, which is involved in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:26043075

  1. Attenuation of the macrophage inflammatory activity by TiO₂ nanotubes via inhibition of MAPK and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Patricia; Mazare, Anca; Schmuki, Patrik; Cimpean, Anisoara

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial implantation in a living tissue triggers the activation of macrophages in inflammatory events, promoting the transcription of pro-inflammatory mediator genes. The initiation of macrophage inflammatory processes is mainly regulated by signaling proteins of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and by nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways. We have previously shown that titania nanotubes modified Ti surfaces (Ti/TiO2) mitigate the immune response, compared with flat Ti surfaces; however, little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) by which this nanotopography attenuates the inflammatory activity of macrophages. Thus, we analyzed the effects of TiO2 nanotubes on the activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in standard and lipopolysaccharide-evoked conditions. Results showed that the Ti/TiO2 significantly reduce the expression levels of the phosphorylated forms of p38, ERK1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), IKKβ, and IkB-α. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the p65 nuclear accumulation on the nanotubular surface was remarked. Following, by using specific MAPK inhibitors, we observed that lipopolysaccharide-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and nitric oxide was significantly inhibited on the Ti/TiO2 surface via p38 and ERK1/2, but not via JNK. However, the selective inhibitor for JNK signaling pathway (SP600125) was effective in reducing tumor necrosis factor alpha release as well as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and nitric oxide production. Altogether, these data suggest that titania nanotubes can attenuate the macrophage inflammatory response via suppression of MAPK and NF-κB pathways providing a potential mechanism for their anti-inflammatory activity.

  2. Phosphorylation pattern of the p90rsk and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) molecule: comparison of in vitro and in vivo matured porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Schuon, C; Ebeling, S; Meinecke, B

    2007-08-01

    The overall objective was to elucidate the phosphorylation pattern and activity of the kinase p90rsk, a substrate of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), during in vitro and in vivo maturation of pig oocytes. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were collected from slaughtered pigs and matured in vitro (0, 22, 26, 30, 34, 46 h) with and without the MEK inhibitor U0126. For in vivo maturation, gilts were stimulated with equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) (600-800 IU). Maturation was induced 72 h later with hCG (500 IU). Oocytes were obtained surgically (0, 22, 30 h). The samples were submitted to electrophoresis and protein blotting analysis. Enhanced chemiluminescence was used for visualization. In vitro matured oocytes were further submitted to a commercially available radioactive kinase assay to determine kinase activity. It was shown that oocytes, as well as cumulus cells, already possess a partially phosphorylated p90rsk at the time of removal from follicles, with a further phosphorylation of the molecule occurring between 22-24 h after the initiation of culture, and in vivo maturation. The phosphorylation of p90rsk coincides with the phosphorylation of MAPK and can be prevented by U0126, indicating a MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of p90rsk. Phosphorylation of the in vivo matured oocytes occurred shown as a band of less than 200 kDa. This is presumably a molecule complex, with MAPK not being a component. Therefore, the p90rsk molecule in vivo exists as a dimer. Determination of kinase activity demonstrated decreasing enzyme activities. This led to the conclusion that the assay is not specific for p90rsk, instead measuring p70S6 kinase activities.

  3. γ-Enolase C-terminal peptide promotes cell survival and neurite outgrowth by activation of the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Anja; Obermajer, Nataša; Kos, Janko

    2012-04-15

    γ-Enolase, a glycolytic enzyme, is expressed specifically in neurons. It exerts neurotrophic activity and has been suggested to regulate growth, differentiation, survival and regeneration of neurons. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of γ-enolase in PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) signalling, the two pathways triggered predominantly by neurotrophic factors. Whereas the PI3K/Akt pathway, rather than the MAPK/ERK pathway, is involved in γ-enolase-enhanced cell survival, γ-enolase-stimulated neurite outgrowth requires both pathways, i.e. the activation of both PI3K and ERK1/2, leading to subsequent expression of the growth-cone-specific protein GAP-43 (growth-associated protein of 43 kDa). MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase) and PI3K inhibition blocked or attenuated the neurite outgrowth associated with dynamic remodelling of the actin-based cytoskeleton. We show that γ-enolase-mediated PI3K activation regulates RhoA kinase, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton organization. Moreover, the inhibition of RhoA downstream effector ROCK (Rho-associated kinase) results in enhanced γ-enolase-induced neurite outgrowth, accompanied by actin polymerization and its redistribution to growth cones. Our results show that γ-enolase controls neuronal survival, differentiation and neurite regeneration by activating the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signalling pathways, resulting in downstream regulation of the molecular and cellular processes of cytoskeleton reorganization and cell remodelling, activation of transcriptional factors and regulation of the cell cycle.

  4. Attenuation of the macrophage inflammatory activity by TiO2 nanotubes via inhibition of MAPK and NF-κB pathways

    PubMed Central

    Neacsu, Patricia; Mazare, Anca; Schmuki, Patrik; Cimpean, Anisoara

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial implantation in a living tissue triggers the activation of macrophages in inflammatory events, promoting the transcription of pro-inflammatory mediator genes. The initiation of macrophage inflammatory processes is mainly regulated by signaling proteins of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and by nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways. We have previously shown that titania nanotubes modified Ti surfaces (Ti/TiO2) mitigate the immune response, compared with flat Ti surfaces; however, little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism(s) by which this nanotopography attenuates the inflammatory activity of macrophages. Thus, we analyzed the effects of TiO2 nanotubes on the activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in standard and lipopolysaccharide-evoked conditions. Results showed that the Ti/TiO2 significantly reduce the expression levels of the phosphorylated forms of p38, ERK1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), IKKβ, and IkB-α. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the p65 nuclear accumulation on the nanotubular surface was remarked. Following, by using specific MAPK inhibitors, we observed that lipopolysaccharide-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and nitric oxide was significantly inhibited on the Ti/TiO2 surface via p38 and ERK1/2, but not via JNK. However, the selective inhibitor for JNK signaling pathway (SP600125) was effective in reducing tumor necrosis factor alpha release as well as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and nitric oxide production. Altogether, these data suggest that titania nanotubes can attenuate the macrophage inflammatory response via suppression of MAPK and NF-κB pathways providing a potential mechanism for their anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26491301

  5. p12CDK2-AP1 interacts with CD82 to regulate the proliferation and survival of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chai, Juan; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Shen, Zhi-Yuan; Liang, Liang; Yang, Xiang-Ming; Ma, Chao; Ni, Qian-Wei; Sun, Mo-Yi

    2016-08-01

    p12 cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)-associating protein 1 (p12CDK2-AP1) has been demonstrated to negatively regulate the activity of CDK2. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We aimed to determine the potential binding proteins of p12CDK2-AP1 and to elucidate the role of p12CDK2-AP1 in the regulation of the proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and in vivo growth of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. The protein-protein interaction was predicted using computational decision templates. The predicted p12CDK2‑AP1 interacting proteins were overexpressed in human oral squamous cell carcinoma OSCC-15 cells, and the protein binding was examined using co-precipitation (Co-IP). Cell proliferation and invasion were determined via MTT assay and Transwell system, respectively. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis. The in vivo growth of OSCC-15 cells was examined in nude mouse tumor xenografts. We found that overexpression of either p12CDK2-AP1 or CD82 significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasion but promoted the apoptosis of OSCC-15 cells (P<0.05). Importantly, combined overexpression of p12CDK2-AP1 and CD82 showed synergistic antitumor activity compared with the overexpression of a single protein alone (P<0.05). Additionally, the simultaneous overexpression of p12CDK2-AP1 and CD82 significantly suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of OSCC-15 cells in nude mice compared with the negative control (P<0.05). Our findings indicate that p12CDK2-AP1 interacts with CD82 to play a functional role in suppressing the in vitro and in vivo growth of OSCC-15 cells. PMID:27349208

  6. Ginsenoside-Rp1 inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation via impaired glycoprotein VI signalling pathway, tyrosine phosphorylation and MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Endale, M; Lee, WM; Kamruzzaman, SM; Kim, SD; Park, JY; Park, MH; Park, TY; Park, HJ; Cho, JY; Rhee, MH

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Ginsenosides are the main constituents for the pharmacological effects of Panax ginseng. Such effects of ginsenosides including cardioprotective and anti-platelet activities have shown stability and bioavailability limitations. However, information on the anti-platelet activity of ginsenoside-Rp1 (G-Rp1), a stable derivative of ginsenoside-Rg3, is scarce. We examined the ability of G-Rp1 to modulate agonist-induced platelet activation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH G-Rp1 in vitro and ex vivo effects on agonist-induced platelet-aggregation, granule-secretion, [Ca2+]i mobilization, integrin-αIIbβ3 activation were examined. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and MAPK expressions and levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the glycoprotein VI (GPVI) signalling pathway components were also studied. G-Rp1 effects on arteriovenous shunt thrombus formation in rats or tail bleeding time and ex vivo coagulation time in mice were determined. KEY RESULT G-Rp1 markedly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, thrombin or ADP. While G-Rp1 elevated cAMP levels, it dose-dependently suppressed collagen-induced ATP-release, thromboxane secretion, p-selectin expression, [Ca2+]i mobilization and αIIbβ3 activation and attenuated p38MAPK and ERK2 activation. Furthermore, G-Rp1 inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple components (Fyn, Lyn, Syk, LAT, PI3K and PLCγ2) of the GPVI signalling pathway. G-Rp1 inhibited in vivo thrombus formation and ex vivo platelet aggregation and ATP secretion without affecting tail bleeding time and coagulation time, respectively. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS G-Rp1 inhibits collagen-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation through modulation of early GPVI signalling events, and this effect involves VASP stimulation, and ERK2 and p38-MAPK inhibition. These data suggest that G-Rp1 may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases involving aberrant platelet activation. PMID

  7. Gallic acid ameliorates renal functions by inhibiting the activation of p38 MAPK in experimentally induced type 2 diabetic rats and cultured rat proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Amjid; Ahsan, Haseeb; Mujeeb, Mohd; Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients that accounts for about 40% of deaths in type 2 diabetes. p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), a serine-threonine kinase, plays an important role in tissue inflammation and is known to be activated under conditions of oxidative stress and hyperglycemia. The role of p38 MAPK has been demonstrated in DN, and its inhibition has been suggested as an alternative approach in the treatment of DN. In the present study, we investigated the nephroprotective effects of an anti-inflammatory phenolic compound, gallic acid (GA, 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), in high fat diet/streptozotocin (HFD/STZ) induce type 2 diabetic wistar albino rats. GA (25 mg/kgbw and 50 mg/kgbw, p.o.) treatment for 16 weeks post induction of diabetes led to a significant reduction in the levels of blood glucose, HbA1c, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and proteinuria as well as a significant reduction in the levels of creatinine clearance. GA significantly inhibited the renal p38 MAPK and nuclear factor kappa B (N-κB) activation as well as significantly reduced the levels of renal transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and fibronectin. Treatment with GA resulted in a significant reduction in the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines viz. interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Moreover, GA significantly lowered renal pathology and attenuated renal oxidative stress. In cultured rat NRK 52E proximal tubular epithelial cells, GA treatment inhibited high glucose induced activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB as well as suppressed proinflammatory cytokine synthesis. The results of the present study provide in vivo and in vitro evidences that the p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DN, and GA attenuates the p38 MAPK-mediated renal dysfunction in HFD/STZ induced type 2 diabetic rats.

  8. Vorinostat Enhances Cytotoxicity of SN-38 and Temozolomide in Ewing Sarcoma Cells and Activates STAT3/AKT/MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Valerie B.; Vetter, Nancy S.; Kamara, Davida F.; Collier, Anderson B.; Gresh, Renee C.; Kolb, E. Anders

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been evaluated in patients with Ewing sarcoma (EWS) but demonstrated limited activity. To better understand the potential for HDACi in EWS, we evaluated the combination of the HDACi vorinostat, with DNA damaging agents SN-38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan and topoisomerase 1 inhibitor) plus the alkylating agent temozolomide (ST). Drugs were evaluated in sequential and simultaneous combinations in two EWS cell lines. Results demonstrate that cell viability, DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are dependent on the sequence of drug administration. Enhanced cytotoxicity is exhibited in vitro in EWS cell lines treated with ST administered before vorinostat, which was modestly higher than concomitant treatment and superior to vorinostat administered before ST. Drug combinations downregulate cyclin D1 to induce G0/G1 arrest and promote apoptosis by cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP. When ST is administered before or concomitantly with vorinostat there is activation of STAT3, MAPK and the p53 pathway. In contrast, when vorinostat is administered before ST, there is DNA repair, increased AKT phosphorylation and reduced H2B acetylation. Inhibition of AKT using the small molecule inhibitor MK-2206 did not restore H2B acetylation. Combining ST with the dual ALK and IGF-1R inhibitor, AZD3463 simultaneously inhibited STAT3 and AKT to enhance the cytotoxic effects of ST and further reduce cell growth suggesting that STAT3 and AKT activation were in part mediated by ALK and IGF-1R signaling. In summary, potent antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity were demonstrated for ST induced DNA damage before or simultaneous with HDAC inhibition and cell death was mediated through the p53 pathway. These observations may aid in designing new protocols for treating pediatric patients with high-risk EWS. PMID:26571493

  9. Apoptosis Induction by the Total Flavonoids from Arachniodes exilis in HepG2 Cells through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysfunction Involving MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chaomei; Wei, Han; Yin, Changchang; Ruan, Jinlan

    2014-01-01

    Arachniodes exilis is used as a folk medicine in China and proved to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and sedative activities. In the present study, the antitumor effect of the total flavonoids of A. exilis (TFAE) against HepG2 cells was evaluated. The results showed that TFAE inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dosage- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry and Hoechst 33342 fluorescence staining results showed that TFAE could significantly increase the apoptosis ratio of HepG2 cells, which is accompanied with increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Western blotting indicated that TFAE downregulated the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, increased cytochrome c release, and activated the caspases-3 and -9. Further analysis showed that TFAE stimulated the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). However, treatment with NAC (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and MAPK-specific inhibitors (SP600125 and SB203580) could reverse the changes of these apoptotic-related proteins. These results suggested that TFAE possessed potential anticancer activity in HepG2 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction involving MAPK pathway. PMID:24976852

  10. Extracellular Hsp90 serves as a co-factor for MAPK activation and latent viral gene expression during de novo infection by KSHV

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Zhiqiang; DeFee, Michael; Isaacs, Jennifer S.; Parsons, Chris

    2010-07-20

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. KSHV interaction with the cell membrane triggers activation of specific intracellular signal transduction pathways to facilitate virus entry, nuclear trafficking, and ultimately viral oncogene expression. Extracellular heat shock protein 90 localizes to the cell surface (csHsp90) and facilitates signal transduction in cancer cell lines, but whether csHsp90 assists in the coordination of KSHV gene expression through these or other mechanisms is unknown. Using a recently characterized non-permeable inhibitor specifically targeting csHsp90 and Hsp90-specific antibodies, we show that csHsp90 inhibition suppresses KSHV gene expression during de novo infection, and that this effect is mediated largely through the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation by KSHV. Moreover, we show that targeting csHsp90 reduces constitutive MAPK expression and the release of infectious viral particles by patient-derived, KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cells. These data suggest that csHsp90 serves as an important co-factor for KSHV-initiated MAPK activation and provide proof-of-concept for the potential benefit of targeting csHsp90 for the treatment or prevention of KSHV-associated illnesses.

  11. PBX3 promotes migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Bo; Gu, Jin; Ji, Deng-Bo; Li, Zhao-Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox (PBX)3 in migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. METHODS: We detected PBX3 expression in five cell lines and surgical specimens from 111 patients with CRC using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We forced expression of PBX3 in low metastatic HT-29 and SW480 cells and knocked down expression of PBX3 in highly metastatic LOVO and HCT-8 cells. Wound healing and Boyden chamber assays were used to detect cell migration and invasion after altered expression of PBX3. Western blot was performed to detect the change of signaling molecule ERK1/2 following PBX3 overexpression. RESULTS: High level of PBX3 expression was correlated with the invasive potential of CRC cells, and significantly associated with lymph node invasion (P = 0.02), distant metastasis (P = 0.04), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.03) and poor overall survival of patients (P < 0.05). Ectopic expression of PBX3 in low metastatic cells was shown to promote migration and invasion, while inhibited PBX3 expression in highly metastatic cells suppressed migration and invasion. Furthermore, upregulation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was found to be one of the targeted molecules responsible for PBX3-induced CRC cell migration and invasion. CONCLUSION: PBX3 induces invasion and metastasis of CRC cells partially through activation of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:25561793

  12. Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) promotes human gallbladder tumor growth via activation of the AXL/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Maolan; Lu, Jianhua; Zhang, Fei; Li, Huaifeng; Zhang, Bingtai; Wu, Xiangsong; Tan, Zhujun; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Guofeng; Mu, Jiasheng; Shu, Yijun; Bao, Runfa; Ding, Qichen; Wu, Wenguang; Dong, Ping; Gu, Jun; Liu, Yingbin

    2014-12-28

    The transcriptional coactivator Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), a key regulator of cell proliferation and organ size in vertebrates, has been implicated in various malignancies. However, little is known about the expression and biological function of YAP1 in human gallbladder cancer (GBC). In this study we examined the clinical significance and biological functions of YAP1 in GBC and found that nuclear YAP1 and its target gene AXL were overexpressed in GBC tissues. We also observed a significant correlation between high YAP1 and AXL expression levels and worse prognosis. The depletion of YAP1 using lentivirus shRNAs significantly inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest in S phase in concordance with the decrease of CDK2, CDC25A, and cyclin A, and resulted in increased cell apoptosis and invasive repression in GBC cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of YAP1 also inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that the activation of the AXL/MAPK pathway was involved in the oncogenic functions of YAP1 in GBC. These results demonstrated that YAP1 is a putative oncogene and represents a prognostic marker and potentially a novel therapeutic target for GBC.

  13. Celecoxib Inhibits the Lytic Activation of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus through Down-Regulation of RTA Expression by Inhibiting the Activation of p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jungang; Jiang, Liangyu; Lan, Ke; Chen, Xulin

    2015-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV's lytic replication cycle is critical for the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated diseases. Despite recent progress in the development of treatments for KSHV associated malignancies, these therapies are not completely efficacious and cause side effects. Therefore, more effective therapies with antiviral agents against KSHV are urgently needed. In this study, we identified celecoxib as an antiviral agent against KSHV. Our data suggest that celecoxib inhibits the lytic activation of KSHV through the down-regulation of the expression of the lytic switch protein, replication and transcription activator (RTA), by inhibiting the activation of p38 MAPK. Therefore, celecoxib may provide a candidate inhibitor for the therapeutic research of KSHV-related malignancies.

  14. Baicalin Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension to Improve Hypoxic Cor Pulmonale by Reducing the Activity of the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway and MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuangquan; Wang, Yiran; Liu, Panpan; Chen, Ali; Chen, Mayun; Yao, Dan; Xu, Xiaomei; Wang, Liangxing; Huang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Baicalin has a protective effect on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats, but the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. Thus, investigating the potential mechanism of this effect was the aim of the present study. Model rats that display hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale under control conditions were successfully generated. We measured a series of indicators to observe the levels of pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. We assessed the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the pulmonary arteriole walls and pulmonary tissue homogenates using immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses, respectively. The matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 9 protein and mRNA levels in the pulmonary arteriole walls were measured using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrated that baicalin not only reduced p38 MAPK activation in both the pulmonary arteriole walls and tissue homogenates but also downregulated the protein and mRNA expression levels of MMP-9 in the pulmonary arteriole walls. This downregulation was accompanied by the attenuation of pulmonary hypertension, arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. These results suggest that baicalin may attenuate pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale, which are induced by chronic hypoxia, by downregulating the p38 MAPK/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:27688788

  15. Baicalin Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension to Improve Hypoxic Cor Pulmonale by Reducing the Activity of the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway and MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiran; Chen, Ali; Chen, Mayun; Yao, Dan; Xu, Xiaomei; Wang, Liangxing

    2016-01-01

    Baicalin has a protective effect on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats, but the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. Thus, investigating the potential mechanism of this effect was the aim of the present study. Model rats that display hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale under control conditions were successfully generated. We measured a series of indicators to observe the levels of pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. We assessed the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the pulmonary arteriole walls and pulmonary tissue homogenates using immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses, respectively. The matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 9 protein and mRNA levels in the pulmonary arteriole walls were measured using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrated that baicalin not only reduced p38 MAPK activation in both the pulmonary arteriole walls and tissue homogenates but also downregulated the protein and mRNA expression levels of MMP-9 in the pulmonary arteriole walls. This downregulation was accompanied by the attenuation of pulmonary hypertension, arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. These results suggest that baicalin may attenuate pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale, which are induced by chronic hypoxia, by downregulating the p38 MAPK/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:27688788

  16. Baicalin Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension to Improve Hypoxic Cor Pulmonale by Reducing the Activity of the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway and MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiran; Chen, Ali; Chen, Mayun; Yao, Dan; Xu, Xiaomei; Wang, Liangxing

    2016-01-01

    Baicalin has a protective effect on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats, but the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. Thus, investigating the potential mechanism of this effect was the aim of the present study. Model rats that display hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale under control conditions were successfully generated. We measured a series of indicators to observe the levels of pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. We assessed the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the pulmonary arteriole walls and pulmonary tissue homogenates using immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses, respectively. The matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 9 protein and mRNA levels in the pulmonary arteriole walls were measured using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrated that baicalin not only reduced p38 MAPK activation in both the pulmonary arteriole walls and tissue homogenates but also downregulated the protein and mRNA expression levels of MMP-9 in the pulmonary arteriole walls. This downregulation was accompanied by the attenuation of pulmonary hypertension, arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. These results suggest that baicalin may attenuate pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale, which are induced by chronic hypoxia, by downregulating the p38 MAPK/MMP-9 pathway.

  17. The dynamics of MAPK inactivation at fertilization in mouse eggs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Garcia, Jose Raul; Bradley, Josephine; Nomikos, Michail; Paul, Laboni; Machaty, Zoltan; Lai, F. Anthony; Swann, Karl

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Egg activation at fertilization in mammals is initiated by prolonged Ca2+ oscillations that trigger the completion of meiosis and formation of pronuclei. A fall in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity is essential for pronuclear formation, but the precise timing and mechanism of decline are unknown. Here, we have measured the dynamics of MAPK pathway inactivation during fertilization of mouse eggs using novel chemiluminescent MAPK activity reporters. This reveals that the MAPK activity decrease begins during the Ca2+ oscillations, but MAPK does not completely inactivate until after pronuclear formation. The MAPKs present in eggs are Mos, MAP2K1 and MAP2K2 (MEK1 and MEK2, respectively) and MAPK3 and MAPK1 (ERK1 and ERK2, respectively). Notably, the MAPK activity decline at fertilization is not explained by upstream destruction of Mos, because a decrease in the signal from a Mos–luciferase reporter is not associated with egg activation. Furthermore, Mos overexpression does not affect the timing of MAPK inactivation or pronuclear formation. However, the late decrease in MAPK could be rapidly reversed by the protein phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid. These data suggest that the completion of meiosis in mouse zygotes is driven by an increased phosphatase activity and not by a decline in Mos levels or MEK activity. PMID:24741069

  18. Rosiglitazone attenuates NF-{kappa}B-dependent ICAM-1 and TNF-{alpha} production caused by homocysteine via inhibiting ERK{sub 1/2}/p38MAPK activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yong-Ping; Liu, Yu-Hui; Chen, Jia; Song, Tao; You, Yu; Tang, Zhen-Yan; Li, Yuan-Jian; Zhang, Guo-Gang . E-mail: xyzgg2006@sina.com

    2007-08-17

    Previous studies demonstrated an important interaction between nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) activation and homocysteine (Hcy)-induced cytokines expression in endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the underlying mechanism remains illusive. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hcy on NF-{kappa}B-mediated sICAM-1, TNF-{alpha} production and the possible involvement of ERK{sub 1/2}/p38MAPK pathway. The effects of rosiglitazone intervention were also examined. Our results show that Hcy increased the levels of sICAM-1 and TNF-{alpha} in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. This effect was significantly depressed by rosiglitazone and different inhibitors (PDTC, NF-{kappa}B inhibitor; PD98059, MEK inhibitor; SB203580, p38MAPK specific inhibitor; and staurosporine, PKC inhibitor). Next, we investigated the effect of Hcy on ERK{sub 1/2}/p38MAPK pathway and NF-{kappa}B activity in HUVECs. The results show that Hcy activated both ERK{sub 1/2}/p38MAPK pathway and NF-{kappa}B-DNA-binding activity. These effects were markedly inhibited by rosiglitazone as well as other inhibitors (SB203580, PD98059, and PDTC). Further, the pretreatment of staurosporine abrogated ERK{sub 1/2}/p38MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting that Hcy-induced ERK{sub 1/2}/p38MAPK activation is associated with PKC activity. Our results provide evidence that Hcy-induced NF-{kappa}B activation was mediated by activation of ERK{sub 1/2}/p38MAPK pathway involving PKC activity. Rosiglitazone reduces the NF-{kappa}B-mediated sICAM-1 and TNF-{alpha} production induced by Hcy via inhibition of ERK{sub 1/2}/p38MAPK pa0011thw.

  19. Relationship between apoptosis and the cell cycle in lymphocytes: roles of protein kinase C, tyrosine phosphorylation, and AP1.

    PubMed

    Walker, P R; Kwast-Welfeld, J; Gourdeau, H; Leblanc, J; Neugebauer, W; Sikorska, M

    1993-07-01

    The mechanism of switching between the cell cycle and active cell death (apoptosis) was investigated in cytokine-dependent CTLL cells. These cells proliferate in the presence of interleukin 2 (IL2), but accumulate in early G1 and undergo apoptosis in its absence. In the absence of IL2 the cells also become sensitive to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. Using specific inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases we established that two signals are required to fully repress cell death and stimulate G1 progression. One of these signals activates protein kinase C (PKC) which represses cell death and the other activates a tyrosine kinase which confers glucocorticoid resistance and permits cell cycle progression. Thus, phorbol esters can activate PKC and maintain cell viability in the absence of IL2, but the cells cannot proliferate. Moreover, the cells remain sensitive to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis unless the tyrosine kinase-mediated signal is also given. There is a correlation between the presence of AP1 DNA-binding activity and the repression of the cell death pathway. The c-jun gene is expressed constitutively and both IL2 and phorbol esters induce the expression of c-fos to generate a functional AP1 capable of repressing cell death. However, only interleukin 2 can initiate the tyrosine kinase-mediated modification that confers dexamethasone resistance and permits G1 progression. In the absence of IL2 glucocorticoids stimulate AP1 degradation and induce apoptosis.

  20. 4-Hydroxynonenal enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via 5-lipoxygenase-mediated activation of ERK and p38 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung J.; Kim, Chae E.; Yun, Mi R.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Shin, Hwa K.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-01-15

    Exaggerated levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) co-exist in macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions, and activated macrophages produce MMP-9 that degrades atherosclerotic plaque constituents. This study investigated the effects of HNE on MMP-9 production, and the potential role for 5-LO derivatives in MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with HNE led to activation of 5-LO, as measured by leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production. This was associated with an increased production of MMP-9, which was blunted by inhibition of 5-LO with MK886, a 5-LO inhibitor or with 5-LO siRNA. A cysteinyl-LT{sub 1} (cysLT{sub 1}) receptor antagonist, REV-5901 as well as a BLT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, U-75302, also attenuated MMP-9 production induced by HNE. Furthermore, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT (LTC{sub 4} and LTD{sub 4}) enhanced MMP-9 production in macrophages, suggesting a pivotal role for 5-LO in HNE-mediated production of MMP-9. Among the MAPK pathways, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, but not JNK. Linked to these results, a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as an ERK inhibitor blunted MMP-9 production induced by LT. Collectively, these data suggest that 5-LO-derived LT mediates HNE-induced MMP-9 production via activation of ERK and p38 MAPK pathways, consequently leading to plaque instability in atherosclerosis.

  1. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) induces cell death through MAPK-dependent mechanism in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Hun; Yoo, Chong Il; Kim, Hui Taek; Park, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Keun Kim, Yong . E-mail: kim430@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies in cell death induced by PPAR{gamma} agonists in osteoblastic cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone, PPAR{gamma} agonists, resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent cell death, which was largely attributed to apoptosis. But a PPAR{alpha} agonist ciprofibrate did not affect the cell death. Ciglitazone caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ciglitazone-induced cell death was prevented by antioxidants, suggesting an important role of ROS generation in the ciglitazone-induced cell death. ROS generation and cell death induced by ciglitazone were inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone treatment caused activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Activation of ERK was dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that of p38 was independent. Ciglitazone-induced cell death was significantly prevented by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK upstream kinase MEK1/2, and SB203580, a p38 inhibitor. Ciglitazone treatment increased Bax expression and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and its effect was prevented by N-acetylcysteine, PD98059, and SB203580. Ciglitazone induced caspase activation, which was prevented by PD98059 and SB203580. The general caspase inhibitor z-DEVD-FMK and the specific inhibitor of caspases-3 DEVD-CHO exerted the protective effect against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. The EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and suramin protected against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that the MAPK signaling pathways play an active role in mediating the ciglitazone-induced cell death of osteoblasts and function upstream of a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. These data may provide a novel insight into potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of osteoporosis.

  2. The activity of Mblk-1, a mushroom body-selective transcription factor from the honeybee, is modulated by the ras/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Min; Kunieda, Takekazu; Kubo, Takeo

    2003-05-16

    We previously identified a gene, termed Mblk-1, that encodes a putative transcription factor with two DNA-binding motifs expressed preferentially in the mushroom body of the honeybee brain, and its preferred binding sequence, termed Mblk-1-binding element (MBE) (Takeuchi, H., Kage, E., Sawata, M., Kamikouchi, A., Ohashi, K., Ohara, M., Fujiyuki, T., Kunieda, T., Sekimizu, K., Natori, S., and Kubo, T. (2001) Insect Mol Biol 10, 487-494; Park, J.-M., Kunieda. T., Takeuchi, H., and Kubo, T. (2002) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 291, 23-28). In the present study, the effect of Mblk-1 on transcription of genes containing MBE in Drosophila Schneider's Line 2 cells was examined using a luciferase assay. Mblk-1 expression transactivated promoters containing MBEs approximately 2-7-fold. Deletion experiments revealed that RHF2, the second DNA-binding domain of Mblk-1, was necessary for the transcriptional activity. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylated Mblk-1 at Ser-444 in vitro, and the Mblk-1-induced transactivation was stimulated by phosphorylation of Ser-444 by the Ras/MAPK pathway in the luciferase assay. These results suggest that Mblk-1 is a transcription factor that might function in the mushroom body neuronal circuits downstream of the Ras/MAPK pathway in the honeybee brain.

  3. Attenuated Leishmania induce pro-inflammatory mediators and influence leishmanicidal activity by p38 MAPK dependent phagosome maturation in Leishmania donovani co-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Somenath; Bose, Dipayan; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Das, Subhadip; Chakraborty, Sreeparna; Das, Tanya; Saha, Krishna Das

    2016-01-01

    Promastigote form of Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, delays phagosome maturation and resides inside macrophages. But till date limited study has been done to manipulate the phagosomal machinery of macrophages to restrict Leishmania growth. Attenuated Leishmania strain exposed RAW 264.7 cells showed a respiratory burst and enhanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The augmentation of pro-inflammatory activity is mostly attributed to p38 MAPK and p44/42 MAPK. In our study, these activated macrophages are found to induce phagosome maturation when infected with pathogenic Leishmania donovani. Increased co-localization of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester labeled pathogenic L. donovani with Lysosome was found. Moreover, increased co-localization was observed between pathogenic L. donovani and late phagosomal markers viz. Rab7, Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein 1, Cathepsin D, Rab9, and V-ATPase which indicate phagosome maturation. It was also observed that inhibition of V-type ATPase caused significant hindrance in attenuated Leishmania induced phagosome maturation. Finally, it was confirmed that p38 MAPK is the key player in acidification and maturation of phagosome in attenuated Leishmania strain pre-exposed macrophages. To our knowledge, this study for the first time reported an approach to induce phagosome maturation in L. donovani infected macrophages which could potentiate short-term prophylactic response in future. PMID:26928472

  4. Attenuated Leishmania induce pro-inflammatory mediators and influence leishmanicidal activity by p38 MAPK dependent phagosome maturation in Leishmania donovani co-infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Somenath; Bose, Dipayan; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Das, Subhadip; Chakraborty, Sreeparna; Das, Tanya; Saha, Krishna Das

    2016-01-01

    Promastigote form of Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, delays phagosome maturation and resides inside macrophages. But till date limited study has been done to manipulate the phagosomal machinery of macrophages to restrict Leishmania growth. Attenuated Leishmania strain exposed RAW 264.7 cells showed a respiratory burst and enhanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The augmentation of pro-inflammatory activity is mostly attributed to p38 MAPK and p44/42 MAPK. In our study, these activated macrophages are found to induce phagosome maturation when infected with pathogenic Leishmania donovani. Increased co-localization of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester labeled pathogenic L. donovani with Lysosome was found. Moreover, increased co-localization was observed between pathogenic L. donovani and late phagosomal markers viz. Rab7, Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein 1, Cathepsin D, Rab9, and V-ATPase which indicate phagosome maturation. It was also observed that inhibition of V-type ATPase caused significant hindrance in attenuated Leishmania induced phagosome maturation. Finally, it was confirmed that p38 MAPK is the key player in acidification and maturation of phagosome in attenuated Leishmania strain pre-exposed macrophages. To our knowledge, this study for the first time reported an approach to induce phagosome maturation in L. donovani infected macrophages which could potentiate short-term prophylactic response in future. PMID:26928472

  5. p38MAPK activation is involved in androgen-independent proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by regulating IL-6 secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Shida, Yohei; Igawa, Tsukasa . E-mail: tigawa@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Hakariya, Tomoaki; Sakai, Hideki; Kanetake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Increased levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) are frequently observed in patients with advanced, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. However, the precise mechanism of IL-6 regulation is still largely unknown. Since prostate cancer gradually progresses to an androgen-independent state despite the stress caused by various therapeutic agents, we hypothesized the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs) involvement in androgen-independent growth or IL-6 secretion of prostate cancer cells. Using PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells, we analyzed the role of SAPKs in IL-6 mediated cell growth and found that the p38MAPK and JNK are involved in androgen-independent cancer cell growth. Furthermore, IL-6 secretion by PC-3 and DU145 cells was significantly suppressed by SAPKs inhibitor, especially by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not by JNK inhibitor SP600125 nor by MEK inhibitor, PD98059. These results raised the possibility that the IL-6 mediated androgen-independent proliferation of PC-3 and DU145 cells is regulated at least partly via SAPKs signaling pathway especially through p38MAPK activation.

  6. Isomenthone protects human dermal fibroblasts from TNF-α-induced death possibly by preventing activation of JNK and p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsun; Byun, Sangyo; Kim, Seungbeom; Kim, Moohan; Park, Deokhoon; Lee, Jongsung

    2012-10-01

    Cell death evoked by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is regulated by the TNF-α receptor-associated death domain containing protein, which interacts with and activates apoptotic proteases triggering cell death. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK, induce the apoptotic program and are indispensible early elements in stress-induced apoptosis that control the release of cytochrome c. Isomenthone is a constituent of the essential oil of Mentha arvensis L. and is used as a fragrance and flavor in the cosmetic, drug, and food industries. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of isomenthone against TNF-α-induced cell death and its mechanism in human dermal fibroblasts. To understand the cytoprotective role of isomenthone, MTT and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays for cell viability and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis for the mechanistic study were performed. We found that isomenthone inhibited the TNF-α-mediated reduction in cell viability and inhibited the increase in apoptosis under a serum-free condition. Isomenthone also blocked the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways and downstream apoptotic events. These results indicate that isomenthone has the potential to protect fibroblasts against TNF-α-induced cell death under a serum-deprived condition by blocking activation of the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways and downstream apoptotic events.

  7. Plantamajoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via suppressing NF-κB and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haichong; Zhao, Gan; Jiang, Kangfeng; Chen, Xiuying; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Despite developments in the knowledge and therapy of acute lung injury in recent decades, mortality remains high, and there is usually a lack of effective therapy. Plantamajoside, a major ingredient isolated from Plantago asiatica L. (Plantaginaceae), has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of plantamajoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice has not been investigated. The present study aimed to reveal the potential mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of plantamajoside on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. The results of histopathological changes as well as the lung wet-to-dry ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity showed that plantamajoside ameliorated the lung injury that was induced by LPS. qPCR and ELISA assays demonstrated that plantamajoside suppressed the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 is an important sensor in LPS infection. Molecular studies showed that the expression of TLR4 was inhibited by plantamajoside administration. Further study was conducted on nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) using pathways using western blots. The results showed that plantamajoside inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, JNK and ERK. All results indicated that plantamajoside has protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. Thus, plantamajoside may be a potential therapy for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:27089391

  8. Plantamajoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via suppressing NF-κB and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haichong; Zhao, Gan; Jiang, Kangfeng; Chen, Xiuying; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Despite developments in the knowledge and therapy of acute lung injury in recent decades, mortality remains high, and there is usually a lack of effective therapy. Plantamajoside, a major ingredient isolated from Plantago asiatica L. (Plantaginaceae), has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of plantamajoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice has not been investigated. The present study aimed to reveal the potential mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of plantamajoside on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. The results of histopathological changes as well as the lung wet-to-dry ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity showed that plantamajoside ameliorated the lung injury that was induced by LPS. qPCR and ELISA assays demonstrated that plantamajoside suppressed the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 is an important sensor in LPS infection. Molecular studies showed that the expression of TLR4 was inhibited by plantamajoside administration. Further study was conducted on nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) using pathways using western blots. The results showed that plantamajoside inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, JNK and ERK. All results indicated that plantamajoside has protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. Thus, plantamajoside may be a potential therapy for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation.

  9. Chlamydial plasmid-encoded protein pORF5 induces production of IL-1β and IL-18 via NALP3 inflammasome activation and p38 MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenjuan; Zou, Yan; Su, Shengmei; He, Zhansheng; Liu, Yan; Huang, Qiulin; Li, Zhongyu

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Chlamydia-induced inflammation is poorly understood. pORF5 is the only secreted protein encoded by Chlamydial plasmid. This study aims to investigate the effects of pORF5 on the production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) and the underlying mechanisms of these effects. THP-1 (a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) cells were stimulated by pORF5 with or without pretreatment with Natch domain, Leucine-rich repeat and PYD-containing protein 3 (NALP3) siRNA, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) siRNA, cysteine aspartate-specific protease-1 (caspase-1) specific inhibitor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) inhibitor. IL-1β, IL-18 and caspase-1 expression was detected through both ELISA and qRT-PCR. NALP3 and ASC expression was detected by qRT-PCR. The expression of caspase-1 and phosphorylated-p38 MAPK was detected by western blot analysis. pORF5 induced IL-1β, IL-18, caspase-1 and NALP3 inflammasome expression in THP-1 cells. Caspase-1 inhibitor significantly reduced pORF5-induced IL-1β and IL-18 expression. The siRNAs for NALP3 inflammasome significantly reduced pORF5-induced IL-1β, IL-18 and caspase-1 expression. Furthermore, p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced pORF5-induced IL-1β, IL-18, caspase-1 and NALP3 inflammasome expression. pORF5 could induce production of IL-1β and IL-18 via NALP3 inflammasome activation and p38MAPK pathway. pORF5 protein might play an important role in Chlamydia pathogenesis. This study provides a new insight into the molecular pathogenesis of Chlamydial diseases. PMID:26884953

  10. Nanosized titanium dioxide resulted in the activation of TGF-β/Smads/p38MAPK pathway in renal inflammation and fibration of mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, F; Wu, N; Ge, Y; Zhou, Y; Shen, T; Qiang, Q; Zhang, Q; Chen, M; Wang, Y; Wang, L; Hong, J

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been demonstrated to damage the kidneys. However, whether chronic nephritis leads to renal fibration or the fibrosis is associated with the activation of TGF-β/Smads/p38MAPK pathway caused by TiO2 NPs exposure is not well understood. Forty male mice were separately exposed to 0, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg body weight TiO2 NPs for 6 months. Renal biochemical functions and levels of TGF-β/Smads/p38MAPK pathway-related markers and extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in the kidneys were investigated. The findings showed that subchronic TiO2 NPs exposure increased levels of urinary creatisix (Cr), N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, and vanin-1, resulted in severe renal inflammation and fibration. Furthermore, TiO2 NP exposure upregulated expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, 0.07- to 2.72-fold), Smad2 (0.42- to 1.63-fold), Smad3 (0.02- to 1.94-fold), ECM (0.15- to 2.75-fold), α-smooth muscle actin (0.14- to 3.06-fold), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK, 0.11- to 3.78-fold), and nuclear factor-κB (0.4- to 2.27-fold), and downregulated Smad7 (0.05- to 0.61-fold) expression in mouse kidney. Subchronic TiO2 NPs exposure induced changes of renal characteristics towards inflammation and fibration may be mediated via TGF-β/Smads/p38MAPK pathway, and the uses of TiO2 NPs should be carried out cautiously, especially in humans. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1452-1461, 2016.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide signals activation of tumor necrosis factor biosynthesis through the ras/raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Geppert, T. D.; Whitehurst, C. E.; Thompson, P.; Beutler, B.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to activate macrophages, causing the release of toxic cytokines that may provoke inflammation and shock. One of the most important and best studied of these cytokines is tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Details of the signaling pathway leading to TNF biosynthesis remain unclear. The pathway is branched in the sense that TNF gene transcription and TNF mRNA translation are both strongly stimulated by LPS. Recent evidence has indicated that MAP kinase homologs become phosphorylated in LPS-stimulated cells, suggesting their possible involvement in signal transduction. We sought to test this hypothesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measurements of LPS-induced MEK and ERK2 activity were undertaken in LPS-sensitive and LPS-insensitive cells. Transfection studies, in which dominant inhibitors of ras and raf-1 were used to block signaling to the level of MAP kinase, were carried out in order to judge whether the TNF gene transcription and TNF mRNA translation are modulated through this pathway. RESULTS: In RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages, both ERK2 and MEK1 activity are induced by LPS treatment. In the same cell line, dominant negative inhibitors of ras and raf-1 block LPS-induced activation of the TNF promoter, as well as derepression of the translational blockade normally imposed by the TNF 3'-untranslated region. A constitutively active form of raf-1 (raf-BXB) was found to augment, but not replace, the LPS signal. In LPS-insensitive cells (RAW 264.7 x NIH 3T3 fusion hybrid cells and primary macrophages derived from C3H/HeJ mice), ERK2 activity was found to be refractory to induction by LPS. CONCLUSIONS: The ras/raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway is chiefly responsible for transduction of the LPS signal to the level of the TNF gene and mRNA. raf and raf-1 lie upstream from (or actually represent) the physical branchpoints of the transcriptional and translation activation signals generated by LPS. The lesions that prevent LPS signaling in macrophages

  12. Specificity of MAP kinase signaling in yeast differentiation involves transient versus sustained MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, W; Flatauer, L J; Bardwell, A J; Bardwell, L

    2001-09-01

    Signals transmitted by common components often elicit distinct (yet appropriate) outcomes. In yeast, two developmental options-mating and invasive growth-are both regulated by the same MAP kinase cascade. Specificity has been thought to result from specialized roles for the two MAP kinases, Kss1 and Fus3, and because Fus3 prevents Kss1 from gaining access to the mating pathway. Kss1 has been thought to participate in mating only when Fus3 is absent. Instead, we show that Kss1 is rapidly phosphorylated and potently activated by mating pheromone in wild-type cells, and that this is required for normal pheromone-induced gene expression. Signal identity is apparently maintained because active Fus3 limits the extent of Kss1 activation, thereby preventing inappropriate signal crossover. PMID:11583629

  13. The V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b mediates dorsal forerunner cell proliferation and left-right asymmetry in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gokey, Jason J; Dasgupta, Agnik; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2015-11-01

    Asymmetric fluid flows generated by motile cilia in a transient 'organ of asymmetry' are involved in establishing the left-right (LR) body axis during embryonic development. The vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) proton pump has been identified as an early factor in the LR pathway that functions prior to cilia, but the role(s) for V-ATPase activity are not fully understood. In the zebrafish embryo, the V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b is maternally supplied and expressed in dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) that give rise to the ciliated organ of asymmetry called Kupffer's vesicle (KV). V-ATPase accessory proteins modulate V-ATPase activity, but little is known about their functions in development. We investigated Atp6ap1b and V-ATPase in KV development using morpholinos, mutants and pharmacological inhibitors. Depletion of both maternal and zygotic atp6ap1b expression reduced KV organ size, altered cilia length and disrupted LR patterning of the embryo. Defects in other ciliated structures-neuromasts and olfactory placodes-suggested a broad role for Atp6ap1b during development of ciliated organs. V-ATPase inhibitor treatments reduced KV size and identified a window of development in which V-ATPase activity is required for proper LR asymmetry. Interfering with Atp6ap1b or V-ATPase function reduced the rate of DFC proliferation, which resulted in fewer ciliated cells incorporating into the KV organ. Analyses of pH and subcellular V-ATPase localizations suggested Atp6ap1b functions to localize the V-ATPase to the plasma membrane where it regulates proton flux and cytoplasmic pH. These results uncover a new role for the V-ATPase accessory protein Atp6ap1b in early development to maintain the proliferation rate of precursor cells needed to construct a ciliated KV organ capable of generating LR asymmetry.

  14. Unconjugated Bilirubin exerts Pro-Apoptotic Effect on Platelets via p38-MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Thushara, Ram M.; Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Paul, Manoj; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Basappa; Nagaraju, Ganesh; Raghavan, Sathees C.; Girish, Kesturu S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the most frequently observed secondary complications in many pathological conditions including liver diseases, where hyperbilirubinemia is very common. The present study sought to find the cause of thrombocytopenia in unconjugated hyperbilirubinemic conditions. Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), an end-product of heme catabolism, is known to have pro-oxidative and cytotoxic effects at high serum concentration. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic effect of UCB on human platelets in vitro, and followed it up with studies in phenylhydrazine-induced hyperbilirubinemic rat model and hyperbilirubinemic human subjects. UCB is indeed found to significantly induce platelet apoptotic events including elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, increased intracellular calcium levels, cardiolipin peroxidation and phosphatidylserine externalization (p < 0.001) as evident by FACS analysis. The immunoblots show the elevated levels of cytosolic cytochrome c and caspase activation in UCB-treated platelets. Further, UCB is found to induce mitochondrial ROS generation leading to p38 activation, followed by downstream activation of p53, ultimately resulting in altered expression of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins as evident from immunoblotting. All these parameters conclude that elevated unconjugated bilirubin causes thrombocytopenia by stimulating platelet apoptosis via mitochondrial ROS-induced p38 and p53 activation. PMID:26459859

  15. Mobile phone electromagnetic radiation activates MAPK signaling and regulates viability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Choi, Jong-Soon; Hong, Sae-Yong; Son, Tae-Ho; Yu, Kweon

    2008-07-01

    Mobile phones are widely used in the modern world. However, biological effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phones are largely unknown. In this report, we show biological effects of the mobile phone 835 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) in the Drosophila model system. When flies were exposed to the specific absorption rate (SAR) 1.6 W/kg, which is the proposed exposure limit by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), more than 90% of the flies were viable even after the 30 h exposure. However, in the SAR 4.0 W/kg strong EMF exposure, viability dropped from the 12 h exposure. These EMF exposures triggered stress response and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. The EMF exposures also activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, but not p38 kinase signaling. Interestingly, SAR 1.6 W/kg activated mainly ERK signaling and expression of an anti-apoptotic gene, whereas SAR 4.0 W/kg strongly activated JNK signaling and expression of apoptotic genes. In addition, SAR 4.0 W/kg amplified the number of apoptotic cells in the fly brain. These findings demonstrate that the exposure limit on electromagnetic radiation proposed by ANSI triggered ERK-survival signaling but the strong electromagnetic radiation activated JNK-apoptotic signaling in Drosophila.

  16. Characterization of CRTAM gene promoter: AP-1 transcription factor control its expression in human T CD8 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Patiño-Lopez, Genaro; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Canche-Pool, Elsy; Recillas-Targa, Felix; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; Zlotnik, Albert; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2009-10-01

    Class-I MHC-restricted T-cell associated molecule (CRTAM) is a member of the Nectin-like adhesion molecule family. It is rapidly induced in NK, NKT and CD8(+) T cells. Interaction with its ligand Nectin-like 2 results in increased secretion of IFN-gamma by activated CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Through sequential bioinformatic analyses of the upstream region of the human CRTAM gene, we detected cis-elements potentially important for CRTAM gene transcription. Analyzing 2kb upstream from the ATG translation codon by mutation analysis in conjunction with luciferase reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shify assay (EMSA) and supershift assays, we identified an AP-1 binding site, located at 1.4kb from the ATG translation codon of CRTAM gene as an essential element for CRTAM expression in activated but not resting human CD8(+) T cells. CRTAM expression was reduced in activated CD8(+) T cells treated with the JNK inhibitor SP600125, indicating that CRTAM expression is driven by the JNK-AP-1 signaling pathway. This study represents the first CRTAM gene promoter analysis in human T cells and indicates that AP-1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of this gene, a likely important finding because CRTAM has recently been shown to play a role in IFN-gamma and IL-17 production and T cell proliferation.

  17. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Attenuates Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Expression via c-Jun/AP-1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Rui; Li, Na; Yang, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Zhao, Jie; Li, Shao

    2015-11-01

    Scorpion venom has been used in the Orient to treat central nervous system diseases for many years, and the protein/peptide toxins in Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) venom are believed to be the effective components. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is an active component of the scorpion venom extracted from BmK. In a previous study, we found that SVHRP could inhibit the formation of a glial scar, which is characterized by enhanced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, in the epileptic hippocampus. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be clarified. The results of the present study indicate that endogenous GFAP expression in primary rat astrocytes was attenuated by SVHRP. We further demonstrate that the suppression of GFAP was primarily mediated by inhibiting both c-Jun expression and its binding with AP-1 DNA binding site and other factors at the GFAP promoter. These results support that SVHRP contributes to reducing GFAP at least in part by decreasing the activity of the transcription factor AP-1. In conclusion, the effects of SVHRP on astrocytes with respect to the c-Jun/AP-1 signaling pathway in vitro provide a practical basis for studying astrocyte activation and inhibition and a scientific basis for further studies of traditional medicine.

  18. Electromagnetic pulse activated brain microglia via the p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long-Long; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Wei-Dong; Li, Hai-Juan; Kang-Chu-Li; Miao, Xia; An, Guang-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Guo, Guo-Zhen; Ding, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that electromagnetic pulses (EMP) induced an increase in blood brain barrier permeability and the leakage of albumin from blood into brain tissue. Albumin is known to activate microglia cells. Thus, we hypothesised that microglia activation could occur in the brain after EMP exposure. To test this hypothesis, the morphology and secretory function of microglia cells, including the expression of OX-42 (a marker of microglia activation), and levels of TNF-α, IL-10, IL-1β, and NO were determined in the rat cerebral cortex after EMP exposure. In addition, to examine the signalling pathway of EMP-induced microglia activation, protein and phosphorylated protein levels of p38, JNK and ERK were determined. It was found that the expression of OX-42increased significantly at 1, 6 and 12h (p<0.05) and recovered to the sham group level at 24h after EMP exposure. Levels of NO, TNF-α and IL-10 also changed significantly in vivo and in vitro after EMP exposure. The protein level of p38 and phosphorylated p38 increased significantly after EMP exposure (p<0.05) and recovered to sham levels at 12 and 24h, respectively. Protein and phosphorylated protein levels of ERK and JNK did not change. SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) partly prevented the change in NO, IL-10, IL-1β, TNF-α levels induced by EMP exposure. Taken together, these results suggested that EMP exposure (200kV/m, 200 pulses) could activate microglia in rat brain and affect its secretory function both in vivo and in vitro, and the p38 pathway is involved in this pr