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Sample records for activate molecular oxygen

  1. Activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on oxide supported Au catalysts.

    PubMed

    Widmann, D; Behm, R J

    2014-03-18

    Although highly dispersed Au catalysts with Au nanoparticles (NPs) of a few nanometers in diameter are well-known for their high catalytic activity for several oxidation and reduction reactions already at rather low temperatures for almost 30 years, central aspects of the reaction mechanism are still unresolved. While most studies focused on the active site, the active Au species, and the effect of the support material, the most crucial step during oxidation reactions, the activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the resulting active oxygen species (Oact), received more attention just recently. This is topic of this Account, which focuses on the formation, location, and nature of the Oact species present on metal oxide supported Au catalysts under typical reaction conditions, at room temperature and above. It is mainly based on quantitative temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor measurements, which different from most spectroscopic techniques are able to detect and quantify these species even at the extremely low concentrations present under realistic reaction conditions. Different types of pulse experiments were performed, during which the highly dispersed, realistic powder catalysts are exposed to very low amounts of reactants, CO and/or O2, in order to form and reactively remove Oact species and gain information on their formation, nature, and the active site for Oact formation. Our investigations have shown that the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on Au/TiO2 for reaction at 80 °C and higher is a highly stable atomic species, which at 80 °C is formed only at the perimeter of the Au-oxide interface and whose reactive removal by CO is activated, but not its formation. From these findings, it is concluded that surface lattice oxygen represents the Oact species for the CO oxidation. Accordingly, the CO oxidation proceeds via a Au-assisted Mars-van Krevelen mechanism, during which surface lattice oxygen close to the Au NPs is removed by reaction

  2. Molecular dioxygen enters the active site of 12/15-lipoxygenase via dynamic oxygen access channels.

    PubMed

    Saam, Jan; Ivanov, Igor; Walther, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kuhn, Hartmut

    2007-08-14

    Cells contain numerous enzymes that use molecular oxygen for their reactions. Often, their active sites are buried deeply inside the protein, which raises the question whether there are specific access channels guiding oxygen to the site of catalysis. Choosing 12/15-lipoxygenase as a typical example for such oxygen-dependent enzymes, we determined the oxygen distribution within the protein and defined potential routes for oxygen access. For this purpose, we have applied an integrated strategy of structural modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic measurements. First, we computed the 3D free-energy distribution for oxygen, which led to identification of four oxygen channels in the protein. All channels connect the protein surface with a region of high oxygen affinity at the active site. This region is localized opposite to the nonheme iron providing a structural explanation for the reaction specificity of this lipoxygenase isoform. The catalytically most relevant path can be obstructed by L367F exchange, which leads to a strongly increased Michaelis constant for oxygen. The blocking mechanism is explained in detail by reordering the hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules. Our results provide strong evidence that the main route for oxygen access to the active site of the enzyme follows a channel formed by transiently interconnected cavities whereby the opening and closure are governed by side chain dynamics. PMID:17675410

  3. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  4. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON THE ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION OF NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER IN OHIO RIVER WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently published data show that the adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon for phenois increases significantly in the presence of molecular oxygen (Vidic, Suidan,Traegner and Nakhla, 1990). in this study, the effect of molecular oxygen on the adsorptive capacity of a...

  5. Effects of molecular oxygen and pH on the adsorption of aniline to activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.; Pinisetti, K.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines the influence of molecular oxygen and pH on the adsorption of aniline to F-300 Calgon Carbon. Molecular oxygen increased the adsorptive capacity of GAC for anilines by 250--400 % at pH 3, 30--83% at pH 5, 17--42% at pH 9, and B-45% at pH 11 (higher than those obtained in the absence of molecular oxygen). At pH 7, some of the products formed are poorly adsorbed as evidenced by an increase in UV absorbance in the oxic isotherms as compared to the other isotherms. Oxygen uptake measurements revealed significant consumption of molecular oxygen during the adsorption of aniline compounds. It is speculated that the increase in the GAC adsorptive capacity under oxic conditions was due to the polymerization of these adsorbates on the carbon surface.

  6. Singlet molecular oxygen-quenching activity of carotenoids: relevance to protection of the skin from photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Junji; Minami, Yuko; Bando, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are known to be potent quenchers of singlet molecular oxygen [O2 (1Δg)]. Solar light-induced photooxidative stress causes skin photoaging by accelerating the generation of reactive oxygen species via photodynamic actions in which O2 (1Δg) can be generated by energy transfer from excited sensitizers. Thus, dietary carotenoids seem to participate in the prevention of photooxidative stress by accumulating as antioxidants in the skin. An in vivo study using hairless mice clarified that a O2 (1Δg) oxygenation-specific peroxidation product of cholesterol, cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, accumulates in skin lipids due to ultraviolet-A exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase-9, a metalloproteinase family enzyme responsible for the formation of wrinkles and sagging, was enhanced in the skin of ultraviolet-A -irradiated hairless mice. The activation of metalloproteinase-9 and the accumulation of 5α-hydroperoxide, as well as formation of wrinkles and sagging, were lowered in mice fed a β-carotene diet. These results strongly suggest that dietary β-carotene prevents the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (at least in part), by inhibiting the photodynamic action involving the formation of 5α-hydroperoxide in the skin. Intake of β-Carotene therefore appears to be helpful in slowing down ultraviolet-A -induced photoaging in human skin by acting as a O2 (1Δg) quencher. PMID:21297913

  7. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON ADSORPTIVE CAPACITY AND EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF GRANULATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THREE ORTHO-SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorptive capacity of activated carbon for several organic compounds was found to be strongly influenced by the presence of molecular oxygen. This influence is manifested by the polymerization of adsorbate on the surface of activated carbon. As a result, GAC exhibits much high...

  8. Molecular mimicry of substrate oxygen atoms by water molecules in the beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Palau, J

    2001-08-01

    Soybean beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2) has been crystallized both free and complexed with a variety of ligands. Four water molecules in the free-enzyme catalytic cleft form a multihydrogen-bond network with eight strategic residues involved in enzyme-ligand hydrogen bonds. We show here that the positions of these four water molecules are coincident with the positions of four potential oxygen atoms of the ligands within the complex. Some of these waters are displaced from the active site when the ligands bind to the enzyme. How many are displaced depends on the shape of the ligand. This means that when one of the four positions is not occupied by a ligand oxygen atom, the corresponding water remains. We studied the functional/structural role of these four waters and conclude that their presence means that the conformation of the eight side chains is fixed in all situations (free or complexed enzyme) and preserved from unwanted or forbidden conformational changes that could hamper the catalytic mechanism. The water structure at the active pocket of beta-amylase is therefore essential for providing the ligand recognition process with plasticity. It does not affect the protein active-site geometry and preserves the overall hydrogen-bonding network, irrespective of which ligand is bound to the enzyme. We also investigated whether other enzymes showed a similar role for water. Finally, we discuss the potential use of these results for predicting whether water molecules can mimic ligand atoms in the active center. PMID:11468361

  9. Assembly of a Metalloporphyrin-Polyoxometalate Hybrid Material for Highly Efficient Activation of Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu-Lan; Xu, Xuan; Ou, Sha; Zhao, Min; He, Wei-Long; Wu, Chuan-De

    2016-08-01

    Organic metalloporphyrins and inorganic polyoxometalates (POMs) are two kinds of efficient molecular catalysts to prompt a variety of chemical reactions. They have been used as active moieties for the synthesis of porous materials to realize highly efficient heterogeneous catalysis. Both of them are regarded as the organic/inorganic equivalent counterparts to complement the individual features. Therefore, the combination of metalloporphyrins and POMs in the same hybrid materials might generate interesting catalytic properties by emerging their unique individual functions. To avoid the random connections between metalloporphyrins, POMs, and lanthanide connecting nodes, we have developed a "step-by-step" aggregation strategy, including the reaction of POMs with metal ions to bind metal nodes on the surfaces of POMs at the first step and the reaction of the resulting POM derivatives with metalloporphyrin linkers to result in hybrid materials at the second step. Catalytic experiments demonstrate that the resulting hybrid material exhibits interesting catalytic properties in the heterogeneous epoxidation of olefins, in which the conversion, epoxide selectivity, turnover number, and turnover frequency for the epoxidation of styrene to (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene are >99%, 94%, 220000, and 22000 h(-1), respectively. These results demonstrate that the collaborative work of multiple active sites in hybrid materials can achieve superior high efficiency in heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:27408952

  10. Molecular hydrogen inhibits lipopolysaccharide-triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages by targeting the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-Dong; Wu, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Rui; Hao, Da-Peng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome, an intracellular multi-protein complex controlling the maturation of cytokine interleukin-1β, plays an important role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cascades. Recently, the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in macrophages stimulated with LPS has been suggested to act as a trigger during the process of NLRP3 inflammasome activation that can be blocked by some mitochondria-targeted antioxidants. Known as a ROS scavenger, molecular hydrogen (H2) has been shown to possess therapeutic benefit on LPS-induced inflammatory damage in many animal experiments. Due to the unique molecular structure, H2 can easily target the mitochondria, suggesting that H2 is a potential antagonist of mtROS-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Here we have showed that, in mouse macrophages, H2 exhibited substantial inhibitory activity against LPS-initiated NLRP3 inflammasome activation by scavenging mtROS. Moreover, the elimination of mtROS by H2 resultantly inhibited mtROS-mediated NLRP3 deubiquitination, a non-transcriptional priming signal of NLRP3 in response to the stimulation of LPS. Additionally, the removal of mtROS by H2 reduced the generation of oxidized mitochondrial DNA and consequently decreased its binding to NLRP3, thereby inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our findings have, for the first time, revealed the novel mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of molecular hydrogen on LPS-caused NLRP3 inflammasome activation, highlighting the promising application of this new antioxidant in the treatment of LPS-associated inflammatory pathological damage. PMID:26488087

  11. Activation of molecular oxygen, polyoxometalates, and liquid-phase catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Ronny

    2010-04-19

    In this Forum Article, we discuss the use of dioxygen (O(2)) in oxidations catalyzed by polyoxometalates. One- and two-electron-transfer oxidation of organic substrates is catalyzed by H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) and often occurs via an outer-sphere mechanism. The reduced polyoxometalate is reoxidized in a separate step by O(2) with the formation of water. H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) also catalyzes electron transfer-oxygen transfer reactions. Here, in contrast to the paradigm that high-valent oxo species are often stronger oxygen-transfer species than lower-valent species, the opposite occurs. Thus, oxygen transfer from the catalyst is preceded by electron transfer from the organic substrate. The monooxygenase-type reduction of O(2) with polyoxometalates is also discussed based on the formation of a stable iron(III) hydroperoxide compound that may have implications for the oxidation of other lower-valent polyoxometalates such as vanadium(IV)- and ruthenium(II)-substituted polyoxometalates. Finally, the formation of hybrid compounds through the attachment of electron-accepting polyoxometalates to coordination compounds can modify the reactivity of the latter by making higher-valent oxidation states more accessible. PMID:20380461

  12. Steroids, triterpenoids and molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Summons, Roger E; Bradley, Alexander S; Jahnke, Linda L; Waldbauer, Jacob R

    2006-01-01

    There is a close connection between modern-day biosynthesis of particular triterpenoid biomarkers and presence of molecular oxygen in the environment. Thus, the detection of steroid and triterpenoid hydrocarbons far back in Earth history has been used to infer the antiquity of oxygenic photosynthesis. This prompts the question: were these compounds produced similarly in the past? In this paper, we address this question with a review of the current state of knowledge surrounding the oxygen requirement for steroid biosynthesis and phylogenetic patterns in the distribution of steroid and triterpenoid biosynthetic pathways. The hopanoid and steroid biosynthetic pathways are very highly conserved within the bacterial and eukaryotic domains, respectively. Bacteriohopanepolyols are produced by a wide range of bacteria, and are methylated in significant abundance at the C2 position by oxygen-producing cyanobacteria. On the other hand, sterol biosynthesis is sparsely distributed in distantly related bacterial taxa and the pathways do not produce the wide range of products that characterize eukaryotes. In particular, evidence for sterol biosynthesis by cyanobacteria appears flawed. Our experiments show that cyanobacterial cultures are easily contaminated by sterol-producing rust fungi, which can be eliminated by treatment with cycloheximide affording sterol-free samples. Sterols are ubiquitous features of eukaryotic membranes, and it appears likely that the initial steps in sterol biosynthesis were present in their modern form in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes. Eleven molecules of O2 are required by four enzymes to produce one molecule of cholesterol. Thermodynamic arguments, optimization of function and parsimony all indicate that an ancestral anaerobic pathway is highly unlikely. The known geological record of molecular fossils, especially steranes and triterpanes, is notable for the limited number of structural motifs that have been observed. With a few exceptions

  13. Laccase isoenzymes of Pleurotus eryngii: characterization, catalytic properties, and participation in activation of molecular oxygen and Mn2+ oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, C; Guillén, F; Martínez, A T; Martínez, M J

    1997-01-01

    Two laccase isoenzymes produced by Pleurotus eryngii were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity (42- and 43-fold) with an overall yield of 56.3%. Laccases I and II from this fungus are monomeric glycoproteins with 7 and 1% carbohydrate content, molecular masses (by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of 65 and 61 kDa, and pIs of 4.1 and 4.2, respectively. The highest rate of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) oxidation for laccase I was reached at 65 degrees C and pH 4, and that for laccase II was reached at 55 degrees C and pH 3.5. Both isoenzymes are stable at high pH, retaining 60 to 70% activity after 24 h from pH 8 to 12. Their amino acid compositions and N-terminal sequences were determined, the latter strongly differing from those of laccases of other basidiomycetes. Antibodies against laccase I reacted with laccase II, as well as with laccases from Pleurotus ostreatus, Pleurotus pulmonarius, and Pleurotus floridanus. Different hydroxy- and methoxy-substituted phenols and aromatic amines were oxidized by the two laccase isoenzymes from P. eryngii, and the influence of the nature, number, and disposition of aromatic-ring substituents on kinetic constants is discussed. Although both isoenzymes presented similar substrate affinities, the maximum rates of reactions catalyzed by laccase I were higher than those of laccase II. In reactions with hydroquinones, semiquinones produced by laccase isoenzymes were in part converted into quinones via autoxidation. The superoxide anion radical produced in the latter reaction dismutated, producing hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of manganous ion, the superoxide union was reduced to hydrogen peroxide with the concomitant production of manganic ion. These results confirmed that laccase in the presence of hydroquinones can participate in the production of both reduced oxygen species and manganic ions. PMID:9172335

  14. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i. PMID:25592711

  15. Detection of molecular oxygen on Mars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carleton, N. P.; Traub, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Molecular oxygen was detected in Martian spectra near 7635 A and its abundance was measured both during and after the 1971 dust storm. Its column abundance in the clear Martian atmosphere is about 10.4 plus or minus 1.0 cm/amagat, giving a mixing ratio of molecular oxygen to carbon dioxide 0.0013. The mixing ratio of molecular oxygen to carbon monoxide (1.4 plus or minus 0.3) is quite different from the value of 0.5 that would result from the photolysis of a pure carbon dioxide atmosphere, which indicates that there is or was a net source of oxygen relative to carbon (probably water) in the Martian atmosphere.

  16. Suppressive effects of sirtinol on human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection and hCMV-induced activation of molecular mechanisms of senescence and production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Mao, Genxiang; Li, Huifen; Ding, Xiang; Meng, Xin; Wang, Guofu; Leng, Sean X

    2016-09-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that chronic human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection contributes significantly to T-cell immunosenescence and adverse health outcomes in older adults. As such, it is important to search for compounds with anti-hCMV properties. Studies have shown that resveratrol, a sirtuin activator, suppresses hCMV infection. Here we report suppressive effects of sirtinol, a sirtuin antagonist, on hCMV infection and its cellular and molecular consequences. Human diploid fibroblast WI-38 cells were infected by hCMV Towne strain in the absence or presence of sirtinol. hCMV replication was measured using qPCR. Senescent phenotype was determined by senescence-associated β galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity. Expression of hCMV immediate early (IE) and early (E) proteins and senescence-associated proteins (pRb and Rb, p16(INK4), and p53) and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed using standard laboratory assays. The results demonstrated that sirtinol suppressed hCMV infection as well as hCMV-induced activation of molecular mechanisms of senescence and ROS production. While underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, these findings indicate sirtinol as a novel and potent anti-hCMV agent with the potential to be developed as an effective treatment for chronic hCMV infection and its cellular and molecular consequences that are important to ageing and health of older adults. PMID:26763147

  17. Balloon-borne molecular oxygen search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Timothy C.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment is described that is designed to detect molecular oxygen in interstellar molecular clouds. Oxygen is the third most abundant element in our galaxy. The oxygen-bearing molecules that have been detected do not account for the expected oxygen abundance in molecular clouds. Molecular oxygen (O2) could be a major reservoir for the missing oxygen. At the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) in conjunction with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Bell Laboratories, a balloon-borne, millimeter-wavelength receiver with the capability of observing the primary isotopes of O2 (118, 750 MHz; N = 1, J = 1-0) and CO (115, 271 MHz; J = 1-0) has been designed, built, and flown. This system uses a superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixer and a digital auto-correlator spectrometer. The SIS spectrometer (SISS) has achieved a double sideband receiver temperature of 5 K and a spectral resolution of 1 km/s. Using the 1-meter primary mirror on the UCSB balloon-borne gondola, the SISS has an 11 arcsecond beam (FWHM). The first flight was executed in August 1993. Although pointing and cryogenic problems prevented taking astronomical data, it proved to be an excellent engineering flight.

  18. Negative impact of oxygen molecular activation on Cr(VI) removal with core-shell Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yi; Wu, Hao; Ai, Zhihui

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that the presence of oxygen molecule can inhibit Cr(VI) removal with core-shell Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires at neutral pH of 6.1. 100% of Cr(VI) removal was achieved by the Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires within 60 min in the anoxic condition, in contrast, only 81.2% of Cr(VI) was sequestrated in the oxic condition. Removal kinetics analysis indicated that the presence of oxygen could inhibit the Cr(VI) removal efficiency by near 3 times. XRD, SEM, and XPS analysis revealed that either the anoxic or oxic Cr(VI) removal was involved with adsorption, reduction, co-precipitation, and re-adsorption processes. More Cr(VI) was bound in a reduced state of Cr(III) in the anoxic process, while a thicker Cr(III)/Fe(III)/Cr(VI) oxyhydroxides shell, leading to inhibiting the electron transfer, was found under the oxic process. The negative impact of oxygen molecule was attributed to the oxygen molecular activation which competed with Cr(VI) adsorbed for the consumption of donor electrons from Fe(0) core and ferrous ions bound on the iron oxides surface under the oxic condition. This study sheds light on the understanding of the fate and transport of Cr(VI) in oxic and anoxic environment, as well provides helpful guide for optimizing Cr(VI) removal conditions in real applications. PMID:25988715

  19. Oxygen Radical Scavenger Activity, EPR, NMR, Molecular Mechanics and Extended-Hückel Molecular Orbital Investigation of the Bis(Piroxicam)Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Cini, R; Pogni, R; Basosi, R; Donati, A; Rossi, C; Sabadini, L; Rollo, L; Lorenzini, S; Gelli, R; Marcolongo, R

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen radical scavenger activity (ORSA) of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] (HPir = Piroxicam = 4-hydroxy -2- methyl -N-2- pyridyl -2H- 1,2-benzothiazine -3- carboxamide 1,1-dioxide) was determined by chemiluminescence of samples obtained by mixing human neutrophils (from healthy subjects) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (DMF = N,N -dimethylformammide) in DMSO/GLY/PBS (2:1:2, v/v) solution (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide, GLY = 1,2,3-propantriol, PBS = Dulbecco's buffer salt solution). The ratio of the residual radicals, for the HPir (1.02.10(-4)M) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (1.08.10(-5)M)/HPir (8.01.10-(-5)M) systems was higher than 12 (not stimulated) [excess of piroxicam was added (Cu/Pir molar ratio approximately 1:10) in order to have most of the metal complexed as bischelate]. In contrast, the ratio of residual radicals for the CuCl(2) (1.00.10(-5)M) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (1.08.10(-5)M)/Hpir (8.01.10(-5)M)system was 5. The [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] compound is therefore a stronger radical scavenger than either HPir or CuCl(2). A molecular mechanics (MM) analysis of the gas phase structures of neutral HPir, its zwitterionic (HPir(+-)) and anionic (Pir(-)) forms, and some Cu(II)-piroxicam complexes based on X-ray structures allowed calculation of force constants. The most stable structure for HPir has a ZZZ conformation similar to that found in the Cu(II) (and Cd(II) complexes) in the solid state as well as in the gas phase. The structure is stabilized by a strong H bond which involves the N(amide)-H and O(enolic) groups. The MM simulation for the [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] complex showed that two high repulsive intramolecular contacts exist between a pyridyl hydrogen atom of one Pir(-) molecule with the O donor of the other ligand. These interactions activate a transition toward a pseudo-tetrahedral geometry, in the case the apical ligands are removed. On refluxing a suspension of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] in acetone a brown microcystalline solid with the Cu(Pir)(2).0.5DMF

  20. The Three Forms of Molecular Oxygen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Finds that a logical application of the simple rules of the molecular orbital bonding theory for diatomic molecules predicted the existence of three spin isomers of the oxygen molecule: one triplet form with two unpaired electrons and two singlet forms with all electrons paired. (MVL)

  1. Analysis of molecular oxygen exit pathways in cyanobacterial photosystem II: Molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Dontsova, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    In thylakoids of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic organisms, the light-induced production of molecular oxygen is catalyzed by the giant lipid-pigment-protein complex called photosystem II (PSII). The oxygen-evolving complex is buried deep in the lumenal part of PSII, and dioxygen molecules need to pass through the protein environment in order to leave the active site of the enzyme free. Previous studies aimed at finding oxygen channels in PSII were based on either an analysis of the cavities within is static structure or experiments on the insertion of noble gas molecules into PSII crystals under elevated pressure. In these studies, some possible exit pathways for the molecules were found and the static positions of molecular oxygen were determined. In the present work, the oxygen movement in the transport system of PSII is simulated by molecular dynamics.

  2. Molecular oxygen in the ρ Ophiuchi cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, B.; Liseau, R.; Pagani, L.; Bergman, P.; Bernath, P.; Biver, N.; Black, J. H.; Booth, R. S.; Buat, V.; Crovisier, J.; Curry, C. L.; Dahlgren, M.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Falgarone, E.; Feldman, P. A.; Fich, M.; Florén, H. G.; Fredrixon, M.; Frisk, U.; Gahm, G. F.; Gerin, M.; Hagström, M.; Harju, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Johansson, L. E. B.; Justtanont, K.; Klotz, A.; Kyrölä, E.; Kwok, S.; Lecacheux, A.; Liljeström, T.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lundin, S.; Mégie, G.; Mitchell, G. F.; Murtagh, D.; Nordh, L. H.; Nyman, L.-Å.; Olberg, M.; Olofsson, A. O. H.; Olofsson, G.; Olofsson, H.; Persson, G.; Plume, R.; Rickman, H.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rydbeck, G.; Sandqvist, A. A.; Schéele, F. V.; Serra, G.; Torchinsky, S.; Tothill, N. F.; Volk, K.; Wiklind, T.; Wilson, C. D.; Winnberg, A.; Witt, G.

    2007-05-01

    Context: Molecular oxygen, O2, has been expected historically to be an abundant component of the chemical species in molecular clouds and, as such, an important coolant of the dense interstellar medium. However, a number of attempts from both ground and from space have failed to detect O2 emission. Aims: The work described here uses heterodyne spectroscopy from space to search for molecular oxygen in the interstellar medium. Methods: The Odin satellite carries a 1.1 m sub-millimeter dish and a dedicated 119 GHz receiver for the ground state line of O2. Starting in 2002, the star forming molecular cloud core ρ {Oph A} was observed with Odin for 34 days during several observing runs. Results: We detect a spectral line at v_LSR =+3.5 km s-1 with Δ v_FWHM=1.5 km s-1, parameters which are also common to other species associated with ρ {Oph A}. This feature is identified as the O2 (NJ = 11 - 1_0) transition at 118 750.343 MHz. Conclusions: The abundance of molecular oxygen, relative to H{2} , is 5 × 10-8 averaged over the Odin beam. This abundance is consistently lower than previously reported upper limits. Based on observations with Odin, a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the National Technology Agency of Finland (Tekes) and Centre National d'Étude Spatiale (CNES). The Swedish Space Corporation has been the industrial prime contractor and also is operating the satellite. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Singlet molecular oxygen in photobiochemical systems: IR phosphorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Krasnovsky, A A

    1998-01-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) is one of the most active intermediates involved in photosensitized oxygenation reactions in chemical and biological systems. Deactivation of singlet oxygen is accompanied by infrared phosphorescence (1270 nm) which is widely employed for 1O2 detection and study. This review considers techniques for phosphorescence detection, phosphorescence spectra, quantum yields and kinetics under laser excitation, the radiative and real 1O2 lifetimes in organic solvents and water, 1O2 quenching by biomolecules, and estimation of singlet oxygen lifetimes, diffusion lengths and phosphorescence quantum yields in blood plasma, cell cytoplasm, erythrocyte ghosts, retinal rod outer segments and chloroplast thylakoids. The experiments devoted to 1O2 phosphorescence detection in photosensitizer-containing living cells are discussed in detail. Information reviewed is important for understanding the mechanisms of photodestruction in biological systems and various applied problems of photobiology and photomedicine. PMID:10379647

  4. Cooperative Catalysis for Selective Alcohol Oxidation with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Slot, Thierry K; Eisenberg, David; van Noordenne, Dylan; Jungbacker, Peter; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2016-08-22

    The activation of dioxygen for selective oxidation of organic molecules is a major catalytic challenge. Inspired by the activity of nitrogen-doped carbons in electrocatalytic oxygen reduction, we combined such a carbon with metal-oxide catalysts to yield cooperative catalysts. These simple materials boost the catalytic oxidation of several alcohols, using molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure and low temperature (80 °C). Cobalt and copper oxide demonstrate the highest activities. The high activity and selectivity of these catalysts arises from the cooperative action of their components, as proven by various control experiments and spectroscopic techniques. We propose that the reaction should not be viewed as occurring at an 'active site', but rather at an 'active doughnut'-the volume surrounding the base of a carbon-supported metal-oxide particle. PMID:27355443

  5. Singlet molecular oxygen generation by light-activated DHN-melanin of the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in black Sigatoka disease of bananas.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J; Prado, Fernanda M; Oliveira, Marilene S; Ortiz-Mendoza, David; Scalfo, Alexsandra C; Pessoa, Adalberto; Medeiros, Marisa H G; White, James F; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In pathogenic fungi, melanin contributes to virulence, allowing tissue invasion and inactivation of the plant defence system, but has never been implicated as a factor for host cell death, or as a light-activated phytotoxin. Our research shows that melanin synthesized by the fungal banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis acts as a virulence factor through the photogeneration of singlet molecular oxygen O2 (1Δg). Using analytical tools, including elemental analysis, ultraviolet/infrared absorption spectrophometry and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, we characterized both pigment content in mycelia and secreted to the culture media as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin type compound. This is sole melanin-type in M. fijiensis. Isolated melanins irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm produced monomol light emission at 1270 nm, confirming generation of O2 (1Δg), a highly reactive oxygen specie (ROS) that causes cellular death by reacting with all cellular macromolecules. Intermediary polyketides accumulated in culture media by using tricyclazole and pyroquilon (two inhibitors of DHN-melanin synthesis) were identified by ESI-HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, irradiation at 532 nm of that mixture of compounds and whole melanized mycelium also generated O2 (1Δg). A pigmented-strain generated more O2 (1Δg) than a strain with low melanin content. Banana leaves of cultivar Cavendish, naturally infected with different stages of black Sigatoka disease, were collected from field. Direct staining of the naturally infected leaf tissues showed the presence of melanin that was positively correlated to the disease stage. We also found hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but we cannot distinguish the source. Our results suggest that O2 (1Δg) photogenerated by DHN-melanin may be involved in the destructive effects of Mycosphaerella fijiensis on banana leaf tissues. Further studies are needed to fully evaluate contributions of melanin-mediated ROS to microbial pathogenesis. PMID:24646830

  6. Singlet Molecular Oxygen Generation by Light-Activated DHN-Melanin of the Fungal Pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in Black Sigatoka Disease of Bananas

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J.; Prado, Fernanda M.; Oliveira, Marilene S.; Ortiz-Mendoza, David; Scalfo, Alexsandra C.; Pessoa, Adalberto; Medeiros, Marisa H. G.; White, James F.; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In pathogenic fungi, melanin contributes to virulence, allowing tissue invasion and inactivation of the plant defence system, but has never been implicated as a factor for host cell death, or as a light-activated phytotoxin. Our research shows that melanin synthesized by the fungal banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis acts as a virulence factor through the photogeneration of singlet molecular oxygen O2 (1Δg). Using analytical tools, including elemental analysis, ultraviolet/infrared absorption spectrophometry and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, we characterized both pigment content in mycelia and secreted to the culture media as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin type compound. This is sole melanin-type in M. fijiensis. Isolated melanins irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm produced monomol light emission at 1270 nm, confirming generation of O2 (1Δg), a highly reactive oxygen specie (ROS) that causes cellular death by reacting with all cellular macromolecules. Intermediary polyketides accumulated in culture media by using tricyclazole and pyroquilon (two inhibitors of DHN-melanin synthesis) were identified by ESI-HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, irradiation at 532 nm of that mixture of compounds and whole melanized mycelium also generated O2 (1Δg). A pigmented-strain generated more O2 (1Δg) than a strain with low melanin content. Banana leaves of cultivar Cavendish, naturally infected with different stages of black Sigatoka disease, were collected from field. Direct staining of the naturally infected leaf tissues showed the presence of melanin that was positively correlated to the disease stage. We also found hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but we cannot distinguish the source. Our results suggest that O2 (1Δg) photogenerated by DHN-melanin may be involved in the destructive effects of Mycosphaerella fijiensis on banana leaf tissues. Further studies are needed to fully evaluate contributions of melanin-mediated ROS to microbial pathogenesis. PMID:24646830

  7. Free radicals and activated oxygen.

    PubMed

    Famaey, J P

    1982-01-01

    Superoxide anion (0(-2)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) are products of the biological reduction of 0(2). They are very reactive and poorly tolerated within living systems and enzymes that catalytically scavenge these products have been evolved as defense mechanisms. These include superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalase and peroxidases. Large amounts of O-2 are produced by different enzymatic and non enzymatic biological processes. Large amounts of activated oxygens are produced by phagocytosing cells such as macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells. This production is associated with the bactericidal actions of these cells but it also largely contributes to exacerbate and sustain the inflammation where these cells congregate. The arachidonic acid pathway triggered by the inflammatory stimuli is also a source for these oxidizing radicals. The production of activated oxygens has been associated with the normal aging process but also with various toxic reactions (e.g. the toxicity of the herbicide paraquat, of the ionizing radiations, of certain antibiotics such as streptonigrin, etc. . . .). O-2 induces the depolymerization of hyaluronic acid which lends viscosity and lubricating properties to synovial fluids. SOD possess antiinflammatory properties and a bovine SOD, orgotein, has now been largely investigated by intramuscular and intraarticular injections in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Various antiinflammatory compounds (e.g. the salicylates) are able either to inhibit the production of these oxygen radicals or to scavenge them which seems of importance for their antiinflammatory properties. Singlet oxygen, another activated oxygen, might also play a role in the inflammatory process. PMID:6295769

  8. Role of Au-C Interactions on the Catalytic Activity of Au Nanoparticles Supported on TiC(001) Towards Molecular Oxygen Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Feria, L.; Jirsak, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Illas, F.

    2010-03-10

    High-resolution photoemission and density functional calculations on realistic slab surface models were used to study the interaction and subsequent dissociation of O{sub 2} with Au nanoparticles supported on TiC(001). The photoemission results indicate that at 150 K O{sub 2} adsorbs molecularly on the supported gold nanoparticles, and upon heating to temperatures above 200 K the O{sub 2} {yields} 2O reaction takes place with migration of atomic oxygen to the TiC(001) substrate. The addition of Au to TiC(001) substantially enhances the rate of O{sub 2} dissociation at room temperature. The reactivity of Au nanoparticles supported on TiC(001) toward O{sub 2} dissociation is much larger than that of similar nanoparticles supported either on TiO{sub 2}(110) or MgO(001) surfaces, where the cleavage of O-O bonds is very difficult. Density functional calculations carried out on large supercells show that the contact of Au with TiC(001) is essential for charge polarization and an enhancement in the chemical activity of Au. Small two-dimensional particles which expose Au atoms in contact with TiC(001) are the most reactive. While O{sub 2} prefers binding to Au sites, the O atoms interact more strongly with the TiC(001) surface. The oxygen species active during the low-temperature (<200 K) oxidation of carbon monoxide on Au/TiC(001) is chemisorbed O{sub 2}. Once atomic O binds to TiC(001), the chemisorption bond is so strong that temperatures well above 400 K are necessary to remove the O adatoms from the TiC(001) substrate by direct reaction with CO. The high reactivity of Au/TiC(001) toward O{sub 2} at low-temperature opens the route for the transformation of alcohols and amines on the supported Au nanoparticles.

  9. Role of Au-C Interactions on the Catalytic Activity of Au Nanoparticles Supported on TiC(001) toward Molecular Oxygen Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.; Feria, L; Jirsak, T; Takahashi, Y; Nakamura, K; Illas, F

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution photoemission and density functional calculations on realistic slab surface models were used to study the interaction and subsequent dissociation of O{sub 2} with Au nanoparticles supported on TiC(001). The photoemission results indicate that at 150 K O{sub 2} adsorbs molecularly on the supported gold nanoparticles, and upon heating to temperatures above 200 K the O{sub 2} {yields} 2O reaction takes place with migration of atomic oxygen to the TiC(001) substrate. The addition of Au to TiC(001) substantially enhances the rate of O{sub 2} dissociation at room temperature. The reactivity of Au nanoparticles supported on TiC(001) toward O{sub 2} dissociation is much larger than that of similar nanoparticles supported either on TiO{sub 2}(110) or MgO(001) surfaces, where the cleavage of O-O bonds is very difficult. Density functional calculations carried out on large supercells show that the contact of Au with TiC(001) is essential for charge polarization and an enhancement in the chemical activity of Au. Small two-dimensional particles which expose Au atoms in contact with TiC(001) are the most reactive. While O{sub 2} prefers binding to Au sites, the O atoms interact more strongly with the TiC(001) surface. The oxygen species active during the low-temperature (<200 K) oxidation of carbon monoxide on Au/TiC(001) is chemisorbed O{sub 2}. Once atomic O binds to TiC(001), the chemisorption bond is so strong that temperatures well above 400 K are necessary to remove the O adatoms from the TiC(001) substrate by direct reaction with CO. The high reactivity of Au/TiC(001) toward O{sub 2} at low-temperature opens the route for the transformation of alcohols and amines on the supported Au nanoparticles.

  10. Design of a highly efficient and wide pH electro-Fenton oxidation system with molecular oxygen activated by ferrous-tetrapolyphosphate complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cao, Menghua; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a novel electro-Fenton (EF) system was developed with iron wire, activated carbon fiber, and sodium tetrapolyphosphate (Na6TPP) as the anode, cathode, and electrolyte, respectively. This Na6TPP-EF system could efficiently degrade atrazine in a wide pH range of 4.0-10.2. The utilization of Na6TPP instead of Na2SO4 as the electrolyte enhanced the atrazine degradation rate by 130 times at an initial pH of 8.0. This dramatic enhancement was attributed to the formation of ferrous-tetrapolyphosphate (Fe(II)-TPP) complex from the electrochemical corrosion (ECC) and chemical corrosion (CC) of iron electrode in the presence of Na6TPP. The Fe(II)-TPP complex could provide an additional molecular oxygen activation pathway to produce more H2O2 and (•)OH via a series single-electron transfer processes, producing the Fe(III)-TPP complex. The cycle of Fe(II)/Fe(III) was easily realized through the electrochemical reduction (ECR) process on the cathode. More interestingly, we found that the presence of Na6TPP could prevent the iron electrode from excessive corrosion via phosphorization in the later stage of the Na6TPP-EF process, avoiding the generation of iron sludge. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and ion chromatography were used to investigate the degradation intermediates to propose a possible atrazine oxidation pathway in the Na6TPP-EF system. These interesting findings provide some new insight on the development of a low-cost and highly efficient EF system for wastewater treatment in a wide pH range. PMID:25631474

  11. Herschel Measurements of Molecular Oxygen in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Liseau, René; Bell, Tom A.; Black, John H.; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael J.; Li, Di; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; Snell, Ronald; Benz, Arnold O.; Bergin, Edwin; Bruderer, Simon; Caselli, Paola; Caux, Emmanuel; Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Hjalmarson, Åke; Larsson, Bengt; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; De Luca, Massimo; Nagy, Zsofia; Roueff, Evelyne; Sandqvist, Aage; van der Tak, Floris; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Vastel, Charlotte; Viti, Serena; Yıldız, Umut

    2011-08-01

    We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5 × 1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam-filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19''), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is (0.3-7.3) × 10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~5'' diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~10 M sun and the dust temperature is >=150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T >= 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature >=180 K. The inferred O2 column density sime5 × 1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) ~= 4 × 1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10-15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. HERSCHEL MEASUREMENTS OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Li Di; Liseau, Rene; Black, John H.; Bell, Tom A.; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael J.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; Encrenaz, Pierre; Snell, Ronald; Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; Bergin, Edwin; Caselli, Paola; Caux, Emmanuel; Falgarone, Edith

    2011-08-20

    We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) in emission from the H{sub 2} Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} and widths of 3 km s{sup -1}. The beam-averaged column density is N(O{sub 2}) = 6.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and assuming that the source has an equal beam-filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19''), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O{sub 2} relative to H{sub 2} is (0.3-7.3) x 10{sup -6}. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a {approx}5'' diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is {approx}10 M{sub sun} and the dust temperature is {>=}150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O{sub 2} abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T {>=} 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O{sub 2}. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature {>=}180 K. The inferred O{sub 2} column density {approx_equal}5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} can be produced in Peak A, having N(H{sub 2}) {approx_equal} 4 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10-15 km s{sup -1}) C-shock, which can produce N(O{sub 2}) up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}.

  13. A 99 percent purity molecular sieve oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular sieve oxygen generating systems (MSOGS) have become the accepted method for the production of breathable oxygen on military aircraft. These systems separate oxygen for aircraft engine bleed air by application of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology. Oxygen is concentrated by preferential adsorption in nitrogen in a zeolite molecular sieve. However, the inability of current zeolite molecular sieves to discriminate between oxygen and argon results in an oxygen purity limitations of 93-95 percent (both oxygen and argon concentrate). The goal was to develop a new PSA process capable of exceeding the present oxygen purity limitations. A novel molecular sieve oxygen concentrator was developed which is capable of generating oxygen concentrations of up to 99.7 percent directly from air. The process is comprised of four absorbent beds, two containing a zeolite molecular sieve and two containing a carbon molecular sieve. This new process may find use in aircraft and medical breathing systems, and industrial air separation systems. The commercial potential of the process is currently being evaluated.

  14. Active oxygen doctors the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelló, Ana; Francès, Francesc; Corella, Dolores; Verdú, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    Investigation at the scene of a crime begins with the search for clues. In the case of bloodstains, the most frequently used reagents are luminol and reduced phenolphthalein (or phenolphthalin that is also known as the Kastle-Meyer colour test). The limitations of these reagents have been studied and are well known. Household cleaning products have evolved with the times, and new products with active oxygen are currently widely used, as they are considered to be highly efficient at removing all kinds of stains on a wide range of surfaces. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of these new cleaning products on latent bloodstains that may be left at a scene of a crime. To do so, various fabrics were stained with blood and then washed using cleaning agents containing active oxygen. The results of reduced phenolphthalein, luminol and human haemoglobin tests on the washed fabrics were negative. The conclusion is that these new products alter blood to such an extent that it can no longer be detected by currently accepted methods employed in criminal investigations. This inability to locate bloodstains means that highly important evidence (e.g. a DNA profile) may be lost. Consequently, it is important that investigators are aware of this problem so as to compensate for it.

  15. Reaction of Triplet Phenylnitrene with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Mieres-Pérez, Joel; Mendez-Vega, Enrique; Velappan, Kavitha; Sander, Wolfram

    2015-12-18

    Triplet carbenes react with molecular oxygen with rates that approach diffusion control to carbonyl O-oxides, whereas triplet nitrenes react much slower. For investigating the reaction of phenylnitrene with O2, the nitrene was generated by flash vacuum thermolysis (FVT) of phenylazide and subsequently isolated in O2-doped matrices. FVT of the azide produces the nitrene in high yield and with only minor contaminations of the rearranged products that are frequently observed if the nitrene is produced by photolysis. The phenylnitrene was isolated in solid Ar, Xe, mixtures of these rare gases with O2, and even in pure solid O2. At temperatures between 30 and 35 K an extremely slow thermal reaction between the nitrene and O2 was observed, whereas at higher temperatures, solid Ar and O2 rapidly evaporate. Only O2-doped Xe matrices allowed us to anneal at temperatures above 40 K, and at these temperatures, the nitrene reacts with O2 to produce nitroso O-oxide mainly in its syn conformation. Upon visible light irradiation (450 nm), the nitroso oxide rapidly rearranges to nitrobenzene. PMID:26524191

  16. Biological hydroperoxides and singlet molecular oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sayuri; Ronsein, Graziella E; Prado, Fernanda M; Uemi, Miriam; Corrêa, Thais C; Toma, Izaura N; Bertolucci, Agda; Oliveira, Mauricio C B; Motta, Flávia D; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Mascio, Paolo Di

    2007-01-01

    The decomposition of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) into peroxyl radicals is a potential source of singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O(2)) in biological systems. Recently, we have clearly demonstrated the generation of (1)O(2) in the reaction of lipid hydroperoxides with biologically important oxidants such as metal ions, peroxynitrite and hypochlorous acid. The approach used to unequivocally demonstrate the generation of (1)O(2) in these reactions was the use of an isotopic labeled hydroperoxide, the (18)O-labeled linoleic acid hydroperoxide, the detection of labeled compounds by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and the direct spectroscopic detection and characterization of (1)O(2) light emission. Using this approach we have observed the formation of (18)O-labeled (1)O(2) by chemical trapping of (1)O(2) with anthracene derivatives and detection of the corresponding labeled endoperoxide by HPLC-MS/MS. The generation of (1)O(2) was also demonstrated by direct spectral characterization of (1)O(2) monomol light emission in the near-infrared region (lambda = 1270 nm). In summary, our studies demonstrated that LOOH can originate (1)O(2). The experimental evidences indicate that (1)O(2) is generated at a yield close to 10% by the Russell mechanism, where a linear tetraoxide intermediate is formed in the combination of two peroxyl radicals. In addition to LOOH, other biological hydroperoxides, including hydroperoxides formed in proteins and nucleic acids, may also participate in reactions leading to the generation (1)O(2). This hypothesis is currently being investigated in our laboratory. PMID:17505972

  17. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  18. Rational design of a receptor-targeted photodynamic molecular beacon for the multilevel control of singlet oxygen production and PDT activity in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juan; Stefflova, Klara; Warren, Mike; Bu, Jiachuan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the combined action of light, oxygen and a photosensitizer (PS). It offers unique control in the PS's action because the key cytotoxic agent, singlet oxygen (1O II), is only produced in situ upon irradiation. The 1O II production can be controlled in three levels. The first level involves the judicious use of fiber optics to selectively deliver light to disease tissues. The second level is to exert control over the PS's localization by selectively delivering PS to cancer cells. The third level is to exert control of the PS's ability to generate 1O II in responding to specific cancer biomarkers. Here, we present two PDT agents based on the latter two levels of 1O II control. The first PDT agent "PPF" contains a PS (Pyro) and a tumor homing molecule (folate) and a peptide linker. PPF was found to be selectively accumulated in cancer cells via folate receptor (FR) pathway. The second PDT agent "PP MMP7B" is a matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7)-triggered photodynamic molecular beacon (PMB) containing a PS (Pyro), a 1O II quencher (BHQ3) and a MMP7-cleavable peptide linker. Thus, the 1O II production of PP MMP7B is highly sequence-specific and its photodynamic cytotoxicity is MMP7-dependent. Since these agents are designed to share functional modules (PS and peptide linker) and common cancer cell model (KB cells overexpress both FR and MMP7), it forms the basis for rational design of receptor-targeted PMB for achieving a multi-level control of 1O II production in cancer cells, which in term, could provide a much higher level of PDT selectivity.

  19. Copper crystallite in carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfurfuryl alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  20. Copper modified carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfunctional alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  1. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND OZONE ON AMORPHOUS SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Dapeng; He Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco; Brucato, John Robert; Tozzetti, Lorenzo; De Sio, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Oxygen in the interstellar medium is seen in the gas phase, in ices (incorporated in H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}), and in grains such as (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} )SiO{sub 3} or (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} ){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, 0 < x < 1. In this investigation, we study the diffusion of oxygen atoms and the formation of oxygen molecules and ozone on the surface of an amorphous silicate film. We find that ozone is formed at low temperature (<30 K), and molecular oxygen forms when the diffusion of oxygen atoms becomes significant, at around 60 K. This experiment, besides being the first determination of the diffusion energy barrier (1785 {+-} 35 K) for oxygen atoms on a silicate surface, suggests bare silicates as a possible storage place for oxygen atoms in low-A{sub v} environments.

  2. Protection of densely populated excited triplet state ensembles against deactivation by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Mikhail A; Baluschev, Stanislav; Landfester, Katharina

    2016-08-22

    This critical review discusses different approaches towards protection of photoactive materials based on triplet excited state ensembles against deactivation by molecular oxygen though quenching and photooxidation mechanisms. Passive protection, based on the application of barrier materials for packaging, sealing, or encapsulation of the active substances, which prevent oxygen molecules from penetration and physical contact with excited states and active protection, based on the application of oxygen scavenging species are compared. Efficiencies of different approaches together with examples and prospects of their applications are outlined. PMID:27277068

  3. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Oxygen-Dependent Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Lin, Qun; Yun, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Molecular oxygen has long been recognized as a powerful radiosensitizer that enhances the cell-killing efficiency of ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization by oxygen occurs at very low concentrations with the half-maximum radiosensitization at approximately 3 mmHg. However, robust hypoxia-induced signal transduction can be induced at <15 mmHg and can elicit a wide range of cellular responses that will affect therapy response as well as malignant progression. Great strides have been made, especially since the 1990s, toward identification and characterization of the oxygen-regulated molecular pathways that affect tumor response to ionizing radiation. In this review, we will discuss the current advances in our understanding of oxygen-dependent molecular modification and cellular signal transduction and their impact on tumor response to therapy. We will specifically address mechanistic distinctions between radiobiological hypoxia (0–3 mmHg) and pathological hypoxia (3–15 mmHg). We also propose a paradigm that hypoxia increases radioresistance by maintaining the cancer stem cell phenotype. PMID:25938770

  4. Atmospheric odd oxygen production due to the photodissociation of ordinary and isotopic molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.; Frederick, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    Line-by-line calculations are performed to determine the contributions of the Schumann-Runge bands of ordinary and isotopic oxygen to the photodissociation of these molecules at different altitudes. The contributions to the dissociation rates of the satellite lines and of the first and higher vibrational states of the initial molecular states are found to be insignificant. At 70 km, (O-16)(O-18) is found to produce 10 times as much odd oxygen as would be produced if the isotope did not have selective absorption, and 6 percent of the odd oxygen produced is due to this isotope. It is noted that the excess odd oxygen produced is not enough to explain the excess quantity of ozone observed in the atmosphere, which cannot be accounted for in photochemical models. Comparison with previous results is made.

  5. Oxidative radical skeletal rearrangement induced by molecular oxygen: synthesis of quinazolinones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Zhang, Feng-Lian; Chiba, Shunsuke

    2013-06-01

    Oxidative skeletal rearrangement of 5-aryl-4,5-dihydro-1,2,4-oxadiazoles into quinazolinones is induced by molecular oxygen (under a dry air atmosphere) that likely proceeds via transient iminyl radical species. Concise syntheses of biologically active quinazolinone derivatives were demonstrated using the present strategy. PMID:23692460

  6. MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND THE ADSORPTION OF PHENOLS - EFFECT OF FUNCTIONAL GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reveals that the presence of molecular oxygen (oxic conditions) has a significant impact on the exhibited adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon (GAC) for several phenolic compounds. The increase in the GAC adsorptive capacity under oxic conditions results f...

  7. Prolyl Hydroxylase PHD3 Activates Oxygen-dependent Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Rantanen, Krista; Pursiheimo, Juha; Högel, Heidi; Himanen, Virpi; Metzen, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs/EGLNs) are central regulators of the molecular responses to oxygen availability. One isoform, PHD3, is expressed in response to hypoxia and causes apoptosis in oxygenated conditions in neural cells. Here we show that PHD3 forms subcellular aggregates in an oxygen-dependent manner. The aggregation of PHD3 was seen under normoxia and was strongly reduced under hypoxia or by the inactivation of the PHD3 hydroxylase activity. The PHD3 aggregates were dependent on microtubular integrity and contained components of the 26S proteasome, chaperones, and ubiquitin, thus demonstrating features that are characteristic for aggresome-like structures. Forced expression of the active PHD3 induced the aggregation of proteasomal components and activated apoptosis under normoxia in HeLa cells. The apoptosis was seen in cells prone to PHD3 aggregation and the PHD3 aggregation preceded apoptosis. The data demonstrates the cellular oxygen sensor PHD3 as a regulator of protein aggregation in response to varying oxygen availability. PMID:18337469

  8. Rate of reaction between molecular hydrogen and molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokaw, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The shock tube data of Jachimowski and Houghton were rigorously analyzed to obtain rate constants for the candidate initiation reactions H2 + O2 yields H + HO2, H2 + O2 yields H2O + O, and H2 + O2 yields OH + OH. Reaction (01) is probably not the initiation process because the activation energy obtained is less than the endothermicity and because the derived rates greatly exceed values inferred in the literature from the reverse of reaction (01). Reactions (02) and (03) remain as possibilities, with reaction (02) slightly favored on the basis of steric and statistical considerations. The solution of the differential equations is presented in detail to show how the kinetics of other ignition systems may be solved.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen diving affects exhaled molecular profiles in men.

    PubMed

    van Ooij, P J A M; van Hulst, R A; Kulik, W; Brinkman, P; Houtkooper, A; Sterk, P J

    2014-07-01

    Exhaled breath contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are associated with respiratory pathophysiology. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen exposure (hyperoxia) generates a distinguishable VOC pattern. This study aimed to test this hypothesis in oxygen-breathing divers. VOCs in exhaled breath were measured in 10 male divers before and 4h after diving to 9msw (190kPa) for 1h. During the dive they breathed 100% oxygen or air in randomized order. VOCs were determined using two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Compared to air dives, after oxygen dives there was a significant increase in five VOCs (predominately methyl alkanes). Furthermore, a strong, positive correlation was found between increments in 2,4-dimethyl-hexane and those of 4-ethyl-5-methyl-nonane. Although non-submerged hyperoxia studies on VOCs have been performed, the present study is the first to demonstrate changes in exhaled molecular profiles after submerged oxygen diving. The pathophysiological background might be attributed to either a lipid peroxidation-induced pathway, an inflammatory pathway, or to both. PMID:24703972

  10. Bioinspired molecular adhesive for water-resistant oxygen indicator films.

    PubMed

    Vu, Chau Hai Thai; Won, Keehoon

    2013-01-01

    Mussels can attach themselves to nearly all types of hard surfaces in wet environments. Such attractive adhesive ability of mussels is believed to rely on the amino acid composition of proteins found near the plaque-substrate interface. Dopamine (DA) is identified as a simplified mimic of mussel proteins, which are rich in 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine and lysine, because it contains both catechol and amine functional groups. In this work, we have first applied this bioinspired adhesive to tackle a dye leaching problem of colorimetric oxygen indicator films, which are widely used to ensure the absence of oxygen inside the package of oxygen-sensitive materials. Simple immersion of packaging films into a DA solution resulted in poly(DA) deposition, decreasing the water contact angle of the films from 105° to 65°. The poly(DA) coating could reduce the thionine leakage of the UV-activated oxygen indicator film. The effects of poly(DA) coating were found to be dependent on the DA solution pH, the coating time, and the DA concentration. The film resistant to dye leaching lost its dye color by 5 min UVB irradiation and regained the color in the presence of oxygen, demonstrating that it functioned successfully as UV-activated oxygen indicators. PMID:23335471

  11. Incorporation of oxygen into abscisic acid and phaseic acid for molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Creelman, R.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1984-05-01

    Abscisic acid accumulates in detached, wilted leaves of Xanthium strumariu. When these leaves are subsequently rehydrated, phaseic acid, a catabolite of abscisic acid, accumulates. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of phaseic acid isolated from stressed and subsequently rehydrated leaves placed in an atmosphere containing 20% /sup 18/O/sub 2/ and 80% N/sub 2/ indicates that one atom of /sup 18/O is incorporated in the 6'-hydroxymethyl group of phaseic acid. This suggests that the enzyme that converts abscisic acid to phaseic acid is an oxygenase. Analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of abscisic acid isolated from stressed leaves kept in an atmosphere containing /sup 18/O/sub 2/ indicates that one atom of /sup 18/O is presented in the carboxyl group of abscisic acid. Thus, when abscisic acid accumulates in water-streesed leaves, only one of the four oxygens present in the abscisic acid molecule is derived from molecular oxygen. This suggest that either (a) the oxygen present in the 1'-, 4'-, and one of the two oxygens at the 1-position of abscisic acid arise from water, or (b) there exists a stored precursor with oxygen atoms already present in the 1'- and 4'-positions of abscisic acid which is converted to abscisic acid under conditions of water stress. 17 references, 2 figures, 1 tables.

  12. Photochemistry of molecular and atomic oxygen in the terrestrial nightglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr; Von Savigny, Christian; Sinnhuber, Miriam

    2016-07-01

    The electronic states of molecular oxygen ({O}_2) are in constant communication through collisions in high vibrational levels of {O}_2 in the MLT (Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere) region. We assume that the Herzberg {O}_2 electronic states transfer energy to O-atoms to generate the green line. Our Multiple Nightglow Chemistry model is based on more than 80 (odd oxygen and odd hydrogen) aeronomical reactions to implement this concept. We retrieved atomic oxygen concentration ([O]) profiles in the MLT region with help of SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) and SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) infrared radiometer observations of the nightglow. Particularly, we obtained volume emission rate (VER) profiles (due to the infrared atmospheric {O}_2(a^1Δ_g) nightglow at 1.27 μm) from SABER to retrieve [O] profiles. We discussed quenching profiles that correspond to retrieved [O] profiles to reflect complex molecularity of infrared atmospheric and green line nightglow emissions.

  13. Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian Kent; Quemener, Goulven; Balakrishman, Naduvalath

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

  14. Conference on Singlet Molecular Oxygen (COSMO 84), program and abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, B.

    1984-09-01

    The Conference objective was to promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication by assembling research workers in such diverse fields as photochemistry, photophysics, synthetic chemistry, photobiology, photomedicine, laser and atmospheric physics; and to present their recent findings with singlet molecular oxygen as the common theme. This was prompted by several recent developments: notably the direct observation of 02 superscript 1 micron g in emission at 1.27 microns which now provides solvent-dependent life-times, reaction or quenching rate constants, and sensitized yields directly; the trapping of zwitterionic intermediates and the role of catalysts in electron transfer peroxidation; the feasibility of a singlet oxygen-iodine chemical laser; direct observation of 02 microns g in enzymic processes; the use of endoperoxides as actinometers; the phototherapy of malignant tumors; prospects for 02 superscript 1 delta g as a solar energy storage intermediate.

  15. Biochar activated by oxygen plasma for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Dubey, Mukul; Kharel, Parashu; Gu, Zhengrong; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-01

    Biochar, also known as black carbon, is a byproduct of biomass pyrolysis. As a low-cost, environmental-friendly material, biochar has the potential to replace more expensive synthesized carbon nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes) for use in future supercapacitors. To achieve high capacitance, biochar requires proper activation. A conventional approach involves mixing biochar with a strong base and baking at a high temperature. However, this process is time consuming and energy inefficient (requiring temperatures >900 °C). This work demonstrates a low-temperature (<150 °C) plasma treatment that efficiently activates a yellow pine biochar. Particularly, the effects of oxygen plasma on the biochar microstructure and supercapacitor characteristics are studied. Significant enhancement of the capacitance is achieved: 171.4 F g-1 for a 5-min oxygen plasma activation, in comparison to 99.5 F g-1 for a conventional chemical activation and 60.4 F g-1 for untreated biochar. This enhancement of the charge storage capacity is attributed to the creation of a broad distribution in pore size and a larger surface area. The plasma activation mechanisms in terms of the evolution of the biochar surface and microstructure are further discussed.

  16. 4-N,N-Dimethylaminopyridine promoted selective oxidation of methyl aromatics with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan; Gao, Jin; Wang, Feng; Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    4-N,N-Dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as catalyst in combination with benzyl bromide was developed for the selective oxidation of methyl aromatics. DMAP exhibited higher catalytic activity than other pyridine analogues, such as 4-carboxypyridine, 4-cyanopyridine and pyridine. The sp3 hybrid carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds of different methyl aromatics were successfully oxygenated with molecular oxygen. The real catalyst is due to the formation of a pyridine onium salt from the bromide and DMAP. The onium salt was well characterized by NMR and the reaction mechanism was discussed. PMID:22466855

  17. Molecular Oxygen in Oort Cloud Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O2, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko of O2/H2O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O2 is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O2 abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O2 of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O2 might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  18. Chemisorption of a Molecular Oxygen On the UN(0 0 1) Surface: Ab Initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukovskii, Yuri F.; Bocharov, Dmitry; Kotomin, Eugene Alexej

    2009-09-15

    The results of DFT GGA calculations on oxygen molecules adsorbed upon the (0 0 1) surface of uranium mononitride (UN) are presented and discussed. We demonstrate that O2 molecules oriented parallel to the substrate can dissociate either (i) spontaneously when the molecular center lies above the surface hollow site or atop N ion, (ii) with the activation barrier when a molecule sits atop the surface U ion. This explains fast UN oxidation in air.

  19. A non-mass-dependent oxygen isotope effect in the production of ozone from molecular oxygen - The role of molecular symmetry in isotope chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidenreich, J. E., III; Thiemens, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    It was previously reported that the reaction products from the synthesis of ozone in an electric discharge through molecular oxygen display a nonmass-dependent (NoMaDic) oxygen isotope effect. In this paper, a detailed characterization of the isotope effect, including the effect of molecular oxygen pressure, and the presence of a chemically inert third body (helium), is reported. The NoMaDic effect is due to an isotopically selective stabilization of the O3 formation reaction intermediate, possibly resulting from the ability of the different isotopomers to exhibit different molecular symmetries.

  20. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, Daniil A; Boyd, Iain D

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system. PMID:27394110

  1. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  2. Superconductivity in oxygen doped iron telluride by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mao

    Iron base superconductor have gained much attention in the research community. They offer great potentials to improve our understanding of the subject of superconductivity by having another family of high temperature superconductors to compare and contrast to the cuprates. Practically, the iron based superconductors seems to be even better candidates for applications in power generation and power transmission. Iron telluride is regarded as the parent compound of the "11" family, the family of iron chalcogenide that has the simplest structure. Iron telluride itself is not a superconductor, by can become one when doped with oxygen. In this investigation, we developed the growth recipe of thin film iron telluride by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). We found the growth to be self-regulated, similar to that of GaAs. The initial layers of growth seem to experience a spontaneous crystallization, as the film quickly go from the initial polycrystalline phase to highly crystalline in just a few unit cells. We studied oxygen doping to the iron telluride thin films and the resultant superconductivity. We characterized the sample with AFM, XRD, transport, and STEM-EELS, and we found that interfacial strain is not an essential ingredient of superconductivity in this particular case. We investigated the doping conditions for two candidate oxygen doping modes: substitution and interstitial. We found that substitution occurs when the film grown in oxygen, while interstitial oxygen is primarily incorporated during annealing after growth. The substitutional oxygen are concentrated in small local regions where substitution is around 100%, but does not contribute to superconductivity. We estimated substitutional oxygen to be about 5%, and is the proximate cause of superconductivity. Hall experiment on our sample showed a shift of dominant carrier type from holes to electrons around 35 K, but the transition was set in motion as early as the structural phase transition around 70 K. We

  3. Cell death induced by direct laser activation of singlet oxygen at 1270 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anquez, F.; El Yazidi Belkoura, I.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Courtade, E.

    2013-02-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a major role in many chemical and biological photo-oxidation processes. It has a high chemical reactivity, which is commonly harnessed for therapeutic issues. Indeed, singlet oxygen is recognized as the major cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. In this treatment of cancer, singlet oxygen is created, among other reactive species, by an indirect transfer of energy from light to molecular oxygen via excitation of a photosensitizer. In this paper, we show that the conventional singlet oxygen production scheme can be simplified. Production of singlet oxygen is achieved in living cells from photosensitizer-free 1270 nm laser excitation of the electronic ground state of molecular oxygen. The quantity of singlet oxygen produced in this way is sufficient to induce an oxidative stress leading to cell death. Other effects such as thermal stress are discriminated, and we conclude that cell death is only due to singlet oxygen creation. This new simplified scheme of singlet oxygen activation can be seen as a breakthrough for phototherapies of malignant diseases and/or as a non-invasive possibility to generate reactive oxygen species in a tightly controlled manner.

  4. AN EFFICIENT AND ECOFRIENDLY OXIDATION OF ALKENES USING IRON NITRATE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An environmentally friendly solventless oxidation of alkenes is accomplished efficiently using relatively benign iron nitrate as catalyst in the pressence of molecular oxygen under pressurized conditions.

  5. A global view of the molecular oxygen night airglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Kafkalidis, Julie F.; Skinner, Wilbert R.; Roble, Raymond G.

    2003-10-01

    The High-Resolution Doppler Imager on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite has observed the O2 atmospheric band nightglow at extremely high spatial resolution of 50 km in the horizontal over much of Earth's surface. These observations of the oxygen nightglow are shown to be a good surrogate for atomic oxygen outflow from the thermosphere and subsequent recombination in the upper mesosphere. The distribution of enhanced airglow and recombination verify the previous observations that bright regions of the nightglow are associated with descending motion, where the tides are transporting atomic oxygen out of the thermosphere, and regions of decreased airglow are associated with ascending tidal motion. The detailed observations of the global airglow at a scale of 100 km present a much more complex picture, however. The tidally enhanced regions are extremely structured, with strong longitudinal and latitudinal variability in brightness and associated atomic oxygen recombination. These structured regions are persistent on a timescale of a day or more, with certain regions of the globe exhibiting enhanced airglow much of the time. These regions are present over the entire night side of the globe but are strongly modulated by the ascending and descending tidal motions. A theoretical study of these enhancements suggests that they are caused by the upward propagation of gravity waves, which break in the high mesosphere and induce strong vertical motion in the atmosphere. It is interesting that the primary cause of the increased transport of atomic oxygen is vertical motion rather than the conventional enhanced turbulence explanation. These gravity waves are associated with wind shear and strong convective activity in the troposphere and often appear in certain preferred locations where convective activity is expected. These observations have important implications for the basic processes by which momentum and energy are deposited in the upper mesosphere. We suggest that

  6. The mechanism of oxidation of fullerenes with molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlers, M.; Bauer, A.; Belz, Th

    1996-12-31

    The novel allotrope of carbon, fullerene is a molecular analogue to the other form of sp hybridised carbon, graphite. In our general attempt to understand the carbon-oxygen reaction at an atomic level we use fullerenes as reference compounds in oxidation studies as they will not exhibit influences of electronic defects on the reactivity. The van der Waals crystals of C{sub 60} and of C{sub 70} can be prepared by slow sublimation with single crystalline quality and in absence of any detectable phase impurity due to the molecular separation procedures for the sublimation precursors. It is equally convenient to work on thin films of fullerenes on e.g. silicon (100) surfaces, on large single crystals and on sublimed powder. Solid fullerenes are air-sensitive materials. They degrade quickly within minutes into a stage of reduced solubility and become eventually fully polymerized upon air/sunlight exposure at 300 K. This property is reminiscent on coal degradation, a process in which a variety of gases are released at low rates. We first investigate this initial step of reactivity of fullerenes with air using temperature-programmed methods.

  7. High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkt, F.; Guyon, P. M.; Hepburn, J.

    1993-07-01

    The threshold TPE photoelectron spectrum of molecular oxygen has been reinvestigated using a partially cooled effusive molecular jet and the monochromatised VUV synchrotron radiation from super-ACO in Orsay. Three vibrational progressions are identified. One of them corresponds to and confirms that observed recently by Baltzer et al. (Phys. Rev. A 45 (1992) 4374), the two other ones are observed for the first time in TPE spectroscopy. Possible assignments for these progressions are discussed. The vibrational progression in the X 2Π g state has been seen up to v+=26 and the two spin-orbit components 2Π 1/2 and 2Π 3/2) are for the first time fully resolved in TPES. High-lying vibrational levels with v+ >20 of the X state are seen to overlap with the a state levels. The relative contribution of both states is obtained through a deconvolution procedure. The vibrational progression in the b 4Σ -g is extended to v+=18. The threshold photoelectron spectrum around 20 eV shows a particularly high density of lines. Possible assignments of these lines to new progressions are discussed with the help of a series of time-of-flight photoelectron spectra (TOF-PES) measured at a series of excitation energies between 18 and 20 eV.

  8. Molecular fossils and the late rise of oxygenic photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocks, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Biomarkers are the molecular fossils of natural products such as lipids and pigments. They can yield a wealth of information about early microbial ecosystems and are particularly valuable when preserved in > 1 billion-year old (Ga) sedimentary rocks where conventional fossils are often lacking. Therefore, in 1999, the detection of traces of biomarkers in 2.5 to 2.7 Ga shales from Western Australia (Brocks et al. 1999, Summons et al. 1999) was celebrated as a breakthrough. The discovery, which was later confirmed by several independent studies, led to far reaching conclusions about the early evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis (Summons et al. 1999) and ancestral eukaryotes (Brocks et al. 1999). However, here we present new data based on the carbon isotopic composition of solidified hydrocarbons (Rasmussen et al. 2008) and the spatial distribution of liquid hydrocarbons within the original 2.5 and 2.7 Ga shales (Brocks 2011) that demonstrate that the molecules must have entered the rocks much later in Earth's history and therefore provide no information about the Archean (>2.5 Ga) biosphere or environment. The elimination of the Archean biomarker data has immense implications for our understanding of Earth's early biosphere. 2-Methylhopanes have been interpreted as evidence for the existence of cyanobacteria at 2.7 Ga, about ~300 million years before the atmosphere became mildly oxygenated in the Great Oxidation Event (GOE; between 2.45 and 2.32 Ga). Now, the oldest direct fossil evidence for cyanobacteria reverts back to 2.15 Ga, and the most ancient robust sign for oxygenic photosynthesis becomes the GOE itself. Moreover, the presence of steranes has been interpreted as evidence for the existence of ancestral eukaryotes at 2.7 Ga. However, without the steranes, the oldest fossil evidence for the domain falls into the range ~1.78-1.68 Ga. Recognition that the biomarkers from Archean rocks are not of Archean age renders permissive hypotheses about a late evolution

  9. SAFETY ASPECTS OF OXYGEN AERATION ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was carried out to assess the impact of the use of oxygen and oxygen-enriched air for aeration of activated sludge systems on the safety of municipal waste-water treatment plants and their personnel. The tasks included (1) determination of oxygen combustion hazards f...

  10. Henry's Law Activity of Oxygen in Molten Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, J. W.

    2015-09-01

    A model is proposed for the solubility of oxygen in molten iron in dilute solutions in which the oxygen exists in two states, free and associated. Only the free oxygen has thermodynamic activity in the sense of interaction with an electrochemical cell to produce the voltage described by the Nernst equation.

  11. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  12. Molecular mechanisms of microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zielasek, J; Hartung, H P

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells are brain macrophages which serve specific functions in the defense of the central nervous system (CNS) against microorganisms, the removal of tissue debris in neurodegenerative diseases or during normal development, and in autoimmune inflammatory disorders of the brain. In cultured microglial cells, several soluble inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and bacterial products like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were demonstrated to induce a wide range of microglial activities, e.g. increased phagocytosis, chemotaxis, secretion of cytokines, activation of the respiratory burst and induction of nitric oxide synthase. Since heightened microglial activation was shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of experimental inflammatory CNS disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of microglial activation may lead to new treatment strategies for neurodegenerative disorders, multiple sclerosis and bacterial or viral infections of the nervous system. PMID:8876774

  13. Interaction of Molecular Oxygen with Au (001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Michael; Loheac, Andrew; Barbour, Andi; Komanicky, Vladimir; Ruffino, Anthony; You, Hoydoo

    Kinetics of dioxygen - Au (001) surface interaction has been studied at high temperature and near atmospheric pressures with in situ x-ray scattering measurements. We find that the hexagonal reconstruction (hex) of Au (001) surface lifts to (1×1) in the presence of dioxygen. The measured lifting rate constant vs. temperature shows a `volcano'-type behavior indicating that oxygen adsorption limits at high temperature while activation barrier of the lifting limits at low temperature. The pressure-temperature (PT) phase diagram obtained in our study shows three regions: hex at low P and T, (1×1) at high P and T, and coexistence of the hex and the (1×1) at the intermediate P and T. Funding provided by Research Corporation for Science Advancement. Work done at the Advanced Photon Source supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Singlet molecular oxygen on natural snow and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2010-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) is a reactive intermediate formed when a chromophore absorbs light and subsequently transfers energy to dissolved oxygen. As an oxidant, 1O2* reacts rapidly with a number of electron-rich environmental pollutants. In our work, we show enhanced kinetics for 1O2* in frozen solutions, where its rate of formation (Rf) and steady state concentration ([1O2*]) can be many orders of magnitude higher than found in the same unfrozen solution. Our goal here is to identify the contribution of 1O2* to the decay of pollutants on snow and ice. We conducted experiments in laboratory solutions made to simulate the concentrations and characteristics of natural snow, as well as in natural snow collected in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California and at Summit, Greenland. Natural snow contains a mixture of inorganic salts and organic species that can function as sources and/or sinks for oxidants, as well as contribute colligative control on the volume of quasi-liquid layers that occur at the surface and grain boundaries of ice. In our experiments, solutions typically contained up to five components: (1) Furfuryl alcohol (FFA), a commonly used probe for 1O2*, (2) Rose Bengal (RB), a 1O2* sensitizer, (3) HOOH, a photochemical precursor for hydroxyl radical (●OH), (4) glycerol to simulate unknown, naturally occurring sinks for ●OH, and (5) sodium sulfate to control the total concentration of solutes. We illuminated samples in a temperature-controlled solar simulator and subsequently measured the loss of FFA using high performance liquid chromatography. To differentiate reactions of 1O2* from other sinks (e.g. ●OH), selective sink species were added to determine the fraction of FFA loss due to direct photolysis, reaction with 1O2*, and reaction with ●OH. We verified reactions of 1O2* with FFA by two methods. First, we utilized the kinetic solvent isotope effect, where an enhancement of FFA loss in a mixture of D2O/water is indicative 1O2* since [1

  15. Self-assembled molecular rafts at liquid|liquid interfaces for four-electron oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Olaya, Astrid J; Schaming, Delphine; Brevet, Pierre-Francois; Nagatani, Hirohisa; Zimmermann, Tomas; Vanicek, Jiri; Xu, Hai-Jun; Gros, Claude P; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-01-11

    The self-assembly of the oppositely charged water-soluble porphyrins, cobalt tetramethylpyridinium porphyrin (CoTMPyP(4+)) and cobalt tetrasulphonatophenyl porphyrin (CoTPPS(4-)), at the interface with an organic solvent to form molecular "rafts", provides an excellent catalyst to perform the interfacial four-electron reduction of oxygen by lipophilic electron donors such as tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). The catalytic activity and selectivity of the self-assembled catalyst toward the four-electron pathway was found to be as good as that of the Pacman type cofacial cobalt porphyrins. The assembly has been characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Surface Second Harmonic Generation, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Density functional theory calculations confirm the possibility of formation of the catalytic CoTMPyP(4+)/ CoTPPS(4-) complex and its capability to bind oxygen. PMID:22107335

  16. PARALLEL EVALUATION OF AIR- AND OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To provide data on the relative merits of air and oxygen in the activated sludge process, two 1900-cu m/day (0.5-mgd) activated sludge pilot plant, one air and one oxygen system, were operated side-by-side at the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant, Carson, California. Both of th...

  17. Molecular characteristics versus biological activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Applegate, Vernon C.; Smith, Manning A.; Willeford, Bennett R.

    1967-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of mononitrophenols containing halogens not only play a key role in their biological activity but provide a novel example of selective toxicity among vertebrate animals. It has been reported that efforts to control the parasitic sea lamprey in the Great Lakes are directed at present to the applications of a selective toxicant to streams inhabited by lamprey larvae. Since 1961, the larvicide that has been used almost exclusively in the control program has been 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM). However, this is only one of about 15 closely related compounds, all halogen-containing mononitrophenols, that display a selectively toxic action upon lampreys. Although not all of the halogenated mononitrophenols are selectively toxic to lampreys (in fact, fewer than half of those tested), no other group of related compounds has displayed any useful larvicidal activity except for the substituted nitrosalicylanilides.

  18. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  19. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  20. Integration of transcription and flux data reveals molecular paths associated with differences in oxygen-dependent phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to adapt to a wide range of external oxygen conditions. Previously, oxygen-dependent phenotypes have been studied individually at the transcriptional, metabolite, and flux level. However, the regulation of cell phenotype occurs across the different levels of cell function. Integrative analysis of data from multiple levels of cell function in the context of a network of several known biochemical interaction types could enable identification of active regulatory paths not limited to a single level of cell function. Results The graph theoretical method called Enriched Molecular Path detection (EMPath) was extended to enable integrative utilization of transcription and flux data. The utility of the method was demonstrated by detecting paths associated with phenotype differences of S. cerevisiae under three different conditions of oxygen provision: 20.9%, 2.8% and 0.5%. The detection of molecular paths was performed in an integrated genome-scale metabolic and protein-protein interaction network. Conclusions The molecular paths associated with the phenotype differences of S. cerevisiae under conditions of different oxygen provisions revealed paths of molecular interactions that could potentially mediate information transfer between processes that respond to the particular oxygen availabilities. PMID:24528924

  1. Chiral effect of the dissociative adsorption of molecular oxygen on the carbon nanotube surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamina, E. N.; Lebedev, N. G.

    2015-05-01

    The electronic-energy characteristics of the adsorption of the oxygen molecule in the ground triplet and excited singlet states on the surface of chiral and achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes were studied by semiempirical MNDO and PM3 quantum-chemical methods using the molecular cluster model with boundary pseudoatoms. The energies of dissociative adsorption of molecular oxygen on the surface of nanotubes were calculated. The chiral effect of the dissociative adsorption of the O2 molecule was predicted and studied. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes that adsorb molecular oxygen most effectively were predicted. A physical rationale of the obtained dependences was presented.

  2. Molecular Evolution of the Oxygen-Binding Hemerythrin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis during Precambrian times entailed the diversification of strategies minimizing reactive oxygen species-associated damage. Four families of oxygen-carrier proteins (hemoglobin, hemerythrin and the two non-homologous families of arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins) are known to have evolved independently the capacity to bind oxygen reversibly, providing cells with strategies to cope with the evolutionary pressure of oxygen accumulation. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin was first studied in marine invertebrates but further research has made it clear that it is present in the three domains of life, strongly suggesting that its origin predated the emergence of eukaryotes. Results Oxygen-binding hemerythrins are a monophyletic sub-group of the hemerythrin/HHE (histidine, histidine, glutamic acid) cation-binding domain. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologs were unambiguously identified in 367/2236 bacterial, 21/150 archaeal and 4/135 eukaryotic genomes. Overall, oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues were found in the same proportion as single-domain and as long protein sequences. The associated functions of protein domains in long hemerythrin sequences can be classified in three major groups: signal transduction, phosphorelay response regulation, and protein binding. This suggests that in many organisms the reversible oxygen-binding capacity was incorporated in signaling pathways. A maximum-likelihood tree of oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues revealed a complex evolutionary history in which lateral gene transfer, duplications and gene losses appear to have played an important role. Conclusions Hemerythrin is an ancient protein domain with a complex evolutionary history. The distinctive iron-binding coordination site of oxygen-binding hemerythrins evolved first in prokaryotes, very likely prior to the divergence of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and spread into many bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species. The later

  3. Singlet molecular oxygen generated in dark biological process.

    PubMed

    Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa H G

    2014-10-01

    Ultraweak chemiluminescence arising from biomolecules oxidation has been attributed to the radiative deactivation of singlet molecular oxygen [(1)O2] and electronically excited triplet carbonyl products involving dioxetane intermediates. As examples, we will discuss the generation of (1)O2 from lipid hydroperoxides, which involves a cyclic mechanism from a linear tetraoxide intermediate. The generation of (1)O2 in aqueous solution via energy transfer from the excited triplet acetone arising from the thermodecomposition of dioxetane a chemical source, and horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-methylpropanal, as an enzymatic source, will also be discussed. The approach used to unequivocally demonstrate the generation of (1)O2 in these reactions is the use of (18)O-labeled hydroperoxide / triplet dioxygen ((18)[(3)O2]), the detection of labeled compounds by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and the direct spectroscopic detection and characterization of (1)O2 light emission. Characteristic light emission at 1,270nm, corresponding to the singlet delta state monomolecular decay was observed. Using(18)[(3)O2], we observed the formation of (18)O-labeled (1)O2 ((18)[(1)O2]) by the chemical trapping of (18)[(1)O2]with the anthracene-9,10-diyldiethane-2,1-diyl disulfate disodium salt (EAS) and detected the corresponding (18)O-labeled EAS endoperoxide usingHPLC-MS/MS. The combined use of the thermolysis of a water-soluble naphthalene endoperoxide as a generator of (18)O labeled (1)O2 and the sensitivity of HPLC-MS/MS allowed the study of (1)O2reactivity toward biomolecules. Photoemission properties and chemical trapping clearly demonstrate that the production of hydroperoxide and excited carbonyls generates (18)[(1)O2], and points to the involvement of (1)O2 in physiological and pathophysiological mechanism. Supported by FAPESP (2012/12663-1), CAPES, INCT Redoxoma (FAPESP/CNPq/CAPES; 573530/2008-4), NAP Redoxoma (PRPUSP; 2011.1.9352.1.8), CEPID

  4. Binding mechanisms of molecular oxygen and moisture to graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yinxiao; Murali, Raghu

    2011-02-01

    We report on the binding mechanisms of oxygen and water to graphene by comparing the doping of graphene in a dry O2 environment versus in ambient. It is seen that dry oxygen dopes graphene from the basal plane while the ambient dopes graphene from the edges or from the substrate in the vicinity of the edge. Upon vacuum annealing, doping is fully reversible in the former case and only partially reversible in the latter case. We observe a thickness-dependent doping as a result of the difference in host sites for doping (basal plane versus edge). Finally, hysteresis is shown to be triggered even in dry oxygen.

  5. Oxygen-independent induction of enzyme activities related to oxygen metabolism in yeast by copper.

    PubMed

    Galiazzo, F; Schiesser, A; Rotilio, G

    1988-04-14

    Aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of CuSO4 (between 0.1 and 1 mM) caused a generalized induction of major enzyme activities involved in 'housekeeping' routes of oxygen metabolism (cytochrome oxidase, glutathione peroxidases and catalase) which were comparable to or higher than that observed with Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase. Fumarase and glutathione transferase, tested as controls for oxygen-unrelated activities, were found to decrease under the same conditions. In the absence of oxygen, copper addition to yeast resulted in significant increases of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidases and a slight increase of cytochrome oxidase, with catalase remaining undetectable irrespective of whether or not copper was present. Other metal ions tested (Mn2+, Co2+) were unable to produce such effects. It is concluded that copper has a general inducing effect on enzymes related to metabolism of oxygen and oxygen derivatives, which is mediated neither by formation of O2-. and H2O2 nor by interaction with copper-specific apoproteins. These results point to a general role of copper as regulator of the expression of major enzyme activities involved in biological oxygen activation. PMID:2831994

  6. Simple and Efficient Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidation of Primary Alcohols with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ritwika; Chandra, Shubhadeep; Maiti, Debabrata; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative transformations utilizing molecular oxygen (O2 ) as the stoichiometric oxidant are of paramount importance in organic synthesis from ecological and economical perspectives. Alcohol oxidation reactions that employ O2 are scarce in homogeneous catalysis and the efficacy of such systems has been constrained by limited substrate scope (most involve secondary alcohol oxidation) or practical factors, such as the need for an excess of base or an additive. Catalytic systems employing O2 as the "primary" oxidant, in the absence of any additive, are rare. A solution to this longstanding issue is offered by the development of an efficient ruthenium-catalyzed oxidation protocol, which enables smooth oxidation of a wide variety of primary, as well as secondary benzylic, allylic, heterocyclic, and aliphatic, alcohols with molecular oxygen as the primary oxidant and without any base or hydrogen- or electron-transfer agents. Most importantly, a high degree of selectivity during alcohol oxidation has been predicted for complex settings. Preliminary mechanistic studies including (18) O labeling established the in situ formation of an oxo-ruthenium intermediate as the active catalytic species in the cycle and involvement of a two-electron hydride transfer in the rate-limiting step. PMID:27257955

  7. Theoretical study of the interaction between molecular oxygen and tetraaza macrocyclic manganese complexes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alexandre; Silva, Adilson Luís Pereira; Viana, Rommel Bezerra; Tanaka, Auro Atsushi; Varela, Jaldyr de Jesus Gomes

    2016-09-01

    Theoretical chemistry calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) were carried out to understand the interaction between oxygen (O2) and MnN4 type manganese-based complexes during the formation of MnN4-O2 adducts. In order to understand how this interaction is affected by different macrocyclic ligands, O2 was bonded to manganese-porphyrin (MnP), manganese-octamethylporphyrin (MnOMP), manganese-tetraaza[14]annulene (MnTAA), manganese-dibenzo [b,i] [1, 4, 8, 11]-tetraaza [14] annulene (MnDBTAA), manganese-2,3,9,10-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-1,3,8,10-tetraene ([(tim)Mn](2+)), and manganese-2,3,9,10-tetraphenyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-1,3,8,10-tetraene ([(ph-tim)Mn](2+)). The binding and activation of the oxygen molecule was facilitated by an increasing trend in the O-O bond lengths and a decreasing one in the O-O vibrational frequency, with preference for the O2 side-on interaction among MnN4 macrocycles. The catalytic activities of the MnN4 complexes toward the O2 binding process increased in the following order: [(ph-tim)Mn](2+) < MnP < MnOMP < MnDBTAA < MnTAA < [(tim)Mn](2+). Therefore, it was concluded that the [(tim)Mn](2+)complex was the most active for the binding and activation of molecular oxygen. PMID:27553302

  8. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  9. Molecular signalling mediating the protective effect of A1 adenosine and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptor activation against apoptosis by oxygen/glucose deprivation in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Renata; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Ballerini, Patrizia; D'Auro, Mariagrazia; Nargi, Eleonora; Buccella, Silvana; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Caciagli, Francesco

    2007-05-01

    Astrocyte death may occur in neurodegenerative disorders and complicates the outcome of brain ischemia, a condition associated with high extracellular levels of adenosine and glutamate. We show that pharmacological activation of A(1) adenosine and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors with N(6)-chlorocyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) and (-)2-oxa-4-aminocyclo-[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268), respectively, protects cultured astrocytes against apoptosis induced by a 3-h exposure to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Protection by CCPA and LY379268 was less than additive and was abrogated by receptor blockade with selective competitive antagonists or pertussis toxin. Both in control astrocytes and in astrocytes exposed to OGD, CCPA and LY379268 induced a rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which are known to support cell survival. In cultures exposed to OGD, CCPA and LY379268 reduced the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38/MAPK, reduced the levels of the proapoptotic protein Bad, increased the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-X(L), and were highly protective against apoptotic death, as shown by nuclear 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and measurements of caspase-3 activity. All of these effects were attenuated by treatment with 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(methylthio)butadiene (U0126) and 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride (LY294002), which inhibit the MAPK and the PI3K pathways, respectively. These data suggest that pharmacological activation of A(1) and mGlu3 receptors protects astrocytes against hypoxic/ischemic damage by stimulating the PI3K and ERK1/2 MAPK pathways. PMID:17293559

  10. Topological analysis of third-row main group dicarbides with molecular oxygen: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Parida, Saroj K.; Sahu, Sridhar

    2015-08-28

    Topological analysis of third-row main group dicarbides with molecular oxygen is calculated using density functional theory (DFT). In addition, Bader topological analysis show large electron density at the bond critical point (BCP) between carbon of C{sub 2}X cluster and oxygen (of molecular oxygen), inferring that the C–O bonding to be more shared-type as compared to that of X - O bonding. This fact is also confirmed by larger positive value of electron density (ρ) and negative ∇{sup 2}ρ. Similar conclusion is also obtained from the delocalization index (δ) which, in the case of C-O is found to be comparatively large.

  11. Cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixture in natural air samples for isotopic and molecular ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb Rahman, Keedakkadan; Abe, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of mass independent isotope fractionation in oxygen during the formation of ozone in the stratosphere has initiated a wide application in isotope geochemistry field. Separation of oxygen-argon mixture has become the foundation of high precision analysis of Δ17O and δ(O2/Ar) for geochemical applications. Here we present precise and simplified cryogenic separation of argon oxygen mixture from the atmospheric and dissolved air using 30/60 mesh 5A molecular sieve zeolite. A pioneer study of this method was conducted by Thiemens and Meagher in 1984. The column which is made of glass tube contains about 1.1 grams of molecular sieve zeolite and both ends of column was filled with glass wools. The experimental set up was tested for different combination of molecular sieves and slurry temperatures. We found the most efficient condition for the separation was at a column temperature of -103°C. For complete transfer of O2 and Ar mixture usually takes in 15-20 minutes time. The isotopic ratios of oxygen were analyzed using mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer Delta Plus) relative to reference oxygen-argon mixture at 3V of m/z 32 for both sample and reference side. The signals of m/z 28, 32, and 40 were measured by dynamically to determine oxygen -argon ratio and to check nitrogen contamination. Repeated measurements of atmospheric air yielded a reproducibility (SE n=80) of 0.006, 0.004 and 0.19‰ for δ17O, δ18O and δO2/Ar respectively. The isotopic and molecular fractionation of argon- oxygen mixture during gas adsorption and desorption while using molecular sieve under liquid nitrogen temperature was studied. We have established a linear relationship governing the effect of 13X and 5A molecular sieves on molecular fractionation. And suggested the use of single 1/8" pellet 13X molecular sieve provided a negligible fractionation.

  12. Molecular sieve generation of aviator's oxygen: Performance of a prototype system under simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Ikels, K G; Lamb, M J; Boscola, E J; Ferguson, R H

    1980-07-01

    The molecular sieve method of generating an enriched-oxygen breathing gas is one of several candidate onboard oxygen generation (OBOG) systems under joint Army-Navy-Air Force development for application in tactical aircraft. The performance of a nominal two-man-capacity molecular sieve oxygen generation system was characterized under simulated flight conditions. Data are given on the composition of the molecular sieve-generated breathing gas (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon) as a function of inlet air pressure, altitude, breathing gas flow rate, and ambient temperature. The maximum oxygen concentration observed was 95%, with the balance argon. At low demand flow rates and certain conditions of pressure and altitude, the argon enrichment factor exceeded that of oxygen giving a maximum argon concentration of 6.6% with the balance oxygen. The structural integrity of the unit was verified by vibration and centrifuge testing. The performance of the molecular sieve unit is discussed in the context of aircraft operating envelopes using both diluter-demand and 100% delivery subsystems. PMID:6774707

  13. Molecular oxygen detection using frequency modulation diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Liang-Guo; Sachse, Glen

    1990-01-01

    A high-sensitivity spectroscopic measurement of O2 using two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy with a GaAlAs diode laser is presented. An oxygen sensor based on this technique would be non-intrusive, compact and possess high sensitivity and fast time response.

  14. Atomic and molecular oxygen adsorbed on (111) transition metal surfaces: Cu and Ni

    SciTech Connect

    López-Moreno, S.; Romero, A. H.

    2015-04-21

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the reaction of oxygen with clean copper and nickel [111]-surfaces. We study several alternative adsorption sites for atomic and molecular oxygen on both surfaces. The minimal energy geometries and adsorption energies are in good agreement with previous theoretical studies and experimental data. From all considered adsorption sites, we found a new O{sub 2} molecular precursor with two possible dissociation paths on the Cu(111) surface. Cross barrier energies for the molecular oxygen dissociation have been calculated by using the climbing image nudge elastic band method, and direct comparison with experimental results is performed. Finally, the structural changes and adsorption energies of oxygen adsorbed on surface when there is a vacancy nearby the adsorption site are also considered.

  15. Atomic and molecular oxygen adsorbed on (111) transition metal surfaces: Cu and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Moreno, S.; Romero, A. H.

    2015-04-01

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the reaction of oxygen with clean copper and nickel [111]-surfaces. We study several alternative adsorption sites for atomic and molecular oxygen on both surfaces. The minimal energy geometries and adsorption energies are in good agreement with previous theoretical studies and experimental data. From all considered adsorption sites, we found a new O2 molecular precursor with two possible dissociation paths on the Cu(111) surface. Cross barrier energies for the molecular oxygen dissociation have been calculated by using the climbing image nudge elastic band method, and direct comparison with experimental results is performed. Finally, the structural changes and adsorption energies of oxygen adsorbed on surface when there is a vacancy nearby the adsorption site are also considered.

  16. Atomic and molecular oxygen adsorbed on (111) transition metal surfaces: Cu and Ni.

    PubMed

    López-Moreno, S; Romero, A H

    2015-04-21

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the reaction of oxygen with clean copper and nickel [111]-surfaces. We study several alternative adsorption sites for atomic and molecular oxygen on both surfaces. The minimal energy geometries and adsorption energies are in good agreement with previous theoretical studies and experimental data. From all considered adsorption sites, we found a new O2 molecular precursor with two possible dissociation paths on the Cu(111) surface. Cross barrier energies for the molecular oxygen dissociation have been calculated by using the climbing image nudge elastic band method, and direct comparison with experimental results is performed. Finally, the structural changes and adsorption energies of oxygen adsorbed on surface when there is a vacancy nearby the adsorption site are also considered. PMID:25903900

  17. Leukocytic oxygen activation and microbicidal oxidative toxins.

    PubMed

    Hurst, J K; Barrette, W C

    1989-01-01

    Following a brief introduction of cellular response to stimulation comprising leukocyte activation, three major areas are discussed: (1) the neutrophil oxidase; (2) myeloperoxidase (MPO)-dependent oxidative microbicidal reactions; and (3) MPO-independent oxidative reactions. Topics included in section (A) are current views on the activation mechanism, redox composition, structural and topographic organization of the oxidase, and its respiratory products. In section (B), emphasis is placed on recent research on cidal mechanisms of HOCl, including the oxidative biochemistry of active chlorine compounds, identification of sites of lesions in bacteria, and attendant metabolic consequences. In section (C), we review the (bio)chemistry of H2O2 and .OH microbicidal reactions, with particular attention being given to addressing the controversial issue of probe methods to identify .OH radical and critical assessment of the recent proposal that MPO-independent killing arises from site-specific metal-catalyzed Fenton-type chemistry. PMID:2548810

  18. OXYGEN UTILIZATION IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE PLANTS: SIMULATION AND MODEL CALIBRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the research described in the report is to apply recent advances in activated sludge process modeling to the simulation of oxygen utilization rates in full scale activated sludge treatment plants. This is accomplished by calibrating the International Association ...

  19. Oxygen tension limits nitric oxide synthesis by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, C C; Li, W P; Calero, M

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have established that constitutive calcium-dependent ('low-output') nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is regulated by oxygen tension. We have investigated the role of oxygen tension in the synthesis of NO by the 'high-output' calcium-independent NOS in activated macrophages. Hypoxia increased macrophage NOS gene expression in the presence of one additional activator, such as lipopolysaccharide or interferon-gamma, but not in the presence of both. Hypoxia markedly reduced the synthesis of NO by activated macrophages (as measured by accumulation of nitrite and citrulline), such that, at 1% oxygen tension, NO accumulation was reduced by 80-90%. The apparent K(m) for oxygen calculated from cells exposed to a range of oxygen tensions was found to be 10.8%, or 137 microM, O(2) This value is considerably higher than the oxygen tension in tissues, and is virtually identical to that reported recently for purified recombinant macrophage NOS. The decrease in NO synthesis did not appear to be due to diminished arginine or cofactor availability, since arginine transport and NO synthesis during recovery in normoxia were normal. Analysis of NO synthesis during hypoxia as a function of extracellular arginine indicated that an altered V(max), but not K(m)(Arg), accounted for the observed decrease in NO synthesis. We conclude that oxygen tension regulates the synthesis of NO in macrophages by a mechanism similar to that described previously for the calcium-dependent low-output NOS. Our data suggest that oxygen tension may be an important physiological regulator of macrophage NO synthesis in vivo. PMID:10970783

  20. Quenching of singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g O sub 2 ) in silica gel/cyclohexane heterogeneous systems. A direct time-resolved study

    SciTech Connect

    Iu, Kaikong; Thomas, J.K. )

    1990-04-25

    Direct time-resolved studies of singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) phosphorescence ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup {minus}}O{sub 2} ({nu} = 0) {l arrow} {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} ({nu} = 0); 1,270 nm) in heterogeneous silica gel/cyclohexane systems are presented. Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) is created through a photosensitization process on silica gel surfaces. The experimental results show that the lifetimes of singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) in both porous and compressed fumed silica/gel cyclohexane systems are significantly less than that in liquid cyclohexane. The shortened singlet molecular oxygen lifetime is due mainly to quenching by adsorbed water and silanol groups on the silica gel surface. In addition, monoamines coadsorbed on the silica gel surface do not quench singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}); however, diamines such as DABCO or piperazine maintain their quenching activity, but the quenching kinetics are not of the Stern-Volmer type. The singlet molecular oxygen lifetime increases on loading the porous silica gel/cyclohexane system with monoamine. Coadsorption of piperazine increases quenching of {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} O{sub 2} by DABCO.

  1. Multiple forms of soluble monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine: oxygen oxidoreductase (EC 1.14.18.1) from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum). III. Influence of pH on the molecular weight distribution of enzyme activity in potato juice.

    PubMed

    Matheis, G; Belitz, H D

    1979-09-01

    Gel chromatography on Sepharose and on Sephadex was used to separate the soluble phenol oxidase in various potato juices into multiple molecular forms ranging from 36,000 to 800,000 daltons. Adjustment of potato juice from physiological pH (ca. 6) to pH 4.5 or to pH 7.8 resulted in the predominance of low-mol.-wt. (less than 150,000 daltons) or high-mol.-wt. (greater than 150,000 daltons) enzyme forms, respectively. This suggests association phenomena of subunits. In potato juice of physiological pH and in potato juice adjusted to pH 4.5, all enzyme forms exhibited both monophenol and o-diphenol oxidase activities (assayed at pH 6.0). In potato juice adjusted to pH 7.8 considerable loss of monophenol oxidase activity (assayed at pH 6.0) occurred. This suggests that o-diphenol oxidase is more alkali-stable than monophenol oxidase. The significance of these findings for enzyme purifications and for the in vivo action of the enzyme is discussed. PMID:41378

  2. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of oxygen binding in hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toru; Thiel, Walter

    2014-05-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on the mechanism of reversible dioxygen binding in the active site of hemocyanin (Hc). The QM region is treated by broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) with spin projection corrections. The X-ray structures of deoxygenated (deoxyHc) and oxygenated (oxyHc) hemocyanin are well reproduced by QM/MM geometry optimizations. The computed relative energies strongly depend on the chosen density functional. They are consistent with the available thermodynamic data for oxygen binding in hemocyanin and in synthetic model complexes when the BH&HLYP hybrid functional with 50% Hartree-Fock exchange is used. According to the QM(BH&HLYP)/MM results, the reaction proceeds stepwise with two sequential electron transfer (ET) processes in the triplet state followed by an intersystem crossing to the singlet product. The first ET step leads to a nonbridged superoxo CuB(II)-O2(•-) intermediate via a low-barrier transition state. The second ET step is even more facile and yields a side-on oxyHc complex with the characteristic Cu2O2 butterfly core, accompanied by triplet-singlet intersystem crossing. The computed barriers are very small so that the two ET processes are expected to very rapid and nearly simultaneous. PMID:24762083

  3. Nitroxyl (HNO) reacts with molecular oxygen and forms peroxynitrite at physiological pH. Biological Implications.

    PubMed

    Smulik, Renata; Dębski, Dawid; Zielonka, Jacek; Michałowski, Bartosz; Adamus, Jan; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Sikora, Adam

    2014-12-19

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the protonated one-electron reduction product of NO, remains an enigmatic reactive nitrogen species. Its chemical reactivity and biological activity are still not completely understood. HNO donors show biological effects different from NO donors. Although HNO reactivity with molecular oxygen is described in the literature, the product of this reaction has not yet been unambiguously identified. Here we report that the decomposition of HNO donors under aerobic conditions in aqueous solutions at physiological pH leads to the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) as a major intermediate. We have specifically detected and quantified ONOO(-) with the aid of boronate probes, e.g. coumarin-7-boronic acid or 4-boronobenzyl derivative of fluorescein methyl ester. In addition to the major phenolic products, peroxynitrite-specific minor products of oxidation of boronate probes were detected under these conditions. Using the competition kinetics method and a set of HNO scavengers, the value of the second order rate constant of the HNO reaction with oxygen (k = 1.8 × 10(4) m(-1) s(-1)) was determined. The rate constant (k = 2 × 10(4) m(-1) s(-1)) was also determined using kinetic simulations. The kinetic parameters of the reactions of HNO with selected thiols, including cysteine, dithiothreitol, N-acetylcysteine, captopril, bovine and human serum albumins, and hydrogen sulfide, are reported. Biological and cardiovascular implications of nitroxyl reactions are discussed. PMID:25378389

  4. Nitroxyl (HNO) Reacts with Molecular Oxygen and Forms Peroxynitrite at Physiological pH

    PubMed Central

    Smulik, Renata; Dębski, Dawid; Zielonka, Jacek; Michałowski, Bartosz; Adamus, Jan; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Sikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the protonated one-electron reduction product of NO, remains an enigmatic reactive nitrogen species. Its chemical reactivity and biological activity are still not completely understood. HNO donors show biological effects different from NO donors. Although HNO reactivity with molecular oxygen is described in the literature, the product of this reaction has not yet been unambiguously identified. Here we report that the decomposition of HNO donors under aerobic conditions in aqueous solutions at physiological pH leads to the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) as a major intermediate. We have specifically detected and quantified ONOO− with the aid of boronate probes, e.g. coumarin-7-boronic acid or 4-boronobenzyl derivative of fluorescein methyl ester. In addition to the major phenolic products, peroxynitrite-specific minor products of oxidation of boronate probes were detected under these conditions. Using the competition kinetics method and a set of HNO scavengers, the value of the second order rate constant of the HNO reaction with oxygen (k = 1.8 × 104 m−1 s−1) was determined. The rate constant (k = 2 × 104 m−1 s−1) was also determined using kinetic simulations. The kinetic parameters of the reactions of HNO with selected thiols, including cysteine, dithiothreitol, N-acetylcysteine, captopril, bovine and human serum albumins, and hydrogen sulfide, are reported. Biological and cardiovascular implications of nitroxyl reactions are discussed. PMID:25378389

  5. Flame temperature measurements by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang, Zhili; Adams, Steven F

    2012-10-01

    Here we report nonintrusive local rotational temperature measurements of molecular oxygen, based on coherent microwave scattering (radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in room air and hydrogen/air flames. Analyses of the rotational line strengths of the two-photon molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition have been used to determine the hyperfine rotational state distribution of the ground X(3)Σ(v'=0) state. Rotationally resolved 2+1 REMPI spectra of the molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition at different temperatures were obtained experimentally by radar REMPI. Rotational temperatures have been determined from the resulting Boltzmann plots. The measurements in general had an accuracy of ~±60 K in the hydrogen/air flames at various equivalence ratios. Discussions about the decreased accuracy for the temperature measurement at elevated temperatures have been presented. PMID:23033104

  6. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Activation of a Dormant Singlet Oxygen Photosensitizer: From Autocatalytic Singlet Oxygen Amplification to Chemicontrolled Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Durantini, Andrés M; Greene, Lana E; Lincoln, Richard; Martínez, Sol R; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-02-01

    Here we show the design, preparation, and characterization of a dormant singlet oxygen ((1)O2) photosensitizer that is activated upon its reaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS), including (1)O2 itself, in what constitutes an autocatalytic process. The compound is based on a two segment photosensitizer-trap molecule where the photosensitizer segment consists of a Br-substituted boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye. The trap segment consists of the chromanol ring of α-tocopherol, the most potent naturally occurring lipid soluble antioxidant. Time-resolved absorption, fluorescence, and (1)O2 phosphorescence studies together with fluorescence and (1)O2 phosphorescence emission quantum yields collected on Br2B-PMHC and related bromo and iodo-substituted BODIPY dyes show that the trap segment provides a total of three layers of intramolecular suppression of (1)O2 production. Oxidation of the trap segment with ROS restores the sensitizing properties of the photosensitizer segment resulting in ∼40-fold enhancement in (1)O2 production. The juxtaposed antioxidant (chromanol) and prooxidant (Br-BODIPY) antagonistic chemical activities of the two-segment compound enable the autocatalytic, and in general ROS-mediated, activation of (1)O2 sensitization providing a chemical cue for the spatiotemporal control of (1)O2.The usefulness of this approach to selectively photoactivate the production of singlet oxygen in ROS stressed vs regular cells was successfully tested via the photodynamic inactivation of a ROS stressed Gram negative Escherichia coli strain. PMID:26789198

  8. Intramolecular gamma-hydroxylations of nonactivated C-H bonds with copper complexes and molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Schönecker, Bruno; Zheldakova, Tatjana; Lange, Corinna; Günther, Wolfgang; Görls, Helmar; Bohl, Martin

    2004-11-19

    Copper(I) complexes incorporating the isomeric bidentate ligands IMPY (iminomethyl-2-pyridines) or AMPY (aminomethylene-2-pyridines) are quite unusual in their ability to bind and activate molecular oxygen. Using these complexes, hydroxylations of nonactivated CH, CH2, or CH3 groups in the gamma-position in relation to the imino-nitrogen atom, and with a specific orientation of one H atom with respect to the binuclear Cu-O species, can be achieved in synthetically useful yields. Through mechanistic studies employing conformationally well-defined molecules (for example, cyclic isoprenoids), coupled with solid-state X-ray structure analyses and force-field calculations, we postulate a seven-membered transition state for this reaction in which six atoms lie approximately in a plane. This plane is defined by the positions of the lone pairs on the nitrogen atoms, as well as the copper and the oxygen atoms. For a successful hydroxylation, one hydrogen atom should be located close to this plane. Prediction of the stereochemical course of these reactions is possible based on a simple geometrical criterion. The convenient introduction of IMPY and AMPY groups as auxiliaries into oxo and primary amino compounds and the simple hydrolysis after the hydroxylation procedure has allowed the synthesis of 3-hydroxy-1-oxo and 3-hydroxy-1-amino compounds. If desired, the 3-hydroxy-1-IMPY and -1-AMPY compounds can be reduced with NaBH4 to obtain 3-hydroxy-1-aminomethylpyridines. For a successful hydroxylation procedure, the method employed for the synthesis of the CuI complexes is very important. Starting either from CuI salts or from CuII salts with a subsequent reduction with benzoin/triethylamine may turn out to be the better way, depending on the ligand and the molecular structure. PMID:15521055

  9. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  10. Oxygen isotopic ratios toward molecular clouds in the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Kun; Zhang, Jiang-Shui; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Lu, Deng-Rong; Wang, Min; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-01

    We present our observations of the J = 1 - 0 rotation transitions in molecular isotopes C18O and C17O toward a sample of molecular clouds with different galactocentric distances, using the Delingha 13.7m (DLH 13.7 m) telescope, administered by Purple Mountain Observatory, and its 9-beam SIS receiver. Complementary observations toward several sources with large galactocentric distance are obtained with the IRAM 30m and Mopra 22m telescopes. C18O/C17O abundance ratios reflecting the 18O/17O isotope ratios are obtained from integrated intensity ratios of C18O and C17O. We derived the ratio value for 13 sources covering a galactocentric distance range of 3kpc to 16kpc. In combination with our mapping results that provide a ratio value of 3.01±0.14 in the Galactic center region, it shows that the abundance ratio tends to increase with galactocentric distance, i.e., it supports a radial gradient along the Galactic disk for the abundance ratio. This is consistent with the inside-out formation scenario of our Galaxy. However, our results may suffer from small samples with large galactocentric distance. Combining our data with multi-transition lines of C18O and C17O will be helpful for constraining opacities and abundances and further confirming the Galactic radial gradient shown by the isotope ratio 18O/17O.

  11. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  12. Evaluation of the Catalytic Activity and Cytotoxicity of Palladium Nanocubes. The Role of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photo-excitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,5,3′,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB), as well as, analyzed the cytotoxic properties of PdNC on HeLa cells. Our findings showed no evidence of singlet oxygen production by PdNC. The nanocubes’ activity is not necessarily linked to activation of oxygen. The oxidation of substrate on PdNC can be a first step followed by PdNC regeneration with oxygen or other oxidant. The catalytic activity of PdNC towards oxidation of TMB is very high and shows direct two-electrons oxidation when the surface of PdNC is clean and the ratio of TMB/PdNC is not very high. Sequential one electron oxidation is observed when the pristine quality of PdNC surface is compromised by serum or uncontrolled impurities and/or the ratio of TMB/PdNC is high. Clean PdNC in serum-free media efficiently induce apoptosis of HeLa cells. It is the primary route of cell death and is associated with hyperpolarization of mitochondria, contrary to a common mitochondrial depolarization initiated by ROS. Again, the effects are very sensitive to how well the pristine surface of PdNC is preserved, suggesting that PdNC can be used as an apoptosis inducing agent but only with appropriate drug delivery system. PMID:25886644

  13. Evaluation of the catalytic activity and cytotoxicity of palladium nanocubes: the role of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-05-13

    Recently, it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photoexcitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and analyzed the cytotoxic properties of PdNC on HeLa cells. Our findings showed no evidence of singlet oxygen production by PdNC. The nanocubes' activity is not necessarily linked to activation of oxygen. The oxidation of substrate on PdNC can be a first step, followed by PdNC regeneration with oxygen or other oxidant. The catalytic activity of PdNC toward the oxidation of TMB is very high and shows direct two-electron oxidation when the surface of the PdNC is clean and the ratio of TMB/PdNC is not very high. Sequential one electron oxidation is observed when the pristine quality of PdNC surface is compromised by serum or uncontrolled impurities and/or the ratio of TMB/PdNC is high. Clean PdNC in serum-free media efficiently induce apoptosis of HeLa cells. It is the primary route of cell death and is associated with hyperpolarization of mitochondria, contrary to a common mitochondrial depolarization initiated by ROS. Again, the effects are very sensitive to how well the pristine surface of PdNC is preserved, suggesting that PdNC can be used as an apoptosis inducing agent, but only with appropriate drug delivery system. PMID:25886644

  14. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON THE SCALEUP OF GAC ADSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid small-scale column test (RSSCT), designed according to the assumption of no dependency of the intraparticle surface diffusion coefficient on the activated carbon particle size, was able to accurately predict breakthrough of three volatile organic chemicals as well as back...

  15. Impact of hydration state and molecular oxygen on the chemical stability of levothyroxine sodium.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Mazen Lee; Engen, William; Morris, Kenneth R

    2015-05-01

    Levothyroxine sodium is an important medication used primarily for treating patients with hypothyroidism. Levothyroxine sodium tablets have been recalled many times since their 1955 introduction to the US market. These recalls resulted from the failure of lots to meet their content uniformity and potency specifications. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that the chemical stability of levothyroxine sodium pentahydrate is compromised upon exposing the dehydrated substance to molecular oxygen. The impact of temperature, oxygen and humidity storage conditions on the stability of solid-state levothyroxine sodium was examined. After exposure to these storage conditions for selected periods of time, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to quantify the formation of impurities. The results showed that levothyroxine sodium samples degraded significantly over a 32-day test period when subjected to dry conditions in the presence of molecular oxygen. However, dehydrated samples remained stable when oxygen was removed from the storage chamber. Furthermore, hydrated samples were stable in the presence of oxygen and in the absence of oxygen. These results reveal conditions that will degrade levothyroxine sodium pentahydrate and elucidate measures that can be taken to stabilize the drug substance. PMID:24295156

  16. Photocatalytic Decarboxylative Hydroxylation of Carboxylic Acids Driven by Visible Light and Using Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-Tao; Ding, Wei; Zhou, Quan-Quan; Liu, Jing; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-08-19

    This paper discloses the first example of photocatalytic direct decarboxylative hydroxylation of carboxylic acids. It enables the conversion of a variety of readily available carboxylic acids to alcohols in moderate to high yields. This unprecedented protocol is accomplished under extremely mild reaction conditions using molecular oxygen (O2) as a green oxidant and using visible light as a driving force. PMID:27385267

  17. Stopping supersonic oxygen with a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils: A molecular coilgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narevicius, Edvardas; Libson, Adam; Parthey, Christian G.; Chavez, Isaac; Narevicius, Julia; Even, Uzi; Raizen, Mark G.

    2008-05-01

    We report the stopping of a molecular oxygen beam, using a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils. A series of coils is fired in a timed sequence to bring the molecules to near rest, where they are detected with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Applications to cold chemistry are discussed.

  18. Empirical model of variations in the IR Atmospheric system of molecular oxygen: 2. Emitting layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, K. V.

    2013-01-01

    The empirical regularities in the variations in the emitting layer parameters depending on the solar zenith angle have been obtained by analyzing and systematizing the data published on the vertical distribution of the volume emission rate of the 1.27 μm molecular oxygen Infrared Atmospheric system measured on rockets and satellites.

  19. Early oxygen-utilization and brain activity in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Alderliesten, Thomas; de Vries, Linda S; Groenendaal, Floris; Toet, Mona C; Lemmers, Petra M A; Vosse van de, Renè E; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J N L

    2015-01-01

    The combined monitoring of oxygen supply and delivery using Near-InfraRed spectroscopy (NIRS) and cerebral activity using amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) could yield new insights into brain metabolism and detect potentially vulnerable conditions soon after birth. The relationship between NIRS and quantitative aEEG/EEG parameters has not yet been investigated. Our aim was to study the association between oxygen utilization during the first 6 h after birth and simultaneously continuously monitored brain activity measured by aEEG/EEG. Forty-four hemodynamically stable babies with a GA < 28 weeks, with good quality NIRS and aEEG/EEG data available and who did not receive morphine were included in the study. aEEG and NIRS monitoring started at NICU admission. The relation between regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE), and quantitative measurements of brain activity such as number of spontaneous activity transients (SAT) per minute (SAT rate), the interval in seconds (i.e. time) between SATs (ISI) and the minimum amplitude of the EEG in μV (min aEEG) were evaluated. rScO2 was negatively associated with SAT rate (β=-3.45 [CI=-5.76- -1.15], p=0.004) and positively associated with ISI (β=1.45 [CI=0.44-2.45], p=0.006). cFTOE was positively associated with SAT rate (β=0.034 [CI=0.009-0.059], p=0.008) and negatively associated with ISI (β=-0.015 [CI=-0.026- -0.004], p=0.007). Oxygen delivery and utilization, as indicated by rScO2 and cFTOE, are directly related to functional brain activity, expressed by SAT rate and ISI during the first hours after birth, showing an increase in oxygen extraction in preterm infants with increased early electro-cerebral activity. NIRS monitored oxygenation may be a useful biomarker of brain vulnerability in high-risk infants. PMID:25965343

  20. Molecular regulation of osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Baron, Roland

    2006-06-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors that are primarily responsible for the degradation of mineralized bone during bone development, homeostasis and repair. In various skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis, hypercalcemia of malignancy, tumor metastases and Paget's disease, bone resorption by osteoclasts exceeds bone formation by osteoblasts leading to decreased bone mass, skeletal fragility and bone fracture. The overall rate of osteoclastic bone resorption is regulated either at the level of differentiation of osteoclasts from their monocytic/macrophage precursor pool or through the regulation of key functional proteins whose specific activities in the mature osteoclast control its attachment, migration and resorption. Thus, reducing osteoclast numbers and/or decreasing the bone resorbing activity of osteoclasts are two common therapeutic approaches for the treatment of hyper-resorptive skeletal diseases. In this review, several of the key functional players involved in the regulation of osteoclast activity will be discussed. PMID:16951988

  1. The role of molecular oxygen in the iron(III)-promoted oxidative dehydrogenation of amines.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Vázquez, Juan Pablo; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-03-28

    A mechanistic study is presented of the oxidative dehydrogenation of the iron(III) complex [Fe(III)L(3)](3+), 1, (L(3) = 1,9-bis(2'-pyridyl)-5-[(ethoxy-2''-pyridyl)methyl]-2,5,8-triazanonane) in ethanol in the presence of molecular oxygen. The product of the reaction was identified by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography as the identical monoimine complex [Fe(II)L(4)](2+), 2, (L(4) = 1,9-bis(2'-pyridyl)-5-[(ethoxy-2''-pyridyl)methyl]-2,5,8-triazanon-1-ene) also formed under an inert nitrogen atmosphere. Molecular oxygen is an active player in the oxidative dehydrogenation of iron(III) complex 1. Reduced oxygen species, e.g., superoxide, (O2˙(-)) and peroxide (O2(2-)), are formed and undergo single electron transfer reactions with ligand-based radical intermediates. The experimental rate law can be described by the third order rate equation, -d[(Fe(III)L(3))(3+)]/dt = kOD[(Fe(III)L(3))(3+)][EtO(-)][O2], with kOD = 3.80 ± 0.09 × 10(7) M(-2) s(-1) (60 °C, μ = 0.01 M). The reduction O2 → O2˙(-) represents the rate determining step, with superoxide becoming further reduced to peroxide as shown by a coupled heme catalase assay. In an independent study, with H2O2, replacing O2 as the oxidant, the experimental rate law depended on [H2O2]: -d[(Fe(III)L(3))(3+)]/dt = kH2O2[(Fe(III)L(3))(3+)][H2O2]), with kH2O2 = 6.25 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1). In contrast to the reaction performed under N2, no kinetic isotope effect (KIE) or general base catalysis was found for the reaction of iron(III) complex 1 with O2. Under N2, two consecutive one-electron oxidation steps of the ligand coupled to proton removal produced the iron(II)-monoimine complex [Fe(II)L(4)](2+) and the iron(II)-amine complex [Fe(II)L(3)](2+) in a 1 : 1 ratio (disproportionation), with the amine deprotonation being the rate determining step. Notably, the reaction is almost one order of magnitude faster in the presence of O2, with kEtO(-) = 3.02 ± 0.09 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (O2) compared to k

  2. Plant hemoglobins: a molecular fossil record for the evolution of oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Julie A; Robinson, Howard; Trent, James T; Kakar, Smita; Smagghe, Benoit J; Hargrove, Mark S

    2007-08-01

    The evolution of oxygen transport hemoglobins occurred on at least two independent occasions. The earliest event led to myoglobin and red blood cell hemoglobin in animals. In plants, oxygen transport "leghemoglobins" evolved much more recently. In both events, pentacoordinate heme sites capable of inert oxygen transfer evolved from hexacoordinate hemoglobins that have unrelated functions. High sequence homology between hexacoordinate and pentacoordinate hemoglobins in plants has poised them for potential structural analysis leading to a molecular understanding of this important evolutionary event. However, the lack of a plant hexacoordinate hemoglobin structure in the exogenously ligand-bound form has prevented such comparison. Here we report the crystal structure of the cyanide-bound hexacoordinate hemoglobin from barley. This presents the first opportunity to examine conformational changes in plant hexacoordinate hemoglobins upon exogenous ligand binding, and reveals structural mechanisms for stabilizing the high-energy pentacoordinate heme conformation critical to the evolution of reversible oxygen binding hemoglobins. PMID:17560601

  3. Plant Hemoglobins: A Molecular Fossil Record for the Evolutin of Oxygen Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy,J.; Robinson, H.; Trent, lll, J.; Kakar, S.; Smagghe, B.; Hargrove, M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of oxygen transport hemoglobins occurred on at least two independent occasions. The earliest event led to myoglobin and red blood cell hemoglobin in animals. In plants, oxygen transport 'leghemoglobins' evolved much more recently. In both events, pentacoordinate heme sites capable of inert oxygen transfer evolved from hexacoordinate hemoglobins that have unrelated functions. High sequence homology between hexacoordinate and pentacoordinate hemoglobins in plants has poised them for potential structural analysis leading to a molecular understanding of this important evolutionary event. However, the lack of a plant hexacoordinate hemoglobin structure in the exogenously ligand-bound form has prevented such comparison. Here we report the crystal structure of the cyanide-bound hexacoordinate hemoglobin from barley. This presents the first opportunity to examine conformational changes in plant hexacoordinate hemoglobins upon exogenous ligand binding, and reveals structural mechanisms for stabilizing the high-energy pentacoordinate heme conformation critical to the evolution of reversible oxygen binding hemoglobins.

  4. The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot production in direct-injection diesel engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.; Mueller, Charles J.; Martin, Glen M.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2003-06-01

    A combined experimental and kinetic modeling study of soot formation in diesel engine combustion has been used to study the addition of oxygenated species to diesel fuel to reduce soot emissions. This work indicates that the primary role of oxygen atoms in the fuel mixture is to reduce the levels of carbon atoms available for soot formation by fixing them in the form of CO or COz. When the structure of the oxygenate leads to prompt and direct formation of CO2, the oxygenate is less effective in reducing soot production than in cases when all fuel-bound 0 atoms produce only CO. The kinetic and molecular structure principles leading to this conclusion are described.

  5. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  6. Atomic Oxygen Recombination at Surface Defects on Reconstructed (0001) α-Quartz Exposed to Atomic and Molecular Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Meana-Paneda, Ruben; Paukku, Yuliya Y.; Duanmu, Kaining; Norman, Paul; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-04-30

    The surface chemistry of silica is strongly affected by the nature of chemically active sites (or defects) occurring on the surface. Here, we employ quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations to study an uncoordinated silicon defect, a non-bridging oxygen defect, and a peroxyl defect on the reconstructed (0001) surface of α-quartz. We characterized the spin states and energies of the defects, and calculated the reaction profiles for atomic oxygen recombination at the defects. We elucidated the diradical character by analyzing the low-lying excited states using multireference wave function methods. We show that the diradical defects consist of weakly coupled doublet radicals, and the atomic oxygen recombination can take place through a barrierless process at defects. We have delineated the recombination mechanism and computed the formation energy of the peroxyl and non-bridging oxygen defects. We found that key recombination reaction paths are barrierless. In addition, we characterize the electronically excited states that may play a role in the chemical and physical processes that occur during recombination on these surface defect sites.

  7. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James W A; Richmond, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  8. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  9. Activated oxygen alters cerebral microvascular responses in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Leffler, C.W.; Busiia, D.W.; Armstead, W.M.; Mirro, R.; Thelin, O. )

    1990-02-26

    In piglets, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion blocks prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilation to hypercapnia (CO{sub 2}) and hypotension but not prostanoid independent dilation to isoproterenol (Isu) or constriction to norepinephrine (NE). Ischemia/reperfusion increases activated-O{sub 2} production by piglet brains. Using cranial windows in piglets, the authors investigated the hypothesis that activated oxygen can block prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension without altering responses to Isu and NE. Exposure to an activated oxygen generating system of xanthine oxidase, hypoxanthine, and Fe that made about 3 times the activated-O{sub 2} on the brain surface as ischemia/reperfusion caused reversible pial arteriolar dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation was reduced to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but not to Isu. NE constrictor responses were also unaltered. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe caused constriction followed by reversible dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation in response to CO{sub 2} and hypotension was not altered. However, addition of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe totally eliminated pial arteriolar dilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but did not decrease dilation caused by Isu or constriction caused by NE. The authors conclude that activated oxygen could produce the altered prostanoid dependent pial arteriolar responses observed following ischemia in piglets.

  10. A rhenium complex doped in a silica molecular sieve for molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanxiao

    2016-01-15

    This paper reported a diamine ligand and its Re(I) complex for potential application in oxygen sensing. The novelty of this diamine ligand localized at its increased conjugation chain which had a typical electron-withdrawing group of 1,3,4-oxadiazole. Electronic distribution of excited electrons and their lifetime were supposed to be increased, favoring oxygen sensing collision. This hypothesis was confirmed by single crystal analysis, theoretical calculation and photophysical measurement. It was found that this Re(I) complex had a long-lived emission peaking at 545 nm, favoring sensing application. By doping this complex into a silica matrix MCM-41, oxygen sensing performance and mechanism of the resulting composites were discussed in detail. Non-linear Stern-Volmer working curves were observed with maximum sensitivity of 5.54 and short response time of ~6 s. PMID:26478986

  11. A rhenium complex doped in a silica molecular sieve for molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanxiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a diamine ligand and its Re(I) complex for potential application in oxygen sensing. The novelty of this diamine ligand localized at its increased conjugation chain which had a typical electron-withdrawing group of 1,3,4-oxadiazole. Electronic distribution of excited electrons and their lifetime were supposed to be increased, favoring oxygen sensing collision. This hypothesis was confirmed by single crystal analysis, theoretical calculation and photophysical measurement. It was found that this Re(I) complex had a long-lived emission peaking at 545 nm, favoring sensing application. By doping this complex into a silica matrix MCM-41, oxygen sensing performance and mechanism of the resulting composites were discussed in detail. Non-linear Stern-Volmer working curves were observed with maximum sensitivity of 5.54 and short response time of ~ 6 s.

  12. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chlorite dismutase: a detoxifying enzyme producing molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Geus, Daniël C. de Thomassen, Ellen A. J.; Feltz, Clarisse L. van der; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2008-08-01

    Preliminary X-ray data collection and analysis for crystals of chlorite dismutase, a haem-based enzyme that very effectively reduces chlorite to chloride while producing molecular oxygen, is reported to 2.1 Å resolution. Chlorite dismutase, a homotetrameric haem-based protein, is one of the key enzymes of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria. It is highly active (< 2 kU mg{sup −1}) in reducing the toxic compound chlorite to the innocuous chloride anion and molecular oxygen. Chlorite itself is produced as the intermediate product of (per)chlorate reduction. The chlorite dismutase gene in Azospira oryzae strain GR-1 employing degenerate primers has been identified and the active enzyme was subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Chlorite dismutase was purified, proven to be active and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 2000 MME, KSCN and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and were most likely to contain six subunits in the asymmetric unit. The refined unit-cell parameters were a = 164.46, b = 169.34, c = 60.79 Å. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and a three-wavelength MAD data set has been collected. Determination of the chlorite dismutase structure will provide insights into the active site of the enzyme, for which no structures are currently available.

  13. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  14. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  15. Detection of molecular oxygen at low concentrations using quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  16. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  17. Charge transfer induced activity of graphene for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Anli; Xia, Weijun; Zhang, Lipeng; Dou, Shuo; Xia, Zhenhai; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-05-01

    Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), with its strong electron-accepting ability, was used to dope graphene as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The charge transfer process was observed from graphene to TCNE by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman characterizations. Our density functional theory calculations found that the charge transfer behavior led to an enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity for the ORR.

  18. Effects of MCI-186 upon neutrophil-derived active oxygens.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, K; Shishido, N; Aizawa, H; Hasebe, N; Kikuchi, K; Nakamura, M

    2007-01-01

    Reactions of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazoline-5-one (MCI-186) with hypochlorous acid and superoxide were analysed by spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry. The results were applied to the neutrophil system to evaluate the scavenging activity of neutrophil-derived active oxygen species by MCI-186. MCI-186 reacted rapidly with hypochlorous acid (1 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1)) to form a chlorinated intermediate, followed by a slow conversion to a new spectrum. MCI-186 consumed 3 moles of hypochlorous acid and did not react with superoxide. The newly synthesized fluorescence probes, 2-[6-(4'-amino)-phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl]benzoic acid (APF) and 2-[6-(4'-hydroxy)phenoxy-3H-anthen-3-on-9-yl]benzoic acid (HPF) successfully detected neutrophil-derived active oxygens (Setsukinai K, Urano Y, Kakinuma K, Majima HJ, Nagano T. Development of novel fluorescence probes that can reliably detect reactive oxygen species and distinguish specific species. J Biol Chem 2003; 278: 3170-3175). The rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with MCI-186 and fluorescence probes was in the order of MCI-186 > APF > HPF. Fluorescence due to the oxidation of APF and HPF was observed with the stimulated neutrophils. The result that the intensity from APF oxidation was higher than that from HPF oxidation is compatible with reports that APF selectively reacts with hypochlorous acid. Fluorescence due to oxidation of both APF and HPF decreased when the reactions were carried out in the presence of a fluorescence probe and MCI-186 in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that MCI-186 effectively scavenges neutrophil-derived hypochlorous acid and other active oxygens. PMID:17705989

  19. Potential molecular mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species

    PubMed Central

    Debold, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Intense contractile activity causes a dramatic decline in the force and velocity generating capacity of skeletal muscle within a few minutes, a phenomenon that characterizes fatigue. Much of the research effort has focused on how elevated levels of the metabolites of ATP hydrolysis might inhibit the function of the contractile proteins. However, there is now growing evidence that elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), which also accumulate in the myoplasm during fatigue, also play a causative role in this type of fatigue. The most compelling evidence comes from observations demonstrating that pre-treatment of intact muscle with a ROS scavenger can significantly attenuate the development of fatigue. A clear advantage of this line of inquiry is that the molecular targets and protein modifications of some of the ROS scavengers are well-characterized enabling researchers to begin to identify potential regions and even specific amino acid residues modified during fatigue. Combining this knowledge with assessments of contractile properties from the whole muscle level down to the dynamic motions within specific contractile proteins enable the linking of the structural modifications to the functional impacts, using advanced chemical and biophysical techniques. Based on this approach at least two areas are beginning emerge as potentially important sites, the regulatory protein troponin and the actin binding region of myosin. This review highlights some of these recent efforts which have the potential to offer uniquely precise information on the underlying molecular basis of fatigue. This work may also have implications beyond muscle fatigue as ROS/RNS mediated protein modifications are also thought to play a role in the loss of muscle function with aging and in some acute pathologies like cardiac arrest and ischemia. PMID:26388779

  20. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of semiquinone and hydroquinone forms of Arabidopsis cryptochrome by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Silkstone, Gary; Mason, Maria; van Thor, Jasper J; Wilson, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Cryptochromes (crys) are flavoprotein photoreceptors present throughout the biological kingdom that play important roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in several organisms. Crys non-covalently bind flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) which undergoes photoreduction from the oxidised state to a radical form suggested to be active in signalling in vivo. Although the photoreduction reactions have been well characterised by a number of approaches, little is known of the oxidation reactions of crys and their mechanisms. In this work, a stopped-flow kinetics approach is used to investigate the mechanism of cry oxidation in the presence and absence of an external electron donor. This in vitro study extends earlier investigations of the oxidation of Arabidopsis cryptochrome1 by molecular oxygen and demonstrates that, under some conditions, a more complex model for oxidation of the flavin than was previously proposed is required to accommodate the spectral evidence (see P. Müller and M. Ahmad (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 21033-21040 [1]). In the absence of an electron donor, photoreduction leads predominantly to the formation of the radical FADH(•). Dark recovery most likely forms flavin hydroperoxide (FADHOOH) requiring superoxide. In the presence of reductant (DTT), illumination yields the fully reduced flavin species (FADH(-)). Reaction of this with dioxygen leads to transient radical (FADH(•)) and simultaneous accumulation of oxidised species (FAD), possibly governed by interplay between different cryptochrome molecules or cooperativity effects within the cry homodimer. PMID:26649273

  1. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of semiquinone and hydroquinone forms of Arabidopsis cryptochrome by molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    van Wilderen, Luuk J.G.W.; Silkstone, Gary; Mason, Maria; van Thor, Jasper J.; Wilson, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptochromes (crys) are flavoprotein photoreceptors present throughout the biological kingdom that play important roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in several organisms. Crys non-covalently bind flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) which undergoes photoreduction from the oxidised state to a radical form suggested to be active in signalling in vivo. Although the photoreduction reactions have been well characterised by a number of approaches, little is known of the oxidation reactions of crys and their mechanisms. In this work, a stopped-flow kinetics approach is used to investigate the mechanism of cry oxidation in the presence and absence of an external electron donor. This in vitro study extends earlier investigations of the oxidation of Arabidopsis cryptochrome1 by molecular oxygen and demonstrates that, under some conditions, a more complex model for oxidation of the flavin than was previously proposed is required to accommodate the spectral evidence (see P. Müller and M. Ahmad (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 21033–21040 [1]). In the absence of an electron donor, photoreduction leads predominantly to the formation of the radical FADH•. Dark recovery most likely forms flavin hydroperoxide (FADHOOH) requiring superoxide. In the presence of reductant (DTT), illumination yields the fully reduced flavin species (FADH−). Reaction of this with dioxygen leads to transient radical (FADH•) and simultaneous accumulation of oxidised species (FAD), possibly governed by interplay between different cryptochrome molecules or cooperativity effects within the cry homodimer. PMID:26649273

  2. Molecular Oxygen and Reactive Oxygen Species in Bread-making Processes: Scarce, but Nevertheless Important.

    PubMed

    Decamps, Karolien; Joye, Iris J; De Vos, Dirk E; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    In bread making, O2 is consumed by flour constituents, yeast, and, optionally, some additives optimizing dough processing and/or product quality. It plays a major role especially in the oxidation/reduction phenomena in dough, impacting gluten network structure. The O2 level is about 7.2 mmol/kg dough, of which a significant part stems from wheat flour. We speculate that O2 is quickly lost to the atmosphere during flour hydration. Later, when the gluten network structure develops, some O2 is incorporated in dough through mixing-in of air. O2 is consumed by yeast respiration and in a number of reactions catalyzed by a wide range of enzymes present or added. About 60% of the O2 consumption in yeastless dough is ascribed to oxidation of fatty acids by wheat lipoxygenase activity. In yeasted dough, about 70% of the O2 in dough is consumed by yeast and wheat lipoxygenase. This would leave only about 30% for other reactions. The severe competition between endogenous (and added) O2-consuming systems impacts the gluten network. Moreover, the scarce literature data available suggest that exogenous oxidative enzymes but not those in flour may promote crosslinking of arabinoxylan in yeastless dough. In any case, dough turns anaerobic during the first minutes of fermentation. PMID:26055405

  3. Laser-induced luminescence of singlet molecular oxygen: generation by drugs and pigments of biological importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Sergei Y.; Krasnovsky, Alexander A., Jr.

    1991-05-01

    The photon counting technique and flashlaser excitation were applied to the timeresolved measurement of photosensitized singlet oxygen luminescence in organic and aqueous media. The quantum yields for singlet oxygen generation have been measured in solutions of photosynthetic pigments synthetic and natural porphyrins porphyrins conjugated with monoclonal antibodies furocoumarins flavins fluorescein tetracycline and endogenous photosensitizers of human lens. The data obtained indicate that the measurement of the singlet oxygen luminescence is a reliable tool to study the photosensitizing activity of drugs and to elucidate primary mechanisms of photodynamic destruction. 1.

  4. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  5. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity.

  6. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  7. Oxygen activation and intramolecular C-H bond activation by an amidate-bridged diiron(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew B; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; Hagen, Karl S; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-07-18

    A diiron(II) complex containing two μ-1,3-(κN:κO)-amidate linkages has been synthesized using the 2,2',2''-tris(isobutyrylamido)triphenylamine (H(3)L(iPr)) ligand. The resulting diiron complex, 1, reacts with dioxygen (or iodosylbenzene) to effect intramolecular C-H bond activation at the methine position of the ligand isopropyl group. The ligand-activated product, 2, has been isolated and characterized by a variety of methods including X-ray crystallography. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy of 2 prepared from(18)O(2) was used to confirm that the oxygen atom incorporated into the ligand framework is derived from molecular oxygen. PMID:21667986

  8. Oxygen evolution on a SrFeO3 anode - Mechanistic considerations from molecular orbital theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehandru, S. P.; Anderson, Alfred B.

    1989-01-01

    Various pathways proposed in the literature for the evolution of O2 in electrochemical oxidations are explored using the atom superposition and electron delocalization molecular orbital (ASED-MO) theory and the cluster models of the SrFeO3 surface as a prototype material. Calculations indicate that oxygen atoms can be easily formed on the (100) surface as well as on the edge cation sites of a SrFeO3 anode by the discharge of OH(-), followed by its deprotonation and electron transfer to the electrode. The O atoms can form O2 on the edge and corner sites, where the Fe(4+) is coordinated to four and three bulk oxygen anions, respectively. The calculations strongly disfavor mechanisms involving coupling of oxygen atoms adsorbed on different cations as well as a mechanism featuring an ozone intermediate.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of hot molecular oxygen in flames using an alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes; Zhou, Bo; Zetterberg, Johan; Li, Zhongshan; Alden, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The use of an alexandrite laser for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and imaging of molecular oxygen in thermally excited vibrational states is demonstrated. The laser radiation after the third harmonic generation was used to excite the B-X (0-7) band at 257 nm in the Schumann-Runge system of oxygen. LIF emission was detected between 270 and 380 nm, revealing distinct bands of the transitions from B(0) to highly excited vibrational states in the electronic ground state, X (v > 7). At higher spectral resolution, these bands reveal the common P- and R-branch line splitting. Eventually, the proposed LIF approach was used for single-shot imaging of the two-dimensional distribution of hot oxygen molecules in flames. PMID:25279538

  10. Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2009-02-25

    Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

  11. On the Utility of the Molecular Oxygen Dayglow Emissions as Proxies for Middle Atmospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Olander, Daphne S.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular oxygen dayglow emissions arise in part from processes related to the Hartley band photolysis of ozone. It is therefore possible to derive daytime ozone concentrations from measurements of the volume emission rate of either dayglow. The accuracy to which the ozone concentration can be inferred depends on the accuracy to which numerous kinetic and spectroscopic rate constants are known, including rates which describe the excitation of molecular oxygen by processes that are not related to the ozone concentration. We find that several key rate constants must be known to better than 7 percent accuracy in order to achieve an inferred ozone concentration accurate to 15 percent from measurements of either dayglow. Currently, accuracies for various parameters typically range from 5 to 100 percent.

  12. Lysostaphin: molecular changes that preserve staphylolytic activity.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysostaphin is a potent staphylolytic enzyme with known resistance mechanisms. To avoid resistance development, this lab is developing lysostaphin-LysK fusion proteins harboring three synergistic lytic activities in one protein. Some of the molecular changes to lysostaphin and their effects on sta...

  13. Mechanism and kinetics of interaction of Fe, Cr, Mo, and Mn atoms with molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmadov, U.S.; Zaslonko, I.S.; Smirnov, V.N.

    1988-09-01

    By means of resonance atomic absorption in shock waves, rate constants have been measured for the interaction of atoms of a number of transition metals (Fe, Cr, Mo, and Mn) with molecular oxygen. A new method is proposed and used for determining the exponent ..gamma.. in the modified Lambert-Beer law D = element of(ZN)/sup ..gamma../. The bond strength in CrO and MoO molecules has been estimated.

  14. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general. PMID:21423188

  15. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayssilov, Georgi N.; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P.; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C.; MatolíN, VladimíR.; Neyman, Konstantin M.; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general.

  16. Chlorite dismutases – a heme enzyme family for use in bioremediation and generation of molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite is a serious environmental concern, as rising concentrations of this harmful anthropogenic compound have been detected in groundwater, drinking water, and soil. Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are therefore important molecules in bioremediation as Clds catalyze the degradation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. Clds are heme b-containing oxidoreductases present in numerous bacterial and archaeal phyla. This review presents the phylogeny of functional Clds and Cld-like proteins, and demonstrates the close relationship of this novel enzyme family to the recently discovered dye-decolorizing peroxidases. The available X-ray structures, biophysical and enzymatic properties, as well as a proposed reaction mechanism, are presented and critically discussed. Open questions about structure-function relationships are addressed, including the nature of the catalytically relevant redox and reaction intermediates and the mechanism of inactivation of Clds during turnover. Based on analysis of currently available data, chlorite dismutase from “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” is suggested as a model Cld for future application in biotechnology and bioremediation. Additionally, Clds can be used in various applications as local generators of molecular oxygen, a reactivity already exploited by microbes that must perform aerobic metabolic pathways in the absence of molecular oxygen. For biotechnologists in the field of chemical engineering and bioremediation, this review provides the biochemical and biophysical background of the Cld enzyme family as well as critically assesses Cld's technological potential. PMID:24519858

  17. Origin of Molecular Oxygen in Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Ronnet, T.; Brugger, B.; Ozgurel, O.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Maggiolo, R.; Wurz, P.; Vernazza, P.; Lunine, J. I.; Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mandt, K. E.; Altwegg, K.; Bieler, A.; Markovits, A.; Rubin, M.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular oxygen has been detected in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko with abundances in the 1%–10% range by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis-Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer instrument on board the Rosetta spacecraft. Here we find that the radiolysis of icy grains in low-density environments such as the presolar cloud may induce the production of large amounts of molecular oxygen. We also show that molecular oxygen can be efficiently trapped in clathrates formed in the protosolar nebula (PSN), and that its incorporation as crystalline ice is highly implausible, because this would imply much larger abundances of Ar and N2 than those observed in the coma. Assuming that radiolysis has been the only O2 production mechanism at work, we conclude that the formation of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is possible in a dense and early PSN in the framework of two extreme scenarios: (1) agglomeration from pristine amorphous icy grains/particles formed in ISM and (2) agglomeration from clathrates that formed during the disk’s cooling. The former scenario is found consistent with the strong correlation between O2 and H2O observed in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s coma while the latter scenario requires that clathrates formed from ISM icy grains that crystallized when entering the PSN.

  18. Inhibition by singlet molecular oxygen of the vascular reactivity in rabbit mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Mizukawa, Hisae; Okabe, Eiichiro

    1997-01-01

    The effects of reactive oxygen intermediates derived from photoactivated rose bengal on the vascular reactivity have been evaluated in rabbit mesenteric artery ring preparations. The artery rings were exposed to xanthene dye rose bengal (50 nM) illuminated (6,000 lux) at 560 nm for 30 min. Spin trapping studies with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (TEMP) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) with electron spin resonance spectrometry were also conducted in solution (and not within tissues) to determine quantitatively the reactive oxygen species generated from photoactivated rose bengal. Contraction of the ring preparations induced by noradrenaline (10−8 to 10−4 M) was attenuated by previous exposure to photolysed rose bengal; the observation that the pD2 decreased without a significant reduction in maximum tension generation is consistent with the view that receptor dysfunction may be involved in the effect of photolysed rose bengal. Prior exposure to photolysed rose bengal of the ring preparations inhibited the endothelium-dependent relaxation evoked by acetylcholine (10−6 M) and calcium ionophore A23187 (10−7 M), but not the endothelium-independent relaxation evoked by nitroglycerin (10−6 M). A variety of scavengers, superoxide dismutase (33 units ml−1), catalase (32 units ml−1) and 1,3-dimethyl-2-thiourea (DMTU, 10 mM), which should eliminate the superoxide anion radical, H2O2 and the hydroxyl radical, had no effect on the attenuated responses to noradrenaline and acetylcholine induced by photolysed rose bengal. In contrast, the inhibition of the observed effect of photolysed rose bengal was obtained with addition of histidine (25 mM), a singlet molecular oxygen quencher. It was found that photolysis of rose bengal from a 1 : 2 : 2 : 1 quartet, characteristic of the hydroxyl radical-DMPO spin adduct, which was effectively blunted by DMTU, superoxide dismutase and catalase whereas histidine was ineffective. The

  19. Oxygen Tolerance of a Molecular Engineered Cathode for Hydrogen Evolution Based on a Cobalt Diimine-Dioxime Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Morozan, Adina; Artero, Vincent

    2015-10-29

    We report here that a bioinspired cobalt diimine-dioxime molecular catalyst for hydrogen evolution immobilized onto carbon nanotube electrodes proves tolerant toward oxygen. The cobalt complex catalyzes O2 reduction with an onset potential of +0.55 V vs RHE. In this process, a mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide is produced in a 3:1 ratio. Our study evidences that such side-reductions have little impact on effectiveness of proton reduction by the grafted molecular catalyst which still displays good activity for H2 evolution in the presence of O2. The presence of O2 in the media is not detrimental toward H2 evolution under the conditions used, which simulate turn-on conditions of a water-splitting device. PMID:25993343

  20. Studies of oxygen species in synthetic Todorokite-like manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuan-Gen; Xu, Wen-Qing; Shen, Yan-Fei; Suib, S.L. ); O'Young, C.L. )

    1994-10-01

    Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves of 3 x 3 tunnel structure (OMS-1) doped with various cations possess high thermal stability and were studied by means of temperature-programmed desorption and reduction by H[sub 2] and CO. Different oxygen species can be discerned according to their peak positions in the temperature-programmed desorption and reduction and assigned to chemisorbed dioxygen, oxygen atoms bound to Mn[sup 2+], and those bound to Mn[sup 4+] ions in the framework. Differences in peak positions and availabilities of these species during TPD and TPR can be explained by creation of nascent Mn[sup 2+] ions during TPR. The effects of doping cations on the reactivity and availability of these oxygen species are demonstrated to be more pronounced in TPR in H[sub 2] or CO than in TPD. In some instances, the trends of changes in reactivity and availability of the oxygen species due to doping of Cu[sup 2+], Ni[sup 2+], Zn[sup 2+], and Mg[sup 2+] correlated with the changes in the heat of formation of oxides of these cations. Temperature-programmed reactions with methane show some reactivity of these doped OMS-1 materials. Pulse reactions with CO show higher reactivity of Cu-doped OM-1 than with butane. However, the recovery of Cu-doped OMS-1 by reoxidation with oxygen pulses seems rather incomplete at the same temperature. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  1. On the determination of oxygen abundances in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, T.; Micela, G.

    2004-08-01

    We discuss oxygen abundances derived from [O I] λ6300s and the O I triplet in stars spanning a wide range in chromospheric activity level, and show that these two indicators yield increasingly discrepant results with higher chromospheric/coronal activity measures. While the forbidden and permitted lines give fairly consistent results for solar-type disk dwarfs, spuriously high O I triplet abundances are observed in young Hyades and Pleiades stars, as well as in individual components of RS CVn binaries (up to 1.8 dex). The distinct behaviour of the [O I]-based abundances which consistently remain near-solar suggests that this phenomenon mostly results from large departures from LTE affecting the O I triplet at high activity level that are currently unaccounted for, but also possibly from a failure to adequately model the atmospheres of K-type stars. These results suggest that some caution should be exercised when interpreting oxygen abundances in active binaries or young open cluster stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (Proposals 64.L-0249 and 071.D-0260). Table \\ref{tab_data} is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  2. Visible-Light-Activated Molecular Switches.

    PubMed

    Bléger, David; Hecht, Stefan

    2015-09-21

    The ability to influence key properties of molecular systems by using light holds much promise for the fields of materials science and life sciences. The cornerstone of such systems is molecules that are able to reversibly photoisomerize between two states, commonly referred to as photoswitches. One serious restriction to the development of functional photodynamic systems is the necessity to trigger switching in at least one direction by UV light, which is often damaging and penetrates only partially through most media. This review provides a summary of the different conceptual strategies for addressing molecular switches in the visible and near-infrared regions of the optical spectrum. Such visible-light-activated molecular switches tremendously extend the scope of photoswitchable systems for future applications and technologies. PMID:26096635

  3. Origin of Active Oxygen in a Ternary CuOx /Co3O4–CeO 2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Zili; Peng, Xihong; Binder, Andrew; Chai, Songhai; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we have studied CO oxidation over a ternary CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 catalyst and employed the techniques of N2 adsorption/desporption, XRD, TPR, TEM, in situ DRIFTS and QMS (Quadrupole mass spectrometer) to explore the origin of active oxygen. DRIFTS-QMS results with labeled 18O2 indicate that the origin of active oxygens in CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 obeys a model, called as queue mechanism. Namely gas-phase molecular oxygens are dissociated to atomic oxygens and then incorporate in oxygen vacancies located at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2 to form active crystalline oxygens, and these active oxygens diffuse to the CO-Cu+ sites thanks to the oxygen vacancy concentrationmore » magnitude and react with the activated CO to form CO2. This process, obeying a queue rule, provides active oxygens to form CO2 from gas-phase O2 via oxygen vacancies and crystalline oxygen at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2.« less

  4. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  5. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  6. Oxygen activation in NO synthases: evidence for a direct role of the substrate.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Albane; Lang, Jérôme; Couture, Manon; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and the other reactive nitrogen species (RNOS) play crucial patho-physiological roles at the interface of oxidative stress and signalling processes. In mammals, the NO synthases (NOSs) are the source of these reactive nitrogen species, and so to understand the precise biological role of RNOS and NO requires elucidation of the molecular functioning of NOS. Oxygen activation, which is at the core of NOS catalysis, involves a sophisticated sequence of electron and proton transfers. While electron transfer in NOS has received much attention, the proton transfer processes has been scarcely investigated. Here, we report an original approach that combines fast-kinetic techniques coupled to resonance Raman spectroscopy with the use of synthetic analogues of NOS substrate. We characterise Fe(II)-O2 reaction intermediates in the presence of L-arginine (Arg), alkyl- and aryl-guanidines. The presence of new reaction intermediates, such as ferric haem-peroxide, that was formerly postulated, was tracked by analysing the oxygen activation reaction at different times and with different excitation wavelengths. Our results suggest that Arg is not a proton donor, but indirectly intervenes in oxygen activation mechanism by modulating the distal H-bond network and, in particular, by tuning the position and the role of the distal water molecule. This report supports a catalytic model with two proton transfers in step 1 (Arg hydroxylation) but only one proton transfer in step 2 (N(ω)-hydroxy-L-arginine oxidation). PMID:27419044

  7. Molecular Imaging with SERS-Active Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Myklejord, Duane V.; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Lead-in Raman spectroscopy has been explored for various biomedical applications (e.g. cancer diagnosis) because it can provide detailed information on the chemical composition of cells and tissues. For imaging applications, several variations of Raman spectroscopy have been developed to enhance its sensitivity. To date, a wide variety of molecular targets and biological events have been investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active nanoparticles. The superb multiplexing capability of SERS-based Raman imaging, already successfully demonstrated in live animals, can be extremely powerful in future research where different agents can be attached to different Raman tags to enable the simultaneous interrogation of multiple biological events. Over the last several years, molecular imaging with SERS-active nanoparticles has advanced significantly and many pivotal proof-of-principle experiments have been successfully carried out. It is expected that SERS-based imaging will continue to be a dynamic research field over the next decade. PMID:21932216

  8. Tracing the oxygen triple isotopic composition of tropospheric molecular oxygen in biogenic apatite - a new tool for palaeoclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, A.; Süssenberger, A.; Gehler, A.; Wotzlaw, J.

    2009-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that tropospheric molecular oxygen posses a significant isotope anomaly [1, 2 and refs. therein]. Relative to the rocks- and minerals-defined terrestrial fractionation line (TFL), tropospheric O2 has an anomaly of -0.35‰ [2]. Because almost all oxygen on Earth is contained in rocks, we suggest that the rocks- and minerals-defined TFL [3] should be used as reference when reporting isotope anomalies with ∆17O = δ'17OSMOW - βTFL δ'18OSMOW. We have developed a new technique for the determination of δ17O and δ18O of silicates by means of laser fluorination GC-CF-irmMS. We have determined βTFL to 0.5247 (N > 100), which is identical to the value reported by other laboratories and techniques [2, 3]. The uncertainty in ∆17O is ±0.03 (1σ) for a single analysis. It was suggested that ∆17O of tropospheric O2 can be used as proxy for the global bioactivity rate [GBR, 1] as well as for past atmospheric CO2 concentrations [4]. Past ∆17O of tropospheric O2 can be determined by analyzing O2 trapped in ice [1, 5] or by analyzing sulfates from terrestrial sulphide oxidation [4]. Disadvantage of ice core data is the limitation in time back <1 Myrs. The sulfate approach is used to trace ∆17O of air O2 back to Proterozoic times. Disadvantage of this technique is the uncertainty in the proportion of oxygen from O2 and oxygen from ambient water during oxidation of the sulphides. We suggest that oxygen from tooth and bone phosphate can be used as proxy for the ∆17O of air O2. Mass balance calculations [e.g. 6] suggest that a considerable portion of oxygen in biogenic apatite sources from respired air O2. We have analyzed tooth (enamel, dentine) and bone material by means of direct fluorination for their δ17O and δ18O. We have chosen material of mammals of different body mass (Mb) from Northern Germany (except Indian Elephant). The ∆17O of apatite varies between -0.16‰ for a wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) and +0.04‰ for a wild boar

  9. Atomic Oxygen Abundance in Molecular Clouds: Absorption Toward Sagittarius B2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Keene, Jocelyn; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Werner, M. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 35 km/s) spectra toward the molecular cloud Sgr B2 at 63 micrometers, the wavelength of the ground-state fine-structure line of atomic oxygen (O(I)), using the ISO-LWS instrument. Four separate velocity components are seen in the deconvolved spectrum, in absorption against the dust continuum emission of Sgr B2. Three of these components, corresponding to foreground clouds, are used to study the O(I) content of the cool molecular gas along the line of sight. In principle, the atomic oxygen that produces a particular velocity component could exist in any, or all, of three physically distinct regions: inside a dense molecular cloud, in the UV illuminated surface layer (PDR) of a cloud, and in an atomic (H(I)) gas halo. For each of the three foreground clouds, we estimate, and subtract from the observed O(I) column density, the oxygen content of the H(I) halo gas, by scaling from a published high-resolution 21 cm spectrum. We find that the remaining O(I) column density is correlated with the observed (13)CO column density. From the slope of this correlation, an average [O(I)]/[(13)CO] ratio of 270 +/- 120 (3-sigma) is derived, which corresponds to [O(I)]/[(13)CO] = 9 for a CO to (13)CO abundance ratio of 30. Assuming a (13)CO abundance of 1x10(exp -6) with respect to H nuclei, we derive an atomic oxygen abundance of 2.7x10(exp -4) in the dense gas phase, corresponding to a 15% oxygen depletion compared to the diffuse ISM in our Galactic neighborhood. The presence of multiple, spectrally resolved velocity components in the Sgr B2 absorption spectrum allows, for the first time, a direct determination of the PDR contribution to the O(I) column density. The PDR regions should contain O(I) but not (13)CO, and would thus be expected to produce an offset in the O(I)-(13)CO correlation. Our data do not show such an offset, suggesting that within our beam O(I) is spatially coexistent with the molecular gas, as traced by (13)CO

  10. Promoted oxidation of phenol in aqueous solution using molecular oxygen at mild conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, F.; Harf, J.; Hug, A.; Rohr, P.R. von

    1999-05-01

    Wet oxidation with molecular oxygen at mild conditions (temperature < 200 C, pressure {le} 2 MPa) is an economically attractive pretreatment step for non-biodegradable aqueous waste streams. In order to overcome the low reactivity of molecular oxygen towards organic molecules at these mild process conditions, an initiator was used in combination with ferrous ions in the acidic range. The promoted oxidation of phenol in aqueous solution was investigated in a 4 liters stirred autoclave. It was possible to degrade the phenol at temperatures as low as 100 C without observing an induction time. The remaining solution contained mainly acetic and formic acid and was well biodegradable. The oxidative behavior of the oxygen/phenol system could be explained using the well-known autoxidation mechanism for aliphatic molecules. 4-hydroperoxy-phenol is suggested as a key intermediate. Measured products are p-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, catechol, maleic, oxalic, pyruvic, formic, and acetic acid. Dimers could also be identified in sample extracts. A global pathway including all identified products is presented.

  11. Angular intensity distribution of a molecular oxygen beam scattered from a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Oh, Junepyo; Kondo, Takahiro; Arakawa, Keitaro; Saito, Yoshihiko; Hayes, W W; Manson, J R; Nakamura, Junji

    2011-06-30

    The scattering of the oxygen molecule from a graphite surface has been studied using a molecular beam scattering technique. The angular intensity distributions of scattered oxygen molecules were measured at incident energies from 291 to 614 meV with surface temperatures from 150 to 500 K. Every observed distribution has a single peak at a larger final angle than the specular angle of 45° which indicates that the normal component of the translation energy of the oxygen molecule is lost by the collision with the graphite surface. The amount of the energy loss by the collision has been roughly estimated as about 30-41% based on the assumption of the tangential momentum conservation during the collision. The distributions have also been analyzed with two theoretical models, the hard cubes model and the smooth surface model. These results indicate that the scattering is dominated by a single collision event of the particle with a flat surface having a large effective mass. The derived effective mass of the graphite surface for the incoming oxygen is 9-12 times heavier than that of a single carbon atom, suggesting a large cooperative motion of the carbon atoms in the topmost graphene layer. PMID:21446680

  12. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  13. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  14. Excellently guarded materials against UV and oxygen in the surfactant molecular complex crystal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Haruyo; Iimura, Nahoko; Hirata, Hirotaka

    2000-07-01

    Crystalline surfactant molecular complexes (SCMs) generated between quaternary ammonium cationic surfactants such as CTAB and various additives disclose their excellent protective properties from UV light and oxygen to complex additive materials, which are occluded in the complex crystal matrix. The effects of UV and oxygen were followed by the absorption decay of additive chromophores in comparing that of naked additive specimens with that of those in the complexed state. From the decay profiles, the rate constants and the half-life times were estimated under the assumptions in which the photo and oxidation processes were dominated in accordance with the first-ordered reaction. The results afford us promising prospects in extending the shelf-life of every material, above all medicinal drug, with the consequence that these obtained values evidently demonstrate the remarkably suppressed rate and extremely elongated half-life times.

  15. [Molecular mechanisms of niclosamide antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    Moskaleva, E Yu; Perevozchikova, V G; Zhirnik, A S; Severin, S E

    2015-01-01

    In this review the recent data regarding the antitumor activity of niclosamide and the molecular mechanisms of its antitumor activity are presented. Niclosamide has been used in the clinic for the treatment of intestinal parasite infections. In recent years in several screening investigations of various drugs and chemical compounds niclosamide was identified as a potential anticancer agent. Niclosamide not only inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin, mTORC1, STAT3, NF-κB and Notch signaling pathways, but also targets mitochondria in cancer cells to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis. A number of studies have established the anticancer activity of niclosamide in both in vitro and in vivo in xenotransplantation models using human tumors and immunodeficient mice. It is important that niclosamide is active not only against tumor cells but also cancer stem cells. Normal cells are resistant to niclosamide. The accumulated experimental data suggest niclosamide is a promising drug for the treatment of various types of cancer. PMID:26716739

  16. The interrelationship between muscle oxygenation, muscle activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake to incremental ramp exercise: influence of aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Boone, Jan; Barstow, Thomas J; Celie, Bert; Prieur, Fabrice; Bourgois, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether muscle and ventilatory responses to incremental ramp exercise would be influenced by aerobic fitness status by means of a cross-sectional study with a large subject population. Sixty-four male students (age: 21.2 ± 3.2 years) with a heterogeneous peak oxygen uptake (51.9 ± 6.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), range 39.7-66.2 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed an incremental ramp cycle test (20-35 W·min(-1)) to exhaustion. Breath-by-breath gas exchange was recorded, and muscle activation and oxygenation were measured with surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The integrated electromyography (iEMG), mean power frequency (MPF), deoxygenated [hemoglobin and myoglobin] (deoxy[Hb+Mb]), and total[Hb+Mb] responses were set out as functions of work rate and fitted with a double linear function. The respiratory compensation point (RCP) was compared and correlated with the breakpoints (BPs) (as percentage of peak oxygen uptake) in muscle activation and oxygenation. The BP in total[Hb+Mb] (83.2% ± 3.0% peak oxygen uptake) preceded (P < 0.001) the BP in iEMG (86.7% ± 4.0% peak oxygen uptake) and MPF (86.3% ± 4.1% peak oxygen uptake), which in turn preceded (P < 0.01) the BP in deoxy[Hb+Mb] (88.2% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake) and RCP (87.4% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake). Furthermore, the peak oxygen uptake was significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated to the BPs and RCP, indicating that the BPs in total[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.66; P < 0.001), deoxy[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.76; P < 0.001), iEMG (r = 0.61; P < 0.001), MPF (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), and RCP (r = 0.75; P < 0.001) occurred at a higher percentage of peak oxygen uptake in subjects with a higher peak oxygen uptake. In this study a close relationship between muscle oxygenation, activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake was found, occurring in a cascade of events. In subjects with a higher aerobic fitness level this cascade occurred at a higher relative intensity. PMID:26701120

  17. Activated carbon becomes active for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuecheng; Jia, Yi; Odedairo, Taiwo; Zhao, Xiaojun; Jin, Zhao; Zhu, Zhonghua; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-06-21

    We utilized a facile method for creating unique defects in the activated carbon (AC), which makes it highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The ORR activity of the defective AC (D-AC) is comparable to the commercial Pt/C in alkaline medium, and the D-AC also exhibits excellent HER activity in acidic solution. PMID:27277286

  18. Base metal-catalyzed benzylic oxidation of (aryl)(heteroaryl)methanes with molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sterckx, Hans; De Houwer, Johan; Mensch, Carl; Herrebout, Wouter; Tehrani, Kourosch Abbaspour

    2016-01-01

    Summary The methylene group of various substituted 2- and 4-benzylpyridines, benzyldiazines and benzyl(iso)quinolines was successfully oxidized to the corresponding benzylic ketones using a copper or iron catalyst and molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. Application of the protocol in API synthesis is exemplified by the alternative synthesis of a precursor to the antimalarial drug Mefloquine. The oxidation method can also be used to prepare metabolites of APIs which is illustrated for the natural product papaverine. ICP–MS analysis of the purified reaction products revealed that the base metal impurity was well below the regulatory limit. PMID:26877817

  19. Metalloporphyrin catalysts for oxygen reduction developed using computer-aided molecular design

    SciTech Connect

    Ryba, G.N.; Hobbs, J.D.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of metalloporphyrin materials used as catalsyts for use in fuel cell applications. The metalloporphyrins are excellent candidates for use as catalysts at both the anode and cathode. The catalysts reduce oxygen in 1 M potassium hydroxide, as well as in 2 M sulfuric acid. Covalent attachment to carbon supports is being investigated. The computer-aided molecular design is an iterative process, in which experimental results feed back into the design of future catalysts.

  20. Molecular cloud origin for the oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi

    2004-09-17

    Meteorites and their components have anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions characterized by large variations in 18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios. On the basis of recent observations of star-forming regions and models of accreting protoplanetary disks, we suggest that these variations may originate in a parent molecular cloud by ultraviolet photodissociation processes. Materials with anomalous isotopic compositions were then transported into the solar nebula by icy dust grains during the collapse of the cloud. The icy dust grains drifted toward the Sun in the disk, and their subsequent evaporation resulted in the 17O- and 18O-enrichment of the inner disk gas. PMID:15375265

  1. Ab initio study of molecular and atomic oxygen on GeTe(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Deringer, Volker L.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2014-11-07

    Oxidation of the phase-change material germanium telluride (GeTe) is an atomic-scale process of fundamental importance, as it is detrimental to the stability of GeTe-based data-storage devices. Here, we present comprehensive density-functional theory simulations of molecular and atomic oxygen in contact with GeTe(111) surfaces. Molecular O{sub 2} is predicted to readily adsorb on the Ge-terminated (111) surface; the pristine Te-terminated counterpart, by contrast, appears quite inert. The coverage-dependent adsorption of O atoms is then investigated, and based on these data, a surface phase diagram for GeTe(111)/O is constructed. These results afford a detailed, atom-resolved picture of the initial surface oxidation of GeTe, and they harmonize well with a previous X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on this very topic.

  2. Study of Oxygen Induced Radicals in Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, Jason; Shah Jahan, M.

    2003-11-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used as a load-bearing component in hip and knee replacements for many years. Gamma irradiation is the method used by many industries to sterilize their joint components. This sterilization method causes primary free radicals (PR) to form throughout the polymer matrix. During post-sterilization exposure to oxygen, on shelf or in vivo, the free radicals react with oxygen and produce oxygen-induced radicals (OIR). These radicals make the polymer more brittle and accelerate polymer degradation. In this study we used electron spin resonance (ESR) technique to monitor the structural changes and concentration of radicals in gamma irradiated UHMWPE. The OIR's ESR spectrum tends to show a single line. Although there may be some contribution of polyenyle radicals in the single line spectrum, it can be shown that the spectrum detected following oxidation of PR is indeed due to the OIR. This result was reached by comparing the results of a long-term study of OIR's as well as studies in a vacuum or inert environment. *Work supported, in part, by funds from the NSF Industry/University Biosurface Center (IUCB)

  3. Production and Characterization of Active Transparent PET Films for Oxygen Sensitive Foods Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaria Galdi, Maria; Incarnato, Loredana

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate possible solutions to realize active, transparent PET film suitable for packaging oxygen sensitive foods. At this purpose, monolayer active PET films at different oxygen scavenger concentrations and multilayer active ones were produced by cast extrusion laboratory scale equipments. To assess their activity and to verify the efficacy of such solutions, O2 absorption analyses were carried out in continuous by an innovative oxygen meter.

  4. Comparison of dissolved-organic-carbon residuals from air- and pure-oxygen-activated-sludge sequencing-batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Esparza-Soto, Mario; Fox, Peter; Westerhoff, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Literature shows that full-scale pure-oxygen activated sludge (O2-AS) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) generate effluents with higher dissolved-organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and larger high-molecular-weight fractions compared to air-activated-sludge (Air-AS) WWTP effluents. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate how gas supplied (air vs. pure oxygen) to sequencing-batch reactors affected DOC transformations. The main conclusions of this paper are (a) O2-AS effluent DOC is more refractory than air-AS effluent DOC; and (b) O2-AS systems may have higher five-day biochemical oxygen demand removals than air-AS systems; however, in terms of COD and DOC removal, air-AS systems are better than O2-AS systems. Analysis of a database from side-by-side O2- and air-AS pilot tests from literature supported these observations. PMID:16629273

  5. Chemistry induced by energetic ions in water ice mixed with molecular nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boduch, Ph.; Domaracka, A.; Fulvio, D.; Langlinay, T.; Lv, X. Y.; Palumbo, M. E.; Rothard, H.; Strazzulla, G.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Several molecular species have been observed as frozen gases in cold environments such as grains in the interstellar/circumstellar medium or icy objects in the outer solar system. Because N2 and O2 are homonuclear, symmetric molecules are not easily observed. It is therefore relevant to find indirect methods to prove their presence from astronomical observations. Aims: Here we investigate one of the possible indirect methods, namely the formation of specific molecules by cosmic ion bombardment of ices in astrophysical environments that contain O2 and N2. The observation of these molecules in astronomical environments could act as a trojan horse to detect the presence of frozen molecular oxygen and/or nitrogen. Methods: We have conducted ion bombardment experiments of frozen O2, H2O and their mixtures with N2 at the laboratories of CIMAP-GANIL at Caen (France) and LASp at Catania (Italy). Different ions (13C2+, Ar2+ and H+) and energies (30-200 keV) have been used. Results: We have found that 13CO2 is formed when carbon ions are implanted in ices containing H2O and/or O2. Ozone and nitrogen oxides (NO, N2O, NO2) are formed in the studied ices containing O2 and N2 with different relative abundances. Conclusions: We suggest that ozone and nitrogen oxides are present and have to be searched for in some specific environments such as dense clouds in the interstellar medium and the surfaces of Pluto, Charon and Triton. Their observation could demonstrate the presence of molecular oxygen and/or nitrogen. A possible interest for the observations of atmospheres in exo-planetary objects is also discussed.

  6. Effect of oxygen on the microbial activities of thermophilic anaerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Pedizzi, C; Regueiro, L; Rodriguez-Verde, I; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-07-01

    Low oxygen levels (μgO2L(-1)) in anaerobic reactors are quite common and no relevant consequences are expected. On the contrary, higher concentrations could affect the process. This work aimed to study the influence of oxygen (4.3 and 8.8mgO2L(-1), respectively) on the different microbial activities (hydrolytic, acidogenic and methanogenic) of thermophilic anaerobic biomass and on the methanogenic community structure. Batch tests in presence of oxygen were conducted using specific substrates for each biological activity and a blank (with minimum oxygen) was included. No effect of oxygen was observed on the hydrolytic and acidogenic activities. In contrast, the methane production rate decreased by 40% in all oxygenated batches and the development of active archaeal community was slower in presence of 8.8mgO2L(-1). However, despite this sensitivity of methanogens to oxygen at saturation levels, the inhibition was reversible. PMID:27020398

  7. Antioxidant Activity of Oxygen Evolving Enhancer Protein 1 Purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Young; Choi, Youn Hee; Lee, Jung Im; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the antioxidant activity of a protein purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens. The purification steps included sodium acetate (pH 6) extraction and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, reversed phase Shodex C4P-50 column chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the purified protein was 33 kDa. The N-terminus and partial peptide amino acid sequence of this protein was identical to the sequence of oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE) 1 protein. The antioxidant activity of the OEE 1 was determined in vitro using a scavenging test with 4 types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). OEE 1 had higher H2 O2 scavenging activity, which proved to be the result of enzymatic antioxidants rather than nonenzymatic antioxidants. In addition, OEE 1 showed less H2 O2 -mediated ROS formation in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that OEE 1 purified from C. fulvescens is an excellent antioxidant. PMID:25944160

  8. Micro- and Nanostructured Materials for Active Devices and Molecular Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Mast, Eric S.; Hall, Michael G.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional single layer barrier coatings are not adequate in preventing degradation of the performance of organic molecular electronic and other active devices. Most advanced devices used in display technology now consist of micro and nanostructured small molecule, polymer and inorganic coatings with thin high reactive group 1A metals. This includes organic electronics such as organic light emitting devices (OLED). The lifetimes of these devices rapidly degrades when they are exposed to atmospheric oxygen and water vapor. Thin film photovoltaics and batteries are also susceptible to degradation by moisture and oxygen. Using in-line coating techniques we apply a composite nanostructured inorganic/polymer thin film barrier that restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels using conventional permeation test equipment. We describe permeation mechanisms for this encapsulation coating and flat panel display and other device applications. Permeation through the multilayer barrier coating is defect and pore limited and can be described by Knudsen diffusion involving a long and tortuous path. Device lifetime is also enhanced by the long lag times required to reach the steady state flux regime. Permeation rates in the range of 10-6 cc,g/m2/d have been achieved and OLED device lifetimes. The structure is robust, yet flexible. The resulting device performance and lifetimes will also be described. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide yielding an engineered nanostructured device for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. This enables, for the first time, thin film encapsulation of emissive organic displays.

  9. A computational analysis of the vibrational levels of molecular oxygen in low-pressure stationary and transient radio-frequency oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemaneci, Efe; Booth, Jean-Paul; Chabert, Pascal; van Dijk, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-04-01

    Vibrational levels of molecular oxygen, O2(v  <  42), are investigated in continuous and pulse-modulated low-pressure radio-frequency oxygen plasma with a global modelling approach. The model is benchmarked against a variety of pressure-, power- and time-resolved measurements of several inductive and asymmetric capacitive discharges available in the literature, and a good agreement is obtained. The sensitivity of the model with respect to the vibrational kinetics, the wall reactions and the spatial inhomogeneity of the charged particles are presented. The simulations without the vibrational levels are also shown for the sake of comparison.

  10. Photodynamic activation as a molecular switch to promote osteoblast cell differentiation via AP-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tu, Yupeng; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), cells are impregnated with a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light irradiation, thereby photochemically generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amounts of ROS produced depends on the PDT dose and the nature of the photosensitizer. Although high levels of ROS are cytotoxic, at physiological levels they play a key role as second messengers in cellular signaling pathways, pluripotency, and differentiation of stem cells. To investigate further the use of photochemically triggered manipulation of such pathways, we exposed mouse osteoblast precursor cells and rat primary mesenchymal stromal cells to low-dose PDT. Our results demonstrate that low-dose PDT can promote osteoblast differentiation via the activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Although PDT has been used primarily as an anti-cancer therapy, the use of light as a photochemical "molecular switch" to promote differentiation should expand the utility of this method in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:26279470

  11. Photodynamic activation as a molecular switch to promote osteoblast cell differentiation via AP-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tu, Yupeng; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), cells are impregnated with a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light irradiation, thereby photochemically generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amounts of ROS produced depends on the PDT dose and the nature of the photosensitizer. Although high levels of ROS are cytotoxic, at physiological levels they play a key role as second messengers in cellular signaling pathways, pluripotency, and differentiation of stem cells. To investigate further the use of photochemically triggered manipulation of such pathways, we exposed mouse osteoblast precursor cells and rat primary mesenchymal stromal cells to low-dose PDT. Our results demonstrate that low-dose PDT can promote osteoblast differentiation via the activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Although PDT has been used primarily as an anti-cancer therapy, the use of light as a photochemical “molecular switch” to promote differentiation should expand the utility of this method in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:26279470

  12. Determining the kinetics and concentrations of singlet molecular oxygen on natural snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2008-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*), the first electronically excited state of molecular oxygen, reacts rapidly with several classes of environmental pollutants such as furans, phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its formation requires the absorption of light by a chromophore (a.k.a. sensitizer), which subsequently transfers energy to ground state molecular oxygen. In prior work, we have shown that the rate of formation (Rf) and steady state concentration ([1O2*]) of 1O2* can be orders of magnitude higher in frozen ice relative to the same laboratory solution studied as a liquid. Here we discuss how we have modified our method to determine Rf and [1O2*] on natural snow, which required overcoming several difficulties: the total solute concentrations are low, the 1O2* sensitizing species are unknown, and other oxidants could be interfering with the measured loss of our chemical probe. The new method is similar to the one used previously, as both use furfuryl alcohol (FFA) as a probe for photoformed 1O2*. The total rate of FFA decay is the sum of its direct photolysis and the rate of all its reactions with other species. Introducing a sink for other oxidants and taking the difference between this measured decay rate and the rate of direct photolysis yields the rate of decay due specifically 1O2*. As a second validation, experiments were also conducted in D2O. In liquid solution, water is the dominant sink for 1O2* where physical quenching controls the lifetime, and thus the steady state concentration, of 1O2*. D2O has a rate constant for quenching of 1O2* much lower than for water. This difference in rate constants is then used to derive [1O2*] in a manner independent of other reactions that may occur. Results from these experiments allowed us to measure Rf and [1O2*] in snow from polar regions and from a mid-latitude site in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. In addition to describing the technique and its results, we will also give a

  13. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites

    PubMed Central

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen–oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O–O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described. PMID:17971328

  14. In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy study of the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface by supersonic molecular oxygen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden; Okada, Ryuta; Yamada, Yoichi; Sasaki, Masahiro

    2014-11-07

    In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy was performed during the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface induced by a molecular oxygen beam with various incident energies up to 2.2 eV from the initial to saturation coverage of surface oxides. The saturation coverage of oxygen on the clean Ge(100) surface was much lower than one monolayer and the oxidation state of Ge was +2 at most. This indicates that the Ge(100) surface is so inert toward oxidation that complete oxidation cannot be achieved with only pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) gas, which is in strong contrast to Si surfaces. Two types of dissociative adsorption, trapping-mediated and direct dissociation, were confirmed by oxygen uptake measurements depending on the incident energy of O{sub 2}. The direct adsorption process can be activated by increasing the translational energy, resulting in an increased population of Ge{sup 2+} and a higher final oxygen coverage. We demonstrated that hyperthermal O{sub 2} beams remarkably promote the room-temperature oxidation with novel atomic configurations of oxides at the Ge(100) surface. Our findings will contribute to the fundamental understanding of oxygen adsorption processes at 300 K from the initial stages to saturated oxidation.

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of vanadium(2+) by molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, J.D.; Bielski, B.H.J.

    1985-12-04

    The reaction between hexaaquovanadium (II) and molecular oxygen has been studied by the stopped-flow method in 0.12M perchloric acid and in solutions containing 0.1M sulfate ion. The kinetics and stoichiometry of the reactions are consistent with a general oxidation mechanism for divalent transition-metal ions proposed by Ochiai. The reaction was found to proceed by parallel pathways resulting in a V(II)-dependent stoichiometry. At concentrations < 0.005 M V(II), one molecule of VO2 was produced per molecule of O2 consumed. At V(II) concentrations greater than 0.1 M, no free peroxide was formed and two vanadyl ions, VOS , are the intermediate reaction products. A mechanism involving a V(II)-dependent equilibrium between a mononuclear vanadium(III) peroxide and a dinuclear vanadium(III) peroxide intermediate explain the reported results. The kinetic parameters of the reaction have been determined and are reported.

  16. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  17. Adsorption of molecular oxygen on VIIIB transition metal-doped graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehnia, F.; Seifi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of molecular oxygen with a triplet ground state on Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Ru-, Rh-, Pd-, OS-, Ir- and Pt-doped graphene is studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The calculations show that O2 molecule is chemisorbed on the doped graphene sheets with large adsorption energies ranging from -0.653 eV to -1.851 eV and the adsorption process is irreversible. Mulliken atomic charge analysis of the structure shows that charge transfer from doped graphene sheets to O2 molecule. The amounts of transferred charge are between 0.375e- to 0.650e-, indicating a considerable change in the structures conductance. These results imply that the effect of O2 adsorption on transition metal-doped graphene structures can alter the possibility of using these materials as a toxic-gas (carbon monoxide, hydrogen fluoride, etc.) sensor.

  18. Selective oxidation of cyclohexane on a novel catalyst Mg-Cu/SBA-15 by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaogang; Liu, Weimin; Yue, Lumin; Fu, Wei; Ha, Minh Ngoc; Li, Jun; Lu, Guanzhong

    2015-10-21

    The novel catalysts xMg-2.3Cu/SBA-15 with copper and magnesium oxide co-supported on mesoporous silica were synthesized by an impregnation method. The newly synthesized catalysts were characterized using a series of techniques such as BET, XRD, H2-TPR, UV-vis, XPS, EDS and TEM. The catalytic performance was evaluated by using selective oxidation of cyclohexane with molecular oxygen as the oxidant in a solvent free system. The incorporation of magnesium improved the dispersion of copper oxide and prevented the deep oxidation of cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. The selectivity of K/A oil was up to 99.3% with 12% conversion of cyclohexane over the 1.2Mg-2.3Cu/SBA-15 catalyst. To our knowledge, this is the best result for the heterogeneous oxidation of cyclohexane by O2. PMID:26388454

  19. Wall-collision line broadening of molecular oxygen within nanoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Can T.; Lewander, Maerta; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svensson, Tomas; Svanberg, Sune; Adolfsson, Erik

    2011-10-15

    Wall-collision broadening of near-infrared absorption lines of molecular oxygen confined in nanoporous zirconia is studied by employing high-resolution diode-laser spectroscopy. The broadening is studied for pores of different sizes under a range of pressures, providing new insights on how wall collisions and intermolecular collisions influence the total spectroscopic line profile. The pressure series show that wall-collision broadening is relatively more prominent under reduced pressures, enabling sensitive means to probe pore sizes of porous materials. In addition, we show that the total wall-collision-broadened profile strongly deviates from a Voigt profile and that wall-collision broadening exhibits an additive-like behavior to the pressure and Doppler broadening.

  20. Sunlight-driven hydrogen peroxide production from water and molecular oxygen by metal-free photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yasuhiro; Kanazawa, Shunsuke; Kofuji, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Hirokatsu; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Hirai, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    Design of green, safe, and sustainable process for the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) is a very important subject. Early reported processes, however, require hydrogen (H2 ) and palladium-based catalysts. Herein we propose a photocatalytic process for H2 O2 synthesis driven by metal-free catalysts with earth-abundant water and molecular oxygen (O2 ) as resources under sunlight irradiation (λ>400 nm). We use graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) containing electron-deficient aromatic diimide units as catalysts. Incorporating the diimide units positively shifts the valence-band potential of the catalysts, while maintaining sufficient conduction-band potential for O2 reduction. Visible light irradiation of the catalysts in pure water with O2 successfully produces H2 O2 by oxidation of water by the photoformed valence-band holes and selective two-electron reduction of O2 by the conduction band electrons. PMID:25293501

  1. Oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt{111} surface alloys.

    PubMed

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Ye, Jin-Yu; Morgan, David; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2014-07-21

    PtM overlayers (where M=Fe, Co or Ni) supported on Pt{111} are prepared via thermal annealing in either a nitrogen/water or hydrogen ambient of dilute aqueous droplets containing M(Z+) cations directly attached to the electrode. Two different PtM phases are detected depending on the nature of the post-annealing cooling environment. The first of these consists of small (<20 nm), closely packed microcrystals comprised of a central metallic core and a shell (several monolayers thick) of mixed metal oxides/hydroxides. The second type of PtM phase is prepared by cooling in a stream of hydrogen gas. Although this second phase also consists of numerous microcrystals covering the Pt{111} electrode surface, these are both flatter than before and moreover are entirely metallic in character. A positive shift in the onset of PtM oxide formation correlates with increased activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which we ascribe to the greater availability of platinum metallic sites under ORR conditions. PMID:24986646

  2. A universal molecular clock of protein folds and its power in tracing the early history of aerobic metabolism and planet oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minglei; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Kim, Kyung Mo; Qu, Ge; Ji, Hong-Fang; Mittenthal, Jay E; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The standard molecular clock describes a constant rate of molecular evolution and provides a powerful framework for evolutionary timescales. Here, we describe the existence and implications of a molecular clock of folds, a universal recurrence in the discovery of new structures in the world of proteins. Using a phylogenomic structural census in hundreds of proteomes, we build phylogenies and time lines of domains at fold and fold superfamily levels of structural complexity. These time lines correlate approximately linearly with geological timescales and were here used to date two crucial events in life history, planet oxygenation and organism diversification. We first dissected the structures and functions of enzymes in simulated metabolic networks. The placement of anaerobic and aerobic enzymes in the time line revealed that aerobic metabolism emerged about 2.9 billion years (giga-annum; Ga) ago and expanded during a period of about 400 My, reaching what is known as the Great Oxidation Event. During this period, enzymes recruited old and new folds for oxygen-mediated enzymatic activities. Remarkably, the first fold lost by a superkingdom disappeared in Archaea 2.6 Ga ago, within the span of oxygen rise, suggesting that oxygen also triggered diversification of life. The implications of a molecular clock of folds are many and important for the neutral theory of molecular evolution and for understanding the growth and diversity of the protein world. The clock also extends the standard concept that was specific to molecules and their timescales and turns it into a universal timescale-generating tool. PMID:20805191

  3. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chlorite dismutase: a detoxifying enzyme producing molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    de Geus, Daniël C.; Thomassen, Ellen A. J.; van der Feltz, Clarisse L.; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2008-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase, a homotetrameric haem-based protein, is one of the key enzymes of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria. It is highly active (>2 kU mg−1) in reducing the toxic compound chlorite to the innocuous chloride anion and molecular oxygen. Chlorite itself is produced as the intermediate product of (per)chlorate reduction. The chlorite dismutase gene in Azospira oryzae strain GR-1 employing degenerate primers has been identified and the active enzyme was subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Chlorite dismutase was purified, proven to be active and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 2000 MME, KSCN and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals belonged to space group P21212 and were most likely to contain six subunits in the asymmetric unit. The refined unit-cell parameters were a = 164.46, b = 169.34, c = 60.79 Å. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and a three-wavelength MAD data set has been collected. Determination of the chlorite dismutase structure will provide insights into the active site of the enzyme, for which no structures are currently available. PMID:18678943

  4. Oxidation of nickel surfaces through the energetic impacts of oxygen molecules: Reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Negar; Behnejad, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics approach accompanied by reactive force field is used to study the characteristics of the oxide growth process on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces at the temperatures of 300, 600, and 900 K and 5 eV as the energy of the O2 impacts. The exposure of Ni surfaces to the high-energy O2 impacts indicates that the primary oxide nuclei can be formed on any impact site. The results of kinetic studies clarify that the oxide growth kinetics cannot be accurately explained with the island growth model and increasing the surface temperature raises failure of the model. Under the present conditions, the growth kinetics is found to obey a Langmuir growth model. Increasing the surface temperature from 300 to 900 K results in ˜18.75% and ˜23% more oxygen consumption by (100) and (111) surfaces of Ni, respectively. The structure of nickel oxide (NiO) film formed after 200 successive O2 impacts per surface super-cell is investigated utilizing radial distribution functions and oxygen density profiles. These calculations demonstrate that the structure of the formed NiO film is amorphous. Moreover, the charge profiles in Ni/NiO system are illustrated and discussed.

  5. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    PubMed

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to < 3 nm. The effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on this oxidized carbon phosphide layer was subsequently probed in situ using XPS. Initially AO exposure resulted in a loss of carbon atoms from the surface, but increased the surface concentration of phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers. PMID:16853637

  6. Investigation of the radiation stimulated oxidation of sulfite by molecular oxygen in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Muratbekov, M.B.; Koroleva, G.Y.

    1986-09-01

    The principles of the radiation-stimulated oxidation of sulfite by molecular oxygen in the range of pH 11.0-14.6 were investigated. It was established that with increasing sulfite concentration, the kinetic order of the reaction with respect to sulfite falls from 1 to 0, and with respect to oxygen it increases from 0 to 1. This is explained by the fact that at low sulfite concentrations the rate-determining step of the process is the reaction SO/sub 5//sup -/ (HSO/sub 5/) + SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ ..-->.. SO/sub 4//sup -/ (HSO/sub 4/) + SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, while at high concentrations it is the reaction SO/sub 3/ + O/sub 2/ ..-->.. SO/sub 5//sup -/. The influence of the pH is explained on the assumption of the existence of two forms of the peroxomonosulfate radical, the more reactive of which is the acid. A number of ratios of reaction rate constants were determined.

  7. A new perspective on the molecular oxygen and hydroxyl airglow emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.

    The mesospheric molecular oxygen and hydroxyl airglow emissions have traditionally been measured in order to derive minor species abundances or to diagnose dynamical phenomena. We present a new interpretation of these airglow emissions and show them to be fundamental measures of energy deposition from which rates of atmospheric heating are readily derived. The heating rate due to absorption of ultraviolet radiation in the Hartley band of ozone may be derived from simultaneous measurements of the oxygen atmospheric band and infrared atmospheric band volume emission rates independent of knowledge of the ozone density, the solar irradiance, and the ozone absorption cross sections. The heating rates due to key exothermic reactions may be derived directly from appropriate airglow observations independent of the reactant concentrations and the temperature-dependent reaction rates. The accuracy of heating rates derived directly from airglow measurements is also inherently higher than that obtained in standard approaches. We suggest that heating rates derived in this manner be treated as data products and that they be compared with numerical model computations to enhance understanding of atmospheric thermodynamics. An initial comparison of airglow-derived energy deposition rates with deposition rates traditionally computed from numerical models shows agreement to within 20% for the Hartley band of ozone in the lower and upper mesosphere.

  8. Liquid- and Ice-Phase Kinetics of Singlet Molecular Oxygen with Organic Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2012-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*), a reactive state of dissolved oxygen, is formed from a sensitizer chromophore that absorbs light and transfers energy to ground-state O2. The chemistry of 1O2* has been studied predominantly in surface waters and aqueous atmospheric drops, where 1O2* can be an important sink for electron-rich pollutants. In our recent work we have shown that 1O2* concentrations can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude on ice compared to in identical, but unfrozen, aqueous solutions. The goal of this work is to assess the potential importance of 1O2* to the decay of organic pollutants on ice in order to better understand pollutant cycling in the cryosphere. Using 549 nm radiation we illuminated liquid and bulk ice samples containing a 1O2* sensitizer (Rose Bengal), salt (NaCl), and an organic pollutant at a controlled temperature. Organic species were chosen to represent several chemical classes, including furans (furfuryl alcohol), phenols (bisphenol A), and amino acids (tryptophan). During illumination the decay of the pollutant was measured to determine the rate constant for loss by reaction with 1O2*. In all cases we observe enhanced loss of pollutants on ice relative to liquid samples. We will discuss how the magnitude of the ice-phase enhancement depends on the different pollutant classes, their aqueous solubility, and freezing point depression.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of bacterial virulence gene expression by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jeffrey; Rolfe, Matthew D; Smith, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) and nitric oxide (NO) are diatomic gases that play major roles in infection. The host innate immune system generates reactive oxygen species and NO as bacteriocidal agents and both require O2 for their production. Furthermore, the ability to adapt to changes in O2 availability is crucial for many bacterial pathogens, as many niches within a host are hypoxic. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved transcriptional regulatory systems that perceive these gases and respond by reprogramming gene expression. Direct sensors possess iron-containing co-factors (iron–sulfur clusters, mononuclear iron, heme) or reactive cysteine thiols that react with O2 and/or NO. Indirect sensors perceive the physiological effects of O2 starvation. Thus, O2 and NO act as environmental cues that trigger the coordinated expression of virulence genes and metabolic adaptations necessary for survival within a host. Here, the mechanisms of signal perception by key O2- and NO-responsive bacterial transcription factors and the effects on virulence gene expression are reviewed, followed by consideration of these aspects of gene regulation in two major pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:25603427

  10. Oxidation of nickel surfaces through the energetic impacts of oxygen molecules: Reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Negar; Behnejad, Hassan

    2016-04-14

    Molecular dynamics approach accompanied by reactive force field is used to study the characteristics of the oxide growth process on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces at the temperatures of 300, 600, and 900 K and 5 eV as the energy of the O2 impacts. The exposure of Ni surfaces to the high-energy O2 impacts indicates that the primary oxide nuclei can be formed on any impact site. The results of kinetic studies clarify that the oxide growth kinetics cannot be accurately explained with the island growth model and increasing the surface temperature raises failure of the model. Under the present conditions, the growth kinetics is found to obey a Langmuir growth model. Increasing the surface temperature from 300 to 900 K results in ∼18.75% and ∼23% more oxygen consumption by (100) and (111) surfaces of Ni, respectively. The structure of nickel oxide (NiO) film formed after 200 successive O2 impacts per surface super-cell is investigated utilizing radial distribution functions and oxygen density profiles. These calculations demonstrate that the structure of the formed NiO film is amorphous. Moreover, the charge profiles in Ni/NiO system are illustrated and discussed. PMID:27083743

  11. A perovskite oxide optimized for oxygen evolution catalysis from molecular orbital principles.

    PubMed

    Suntivich, Jin; May, Kevin J; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Goodenough, John B; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-12-01

    The efficiency of many energy storage technologies, such as rechargeable metal-air batteries and hydrogen production from water splitting, is limited by the slow kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We found that Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ) (BSCF) catalyzes the OER with intrinsic activity that is at least an order of magnitude higher than that of the state-of-the-art iridium oxide catalyst in alkaline media. The high activity of BSCF was predicted from a design principle established by systematic examination of more than 10 transition metal oxides, which showed that the intrinsic OER activity exhibits a volcano-shaped dependence on the occupancy of the 3d electron with an e(g) symmetry of surface transition metal cations in an oxide. The peak OER activity was predicted to be at an e(g) occupancy close to unity, with high covalency of transition metal-oxygen bonds. PMID:22033519

  12. Laboratory test and evaluation report of the essex model 60C-0037-2 molecular sieve oxygen generating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Brendan E.; Bruckart, James E.; Quattlebaum, Martin; Johnston, Leslie W.

    1993-06-01

    The Essex Model 60C-0037-2 Molecular Sieve Oxygen Generating System was tested for environmental and electromagnetic interference/compatibility under the U.S. Army Program for Testing and Evaluation of Equipment for Aeromedical Operations. The tests were conducted using current military and industrial standards and procedures for environmental tests and electromagnetic interference/compatibility and human factors. The Essex Model 60C-0037-2 performed properly in the test environments. The oxygen concentration produced by the unit depends on the compressed air pressure, oxygen flow, and vent pressure. A separate oxygen concentration analyzer would be required to determine the oxygen concentration for patient use. The unit produces a significant amount of noise while operating.

  13. Study of iron structure stability in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic with oxygen injection using molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Sudarko; Shafii, Mohammad Ali; Celino, Massimo

    2014-09-30

    Corrosion of structural materials in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic is a major problem for design of PbBi cooled reactor. One technique to inhibit corrosion process is to inject oxygen into coolant. In this paper we study and focus on a way of inhibiting the corrosion of iron using molecular dynamics method. For the simulation results we concluded that effective corrosion inhibition of iron may be achieved by injection 0.0532 wt% to 0.1156 wt% oxygen into liquid lead-bismuth. At this oxygen concentration the structure of iron material will be maintained at about 70% in bcc crystal structure during interaction with liquid metal.

  14. The fate of the hydroxyl radical in the earth's primitive atmosphere and implications for the production of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Wood, T. B.; Thiemens, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    Behavior of the hydroxyl radical produced by the photolysis of water vapor in the earth's early atmosphere is examined. Because of the substantial OH radical reactivity with trace species (CO, HCl, SO2, H2S, NH3, and CH4) the formation of molecular oxygen may be prevented, even at a trace species mixing ratio. The photolysis rate of H2O, with corrections for hydrogen exospheric escape, is capable of describing the oxidation of the atmosphere and crust but may not be used to determine the rate of molecular oxygen generation without consideration of the various OH-trace species reactions.

  15. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  16. Reactive oxygen species–associated molecular signature predicts survival in patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tong; Wang, Ting; Slepian, Marvin J.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Hecker, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sepsis-related multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. There is overwhelming evidence that oxidative stress plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated multiple organ failure; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS)–associated biomarkers and/or diagnostics that define mortality or predict survival in sepsis are lacking. Lung or peripheral blood gene expression analysis has gained increasing recognition as a potential prognostic and/or diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to identify ROS-associated biomarkers predictive of survival in patients with sepsis. In-silico analyses of expression profiles allowed the identification of a 21-gene ROS-associated molecular signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. Importantly, this signature performed well in a validation cohort consisting of sepsis patients aggregated from distinct patient populations recruited from different sites. Our signature outperforms randomly generated signatures of the same signature gene size. Our findings further validate the critical role of ROSs in the pathogenesis of sepsis and provide a novel gene signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. These results also highlight the utility of peripheral blood molecular signatures as biomarkers for predicting mortality risk in patients with sepsis, which could facilitate the development of personalized therapies. PMID:27252846

  17. Activation of oxygen-mediating pathway using copper ions: fine-tuning of growth kinetics in gold nanorod overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqi; Zhang, Hui; Wen, Tao; Yan, Jiao; Hou, Shuai; Shi, Xiaowei; Hu, Zhijian; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2014-10-21

    Growth kinetics plays an important role in the shape control of nanocrystals (NCs). Herein, we presented a unique way to fine-tune the growth kinetics via oxidative etching activated by copper ions. For the overgrowth of gold nanorods (Au NRs), competitive adsorption of dissolved oxygen on rod surface was found to slow down the overgrowth rate. Copper ions were able to remove the adsorbed oxygen species from the Au surface via oxidative etching, thus exposing more reaction sites for Au deposition. In this way, copper ions facilitated the overgrowth process. Furthermore, Cu(2+) rather than Cu(+) acted as the catalyst for the oxidative etching. Comparative study with Ag(+) indicated that Cu(2+) cannot regulate NC shapes via an underpotential deposition mechanism. In contrast, Ag(+) led to the formation of Au tetrahexahedra (THH) and a slight decrease of the growth rate at similar growth conditions. Combining the distinct roles of the two ions enabled elongated THH to be produced. Copper ions activating the O2 pathway suggested that dissolved oxygen has a strong affinity for the Au surface. Moreover, the results of NC-sensitized singlet oxygen ((1)O2) indicated that the absorbed oxygen species on the surface of Au NCs bounded with low-index facets mainly existed in the form of molecular O2. PMID:25244407

  18. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal highly permeable oxygen exit channels shared with water uptake channels in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Vassiliev, Serguei; Zaraiskaya, Tatiana; Bruce, Doug

    2013-10-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the oxidation of water in the conversion of light energy into chemical energy in photosynthesis. Water delivery and oxygen removal from the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), buried deep within PSII, are critical requirements to facilitate the reaction and minimize reactive oxygen damage. It has often been assumed that water and oxygen travel through separate channels within PSII, as demonstrated in cytochrome c oxidase. This study describes all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of PSII designed to investigate channels by fully characterizing the distribution and permeation of both water and oxygen. Interestingly, most channels found in PSII were permeable to both oxygen and water, however individual channels exhibited different energetic barriers for the two solutes. Several routes for oxygen diffusion within PSII with low energy permeation barriers were found, ensuring its fast removal from the OEC. In contrast, all routes for water showed significant energy barriers, corresponding to a much slower permeation rate for water through PSII. Two major factors were responsible for this selectivity: (1) hydrogen bonds between water and channel amino acids, and (2) steric restraints. Our results reveal the presence of a shared network of channels in PSII optimized to both facilitate the quick removal of oxygen and effectively restrict the water supply to the OEC to help stabilize and protect it from small water soluble inhibitors. PMID:23816955

  20. Relationship between molecular structure, concentration and odor qualities of oxygenated aliphatic molecules.

    PubMed

    Laing, D G; Legha, P K; Jinks, A L; Hutchinson, I

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the concentration of an odorant increases the number of receptor cells and glomeruli in the olfactory bulb that are stimulated, and it is commonly acknowledged that these represent increased numbers of receptor types. Currently, it is not known whether a receptor type is associated with a unique quality and a unique molecular feature of an odorant, or its activation is used by the brain in a combinatorial manner with other activated receptor types to produce a characteristic quality. The present study investigated the proposal that a molecular feature common to several aliphatic odorants and known to be the key feature required to stimulate the same mitral cells in the olfactory bulb results in a quality that is common to the odorants. Since the common structural feature may activate a specific receptor type possibly at a similar concentration, the qualities of the odorants were determined at seven concentrations where the lowest and highest concentrations were the detection threshold (DT) and 729DT of each subject. A list of 146 descriptors was used by 15 subjects to describe the qualities of each odorant at each concentration. The results indicate that each of the five odorants was characterized by different qualities and the qualities of four of the odorants changed with changes in concentration. Importantly, no quality common to each of the odorants that had the same molecular feature could be identified and it is proposed that identification of the odorants occurs via a combinatorial mechanism involving several types of receptors. PMID:12502524

  1. Surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chamberlin, Sara E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-09-13

    The surface structure of a-Cr2O3(0001) before and after exposure to activated oxygen from an ECR plasma source was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). Epitaxial Cr2O3(0001) thin films were deposited on Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). When cooled or annealed in vacuum, strong evidence for a Cr-Cr-O3- termination was obtained by comparing the Cr3+ XPD azimuthal scan to single scattering simulations. However, after plasma exposure, a high binding energy feature was observed in the Cr 2p XPS spectrum that possesses an ordered structure distinct from the underlying Cr3+ of Cr2O3, which remains Cr-Cr-O3-like. Investigation of this new surface structure with simulations of various candidate structures tentatively rules out CrO2-like configurations. The high binding energy feature likely arises from a higher oxidation state of Cr. One possibility is the oxidation of the surface layer of Cr to Cr6- with a double chromyl structure (O=Cr=O).

  2. Surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chamberlin, Sara E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-12-01

    The surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) before and after exposure to activated oxygen from an ECR plasma source was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). Epitaxial Cr2O3(0001) thin films were deposited on Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). When cooled or annealed in vacuum, strong evidence for a Crsbnd Crsbnd O3sbnd termination was obtained by comparing the Cr3 + XPD azimuthal scan to single scattering simulations. However, after plasma exposure, a high binding energy feature was observed in the Cr 2p XPS spectrum that possesses an ordered structure distinct from the underlying Cr3 + of Cr2O3, which remains Cr-Cr-O3-like. Investigation of this new surface structure with simulations of various candidate structures tentatively rules out CrO2-like configurations. The high binding energy feature likely arises from a higher oxidation state of Cr. One possibility is the oxidation of the surface layer of Cr to Cr6 - δ with a double chromyl structure (Odbnd Crdbnd O).

  3. A mechanism of oxygen sensing in yeast. Multiple oxygen-responsive steps in the heme biosynthetic pathway affect Hap1 activity.

    PubMed

    Hon, Thomas; Dodd, Athena; Dirmeier, Reinhard; Gorman, Nadia; Sinclair, Peter R; Zhang, Li; Poyton, Robert O

    2003-12-12

    Heme plays central roles in oxygen sensing and utilization in many living organisms. In yeast, heme mediates the effect of oxygen on the expression of many genes involved in using or detoxifying oxygen. However, a direct link between intracellular heme level and oxygen concentration has not been vigorously established. In this report, we have examined the relationships among oxygen levels, heme levels, Hap1 activity, and HAP1 expression. We found that Hap1 activity is controlled in vivo by heme and not by its precursors and that heme activates Hap1 even in anoxic cells. We also found that Hap1 activity exhibits the same oxygen dose-response curves as Hap1-dependent aerobic genes and that these dose-response curves have a sharp break at approximately 1 microM O2. The results show that the intracellular signaling heme level, reflected as Hap1 activity, is closely correlated with oxygen concentration. Furthermore, we found that bypass of all heme synthetic steps but ferrochelatase by deuteroporphyrin IX does not circumvent the need for oxygen in Hap1 full activation by heme, suggesting that the last step of heme synthesis, catalyzed by ferrochelatase, is also subjected to oxygen control. Our results show that multiple heme synthetic steps can sense oxygen concentration and provide significant insights into the mechanism of oxygen sensing in yeast. PMID:14512429

  4. Dissociation of molecular iodine in RF discharge for oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirásek, V.; Schmiedberger, J.; Čenský, M.; Kodymová, J.

    2012-04-01

    The dissociation of molecular iodine in 40 MHz-RF discharge was studied experimentally. This generation of atomic iodine is aimed at use in oxygen-iodine lasers. The discharge was ignited in a mixture of I2 + buffer gas fast-flowing through the cylindrical chamber and the discharge products were injected into a supersonic flow of nitrogen. The atomic iodine number density was measured in a low-pressure cavity after mixing with nitrogen and the dissociation fraction was calculated related to the input I2 flow rate. The dissociation fraction of 46.2% was achieved at 0.22 mmol/s of I2 and 7 mmol/s of Ar and RF power of 500 W. Argon and helium were used as a buffer gas; discharge stability and dissociation efficiency were better with argon. At the I2 flow rate corresponding to the operation of a 1 kW chemical oxygen-iodine laser, the dissociation fraction was about 20%. The dissociation efficiency (the fraction of absorbed energy used for the dissociation) significantly decreased with increasing in the specific energy. At a reasonable I2 flow rate (0.32 mmol/s), the maximum achieved efficiency was 8.5% and the corresponding energy cost was 8.9 eV per dissociating of one I2 molecule. The input energy of more than 3 kJ per 1 mmol of I2 is needed for dissociating at least 50% of I2. The obtained dependencies on the gas flow rates infer a good chance for scaling-up of the tested RF discharge generator for the intended application.

  5. DNA Damage: Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study on the Oxygen Binding and Substrate Hydroxylation Step in AlkB Repair Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-01

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N1-methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)–oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ-and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained. PMID:24339041

  6. Involvement of molecular oxygen in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted photosystem II membranes.

    PubMed

    Khorobrykh, A A; Klimov, V V

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown by Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry (Moscow) 67:683-688, 2002); Yanykin et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1797:516-523, 2010); Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry 50:10658-10665, 2011) that Mn-depleted photosystem II (PSII) membrane fragments are characterized by an enhanced oxygen photoconsumption on the donor side of PSII which is accompanied with hydroperoxide formation and it was suggested that the events are related to the oxidative photoinhibition of PSII. Experimental confirmation of this suggestion is presented in this work. The degree of photoinhibition was determined by the loss of the capability of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+) or sodium ascorbate) to the reactivation of electron transport [measured by the light-induced changes of chlorophyll fluorescence yield (∆F)] in Mn-depleted PSII membranes. The transition from anaerobic conditions to aerobic ones significantly activated photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes both in the absence and in the presence of exogenous electron acceptor, ferricyanide. The photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes was suppressed upon the addition of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+), diphenylcarbazide, and ferrocyanide). The addition of superoxide dismutase did not affect the photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes. It is concluded that the interaction of molecular oxygen (rather than superoxide anion radical formed on the acceptor side of PSII) with the oxidized components of the donor side of PSII reflects the involvement of O2 in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes. PMID:25862644

  7. Abundant molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, A.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Bar-Nun, A.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Bochsler, P.; Briois, C.; Calmonte, U.; Combi, M.; de Keyser, J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gasc, S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Hässig, M.; Jäckel, A.; Kopp, E.; Korth, A.; Le Roy, L.; Mall, U.; Maggiolo, R.; Marty, B.; Mousis, O.; Owen, T.; Rème, H.; Rubin, M.; Sémon, T.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Waite, J. H.; Walsh, C.; Wurz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The composition of the neutral gas comas of most comets is dominated by H2O, CO and CO2, typically comprising as much as 95 per cent of the total gas density. In addition, cometary comas have been found to contain a rich array of other molecules, including sulfuric compounds and complex hydrocarbons. Molecular oxygen (O2), however, despite its detection on other icy bodies such as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, has remained undetected in cometary comas. Here we report in situ measurement of O2 in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, with local abundances ranging from one per cent to ten per cent relative to H2O and with a mean value of 3.80 +/- 0.85 per cent. Our observations indicate that the O2/H2O ratio is isotropic in the coma and does not change systematically with heliocentric distance. This suggests that primordial O2 was incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation, which is unexpected given the low upper limits from remote sensing observations. Current Solar System formation models do not predict conditions that would allow this to occur.

  8. Oxidative Cyclizations in a Nonpolar Solvent Using Molecular Oxygen and Studies on the Stereochemistry of Oxypalladation

    PubMed Central

    Trend, Raissa M.; Ramtohul, Yeeman K.; Stoltz., Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative cyclizations of a variety of heteroatom nucleophiles onto unactivated olefins are catalyzed by palladium(II) and pyridine in the presence of molecular oxygen as the sole stoichiometric oxidant in a nonpolar solvent (toluene). Reactivity studies of a number of N-ligated palladium complexes show that chelating ligands slow the reaction. Nearly identical conditions are applicable to five different types of nucleophiles: phenols, primary alcohols, carboxylic acids, a vinylogous acid, and amides. Electron-rich phenols are excellent substrates, and multiple olefin substitution patterns are tolerated. Primary alcohols undergo oxidative cyclization without significant oxidation to the aldehyde, a fact that illustrates the range of reactivity available from various Pd(II) salts under differing conditions. Alcohols can form both fused and spirocyclic ring systems, depending on the position of the olefin relative to the tethered alcohol; the same is true of the acid derivatives. The racemic conditions served as a platform for the development of an enantioselective reaction. Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated primary alcohol substrates rule out a “Wacker-type” mechanism involving anti oxypalladation and suggest that the reaction proceeds by syn oxypalladation for both mono- and bidentate ligands. In contrast, cyclizations of deuterium-labeled carboxylic acid substrates undergo anti oxypalladation. PMID:16351107

  9. Molecular oxygen measurements at 200 km from AE-D near winter solstice, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, D. C.; Potter, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing the fly-through mode, the open source neutral mass spectrometer on Atmosphere Explorer-D (AE-D) has measured O2 densities, as well as N2 densities and in situ neutral temperatures, at midmorning during winter solstice over the latitude range 90 degrees S to 90 degrees N. The expected seasonal variation in N2 was found at 200 km together with a more complex behavior in molecular oxygen than might be expected from a diffusive equilibrium model with constant lower boundary values. Under geomagnetically quiet conditions the equatorial 200 km value of O2 was about 1.7 x 10 to the 8th/cu cm. A local maximum in the 200 km O2 densities was found near 70 degrees N, where an average quiet time value was 2.5 x 10 to the 8th/cu cm, implying a 120 km density of 8.3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm. The in situ temperature measurements confirm the presence of higher temperatures near 70 degrees N latitude, even during geomagnetically quiet conditions.

  10. Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous Solid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kavetski, Alexandre G.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2006-02-16

    The low-energy, electron-stimulated production of molecular oxygen from pure amorphous solid water (ASW) films and ASW films co-dosed with H2O2 is investigated. Layered films of H216O and H218O are used to determine the spatial profile of the reactions in the films leading to O2. The O2 yield is dose-dependent, indicating that precursors are involved in the O2 production. For temperatures below {approx}80 K, the O2 yield at steady state is relatively low and nearly independent of temperature. At higher temperatures, the yield increases rapidly. The O2 yield is enhanced from H2O2-dosed water films, but the experiments show that H2O2 is not the final precursor in the reactions leading to O2. Instead, a stable precursor for O2 is produced through a multi-step reaction sequence probably involving the reactions of OH radicals to produce H2O2 and then HO2. The O2 is produced in a non-thermal reaction from the HO2. For relatively thick films, the reactions leading to O2 occur at or near the ASW/vacuum interface. However, the electronic excitations which initiate the reactions occur over a larger range in the film. A kinetic model which qualitatively accounts for all of the observations is presented.

  11. Abundant molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bieler, A; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Berthelier, J-J; Bochsler, P; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; van Dishoeck, E F; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Hässig, M; Jäckel, A; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Maggiolo, R; Marty, B; Mousis, O; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Walsh, C; Wurz, P

    2015-10-29

    The composition of the neutral gas comas of most comets is dominated by H2O, CO and CO2, typically comprising as much as 95 per cent of the total gas density. In addition, cometary comas have been found to contain a rich array of other molecules, including sulfuric compounds and complex hydrocarbons. Molecular oxygen (O2), however, despite its detection on other icy bodies such as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, has remained undetected in cometary comas. Here we report in situ measurement of O2 in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, with local abundances ranging from one per cent to ten per cent relative to H2O and with a mean value of 3.80 ± 0.85 per cent. Our observations indicate that the O2/H2O ratio is isotropic in the coma and does not change systematically with heliocentric distance. This suggests that primordial O2 was incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation, which is unexpected given the low upper limits from remote sensing observations. Current Solar System formation models do not predict conditions that would allow this to occur. PMID:26511578

  12. Molecular oxygen migration through the xenon docking sites of human hemoglobin in the R-state.

    PubMed

    Lepeshkevich, Sergei V; Gilevich, Syargey N; Parkhats, Marina V; Dzhagarov, Boris M

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond laser flash-photolysis technique was used to study bimolecular and geminate molecular oxygen (O2) rebinding to tetrameric human hemoglobin and its isolated α and β chains in buffer solutions equilibrated with 1atm of air and up to 25atm of xenon. Xenon binding to the isolated α chains and to the α subunits within tetrameric hemoglobin was found to cause a decrease in the efficiency of O2 escape by a factor of ~1.30 and 3.3, respectively. A kinetic model for O2 dissociation, rebinding, and migration through two alternative pathways in the hemoglobin subunits was introduced and discussed. It was shown that, in the isolated α chains and α subunits within tetrameric hemoglobin, nearly one- and two-third escaping molecules of O2 leave the protein via xenon docking sites, respectively. The present experimental data support the idea that O2 molecule escapes from the β subunits mainly through the His(E7) gate, and show unambiguously that, in the α subunits, in addition to the direct E7 channel, there is at least one alternative escape route leading to the exterior via the xenon docking sites. PMID:27288155

  13. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg(2+) ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn(2+)); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg(2+) causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn(2+) release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn(2+) or Hg(2+). Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg(2+)-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg(2+) that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system. PMID:20951154

  14. [Relationship between the oxidation-reduction system of astrocytes with production of active forms of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Semenkova, G N; Kvacheva, Z B; Obydennikova, S V; Cherenkevich, S N; Titov, L P

    1998-01-01

    Cells of neuroglia--the astrocytes are of interest from the point of view of their participation in phagocytosis. Phagocyte ability to generate active oxygen forms (AOF) as used as the basic criterion of the estimation of their functional activity. For the purpose to clear up molecular and cellular mechanisms of phagocytosis a study of astrocyte redox-systems, participating in production of AOF, was undertaken. Registration of AOF in astrocytes was carried out using a method of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Primary culture of guinea pig astrocytes was used. Spontaneous chemiluminescence of low intensity was found for the astrocytes at the presence of luminol. The destruction of the cells was accompanied by a significant growth of the intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence. Suspension of endocutosis inductors, particle of latex and phytohemagglutinin, added to astrocytes did not result in formation of AOF, characteristic for other cells, possessing phagocytosis. It was established, that addition of hydrogen peroxide destroys astrocytes at the presence of luminol and gives rise to the emission. Chemiluminescence was not observed in similar experiments with intact cells. A conclusion was made that inside astrocytes there are structures, which show peroxidase-like activity. PMID:9848214

  15. Method of Separating Oxygen From Spacecraft Cabin Air to Enable Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Extravehicular activities (EVAs) require high-pressure, high-purity oxygen. Shuttle EVAs use oxygen that is stored and transported as a cryogenic fluid. EVAs on the International Space Station (ISS) presently use the Shuttle cryo O2, which is transported to the ISS using a transfer hose. The fluid is compressed to elevated pressures and stored as a high-pressure gas. With the retirement of the shuttle, NASA has been searching for ways to deliver oxygen to fill the highpressure oxygen tanks on the ISS. A method was developed using low-pressure oxygen generated onboard the ISS and released into ISS cabin air, filtering the oxygen from ISS cabin air using a pressure swing absorber to generate a low-pressure (high-purity) oxygen stream, compressing the oxygen with a mechanical compressor, and transferring the high-pressure, high-purity oxygen to ISS storage tanks. The pressure swing absorber (PSA) can be either a two-stage device, or a single-stage device, depending on the type of sorbent used. The key is to produce a stream with oxygen purity greater than 99.5 percent. The separator can be a PSA device, or a VPSA device (that uses both vacuum and pressure for the gas separation). The compressor is a multi-stage mechanical compressor. If the gas flow rates are on the order of 5 to 10 lb (.2.3 to 4.6 kg) per day, the compressor can be relatively small [3 16 16 in. (.8 41 41 cm)]. Any spacecraft system, or other remote location that has a supply of lowpressure oxygen, a method of separating oxygen from cabin air, and a method of compressing the enriched oxygen stream, has the possibility of having a regenerable supply of highpressure, high-purity oxygen that is compact, simple, and safe. If cabin air is modified so there is very little argon, the separator can be smaller, simpler, and use less power.

  16. Biosynthesis of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus using oxygen vector and optimum impeller tip speed.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zee-Wei; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2012-09-01

    The potential use of n-dodecane and n-hexadecane as oxygen vectors for enhancing hyaluronic acid (HA) biosynthesis by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920 was investigated using a 2-L stirred-tank bioreactor equipped with helical ribbon or Rushton turbine impellers. The volumetric fraction of the oxygen vector influenced the gas-liquid volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) positively. Batch HA fermentation with 1% (v/v) n-dodecane or 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane addition was carried out at different impeller tip speeds. Even though cell growth was lower in the fermentation with oxygen vector addition, the HA productivity and molecular weight were higher when compared to the fermentation without oxygen vector at low impeller tip speed. The highest HA concentration (4.25 gHA/l) and molecular weight (1.54 × 10(7) Da) were obtained when 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane and 0.785 m/s impeller tip speed of helical ribbon were used. PMID:22608992

  17. The Effect of 30% Oxygen on Visuospatial Performance and Brain Activation: An Fmri Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, S.C.; Tack, G.R.; Lee, B.; Eom, G.M.; Lee, S.Y.; Sohn, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that administration of the air with 30% oxygen compared with normal air (21% oxygen) enhances cognitive functioning through increased activation in the brain. A visuospatial task was presented while brain images were scanned by a 3 T fMRI system. The results showed that there was an improvement in…

  18. Atmospheric oxygen plasma activation of silicon (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, Sara B.; Gonzalez, Eleazar II; Hicks, Robert F.

    2010-05-15

    Silicon (100) surfaces were converted to a hydrophilic state with a water contact angle of <5 deg. by treatment with a radio frequency, atmospheric pressure helium, and oxygen plasma. A 2 in. wide plasma beam, operating at 250 W, 1.0 l/min O{sub 2}, 30 l/min He, and a source-to-sample distance of 3{+-}0.1 mm, was scanned over the sample at 100{+-}2 mm/s. Plasma oxidation of HF-etched silicon caused the dispersive component of the surface energy to decrease from 55.1 to 25.8 dyn/cm, whereas the polar component of the surface energy increased from 0.3 to 42.1 dyn/cm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the treatment generated a monolayer of covalently bonded oxygen on the Si(100) surface 0.15{+-}0.10 nm thick. The surface oxidation kinetics have been measured by monitoring the change in water contact angle with treatment time, and are consistent with a process that is limited by the mass transfer of ground-state oxygen atoms to the silicon surface.

  19. Upper limit on the rate constant for isotope exchange between molecular oxygen and ozone at 298 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Morton, J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1987-01-01

    The gas phase bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between molecular oxygen and ozone has been investigated directly for the first time. Its rate coefficient is found to be less than 2 x 10 to the -25th cu cm/sec at 298 K, over six orders of magnitude below recent estimates. Much faster exchange was observed over condensed ozone at 77 K, suggesting isotopic scrambling is catalyzed under these conditions. The low rate coefficient implies that homogeneous exchange between ground state oxygen and ozone molecules cannot play a significant role in heavy ozone chemistry.

  20. Catalytic Chan–Lam coupling using a ‘tube-in-tube’ reactor to deliver molecular oxygen as an oxidant

    PubMed Central

    Mallia, Carl J; Burton, Paul M; Smith, Alexander M R; Walter, Gary C

    2016-01-01

    Summary A flow system to perform Chan–Lam coupling reactions of various amines and arylboronic acids has been realised employing molecular oxygen as an oxidant for the re-oxidation of the copper catalyst enabling a catalytic process. A tube-in-tube gas reactor has been used to simplify the delivery of the oxygen accelerating the optimisation phase and allowing easy access to elevated pressures. A small exemplification library of heteroaromatic products has been prepared and the process has been shown to be robust over extended reaction times. PMID:27559412

  1. Catalytic Chan-Lam coupling using a 'tube-in-tube' reactor to deliver molecular oxygen as an oxidant.

    PubMed

    Mallia, Carl J; Burton, Paul M; Smith, Alexander M R; Walter, Gary C; Baxendale, Ian R

    2016-01-01

    A flow system to perform Chan-Lam coupling reactions of various amines and arylboronic acids has been realised employing molecular oxygen as an oxidant for the re-oxidation of the copper catalyst enabling a catalytic process. A tube-in-tube gas reactor has been used to simplify the delivery of the oxygen accelerating the optimisation phase and allowing easy access to elevated pressures. A small exemplification library of heteroaromatic products has been prepared and the process has been shown to be robust over extended reaction times. PMID:27559412

  2. Communication: A novel method for generating molecular mixtures at extreme conditions: The case of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael Sneed, Daniel; White, Melanie; Wang, Yonggang

    2014-09-07

    We have successfully created a segregated mixture of hydrogen and oxygen at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell using hard x-ray photochemistry. A keyhole (two holes connected by an opening) sample chamber was created in a metallic gasket to support two segregated powders of ammonia borane and potassium perchlorate, respectively, in each hole at a pressure of ∼5.0 GPa. Both holes were separately irradiated with synchrotron hard x-rays to release molecular oxygen and molecular hydrogen, respectively. Upon irradiation of the first KClO{sub 4}-containing hole, solid reddish-orange O{sub 2} appeared in the region of irradiation and molecular oxygen was found to diffuse throughout the entire sample region. The second ammonia borane-containing hole was then irradiated and H{sub 2} was observed to form via Raman spectroscopy. Water also was observed in the ammonia borane-containing hole and possibly (in the form of ice VII) in the second hole. This unique experiment demonstrates the ability to easily create solid mixtures of simple molecular systems via x-ray irradiation and then react them via further irradiation which will aid the study of chemistry under extreme conditions.

  3. Design of high pressure oxygen filter for extravehicular activity life support system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The experience of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with extravehicular activity life support emergency oxygen supply subsystems has shown a large number of problems associated with particulate contamination. These problems have resulted in failures of high pressure oxygen component sealing surfaces. A high pressure oxygen filter was designed which would (a) control the particulate contamination level in the oxygen system to a five-micron glass bead rating, ten-micron absolute condition (b) withstand the dynamic shock condition resulting from the sudden opening of 8000 psi oxygen system shutoff valve. Results of the following program tasks are reported: (1) contaminant source identification tests, (2) dynamic system tests, (3) high pressure oxygen filter concept evaluation, (4) design, (5) fabrication, (6) test, and (7) application demonstration.

  4. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  5. Reactive oxygen scavenging activity of matured whiskey and its active polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Taguchi, A; Koshimizu, S; Suwa, Y; Yamada, Y; Shirasaka, N; Yoshizumi, H

    2007-04-01

    The quality of whiskey is known to improve remarkably by its storage over many years. This process is commonly termed "maturing." In this process, polyphenols derived from lignin and tannin of the barrel have an important role in not only forming the matured flavor and taste but also contributing to the advance of clustering ethanol and water in whiskey. It is also likely that polyphenols generally possess reactive oxygen (RO) scavenging activity. The present study evaluated the RO scavenging activity (free-radical scavenging activity, H(2)O(2) reduction activity under peroxidase coculture, and H(2)O(2)scavenging activity) of 24 single malt whiskeys with a maturation age of 10 to 30 y produced in Japanese, Scotch (Islay), or Scotch (Speyside and Highland) regions. Single malt whiskey not only showed RO scavenging activity but there was also a positive correlation between this activity and the maturation age of whiskey exceeding the difference resulting from the manufacturing region. A nonvolatile fraction derived from the barrel was responsible for RO scavenging activity. In particular, the contents of ellagic and gallic acids and lyoniresinol, the main polyphenolic compounds in whiskey, increased with maturation age. For the free-radical scavenging activity per molecule, each compound was 1.68 to 3.14 times that of trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E). The activities of ellagic acid, gallic acid, and lyoniresinol in the whiskey (Yamazaki 18) were equivalent to that of 80.3, 31.2, and 11.1 ppm trolox, respectively. Accordingly, the total activity of these 3 compounds accounted for about 20% of the activity of the whiskey (630.7 ppm trolox). PMID:17995817

  6. Origin of Active Oxygen in a Ternary CuOx /Co3O4–CeO 2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Zili; Peng, Xihong; Binder, Andrew; Chai, Songhai; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we have studied CO oxidation over a ternary CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 catalyst and employed the techniques of N2 adsorption/desporption, XRD, TPR, TEM, in situ DRIFTS and QMS (Quadrupole mass spectrometer) to explore the origin of active oxygen. DRIFTS-QMS results with labeled 18O2 indicate that the origin of active oxygens in CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 obeys a model, called as queue mechanism. Namely gas-phase molecular oxygens are dissociated to atomic oxygens and then incorporate in oxygen vacancies located at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2 to form active crystalline oxygens, and these active oxygens diffuse to the CO-Cu+ sites thanks to the oxygen vacancy concentration magnitude and react with the activated CO to form CO2. This process, obeying a queue rule, provides active oxygens to form CO2 from gas-phase O2 via oxygen vacancies and crystalline oxygen at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2.

  7. Powerful Molecular Outflows in Nearby Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain; Meléndez, Marcio

    2014-07-01

    We report the results from a systematic search for molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows with Herschel-PACS† in a sample of 43 nearby (z < 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. We find that the character of the OH feature (strength of the absorption relative to the emission) correlates with that of the 9.7-μm silicate feature, a measure of obscuration in ULIRGs. Unambiguous evidence for molecular outflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than -50 km s-1, is seen in 26 (70%) of the 37 OH-detected targets, suggesting a wide-angle (~ 145°) outflow geometry. Conversely, unambiguous evidence for molecular inflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than +50 km s-1, is seen in only 4 objects, suggesting a planar or filamentary geometry for the inflowing gas. Terminal outflow velocities of ~ -1000 km s-1 are measured in several objects, but median outflow velocities are typically ~ -200 km s-1. While the outflow velocities show no statistically significant dependence on the star formation rate, they are distinctly more blueshifted among systems with large AGN fractions and luminosities [log (L AGN/L ⊙) >= 11.8 +/- 0.3]. The quasars in these systems play a dominant role in driving the molecular outflows. In contrast, the most AGN dominated systems, where OH is seen purely in emission, show relatively modest OH line widths, despite their large AGN luminosities, perhaps indicating that molecular outflows subside once the quasar has cleared a path through the obscuring material.

  8. Titanium dioxide induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated Fas upregulation and Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ki-Chun; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Kwon, Dongwook; Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Woo, Soo Jung; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lim, Eun-Jung; Suh, Yongjoon; Kim, Min-Jung; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Lee, Su-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Background Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been widely used in many areas, including biomedicine, cosmetics, and environmental engineering. Recently, it has become evident that some TiO2 particles have a considerable cytotoxic effect in normal human cells. However, the molecular basis for the cytotoxicity of TiO2 has yet to be defined. Methods and results In this study, we demonstrated that combined treatment with TiO2 nanoparticles sized less than 100 nm and ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-dependent upregulation of Fas and conformational activation of Bax in normal human cells. Treatment with P25 TiO2 nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic size distribution centered around 70 nm (TiO2P25–70) together with ultraviolet A irradiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, accompanied by transcriptional upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and conformational activation of Bax. In line with these results, knockdown of either Fas or Bax with specific siRNA significantly inhibited TiO2-induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, inhibition of reactive oxygen species with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, clearly suppressed upregulation of Fas, conformational activation of Bax, and subsequent apoptotic cell death in response to combination treatment using TiO2P25–70 and ultraviolet A irradiation. Conclusion These results indicate that sub-100 nm sized TiO2 treatment under ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and activation of the preapoptotic protein, Bax. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which nanosized particles induce activation of cell death signaling pathways would be critical for the development of prevention strategies to minimize the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. PMID:22419868

  9. Antioxidant Protects against Increases in Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronan and Inflammation in Asphyxiated Newborn Pigs Resuscitated with 100% Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Yucel; Ramgopal, Mrithyunjay; Mija, Dan S.; Cheong, Naeun; Longoria, Christopher; Mahendroo, Mala; Nakstad, Britt; Saugstad, Ola D.; Savani, Rashmin C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Newborn resuscitation with 100% oxygen is associated with oxidative-nitrative stresses and inflammation. The mechanisms are unclear. Hyaluronan (HA) is fragmented to low molecular weight (LMW) by oxidative-nitrative stresses and can promote inflammation. We examined the effects of 100% oxygen resuscitation and treatment with the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), on lung 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), LMW HA, inflammation, TNFα and IL1ß in a newborn pig model of resuscitation. Methods & Principal Findings Newborn pigs (n = 40) were subjected to severe asphyxia, followed by 30 min ventilation with either 21% or 100% oxygen, and were observed for the subsequent 150 minutes in 21% oxygen. One 100% oxygen group was treated with NAC. Serum, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung sections, and lung tissue were obtained. Asphyxia resulted in profound hypoxia, hypercarbia and metabolic acidosis. In controls, HA staining was in airway subepithelial matrix and no 3-NT staining was seen. At the end of asphyxia, lavage HA decreased, whereas serum HA increased. At 150 minutes after resuscitation, exposure to 100% oxygen was associated with significantly higher BAL HA, increased 3NT staining, and increased fragmentation of lung HA. Lung neutrophil and macrophage contents, and serum TNFα and IL1ß were higher in animals with LMW than those with HMW HA in the lung. Treatment of 100% oxygen animals with NAC blocked nitrative stress, preserved HMW HA, and decreased inflammation. In vitro, peroxynitrite was able to fragment HA, and macrophages stimulated with LMW HA increased TNFα and IL1ß expression. Conclusions & Significance Compared to 21%, resuscitation with 100% oxygen resulted in increased peroxynitrite, fragmentation of HA, inflammation, as well as TNFα and IL1ß expression. Antioxidant treatment prevented the expression of peroxynitrite, the degradation of HA, and also blocked increases in inflammation and inflammatory cytokines. These findings provide insight

  10. Effects of carbohydrate on the internal oxygen concentration, oxygen uptake, and nitrogenase activity in detached pea nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    The interaction between carbon substrates and O{sub 2} and their effects on nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were examined in detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle). The internal O{sub 2} concentration was estimated from the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin measured by reflectance spectroscopy. Lowering the endogenous carbohydrate content of nodules by excising the shoots 16 hours before nodule harvest or by incubating detached nodules at 100 kPa O{sub 2} for 2 hours resulted in a 2- to 10-fold increase in internal O{sub 2}, and a decline in nitrogenase activity. Conversely, when detached nodules were supplied with 100 millimolar succinate, the internal O{sub 2} was lowered. Nitrogenase activity was stimulated by succinate but only at high external O{sub 2}. Oxygen uptake increased linearly with external O{sub 2} but was affected only slightly by the carbon treatments. The apparent diffusion resistance in the nodule cortex was similar in all of the treatments. Carbon substrates can thus affect nitrogenase activity indirectly by affecting the O{sub 2} concentration within detached nodules.

  11. Caveolin-1 is involved in reactive oxygen species-induced SHP-2 activation in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ji Hee; Park, Soo Jung; Jo, Ara; Jou, Ilo; Park, Jung Soo

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a neuroprotective role of Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) against ischemic brain injury. However, the molecular mechanisms of SHP-2 activation and those governing how SHP-2 exerts its function under oxidative stress conditions are not well understood. Recently we have reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative stress promotes the phosphorylation of endogenous SHP-2 through lipid rafts, and that this phosphorylation strongly occurs in astrocytes, but not in microglia. To investigate the molecules involved in events leading to phosphorylation of SHP-2, raft proteins were analyzed using astrocytes and microglia. Interestingly, caveolin-1 and -2 were detected only in astrocytes but not in microglia, whereas flotillin-1 was expressed in both cell types. To examine whether the H2O2-dependent phosphorylation of SHP-2 is mediated by caveolin-1, we used specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) to downregulate caveolin-1 expression. In the presence of caveolin-1 siRNA, the level of SHP-2 phosphorylation induced by H2O2 was significantly decreased, compared with in the presence of control siRNA. Overexpression of caveolin-1 effectively increased H2O2-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation in microglia. Lastly, H2O2 induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in astrocytes through caveolin-1. Our results suggest that caveolin-1 is involved in astrocyte-specific intracellular responses linked to the SHP-2-mediated signaling cascade following ROS-induced oxidative stress. PMID:21918362

  12. A Distonic Radical-Ion for Detection of Traces of Adventitious Molecular Oxygen (O2) in Collision Gases Used in Tandem Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariwala, Freneil B.; Hibbs, John A.; Weisbecker, Carl S.; Ressler, John; Khade, Rahul L.; Zhang, Yong; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2014-09-01

    We describe a diagnostic ion that enables rapid semiquantitative evaluation of the degree of oxygen contamination in the collision gases used in tandem mass spectrometers. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the m/z 359 positive ion generated from the analgesic etoricoxib undergoes a facile loss of a methyl sulfone radical [•SO2(CH3); 79-Da] to produce a distonic radical cation of m/z 280. The product-ion spectrum of this m/z 280 ion, recorded under low-energy activation on tandem-in-space QqQ or QqTof mass spectrometers using nitrogen from a generator as the collision gas, or tandem-in-time ion-trap (LCQ, LTQ) mass spectrometers using purified helium as the buffer gas, showed two unexpected peaks at m/z 312 and 295. This enigmatic m/z 312 ion, which bears a mass-to-charge ratio higher than that of the precursor ion, represented an addition of molecular oxygen (O2) to the precursor ion. The exceptional affinity of the m/z 280 radical cation towards oxygen was deployed to develop a method to determine the oxygen content in collision gases.

  13. Molecular Probes of the Mechanism of Cytochrome P450. Oxygen Traps a Substrate Radical Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Harriet L. R.; Groves, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The diagnostic substrate tetramethylcyclopropane (TMCP) has been reexamined as a substrate with three drug- and xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes, human CYP2E1, CYP3A4 and rat CYP2B1. The major hydroxylation product in all cases was the unrearranged primary alcohol along with smaller amounts of a rearranged tertiary alcohol. Significantly, another ring-opened product, diacetone alcohol, was also observed. With CYP2E1 this product accounted for 20% of the total turnover. Diacetone alcohol also was detected as a product from TMCP with a biomimetic model catalyst, FeTMPyP, but not with a ruthenium porphyrin catalyst. Lifetimes of the intermediate radicals were determined from the ratios of rearranged and unrearranged products to be 120, 13 and 1 ps for CYP2E1, CYP3A4 and CYP2B1, respectively, corresponding to rebound rates of 0.9×1010 s−1, 7.2×1010 s−1 and 1.0×1012 s−1. For the model iron porphyrin, FeTMPyP, a radical lifetime of 81 ps and a rebound rate of 1.2×1010 s−1 were determined. These apparent radical lifetimes are consistent with earlier reports with a variety of CYP enzymes and radical clock substrates, however, the large amounts of diacetone alcohol with CYP2E1 and the iron porphyrin suggest that for these systems a considerable amount of the intermediate carbon radical is trapped by molecular oxygen. These results add to the view that cage escape of the intermediate carbon radical in [FeIV-OH •R] can compete with cage collapse to form a CO bond. The results could be significant with regard to our understanding of iron-catalyzed C-H hydroxylation, the observation of P450-dependent peroxidation and the development of oxidative stress, especially for CYP2E1. PMID:21075070

  14. The effect of the structure and conformational dynamics on quenching of triplet states of porphyrins and their chemical dimers by molecular oxygen and on singlet oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashin, N. V.; Shchupak, E. E.; Sagun, E. I.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations are performed to analyze the factors affecting rate constant k T of quenching of the lowest triplet state by molecular oxygen and quantum yield γΔ of singlet oxygen generation in chemical dimers of porphyrins bound by phenyl spacers at one of the meso positions (OEP)2-Ph, (TPP)2, and their Zn complexes. It is established that, for both types of dimers, the triplet excitation is localized on one of the macrocycles. The steric hindrance of macrocycles at the site of the phenyl ring of (OEP)2-Ph, (ZnOEP)2-Ph, and their monomeric analogues OEP-Ph and ZnOEP-Ph facilitates its rotation by 90° in the triplet state. The lowest triplet state energy in this ( U) conformation is lower than 7800 cm-1, which makes impossible electronic excitation energy transfer to molecular oxygen. The potential barrier of transformation to the U conformation is considerably lower for dimers than for monomers. Because of this, the rate of conformational transformations for dimers is higher and some of the (OEP)2-Ph and (ZnOEP)2-Ph molecules have time to transform into the new U conformation before diffusion collision with O2 molecules in solution. This leads to a noticeable decrease in γΔ in accordance with experimental data. It is shown that the behavior of k T in the series of the studied dimers, their monomeric analogues, and relative compounds corresponds to the model of dipole-dipole electronic excitation energy transfer 1(3M⋯3Σ{g/-}) → 1(1M0⋯1Δg) in collisional complexes.

  15. L-ascorbic acid quenching of singlet delta molecular oxygen in aqueous media: generalized antioxidant property of vitamin C

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.T.; Khan, A.U.

    1983-09-30

    L-ascorbic acid quenches singlet (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/) molecular oxygen in aqueous media (pH 6.8 for (/sup 1/H)H/sub 2/O and pD 7.2 for (/sup 2/H)D/sub 2/O) as measured directly by monitoring (0,0) /sup 1/..delta../sub g/ ..-->.. /sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/ emission at 1.28 micron. Singlet oxygen was generated at room temperature in the solutions via photosensitization of sodium chrysene sulfonate; this sulfonated polycyclic hydrocarbon was synthesized to provide a water soluble chromophore inert to usual dye-ascorbate photobleaching. A marked isotope effect is found; k/sub Q//sup H/sub 2/O/ is 3.3 times faster than k/sub Q//sup D/sub 2/O/, suggesting ascorbic acid is chemically quenching singlet oxygen.

  16. Study of oxygen scavenging PET-based films activated by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2016-05-01

    In this work an active barrier system consisting of a thin and transparent film based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied. Dynamic oxygen absorption measurements were performed at different values of relative humidity and temperature, pointing out that humidity is a key factor in activating the oxidation of the polymer sample. Moreover, the thermal and optical properties of the films were investigated and a good correlation was found between the crystallinity increase and the consequent transparency reduction occurring after the oxygen absorption.

  17. Synergistic H4NI-AcOH Catalyzed Oxidation of the Csp(3)-H Bonds of Benzylpyridines with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lanhui; Wang, Lianyue; Lv, Ying; Li, Guosong; Gao, Shuang

    2015-05-01

    The oxidation of benzylpyridines forming benzoylpyridines was achieved based on a synergistic H4NI-AcOH catalyst and molecular oxygen in high yield under solvent-free conditions. This is the first nonmetallic catalytic system for this oxidation transformation using molecular oxygen as the oxidant. The catalytic system has a wide scope of substrates and excellent chemoselectivity, and this procedure can also be scaled up. The study of a preliminary reaction mechanism demonstrated that the oxidation of the Csp(3)-H bonds of benzylpyridines was promoted by the pyridinium salts formed by AcOH and benzylpyridines. The synergistic effect of H4NI-AcOH was also demonstrated by control experiments. PMID:25885281

  18. Oxygen requirements for formation and activity of the squalene expoxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on squalene epoxidase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. In cells grown in standing cultures, the epoxidase was localized mainly in the 'mitochondrial' fraction. Upon aeration, enzyme activity increased and the newly formed enzyme was associated with the 'microsomal' fraction. At 0.03 percent (vol/vol) oxygen, epoxidase levels doubled, whereas the ergosterol level was only slightly increased. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in epoxidase under these conditions. An apparent K sub m for oxygen of 0.38 percent (vol/vol) was determined from a crude particulate preparation for the epoxidase.

  19. The role of beaded activated carbon's surface oxygen groups on irreversible adsorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of surface oxygen groups to irreversible adsorption (aka heel formation) during cyclic adsorption/regeneration of organic vapors commonly found in industrial systems, including vehicle-painting operations. For this purpose, three chemically modified activated carbon samples, including two oxygen-deficient (hydrogen-treated and heat-treated) and one oxygen-rich sample (nitric acid-treated) were prepared. The samples were tested for 5 adsorption/regeneration cycles using a mixture of nine organic compounds. For the different samples, mass balance cumulative heel was 14 and 20% higher for oxygen functionalized and hydrogen-treated samples, respectively, relative to heat-treated sample. Thermal analysis results showed heel formation due to physisorption for the oxygen-deficient samples, and weakened physisorption combined with chemisorption for the oxygen-rich sample. Chemisorption was attributed to consumption of surface oxygen groups by adsorbed species, resulting in formation of high boiling point oxidation byproducts or bonding between the adsorbates and the surface groups. Pore size distributions indicated that different pore sizes contributed to heel formation - narrow micropores (<7Å) in the oxygen-deficient samples and midsize micropores (7-12Å) in the oxygen-rich sample. The results from this study help explain the heel formation mechanism and how it relates to chemically tailored adsorbent materials. PMID:27295065

  20. Molecular emission in chemically active protostellar outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.

    2011-12-01

    Protostellar outflows play an important role in the dynamical and chemical evolution of cloud through shocks. The Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) brings new insight both on the molecular content and the physical conditions in protostellar shocks through high spectral and angular resolution studies of the emission of major gas cooling agents and hydrides. The Herschel/CHESS key-program is carrying out an in depth study of the prototypical shock region L1157-B1. Analysis of the line profiles detected allows to constrain the formation/destruction route of various molecular species, in relation with the predictions of MHD shock models. The Herschel/WISH key-program investigates the properties and origin of water emission in a broad sample of protostellar outflows and envelopes. Implications of the first results for future studies on mass-loss phenomena are discussed.

  1. An ab initio study of the adsorption and dissociation of molecular oxygen on the (0 0 0 1) surface of double hexagonal close-packed americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dholabhai, Pratik P.; Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Ray, Asok K.

    2008-12-01

    In our continuing attempts to understand theoretically various surface properties such as corrosion and potential catalytic activity of actinide surfaces in the presence of environmental gases, we report here the first ab initio study of molecular adsorption on the double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp) americium (Am) (0 0 0 1) surface. Specifically, molecular oxygen adsorption on the (0 0 0 1) surface of dhcp Am has been studied in detail within the framework of density functional theory using a full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (FP-LAPW+lo) method. Dissociative adsorption is found to be energetically more favorable compared to molecular adsorption. Chemisorption energies were optimized with respect to the distance of adsorbates from the surface for three approach positions at three adsorption sites, namely t1 (one-fold top), b2 (two-fold bridge), and h3 (three-fold hollow) sites. Chemisorption energies were computed at the scalar-relativistic-no-spin-orbit-coupling (SR-NSOC) and at the fully relativistic-with-spin-orbit-coupling (FR-SOC) levels of theory. The most stable configuration corresponds to a horizontal approach molecular dissociation with the oxygen atoms occupying neighboring h3 sites, with chemisorption energies at the NSOC and SOC theoretical levels being 9.395 and 9.886 eV, respectively. The corresponding distances of the oxygen molecule from the surface and oxygen-oxygen distance were found to be 0.953 and 3.731 Å, respectively. Overall our calculations indicate that chemisorption energies in cases with SOC are slightly more stable than those with NSOC in the 0.089-0.493 eV range. The work functions and net magnetic moments, respectively, increased and decreased in all cases compared to corresponding quantities of the bare dhcp-Am (0 0 0 1) surface. Adsorbate-substrate interactions have been analyzed in detail using partial charges inside muffin-tin spheres, difference charge density distributions, and

  2. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs.

  3. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-14

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs. PMID:27083744

  4. Oxygen activation with transition metal complexes in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bakac, Andreja

    2010-04-12

    Coordination to transition-metal complexes changes both the thermodynamics and kinetics of oxygen reduction. Some of the intermediates (superoxo, hydroperoxo, and oxo species) are close analogues of organic oxygen-centered radicals and peroxides (ROO{sm_bullet}, ROOH, and RO{sm_bullet}). Metal-based intermediates are typically less reactive, but more persistent, than organic radicals, which makes the two types of intermediates similarly effective in their reactions with various substrates. The self-exchange rate constant for hydrogen-atom transfer for the couples Cr{sub aq}OO{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OOH{sup 2+} and L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhOO{sup 2+}/L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhOOH{sup 2+} was estimated to be 10{sup 1 {+-} 1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The use of this value in the simplified Marcus equation for the Cr{sub aq}O{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OOH{sup 2+} cross reaction provided an upper limit k{sub CrO,CrOH} {le} 10{sup (-2{+-}1)} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for Cr{sub aq}O{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OH{sup 2+} self-exchange. Even though superoxo complexes react very slowly in bimolecular self-reactions, extremely fast cross reactions with organic counterparts, i.e., acylperoxyl radicals, have been observed. Many of the intermediates generated by the interaction of O{sub 2} with reduced metal complexes can also be accessed by alternative routes, both thermal and photochemical.

  5. Molecular aspects of vitamin D anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Picotto, Gabriela; Liaudat, Ana C; Bohl, Luciana; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2012-10-01

    Environment may influence the development and prevention of cancer. Calcitriol has been associated with calcium homeostasis regulation. Many epidemiological, biochemical, and genetic studies have shown non-classic effects of vitamin D, such as its involvement in the progression of different cancers. Although vitamin D induces cellular arrest, triggers apoptotic pathways, inhibits angiogenesis, and alters cellular adhesion, the precise mechanisms of its action are still not completely established. This article will present a revision about the molecular aspects proposed to be involved in the anticancer action of calcitriol. Adequate levels of vitamin D to prevent cancer development will also be discussed. PMID:22963190

  6. Correction for intravascular activity in the oxygen-15 steady-state technique is independent of the regional hematocrit

    SciTech Connect

    Lammertsma, A.A.; Baron, J.C.; Jones, T.

    1987-06-01

    The oxygen-15 steady-state technique to measure the regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen requires a correction for the nonextracted intravascular molecular oxygen-15. To perform this correction, an additional procedure is carried out using RBCs labeled with /sup 11/CO or C/sup 15/O. The previously reported correction method, however, required knowledge of the regional cerebral to large vessel hematocrit ratio. A closer examination of the underlying model eliminated this ratio. Both molecular oxygen and carbon monoxide are carried by RBCs and are therefore similarly affected by a change in hematocrit.

  7. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsoy, Olga V; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis. PMID:27617010

  8. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsoy, Olga V.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis. PMID:27617010

  9. The effect of mayfly (Hexagenia spp.) burrowing activity on sediment oxygen demand in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, William J.; Soster, Frederick M.; Matisoff, Gerald; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies support the hypothesis that large numbers of infaunal burrow-irrigating organisms in the western basin of Lake Erie may increase significantly the sediment oxygen demand, thus enhancing the rate of hypolimnetic oxygen depletion. We conducted laboratory experiments to quantify burrow oxygen dynamics and increased oxygen demand resulting from burrow irrigation using two different year classes of Hexagenia spp. nymphs from western Lake Erie during summer, 2006. Using oxygen microelectrodes and hot film anemometry, we simultaneously determined oxygen concentrations and burrow water flow velocities. Burrow oxygen depletion rates ranged from 21.7 mg/nymph/mo for 15 mm nymphs at 23 °C to 240.7 mg/nymph/mo for 23 mm nymphs at 13 °C. Sealed microcosm experiments demonstrated that mayflies increase the rate of oxygen depletion by 2-5 times that of controls, depending on size of nymph and water temperature, with colder waters having greater impact. At natural population densities, nymph pumping activity increased total sediment oxygen demand 0.3-2.5 times compared to sediments with no mayflies and accounted for 22-71% of the total sediment oxygen demand. Extrapolating laboratory results to the natural system suggest that Hexagenia spp. populations may exert a significant control on oxygen depletion during intermittent stratification. This finding may help explain some of the fluctuations in Hexagenia spp. population densities in western Lake Erie and suggests that mayflies, by causing their own population collapse irrespective of other environmental conditions, may need longer term averages when used as a bio-indicator of the success of pollution-abatement programs in western Lake Erie and possibly throughout the Great Lakes.

  10. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Terence M.; Nyati, Shyam; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  11. The oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 (OEE) of photosystem II in green algae exhibits thioredoxin activity.

    PubMed

    Heide, Heinrich; Kalisz, Henryk M; Follmann, Hartmut

    2004-02-01

    A thioredoxin-like chloroplast protein of the fructosebisphosphatase-stimulating f-type, but with an unusually high molecular mass of 28 kDa has previously been identified and purified to homogeneity in a fractionation scheme for resolution of the acid- and heat-stable, regular-size (12kDa) thioredoxins of the unicellular green algae, Scenedesmus obliquus. An apparently analogous protein of 26 kDa was described in a cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp., but no such large thioredoxin species f exists in the thioredoxin profiles of higher plants. The structure of the 28 kDa protein, which had been envisaged to represent a precursor, or fusion product of the two more specialized, common chloroplast thioredoxins f and m has now been determined by amino acid sequencing. Although it exhibits virtually all the properties and enzyme-modulating activities of a thioredoxin proper this algal protein, surprisingly, does not belong to the thioredoxin family of small redox proteins but is identical with OEE (oxygen evolving enhancer) protein 1, an auxiliary component of the photosystem II manganese cluster. Extracts of Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii also contain heat-stable protein fractions of 23-26 kDa capable of specifically stimulating chloroplast fructosebisphosphatase in vitro. In contrast, OEE protein 1 from spinach is not able to modulate FbPase or NADP malate dehydrogenase from spinach chloroplasts. A dual function of the OEE protein in algal photosynthesis is envisaged. PMID:15022827

  12. Stable isotope analysis of molecular oxygen from silicates and oxides using CO2 laser extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    A laser-excited system for determination of the oxygen isotope composition of small quantities of silicate and oxide minerals was constructed and tested at JSC. This device is the first reported to use a commercially available helium cryostat to transfer and purify oxygen gas quantitatively within the system. The system uses oxygen gas instead of the conventional CO2 for mass spectrometer analyses. This modification of technique permits determination of all three stable oxygen isotopes, an essential requirement for oxygen isotope analysis of meteoritic material. Tests of the system included analysis of standard silicate materials NBS 28 and UWMG2 garnet, six SNC meteorites, and inclusions and chondrules from the Allende meteorite. Calibration with terrestrial standards was excellent. Meteorite values are close to published values and show no evidence of terrestrial oxygen contamination. The one limitation observed is that, in some runs on fine-grained SNC matrix material, sample results were affected by other samples in the sample holder within the reaction chamber. This reemphasizes the need for special precautions in dealing with fine-grained, reactive samples. Performance of the JSC instrument compares favorably with that of any other instrument currently producing published oxygen isotope data.

  13. Inactivation of Pathogenic Bacteria on Seeds by Active Oxygen Species Generated in Low-Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Reoto; Uchida, Shohei; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kosaka, Rina; Soeda, Yasutaka

    2015-09-01

    The inactivation of bacteria on seeds by active oxygen species generated by a low-pressure oxygen plasma is investigated. Species of active oxygen contributing to the inactivation of bacteria are attempted to be identified. Cylindrical stainless chamber with the internal volume of 17 L is used and RF antenna is set inside the chamber. The oxygen gas pressure is 20-100 Pa. RF power of 13.56 MHz is supplied to RF antenna and CCP is generated. After irradiation, bacteria are extracted from seeds and cultivated on nutrient agars. The number of colonies on these agars is counted after 48 h incubation. The number of bacteria on seeds decreases to less than 10-3 after plasma irradiation for 45 min comparing with that of control. The tendency of the reduction rate of bacteria on seeds has positive correlation with that of the light emission intensity of the singlet excited oxygen molecule as the oxygen gas pressure is varied. It is supposed that the singlet excited oxygen molecule would be one of the major factors for the inactivation of bacteria on seeds.

  14. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  15. Spectral dependence of the efficiency of direct optical excitation of molecular oxygen in tetrachloromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. M.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Bagrov, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The spectral dependence of the efficiency of direct optical excitation of an oxygen molecule in tetrachloromethane using cw LED sources with different wavelengths and an optical parametric oscillator with single-shot output radiation (tuning range of 415-670 nm) has been studied by recording the phosphorescence of singlet oxygen at the O2(1Δg)-O2(3Σg) transition (λ = 1270 nm). The results show that single-shot irradiation of tetrachloromethane in the short-wavelength spectral range leads to efficient quenching of singlet- oxygen phosphorescence by the products of photolytic decomposition of solvent.

  16. Ferrous iron oxidation by molecular oxygen under acidic conditions: The effect of citrate, EDTA and fulvic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Adele M.; Griffin, Philippa J.; Waite, T. David

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the rates of Fe(II) oxidation by molecular oxygen in the presence of citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were determined over the pH range 4.0-5.5 and, for all of the ligands investigated, found to be substantially faster than oxidation rates in the absence of any ligand. EDTA was found to be particularly effective in enhancing the rate of Fe(II) oxidation when sufficient EDTA was available to complex all Fe(II) present in solution, with a kinetic model of the process found to adequately describe all results obtained. When Fe(II) was only partially complexed by EDTA, reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heterogeneous Fe(II) oxidation were found to contribute significantly to the removal rate of iron from solution at different stages of oxidation. This was possible due to the rapid rate at which EDTA enhanced Fe(II) oxidation and formed ROS and Fe(III). The rapid rate of Fe(III) generation facilitated the formation of free ferric ion activities in excess of those required for ferric oxyhydroxide precipitation following Fe(III)-EDTA dissociation. In comparison, the rate of Fe(II) oxidation was slower in the presence of citrate, and therefore the concentrations of free Fe(III) able to form in the initial stages of Fe(II) oxidation were much lower than those formed in the presence of EDTA, despite the resultant Fe(III)-citrate complex being less stable than that of Fe(III)-EDTA. The slower rate of citrate enhanced oxidation also resulted in slower rates of ROS generation, and, as such, oxidation of the remaining inorganic Fe(II) species by ROS was negligible. Overall, this study demonstrates that organic ligands may substantially enhance the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Even under circumstances where the ligand is not present at sufficient concentrations to complex all of the Fe(II) in solution, ensuing oxidative processes may sustain an enhanced rate of Fe(II) oxidation relative to that of

  17. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  18. SIMPLIFIED INJECTION OF OXYGEN GAS INTO AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District conducted a pilot investigation of the Simplox process at their Tapia Water Reclamation Facility in Calabasas, California. The Simplox process, developed by the Cosmodyne Division of Cordon International, involves covering an activated sl...

  19. DESIGN PROCEDURES FOR DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTROL OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents design procedures and guidelines for the selection of aeration equipment and dissolved (DO) control systems for activated sludge treatment plants. Aeration methods, equipment and application techniques are examined and selection procedures offered. Various DO...

  20. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg{sup 2+} ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn{sup 2+}); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg{sup 2+} causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn{sup 2+} release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg{sup 2+}-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  1. Activity-induced tissue oxygenation changes in rat cerebellar cortex: interplay of postsynaptic activation and blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Offenhauser, Nikolas; Thomsen, Kirsten; Caesar, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging relies on the robust coupling between neuronal activity, metabolism and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but the physiological basis of the neuroimaging signals is still poorly understood. We examined the mechanisms of activity-dependent changes in tissue oxygenation in relation to variations in CBF responses and postsynaptic activity in rat cerebellar cortex. To increase synaptic activity we stimulated the monosynaptic, glutamatergic climbing fibres that excite Purkinje cells via AMPA receptors. We used local field potentials to indicate synaptic activity, and recorded tissue oxygen partial pressure (Ptiss,O2) by polarographic microelectrodes, and CBF using laser-Doppler flowmetry. The disappearance rate of oxygen in the tissue increased linearly with synaptic activity. This indicated that, without a threshold, oxygen consumption increased as a linear function of synaptic activity. The reduction in Ptiss,O2 preceded the rise in CBF. The time integral (area) of the negative Ptiss,O2 response increased non-linearly showing saturation at high levels of synaptic activity, concomitant with a steep rise in CBF. This was accompanied by a positive change in Ptiss,O2. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced the initial negative Ptiss,O2 response (‘dip’), while attenuating the evoked CBF increase and positive Ptiss,O2 response equally. This indicates that increases in CBF counteract activity-induced reductions in Ptiss,O2, and suggests the presence of a tissue oxygen reserve. The changes in Ptiss,O2 and CBF were strongly attenuated by AMPA receptor blockade. Our findings suggest an inverse relationship between negative Ptiss,O2 and CBF responses, and provide direct in vivo evidence for a tight coupling between activity in postsynaptic AMPA receptors and cerebellar oxygen consumption. PMID:15774524

  2. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric RAF dimer activation.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Bohuszewicz, Olga; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2014-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in cell regulatory mechanisms. Dimerization plays also a crucial role in the kinase activity of many kinases, including RAF, CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), with heterodimers often being the most active forms. However, the structural and mechanistic details of how phosphorylation affects the activity of homo- and hetero-dimers are largely unknown. Experimentally, synthesizing protein samples with fully specified and homogeneous phosphorylation states remains a challenge for structural biology and biochemical studies. Typically, multiple changes in phosphorylation lead to activation of the same protein, which makes structural determination methods particularly difficult. It is also not well understood how the occurrence of phosphorylation and dimerization processes synergize to affect kinase activities. In the present article, we review available structural data and discuss how MD simulations can be used to model conformational transitions of RAF kinase dimers, in both their phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms. PMID:25109958

  3. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  4. Oxygen control of breathing by an olfactory receptor activated by lactate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andy J.; Ortega, Fabian E.; Riegler, Johannes; Madison, Daniel V.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animals have evolved homeostatic responses to changes in oxygen availability that act on different time scales. Although the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional pathway that controls long term responses to low oxygen (hypoxia) has been established1, the pathway that mediates acute responses to hypoxia in mammals is not well understood. Here we show that the olfactory receptor Olfr78 is highly and selectively expressed in oxygen-sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body, a chemosensory organ at the carotid artery bifurcation that monitors blood oxygen and stimulates breathing within seconds when oxygen declines2. Olfr78 mutants fail to increase ventilation in hypoxia but respond normally to hypercapnia. Glomus cells are present in normal numbers and appear structurally intact, but hypoxia-induced carotid body activity is diminished. Lactate, a metabolite that rapidly accumulates in hypoxia and induces hyperventilation3–6, activates Olfr78 in heterologous expression experiments, induces calcium transients in glomus cells, and stimulates carotid sinus nerve activity through Olfr78. We propose that in addition to its role in olfaction, Olfr78 acts as a hypoxia sensor in the breathing circuit by sensing lactate produced when oxygen levels decline. PMID:26560302

  5. Lewis Acid Pairs for the Activation of Biomass-derived Oxygenates in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Yuriy

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project is to understand the mechanistic aspects behind the cooperative activation of oxygenates by catalytic pairs in aqueous media. Specifically, we will investigate how the reactivity of a solid Lewis acid can be modulated by pairing the active site with other catalytic sites at the molecular level, with the ultimate goal of enhancing activation of targeted functional groups. Although unusual catalytic properties have been attributed to the cooperative effects promoted by such catalytic pairs, virtually no studies exist detailing the use heterogeneous water-tolerant Lewis pairs. A main goal of this work is to devise rational pathways for the synthesis of porous heterogeneous catalysts featuring isolated Lewis pairs that are active in the transformation of biomass-derived oxygenates in the presence of bulk water. Achieving this technical goal will require closely linking advanced synthesis techniques; detailed kinetic and mechanistic investigations; strict thermodynamic arguments; and comprehensive characterization studies of both materials and reaction intermediates. For the last performance period (2014-2015), two technical aims were pursued: 1) C-C coupling using Lewis acid and base pairs in Lewis acidic zeolites. Tin-, zirconium-, and hafnium containing zeolites (e.g., Sn-, Zr-, and Hf-Beta) are versatile solid Lewis acids that selectively activate carbonyl functional groups. In this aim, we demonstrate that these zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. 2) One-pot synthesis of MWW zeolite nanosheets for activation of bulky substrates. Through

  6. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y. . E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

  7. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and molecular hydrogen in oxygen-rich planetary nebulae: the case of NGC 6720

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.; Pilleri, P.; Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Joblin, C.

    2016-02-01

    Evolved stars are primary sources for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dust grains. Their circumstellar chemistry is usually designated as either oxygen rich or carbon rich, although dual-dust chemistry objects, whose infrared spectra reveal both silicate- and carbon-dust features, are also known. The exact origin and nature of this dual-dust chemistry is not yet understood. Spitzer-Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging of the nearby, oxygen-rich planetary nebula NGC 6720 reveals the presence of the 11.3 μm aromatic (PAH) emission band. It is attributed to emission from neutral PAHs, since no band is observed in the 7-8 μm range. The spatial distribution of PAHs is found to closely follow that of the warm clumpy molecular hydrogen emission. Emission from both neutral PAHs and warm H2 is likely to arise from photodissociation regions associated with dense knots that are located within the main ring. The presence of PAHs together with the previously derived high abundance of free carbon (relative to CO) suggest that the local conditions in an oxygen-rich environment can also become conducive to in situ formation of large carbonaceous molecules, such as PAHs, through a bottom-up chemical pathway. In this scenario, the same stellar source can enrich the interstellar medium with both oxygen-rich dust and large carbonaceous molecules.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and molecular hydrogen in oxygen-rich planetary nebulae: the case of NGC 6720

    PubMed Central

    Cox, N. L. J.; Pilleri, P.; Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Joblin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Evolved stars are primary sources for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dust grains. Their circumstellar chemistry is usually designated as either oxygen-rich or carbon-rich, although dual-dust chemistry objects, whose infrared spectra reveal both silicate- and carbon-dust features, are also known. The exact origin and nature of this dual-dust chemistry is not yet understood. Spitzer-IRS mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging of the nearby, oxygen-rich planetary nebula NGC 6720 reveals the presence of the 11.3 μm aromatic (PAH) emission band. It is attributed to emission from neutral PAHs, since no band is observed in the 7–8 μm range. The spatial distribution of PAHs is found to closely follow that of the warm clumpy molecular hydrogen emission. Emission from both neutral PAHs and warm H2 is likely to arise from photo-dissociation regions associated with dense knots that are located within the main ring. The presence of PAHs together with the previously derived high abundance of free carbon (relative to CO) suggest that the local conditions in an oxygen-rich environment can also become conducive to in-situ formation of large carbonaceous molecules, such as PAHs, via a bottom-up chemical pathway. In this scenario, the same stellar source can enrich the interstellar medium with both oxygen-rich dust and large carbonaceous molecules. PMID:26924856

  10. Photocatalytic evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen over La-doped NaTaO3 particles: Effect of different cocatalysts (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Irina; Kandiel, Tarek; Hakki, Amer; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef W.

    2015-09-01

    To solve the global energy and environmental issues highly efficient systems for solar energy conversion and storage are needed. One of them involves the photocatalytic conversion of solar energy into the storable fuel molecular hydrogen via the water splitting process utilizing metal-oxide semiconductors as catalysts. Since photocatalytic water splitting is still a rather poorly understood reaction, fundamental research in this field is required. Herein, the photocatalytic activity for water splitting was investigated utilizing La-doped NaTaO3 as a model photocatalyst. The activity of La-doped NaTaO3 was assessed by the determination of the overall quantum yield of molecular hydrogen and molecular oxygen evolution. In pure water La-doped NaTaO3 exhibits rather poor activity for the photocatalytic H2 evolution whereby no O2 was detected. To enhance the photocatalytic activity the surface of La-doped NaTaO3 was modified with various cocatalysts including noble metals (Pt, Au and Rh) and metal oxides (NiO, CuO, CoO, AgO and RuO2). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated in pure water, in aqueous methanol solution, and in aqueous silver nitrate solution. The results reveal that cocatalysts such as RuO2 or CuO exhibiting the highest catalytic activity for H2 evolution from pure water, possess, however, the lowest activity for O2 evolution from aqueous silver nitrate solution. La-doped NaTaO3 modified with Pt shows the highest quantum yield of 33 % with respect to the H2 evolution in the presence of methanol. To clarify the role of methanol in such a photocatalytic system, long-term investigations and isotopic studies were performed. The underlying mechanisms of methanol oxidation were elucidated.

  11. [Effect of substances which change the proton-motive force on activity of methane microbe oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Malashenko, Iu P; Sokolov, I G; Rokitko, P V; Romanovskaia, V A

    2006-01-01

    High extracellular concentration of K+ stimulated methane oxygenation with Methylomonas rubra 15 [Russian character: see text], Methylococcus thermophilus 111 [Russian character: see text] and Methylococcus capsulatus 494 at neutral value of pH. That was determined by K+ arrival to the cells at neutral medium pH that resulted in the increase of pH difference between the exterior and interior sides of the membrane (ApH) and, respectively, in the increase of the methane oxygenation rate. Thus, methane monooxygenation depends on the availability of ion gradients on a membrane. Ionophores valinomycin and monensin inhibited methane oxygenation by the cells of Methylomonas rubra 15 [Russian character: see text] that evidenced for the methane oxygenation dependence on the protone-motive force which could be formed as the result both of protons displacement with oxygenation of methane monooxygenation products and of the gradient of potassium and sodium ions. Protonophore FCCP suppressed completely methane oxygenation in Methylococcus capsulatus 494 and M. thermophilus 111 [Russian character: see text] at neutral pH, and took no effect at the alkaline values of pH. This suggests that FCCP dissipates the proton-motive force and does not inhibit methane monooxygenase activity. The results obtained indicate that the process of methane oxygenation should be combined with energy generation in a form of the transmembrane electric charge (delta psi) and proton gradient (deltapH). PMID:17243361

  12. Highly vibrationally excited CO generated in a low-temperature chemical reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jans, E.; Frederickson, K.; Yurkovich, M.; Musci, B.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A chemical flow reactor is used to study the vibrational population distribution of CO produced by a reaction between carbon vapor generated in an arc discharge and molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate formation of highly vibrationally excited CO, up to vibrational level v = 14, at low temperatures, T = 400-450 K, with population inversion at v = 4-7, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of reaction enthalpy. The results show feasibility of development of a new CO chemical laser using carbon vapor and oxygen as reactants.

  13. Catalytic methods using molecular oxygen for treatment of PMMS and ECLSS waste streams, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation has proven to be an effective addition to the baseline sorption, ion exchange water reclamation technology which will be used on Space Station Freedom (SSF). Low molecular weight, polar organics such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, and thiocarbamides which are poorly removed by the baseline multifiltration (MF) technology can be oxidized to carbon dioxide at low temperature (121 C). The catalytic oxidation process by itself can reduce the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) to below 500 ppb for solutions designed to model these waste waters. Individual challenges by selected contaminants have shown only moderate selectivity towards particular organic species. The combined technology is applicable to the more complex waste water generated in the Process Materials Management System (PMMS) and Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard SSF. During the phase 3 Core Module Integrated Facility (CMIF) water recovery tests at NASA MSFC, real hygiene waste water and humidity condensate were processed to meet potable specifications by the combined technology. A kinetic study of catalytic oxidation demonstrates that the Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation for heterogeneous catalysts accurately represent the kinetic behavior. From this relationship, activation energy and rate constants for acetone were determined.

  14. NADPH Oxidase- and Mitochondria-derived Reactive Oxygen Species in Proinflammatory Microglial Activation: A Bipartisan Affair?

    PubMed Central

    Bordt, Evan A.; Polster, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain and play major roles in central nervous system development, maintenance, and disease. Brain insults cause microglia to proliferate, migrate, and transform into one or more activated states. Classical M1 activation triggers the production of proinflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species which, in excess, can exacerbate brain injury. The mechanisms underlying microglial activation are not fully understood, yet reactive oxygen species are increasingly implicated as mediators of microglial activation. In this review, we highlight studies linking reactive oxygen species, in particular hydrogen peroxide derived from NADPH oxidase-generated superoxide, to the classical activation of microglia. In addition, we critically evaluate controversial evidence suggesting a specific role for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that mediates the production of IL-1β and IL-18. Finally, the limitations of common techniques used to implicate mitochondrial ROS in microglial and inflammasome activation, such as the use of the mitochondrially-targeted ROS indicator MitoSOX and the mitochondrially-targeted antioxidant MitoTEMPO, are also discussed. PMID:25091898

  15. Novel water-resistant UV-activated oxygen indicator for intelligent food packaging.

    PubMed

    Vu, Chau Hai Thai; Won, Keehoon

    2013-09-01

    For the first time, alginate polymer has been applied to prevent dyes from leaching out of colorimetric oxygen indicator films, which enable people to notice the presence of oxygen in the package in an economic and simple manner. The dye-based oxygen indicator film suffers from dye leaching upon contact with water. In this work, UV-activated visual oxygen indicator films were fabricated using thionine, glycerol, P25 TiO2, and zein as a redox dye, a sacrificial electron donor, UV-absorbing semiconducting photocatalyst, and an encapsulation polymer, respectively. When this zein-coated film was immersed in water for 24h, the dye leakage was as high as 80.80±0.45%. However, introduction of alginate (1.25%) as the coating polymer considerably diminished the dye leaching to only 5.80±0.06%. This is because the ion-binding ability of alginate could prevent the cation dye from leaching into water. This novel water-resistant UV-activated oxygen indicator was also successfully photo-bleached and regained colour fast in the presence of oxygen. PMID:23578614

  16. Active and stable carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoon T.; Won, Jong H.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials, such as nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays, Co3O4/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids and carbon nanotube–graphene complexes have shown respectable oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media. Although certainly promising, the performance of these materials does not yet warrant implementation in the energy conversion/storage devices utilizing basic electrolytes, for example, alkaline fuel cells, metal-air batteries and certain electrolysers. Here we demonstrate a new type of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst obtained from iron acetate as an iron precursor and from cyanamide as a nitrogen and carbon nanotube precursor in a simple, scalable and single-step method. The composite has the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalysts. When used at a sufficiently high loading, this catalyst also outperforms the most active platinum-based catalysts. PMID:23715281

  17. Air-activated chemical warming devices: effects of oxygen and pressure.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, G; Rivard, R; Fabus, S

    2005-01-01

    Air-activated chemical warming devices use an exothermic chemical reaction of rapidly oxidizing iron to generate heat for therapeutic purposes. Placing these products in a hyperbaric oxygen environment greatly increases the supply of oxidant and thus increases the rate of reaction and maximum temperature. Testing for auto-ignition and maximum temperatures attained by ThermaCare Heat Wraps, Playtex Heat Therapy, and Heat Factory disposable warm packs under ambient conditions and under conditions similar to those encountered during hyperbaric oxygen treatments in monoplace and multiplace hyperbaric chambers (3 atm abs and > 95% oxygen) revealed a maximum temperature of 269 degrees F (132 degrees C) with no spontaneous ignition. The risk of thermal burn injury to adjacent skin may be increased significantly if these devices are used under conditions of hyperbaric oxygen. PMID:16509287

  18. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts. PMID:26178185

  19. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts.

  20. Apogossypolone targets mitochondria and light enhances its anticancer activity by stimulating generation of singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yu; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Peng; Yang, Dajun; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Apogossypolone (ApoG2), a novel derivative of gossypol, has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and to have antitumor activity in multiple types of cancer cells. Recent reports suggest that gossypol stimulates the generation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leukemia and colorectal carcinoma cells; however, gossypol-mediated cell death in leukemia cells was reported to be ROS-independent. This study was conducted to clarify the effect of ApoG2-induced ROS on mitochondria and cell viability, and to further evaluate its utility as a treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We tested the photocytotoxicity of ApoG2 to the poorly differentiated NPC cell line CNE-2 using the ROS-generating TL/10 illumination system. The rapid ApoG2-induced cell death was partially reversed by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), but the ApoG2-induced reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was not reversed by NAC. In the presence of TL/10 illumination, ApoG2 generated massive amounts of singlet oxygen and was more effective in inhibiting cell growth than in the absence of illumination. We also determined the influence of light on the anti-proliferative activity of ApoG2 using a CNE-2–xenograft mouse model. ApoG2 under TL/10 illumination healed tumor wounds and suppressed tumor growth more effectively than ApoG2 treatment alone. These results indicate that the ApoG2-induced CNE-2 cell death is partly ROS-dependent. ApoG2 may be used with photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat NPC. PMID:21192843

  1. Tetranuclear vanadium complex, (VO)(4)(hpic)(4): a recyclable catalyst for oxidation of benzyl alcohols with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Shintaro; Ueta, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Jun; Nomoto, Akihiro; Yano, Shigenobu; Ueshima, Michio; Ogawa, Akiya

    2009-11-28

    Vanadium(iv) complexes bearing 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (H(2)hpic) as ligands, VO(Hhpic)(2) (1) and the cyclic tetramer (VO)(4)(hpic)(4) (2), have excellent catalytic ability for the oxidation of a variety of primary and secondary benzyl alcohols with molecular oxygen in acetonitrile or protic solvents such as ethanol and water, affording the corresponding aldehydes and ketones, respectively. Construction of multi-nuclear complexes by the selection of ligands attains higher turnover numbers and recycling of the catalyst. PMID:19885511

  2. Thermal desorption of molecular oxygen from SnO2 (110) surface: Insights from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanov, Viacheslav; Golovanova, Viktoria; Rantala, Tapio T.

    2016-02-01

    First-principles density functional theory calculations in the generalized gradient approximation, with plane wave basis set and pseudopotentials, have been used to investigate the desorption pathways of molecular oxygen species adsorbed on the SnO2 (110) surface. Energetics of the thermodynamically favored precursors is studied in dependence on the surface charge provided either by surface defects or by donor type impurities from the near-surface region. The resonant desorption modes of O2 molecules are examined in the framework of ab initio atomic thermodynamics and relationship of these results to experimental observations is discussed.

  3. Antioxidative activity and growth regulation of Brassicaceae induced by oxygen radical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Ono, Reoto; Shiratani, Masaharu; Yonesu, Akira

    2015-06-01

    The growth regulation characteristics of plants are investigated when plant seeds are irradiated with atmospheric discharge plasma. Enhancement of the germination and lengths of the stem and root of plants are observed after seeding. The total length of the stem and root increases approximately 1.6 times after a cultivation period of 72 h. The growth regulation effect is found to be maintained for 80 h of cultivation after seeding. The growth regulation originates from the change in the antioxidative activity of plant cells induced by active oxygen species generated in the oxygen plasma, which leads to the production of growth factor in plants.

  4. Effects of Hydration and Oxygen Vacancy on CO2 Adsorption and Activation on β-Ga2O3(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yunxiang; Liu, Chang-jun; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

    2010-01-04

    The effects of hydration and oxygen vacancy on CO2 adsorption on the β-Ga2O3(100) surface have been studied using density functional theory slab calculations. Adsorbed CO2 is activated on the dry perfect β-Ga2O3(100) surface, resulting in a carbonate species. This adsorption is slightly endothermic, with an adsorption energy of 0.07 eV. Water is preferably adsorbed molecularly on the dry perfect β-Ga2O3(100) surface with an adsorption energy of -0.56 eV, producing a hydrated perfect β-Ga2O3(100) surface. Adsorption of CO2 on the hydrated surface as a carbonate species is also endothermic, with an adsorption energy of 0.14 eV, indicating a slight repulsive interaction when H2O and CO2 are coadsorbed. The carbonate species on the hydrated perfect surface can be protonated by the co-adsorbed H2O to a bicarbonate species, making the overall process exothermic with an adsorption energy of -0.13 eV. The effect of defects on CO2 adsorption and activation has been examined by creating an oxygen vacancy on the dry β-Ga2O3(100) surface. The formation of an oxygen vacancy is endothermic, by 0.34 eV, with respect to a free O2 molecule in the gas phase. Presence of the oxygen vacancy promoted the adsorption and activation of CO2. In the most stable CO2 adsorption configuration on the dry defective β-Ga2O3(100) surface with an oxygen vacancy, one of the oxygen atoms of the adsorbed CO2 occupies the oxygen vacancy site and the CO2 adsorption energy is -0.31 eV. Water favors dissociative adsorption at the oxygen vacancy site on the defective surface. This process is instantaneous with an adsorption energy of -0.62 eV. These results indicate that, when water and CO2 are both present in the adsorption system simultaneously, the water molecule will compete with CO2 for the oxygen vacancy sites and impact CO2 adsorption and conversion negatively. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. A portion of the computing time was

  5. REVIEW: Excited states in the active media of oxygen — iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.

    2009-11-01

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen — iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O2 and I2 molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I2 in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended.

  6. The relationship between brain cortical activity and brain oxygenation in the prefrontal cortex during hypergravity exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig; Goswami, Nandu; Robinson, Ryan; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Schneider, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Artificial gravity has been proposed as a method to counteract the physiological deconditioning of long-duration spaceflight; however, the effects of hypergravity on the central nervous system has had little study. The study aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between prefrontal cortex brain activity and prefrontal cortex oxygenation during exposure to hypergravity. Twelve healthy participants were selected to undergo hypergravity exposure aboard a short-arm human centrifuge. Participants were exposed to hypergravity in the +Gz axis, starting from 0.6 +Gz for women, and 0.8 +Gz for men, and gradually increasing by 0.1 +Gz until the participant showed signs of syncope. Brain cortical activity was measured using electroencephalography (EEG) and localized to the prefrontal cortex using standard low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Prefrontal cortex oxygenation was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A significant increase in prefrontal cortex activity (P < 0.05) was observed during hypergravity exposure compared with baseline. Prefrontal cortex oxygenation was significantly decreased during hypergravity exposure, with a decrease in oxyhemoglobin levels (P < 0.05) compared with baseline and an increase in deoxyhemoglobin levels (P < 0.05) with increasing +Gz level. No significant correlation was found between prefrontal cortex activity and oxy-/deoxyhemoglobin. It is concluded that the increase in prefrontal cortex activity observed during hypergravity was most likely not the result of increased +Gz values resulting in a decreased oxygenation produced through hypergravity exposure. No significant relationship between prefrontal cortex activity and oxygenation measured by NIRS concludes that brain activity during exposure to hypergravity may be difficult to measure using NIRS. Instead, the increase in prefrontal cortex activity might be attributable to psychological stress, which could pose a problem for the use of a

  7. Theoretical study on photooxidation mechanism of ruthenium complex [Ru(II)-(bpy)2 (TMBiimH2 )](2+) with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Hong; Wu, Dan; Xia, Shu-Hua; Cui, Ganglong

    2016-09-15

    Photoinduced reactions of ruthenium complexes with molecular oxygen have attracted a lot of experimental attention; however, the reaction mechanism remains elusive. In this work, we have used the density functional theory method to scrutinize the visible-light induced photooxidation mechanism of the ruthenium complex [Ru(II)-(bpy)2 (TMBiimH2 )](2+) (bpy: 2, 2-bipyridine and TMBiimH2 : 4, 5, 4, 5-tetramethyl-2, 2-biimidazole) initiated by the attack of molecular oxygen. The present computational results not only explain very well recent experiments, also provide new mechanistic insights. We found that: (1) the triplet energy transfer process between the triplet molecular oxygen and the metal-ligand charge transfer triplet state of the ruthenium complex, which leads to singlet molecular oxygen, is thermodynamically favorable; (2) the singlet oxygen addition process to the S0 ruthenium complex is facile in energy; (3) the chemical transformation from endoperoxide to epidioxetane intermediates can be either two- or one-step reaction (the latter is energetically favored). These findings contribute important mechanistic information to photooxidation reactions of ruthenium complexes with molecular oxygen. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27384925

  8. Respiratory muscle activity and oxygenation during sleep in patients with muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    White, J E; Drinnan, M J; Smithson, A J; Griffiths, C J; Gibson, G J

    1995-05-01

    Patients with respiratory muscle weakness show nocturnal hypoventilation, with oxygen desaturation particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but evidence in individuals with isolated bilateral diaphragmatic paresis (BDP) is conflicting. The effect of sleep on relative activity of the different respiratory muscles of such patients and, consequently, the precise mechanisms causing desaturation have not been clarified. We have studied eight patients, four with generalized muscle weakness and four with isolated BDP during nocturnal sleep with measurements including oxygen saturation and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of various respiratory muscle groups. Nocturnal oxygenation correlated inversely with postural fall in vital capacity, an index of diaphragmatic strength. During REM sleep, hypopnoea and desaturation occurred particularly during periods of rapid eye movements (phasic REM sleep). In most subjects, such events were "central" in type and associated with marked suppression of intercostal muscle activity, but two subjects had recurrent desaturation due to "obstructive" hypopnoea and/or apnoea. Expiratory activity of the external oblique muscle was present whilst awake and during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in seven of the eight subjects in the semirecumbent posture. This probably represents an "accessory inspiratory" effect, which aids passive caudal diaphragmatic motion as the abdominal muscles relax at the onset of inspiration. Expiratory abdominal muscle activity was suppressed in phasic REM sleep, suggesting that loss of this "accessory inspiratory" effect may contribute to "central" hypopnoea. We conclude that, in patients with muscle weakness, nocturnal oxygenation correlates with diaphragmatic strength.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656954

  9. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  10. Molecular Determinants of GS-9620-Dependent TLR7 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rebbapragada, Indrani; Birkus, Gabriel; Perry, Jason; Xing, Weimei; Kwon, HyockJoo; Pflanz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    GS-9620 is an orally administered agonist of Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 currently being evaluated in clinical studies for the treatment of chronic HBV and HIV patients. GS-9620 has shown antiviral efficacy in preclinical models of chronic hepadnavirus infection in woodchuck as well as chimpanzee. However, the molecular determinants of GS-9620-dependent activation of TLR7 are not well defined. The studies presented here elucidate GS-9620 subcellular distribution and characterize its molecular interactions with human TLR7 using structure-guided mutational analysis. Based on our results we present a molecular model of TLR7 bound to GS-9620. We also determine that several coding SNPs had no effect on GS-9620-dependent TLR7 activation. In addition, our studies provide evidence that TLR7 exists in a ligand-independent oligomeric state and that, TLR7 activation by GS-9620 is likely associated with compound-induced conformational changes. Finally, we demonstrate that activation of NF-κB and Akt pathways in primary plasmacytoid dendritic cells occur as immediate downstream cellular responses to GS-9620 stimulation. The data presented here further our understanding of the molecular parameters governing TLR7 activation by GS-9620, and more generally by nucleos/tide-related ligands. PMID:26784926

  11. A molecular dynamics examination on mutation-induced catalase activity in coral allene oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    De Luna, Phil; Bushnell, Eric A C; Gauld, James W

    2013-11-27

    Coral allene oxide synthase (cAOS) catalyzes the formation of allene oxides from fatty acid hydroperoxides. Interestingly, its active site differs from that of catalase by only a single residue yet is incapable of catalase activity. That is, it is unable to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to molecular oxygen and water. However, the single active-site mutation T66V allows cAOS to exhibit catalase activity. We have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in order to gain insights into the differences in substrate (8R-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic) and H2O2 active site binding between wild-type cAOS and the T66V mutant cAOS. It is observed that in wild-type cAOS the active site Thr66 residue consistently forms a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with H2O2 (catalase substrate) and, importantly, with the aid of His67 helps to pull H2O2 away from the heme Fe center. In contrast, in the T66V-cAOS mutant the H2O2 is much closer to the heme's Fe center and now forms a consistent Fe···O2H2 interaction. In addition, the His67···H2O2 distance shortens considerably, increasing the likelihood of a Cpd I intermediate and hence exhibiting catalase activity. PMID:24164352

  12. Trapping cold molecules and atoms: Simultaneous magnetic deceleration and trapping of cold molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelink, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-05-01

    Cooling molecules to the ultra-cold regime remains a major challenge in the growing field of cold molecules. The molecular internal degrees of freedom complicate the effort of direct application of laser cooling. An alternative and general path towards ultra-cold molecules relies on sympathetic cooling via collisions with laser-cooled atoms. Here, we demonstrate the first step towards application of sympathetic cooling by co-trapping of molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms in a magnetic trap at a temperature of 300 mK. Our experiment begins with a pulsed supersonic beam which is a general source for cold high-flux atomic and molecular beams. Although the supersonic expansion efficiently cools the beam to temperatures below 1K, it also accelerates the beam to high mean velocities. We decelerate a beam of O2 in a moving magnetic trap decelerator from 375 m/s to a stop. We entrained the molecular beam with Li atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading the molecules and atoms into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 109 trapped molecules with background limited lifetime of 0.6 Sec. Our achievement enables application of laser cooling on the Li atoms in order to sympathetically cool the O2.

  13. Active medium gain study of electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobyanin, Yuriy; Adamenkov, Yuriy; Vyskubenko, Boris; Goryachev, Leonid; Ilyin, Sergey; Kalashnik, Anatoliy; Rakhimova, Tatiana; Rogozhnikov, Georgiy

    2007-05-01

    The paper reports on experimental studies of the active medium gain in supersonic electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser (DOIL) based on traveling mw discharge. The measurements have included: absolute concentration, yield, and energy efficiency of production of SO in pure oxygen and oxygen-helium mixes at an oxygen partial pressure 3 to 15 Torr. For the gas flow to get rid of atomic oxygen, both heterogeneous mercury oxide coatings of the tube walls and homogeneous additives to the work mix, such as nitrogen oxide, have been used. The active medium of DOIL was formed using a nozzle array of the type of ejector sized as 10*50 mm2. The singlet oxygen-helium mix was supplied through three rows of sonic cylindrical nozzles, while the iodine-carrier gas mix - through two rows of supersonic conical nozzles with a half-opening angle of 10°(arc). The gas-phase iodine was produced in a quartz cell filled with iodine crystals. Room-temperature iodine vapors were picked up with a carrier gas (nitrogen or helium) and thus delivered into the nozzle array. The active medium was investigated by the high-resolution laser diode spectroscopy approach that used the laser type Vortex 6025 purchased from New Focus, Inc. The laser medium gain factor was determined by the intra-cavity approach having a sensitivity about 1*10 -6 cm -1. The static temperature of the medium was determined from the measurements of gain half-width. The gain of the active medium of electric-discharge OIL has been investigated. The DOIL in use was operating on a mix composed as O II:He=1:1 at a total pressure of 6 Torr and flowrate - about 1 mmol/s. With helium as an iodine carrier gas at a flowrate ~3 mmol/s, we have recorded a positive gain in the DOIL medium.

  14. Endothelial-cell apoptosis induced by cleaved high-molecular-weight kininogen (HKa) is matrix dependent and requires the generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Danyu; McCrae, Keith R.

    2006-01-01

    High–molecular-weight kininogen (HK) is an abundant plasma protein that plays a central role in activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. Cleavage of HK by plasma kallikrein results in release of the nonapeptide bradykinin (BK), leaving behind cleaved high–molecular-weight kininogen (HKa). Previous studies have demonstrated that HKa induces apoptosis of proliferating endothelial cells and inhibits angiogenesis in vivo, activities mediated primarily through its domain 5. However, the mechanisms by which these effects occur are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that HKa induces apoptosis of endothelial cells cultured on gelatin, vitronectin, fibronectin, or laminin but not collagen type I or IV. The ability of HKa to induce endothelial-cell apoptosis is dependent on the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and associated with depletion of glutathione and peroxidation of endothelial-cell lipids, effects that occur only in cells cultured on matrix proteins permissive for HKa-induced apoptosis. Finally, the ability of HKa to induce endothelial-cell apoptosis is blocked by the addition of reduced glutathione or N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate a unique role for oxidant stress in mediating the activity of an antiangiogenic polypeptide and highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in regulating endothelial-cell survival. PMID:16418331

  15. Low-temperature anomalies in the magnetic and thermal properties of molecular cryocrystals doped with oxygen impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiman, Yu. A.; Tretyak, S. M.; JeŻowski, A.

    2000-09-01

    The magnetic properties of oxygen pair clusters are investigated theoretically for different cluster geometries which can be realized by doping molecular cryomatrices with oxygen. Anomalous temperature and pressure behavior of the magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, and entropy is predicted. It is proposed to use these anomalies for studying the parameters characterizing the oxygen clusters and the parameters of the host matrix: the effective spin-figure interaction constant D for the molecule in the matrix, the exchange parameter J, and the number of pair clusters Np, which can deviate markedly from the purely random value Np=6Nc2 (N is Avogadro's number, and c is the molar concentration of the impurity). The data on the magnetic susceptibility may be used to analyze the character of the positional and orientational short-range order in the solid solution. The value of D contains information about the orientational order parameter; the distance and angular dependence of the exchange interaction parameter are still subject to discussion in the literature. The temperature dependence of Np contains information about diffusion and clusterization processes in the system.

  16. Chemical analysis and molecular models for calcium-oxygen-carbon interactions in black carbon found in fertile Amazonian anthrosoils.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, Braulio S; Araujo, Joyce R; Silva, Alexander M; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Falcão, Newton P S; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Carbon particles containing mineral matter promote soil fertility, helping it to overcome the rather unfavorable climate conditions of the humid tropics. Intriguing examples are the Amazonian Dark Earths, anthropogenic soils also known as "Terra Preta de Índio'' (TPI), in which chemical recalcitrance and stable carbon with millenary mean residence times have been observed. Recently, the presence of calcium and oxygen within TPI-carbon nanoparticles at the nano- and mesoscale ranges has been demonstrated. In this work, we combine density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of TPI-carbons to elucidate the chemical arrangements of calcium-oxygen-carbon groups at the molecular level in TPI. The molecular models are based on graphene oxide nanostructures in which calcium cations are strongly adsorbed at the oxide sites. The application of material science techniques to the field of soil science facilitates a new level of understanding, providing insights into the structure and functionality of recalcitrant carbon in soil and its implications for food production and climate change. PMID:24892495

  17. Production of Energetic Active-Oxygen Species at Atmospheric Pressure by Linear Microplasma Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Wilson; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin; Davis, Steven; Hoskinson, Alan; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    Linear arrays of stripline resonators operated at microwave frequencies and low powers provide spatially and temporally continuous micro-discharges with high E/N at atmospheric pressure. When implemented in a discharge-flow reactor, these microplasmas excite metastable singlet molecular oxygen and dissociate oxygen molecules to produce atomic oxygen, with efficiencies comparable to conventional microwave resonant cavities at low pressures. At elevated pressure, production of atomic oxygen leads to prompt formation of ozone immediately downstream of the discharge exit. We have observed and quantified the production of O2(a 1 Δ) metastables and O3 in the effluent of linear microplasma arrays for O2/He, O2/Ar, O2/N2/He,andO2/N2/Ar mixtures as functions of pressure, gas flow rate, and species mixing ratio. We compare results for single-array microplasmas, where the discharge products are formed in a small volume and entrained into the bulk flow, and overlapping dual-array microplasmas which process larger gas flow volumes. Supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory and Department of Energy.

  18. FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF OPEN TANK OXYGEN ACTIVATED SLUDGE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an operating summary of a full-scale demonstration of the FMC open tank pure oxygen (FMC O2) activated sludge system, conducted at the facilities of the Metropolitan Denver Sewage Disposal District No. 1 (Metro) in Denver, Colorado. The system was operated ov...

  19. In vivo imaging of brain metabolism activity using a phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probe

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Borisov, Sergei; Pumbo, Elena; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2013-01-01

    Several approaches have been adopted for real-time imaging of neural activity in vivo. We tested a new cell-penetrating phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probe, NanO2-IR, to monitor temporal and spatial dynamics of oxygen metabolism in the neocortex following peripheral sensory stimulation. Probe solution was applied to the surface of anesthetized mouse brain; optical imaging was performed using a MiCAM-02 system. Trains of whisker stimuli were delivered and associated changes in phosphorescent signal were recorded in the contralateral somatosensory (“barrel”) cortex. Sensory stimulation led to changes in oxygenation of activated areas of the barrel cortex. The oxygen imaging results were compared to those produced by the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. While the signals emitted by the two probes differed in shape and amplitude, they both faithfully indicated specific whisker evoked cortical activity. Thus, NanO2-IR probe can be used as a tool in visualization and realtime analysis of sensory- evoked neural activity in vivo. PMID:23624034

  20. OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE PLANT COMPLETES TWO YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed report of the conversion to and operational performance of an oxygen-activated sludge system at the Westgate wastewater treatment plant in Fairfax County, Virginia, is given in this report. It is presented in the form of a case history including the time span leading u...

  1. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  2. Decolorization / deodorization of zein via activated carbons and molecular sieves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective is to evaluate a series of granular media consisting of activated carbons and molecular sieves in a batch process for the purpose of clarifying and removal of color and odor components from yellow zein dispersed in an aqueous alcohol medium. The major contributors of yellow zein is du...

  3. Activation of Methanogenesis in Arid Biological Soil Crusts Despite the Presence of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Roey; Matthies, Diethart; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Methanogenesis is traditionally thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. Wetland and rice field soils are well known sources for atmospheric methane, while aerated soils are considered sinks. Although methanogens have been detected in low numbers in some aerated, and even in desert soils, it remains unclear whether they are active under natural oxic conditions, such as in biological soil crusts (BSCs) of arid regions. To answer this question we carried out a factorial experiment using microcosms under simulated natural conditions. The BSC on top of an arid soil was incubated under moist conditions in all possible combinations of flooding and drainage, light and dark, air and nitrogen headspace. In the light, oxygen was produced by photosynthesis. Methane production was detected in all microcosms, but rates were much lower when oxygen was present. In addition, the δ13C of the methane differed between the oxic/oxygenic and anoxic microcosms. While under anoxic conditions methane was mainly produced from acetate, it was almost entirely produced from H2/CO2 under oxic/oxygenic conditions. Only two genera of methanogens were identified in the BSC-Methanosarcina and Methanocella; their abundance and activity in transcribing the mcrA gene (coding for methyl-CoM reductase) was higher under anoxic than oxic/oxygenic conditions, respectively. Both methanogens also actively transcribed the oxygen detoxifying gene catalase. Since methanotrophs were not detectable in the BSC, all the methane produced was released into the atmosphere. Our findings point to a formerly unknown participation of desert soils in the global methane cycle. PMID:21655270

  4. Structural and functional characterization of "laboratory evolved" cytochrome P450cam mutants showing enhanced naphthalene oxygenation activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Koji; Tosha, Takehiko; Yoshioka, Shiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishimori, Koichiro; Morishima, Isao

    2004-10-29

    To elucidate molecular mechanisms for the enhanced oxygenation activity in the three mutants of cytochrome P450cam screened by 'laboratory evolution' [Nature 399 (1999) 670], we purified the mutants and characterized their functional and structural properties. The electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra revealed that the structures of heme binding site of all purified mutants were quite similar to that of the wild-type enzyme, although the fraction of the inactivated form, called "P420," was increased. In the reaction with H(2)O(2), only trace amounts of the naphthalene hydroxylation product were detected by gas chromatography. We, therefore, conclude that the three mutants do not exhibit significant changes in the structural and functional properties from those of wild-type P450cam except for the stability of the axial ligand in the reduced form. The enhanced fluorescence in the whole-cell assay would reflect enhancement in the oxygenation activity below the detectable limit of the gas chromatography and/or contributions of other reactions catalyzed by the heme iron. PMID:15451425

  5. Activation energies for oxygen reduction on platinum alloys: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alfred B; Roques, Jérôme; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Murthi, Vivek S; Markovic, Nenad M; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2005-01-27

    A combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the electrode potential dependencies of activation energies is presented for the first step in oxygen reduction over platinum and platinum alloy catalysts in both polycrystalline and carbon supported form. Tafel data for several of the catalysts are used to predict potential-dependent activation energies for oxygen reduction over the 0.6-0.9 V range in strong and weak acid. Comparisons with the theoretical curve show good agreement above 0.8 V, suggesting a fairly constant preexponential factor. Arrhenius determinations of activation energies over the 0.7-0.9 V range yield little trend for weak acid, possibly because of the larger uncertainties in the Arrhenius fits, but the strong acid results have smaller uncertainties and for them the measured activation energies trend up with potential. PMID:16851081

  6. In Situ Observation of Active Oxygen Species in Fe-Containing Ni-Based Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: The Effect of pH on Electrochemical Activity.

    PubMed

    Trześniewski, Bartek J; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Vermaas, David A; Longo, Alessandro; Bras, Wim; Koper, Marc T M; Smith, Wilson A

    2015-12-01

    Ni-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OECs) are cost-effective and very active materials that can be potentially used for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion process toward sustainable energy generation. We present a systematic spectroelectrochemical characterization of two Fe-containing Ni-based OECs, namely nickel borate (Ni(Fe)-B(i)) and nickel oxyhydroxide (Ni(Fe)OOH). Our Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results show that both OECs are chemically similar, and that the borate anions do not play an apparent role in the catalytic process at pH 13. Furthermore, we show spectroscopic evidence for the generation of negatively charged sites in both OECs (NiOO(-)), which can be described as adsorbed "active oxygen". Our data conclusively links the OER activity of the Ni-based OECs with the generation of those sites on the surface of the OECs. The OER activity of both OECs is strongly pH dependent, which can be attributed to a deprotonation process of the Ni-based OECs, leading to the formation of the negatively charged surface sites that act as OER precursors. This work emphasizes the relevance of the electrolyte effect to obtain catalytically active phases in Ni-based OECs, in addition to the key role of the Fe impurities. This effect should be carefully considered in the development of Ni-based compounds meant to catalyze the OER at moderate pHs. Complementarily, UV-vis spectroscopy measurements show strong darkening of those catalysts in the catalytically active state. This coloration effect is directly related to the oxidation of nickel and can be an important factor limiting the efficiency of solar-driven devices utilizing Ni-based OECs. PMID:26544169

  7. Spectroscopic evidence for the formation of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/O/sub 2/) upon irradiation of a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/Sigma/sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1988-01-20

    It is well-known that the presence of molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) in a variety of organic solvents causes an often substantial red shift in the solvent absorption spectrum. This extra, broad absorption feature is reversibly removed by purging the solvent with nitrogen gas. Mulliken and Tsubomura assigned the oxygen-dependent absorption band to a transition from a ground state solvent-oxygen complex to a solvent-oxygen charge transfer (CT) state (sol/sup .+/O/sub 2//sup .-/). In addition to the broad Mulliken CT band, there are, often in the same spectral region, distinct singlet-triplet transitions (T/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/) which are enhanced by molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/). Since both of these solvent-oxygen cooperative transitions may result in the formation of reactive oxygenating species, singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/) and/or the superoxide ion (O/sub 2//sup .-/), it follows that recent studies have focused on unsaturated hydrocarbon oxygenation subsequent to the irradiation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands in both the solution phase and cryogenic (10 K) glasses. In these particular experiments, oxygenated products characteristic of both /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sub .-/ were obtained, although the systems studied appeared to involve the participation of one intermediate at the exclusion of the other. In this communication, the authors provide, for the first time, direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ following a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption. They have observed, in a time-resolved experiment, a near-IR luminescence subsequent to laser excitation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands of mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, and benzene at 355 nm and 1,4-dioxane at 266 nm. They suggest that this signal is due to /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2

  8. Unciaphenol, an Oxygenated Analogue of the Bergman Cyclization Product of Uncialamycin Exhibits Anti-HIV Activity.

    PubMed

    Williams, David E; Bottriell, Helen; Davies, Julian; Tietjen, Ian; Brockman, Mark A; Andersen, Raymond J

    2015-11-01

    Unciaphenol (2), an oxygenated analogue of the Bergman cyclization product of the enediyne uncialamycin (1), has been isolated along with 1 from cultures of the actinomycete Streptomyces uncialis. It is proposed that the C-22 OH substituent in 2 might arise from the attack of a nucleophilic oxygen species on the p-benzyne diradical intermediate IA in the Bergman cyclization of 1. 2 shows in vitro anti-HIV activity against viral strains that are resistant to clinically utilized anti-retroviral therapies. PMID:26465962

  9. Highly oxygenated triterpenoids from the roots of Schisandra chinensis and their anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiu-Yan; Gao, Kun; Nan, Zhi-Biao

    2016-01-01

    A new highly oxygenated triterpenoid, schinchinenlactone D (1), and three known compounds (2-4) were isolated from the roots of Schisandra chinensis. Their structures were determined by combining the spectroscopic analysis with the theoretical computations. The anti-inflammatory activities of compounds 1-4 were evaluated, and compound 3 exhibits the most significant activity in the inhibition of NO production with an IC50 value of 10.6 μM. PMID:26313467

  10. Tuning the activity of Pt(111) for oxygen electroreduction by subsurface alloying.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Ifan E L; Bondarenko, Alexander S; Perez-Alonso, Francisco J; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Bech, Lone; Johansson, Tobias P; Jepsen, Anders K; Frydendal, Rasmus; Knudsen, Brian P; Rossmeisl, Jan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2011-04-13

    To enable the development of low temperature fuel cells, significant improvements are required to the efficiency of the Pt electrocatalysts at the cathode, where oxygen reduction takes place. Herein, we study the effect of subsurface solute metals on the reactivity of Pt, using a Cu/Pt(111) near-surface alloy. Our investigations incorporate electrochemical measurements, ultrahigh vacuum experiments, and density functional theory. Changes to the OH binding energy, ΔE(OH), were monitored in situ and adjusted continuously through the subsurface Cu coverage. The incorporation of submonolayer quantities of Cu into Pt(111) resulted in an 8-fold improvement in oxygen reduction activity. The most optimal catalyst for oxygen reduction has an ΔE(OH) ≈ 0.1 eV weaker than that of pure Pt, validating earlier theoretical predictions. PMID:21417329

  11. Effects of oxygen concentration on the nitrifying activity of an aerobic hybrid granular sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Filali, Ahlem; Bessiere, Yolaine; Sperandio, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to quantify the influence of the simultaneous presence of flocs and granules in the nitrifying activity in a sequencing batch airlift reactor (SBAR). The nitrification rate and oxygen limitation of flocs, granules and hybrid sludge was investigated using respirometric assays at different dissolved oxygen concentrations. The spatial distribution of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) was investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results showed that the nitrification rate was much less sensitive to oxygen limitation in systems containing a fraction of flocs than in pure granular sludge. Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) were found to be distributed in similar quantities in flocs and granules whereas the Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) were located preferentially in granules. This study showed that the presence of flocs with granules could increase the robustness of the process to transitory reductions of aeration. PMID:22233907

  12. [pi] Backbonding in Carbonyl Complexes and Carbon-Oxygen Stretching Frequencies: A Molecular Modeling Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is described that has illustrated the effect of various factors on [pi] backbonding to carbonyl ligands, where the students can view the molecular orbitals corresponding to the M-CO [pi] interaction as well as the competing interaction between the metal and co-ligands. The visual and hands-on nature of the modeling exercise has helped…

  13. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  14. Increased oxygen consumption following activation of brain: theoretical footnotes using spectroscopic data from barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, J; Johnston, D; Martindale, J; Jones, M; Berwick, J; Zheng, Y

    2001-06-01

    Optical imaging spectroscopy (OIS) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) data sequences from anesthetized rats were used to determine the relationship between changes in oxy-and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration and changes in blood volume and flow in the presence and absence of stimulation. The data from Jones et al. (accompanying paper) were used to explore the differences between two theoretical models of flow activation coupling. The essential difference between the two models is the extension of the model of Buxton and Frank by Hyder et al. (1998, J. Appl. Physiol. 85: 554--564) to incorporate change in capillary diffusivity coupled to flow. In both models activation-increased flow changes increase oxygen transport from the capillary; however, in Hyder et al.'s model the diffusivity of the capillary itself is increased. Hyder et al. proposed a parameter (Omega), a scaling "constant" linking increased blood flow and oxygen "diffusivity" in the capillary bed. Thus, in Buxton and Frank's theory, Omega = 0; i.e., there are no changes in diffusivity. In Hyder et al.'s theory, 0 < Omega < 1, and changes in diffusivity are assumed to be linearly related to flow changes. We elaborate the theoretical position of both models to show that, in principle, the different predictions from the two theories can be evaluated using optical imaging spectroscopy data. We find that both theoretical positions have limitations when applied to data from brief stimulation and when applied to data from mild hypercapnia. In summary, the analysis showed that although Hyder et al.'s proposal that diffusivity increased during activation did occur; it was shown to arise from an implementation of Buxton and Frank's theory under episodes of brief stimulation. The results also showed that the scaling parameter Omega is not a constant as the Hyder et al. model entails but in fact varies over the time course of the flow changes. Data from experiments in which mild hypercapnia was administered also

  15. Scavenging activity of "beta catechin" on reactive oxygen species generated by photosensitization of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M V; Yoneda, T; Hiramatsu, M

    1996-05-01

    "beta CATECHIN", a preparation containing green tea extract, ascorbic acid, sunflower seed extract, dunaliella carotene and natural vitamin E, has been designed as a model "universal antioxidant" that offers protection via its scavenging action on a wide range of free radicals, both water-soluble and fat-soluble. Reactive oxygen species like singlet oxygen, hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, are often generated in biological systems during photosensitized oxidation reactions. We report on the simultaneous effect of "beta CATECHIN" on active oxygen species generated during the photosensitized oxidation of riboflavin using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone (TMPD) as a "spin-trapping" agent. The intensities of the resulting stable nitroxide radical adduct, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Results show simultaneous, nonspecific and complete scavenging action of reactive oxygen species generated in our in vitro model system by "beta CATECHIN". It is therefore suggested that "beta CATECHIN" could offer protection against free radical insult and in preventing cancer and other diseases that are mediated by reactive oxygen species. PMID:8739038

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  17. Molecular Mechanism of Active Zone Organization at Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Organization of presynaptic active zones is essential for development, plasticity, and pathology of the nervous system. Recent studies indicate a trans-synaptic molecular mechanism that organizes the active zones by connecting the pre- and the postsynaptic specialization. The presynaptic component of this trans-synaptic mechanism is comprised of cytosolic active zone proteins bound to the cytosolic domains of voltage-dependent calcium channels (P/Q-, N-, and L-type) on the presynaptic membrane. The postsynaptic component of this mechanism is the synapse organizer (laminin β2) that is expressed by the postsynaptic cell and accumulates specifically on top of the postsynaptic specialization. The pre- and the postsynaptic components interact directly between the extracellular domains of calcium channels and laminin β2 to anchor the presynaptic protein complex in front of the postsynaptic specialization. Hence, the presynaptic calcium channel functions as a scaffolding protein for active zone organization and as an ion-conducting channel for synaptic transmission. In contrast to the requirement of calcium influx for synaptic transmission, the formation of the active zone does not require the calcium influx through the calcium channels. Importantly, the active zones of adult synapses are not stable structures and require maintenance for their integrity. Furthermore, aging or diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system impair the active zones. This review will focus on the molecular mechanisms that organize the presynaptic active zones and summarize recent findings at the neuromuscular junctions and other synapses. PMID:22135013

  18. Molecular rotational line profiles from oxygen-rich red giant winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justtanont, K.; Skinner, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a radiative transfer model of the dust and gas envelopes around late-type stars. The gas kinetic temperature for each star is calculated by solving equations of motion and the energy balance simultaneously. The main processes include viscous heating and adiabatic and radiative cooling. Heating is dominated by viscosity as the grains stream outward through the gas, with some contribution in oxygen-rich stars by near-IR pumping of H2O followed by collisional de-excitation in the inner envelope. For O-rich stars, rotational H2O cooling is a dominant mechanism in the middle part of the envelope, with CO cooling being less significant. We have applied our model to three well-studied oxygen-rich red giant stars. The three stars cover a wide range of mass-loss rates, and hence they have different temperature structures. The derived temperature structures are used in calculating CO line profiles for these objects. Comparison of the dust and gas mass-loss rates suggests that mass-loss rates are not constant during the asymptotic giant branch phase. In particular, the results show that the low CO 1-0 antenna temperatures of OH/IR stars reflect an earlier phase of much lower mass-loss rate.

  19. Selective para hydroxylation of phenol and aniline by singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Briviba, K; Devasagayam, T P; Sies, H; Steenken, S

    1993-01-01

    Phenol reacts with singlet oxygen (1O2) generated in aqueous solution (H2O or D2O) by (a) the exposure of methylene blue to light or (b) the thermal dissociation of the endoperoxide of 3,3'-(1,4-naphthylidene)dipropionate to lead selectively to hydroquinone as the primary product. The other isomers of phenol hydroxylation, catechol and resorcinol, were not observed. In agreement with the involvement of 1O2 as the reactive species in the hydroxylation, in D2O the yield of hydroquinone is 7 times that in H2O, and the 1O2 quenchers azide and the thiols, glutathione and dithiothreitol, suppress the production of hydroquinone. In contrast, the hydroxyl radical scavengers, tert-butyl alcohol, propanol, or sodium formate, are without effect. In a follow-up reaction, hydroquinone is converted into benzoquinone. Reaction of 1O2 with aniline leads to the selective formation of 4-hydroxyaniline as the initial product. This is further converted to hydroquinone with formation of ammonia (deamination), and then to benzoquinone. On the basis of these results, the selective para hydroxylation of phenol or aniline may be used as an indicator for the involvement of singlet oxygen as compared to .OH radical- or cytochrome P450-mediated reactions. PMID:8374055

  20. [Light-induced production and consumption of oxygen by chloroplasts: activation and inhibition].

    PubMed

    Chan Van, N i; Nikandrov, V V; Brin, G P; Krasnovskii, A A

    1977-07-01

    Light-induced production and consumption of oxygen by pea chloroplasts are activated at certain concentrations of the solvents (diethyl ester, methyl alcohol, dimethylsulfoxide) and detergent Triton X-100. At higher concentrations of the compounds studied both reactions are inhibited. The uncouplers (methylamine and carbonyl cyanide-3-chlorophenylhydrazone) activate these processes. The agents studied have a similar effect on the processes of light-induced production and consumption of oxygen, which are limited by a common link bound to the phosphorylation site in photosystem I. The effects observed suggest that the inhibition may be due to inhibition of photosystem II, whereas the activation may be largely due to an action on photosystem I. PMID:907797

  1. LASERS: Efficient chemical oxygen — iodine laser with a high total pressure of the active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Nikolaev, V. D.; Svistun, M. I.; Khvatov, N. A.; Heiger, G. D.; Madden, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    A new concept of obtaining a high total pressure of the active medium of a chemical oxygen — iodine laser (OIL) is proposed and verified. The nozzle unit of the laser consists of the alternating vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to produce high-pressure nitrogen jets, plane slotted nozzles for the flow of O2(1Δ) oxygen, and vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to inject the N2 — I2 mixture between the first two streams. For a molar chlorine flow rate of 39.2 mmol s-1, the output power was 700 W and the chemical efficiency was 19.7 %. The combined use of the ejector nozzle unit proposed to obtain the active medium and a super-sonic diffuser allows a significant simplification of the ejection system for the exhaust active medium of the OIL.

  2. Catalytic activity trends of oxygen reduction reaction for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-11-30

    We report the intrinsic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline palladium, platinum, ruthenium, gold, and glassy carbon surfaces in 0.1 M LiClO(4) 1,2-dimethoxyethane via rotating disk electrode measurements. The nonaqueous Li(+)-ORR activity of these surfaces primarily correlates to oxygen adsorption energy, forming a "volcano-type" trend. The activity trend found on the polycrystalline surfaces was in good agreement with the trend in the discharge voltage of Li-O(2) cells catalyzed by nanoparticle catalysts. Our findings provide insights into Li(+)-ORR mechanisms in nonaqueous media and design of efficient air electrodes for Li-air battery applications. PMID:22044022

  3. Improved oxygen reduction activity on Pt3Ni(111) via increased surface site availability.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Fowler, Ben; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Wang, Guofeng; Ross, Philip N; Lucas, Christopher A; Marković, Nenad M

    2007-01-26

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is the main limitation for automotive applications. We demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) surface is 10-fold more active for the ORR than the corresponding Pt(111) surface and 90-fold more active than the current state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts for PEMFC. The Pt3Ni(111) surface has an unusual electronic structure (d-band center position) and arrangement of surface atoms in the near-surface region. Under operating conditions relevant to fuel cells, its near-surface layer exhibits a highly structured compositional oscillation in the outermost and third layers, which are Pt-rich, and in the second atomic layer, which is Ni-rich. The weak interaction between the Pt surface atoms and nonreactive oxygenated species increases the number of active sites for O2 adsorption. PMID:17218494

  4. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:25334050

  5. Oxygen deficient ZnO 1-x nanosheets with high visible light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong-Li; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Xi-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Xie, Xiao; Xu, An-Wu

    2015-04-28

    Zinc oxide is one of the most important wide-band-gap (3.2 eV) materials with versatile properties, however, it can not be excited by visible light. In this work, we have developed an exquisite and simple way to prepare oxygen-deficient ZnO 1-x nanosheets with a gray-colored appearance and excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. Detailed analysis based on UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra confirms the existence of oxygen vacancies in ZnO 1-x. The incorporation of oxygen defects could effectively extend the light absorption of ZnO 1-x into the visible-light region due to the fact that the energy of the localized state is located in the forbidden gap. Thus, our obtained ZnO 1-x shows a higher photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) compared to defect-free ZnO under visible light illumination. Additionally, the high content of ˙OH radicals with a strong photo-oxidation capability over the ZnO 1-x nanosheets significantly contributes to the improvement in the photocatalytic performance. Our oxygen deficient ZnO 1-x sample shows a very high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO even after 5 cycles without any obvious decline. The results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the optoelectronic and photocatalytic performances of nanomaterials. PMID:25812132

  6. Nucleolar protein B23 has molecular chaperone activities.

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, A.; Olson, M. O.

    1999-01-01

    Protein B23 is an abundant, multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein whose activities are proposed to play a role in ribosome assembly. Szebeni et al. (1997) showed stimulation of nuclear import in vitro by protein B23 and suggested that this effect was due to a molecular chaperone-like activity. Protein B23 was tested for chaperone activities using several protein substrates. The temperature-dependent and -independent aggregation of the HIV-1 Rev protein was measured using a zero angle light scattering (turbidity) assay. Protein B23 inhibited the aggregation of the Rev protein, with the amount of inhibition proportional to the concentration of B23 added. This activity was saturable with nearly complete inhibition when the molar ratio of B23:Rev was slightly above one. Protein B23 also protected liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH), carboxypeptidase A, citrate synthase, and rhodanese from aggregation during thermal denaturation and preserved the enzyme activity of LADH under these conditions. In addition, protein B23 was able to promote the restoration of activity of LADH previously denatured with guanidine-HCl. Protein B23 preferentially bound denatured substrates and exposed hydrophobic regions when complexed with denatured proteins. Thus, by several criteria, protein B23 behaves like a molecular chaperone; these activities may be related to its role in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:10211837

  7. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of niobium oxides by solid/liquid state oxygen source and lithium assisted metal-halide chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Greenlee, Jordan D.; Shank, Joshua C.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2015-09-01

    In order to consistently grow high quality niobium oxides and lithium niobium oxides, a novel solid/liquid state oxygen source, LiClO4, has been implemented in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. LiClO4 is shown to decompose into both molecular and atomic oxygen upon heating. This allows oxidation rates similar to that of molecular oxygen but at a reduced overall beam flux, quantified by in situ Auger analysis. LiClO4 operation is decomposition limited to less than 400 °C, and other material limitations are identified. The design of a custom near-ambient NbCl5 effusion cell is presented, which improves both short and long term stability. Films of Nb oxidation state +2, +3, and +5 are grown using these new tools, including the multi-functional sub-oxide LiNbO2.

  8. The Trapping Of Laser-Generated Biradicals With Molecular Oxygen: The Synthesis Of Peroxides Related To Vitamin K, Insect Pheromones And Prostaglandins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1984-05-01

    The theoretical and experimental considerations involved in laser-generated biradical trapping with molecular oxygen are discussed. This method has been applied in the elucidation of the mechanism of the photodegradation of Vitamin K via oxygen trapping of a preoxe-tane biradical. The trapping of biradicals derived from azoalkanes has been applied to the syntheses of pine beetle pheromone mimics and prostaglandin endoperoxide analogues.

  9. Spectral line shapes and frequencies of the molecular oxygen B-band R-branch transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domysławska, Jolanta; Wójtewicz, Szymon; Masłowski, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Bielska, Katarzyna; Trawiński, Ryszard S.; Ciuryło, Roman; Lisak, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We present the line-shape parameters for the first 11 lines of the oxygen B-band R-branch self-broadened transitions measured at low pressures by the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer (PDH-locked FS-CRDS) linked to the optical frequency comb. The collisional self-broadening, shifting and narrowing parameters were determined together with the quadratic speed-dependence as well as phase- and velocity-changing correlations parameters. The absolute frequencies of the transitions with combined standard uncertainties below 150 kHz are reported. Dependence of line parameters on choice of the line-shape model is discussed.

  10. On the formation and annihilation of the singlet molecular metastables in an oxygen discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toneli, D. A.; Pessoa, R. S.; Roberto, M.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a volume averaged global model for an inductively coupled RF oxygen discharge that considers an extensive reaction set that includes the species: O2(X3Σ\\text{g}- ), O2({{a}1}{Δ\\text{g}} ), O2({{b}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ), O2(A3Σ\\text{u}+ , A’3{Δ\\text{u}} , {{c}1}Σ\\text{u}- ), O2+ , O2- , O(3P), O(1D), O+, O-, O3, O3+ , O3- , and electrons. We propose revised rate coefficients for some of the reactions and explore the densities of various species as a function of discharge pressure, in the pressure range 1-100 mTorr. We find that the O2({{a}1}{Δ\\text{g}} ) density can be lower than the O2({{b}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) density in the pressure range from 2.5 to 80 mTorr. The relative reaction rates for formation and annihilation of O2({{a}1}{Δ\\text{g}} ) and O2({{b}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) are evaluated and the most important reactions are indicated. The O- loss process is also studied. The results show that O2({{a}1}{Δ\\text{g}} ) has only a small contribution to the loss of the negative ion O-, while electron impact detachment is a very effective loss process at low pressure (<2 mTorr) and detachment by the oxygen atom O(3P) and the metastable singlet O2({{b}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) are the most effective loss process up to roughly 50 mTorr where charge exchange becomes the most effective process for O- loss.

  11. Photochemical processes in doped argon-neon core-shell clusters: the effect of cage size on the dissociation of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Laarmann, T; Wabnitz, H; von Haeften, K; Möller, T

    2008-01-01

    The caging effect of the host environment on photochemical reactions of molecular oxygen is investigated using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and spectrally resolved fluorescence. Oxygen doped clusters are formed by coexpansion of argon and oxygen, by pickup of molecular oxygen or by multiple pickup of argon and oxygen by neon clusters. Sequential pickup provides radially ordered core-shell structures in which a central oxygen molecule is surrounded by argon layers of variable thickness inside large neon clusters. Pure argon and core-shell argon-neon clusters excited with approximately 12 eV monochromatic synchrotron radiation show strong fluorescence in the vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) spectral range. When the clusters are doped with O2, fluorescence in the visible (vis) spectral range is observed and the vuv radiation is found to be quenched. Energy-resolved vis fluorescence spectra show the 2 1Sigma+-->1 1Sigma+(ArO(1S)-->ArO(1D)) transition from argon oxide as well as the vibrational progression A '3Delta u(nu'=0)-->X 3Sigmag*(nu") of O2 indicating that molecular oxygen dissociates and occasionally recombines depending on the experimental conditions. Both the emission from ArO and O2 as well the vuv quenching by oxygen are found to depend on the excitation energy, providing evidence that the energy transfer from the photoexcited cluster to the embedded oxygen proceeds via the O2+ ground state. The O2+ decays via dissociative recombination and either reacts with Ar resulting in electronically excited ArO or it recombines to O2 within the Ar cage. Variation of the Ar layer thickness in O2-Ar-Ne core-shell clusters shows that a stable cage is formed by two solvation layers. PMID:18190199

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen preserves neurotrophic activity of carbon monoxide-exposed astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jurič, Damijana M; Šuput, Dušan; Brvar, Miran

    2016-06-24

    In astrocytes, carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by caspase and calpain activation. Impairment in astrocyte function can be time-dependently reduced by hyperbaric (3bar) oxygen (HBO). Due to the central role of astrocytes in maintaining neuronal function by offering neurotrophic support we investigated the hypothesis that HBO therapy may exert beneficial effect on acute CO poisoning-induced impairment in intrinsic neurotrophic activity. Exposure to 3000ppm CO in air followed by 24-72h of normoxia caused a progressive decline of gene expression, synthesis and secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to different extent. 1h treatment with 100% oxygen disclosed a pressure- and time-dependent efficacy in preserving astrocytic neurotrophic support. The beneficial effect was most evident when the astrocytes were exposed to HBO 1-5h after exposure to CO. The results further support an active role of hyperbaric, not normobaric, oxygenation in reducing dysfunction of astrocytes after acute CO poisoning. By preserving endogenous neurotrophic activity HBO therapy might promote neuronal protection and thus prevent the occurrence of late neuropsychological sequelae. PMID:27113706

  13. Effect of KOH activation on the formation of oxygen structure in activated carbons synthesized from polymeric precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jung, Woo-Young

    2002-06-01

    In this work, the influence of KOH activation on the surface chemistry of activated carbons (ACs) synthesized from polystyrene-based cation exchangeable resin (PSI) has been investigated. The surface chemistry of ACs has been characterized by using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pH measurement, and Boehm's titration method. As a result, PSI can be successfully converted into ACs with high porosities. The total oxygen content on the ACs studied increases with increasing the KOH-to-PSI ratio. FT-IR and XPS analyses show that the resulting carbons possess a number of oxygen surface functional groups, such as carbonyl, quinone, phenol, ether, and carboxylic acid groups. The highest oxygen content and acid value are observed at a KOH-to-PSI ratio of 4 (KPS-4). However, its pH and surface basicity are higher than those of a KOH-to-PSI ratio of 2 (KPS-2), indicating the formation of basic species, such as quinone and pyrone groups. Although the oxygen-containing groups with basic character exist in the resulting carbons, all the samples are still acidic in character. PMID:16290638

  14. Advanced Aromatic Polymers with Excellent Antiatomic Oxygen Performance Derived from Molecular Precursor Strategy and Copolymerization of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Tang, Yusheng; Yu, Zhen; Gu, Junwei; Kong, Jie

    2015-09-16

    In this contribution, the advanced aromatic polymers with excellent antiatomic oxygen (AO) performance were designed and synthesized using molecular precursor strategy and copolymerization of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). A soluble poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO) precursor, that is, TBS-PBO (tert-butyldimethylsilyl was denoted as TBS), was designed to overcome the poor solubility of PBO in organic solvents. Then the new copolymer of TBS-PBO-POSS was synthesized by the copolymerization of TBS-PBO and POSS, which possessed good solubility and film-forming ability in common organic solvents, such as N-methylpyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, and dimethyl sulfoxide. More importantly, the TBS-PBO-POSS films exhibited outstanding antiatomic oxygen properties because of the incorporation of POSS monomers with cagelike structure into the main chain of copolymer, which drastically reduced the AO-induced erosion owing to the formation of the passivating silica layer on the surface of polymers. When the TBS-PBO-POSS films were exposed to AO effective fluences of 1.5495×10(20) atom cm(-2) (5 h) and 4.6486×10(20) atom cm(-2) (15 h), the relative mass loss was merely 0.19% and 0.41%, respectively. This work provides a new perspective and efficient strategy for the molecular design of aromatic heterocyclic polymers possessing excellent combination properties including processing convenience and antioxidative and mechanical properties, which can be employed as potential candidates to endure the aggressive environment encountered in low earth orbits. PMID:26322523

  15. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  16. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to cartilage degradation in rheumatic diseases: molecular pathways, diagnosis and potential therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Schiller, J; Fuchs, B; Arnhold, J; Arnold, K

    2003-10-01

    Inflammatory joint diseases are of considerable socio-economic significance. However, mechanisms of cartilage destruction are so far only poorly understood. This review is dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) like superoxide anion radicals, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen, hypochlorous acid, hydroxyl radicals and nitric oxide that are generated under inflammatory conditions and also to their potential contribution to cartilage degradation. First, the relevance of rheumatic diseases and potential mechanisms of cartilage degradation are discussed in this review, followed by the description of the chemical constituents and the molecular architecture of articular cartilage as well as the different cell types that play a role in inflammation and cartilage destruction. Methods of the assessment of cartilage degeneration are also shortly discussed. In the main chapter of this review the characteristics of individual ROS, their generation under in vivo conditions as well as their reactivities with individual cartilage components are discussed. Because of the low selectivity of ROS, useful "markers" of cartilage degradation allowing the differentiation of effects induced by individual ROS are also discussed. In the last chapter current therapeutic concepts of the treatment of rheumatic diseases are reviewed. The recently developed "anti-TNF-alpha" therapy that is primarily directed against neutrophilic granulocytes that are powerful sources of ROS and, therefore, important mediators of joint degeneration are emphasised. PMID:12871089

  17. Oxygen plasma power dependence on ZnO grown on porous silicon substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Giwoong; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Do Yeob; Yim, Kwang Gug; Kim, Soaram; Kim, Sung-O.; Lee, Dong-Yul; Leem, Jae-Young; Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Gimhae, Gyungnam 621-749

    2012-10-15

    ZnO thin films were deposited on porous silicon by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy using different radio frequency power settings. Optical emission spectrometry was applied to study the characteristics of the oxygen plasma, and the effects of the radio frequency power on the properties of the ZnO thin films were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. The grain sizes for radio frequency powers of 100, 200, and 300 W were 46, 48, and 62 nm, respectively. In addition, the photoluminescence intensities of the ultraviolet and the visible range increased at 300 W, because the density of the atomic oxygen transitions increased. The quality of the ZnO thin films was enhanced, but the deep-level emission peaks increased with increasing radio frequency power. The structural and optical properties of the ZnO thin films were improved at the radio frequency power of 300 W. Moreover, the optical properties of the ZnO thin films were improved with porous silicon, instead of Si.

  18. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  19. An optimized molecular inclusion complex of diferuloylmethane: enhanced physical properties and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qunyou; Li, Yi; Wu, Jianyong; Mei, Hu; Zhao, Chunjing; Zhang, Jingqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate the enhanced physical properties and biological activity of a molecular inclusion complex (MICDH) comprising diferuloylmethane (DFM) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. Methods The preparation conditions of MICDH were optimized using an orthogonal experimental design. The solubility, in vitro release and model fitting, microscopic morphology, molecular structure simulation, anti-lung cancer activity, and action mechanism of MICDH were evaluated. Results The solubility of DFM was improved 4400-fold upon complexation with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. The release rate of DFM was significantly higher from MICDH than from free DFM. MICDH exhibited higher antitumor activity against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells than free DFM. More cells were arrested in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle or were induced to undergo apoptosis when treated with MICDH than when treated with free DFM. Furthermore, increased reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium ion levels and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed in cells treated with MICDH. Conclusion MICDH markedly improved the physical properties and antitumor activity of DFM. MICDH may prove to be a preferred alternative to free DFM as a formulation for DFM delivery in lung cancer treatment. PMID:23091376

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Potato Tuber Mitochondria Is Modulated by Mitochondrially Bound Hexokinase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Meyer, Laudiene Evangelista; Machado, Lilia Bender; Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Galina, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria (PTM) have a mitochondrially bound hexokinase (HK) activity that exhibits a pronounced sensitivity to ADP inhibition. Here we investigated the role of mitochondrial HK activity in PTM reactive oxygen species generation. Mitochondrial HK has a 10-fold higher affinity for glucose (Glc) than for fructose (KMGlc = 140 μm versus KMFrc = 1,375 μm). Activation of PTM respiration by succinate led to an increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release that was abrogated by mitochondrial HK activation. Mitochondrial HK activity caused a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in oxygen consumption by PTM. Inhibition of Glc phosphorylation by mannoheptulose or GlcNAc induced a rapid increase in H2O2 release. The blockage of H2O2 release sustained by Glc was reverted by oligomycin and atractyloside, indicating that ADP recycles through the adenine nucleotide translocator and F0F1ATP synthase is operative during the mitochondrial HK reaction. Inhibition of mitochondrial HK activity by 60% to 70% caused an increase of 50% in the maximal rate of H2O2 release. Inhibition in H2O2 release by mitochondrial HK activity was comparable to, or even more potent, than that observed for StUCP (S. tuberosum uncoupling protein) activity. The inhibition of H2O2 release in PTM was two orders of magnitude more selective for the ADP produced from the mitochondrial HK reaction than for that derived from soluble yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) HK. Modulation of H2O2 release and oxygen consumption by Glc and mitochondrial HK inhibitors in potato tuber slices shows that hexoses and mitochondrial HK may act as a potent preventive antioxidant mechanism in potato tubers. PMID:19109413

  1. Selective nitrogen doping in graphene: Enhanced catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Huang, Sheng-Feng; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Boero, Mauro; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki; Miyata, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of N-doped zigzag graphene ribbons with various ratios of dihydrogenated to monohydrogenated edge carbons are investigated within the density functional theory framework. We find that the stability of graphitic N next to the edge, which is claimed to play important roles in the catalytic activity in our previous work, will be enhanced with increasing the concentration of dihydrogenated carbons. Furthermore, the dihydrogenated edge carbons turn out to be easily converted into monohydrogenated ones in the presence of oxygen molecules at room temperature. Based on our results, we propose a possible way to enhance the oxygen reduction catalytic activity of N-doped graphene by controlling the degrees of hydrogenation of edge carbons. The characteristic features in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra for each specific N site considered here will also be given.

  2. Doped LaFeO3 as SOFC Catalysts: Control of Oxygen Mobility Oxidation Activity

    SciTech Connect

    N Lakshminarayanan; J Kuhn; S Rykov; J Millet; U Ozkan; T Rao; J Smedley; E Wang; E Muller; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The bulk structure and surface properties of Fe-based perovskite-type oxides with the formula La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-{delta}} for y = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 have been investigated. The properties were found to strongly depend upon Co content, temperature, and environment. The materials were selected due to their potential use as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The intermediate Co loading formed oxygen vacancies most easily and several other properties including oxidation activity and surface sites showed a similar non-linear trend. Trends are related to a possible transition in electronic structure. Activity for oxidation of methane, oxygen storage and chemical compatibility was shown to be superior to that of the La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3}.

  3. Structural Characterization of Mutations at the Oxygen Activation Site in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman Jorns, Marilyn; Chen, Zhi-wei; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-04-30

    Oxygen reduction and sarcosine oxidation in monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) occur at separate sites above the si- and re-faces, respectively, of the flavin ring. Mutagenesis studies implicate Lys265 as the oxygen activation site. Substitution of Lys265 with a neutral (Met, Gln, or Ala) or basic (Arg) residue results in an {approx}10{sup 4}- or 250-fold decrease, respectively, in the reaction rate. The overall structure of MSOX and residue conformation in the sarcosine binding cavity are unaffected by replacement of Lys265 with Met or Arg. The side chain of Met265 exhibits the same configuration in each molecule of Lys265Met crystals and is nearly congruent with Lys265 in wild-type MSOX. The side chain of Arg265 is, however, dramatically shifted (4-5 {angstrom}) compared with Lys265, points in the opposite direction, and exhibits significant conformational variability between molecules of the same crystal. The major species in solutions of Lys265Arg is likely to contain a 'flipped-out' Arg265 and exhibit negligible oxygen activation, similar to Lys265Met. The 400-fold higher oxygen reactivity observed with Lys265Arg is attributed to a minor (<1%) 'flipped-in' Arg265 conformer whose oxygen reactivity is similar to that of wild-type MSOX. A structural water (WAT1), found above the si-face of the flavin ring in all previously determined MSOX structures, is part of an apparent proton relay system that extends from FAD N(5) to bulk solvent. WAT1 is strikingly absent in Lys265Met and Lys265Arg, a feature that may account for the apparent kinetic stabilization of a reductive half-reaction intermediate that is detectable with the mutants but not wild-type MSOX.

  4. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L.; Schauer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  5. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  6. The activation strain model and molecular orbital theory

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Lando P; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The activation strain model is a powerful tool for understanding reactivity, or inertness, of molecular species. This is done by relating the relative energy of a molecular complex along the reaction energy profile to the structural rigidity of the reactants and the strength of their mutual interactions: ΔE(ζ) = ΔEstrain(ζ) + ΔEint(ζ). We provide a detailed discussion of the model, and elaborate on its strong connection with molecular orbital theory. Using these approaches, a causal relationship is revealed between the properties of the reactants and their reactivity, e.g., reaction barriers and plausible reaction mechanisms. This methodology may reveal intriguing parallels between completely different types of chemical transformations. Thus, the activation strain model constitutes a unifying framework that furthers the development of cross-disciplinary concepts throughout various fields of chemistry. We illustrate the activation strain model in action with selected examples from literature. These examples demonstrate how the methodology is applied to different research questions, how results are interpreted, and how insights into one chemical phenomenon can lead to an improved understanding of another, seemingly completely different chemical process. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:324–343. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1221 PMID:26753009

  7. Daucosterol protects neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-mediated injury by activating IGF1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-hua; Yuan, Xiao-lin; Yang, Nian-yun; Ren, Li; Zhao, Feng-ming; Luo, Ban-xin; Bian, Yao-yao; Xu, Jian-ya; Lu, Da-xiang; Zheng, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Chuan-juan; Diao, Yuan-ming; Xia, Bao-mei; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that daucosterol (a sterolin) up-regulates the expression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1)(1) protein in neural stem cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of daucosterol on the survival of cultured cortical neurons after neurons were subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and simulated reperfusion (OGD/R)(2), and determined the corresponding molecular mechanism. The results showed that post-treatment of daucosterol significantly reduced neuronal loss, as well as apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity, displaying the neuroprotective activity. We also found that daucosterol increased the expression level of IGF1 protein, diminished the down-regulation of p-AKT(3) and p-GSK-3β(4), thus activating the AKT(5) signal pathway. Additionally, it diminished the down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1(6) and Bcl-2(7), and decreased the expression level of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax(8), thus raising the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. The neuroprotective effect of daucosterol was inhibited in the presence of picropodophyllin (PPP)(9), the inhibitor of insulin-like growth factor I receptors (IGF1R)(10). Our study provided information about daucosterol as an efficient and inexpensive neuroprotectants, to which the IGF1-like activity of daucosterol contributes. Daucosterol could be potentially developed as a medicine for ischemic stroke treatment. PMID:25864625

  8. Highly branched PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites with superior electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Shi, Qiurong; Xia, Haibing; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-01

    Morphology control is a promising strategy to improve the catalytic performance of Pt-based catalysts. In this work, we reported a facile synthesis of PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites using Brij 58 as a template. The highly branched structures and porous features offer relatively large surface areas, which is beneficial to the enhancement of the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells. In addition, the elimination of carbon supports showed an important effect on the stability of the catalysts. By tuning the ratio of Pt and Cu precursors, PtCu nanodendrites were almost four times more active on the basis of an equivalent Pt mass for oxygen reduction reactions than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.Morphology control is a promising strategy to improve the catalytic performance of Pt-based catalysts. In this work, we reported a facile synthesis of PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites using Brij 58 as a template. The highly branched structures and porous features offer relatively large surface areas, which is beneficial to the enhancement of the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells. In addition, the elimination of carbon supports showed an important effect on the stability of the catalysts. By tuning the ratio of Pt and Cu precursors, PtCu nanodendrites were almost four times more active on the basis of an equivalent Pt mass for oxygen reduction reactions than the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07682j

  9. A General Method for Multimetallic Platinum Alloy Nanowires as Highly Active and Stable Oxygen Reduction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-25

    An unconventional class of high-performance Pt alloy multimetallic nanowires (NWs) is produced by a general method. The obtained PtNi NWs exhibit amazingly specific and mass oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities with improvement factors of 51.1 and 34.6 over commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively, and are also stable in ORR conditions, making them among the most efficient electrocatalysts for ORR. PMID:26459261

  10. Copper(II) as an efficient scavenger of singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Joshi, P C

    1998-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to play an important role in tissue injury that damages DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Increased production of ROS and/or decreased efficiency of antioxidant defense system has been shown to contribute to a number of degenerative processes including cancer and AIDS. Among the various forms of ROS, singlet oxygen (1O2), which is generated predominantly in photosensitization reactions, is of particular physiologic significance because of its selectively long life in aqueous solution, its ability to cross the cell membrane barrier and high reactivity towards biomolecules. In the present study, the 1O2 scavenging potential of Cu(II) has been evaluated by (i) generating 1O2 by photosensitization of rose bengal (RB), (ii) establishing 1O2 quenching with recognized 1O2 scavengers like sodium azide, DABCO and (iii) examining the effect of Cu(II) in scavenging of 1O2. The results revealed that Cu(II) inhibited the rate of 1O2 production by 88%, 68%, 40%, 21% and 10% at a concentration of 10(-2) M, 5 x 10(-3) M, 10(-3) M; 5 x 10(-4) M, and 10(-4) M, respectively. Under similar experimental condition, sodium azide or DABCO at 10(-2) M inhibited the 1O2 production by 86% and 88%, respectively. Other 1O2 generating photosensitizer like hematoporphyrin, riboflavin and methylene blue also produced identical results with Cu(II) but Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) or As(III) did not produce any quenching of 1O2. Presence of a copper binding peptide (Gly-Gly-His) in the reaction system reduced the 1O2 scavenging capacity of Cu(II) by 52-66% depending upon the UV dose. The 1O2 scavenging property of metal ion appears to have an advantage to reduce the oxidative damage of photodynamic reactions in order to prevent ROS-induced toxicity reactions. PMID:9854900

  11. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael D; Christen, Hans M; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active than the (110) surface that has been traditionally explored by density functional theory studies. The relation between the OER activity and density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites exposed on each rutile crystallographic facet is discussed. The surface-orientation dependent activities can guide the design of high-surface-area catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  12. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particles located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.

  13. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Oxygen Electroreduction Activities of Carbon-Supported PtW Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Liufeng; More, Karren Leslie; He, Ting

    2010-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtW (PtW/C) alloy nanoparticle catalysts with well-controlled particle size, dispersion, and composition uniformity, have been synthesized by wet chemical methods of decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes, hydrolysis of metal salts, and chemical reactions within a reverse microemulsion. The synthesized PtW/C catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The catalytic oxygen electroreduction activities were measured by the hydrodynamic rotating disk electrode technique in an acidic electrolyte. The influence of the synthesis method on PtW particle size, size distribution, composition uniformity, and catalytic oxygen electroreduction activity, have been investigated. Among the synthesis methods studied, PtW/C catalysts prepared by the decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes displayed the best platinum mass activity for oxygen reduction reaction under the current small scale production; a 3.4-fold catalytic enhancement was achieved in comparison to a benchmark Pt/C standard.

  14. Phenol degradation in heterogeneous system generating singlet oxygen employing light activated electropolymerized phenothiazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwowar, Katarzyna; Blacha-Grzechnik, Agata; Bernas, Paulina; Zak, Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    Five selected amine-derivatives of phenothiazine were electropolymerized on an ITO/glass substrate and then used in the daylight-activated process to produce in situ singlet oxygen which degrades phenol in a solution. The phenothiazines were immobilized in a simple electrochemical procedure in an acidic solution which led to the formation of an ultrathin transparent polymeric film. All films obtained on the ITO substrate including azure A (AA), azure C (AC), methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue (TBO), and thionine (Th) had a comparable surface coverage at the level of picomoles/cm2. The activity of these materials was then compared and presented in terms of an efficiency of the phenol degradation process in an aqueous solution by photogenerated singlet oxygen. That efficiency was determined by the UV-vis spectroscopy employing a phenol/4-aminoantipyrine complex. All the phenothiazine ultrathin polymeric films were capable of generating the singlet oxygen in the aqueous solution under daylight activation, which was used in the consecutive process of phenol degradation. The highest efficiency at a level of 51.4% and 45.4% was found for the AC/ITO and MB/ITO layers, respectively.

  15. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  16. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst. PMID:25229121

  17. Stable platinum nanoclusters on genomic DNA–graphene oxide with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Jitendra N.; Nath, Krishna; Kumar, Susheel; Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Kemp, K. Christian; Le, Nhien H.; Youn, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kwang S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize platinum clusters with small diameters of 2–4 nm are known to be excellent catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. The inherent catalytic activity of smaller platinum clusters has not yet been reported due to a lack of preparation methods to control their size (<2 nm). Here we report the synthesis of platinum clusters (diameter ≤1.4 nm) deposited on genomic double-stranded DNA–graphene oxide composites, and their high-performance electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. The electrochemical behaviour, characterized by oxygen reduction reaction onset potential, half-wave potential, specific activity, mass activity, accelerated durability test (10,000 cycles) and cyclic voltammetry stability (10,000 cycles) is attributed to the strong interaction between the nanosize platinum clusters and the DNA–graphene oxide composite, which induces modulation in the electronic structure of the platinum clusters. Furthermore, we show that the platinum cluster/DNA–graphene oxide composite possesses notable environmental durability and stability, vital for high-performance fuel cells and batteries. PMID:23900456

  18. Inhibitory activities of soluble and bound millet seed phenolics on free radicals and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara, Anoma; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2011-01-12

    Oxidative stress, caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), is responsible for modulating several pathological conditions and aging. Soluble and bound phenolic extracts of commonly consumed millets, namely, kodo, finger (Ravi), finger (local), foxtail, proso, little, and pearl, were investigated for their phenolic content and inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and ROS, namely, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). Inhibition of DPPH and hydroxyl radicals was detrmined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The peroxyl radical inhibitory activity was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The scavenging of H(2)O(2), HOCl, and (1)O(2) was evaluated using colorimetric methods. The results were expressed as micromoles of ferulic acid equivalents (FAE) per gram of grain on a dry weight basis. In addition, major hydroxycinnamic acids were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS). All millet varieties displayed effective radical and ROS inhibition activities, which generally positively correlated with phenolic contents, except for hydroxyl radical. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of ferulic and p-coumaric acids as major hydroxycinnamic acids in phenolic extract and responsible for the observed effects. Bound extracts of millet contributed 38-99% to ROS scavenging, depending on the variety and the test system employed. Hence, bound phenolics must be included in the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of millets and other cereals. PMID:21133411

  19. A mathematical model relating cortical oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin flows and volumes to neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Suh, Minah; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To describe a toolkit of components for mathematical models of the relationship between cortical neural activity and space-resolved and time-resolved flows and volumes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin motivated by optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI). Approach. Both blood flow and blood volume and both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are accounted for. Flow and volume are described by including analogies to both resistive and capacitive electrical circuit elements. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are described by generalization of Kirchhoff's laws based on well-mixed compartments. Main results. Mathematical models built from this toolkit are able to reproduce experimental single-stimulus OISI results that are described in papers from other research groups and are able to describe the response to multiple-stimuli experiments as a sublinear superposition of responses to the individual stimuli. Significance. The same assembly of tools from the toolkit but with different parameter values is able to describe effects that are considered distinctive, such as the presence or absence of an initial decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, indicating that the differences might be due to unique parameter values in a subject rather than different fundamental mechanisms.

  20. Adair-based hemoglobin equilibrium with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen ion activity.

    PubMed

    Mateják, Marek; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    As has been known for over a century, oxygen binding onto hemoglobin is influenced by the activity of hydrogen ions (H⁺), as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO₂). As is also known, the binding of both CO₂and H⁺ on terminal valine-1 residues is competitive. One-parametric situations of these hemoglobin equilibria at specific levels of H⁺, O₂or CO₂are also well described. However, we think interpolating or extrapolating this knowledge into an 'empirical' function of three independent variables has not yet been completely satisfactory. We present a model that integrates three orthogonal views of hemoglobin oxygenation, titration, and carbamination at different temperatures. The model is based only on chemical principles, Adair's oxygenation steps and Van't Hoff equation of temperature dependences. Our model fits the measurements of the Haldane coefficient and CO₂hemoglobin saturation. It also fits the oxygen dissociation curve influenced by simultaneous changes in H⁺, CO₂and O₂, which makes it a strong candidate for integration into more complex models of blood acid-base with gas transport, where any combination of mentioned substances can appear. PMID:25594800

  1. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  2. Microbial activities and phosphorus cycling: An application of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Lisa M.; Joshi, Sunendra R.; Kana, Todd M.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms carry out biochemical transformations of nutrients that make up their cells. Therefore, understanding how these nutrients are transformed or cycled in natural environments requires knowledge of microbial activity. Commonly used indicators for microbial activity typically include determining microbial respiration by O2/CO2 measurements, cell counts, and measurement of enzyme activities. However, coupled studies on nutrient cycling and microbial activity are not given enough emphasis. Here we apply phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18OP) as a tool for measurement of microbial activity and compare the rate of isotope exchange with methods of measuring microbial activities that are more commonly applied in environmental studies including respiration, dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell counts. Our results show that different bacteria may have different strategies for P uptake, storage and release, their respiration and consequently expression of DHA and APase activities, but in general the trend of their enzyme activities are comparable. Phosphate δ18OP values correlated well with these other parameters used to measure microbial activity with the strongest linear relationships between δ18OP and CO2 evolution (r = -0.99). Even though the rate of isotope exchange for each microorganism used in this study is different, the rate per unit CO2 respiration showed one general trend, where δ18OP values move towards equilibrium while CO2 is generated. While this suggests that P cycling among microorganisms used in this study can be generalized, further research is needed to determine whether the microorganism-specific isotope exchange trend may occur in natural environments. In summary, phosphate oxygen isotope measurements may offer an alternative for use as a tracer to measure microbial activity in soils, sediments, and many other natural environments.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Reactive Oxygen Species in Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tingyang; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Zuo, Li

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is experienced by individuals suffering from cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart diseases and subsequently undergoing reperfusion treatments in order to manage the conditions. The occlusion of blood flow to the tissue, termed ischemia, can be especially detrimental to the heart due to its high energy demand. Several cellular alterations have been observed upon the onset of ischemia. The danger created by cardiac ischemia is somewhat paradoxical in that a return of blood to the tissue can result in further damage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been studied intensively to reveal their role in myocardial I/R injury. Under normal conditions, ROS function as a mediator in many cell signaling pathways. However, stressful environments significantly induce the generation of ROS which causes the level to exceed body's antioxidant defense system. Such altered redox homeostasis is implicated in myocardial I/R injury. Despite the detrimental effects from ROS, low levels of ROS have been shown to exert a protective effect in the ischemic preconditioning. In this review, we will summarize the detrimental role of ROS in myocardial I/R injury, the protective mechanism induced by ROS, and potential treatments for ROS-related myocardial injury. PMID:26509170

  4. Low-pressure line-shape study in molecular oxygen with absolute frequency reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domysławska, J.; Wójtewicz, S.; Cygan, A.; Bielska, K.; Lisak, D.; Masłowski, P.; Trawiński, R. S.; Ciuryło, R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a line-shape analysis of the rovibronic R1 Q2 transition of the oxygen B band resolved by the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique in the low pressure range. The frequency axis of the spectra is linked by the ultra-narrow diode laser to the optical frequency comb in order to measure the absolute frequency at each point of the recorded spectra. Experimental spectra are fitted with various line-shape models: the Voigt profile, the Galatry profile, the Nelkin-Ghatak profile, the speed-dependent Voigt profile, and the speed-dependent Nelkin-Ghatak profile with quadratic and hypergeometric approximations for the speed dependence of collisional broadening and shifting. The influences of Dicke narrowing, speed-dependent effects, and correlation between phase- and velocity-changing collisions on the line shape are investigated. Values of line-shape parameters, including the absolute frequency of the transition 435685.24828(46) GHz, are reported.

  5. Atomic structure of unligated laccase from Cerrena maxima at 1.76 A with molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukova, Yu. N. Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gur'yanov, V. A.; Kobyl'skaya, Yu. V.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2010-05-15

    The three-dimensional structure of unligated laccase from Cerrena maxima was established by X-ray diffraction at 1.76-A resolution; R{sub work} = 18.07%, R{sub free} = 21.71%, rmsd of bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.008 A, 1.19{sup o}, and 0.077{sup o}, respectively. The coordinate error for the refined structure estimated from the Luzzati plot is 0.195 A. The maximum average error in the atomic coordinates is 0.047 A. A total of 99.4% of amino-acid residues of the polypeptide chain are in the most favorable, allowable, and accessible regions of the Ramachandran plot. The three-dimensional structures of the complexes of laccase from C. maxima with molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were determined by the molecular simulation. These data provide insight into the structural aspect of the mechanism of the enzymatic cycle. The structure factors and the refined atomic coordinates were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB-ID code is 3DIV).

  6. Atomic structure of unligated laccase from Cerrena maxima at 1.76 Å with molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, Yu. N.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gur'yanov, V. A.; Kobyl'Skaya, Yu. V.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    The three-dimensional structure of unligated laccase from Cerrena maxima was established by X-ray diffraction at 1.76-Å resolution; R work = 18.07%, R free = 21.71%, rmsd of bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.008 Å, 1.19°, and 0.077°, respectively. The coordinate error for the refined structure estimated from the Luzzati plot is 0.195 Å. The maximum average error in the atomic coordinates is 0.047 Å. A total of 99.4% of amino-acid residues of the polypeptide chain are in the most favorable, allowable, and accessible regions of the Ramachandran plot. The three-dimensional structures of the complexes of laccase from C. maxima with molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were determined by the molecular simulation. These data provide insight into the structural aspect of the mechanism of the enzymatic cycle. The structure factors and the refined atomic coordinates were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB-ID code is 3DIV).

  7. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Disease Activity in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Aikawa, Elena; Newby, David E; Tarkin, Jason M; Rudd, James H F; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-07-01

    Major focus has been placed on the identification of vulnerable plaques as a means of improving the prediction of myocardial infarction. However, this strategy has recently been questioned on the basis that the majority of these individual coronary lesions do not in fact go on to cause clinical events. Attention is, therefore, shifting to alternative imaging modalities that might provide a more complete pan-coronary assessment of the atherosclerotic disease process. These include markers of disease activity with the potential to discriminate between patients with stable burnt-out disease that is no longer metabolically active and those with active atheroma, faster disease progression, and increased risk of infarction. This review will examine how novel molecular imaging approaches can provide such assessments, focusing on inflammation and microcalcification activity, the importance of these processes to coronary atherosclerosis, and the advantages and challenges posed by these techniques. PMID:27390335

  8. Molecular profiling of activated neurons by phosphorylated ribosome capture.

    PubMed

    Knight, Zachary A; Tan, Keith; Birsoy, Kivanc; Schmidt, Sarah; Garrison, Jennifer L; Wysocki, Robert W; Emiliano, Ana; Ekstrand, Mats I; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-21

    The mammalian brain is composed of thousands of interacting neural cell types. Systematic approaches to establish the molecular identity of functional populations of neurons would advance our understanding of neural mechanisms controlling behavior. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6, a structural component of the ribosome, becomes phosphorylated in neurons activated by a wide range of stimuli. We show that these phosphorylated ribosomes can be captured from mouse brain homogenates, thereby enriching directly for the mRNAs expressed in discrete subpopulations of activated cells. We use this approach to identify neurons in the hypothalamus regulated by changes in salt balance or food availability. We show that galanin neurons are activated by fasting and that prodynorphin neurons restrain food intake during scheduled feeding. These studies identify elements of the neural circuit that controls food intake and illustrate how the activity-dependent capture of cell-type-specific transcripts can elucidate the functional organization of a complex tissue. PMID:23178128

  9. Reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Jixueteng evaluated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and photon emission.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Toshizo; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takamichi, Maomi; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Maehata, Yojiro; Sugiyama, Shuta; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Todoki, Kazuo; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Hamada, Nobushiro

    2014-12-01

    Jixueteng, the dried stem of Spatholobus suberectus Dunn (Leguminosae), is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine that is commonly classified as a herb that promotes blood circulation and can be used to treat blood stasis. The aim of this study was to examine the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity of Jixueteng and other herbal medicines. The ROS scavenging activities of the water extracts of Jixueteng, Cnidium officinale and Salvia miltiorrhiza were examined using an electron spin resonance (ESR) technique and faint luminescence measurement. The ESR signal intensities of the superoxide anion (O2·) and hydroxyl radical (HO·) were reduced more by Jixueteng than the other herbal medicines we tested. High photon emission intensity to hydrogen peroxide (H202) and HO· was observed in Jixueteng using the XYZ chemiluminescence system that was used as faint luminescence measurement and analysis. The results of the present study revealed that the ROS scavenging activity of 8% Jixueteng was the strongest among the herbal medicines we tested. It has been reported that Jixueteng includes various polyphenols. In the ROS scavenging activity by Jixueteng, it is supposed that the antioxidant activity caused by these polyphenols would contribute greatly. In conclusion, a water extract component of Jixueteng had potent free radical scavenging activity and an antioxidative effect that inhibited the oxidative actions of O2·⁻, H2O2 and HO·. Therefore, Jixueteng represents a promising therapeutic drug for reactive oxygen-associated pathologies. PMID:25632478

  10. An Inner-Sphere Mechanism for Molecular Oxygen Reduction Catalyzed by Copper Amine Oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Smirnov, Valeriy V.; Lanci, Michael P.; Brown, Doreen E.; Shepard, Eric M.; Dooley, David M.; Roth, Justine P.

    2008-01-01

    Copper and topaquinone (TPQ) containing amine oxidases utilize O2 for the metabolism of biogenic amines while concomitantly generating H2O2 for use by the cell. The mechanism of O2 reduction has been the subject of long-standing debate due to the obscuring influence of a proton-coupled electron transfer between the tyrosine-derived TPQ and copper, a rapidly established equilibrium precluding assignment of the enzyme in its reactive form. Here we show that substrate-reduced pea seedling amine oxidase (PSAO) exists predominantly in the CuI, TPQ semiquinone state. A new mechanistic proposal for O2 reduction is advanced on the basis of thermodynamic considerations together with kinetic studies (at varying pH, temperature and viscosity), the identification of steady-state intermediates and the analysis of competitive oxygen kinetic isotope effects: 18O KIEs, [kcat/KM(16,16O2)]/[kcat/KM(16,18O2)]. The 18O KIE = 1.0136 ± 0.0013 at pH 7.2 is independent of temperature from 5 to 47°C and insignificantly changed to 1.0122 ± 0.0020 upon raising the pH to 9, thus indicating the absence of kinetic complexity. Using density functional methods, the effect is found to be precisely in the range expected for reversible O2 binding to CuI to afford a superoxide, [CuII(η1-O2)−I]+, intermediate. Electron transfer from the TPQ semiquinone follows in the first irreversible step to form a peroxide, CuII(η1-O2)−II, intermediate driving the reduction of O2. The similar 18O KIEs reported for copper amine oxidases from other sources raise the possibility that all enzymes react by related inner-sphere mechanisms although additional experiments are needed to test this proposal. PMID:18582059

  11. Singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g O sub 2 ) formation upon irradiation of an oxygen ( sup 3. Sigma. sub g sup minus O sub 2 )-organic molecule charge-transfer absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R. )

    1989-07-13

    Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) phosphorescence ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2} {l arrow} {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}: 1270 nm) has been observed in a time-resolved experiment subsequent to pulsed UV laser irradiation of the oxygen ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2})-organic molecule charge-transfer bands of liquid aromatic hydrocarbons (mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, benzene), ethers (tetrahydrofuran, 1,4-dioxane, glyme, diglyme, triglyme), alcohols (methanol, propanol), and aliphatic hydrocarbons (cyclohexane, cyclooctane, decahydronaphthalene). Although {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} could originate from a variety of different processes in these oxygenated solvent systems, we have used the results of several independent experiments to indicate that an oxygen-solvent charge-transfer (CT) state is the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} precursor. Other transient species have also been observed in time-resolved absorption experiments subsequent to pulsed UV irradiation of the oxygen-solvent CT bands. Some of these molecular transients, or species derived from these intermediates, may be responsible for an observed increase in the rate of {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} decay under certain conditions.

  12. Pt5Gd as a highly active and stable catalyst for oxygen electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Escribano, María; Verdaguer-Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo; Grønbjerg, Ulrik; Knudsen, Brian P; Jepsen, Anders K; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-10-10

    The activity and stability of Pt(5)Gd for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied, using a combination of electrochemical measurements, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS), and density functional theory calculations. Sputter-cleaned, polycrystalline Pt(5)Gd shows a 5-fold increase in ORR activity, relative to pure Pt at 0.9 V, approaching the most active in the literature for catalysts prepared in this way. AR-XPS profiles after electrochemical measurements in 0.1 M HClO(4) show the formation of a thick Pt overlayer on the bulk Pt(5)Gd, and the enhanced ORR activity can be explained by means of compressive strain effects. Furthermore, these novel bimetallic electrocatalysts are highly stable, which, in combination with their enhanced activity, makes them very promising for the development of new cathode catalysts for fuel cells. PMID:22998588

  13. Evidence that reactive oxygen species do not mediate NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Makio; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Isao; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hideyo; Karin, Michael; Kikugawa, Kiyomi

    2003-01-01

    It has been postulated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as second messengers leading to nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. This hypothesis is mainly based on the findings that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), compounds recognized as potential antioxidants, can inhibit NF-κB activation in a wide variety of cell types. Here we reveal that both NAC and PDTC inhibit NF-κB activation independently of antioxidative function. NAC selectively blocks tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced signaling by lowering the affinity of receptor to TNF. PDTC inhibits the IκB–ubiquitin ligase activity in the cell-free system where extracellular stimuli-regulated ROS production does not occur. Furthermore, we present evidence that endogenous ROS produced through Rac/NADPH oxidase do not mediate NF-κB signaling, but instead lower the magnitude of its activation. PMID:12839997

  14. Coupling of total hemoglobin concentration, oxygenation, and neural activity in rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Devor, Anna; Dunn, Andrew K; Andermann, Mark L; Ulbert, Istvan; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M

    2003-07-17

    Recent advances in brain imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), offer great promise for noninvasive mapping of brain function. However, the indirect nature of the imaging signals to the underlying neural activity limits the interpretation of the resulting maps. The present report represents the first systematic study with sufficient statistical power to quantitatively characterize the relationship between changes in blood oxygen content and the neural spiking and synaptic activity. Using two-dimensional optical measurements of hemodynamic signals, simultaneous recordings of neural activity, and an event-related stimulus paradigm, we demonstrate that (1) there is a strongly nonlinear relationship between electrophysiological measures of neuronal activity and the hemodynamic response, (2) the hemodynamic response continues to grow beyond the saturation of electrical activity, and (3) the initial increase in deoxyhemoglobin that precedes an increase in blood volume is counterbalanced by an equal initial decrease in oxyhemoglobin. PMID:12873390

  15. A Strategy to Promote the Electrocatalytic Activity of Spinels for Oxygen Reduction by Structure Reversal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangping; Wang, Jun; Ding, Wei; Nie, Yao; Li, Li; Qi, Xueqiang; Chen, Siguo; Wei, Zidong

    2016-01-22

    The electrocatalytic performance of a spinel for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be significantly promoted by reversing its crystalline structure from the normal to the inverse. As the spinel structure reversed, the activation and cleavage of O-O bonds are accelerated owing to a dissimilarity effect of the distinct metal atoms co-occupying octahedral sites. The Co(II)Fe(III)Co(III)O4 spinel with the Fe and Co co-occupying inverse structure exhibits an excellent ORR activity, which even exceeds that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C by 42 mV in alkaline medium. PMID:26663768

  16. Structure-activity relationship in high-performance iron-based electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ping; Wang, Ying; Pan, Jing; Xu, Weilin; Zhuang, Lin

    2015-12-01

    A sustainable Iron (Fe), Nitrogen (N) co-doped high performance Fe-Nx/C electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is synthesized simply based on nitric acid oxidation of cheap carbon black. The obtained optimal nonprecious metal electrocatalyst shows high ORR performance in both alkaline and acidic conditions and possesses appreciable performance/price ratio due to its low cost. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationship of different active sites on Fe-Nx/C is revealed systematically: Fe-N4/2-C > Fe4-N-C > N-C >> Fe4-C ≥ C, from both experimental and theoretical points of view.

  17. Transcript levels of antioxidative genes and oxygen radical scavenging enzyme activities in chilled zucchini squash in response to superatmospheric oxygen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcript levels of antioxidative genes including Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), Cu/Zn SOD, ascorbate peroxidise (APX), and catalase (CAT) do not vary significantly during storage at 5 °C with high oxygen treatment in freshly harvested zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Elite). However, ...

  18. Chemistry in the Molecular Disks of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are the centers of galaxies with supermassive blackholes whose accretion of mass causes very high luminosities of L˜1044-46erg s-1. An accretion disk has a molecular component that extends to hundreds of pc from the central AGN core. The question of how much central illumination affects the disk and how much star formation is present near the core have been astrophysical interests. Rotational lines from these disks at a sub-kpc scale have been observed for molecules such as CO, HCO+, HCN, and HNC. When ALMA becomes fully operational, it will be able to resolve these disks at much higher resolution than currently. Molecular observations at higher resolution may give some hints on the physics in the molecular disk. We modeled the chemical composition of a molecular disk in an AGN on a scale of tens of pc. To do this, we extended our standard gas-phase OSU network to include important processes at much higher temperatures, approaching 1000 K. We used the density model of Thompson et al., and determined the temperature by the blackbody approximation from the luminosity of the AGN core. The ionization by X-rays from the AGN core, by cosmic-rays from the AGN core, supernovae and stellar winds, and by UV-photons from OB stars are considered. We will briefly mention the effects from other factors that may change the molecular abundances such as shock waves and inhomogeneity of the density of the disk. T. Thompson, E. Quataert, and N. Murray, Astrophysical J. 630, 167 (2005)

  19. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further

  20. Design Insights for Tuning the Electrocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Oxides for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Manivannan, A; Balasubramanian, M; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2015-04-16

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers based on aqueous alkaline electrolytes hold the potential to be sustainable solutions to address the challenge of storing large amounts of electrical energy generated from solar and wind resources. For these batteries and electrolyzers to be economically viable, it is essential to have efficient, durable, and inexpensive electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction. In this article, we describe new insights for predicting and tuning the activity of inexpensive transition metal oxides for designing efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts. We have focused on understanding the factors determining the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in a strong alkaline medium. To this end, we have conducted a systematic investigation of nanophase calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt manganese oxide, an example of a mixed metal oxide that can be tuned for its electrocatalytic activity by varying the transition metal composition. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical polarization experiments, and analysis of mechanisms, we have identified the key determinants of electrocatalytic activity. We have found that the Tafel slopes are determined by the oxidation states and the bond energy of the surface intermediates of Mn-OH and Co-OH bonds while the catalytic activity increased with the average d-electron occupancy of the sigma* orbital of the M-OH bond. We anticipate that such understanding will be very useful in predicting the behavior of other transition metal oxide catalysts.

  1. Khat (Catha edulis) generates reactive oxygen species and promotes hepatic cell apoptosis via MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Abid, Morad Dirhem Naji; Chen, Juan; Xiang, Min; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xiaoping; Gong, Feili

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have suggested an association between khat (Catha edulis) chewing and acute liver lesions or chronic liver disease. However, little is known about the effects of khat on hepatic cells. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism behind khat-induced apoptosis in the L02 human hepatic cell line. We used cell growth inhibition assay, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining to measure hepatocyte apoptosis induced by khat. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression levels of caspase-8 and -9, as well as those of Bax and Bcl-2. We also measured reactive oxygen species production. The results indicated that khat induced significant hepatocyte apoptosis in L02 cells. We found that khat activated caspase-8 and -9, upregulated Bax protein expression and downregulated Bcl-2 expression levels, which resulted in the coordination of apoptotic signals. Khat-induced hepatocyte apoptosis is primarily regulated through the sustained activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and only partially via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Furthermore, the khat-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the activation of the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), attenuated the khat-induced activation of JNK and ERK. Our results demonstrate that khat triggers the generation of intracellular ROS and sequentially induces the sustainable activation of JNK, which in turn results in a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cell apoptosis. PMID:23708648

  2. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-11-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology.

  3. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology. PMID:24264379

  4. Study on Oxidation of Cu and Cu3Au Surfaces with Hyperthermal Oxygen Molecular Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Michio; Teraoka, Yuden

    Corrosion wastes more than a few percent of the world's GDP every year. The initial stage of the corrosion is one of the central topics in material science. The oxidation is one of the major corrosion processes of metals. Thus, the study of the oxidation process on metal surfaces is generally interesting in various fields of science and technology. The growth of a protective thin surface layer, which prevents further oxidation into bulk of a metal, requires the formation of a homogeneous film. One simple way for the protection of underlying metals is surface alloying, combining different substances to form multi-component surfaces. The surface alloying leads to the formation of a protective oxide layer due to the preferential oxidation of one component, possibly with surface segregation. Copper and copper alloys have wide industrial applications, and therefore are of interest for studies of oxidation mechanism, especially in the Cu2O formation. Cu forms the stable Cu2O, while Au does not form a stable oxide and is not soluble into stable Cu2O. Thus, the Cu-Au alloy system is ideal for investigating the effect of alloying on the formation of protective layer against further oxidation into bulk. Here, we introduce our recent comparative studies of the oxidation of Cu(100) and Cu3Au(100) with hyperthermal O2 molecular beam and discuss why Cu3Au(100) is protective against the oxidation.

  5. Influence of molecular oxygen on iodine atoms production in an RF discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheyev, P. A.; Ufimtsev, N. I.; Demyanov, A. V.; Kochetov, I. V.; Azyazov, V. N.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The results of the experiments and modeling of CH3I dissociation in a 40 MHz RF discharge plasma are presented. A discharge chamber of an original design, consisting of quartz tubes between two planar electrodes, permitted us to produce iodine atoms with a number density up to 2  ×  1016 cm‑3. In this discharge chamber, contrary to the previous experiments with a DC discharge and RF discharge with bare planar electrodes, contamination of the walls of the tubes did not disturb discharge stability, thus increasing iodine production rate. A substantial increase in CH3I dissociation efficiency due to the addition of oxygen into Ar(He) : CH3I mixtures was observed. Complete CH3I dissociation in the Ar : CH3I : O2 mixture occurred at 200 W discharge power, while a fraction of discharge power spent on iodine atoms production at 0.17 mmol s‑1 CH3I flow rate amounted to 16%. Extensive numerical modeling showed satisfactory agreement with the experiments and permitted us to estimate a previously unknown rate of constants for the processes: Ar*  +  CH2I2  →  Ar  +  CH2  +  I  +  I – 1.5  ×  10‑11 cm3 s‑1 Ar*  +  CH2I2  →  Ar  +  CH2I+  +  I  +  e – 10‑11 cm3 s‑1. Also, the cross section for the process CH2I2  +  e  →  CH2  +  I  +  I  +  e was estimated to be five times smaller than for the analogous process with CH3I.

  6. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  7. Reactive oxygen species in signalling the transcriptional activation of WIPK expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Yoo, Seung Jin; Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-07-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases represented by tobacco WIPK (wounding-induced protein kinase) and its orthologs in other species are unique in their regulation at transcriptional level in response to stress and pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation of WIPK is essential for induced WIPK activity, and activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) by the constitutively active NtMEK2(DD) is sufficient to induce WIPK gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of SIPK on WIPK gene expression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a combination of pharmacological and gain-of-function transgenic approaches, we studied the relationship among SIPK activation, WIPK gene activation in response to fungal cryptogein, light-dependent ROS generation in chloroplasts, and ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In the conditional gain-of-function GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic tobacco, induction of WIPK expression is dependent on the ROS generation in chloroplasts. Consistently, methyl viologen, an inducer of ROS generation in chloroplasts, highly activated WIPK expression. In addition to chloroplast-originated ROS, H(2)O(2) generated from the cell-surface NADPH oxidase could also activate WIPK gene expression, and inhibition of cryptogein-induced ROS generation also abolished WIPK gene activation. Our data demonstrate that WIPK gene activation is mediated by ROS, which provides a mechanism by which ROS influence cellular signalling processes in plant stress/defence response. PMID:24392654

  8. Tuning the surface oxygen concentration of {111} surrounded ceria nanocrystals for enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Kaneti, Yusuf Valentino; Li, Sean

    2015-12-01

    For oxide semiconductors, the morphology, particle size and oxygen vacancies are usually considered as key influential parameters for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants/dyes. It is widely accepted that cation doping not only modifies their phase and microstructures but also introduces variations in oxygen vacancy concentration. Herein, we report the fabrication of sub-10 nm sized pure and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals (NCs) via a facile, green hydrothermal method for the investigation of photocatalytic activities. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the crystal phase and morphology of the as-prepared nanocrystals. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques were implemented to investigate the presence and variations in oxygen vacancy concentration in un-doped and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals. The photocatalytic activity results revealed that 10 at% doping is the optimal indium doping level to demonstrate superior dye removal efficiency (~40%) over un-doped and doped CeO2 NCs. Moreover, the 10% In-doped CeO2 nanocrystals expressed excellent cycling stability and superior photocatalytic performance toward other dye pollutants. Finally, on the basis of our findings, a possible photocatalytic mechanism in which indium doping can generate more surface oxygen vacancies in the ceria lattice which delay the electron-hole recombination rates, thus increasing the lifetime of electron-hole separation for enhanced photocatalytic performances was proposed.For oxide semiconductors, the morphology, particle size and oxygen vacancies are usually considered as key influential parameters for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants/dyes. It is widely accepted that cation doping not only modifies their phase and microstructures but also introduces variations in oxygen vacancy concentration. Herein, we report the fabrication of sub-10 nm sized pure and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals (NCs) via a facile

  9. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-07

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  10. High performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Clement, Jason T.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-10-01

    The roundtrip electrochemical energy efficiency is improved from 63% to 76% at a current density of 200 mA cm-2 in an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) by utilizing modified carbon paper electrodes in the high-performance no-gap design. Heat treatment of the carbon paper electrodes in a 42% oxygen/58% nitrogen atmosphere increases the electrochemically wetted surface area from 0.24 to 51.22 m2 g-1, resulting in a 100-140 mV decrease in activation overpotential at operationally relevant current densities. An enriched oxygen environment decreases the amount of treatment time required to achieve high surface area. The increased efficiency and greater depth of discharge doubles the total usable energy stored in a fixed amount of electrolyte during operation at 200 mA cm-2.

  11. Effect of surface phosphorus functionalities of activated carbons containing oxygen and nitrogen on electrochemical capacitance

    PubMed Central

    Hulicova-Jurcakova, Denisa; Seredych, Mykola; Lu, Gao Qing; Kodiweera, N.K.A.C.; Stallworth, Phillip E.; Greenbaum, Steven; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2009-01-01

    Micro/mesoporous activated carbons containing oxygen and phosphorus heteroatoms were modified by incorporation of nitrogen using melamine and urea precursors. The surface chemistry was analyzed by the means of elemental analysis, XPS, and 31P MAS NMR. The results indicate that upon the incorporation of nitrogen at high temperatures not only new species involving carbon/nitrogen/oxygen are formed but also the phosphorous environment is significantly altered. Both urea and melamine precursors have similar effects on formation of P–N and P–C bonds. These compounds, although present in small but measurable quantities seem to affect the performance of carbons in electrochemical capacitors. With an increase in the heterogeneity of phosphorus containing species and with a decrease in the content pyrophosphates the capacitance increases and the retention ratio of the capacitor is improved. PMID:20354586

  12. Visible-Light Photoredox Catalyzed Three-Component Cyclization of 2H-Azirines, Alkynyl Bromides, and Molecular Oxygen to Oxazole Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Li, Hongji; Li, Pinhua; Wang, Lei

    2016-08-01

    A novel three-component cyclization of 2H-azirines, alkynyl bromides, and molecular oxygen under visible-light photoredox catalysis at room temperature has been developed, which provides a direct approach to a wide range of substituted oxazoles in moderate to good yields. PMID:27456612

  13. Palladium(II) Catalyzed Cyclization-Carbonylation-Cyclization Coupling Reaction of (ortho-Alkynyl Phenyl) (Methoxymethyl) Sulfides Using Molecular Oxygen as the Terminal Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rong; Kusakabe, Taichi; Yatsu, Tomofumi; Kanno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Keisuke; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Kato, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    An efficient Pd(II)/Pd⁰-p-benzoquinone/hydroquinone-CuCl₂/CuCl catalyst system was developed that uses environmentally friendly molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant to catalyze the cyclization-carbonylation-cyclization coupling reaction (CCC-coupling reaction) of (o-alkynyl phenyl) (methoxymethyl) sulfides. PMID:27607997

  14. CHEMISTRY OF FOG WATERS IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY: 1. IN SITU PHOTOFORMATION OF HYDROXYL RADICAL AND SINGLET MOLECULAR OXYGEN. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aqueous-phase photoformation of hydroxyl radical (characterOH) and singlet molecular oxygen (O2(1Δg) or 1O*

  15. Theoretical study of nitrodibenzofurans: A possible relationship between molecular properties and mutagenic activity.

    PubMed

    Stanković, B; Ostojić, B D; Popović, A; Gruden, M А; Đorđević, D S

    2016-11-15

    In this study we present a theoretical investigation of the molecular properties of nitrodibenzofurans (NDFs) and dinitrodibenzofurans (DNDFs) and their relation to mutagenic activity. Equilibrium geometries, relative energies, vertical ionization potentials (IP), vertical electron activities (EA), electronic dipole polarizabilities, and dipole moments of all NDFs and three DNDFs calculated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods are reported. The Ziegler/Rauk Energy Decomposition Analysis (EDA) is employed for a direct estimate of the variations of the orbital interaction and steric repulsion terms corresponding to the nitro group and the oxygen of the central ring of NDFs. The results indicate differences among NDF isomers for the cleavage of the related bonds and steric effects in the active site. The results show a good linear relationship between polarizability (<α>), anisotropy of polarizability (Δα), the summation of IR intensities (ΣIIR) and the summation of Raman activities (ΣARaman) over all 3N-6 vibrational modes and experimental mutagenic activities of NDF isomers in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain. The polarizability changes with respect to the νsNO+CN vibrational mode are in correlation with the mutagenic activities of NDFs and suggest that intermolecular interactions are favoured along this coordinate. PMID:27475460

  16. Linking neural activity and molecular oscillations in the SCN

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) function as part of a central timing circuit that drives daily changes in our behaviour and underlying physiology. A hallmark feature of SCN neuronal populations is that they are mostly electrically silent during the night, start to fire action potentials near dawn and then continue to generate action potentials with a slow and steady pace all day long. Sets of currents are responsible for this daily rhythm, with the strongest evidence for persistent Na+ currents, L-type Ca2+ currents, hyperpolarization-activated currents (IH), large-conductance Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) currents and fast delayed rectifier (FDR) K+ currents. These rhythms in electrical activity are crucial for the function of the circadian timing system, including the expression of clock genes, and decline with ageing and disease. This article reviews our current understanding of the ionic and molecular mechanisms that drive the rhythmic firing patterns in the SCN. PMID:21886186

  17. State-selective reaction dynamics of atomic oxygen with molecular hydrogen, methanethiol, and ethanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiande

    2000-11-01

    Reaction dynamics have been studied for the following four systems: (1)The rotational state distribution of the nascent NO fragment generated from the photodissociation of (i- C3H7) 3SiONO near 226 nm (S2 absorption band) has been obtained via 1+1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy and with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). The absence of vibrational excitation and relative cold rotational distribution suggest a direct dissociation mechanism upon photolysis of the parent molecule. (2)The reaction dynamics of O(3P) and H2(v = 1). The quantum state specific reactant H2(v = 1) was prepared effectively via Stimulated Raman Pumping (SRP). The internal quantum state distribution of the product OH (X 2Π1/2,3/2) was interrogated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. The one-quantum vibrational excitation of hydrogen not only dramatically increases the reaction rate, but also may have slightly changed the reaction mechanism from the known ground-state hydrogen reaction. (3)Experimental and ab initio studies of the reaction dynamics of O(3P) + CH3SH. Experiments utilized LIF detection of OH, CH3S, SO, and also HSO. Theoretically, ab initio energy evaluations using Gaussian 94 software and G2MP2 theory, and ab initio molecular dynamics were carried out for the reaction. The combination of the experimental and theoretical works has resulted in great insight into the reaction mechanism. (4)Experimental study of the reaction dynamics of O(3P) + C2H 5SH by the similar experimental measurements to the reaction O( 3P) + CH3SH. The reaction O(3P) + C 2H5SD further eliminated the ambiguity in confirming the each other in suggesting the proper reaction mechanisms for the two reaction systems.

  18. Regulation of manganese peroxidase gene transcription by hydrogen peroxide, chemical stress, and molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Alic, M.; Brown, J.A.; Gold, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase (MnP) in nitrogen-limited cultures of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium is regulated at the level of gene transcription by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and various chemicals, including ethanol, sodium arsenite, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, as well as by Mn(II) and heat shock. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrates that the addition of 1.0 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to 5-day-old cultures grown in the absence of Mn results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 15 min. Higher levels of mnp mRNA are obtained with simultaneous induction by Mn and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} than with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone. Although neither MnP activity nor associated protein is detectable in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cultures grown in the absence of Mn, simultaneous induction with Mn and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} results in a 1.6-fold increase in MnP activity compared with the MnP activity resulting resulting from Mn induction alone. In the presence of Mn, purging of low-nitrogen cultures with 100% O{sub 2}, in contrast to incubation under air, results in an increase in the accumulation of mnp mRNA and a 13-fold increase in MnP activity on day 5. However, in contrast to the effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and heat shock, O{sub 2} purging of Mn-deficient cultures results in negligible accumulation of mnp mRNA. 48 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  20. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  1. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  2. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  3. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments.

    PubMed

    Thureborn, Petter; Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  4. Involvement of Activated Oxygen in Nitrate-Induced Senescence of Pea Root Nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Escuredo, P. R.; Minchin, F. R.; Gogorcena, Y.; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, I.; Klucas, R. V.; Becana, M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of short-term nitrate application (10 mM, 0-4 d) on nitrogenase (N2ase) activity, antioxidant defenses, and related parameters was investigated in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Frilene) nodules. The response of nodules to nitrate comprised two stages. In the first stage (0-2 d), there were major decreases in N2ase activity and N2ase-linked respiration and concomitant increases in carbon cost of N2ase and oxygen diffusion resistance of nodules. There was no apparent oxidative damage, and the decline in N2ase activity was, to a certain extent, reversible. The second stage (>2 d) was typical of a senescent, essentially irreversible process. It was characterized by moderate increases in oxidized proteins and catalytic Fe and by major decreases in antioxidant enzymes and metabolites. The restriction in oxygen supply to bacteroids may explain the initial decline in N2ase activity. The decrease in antioxidant protection is not involved in this process and is not specifically caused by nitrate, since it also occurs with drought stress. However, comparison of nitrate- and drought-induced senescence shows an important difference: there is no lipid degradation or lipid peroxide accumulation with nitrate, indicating that lipid peroxidation is not necessarily involved in nodule senescence. PMID:12226252

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Alter Sympathetic Activity During Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Josiane C.; Flôr, Atalia F. L.; França-Silva, Maria S.; Balarini, Camille M.; Braga, Valdir A.

    2015-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II), which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs), mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO). Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS): dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin, and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS. PMID:26779026

  6. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  7. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co(3+/4+) ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  8. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions.

  9. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  10. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  11. New insights into the oxygen dissociation and migration on Pt(1 1 1) surface from the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Li, Haibo; Xu, Shuling; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-11-01

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dissociation of oxygen molecule on the Pt(1 1 1) surface at 350 K. The results show oxygen dissociation is a step-by-step process. The dissociated oxygen atoms can form fcc-fcc or fcc-hcp adsorption structure on the Pt(1 1 1) surface, which is consistent with the results of previous experiments. The Kohn-Sham energy evolutions indicate that the hcp-hcp adsorption structure possesses relatively high energy, and would transform into an fcc-hcp adsorption structure with low energy barrier. This study provides important information in understanding the oxygen dissociation dynamics at the atomic level.

  12. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNA footprinting

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L; Lee, Luke P

    2013-10-29

    This invention provides a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of nucleic acid (e.g., DNA) length changes and perform nucleic acid footprinting. In various embodiments the ruler comprises a nucleic acid attached to a nanoparticle, such that changes in the nucleic acid length are detectable using surface plasmon resonance. The nanoplasmonic ruler provides a fast and convenient platform for mapping nucleic acid-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other footprinting related methods.

  13. Biochemical properties of Paracoccus denitrificans FnrP: reactions with molecular oxygen and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Crack, Jason C; Hutchings, Matthew I; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E

    2016-03-01

    In Paracoccus denitrificans, three CRP/FNR family regulatory proteins, NarR, NnrR and FnrP, control the switch between aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) respiration. FnrP is a [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing homologue of the archetypal O2 sensor FNR from E. coli and accordingly regulates genes encoding aerobic and anaerobic respiratory enzymes in response to O2, and also NO, availability. Here we show that FnrP undergoes O2-driven [4Fe-4S] to [2Fe-2S] cluster conversion that involves up to 2 O2 per cluster, with significant oxidation of released cluster sulfide to sulfane observed at higher O2 concentrations. The rate of the cluster reaction was found to be ~sixfold lower than that of E. coli FNR, suggesting that FnrP can remain transcriptionally active under microaerobic conditions. This is consistent with a role for FnrP in activating expression of the high O2 affinity cytochrome c oxidase under microaerobic conditions. Cluster conversion resulted in dissociation of the transcriptionally active FnrP dimer into monomers. Therefore, along with E. coli FNR, FnrP belongs to the subset of FNR proteins in which cluster type is correlated with association state. Interestingly, two key charged residues, Arg140 and Asp154, that have been shown to play key roles in the monomer-dimer equilibrium in E. coli FNR are not conserved in FnrP, indicating that different protomer interactions are important for this equilibrium. Finally, the FnrP [4Fe-4S] cluster is shown to undergo reaction with multiple NO molecules, resulting in iron nitrosyl species and dissociation into monomers. PMID:26790880

  14. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular water is an important pool of oxygen and hydrogen atoms for biosynthesis. Intracellular water is usually assumed to be isotopically identical to extracellular water, but an unexpected experimental result caused us to question this assumption. Heme O isolated from Escherichia coli cells grown in 95% H218O contained only a fraction of the theoretical value of labeled oxygen at a position where the O atom was known to be derived from water. In fact, fewer than half of the oxygen atoms were labeled. In an effort to explain this surprising result, we developed a method to determine the isotope ratios of intracellular water in cultured cells. The results of our experiments showed that during active growth, up to 70% of the oxygen atoms and 50% of the hydrogen atoms in the intracellular water of E. coli are generated during metabolism and can be isotopically distinct from extracellular water. The fraction of isotopically distinct atoms was substantially less in stationary phase and chilled cells, consistent with our hypothesis that less metabolically-generated water would be present in cells with lower metabolic activity. Our results were consistent with and explained the result of the heme O labeling experiment. Only about 40% of the O atoms on the heme O molecule were labeled because, presumably, only about 40% of the water inside the cells was 18O water that had diffused in from the culture medium. The rest of the intracellular water contained 16O atoms derived from either nutrients or atmospheric oxygen. To test whether we could also detect metabolically-derived hydrogen atoms in cellular constituents, we isolated fatty acids from log-phase and stationary phase E. coli and determined the H isotope ratios of individual fatty acids. The results of these experiments showed that environmental water contributed more H atoms to fatty acids isolated in stationary phase than to the same fatty acids isolated from log-phase cells. Stable isotope analyses of

  15. Molecular Imprint of Enzyme Active Site by Camel Nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang-Wei; Xia, Lijie; Su, Youhong; Liu, Hongchun; Xia, Xueqing; Lu, Qinxia; Yang, Chunjin; Reheman, Kalbinur

    2012-01-01

    Screening of inhibitory Ab1 antibodies is a critical step for producing catalytic antibodies in the anti-idiotypic approach. However, the incompatible surface of the active site of the enzyme and the antigen-binding site of heterotetrameric conventional antibodies become the limiting step. Because camelid-derived nanobodies possess the potential to preferentially bind to the active site of enzymes due to their small size and long CDR3, we have developed a novel approach to produce antibodies with alliinase activities by exploiting the molecular mimicry of camel nanobodies. By screening the camelid-derived variable region of the heavy chain cDNA phage display library with alliinase, we obtained an inhibitory nanobody VHHA4 that recognizes the active site. Further screening with VHHA4 from the same variable domain of the heavy chain of a heavy-chain antibody library led to a higher incidence of anti-idiotypic Ab2 abzymes with alliinase activities. One of the abzymes, VHHC10, showed the highest activity that can be inhibited by Ab1 VHHA4 and alliinase competitive inhibitor penicillamine and significantly suppressed the B16 tumor cell growth in the presence of alliin in vitro. The results highlight the feasibility of producing abzymes via anti-idiotypic nanobody approach. PMID:22374998

  16. Molecular orbital studies on the structure-activity relationships of catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Y

    1992-02-01

    Quantum chemical studies were applied to analyze the activities of catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors. Molecular orbital calculations of inhibitor molecules were made by semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations, CNDO/2 (complete neglect of differential overlap) methods. Regression analysis among theoretical reaction indices based on the frontier electron theory and COMT inhibitory activities were carried out. The COMT inhibitory actions of two series of inhibitors, a series of 1,5-substituted 3,4-dihydroxy benzenes and a series of substituted 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy benzenes, were investigated. The resulting regression equations contain two common reaction indices as regression variables: the electron density on the oxygen atom of the hydroxyl group and the super-delocalizability on the 5th carbon atom of the benzene ring. These two atomic positions are considered to play an important role in the interaction of these inhibitors with COMT. The hydroxyl of atomic position 3 is probably indispensable to the COMT inhibitory action by these inhibitors. PMID:1507526

  17. Molecular Abundances in the Disk of AN Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, N.; Thompson, T. A.; Herbst, E.

    2011-06-01

    There are galactic nuclei that emit high luminosities L˜1044-46 erg S-1 including luminosity produced by X-rays from high mass accretion onto the central black holes. These nuclei are called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and they are accompanied by molecular disks. Observations show high abundances of CN and HCN in the disks; the molecules are proposed to be probes of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) created by the X-rays from AGNs. We have constructed a spatially-dependent chemical-abundance model of the molecular disk in NGC 1068, a typical AGN-dominated galaxy. Recently, new observations of CN and HCN have been made at much higher spatial resolution, and there are also detections of polyatomic molecules such as HC3N, c-C3H2, and C2H. We discuss how these observations and our simulations can help us to better understand the physical conditions, the disk structure, and conditions for star formation within molecular disks, which are still uncertain. We also include a comparison with other types of galaxies such as (ultra-) luminous infrared galaxies. Usero et al.Astronomy and Astrophysics. 419 (897), 2004. Initial results were presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy 2010, RF05 Garcia-Burillo et al. Astronomy and Astrophysics. 519 (2), 2010. Garcia-Burillo et al. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 131 (12031), 2008. Costagliola et al. ArXiv e-print arXiv:1101.2122, 2011. Nakajima et al. Astrophysical Journal Letters 728 (L38), 2008.

  18. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s −0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol−1s−1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material–over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  19. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Charlette M; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A; Mudalige, Thilak K; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material's -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 10(6) mol(-1)s(-1) was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  20. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering. PMID:25817808

  1. In situ x-ray, electrochemical, and modeling investigation of the oxygen electrode activation.

    SciTech Connect

    Yildiz, B.; Chang, K.-C.; Meyers, D.; Carter, J. D.; You, H.

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen electrodes of solid oxide electrochemical cells have been shown to improve under strong cathodic and anodic polarization. Our study investigates the mechanism causing such improvement, using in situ x-ray and electrochemical characterization and electrochemical impedance modeling of the oxygen electrodes. Several porous and dense thin-film model electrodes of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LCM) on single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes have been analyzed in situ at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) using x-ray reflectivity and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) at the Mn K-edge and La LII-edge. In situ x-ray reflectivity analysis show that no clear correlation between the polarization of the electrode and any further changes in the roughness of the LSM/YSZ interface exist. XANES measurements illustrate that the cathodic or anodic dc polarization at high temperature induces no detectable changes in Mn chemical state either in the bulk or at the surface of the LCM and LSM electrodes on YSZ, while the La chemical state changes reversibly at the electrode surface. This field-induced chemical change of La at the surface of electrodes is assumed to be a cause of the electrochemical activation through enhanced surface exchange of oxygen on the doped lanthanum manganite electrodes.

  2. The scavenging of free radical and oxygen species activities and hydration capacity of collagen hydrolysates from walleye pollock ( Theragra chalcogramma) skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yongliang; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue

    2009-06-01

    Fish skin collagen hydrolysates (FSCH) were prepared from walleye pollock ( Theragra chalcogramma) using a mixture of enzymes, namely trypsin and flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis of the skin collagen was 27.3%. FSCH was mainly composed of low-molecular-weight peptides and the relative proportion of <1000Da fraction was 70.6%. Free radical and oxygen species scavenging activities of FSCH were investigated in four model systems, including diphenylpicrylhy-drazyl radical (DPPH), superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide model, and compared with that of a native antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). FSCH was also evaluated by water-absorbing and water-holding capacity. The results showed that FSCH was able to scavenge free radical and oxygen species significantly and to enhance water-absorbing and water-holding capacity remarkably. Therefore, FSCH may have potential applications in the medicine and food industries.

  3. Phosphate oxygen isotopic evidence for a temperate and biologically active Archaean ocean.

    PubMed

    Blake, Ruth E; Chang, Sae Jung; Lepland, Aivo

    2010-04-15

    Oxygen and silicon isotope compositions of cherts and studies of protein evolution have been interpreted to reflect ocean temperatures of 55-85 degrees C during the early Palaeoarchaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago). A recent study combining oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of cherts, however, makes a case for Archaean ocean temperatures being no greater than 40 degrees C (ref. 5). Ocean temperature can also be assessed using the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate. Recent studies show that (18)O:(16)O ratios of dissolved inorganic phosphate (delta(18)O(P)) reflect ambient seawater temperature as well as biological processing that dominates marine phosphorus cycling at low temperature. All forms of life require and concentrate phosphorus, and as a result of biological processing, modern marine phosphates have delta(18)O(P) values typically between 19-26 per thousand (VSMOW), highly evolved from presumed source values of approximately 6-8 per thousand that are characteristic of apatite in igneous rocks and meteorites. Here we report oxygen isotope compositions of phosphates in sediments from the 3.2-3.5-billion-year-old Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We find that delta(18)O(P) values range from 9.3 per thousand to 19.9 per thousand and include the highest values reported for Archaean rocks. The temperatures calculated from our highest delta(18)O(P) values and assuming equilibrium with sea water with delta(18)O = 0 per thousand (ref. 12) range from 26 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The higher delta(18)O(P) values are similar to those of modern marine phosphate and suggest a well-developed phosphorus cycle and evolved biologic activity on the Archaean Earth. PMID:20393560

  4. Kinetics of an oxygen - iodine active medium with iodine atoms optically pumped on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Malyshev, M. S.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetics of the processes occurring in an O2 - I2 - He - H2O gas flow in which photodissociation of molecular iodine at a wavelength close to 500 nm and excitation of atomic iodine on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition by narrow-band radiation near 1315 nm are implemented successively has been analysed. It is shown that implementation of these processes allows one to form an oxygen - iodine medium with a high degree of dissociation of molecular iodine and a relative content of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ) exceeding 10%. Having formed a supersonic gas flow with a temperature ~100 K from this medium, one can reach a small-signal gain of about 10-2 cm-1 on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition in iodine atoms. The specific power per unit flow cross section in the oxygen - iodine laser with this active medium may reach ~100 W cm-2.

  5. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resulting in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.

  6. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resultingmore » in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.« less

  7. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  8. Activity-stability relationship in the surface electrochemistry of the oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seo Hyoung; Connell, Justin G; Danilovic, Nemanja; Subbaraman, Ram; Chang, Kee-Chul; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Markovic, Nenad M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the functional links between the stability and reactivity of oxide materials during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is one key to enabling a vibrant hydrogen economy capable of competing with fossil fuel-based technologies. In this work, by focusing on the surface chemistry of monometallic Ru oxide in acidic and alkaline environments, we found that the kinetics of the OER are almost entirely controlled by the stability of the Ru surface atoms. The same activity-stability relationship was found for more complex, polycrystalline and single-crystalline SrRuO(3) thin films in alkaline solutions. We propose that the electrochemical transformation of either water (acidic solutions) or hydroxyl ions (alkaline solutions) to di-oxygen molecules takes place at defect sites that are inherently present on every electrode surface. During the OER, surface defects are also created by the corrosion of the Ru ions. The dissolution is triggered by the potential-dependent change in the valence state (n) of Ru: from stable but inactive Ru(4+) to unstable but active Ru(n>4+). We conclude that if the oxide is stable then it is completely inactive for the OER. A practical consequence is that the best materials for the OER should balance stability and activity in such a way that the dissolution rate of the oxide is neither too fast nor too slow. PMID:25490237

  9. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  10. Electrochemical activation of commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Xia, Guangsen; Liu, Haining; Xia, Shuwei; Lu, Yonghong

    2015-03-28

    Nitrogen (N)-doped carbon and its non-noble metal composite replacing platinum-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts still have some fundamental problems that remain. Here the micron-sized commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber (PAN-CF) electrode was modified using an electrochemical method, converting its inherent pyridinic-N into 2-pyridone (or 2-hydroxyl pyridine) functional group existing in three-dimensional active layers with remarkable ORR catalytic activity and stability. The carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen and oxygen atoms is prone to act as an active site to efficiently catalyze a two-electron ORR process. However, after coordinating pyridone to the Cu(2+) ion, together with the electrochemical reaction, the chemical redox between Cu(+) and ORR intermediates synergistically tends towards a four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. In different medium, the complexation and dissociation can induce the charge transfer and reconstruction among proton, metal ion and pyridone functionalities, eventually leading to the changes of ORR performance. PMID:25712410

  11. Testing and Oxygen Assessment Results for a Next Generation Extravehicular Activity Portable Life Support System Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Rivera, Fatonia L.; Martin, Devin

    2011-01-01

    NASA is designing a next generation Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use in future surface exploration endeavors. To meet the new requirements for ventilation flow at nominal and buddy modes, a fan has been developed and tested. This paper summarizes the results of the performance and life cycle testing efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Additionally, oxygen compatibility assessment results from an evaluation conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) are provided, and lessons learned and future recommendations are outlined.

  12. Evaluation of the persistence of micropollutants through pure-oxygen activated sludge nitrification and denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, A.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Kish, G.

    2006-01-01

    The persistence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and household and industrial chemicals through a pure-oxygen activated sludge, nitrification, denitrification wastewater treatment facility was evaluated. Of the 125 micropollutants that were tested in this study, 55 compounds were detected in the untreated wastewater, and 27 compounds were detected in the disinfected effluent. The persistent compounds included surfactants, fire-retardant chemicals, pesticides, fragrance compounds, hormones, and one pharmaceutical. Physical-chemical properties of micropollutants that affected partitioning onto wastewater solids included vapor pressure and octanol-water partition coefficients.

  13. An ultrastable bimetallic carbide as platinum electrocatalyst support for highly active oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Zhang, Mingmei; Xie, Jimin; Shen, Pei Kang

    2015-11-01

    Stable bimetallic carbide (Fe2MoC) with graphitized carbon (GC) as matrix has been synthesized through an ion-exchange method. The Pt nanoparticles are loaded on the GC-Fe2MoC composite to form Pt/GC-Fe2MoC electrocatalyst which shows much higher activity and stability than those of commercial Pt/C for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic media. The excellent performances of Pt/GC-Fe2MoC are mainly due to the inherent stability of GC-Fe2MoC and the promotion effect between Fe2MoC and Pt.

  14. Catalytic activity of metal oxides in hydrogen sulfide oxidation by oxygen and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marshneva, V.I.; Mokrinskii, V.V.

    1989-02-01

    Separate investigations have been made of the catalytic activities of a wide range of oxides by groups I-VIII metals in the Claus reaction and oxidation of H/sub 2/S by oxygen. Only 9 of 21 oxides used in the Claus reaction exhibit stable activity. The remaining oxides are deactivated, mainly by absorbing H/sub 2/S and being converted into sulfides. There are similar tendencies in the changes of sulfur formation specific velocities in both processes in the series of stable oxides V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, TiO/sub 2/, Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgO, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Vanadium pentoxide is the most active catalyst in the total and partial oxidations of H/sub 2/S and the Claus reaction.

  15. Elucidating the activity of stepped Pt single crystals for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S; Hansen, Heine A; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L

    2014-07-21

    The unexpectedly high measured activity of Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystal surfaces towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is explained utilizing the hydroxyl binding energy as the activity descriptor. Using this descriptor (estimated using experimental data obtained by different groups), a well-defined Sabatier-type volcano is observed for the activities measured for the Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystals, in remarkable agreement with earlier theoretical studies. We propose that the observed destabilisation of *OH species at these surfaces is due to the decreased solvation of the adsorbed hydroxyl intermediates on adjacent terrace sites. PMID:24643715

  16. Reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity during epididymal sperm maturation in Corynorhinus mexicanus bats.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Ríos, Edith; Rosado García, Adolfo; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Königsberg, Mina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; Rodríguez-Tobón, Ahiezer; Fuentes-Mascorro, Gisela; León-Galván, Miguel Angel

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged sperm storage in the epididymis of Corynorhinus mexicanus bats after testicular regression has been associated with epididymal sperm maturation in the caudal region, although the precise factors linked with this phenomenon are unknown. The aim of this work is to determine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in antioxidant enzymatic activity occurring in the spermatozoa and epididymal fluid over time, in sperm maturation and storage in the caput, corpus and cauda of the bat epididymis. Our data showed that an increment in ROS production coincided with an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in epididymal fluid and with a decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the spermatozoa in at different time points and epididymal regions. The increase in ROS production was not associated with oxidative damage measured by lipid peroxidation. The results of the current study suggest the existence of a shift in the redox balance, which might be associated with sperm maturation and storage. PMID:26952757

  17. Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption on Activated Carbon through Manipulation of Surface Oxygen Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John; Qu, Deyang; Foster, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    Passive energy storage is a necessary component for balancing the lifecycle budget with new forms of green energy. The work presented describes how surface oxygen groups (SOG) on granulated activated carbon have been manipulated using Nitric Acid in a controlled, stepwise fashion. The structure and surface functionality of the activated carbon samples were characterized using DRIFTS, Raman Spectroscopy and Porosimetry. Total surface area was found to increase proportionally with the removal of heteroatom material, exposing previously insulated active sites responsible for SOG attachment. Broad oxide peaks were deconvoluted and analyzed, allowing for absolute identification of evolving functionality at each oxidation stage. SOGs were maximized on the third oxidation cycle with the presence of conjugated aromatic, phenol, lactone, and carboxylic acid groups. FSN Zonyl nonionic was applied to all oxidized samples at various concentrations. Total adsorbed surfactant was quantified for each concentration / oxidation scheme using attenuated total reflection. The relative quantity and polarity of chemisorbed surfactant were qualitatively assessed for each equilibrium concentration.

  18. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  19. Palladium-platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-01

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. These results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  20. NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later.

    PubMed

    Gloire, Geoffrey; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie; Piette, Jacques

    2006-11-30

    The transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a major role in coordinating innate and adaptative immunity, cellular proliferation, apoptosis and development. Since the discovery in 1991 that NF-kappaB may be activated by H(2)O(2), several laboratories have put a considerable effort into dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying this activation. Whereas early studies revealed an atypical mechanism of activation, leading to IkappaBalpha Y42 phosphorylation independently of IkappaB kinase (IKK), recent findings suggest that H(2)O(2) activates NF-kappaB mainly through the classical IKK-dependent pathway. The molecular mechanisms leading to IKK activation are, however, cell-type specific and will be presented here. In this review, we also describe the effect of other ROS (HOCl and (1)O(2)) and reactive nitrogen species on NF-kappaB activation. Finally, we critically review the recent data highlighting the role of ROS in NF-kappaB activation by proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), two major components of innate immunity. PMID:16723122

  1. π-π Stacking induced enhanced molecular solubilization, singlet oxygen production, and retention of a photosensitizer loaded in thermosensitive polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Elkhabaz, Ahmed; Yengej, Fjodor A Yousef; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; Hennink, Wim E; van Nostrum, Cornelus F

    2014-12-01

    Cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT) by photosensitizers (PS)-loaded polymeric micelles (PM) is hampered by the tendency of PS to aggregate in PM and/or by premature release of PS in the blood circulation. In the present study, aromatic thermosensitive PM, characterized by π-π stacking interaction, are used to encapsulate an axially solketal-substituted silicon phthalocyanine (Si(sol)2 Pc) with enhanced loading capacity, smaller size, and significantly improved retention of Si(sol)2 Pc compared with systems based on thermosensitive PM lacking aromatic groups. Interestingly, Si(sol)2 Pc is much less prone to aggregation in the aromatic PM, i.e., the amount of Si(sol)2 Pc that could be encapsulated without aggregation is 330 times higher in the aromatic PM than in the nonaromatic PM. Furthermore, Si(sol)2 Pc in the aromatic PM in a molecularly dissolved (non-aggregated) form displays three times more efficient singlet oxygen production than Si(sol)2 Pc aggregated in the non-aromatic PM. As a result, the photocytotoxicity of Si(sol)2 Pc-loaded aromatic PM to B16F10 cells is increased, compared with that of the non-aromatic PM, while no significant cytotoxicity is observed in the dark. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis shows cell uptake of Si(sol)2 Pc loaded in the aromatic PM, and the Si(sol)2 Pc is taken up by the cells together with the micelles. The efficient singlet oxygen production of Si(sol)2 Pc dissolved in the aromatic PM makes it an interesting formulation for cancer PDT. PMID:25388924

  2. Active Oxygen Metabolites and Thromboxane in Phorbol Myristate Acetate Toxicity to the Isolated, Perfused Rat Lung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Laurie Jean

    When administered intravenously or intratracheally to rats, rabbits and sheep, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) produces changes in lung morphology and function are similar to those seen in humans with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Therefore, it is thought that information about the mechanism of ARDS development can be gained from experiments using PMA-treated animals. Currently, the mechanisms by which PMA causes pneumotoxicity are unknown. Results from other studies in rabbits and in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs suggest that PMA-induced lung injury is mediated by active oxygen species from neutrophils (PMN), whereas studies in sheep and rats suggest that PMN are not required for the toxic response. The role of PMN, active oxygen metabolites and thromboxane (TxA_2) in PMA-induced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs (IPLs) was examined in this thesis. To determine whether PMN were required for PMA to produce toxicity to the IPL, lungs were perfused for 30 min with buffer containing various concentrations of PMA (in the presence or absence of PMN). When concentrations >=q57 ng/ml were added to medium devoid of added PMN, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. When a concentration of PMA (14-28 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to the perfusion medium containing PMN (1 x 10 ^8), perfusion pressure increased, and lungs accumulated fluid. These results indicate that high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of PMN, whereas injury induced by lower concentrations is PMN-dependent. To examine whether active oxygen species were involved in mediating lung injury induced by PMA and PMN, lungs were coperfused with the oxygen radical scavengers SOD and/or catalase. Coperfusion with either or both of these enzymes totally protected lungs against injury caused by PMN and PMA. These results suggest that active oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical in particular), mediate lung injury in

  3. PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE FROM CARBON SURFACES COATED WITH OXYGEN: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, D.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A. E-mail: ur5n@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    We investigate via infrared spectroscopy the synthesis of CO{sub 2} by ultraviolet irradiation (6.41 eV) of amorphous carbon covered with solid O{sub 2} at 21 K. Oxidation occurs at the O{sub 2}-carbon interface promoted by photon excitation or dissociation of O{sub 2} molecules. The CO{sub 2} production is linear with photon fluence with a yield of 3.3 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} CO{sub 2} photon{sup -1}; the yield does not decrease at high fluences (at least up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} photons cm{sup -2}) since CO{sub 2} is not photodissociated at this photon energy. Replacing oxygen with water ice did not produce CO{sub 2} since H{sub 2}O does not dissociate at this photon energy. The CO{sub 2} synthesis process discussed in this Letter does not require H{sub 2}O or CO and may be important in cold astrophysical environments where O{sub 2} could be locally segregated on carbonaceous grains, such as in molecular clouds and icy objects in the outer solar system.

  4. Oxygenator Is the Main Responsible for Leukocyte Activation in Experimental Model of Extracorporeal Circulation: A Cautionary Tale

    PubMed Central

    Rungatscher, Alessio; Tessari, Maddalena; Stranieri, Chiara; Solani, Erika; Linardi, Daniele; Milani, Elisabetta; Montresor, Alessio; Merigo, Flavia; Salvetti, Beatrice; Menon, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess mechanisms underlying inflammatory activation during extracorporeal circulation (ECC), several small animal models of ECC have been proposed recently. The majority of them are based on home-made, nonstandardized, and hardly reproducible oxygenators. The present study has generated fundamental information on the role of oxygenator of ECC in activating inflammatory signaling pathways on leukocytes, leading to systemic inflammatory response, and organ dysfunction. The present results suggest that experimental animal models of ECC used in translational research on inflammatory response should be based on standardized, reproducible oxygenators with clinical characteristics. PMID:26063972

  5. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  6. Inhibition of histone deacetylase activity in reduced oxygen environment enhances the osteogenesis of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Hammerick, Kyle E; James, Aaron W; Carre, Antoine L; Leucht, Philipp; Giaccia, Amato J; Longaker, Michael T

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxygen tension has a great impact on the osteogenic differentiation capacity of mesenchymal cells derived from adipose tissue: reduced oxygen impedes osteogenesis. We have found that expansion of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (mASCs) in reduced oxygen tension (10%) results in increased cell proliferation along with induction of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. In this study, we utilized two HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), sodium butyrate (NaB) and valproic acid (VPA), and studied their effects on mASCs expanded in various oxygen tensions (21%, 10%, and 1% O(2)). Significant growth inhibition was observed with NaB or VPA treatment in each oxygen tension. Osteogenesis was enhanced by treatment with NaB or VPA, particularly in reduced oxygen tensions (10% and 1% O(2)). Conversely, adipogenesis was decreased with treatments of NaB or VPA at all oxygen tensions. Finally, NaB- or VPA-treated, reduced oxygen tension-exposed (1% O(2)) ASCs were grafted into surgically created mouse tibial defects and resulted in significantly increased bone regeneration. In conclusion, HDACi significantly promote the osteogenic differentiation of mASCs exposed to reduced oxygen tension; HDACi may hold promise for future clinical applications of ASCs for skeletal regeneration. PMID:19505250

  7. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity in Reduced Oxygen Environment Enhances the Osteogenesis of Mouse Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yue; Hammerick, Kyle E.; James, Aaron W.; Carre, Antoine L.; Leucht, Philipp; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxygen tension has a great impact on the osteogenic differentiation capacity of mesenchymal cells derived from adipose tissue: reduced oxygen impedes osteogenesis. We have found that expansion of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (mASCs) in reduced oxygen tension (10%) results in increased cell proliferation along with induction of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. In this study, we utilized two HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), sodium butyrate (NaB) and valproic acid (VPA), and studied their effects on mASCs expanded in various oxygen tensions (21%, 10%, and 1% O2). Significant growth inhibition was observed with NaB or VPA treatment in each oxygen tension. Osteogenesis was enhanced by treatment with NaB or VPA, particularly in reduced oxygen tensions (10% and 1% O2). Conversely, adipogenesis was decreased with treatments of NaB or VPA at all oxygen tensions. Finally, NaB- or VPA-treated, reduced oxygen tension–exposed (1% O2) ASCs were grafted into surgically created mouse tibial defects and resulted in significantly increased bone regeneration. In conclusion, HDACi significantly promote the osteogenic differentiation of mASCs exposed to reduced oxygen tension; HDACi may hold promise for future clinical applications of ASCs for skeletal regeneration. PMID:19505250

  8. Measuring the activities of higher organisms in activated sludge by means of mechanical shearing pretreatment and oxygen uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-07-01

    A pretreatment method was developed to assess the activities of higher organisms. The method is based on mechanical shearing to damage the large cells of the protozoan and metazoan community in activated sludge. The procedure was confirmed through experimentation to be effective in determining the activities of higher organisms by comparing oxygen uptake rates (OURs) before and after the higher organisms were eradicated. Shearing led to disintegration of flocs, which could be effectively reconstituted by centrifugation. The reconstitution of the sludge flocs was essential since otherwise the activity of the floc mass would be too high due to lack of diffusion limitation. Mechanical shearing had no influence on the morphology, quantity and specific activity of yeasts, and it was inferred that bacteria smaller than yeasts in size would also not be influenced by the applied shearing procedure. Moreover, the effect of filamentous organisms on the measured activities of higher organisms was experimentally demonstrated and analyzed, and determined to be so weak that it could be ignored. Based on these tests, five typical activated sludge processes were selected to measure the contribution of higher organisms to the original OUR. The measured activities of higher organisms ranged from 9.4 to 25.0% of the original OURs. PMID:20605188

  9. Maximal Oxygen Intake and Maximal Work Performance of Active College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Susanne L.

    Maximal oxygen intake and associated physiological variables were measured during strenuous exercise on women subjects (N=20 physical education majors). Following assessment of maximal oxygen intake, all subjects underwent a performance test at the work level which had elicited their maximal oxygen intake. Mean maximal oxygen intake was 41.32…

  10. Non-hypoxic activation of the negative regulatory feedback loop of prolyl-hydroxylase oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Tug, Suzan; Delos Reyes, Buena; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2009-07-10

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) coordinate cellular responses towards hypoxia. HIFs are mainly regulated by a group of prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) that in the presence of oxygen, target the HIFalpha subunit for degradation. Herein, we studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating PHD activities under normoxic conditions. In the present study we show that different NO-donors initially inhibited endogenous PHD2 activity which led to accumulation of HIF-1alpha subsequently to enhance HIF-1 dependent increased PHD2 promoter activity. Consequently PHD2 abundance and activity were strongly induced which caused downregulation of HIF-1alpha. Interestingly, upregulation of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO was not found in cells that lack an intact pVHL dependent degradation pathway. Recovery of PHD activity required intact cells and was not observed in cell extracts or recombinant PHD2. In conclusion induction of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO is dependent on a feedback loop initiated despite normoxic conditions. PMID:19427832

  11. Oxygenation, EMG and position sense during computer mouse work. Impact of active versus passive pauses.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, A G; Djupsjöbacka, M; Svedmark, A

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of active versus passive pauses implemented during computer mouse work on muscle oxygenation and EMG of the forearm extensor carpi radialis muscle, and on wrist position sense. Fifteen healthy female subjects (age: 19-24 years) performed a 60-min mouse-operated computer task, divided into three 20 min periods, on two occasions separated by 3-6 days. On one occasion a passive pause (subjects resting) was implemented at the end of each 20-min period, and on another occasion an active pause (subjects performed a number of high intensity extensions of the forearm) was implemented. Also at the end of each 20-min period, test contractions were conducted and subjective ratings of fatigue and stress were obtained. Another parameter of interest was total haemoglobin calculated as the summation of oxy-and deoxy-haemoglobin, since it reflects blood volume changes. The most interesting findings were an overall increasing trend in total haemoglobin throughout the mouse work (P<0.001), and that this trend was greater for the active pause as compared to the passive pause (P<0.01). These data were accompanied by an overall increase in oxygen saturation (P<0.001), with a tendency, albeit not significant, toward a higher increase for the active pause (P=0.13). EMG amplitude and median frequency tended to decrease (P=0.08 and 0.05, respectively) during the mouse work but was not different between pause types. Borg ratings of forearm fatigue showed an overall increase during the activity (P<0.001), but the perceptions of stress did not change. Position sense did not change due to the mouse work for either pause type. While increasing trends were found for both pause types, the present study lends support to the hypothesis of an enhancement in oxygenation and blood volume for computer mouse work implemented with active pauses. However, a presumption of an association between this enhancement and attenuated fatigue during the mouse work was not supported

  12. Molecular insight into activated sludge producing polyhydroxyalkanoates under aerobic-anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Pokoj, Tomasz; Klimiuk, Ewa

    2008-08-01

    One of the options enabling more economic production of polyhydroxyalkanoates compared to pure cultures is the application of mixed cultures. The use of a microbial community in a sequencing batch reactor has a few advantages: a simple process control, no necessity for sterile processing, and possibilities of using cheap substrates as a source of carbon. Nevertheless, while cultivation methods to achieve high PHAs biomass concentration and high productivity in wild and recombinant strains are defined, knowledge about the cultivation strategy for PHAs production by mixed culture and species composition of bacterial communities is still very limited. The main object of this study was to characterize on the molecular level the composition and activity of PHAs producing microorganism in activated sludge cultivated under oxygen limitation conditions. PHAs producers were detected using a PCR technique and the created PHA synthase gene library was analyzed by DNA sequencing. The obtained results indicate that PHAs-producers belonged to Pseudomonas sp., and possessed genes coding for mcl-PHA synthase. The kinetics of mcl-PHA synthase expression was relatively estimated using real-time PCR technology at several timepoints. Performed quantitative and qualitative analysis of total bacterial activity showed that there were differences in total activity during the process but differential expression of various groups of microorganisms examined by using DGGE was not observed. PMID:18418634

  13. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-10-01

    For oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over alloy electrocatalysts, the understanding of how the atomic arrangement of the metal species in the nanocatalysts is responsible for the catalytic enhancement is challenging for achieving better design and tailoring of nanoalloy catalysts. This paper reports results of an investigation of the atomic structures and the electrocatalytic activities of ternary and binary nanoalloys, aiming at revealing a fundamental insight into the unique atomic-scale structure-electrocatalytic activity relationship. PtIrCo catalyst and its binary counterparts (PtCo and PtIr) are chosen as a model system for this study. The effect of thermochemical treatment temperature on the atomic-scale structure of the catalysts was examined as a useful probe to the structure-activity correlation. The structural characterization of the binary and ternary nanoalloy catalysts was performed by combining surface sensitive techniques such as XPS and 3D atomic ordering sensitive techniques such as high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis (HE-XRD/PDFs) and computer simulations. The results show that the thermal treatment temperature tunes the nanoalloy’s atomic and chemical ordering in a different way depending on the chemical composition, leading to differences in the nanoalloy’s mass and specific activities. A unique structural tunability of the atomic ordering in a platinum-iridium-cobalt nanoalloy has been revealed for enhancing greatly the electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction, which has significant implication for rational design and nanoengineering of advanced catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

  14. Biomass Oxidation: Formyl C-H Bond Activation by the Surface Lattice Oxygen of Regenerative CuO Nanoleaves.

    PubMed

    Amaniampong, Prince N; Trinh, Quang Thang; Wang, Bo; Borgna, Armando; Yang, Yanhui; Mushrif, Samir H

    2015-07-27

    An integrated experimental and computational investigation reveals that surface lattice oxygen of copper oxide (CuO) nanoleaves activates the formyl C-H bond in glucose and incorporates itself into the glucose molecule to oxidize it to gluconic acid. The reduced CuO catalyst regains its structure, morphology, and activity upon reoxidation. The activity of lattice oxygen is shown to be superior to that of the chemisorbed oxygen on the metal surface and the hydrogen abstraction ability of the catalyst is correlated with the adsorption energy. Based on the present investigation, it is suggested that surface lattice oxygen is critical for the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, without further breaking down the glucose molecule into smaller fragments, because of C-C cleavage. Using CuO nanoleaves as catalyst, an excellent yield of gluconic acid is also obtained for the direct oxidation of cellobiose and polymeric cellulose, as biomass substrates. PMID:26119659

  15. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation.

    PubMed

    Babon, Jeffrey J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M; Nicola, Nicos A; Varghese, Leila N

    2014-08-15

    The JAK (Janus kinase) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2), was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haemopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organization of the component FERM (4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-SH2 (Src homology 2), pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain-containing proteins, SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) proteins and LNK. These recent studies highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilized by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. PMID:25057888

  16. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Chan, H C Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir; Stevens, Raymond C; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-08-22

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1 R) is activated by adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1 R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 μs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1 R activation. PMID:27460867

  17. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  18. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Janus Kinase (JAK) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2, was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haematopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organisation of the component FERM-SH2, pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain containing proteins, SOCS (Suppressors of Cytokine Signalling) proteins and Lnk. These recent advances highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilised by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. PMID:25057888

  19. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1R) is activated by adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 µs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1R activation. PMID:27460867

  20. Metal-Oxygen Bond Ionicity as an Efficient Descriptor for Doped NiOOH Photocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zaffran, Jeremie; Toroker, Maytal Caspary

    2016-06-01

    The computational design of solid catalysts has become a very "hot" field during the last decades, especially with the recent increase in computational tool performance. However, theoretical techniques are still very time demanding because they require the consideration of many adsorption configurations of the reaction intermediates on the surface. Herein, we propose to use the metal-oxygen (M-O) bond ionicity as a descriptor for the photocatalytic activity of one of the best catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Ionicity is a bulk property and thus carries the advantage of being easily obtainable from a simple Bader charge analysis by using density functional theory (DFT). We will show that this criterion can be used successfully to design efficient dopants for NiOOH material. This catalyst is known to exhibit interesting photoelectrochemical properties for OER if it is doped with specific transition metals. Finally, we demonstrate that other electronic properties that relate to bulk calculation, such as oxidation states and density of states, are not alone sufficient to explain the photocatalytic activity of the material. Thus, M-O bond ionicity attracts significant interest compared with other bulk observables obtained by using DFT computations. PMID:26945687

  1. Ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons with very high electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Taeyoung; Choi, YongMan; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Min Gyu; Sa, Young Jin; Kim, Jaesik; Lee, Zonghoon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kwon, Kyungjung; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Gu-Gon; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of the platinum-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has impeded the widespread application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We report on a new family of non-precious metal catalysts based on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons (M-OMPC; M = Fe, Co, or FeCo) with high surface areas and tunable pore structures, which were prepared by nanocasting mesoporous silica templates with metalloporphyrin precursors. The FeCo-OMPC catalyst exhibited an excellent ORR activity in an acidic medium, higher than other non-precious metal catalysts. It showed higher kinetic current at 0.9 V than Pt/C catalysts, as well as superior long-term durability and MeOH-tolerance. Density functional theory calculations in combination with extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed a weakening of the interaction between oxygen atom and FeCo-OMPC compared to Pt/C. This effect and high surface area of FeCo-OMPC appear responsible for its significantly high ORR activity. PMID:24056308

  2. Ni- and Mn-Promoted Mesoporous Co3O4: A Stable Bifunctional Catalyst with Surface-Structure-Dependent Activity for Oxygen Reduction Reaction and Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenqiao; Ren, Zheng; Chen, Sheng-Yu; Meng, Yongtao; Biswas, Sourav; Nandi, Partha; Elsen, Heather A; Gao, Pu-Xian; Suib, Steven L

    2016-08-17

    Efficient bifunctional catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are highly desirable due to their wide applications in fuel cells and rechargeable metal air batteries. However, the development of nonprecious metal catalysts with comparable activities to noble metals is still challenging. Here we report a one-step wet-chemical synthesis of Ni-/Mn-promoted mesoporous cobalt oxides through an inverse micelle process. Various characterization techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N2 sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirm the successful incorporation of Ni and Mn leading to the formation of Co-Ni(Mn)-O solid solutions with retained mesoporosity. Among these catalysts, cobalt oxide with 5% Ni doping demonstrates promising activities for both ORR and OER, with an overpotential of 399 mV for ORR (at -3 mA/cm(2)) and 381 mV (at 10 mA/cm(2)) for OER. Furthermore, it shows better durability than precious metals featuring little activity decay throughout 24 h continuous operation. Analyses of cyclic voltammetry (CV), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and O2-temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD) reveal that redox activity of Co(3+) to Co(4+) is crucial for OER performance, while the population of surface oxygen vacancies and surface area determine ORR activities. The comprehensive investigation of the intrinsic active sites for ORR and OER by correlating different physicochemical properties to the electrochemical activities is believed to provide important insight toward the rational design of high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR and OER reactions. PMID:27458646

  3. NQO1-induced activation of AMPK contributes to cancer cell death by oxygen-glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyemi; Oh, Eun-Taex; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Park, Moon-Taek; Lee, Ja-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Seon; Park, Heon Joo

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) due to insufficient blood circulation can decrease cancer cell survival and proliferation in solid tumors. OGD increases the intracellular [AMP]/[ATP] ratio, thereby activating the AMPK. In this study, we have investigated the involvement of NQO1 in OGD-mediated AMPK activation and cancer cell death. We found that OGD activates AMPK in an NQO1-dependent manner, suppressing the mTOR/S6K/4E-BP1 pathway, which is known to control cell survival. Thus, the depletion of NQO1 prevents AMPK-induced cancer cell death in OGD. When we blocked OGD-induced Ca2+/CaMKII signaling, the NQO1-induced activation of AMPK was attenuated. In addition, when we blocked the RyR signaling, the accumulation of intracellular Ca2+ and subsequent activation of CaMKII/AMPK signaling was decreased in NQO1-expressing cells under OGD. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CD38 abrogated the OGD-induced activation of Ca2+/CaMKII/AMPK signaling. Taken together, we conclude that NQO1 plays a key role in the AMPK-induced cancer cell death in OGD through the CD38/cADPR/RyR/Ca2+/CaMKII signaling pathway. PMID:25586669

  4. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids. PMID:25176328

  5. Segregated Pt on Pd nanotubes for enhanced oxygen reduction activity in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    St John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W; Dyck, Ondrej; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Papandrew, Alexander B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscaled Pt domains were integrated with Pd nanotubes via vapor deposition to yield a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The surface-area-normalized ORR activity of these bi-metallic Pt-on-Pd nanotubes (PtPdNTs) was nearly 6× the corresponding carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt/C) activity at 0.9 V vs. RHE (1.5 vs. 0.24 mA cmmetal(-2), respectively). Furthermore, the high specific activity of the PtPdNTs was achieved without sacrificing mass-normalized activity, which is more than twice that of Pt/C (0.333 A mgPtPdNT(-1)vs. 0.141 A mgPt/C(-1)) and also greater than that of Pd/C (0.221 A mgPd/C(-1)). We attribute the enhancements in specific and mass activity to modifications of the segregated Pt electronic structure and to nanoscale porosity, respectively. PMID:26553367

  6. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiuli; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shuang; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-17

    Developing inexpensive and non-precious metal electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is among the major goals in fuel cells. Herein, by using density-functional theory calculations, we show that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids exhibit unexpectedly high ORR catalytic activity-even comparable to that of the Pt(111) surface. Both graphitic-type and pyridine-type N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids are highly active for the ORR and have good CO tolerance. The formation of the second H2O molecule is the rate-determining step for the ORR with the graphitic-type hybrid, whereas on the pyridine-type hybrid, it is the formation of OOH. Note that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrid materials combine the high reactivity of olympicene and the high electrical conductivity of graphene, which allows them to be potentially used as low-cost and non-precious-metal ORR catalysts. PMID:27499058

  7. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

    2015-03-11

    Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode. PMID:25686380

  8. Porous Dendritic Platinum Nanotubes with Extremely High Activity and Stability for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaixia; Sun, Shuhui; Cai, Mei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Porous dendritic Pt nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a facile, cost-effective aqueous solution method at room temperature in large scale. These unique structures are porous, hollow, hierarchical, and single crystalline, which not only gives them a large surface area with high catalyst utilization, but also improves mass transport and gas diffusion. These novel Pt structures exhibited significantly improved catalytic activity (4.4 fold) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and greatly enhanced durability (6.1 fold) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. This work provides a promising approach to the design of highly efficient next-generation electrocatalysts. PMID:23524665

  9. Rationalizing the Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution Reaction Activity of Two-Dimensional Hydrogenated Silicene and Germanene.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Caroline J; Chakraborty, Sudip; Anversa, Jonas; Baierle, Rogério J; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-20

    We have undertaken first-principles electronic structure calculations to show that the chemical functionalization of two-dimensional hydrogenated silicene (silicane) and germanene (germanane) can become a powerful tool to increase the photocatalytic water-splitting activity. Spin-polarized density functional theory within the GGA-PBE and HSE06 types of exchange correlation functionals has been used to obtain the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicane and germanane functionalized with a series of nonmetals (N, P, and S), alkali metals (Li, Na, and K) and alkaline-earth metals (Mg and Ca). The surface-adsorbate interaction between the functionalized systems with H2 and O2 molecules that leads to envisaged hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction activity has been determined. PMID:26704530

  10. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  11. Oxide Defect Engineering Enables to Couple Solar Energy into Oxygen Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xiyu; Ye, Huacheng; Chen, Shuangming; Ju, Huanxin; Liu, Daobin; Lin, Yue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-07-20

    Modern development of chemical manufacturing requires a substantial reduction in energy consumption and catalyst cost. Sunlight-driven chemical transformation by metal oxides holds great promise for this goal; however, it remains a grand challenge to efficiently couple solar energy into many catalytic reactions. Here we report that defect engineering on oxide catalyst can serve as a versatile approach to bridge light harvesting with surface reactions by ensuring species chemisorption. The chemisorption not only spatially enables the transfer of photoexcited electrons to reaction species, but also alters the form of active species to lower the photon energy requirement for reactions. In a proof of concept, oxygen molecules are activated into superoxide radicals on defect-rich tungsten oxide through visible-near-infrared illumination to trigger organic aerobic couplings of amines to corresponding imines. The excellent efficiency and durability for such a highly important process in chemical transformation can otherwise be virtually impossible to attain by counterpart materials. PMID:27351805

  12. Oxidative DNA adducts after Cu(2+)-mediated activation of dihydroxy PCBs: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Wendy A; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2009-05-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic industrial chemicals, complete carcinogens, and efficacious tumor promoters. However, the mechanism(s) of PCB-mediated carcinogenicity remains largely undefined. One likely pathway by which these agents may play a role in carcinogenesis is the generation of oxidative DNA damage by redox cycling of dihydroxylated PCB metabolites. We have now employed a new (32)P-postlabeling system to examine novel oxidative DNA lesions induced by Cu(2+)-mediated activation of PCB metabolites. (32)P postlabeling of DNA incubated with various PCB metabolites resulted in over a dozen novel polar oxidative DNA adducts that were chromatographically similar for all active agents. The most potent metabolites tested were the hydroquinones (hydroxyl groups arranged para to each other), yielding polar oxidative adduct levels ranging from 55 to 142 adducts/10(6) nucleotides. PCB catechols, or ortho-dihydroxy metabolites, were up to 40% less active than their corresponding hydroquinone congeners, whereas monohydroxylated and quinone metabolites did not produce detectable oxidative damage over that of vehicle. With the exception of 2,4,5-Cl-2',5'-dihydroxybiphenyl, this oxidative DNA damage seemed to be inversely related to chlorine content: no chlorine approximately mono->di->trichlorinated metabolites. Importantly, copper, but not iron, was essential for activation of the PCB metabolites to these polar oxidative DNA adducts, because in its absence or in the presence of the Cu(+)-specific scavenger bathocuproine, no adducts were detected. Intervention studies with known reactive oxygen species (ROS) modifiers suggested that H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and superoxide may also be involved in this PCB-mediated oxidative DNA damage. These data indicate a mechanistic role for several ROS, in addition to copper, in PCB-induced DNA damage and provide further support for oxidative DNA damage in PCB-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19233261

  13. Molecular mechanism of L-DNase II activation and function as a molecular switch in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Torriglia, Alicia; Leprêtre, Chloé; Padrón-Barthe, Laura; Chahory, Sabine; Martin, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    The discovery of caspase activation counts as one of the most important finds in the biochemistry of apoptosis. However, targeted disruption of caspases does not impair every type of apoptosis. Other proteases can replace caspases and several so called "caspase independent" pathways are now described. Here we review our current knowledge on one of these pathways, the LEI/L-DNase II. It is a serine protease-dependent pathway and its key event is the transformation of LEI (leukocyte elastase inhibitor, a serine protease inhibitor) into L-DNase II (an endonuclease). The molecular events leading to this change of enzymatic function as well as the cross-talk and interactions of this molecule with other apoptotic pathway, including caspases, are discussed. PMID:18761000

  14. Antituberculosis Activity of the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network Library

    PubMed Central

    MADDRY, JOSEPH A.; ANANTHAN, SUBRAMANIAM; GOLDMAN, ROBERT C.; HOBRATH, JUDITH V.; KWONG, CECIL D.; MADDOX, CLINTON; RASMUSSEN, LYNN; REYNOLDS, ROBERT C.; SECRIST, JOHN A.; SOSA, MELINDA I.; WHITE, E. LUCILE; ZHANG, WEI

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein. PMID:19783214

  15. MEK1/2 Inhibitors: Molecular Activity and Resistance Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pui-Kei; Park, Jong-In

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant activation of the three-layered protein kinase cascade, Raf/MEK/ERK, is often detected in human cancer, which is mainly attributed to the oncogenic alterations of RAF, or its upstream activators RAS or cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. Deregulated activity of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway drives uncontrolled tumor cell proliferation and survival, thus providing a rational therapeutic target for the treatment of many cancers. While Raf, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2 are equally important targets for the design of therapeutic small molecular weight inhibitors, the effort to develop MEK1/2-specific inhibitors has been greatly successful. Particularly, MEK1/2 have been relatively advantageous for the design of highly selective adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-noncompetitive inhibitors. Indeed, a plethora of highly selective and potent MEK1/2 inhibitors are now available and many of those inhibitors have been evaluated for their therapeutic potential. Herein, we review different MEK1/2 inhibitors that have been studied for their inhibitory mechanisms and therapeutic potential in cancer. Some of the key structural features of MEK1/2 that are important for the efficacy of these inhibitors are also discussed. In addition, we discuss current challenges and future prospective in using these advanced MEK1/2 inhibitors for cancer therapy. PMID:26615130

  16. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  17. An undergraduate laboratory activity on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Spitznagel, Benjamin; Pritchett, Paige R; Messina, Troy C; Goadrich, Mark; Rodriguez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Vision and Change [AAAS, 2011] outlines a blueprint for modernizing biology education by addressing conceptual understanding of key concepts, such as the relationship between structure and function. The document also highlights skills necessary for student success in 21st century Biology, such as the use of modeling and simulation. Here we describe a laboratory activity that allows students to investigate the dynamic nature of protein structure and function through the use of a modeling technique known as molecular dynamics (MD). The activity takes place over two lab periods that are 3 hr each. The first lab period unpacks the basic approach behind MD simulations, beginning with the kinematic equations that all bioscience students learn in an introductory physics course. During this period students are taught rudimentary programming skills in Python while guided through simple modeling exercises that lead up to the simulation of the motion of a single atom. In the second lab period students extend concepts learned in the first period to develop skills in the use of expert MD software. Here students simulate and analyze changes in protein conformation resulting from temperature change, solvation, and phosphorylation. The article will describe how these activities can be carried out using free software packages, including Abalone and VMD/NAMD. PMID:26751047

  18. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  19. Intensity of daily physical activity is associated with central hemodynamic and leg muscle oxygen availability in COPD.

    PubMed

    Louvaris, Zafeiris; Kortianou, Eleni A; Spetsioti, Stavroula; Vasilopoulou, Maroula; Nasis, Ioannis; Asimakos, Andreas; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2013-09-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), daily physical activity is reported to be adversely associated with the magnitude of exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation and peripheral muscle weakness. There is limited evidence whether central hemodynamic, oxygen transport, and peripheral muscle oxygenation capacities also contribute to reduced daily physical activity. Nineteen patients with COPD (FEV1, 48 ± 14% predicted) underwent a treadmill walking test at a speed corresponding to the individual patient's mean walking intensity, captured by a triaxial accelerometer during a preceding 7-day period. During the indoor treadmill test, the individual patient mean walking intensity (range, 1.5 to 2.3 m/s2) was significantly correlated with changes from baseline in cardiac output recorded by impedance cardiography (range, 1.2 to 4.2 L/min; r = 0.73), systemic vascular conductance (range, 7.9 to 33.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1); r = 0.77), systemic oxygen delivery estimated from cardiac output and arterial pulse-oxymetry saturation (range, 0.15 to 0.99 L/min; r = 0.70), arterio-venous oxygen content difference calculated from oxygen uptake and cardiac output (range, 3.7 to 11.8 mlO2/100 ml; r = -0.73), and quadriceps muscle fractional oxygen saturation assessed by near-infrared spectrometry (range, -6 to 23%; r = 0.77). In addition, mean walking intensity significantly correlated with the quadriceps muscle force adjusted for body weight (range, 0.28 to 0.60; r = 0.74) and the ratio of minute ventilation over maximal voluntary ventilation (range, 38 to 89%, r = -0.58). In COPD, in addition to ventilatory limitations and peripheral muscle weakness, intensity of daily physical activity is associated with both central hemodynamic and peripheral muscle oxygenation capacities regulating the adequacy of matching peripheral muscle oxygen availability by systemic oxygen transport. PMID:23845982

  20. Metal Ion Adsorption by Activated Carbons Made from Pecan Shells: Effect of Oxygen Level During Activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this presenta...