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Sample records for activate molecular oxygen

  1. Charge separation promoted activation of molecular oxygen by neutral gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Alex P; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André

    2013-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles and sub-nanoparticles famously act as highly efficient and selective low-temperature oxidation catalysts with molecular oxygen, in stark contrast to the nobility of the bulk phase. The origins of this activity and the nature of the active species remain open questions. Gas-phase studies of isolated gold clusters hold promise for disentangling these problems. Here we address the interaction of neutral gold clusters (Au(n); 4 ≤ n ≤ 21) with molecular oxygen by probing the highly characteristic O-O vibrational stretch frequencies. This reveals that for selected cluster sizes the oxygen is highly activated with respect to the free moiety. Complementary quantum chemical calculations provide evidence for substantial electron transfer to the O(2) unit and concomitant rearrangement of the parent gold cluster structure upon binding and activation. This gives evidence for a model of the interaction between neutral gold clusters and molecular oxygen.

  2. Molecular dioxygen enters the active site of 12/15-lipoxygenase via dynamic oxygen access channels.

    PubMed

    Saam, Jan; Ivanov, Igor; Walther, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kuhn, Hartmut

    2007-08-14

    Cells contain numerous enzymes that use molecular oxygen for their reactions. Often, their active sites are buried deeply inside the protein, which raises the question whether there are specific access channels guiding oxygen to the site of catalysis. Choosing 12/15-lipoxygenase as a typical example for such oxygen-dependent enzymes, we determined the oxygen distribution within the protein and defined potential routes for oxygen access. For this purpose, we have applied an integrated strategy of structural modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic measurements. First, we computed the 3D free-energy distribution for oxygen, which led to identification of four oxygen channels in the protein. All channels connect the protein surface with a region of high oxygen affinity at the active site. This region is localized opposite to the nonheme iron providing a structural explanation for the reaction specificity of this lipoxygenase isoform. The catalytically most relevant path can be obstructed by L367F exchange, which leads to a strongly increased Michaelis constant for oxygen. The blocking mechanism is explained in detail by reordering the hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules. Our results provide strong evidence that the main route for oxygen access to the active site of the enzyme follows a channel formed by transiently interconnected cavities whereby the opening and closure are governed by side chain dynamics. PMID:17675410

  3. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  4. Adsorption of phenolics on activated carbon--impact of pore size and molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuli; Sorial, George A

    2004-05-01

    The impact of pore size of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on adsorption capacity and on the potential for oligomerization of phenolic compounds on the surface of ACFs in the presence of molecular oxygen has been investigated in this study. Compared with granular activated carbon (GAC), ACFs have unique pore size distributions, suitable to be used to elucidate the effect of pore structure on adsorption. Adsorption isotherm data were collected for o-cresol and 2-ethylphenol on four ACFs (ACC-10, ACC-15, ACC-20, and ACC-25) with different micropore volumes and BET surface area and on one type of GAC bituminous base. These isotherms were collected under anoxic (absence of molecular oxygen) and oxic (presence of molecular oxygen) conditions. No significant impact of the presence of molecular oxygen on adsorption capacity was noted for ACC-10. ACC-10 has an average pore width of 19.2 A and total pore volume of 0.43 cm3g(-1). On the other hand, for the remaining ACFs, which have larger average pore width and larger pore volume, significant increase in the adsorptive capacity had been observed when molecular oxygen was present. The GAC gave the greatest difference between anoxic and oxic conditions when compared to all the ACFs studied. Binary adsorption of o-cresol and 2-ethylphenol on ACFs with the least pore size (ACC-10) also showed no significant differences between oxic and anoxic environment. The binary system under both anoxic and oxic conditions was well predicted by the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST).

  5. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON THE ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION OF NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER IN OHIO RIVER WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently published data show that the adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon for phenois increases significantly in the presence of molecular oxygen (Vidic, Suidan,Traegner and Nakhla, 1990). in this study, the effect of molecular oxygen on the adsorptive capacity of a...

  6. Singlet molecular oxygen-quenching activity of carotenoids: relevance to protection of the skin from photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Junji; Minami, Yuko; Bando, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are known to be potent quenchers of singlet molecular oxygen [O2 (1Δg)]. Solar light-induced photooxidative stress causes skin photoaging by accelerating the generation of reactive oxygen species via photodynamic actions in which O2 (1Δg) can be generated by energy transfer from excited sensitizers. Thus, dietary carotenoids seem to participate in the prevention of photooxidative stress by accumulating as antioxidants in the skin. An in vivo study using hairless mice clarified that a O2 (1Δg) oxygenation-specific peroxidation product of cholesterol, cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, accumulates in skin lipids due to ultraviolet-A exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase-9, a metalloproteinase family enzyme responsible for the formation of wrinkles and sagging, was enhanced in the skin of ultraviolet-A -irradiated hairless mice. The activation of metalloproteinase-9 and the accumulation of 5α-hydroperoxide, as well as formation of wrinkles and sagging, were lowered in mice fed a β-carotene diet. These results strongly suggest that dietary β-carotene prevents the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (at least in part), by inhibiting the photodynamic action involving the formation of 5α-hydroperoxide in the skin. Intake of β-Carotene therefore appears to be helpful in slowing down ultraviolet-A -induced photoaging in human skin by acting as a O2 (1Δg) quencher. PMID:21297913

  7. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON ADSORPTIVE CAPACITY AND EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF GRANULATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THREE ORTHO-SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorptive capacity of activated carbon for several organic compounds was found to be strongly influenced by the presence of molecular oxygen. This influence is manifested by the polymerization of adsorbate on the surface of activated carbon. As a result, GAC exhibits much high...

  8. Molecular hydrogen inhibits lipopolysaccharide-triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages by targeting the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-Dong; Wu, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Rui; Hao, Da-Peng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome, an intracellular multi-protein complex controlling the maturation of cytokine interleukin-1β, plays an important role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cascades. Recently, the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in macrophages stimulated with LPS has been suggested to act as a trigger during the process of NLRP3 inflammasome activation that can be blocked by some mitochondria-targeted antioxidants. Known as a ROS scavenger, molecular hydrogen (H2) has been shown to possess therapeutic benefit on LPS-induced inflammatory damage in many animal experiments. Due to the unique molecular structure, H2 can easily target the mitochondria, suggesting that H2 is a potential antagonist of mtROS-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Here we have showed that, in mouse macrophages, H2 exhibited substantial inhibitory activity against LPS-initiated NLRP3 inflammasome activation by scavenging mtROS. Moreover, the elimination of mtROS by H2 resultantly inhibited mtROS-mediated NLRP3 deubiquitination, a non-transcriptional priming signal of NLRP3 in response to the stimulation of LPS. Additionally, the removal of mtROS by H2 reduced the generation of oxidized mitochondrial DNA and consequently decreased its binding to NLRP3, thereby inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our findings have, for the first time, revealed the novel mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of molecular hydrogen on LPS-caused NLRP3 inflammasome activation, highlighting the promising application of this new antioxidant in the treatment of LPS-associated inflammatory pathological damage.

  9. Photodynamic molecular beacon as an activatable photosensitizer based on protease-controlled singlet oxygen quenching and activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Juan; Stefflova, Klara; Jarvi, Mark; Li, Hui; Wilson, Brian C

    2007-05-22

    Molecular beacons are FRET-based target-activatable probes. They offer control of fluorescence emission in response to specific cancer targets, thus are useful tools for in vivo cancer imaging. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cell-killing process by light activation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen. The key cytotoxic agent is singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). By combining these two principles (FRET and PDT), we have introduced a concept of photodynamic molecular beacons (PMB) for controlling the PS's ability to generate (1)O(2) and, ultimately, for controlling its PDT activity. The PMB comprises a disease-specific linker, a PS, and a (1)O(2) quencher, so that the PS's photoactivity is silenced until the linker interacts with a target molecule, such as a tumor-associated protease. Here, we report the full implementation of this concept by synthesizing a matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7)-triggered PMB and achieving not only MMP7-triggered production of (1)O(2) in solution but also MMP7-mediated photodynamic cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Preliminary in vivo studies also reveal the MMP7-activated PDT efficacy of this PMB. This study validates the core principle of the PMB concept that selective PDT-induced cell death can be achieved by exerting precise control of the PS's ability to produce (1)O(2) by responding to specific cancer-associated biomarkers. Thus, PDT selectivity will no longer depend solely on how selectively the PS can be delivered to cancer cells. Rather, it will depend on how selective a biomarker is to cancer cells, and how selective the interaction of PMB is to this biomarker.

  10. Solvent exchangeable protons and the activation of molecular oxygen: the galactose oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Kosman, D J; Driscoll, J J

    1988-01-01

    The reduction of O2 to H2O2 requires two protons as well as two electrons. Thus, activation of dioxygen reasonably may involve either general or specific acid catalysis. Consequently, the reduction of O2 to H2O2 could exhibit a kinetic solvent isotope effect (KSIE). The reaction catalyzed by the mononuclear Cu(II) enzyme, galactose oxidase does exhibit a KSIE (+1.55). The pL-rate profile exhibits an alkaline shift in D2O which can be attributed to the differential partitioning of H+ versus D+ between bulk water and a metal-bound H2O (delta pKa = +0.19). A variety of spectral evidence places an equatorial, Cu(II)-liganded water molecule at the active site of galactose oxidase. The analysis of the KSIE data is detailed and the potential generality of the function of such metal-bound H2O at other type 2 Cu(II) sites is discussed.

  11. Nanofibers doped with a novel red-emitting Europium complex: Synthesis, characterization, photophysical property and sensing activity toward molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianliang, SUN; Ge, HU; Qing, SHE; Zhaohong, ZUO; Lei, GUO

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we synthesize a novel diamine ligand of DIQ-Et and its corresponding Eu(III) complex of Eu(TTA)3DIQ-Et, where DIQ-Et = N-ethyl-10H-dipyrido-[f,h]-indolo-[3,2-b]-quinoxaline, and TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate. The UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence, low temperature phosphorescence, energy transfer mechanism, and excited state lifetime of Eu(TTA)3DIQ-Et are investigated in detail. Data suggest that the emission of Eu(TTA)3DIQ-Et is quenchable by molecular oxygen due to the back-energy transfer process. By doping Eu(TTA)3DIQ-Et into a polymer matrix of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), oxygen sensing performance of the resulted nanofibers is investigated. Finally, the 0.7 wt% doped sample exhibits a linear response toward molecular oxygen, with a sensitivity of 2.4 and response/recovery time of 12 s/16 s.

  12. Laccase isoenzymes of Pleurotus eryngii: characterization, catalytic properties, and participation in activation of molecular oxygen and Mn2+ oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, C; Guillén, F; Martínez, A T; Martínez, M J

    1997-01-01

    Two laccase isoenzymes produced by Pleurotus eryngii were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity (42- and 43-fold) with an overall yield of 56.3%. Laccases I and II from this fungus are monomeric glycoproteins with 7 and 1% carbohydrate content, molecular masses (by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of 65 and 61 kDa, and pIs of 4.1 and 4.2, respectively. The highest rate of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) oxidation for laccase I was reached at 65 degrees C and pH 4, and that for laccase II was reached at 55 degrees C and pH 3.5. Both isoenzymes are stable at high pH, retaining 60 to 70% activity after 24 h from pH 8 to 12. Their amino acid compositions and N-terminal sequences were determined, the latter strongly differing from those of laccases of other basidiomycetes. Antibodies against laccase I reacted with laccase II, as well as with laccases from Pleurotus ostreatus, Pleurotus pulmonarius, and Pleurotus floridanus. Different hydroxy- and methoxy-substituted phenols and aromatic amines were oxidized by the two laccase isoenzymes from P. eryngii, and the influence of the nature, number, and disposition of aromatic-ring substituents on kinetic constants is discussed. Although both isoenzymes presented similar substrate affinities, the maximum rates of reactions catalyzed by laccase I were higher than those of laccase II. In reactions with hydroquinones, semiquinones produced by laccase isoenzymes were in part converted into quinones via autoxidation. The superoxide anion radical produced in the latter reaction dismutated, producing hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of manganous ion, the superoxide union was reduced to hydrogen peroxide with the concomitant production of manganic ion. These results confirmed that laccase in the presence of hydroquinones can participate in the production of both reduced oxygen species and manganic ions. PMID:9172335

  13. Study on an oxygen sensing rhenium(I) complex with enlarged sensing/active area: fabrication, photophysical parameters and molecular oxygen sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guiying; Lu, Mang; Huang, Can; Wang, Yaoqiong; Ge, Shuping

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we synthesize a novel 1,10-phenanthroline-derived (Phen-derived) diamine ligand of benzo[f][1,10]phenanthroline-6,7-dicarbonitrile (Phen-CN) with enlarged conjugation planar and its corresponding Re(I) complex of Re(CO)3Cl(Phen-CN), hoping to achieve an optical sensor owing large sensing/active area. Its geometric and electronic structures are investigated, which suggests that the effective sensing/active area of Re(CO)3Cl(Phen-CN) is enlarged by the successful formation of conjugation planar. The promising photophysical parameters of Re(CO)3Cl(Phen-CN), including large sensing/active area and long excited state lifetime, make it a potential probe for oxygen detection. By doping Re(CO)3Cl(Phen-CN) into a polymer matrix of poly(vinylpyrrolidone), oxygen sensing performances of the resulted composite materials are investigated. Finally, a high sensitivity of 17.1 is realized, with short response/recovery time of 9s/32s.

  14. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i. PMID:25592711

  15. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i.

  16. Molecular basis of the low activity of antitumor anthracenediones, mitoxantrone and ametantrone, in oxygen radical generation catalyzed by NADH dehydrogenase. Enzymatic and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, Jolanta; Mazerski, Jan; Tkaczyk-Gobis, Katarzyna; Borowski, Edward

    2005-04-01

    Synthetic antitumor anthracenedione drugs, in contrast to anthracycline antibiotics, are ineffective in free radical formation in NADH dehydrogenase system. Our results have indicated that neither the reduction potential nor the side chain conformation and the energies of border orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) determine the ability of anthracenediones to stimulate reactive oxygen species formation in NADH dehydrogenase system. It was shown that the distribution of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), around the quinone system was crucial for this ability. We have found for non-stimulating anthracenediones that the clouds of positive MEP cover the quinone carbon atoms while for agents effective in stimulating reactive oxygen species formation the clouds of negative MEP cover continuously the aromatic core together with the quinone system.

  17. Singlet molecular oxygen generated by biological hydroperoxides.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sayuri; Martinez, Glaucia R; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The chemistry behind the phenomenon of ultra-weak photon emission has been subject of considerable interest for decades. Great progress has been made on the understanding of the chemical generation of electronically excited states that are involved in these processes. Proposed mechanisms implicated the production of excited carbonyl species and singlet molecular oxygen in the mechanism of generation of chemiluminescence in biological system. In particular, attention has been focused on the potential generation of singlet molecular oxygen in the recombination reaction of peroxyl radicals by the Russell mechanism. In the last ten years, our group has demonstrated the generation of singlet molecular oxygen from reactions involving the decomposition of biologically relevant hydroperoxides, especially from lipid hydroperoxides in the presence of metal ions, peroxynitrite, HOCl and cytochrome c. In this review we will discuss details on the chemical aspects related to the mechanism of singlet molecular oxygen generation from different biological hydroperoxides.

  18. Negative impact of oxygen molecular activation on Cr(VI) removal with core-shell Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yi; Wu, Hao; Ai, Zhihui

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that the presence of oxygen molecule can inhibit Cr(VI) removal with core-shell Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires at neutral pH of 6.1. 100% of Cr(VI) removal was achieved by the Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires within 60 min in the anoxic condition, in contrast, only 81.2% of Cr(VI) was sequestrated in the oxic condition. Removal kinetics analysis indicated that the presence of oxygen could inhibit the Cr(VI) removal efficiency by near 3 times. XRD, SEM, and XPS analysis revealed that either the anoxic or oxic Cr(VI) removal was involved with adsorption, reduction, co-precipitation, and re-adsorption processes. More Cr(VI) was bound in a reduced state of Cr(III) in the anoxic process, while a thicker Cr(III)/Fe(III)/Cr(VI) oxyhydroxides shell, leading to inhibiting the electron transfer, was found under the oxic process. The negative impact of oxygen molecule was attributed to the oxygen molecular activation which competed with Cr(VI) adsorbed for the consumption of donor electrons from Fe(0) core and ferrous ions bound on the iron oxides surface under the oxic condition. This study sheds light on the understanding of the fate and transport of Cr(VI) in oxic and anoxic environment, as well provides helpful guide for optimizing Cr(VI) removal conditions in real applications.

  19. Vanadium-catalyzed chlorination under molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Moriuchi, Toshiyuki; Fukui, Yasuhiro; Kato, Satoshi; Kajikawa, Tomomi; Hirao, Toshikazu

    2015-06-01

    A catalytic chlorination of ketones was performed by using a vanadium catalyst in the presence of Bu4NI and AlCl3 under atmospheric molecular oxygen. This catalytic chlorination could be applied to the chlorination of alkenes to give the corresponding vic-dichlorides. AlCl3 was found to serve as both a Lewis acid and a chloride source to induce the facile chlorination. A combination of Bu4NI and AlI3 in the presence of a vanadium catalyst under atmospheric molecular oxygen induced the iodination of ketones.

  20. Oxygen Radical Scavenger Activity, EPR, NMR, Molecular Mechanics and Extended-Hückel Molecular Orbital Investigation of the Bis(Piroxicam)Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Cini, R; Pogni, R; Basosi, R; Donati, A; Rossi, C; Sabadini, L; Rollo, L; Lorenzini, S; Gelli, R; Marcolongo, R

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen radical scavenger activity (ORSA) of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] (HPir = Piroxicam = 4-hydroxy -2- methyl -N-2- pyridyl -2H- 1,2-benzothiazine -3- carboxamide 1,1-dioxide) was determined by chemiluminescence of samples obtained by mixing human neutrophils (from healthy subjects) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (DMF = N,N -dimethylformammide) in DMSO/GLY/PBS (2:1:2, v/v) solution (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide, GLY = 1,2,3-propantriol, PBS = Dulbecco's buffer salt solution). The ratio of the residual radicals, for the HPir (1.02.10(-4)M) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (1.08.10(-5)M)/HPir (8.01.10-(-5)M) systems was higher than 12 (not stimulated) [excess of piroxicam was added (Cu/Pir molar ratio approximately 1:10) in order to have most of the metal complexed as bischelate]. In contrast, the ratio of residual radicals for the CuCl(2) (1.00.10(-5)M) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (1.08.10(-5)M)/Hpir (8.01.10(-5)M)system was 5. The [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] compound is therefore a stronger radical scavenger than either HPir or CuCl(2). A molecular mechanics (MM) analysis of the gas phase structures of neutral HPir, its zwitterionic (HPir(+-)) and anionic (Pir(-)) forms, and some Cu(II)-piroxicam complexes based on X-ray structures allowed calculation of force constants. The most stable structure for HPir has a ZZZ conformation similar to that found in the Cu(II) (and Cd(II) complexes) in the solid state as well as in the gas phase. The structure is stabilized by a strong H bond which involves the N(amide)-H and O(enolic) groups. The MM simulation for the [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] complex showed that two high repulsive intramolecular contacts exist between a pyridyl hydrogen atom of one Pir(-) molecule with the O donor of the other ligand. These interactions activate a transition toward a pseudo-tetrahedral geometry, in the case the apical ligands are removed. On refluxing a suspension of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] in acetone a brown microcystalline solid with the Cu(Pir)(2).0.5DMF

  1. The Three Forms of Molecular Oxygen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Finds that a logical application of the simple rules of the molecular orbital bonding theory for diatomic molecules predicted the existence of three spin isomers of the oxygen molecule: one triplet form with two unpaired electrons and two singlet forms with all electrons paired. (MVL)

  2. Identification in pituitary tissue of a peptide alpha-amidation activity that acts on glycine-extended peptides and requires molecular oxygen, copper, and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Eipper, B A; Mains, R E; Glembotski, C C

    1983-08-01

    An enzymatic activity capable of producing an alpha-amidated peptide product from its glycine-extended precursor has been identified in secretory granules of rat anterior, intermediate, and neural pituitary and bovine intermediate pituitary. High levels of endogenous inhibitors of this alpha-amidation activity have also been found in tissue homogenates. The alpha-amidation activity is totally inhibited by addition of divalent metal ion chelators such as diethyldithiocarbamate, o-phenanthroline, and EDTA; alpha-amidation activity is restored to above control levels upon addition of copper. The alpha-amidation reaction requires the presence of molecular oxygen. Of the various cofactors tested, ascorbic acid was the most potent stimulator of alpha-amidation. The alpha-amidation activity has a neutral pH optimum and is primarily soluble following several cycles of freezing and thawing. Kinetic studies with the bovine intermediate pituitary granule-associated activity demonstrated a linear Lineweaver-Burk plot when D-Tyr-Val-Gly was the varied substrate; the apparent Km and Vmax varied with the concentration of ascorbic acid. The substrate specificity of the alpha-amidation activity appears to be quite broad; the conversion of D-Tyr-Val-Gly into D-Tyr-Val-NH2 is inhibited by the addition of a variety of glycine-extended peptides.

  3. Molecular oxygen in the ρ Ophiuchi cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, B.; Liseau, R.; Pagani, L.; Bergman, P.; Bernath, P.; Biver, N.; Black, J. H.; Booth, R. S.; Buat, V.; Crovisier, J.; Curry, C. L.; Dahlgren, M.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Falgarone, E.; Feldman, P. A.; Fich, M.; Florén, H. G.; Fredrixon, M.; Frisk, U.; Gahm, G. F.; Gerin, M.; Hagström, M.; Harju, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Johansson, L. E. B.; Justtanont, K.; Klotz, A.; Kyrölä, E.; Kwok, S.; Lecacheux, A.; Liljeström, T.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lundin, S.; Mégie, G.; Mitchell, G. F.; Murtagh, D.; Nordh, L. H.; Nyman, L.-Å.; Olberg, M.; Olofsson, A. O. H.; Olofsson, G.; Olofsson, H.; Persson, G.; Plume, R.; Rickman, H.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rydbeck, G.; Sandqvist, A. A.; Schéele, F. V.; Serra, G.; Torchinsky, S.; Tothill, N. F.; Volk, K.; Wiklind, T.; Wilson, C. D.; Winnberg, A.; Witt, G.

    2007-05-01

    Context: Molecular oxygen, O2, has been expected historically to be an abundant component of the chemical species in molecular clouds and, as such, an important coolant of the dense interstellar medium. However, a number of attempts from both ground and from space have failed to detect O2 emission. Aims: The work described here uses heterodyne spectroscopy from space to search for molecular oxygen in the interstellar medium. Methods: The Odin satellite carries a 1.1 m sub-millimeter dish and a dedicated 119 GHz receiver for the ground state line of O2. Starting in 2002, the star forming molecular cloud core ρ {Oph A} was observed with Odin for 34 days during several observing runs. Results: We detect a spectral line at v_LSR =+3.5 km s-1 with Δ v_FWHM=1.5 km s-1, parameters which are also common to other species associated with ρ {Oph A}. This feature is identified as the O2 (NJ = 11 - 1_0) transition at 118 750.343 MHz. Conclusions: The abundance of molecular oxygen, relative to H{2} , is 5 × 10-8 averaged over the Odin beam. This abundance is consistently lower than previously reported upper limits. Based on observations with Odin, a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the National Technology Agency of Finland (Tekes) and Centre National d'Étude Spatiale (CNES). The Swedish Space Corporation has been the industrial prime contractor and also is operating the satellite. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Cooperative Catalysis for Selective Alcohol Oxidation with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Slot, Thierry K; Eisenberg, David; van Noordenne, Dylan; Jungbacker, Peter; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2016-08-22

    The activation of dioxygen for selective oxidation of organic molecules is a major catalytic challenge. Inspired by the activity of nitrogen-doped carbons in electrocatalytic oxygen reduction, we combined such a carbon with metal-oxide catalysts to yield cooperative catalysts. These simple materials boost the catalytic oxidation of several alcohols, using molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure and low temperature (80 °C). Cobalt and copper oxide demonstrate the highest activities. The high activity and selectivity of these catalysts arises from the cooperative action of their components, as proven by various control experiments and spectroscopic techniques. We propose that the reaction should not be viewed as occurring at an 'active site', but rather at an 'active doughnut'-the volume surrounding the base of a carbon-supported metal-oxide particle.

  5. Surface facet of palladium nanocrystals: a key parameter to the activation of molecular oxygen for organic catalysis and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Mao, Keke; Ye, Xiaodong; Yan, Wensheng; Huang, Yaobing; Wang, Jianyong; Fu, Yao; Wang, Xisheng; Wu, Xiaojun; Xie, Yi; Xiong, Yujie

    2013-02-27

    In many organic reactions, the O(2) activation process involves a key step where inert ground triplet O(2) is excited to produce highly reactive singlet O(2). It remains elusive what factor induces the change in the electron spin state of O(2) molecules, although it has been discovered that the presence of noble metal nanoparticles can promote the generation of singlet O(2). In this work, we first demonstrate that surface facet is a key parameter to modulate the O(2) activation process on metal nanocrystals, by employing single-facet Pd nanocrystals as a model system. The experimental measurements clearly show that singlet O(2) is preferentially formed on {100} facets. The simulations further elucidate that the chemisorption of O(2) to the {100} facets can induce a spin-flip process in the O(2) molecules, which is achieved via electron transfer from Pd surface to O(2). With the capability of tuning O(2) activation, we have been able to further implement the {100}-faceted nanocubes in glucose oxidation. It is anticipated that this study will open a door to designing noble metal nanocatalysts for O(2) activation and organic oxidation. Another perspective of this work would be the controllability in tailoring the cancer treatment materials for high (1)O(2) production efficiency, based on the facet control of metal nanocrystals. In the cases of both organic oxidation and cancer treatment, it has been exclusively proven that the efficiency of producing singlet O(2) holds the key to the performance of Pd nanocrystals in the applications.

  6. An efficient Rh/O2 catalytic system for oxidative C-H activation/annulation: evidence for Rh(I) to Rh(III) oxidation by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoying; Yang, Lei; Wang, Yanyu; Xie, Yinjun; Huang, Hanmin

    2013-06-19

    A novel and efficient Rh/O2 catalytic system has been developed and shown to catalyze highly efficient oxidative C-H activation/annulation reactions, producing a broad range of isoquinolinium salts with high turnover numbers (up to 740). Mechanistic studies provided strong evidence of facile oxidation of Rh(I) to Rh(III) by molecular oxygen facilitated by acid.

  7. Singlet molecular oxygen generation by light-activated DHN-melanin of the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in black Sigatoka disease of bananas.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J; Prado, Fernanda M; Oliveira, Marilene S; Ortiz-Mendoza, David; Scalfo, Alexsandra C; Pessoa, Adalberto; Medeiros, Marisa H G; White, James F; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In pathogenic fungi, melanin contributes to virulence, allowing tissue invasion and inactivation of the plant defence system, but has never been implicated as a factor for host cell death, or as a light-activated phytotoxin. Our research shows that melanin synthesized by the fungal banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis acts as a virulence factor through the photogeneration of singlet molecular oxygen O2 (1Δg). Using analytical tools, including elemental analysis, ultraviolet/infrared absorption spectrophometry and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, we characterized both pigment content in mycelia and secreted to the culture media as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin type compound. This is sole melanin-type in M. fijiensis. Isolated melanins irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm produced monomol light emission at 1270 nm, confirming generation of O2 (1Δg), a highly reactive oxygen specie (ROS) that causes cellular death by reacting with all cellular macromolecules. Intermediary polyketides accumulated in culture media by using tricyclazole and pyroquilon (two inhibitors of DHN-melanin synthesis) were identified by ESI-HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, irradiation at 532 nm of that mixture of compounds and whole melanized mycelium also generated O2 (1Δg). A pigmented-strain generated more O2 (1Δg) than a strain with low melanin content. Banana leaves of cultivar Cavendish, naturally infected with different stages of black Sigatoka disease, were collected from field. Direct staining of the naturally infected leaf tissues showed the presence of melanin that was positively correlated to the disease stage. We also found hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but we cannot distinguish the source. Our results suggest that O2 (1Δg) photogenerated by DHN-melanin may be involved in the destructive effects of Mycosphaerella fijiensis on banana leaf tissues. Further studies are needed to fully evaluate contributions of melanin-mediated ROS to microbial pathogenesis.

  8. Singlet Molecular Oxygen Generation by Light-Activated DHN-Melanin of the Fungal Pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in Black Sigatoka Disease of Bananas

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J.; Prado, Fernanda M.; Oliveira, Marilene S.; Ortiz-Mendoza, David; Scalfo, Alexsandra C.; Pessoa, Adalberto; Medeiros, Marisa H. G.; White, James F.; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In pathogenic fungi, melanin contributes to virulence, allowing tissue invasion and inactivation of the plant defence system, but has never been implicated as a factor for host cell death, or as a light-activated phytotoxin. Our research shows that melanin synthesized by the fungal banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis acts as a virulence factor through the photogeneration of singlet molecular oxygen O2 (1Δg). Using analytical tools, including elemental analysis, ultraviolet/infrared absorption spectrophometry and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, we characterized both pigment content in mycelia and secreted to the culture media as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin type compound. This is sole melanin-type in M. fijiensis. Isolated melanins irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm produced monomol light emission at 1270 nm, confirming generation of O2 (1Δg), a highly reactive oxygen specie (ROS) that causes cellular death by reacting with all cellular macromolecules. Intermediary polyketides accumulated in culture media by using tricyclazole and pyroquilon (two inhibitors of DHN-melanin synthesis) were identified by ESI-HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, irradiation at 532 nm of that mixture of compounds and whole melanized mycelium also generated O2 (1Δg). A pigmented-strain generated more O2 (1Δg) than a strain with low melanin content. Banana leaves of cultivar Cavendish, naturally infected with different stages of black Sigatoka disease, were collected from field. Direct staining of the naturally infected leaf tissues showed the presence of melanin that was positively correlated to the disease stage. We also found hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but we cannot distinguish the source. Our results suggest that O2 (1Δg) photogenerated by DHN-melanin may be involved in the destructive effects of Mycosphaerella fijiensis on banana leaf tissues. Further studies are needed to fully evaluate contributions of melanin-mediated ROS to microbial pathogenesis. PMID:24646830

  9. Singlet molecular oxygen generation by light-activated DHN-melanin of the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in black Sigatoka disease of bananas.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J; Prado, Fernanda M; Oliveira, Marilene S; Ortiz-Mendoza, David; Scalfo, Alexsandra C; Pessoa, Adalberto; Medeiros, Marisa H G; White, James F; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In pathogenic fungi, melanin contributes to virulence, allowing tissue invasion and inactivation of the plant defence system, but has never been implicated as a factor for host cell death, or as a light-activated phytotoxin. Our research shows that melanin synthesized by the fungal banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis acts as a virulence factor through the photogeneration of singlet molecular oxygen O2 (1Δg). Using analytical tools, including elemental analysis, ultraviolet/infrared absorption spectrophometry and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, we characterized both pigment content in mycelia and secreted to the culture media as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin type compound. This is sole melanin-type in M. fijiensis. Isolated melanins irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm produced monomol light emission at 1270 nm, confirming generation of O2 (1Δg), a highly reactive oxygen specie (ROS) that causes cellular death by reacting with all cellular macromolecules. Intermediary polyketides accumulated in culture media by using tricyclazole and pyroquilon (two inhibitors of DHN-melanin synthesis) were identified by ESI-HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, irradiation at 532 nm of that mixture of compounds and whole melanized mycelium also generated O2 (1Δg). A pigmented-strain generated more O2 (1Δg) than a strain with low melanin content. Banana leaves of cultivar Cavendish, naturally infected with different stages of black Sigatoka disease, were collected from field. Direct staining of the naturally infected leaf tissues showed the presence of melanin that was positively correlated to the disease stage. We also found hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but we cannot distinguish the source. Our results suggest that O2 (1Δg) photogenerated by DHN-melanin may be involved in the destructive effects of Mycosphaerella fijiensis on banana leaf tissues. Further studies are needed to fully evaluate contributions of melanin-mediated ROS to microbial pathogenesis. PMID:24646830

  10. Differential effect of common ligands and molecular oxygen on antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles versus silver ions.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Zong-Ming; Ma, Jie; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2011-10-15

    The antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is partially due to the release of Ag(+), although discerning the contribution of AgNPs vs Ag(+) is challenging due to their common co-occurrence. We discerned the toxicity of Ag(+) versus a commercially available AgNP (35.4 ± 5.1 nm, coated with amorphous carbon) by conducting antibacterial assays under anaerobic conditions that preclude Ag₀ oxidation, which is a prerequisite for Ag(+) release. These AgNPs were 20× less toxic to E. coli than Ag(+) (EC₅₀: 2.04 ± 0.07 vs 0.10 ± 0.01 mg/L), and their toxicity increased 2.3-fold after exposure to air for 0.5 h (EC₅₀: 0.87 ± 0.03 mg/L) which promoted Ag(+) release. No significant difference in Ag(+) toxicity was observed between anaerobic and aerobic conditions, which rules out oxidative stress by ROS as an important antibacterial mechanism for Ag(+). The toxicity of Ag(+) (2.94 μmol/L) was eliminated by equivalent cysteine or sulfide; the latter exceeded the solubility product equilibrium constant (K(sp)), which is conducive to silver precipitation. Equivalent chloride and phosphate concentrations also reduced Ag(+) toxicity without exceeding K(sp). Thus, some common ligands can hinder the bioavailability and mitigate the toxicity of Ag(+) at relatively low concentrations that do not induce silver precipitation. Furthermore, low concentrations of chloride (0.1 mg/L) mitigated the toxicity of Ag(+) but not that of AgNPs, suggesting that previous reports of higher AgNPs toxicity than their equivalent Ag(+) concentration might be due to the presence of common ligands that preferentially decrease the bioavailability and toxicity of Ag(+). Overall, these results show that the presence of O₂ or common ligands can differentially affect the toxicity of AgNPs vs Ag(+), and underscore the importance of water chemistry in the mode of action of AgNPs. PMID:21950450

  11. Design of a highly efficient and wide pH electro-Fenton oxidation system with molecular oxygen activated by ferrous-tetrapolyphosphate complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cao, Menghua; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a novel electro-Fenton (EF) system was developed with iron wire, activated carbon fiber, and sodium tetrapolyphosphate (Na6TPP) as the anode, cathode, and electrolyte, respectively. This Na6TPP-EF system could efficiently degrade atrazine in a wide pH range of 4.0-10.2. The utilization of Na6TPP instead of Na2SO4 as the electrolyte enhanced the atrazine degradation rate by 130 times at an initial pH of 8.0. This dramatic enhancement was attributed to the formation of ferrous-tetrapolyphosphate (Fe(II)-TPP) complex from the electrochemical corrosion (ECC) and chemical corrosion (CC) of iron electrode in the presence of Na6TPP. The Fe(II)-TPP complex could provide an additional molecular oxygen activation pathway to produce more H2O2 and (•)OH via a series single-electron transfer processes, producing the Fe(III)-TPP complex. The cycle of Fe(II)/Fe(III) was easily realized through the electrochemical reduction (ECR) process on the cathode. More interestingly, we found that the presence of Na6TPP could prevent the iron electrode from excessive corrosion via phosphorization in the later stage of the Na6TPP-EF process, avoiding the generation of iron sludge. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and ion chromatography were used to investigate the degradation intermediates to propose a possible atrazine oxidation pathway in the Na6TPP-EF system. These interesting findings provide some new insight on the development of a low-cost and highly efficient EF system for wastewater treatment in a wide pH range. PMID:25631474

  12. Active oxygen doctors the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelló, Ana; Francès, Francesc; Corella, Dolores; Verdú, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    Investigation at the scene of a crime begins with the search for clues. In the case of bloodstains, the most frequently used reagents are luminol and reduced phenolphthalein (or phenolphthalin that is also known as the Kastle-Meyer colour test). The limitations of these reagents have been studied and are well known. Household cleaning products have evolved with the times, and new products with active oxygen are currently widely used, as they are considered to be highly efficient at removing all kinds of stains on a wide range of surfaces. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of these new cleaning products on latent bloodstains that may be left at a scene of a crime. To do so, various fabrics were stained with blood and then washed using cleaning agents containing active oxygen. The results of reduced phenolphthalein, luminol and human haemoglobin tests on the washed fabrics were negative. The conclusion is that these new products alter blood to such an extent that it can no longer be detected by currently accepted methods employed in criminal investigations. This inability to locate bloodstains means that highly important evidence (e.g. a DNA profile) may be lost. Consequently, it is important that investigators are aware of this problem so as to compensate for it.

  13. HERSCHEL MEASUREMENTS OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Li Di; Liseau, Rene; Black, John H.; Bell, Tom A.; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael J.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; Encrenaz, Pierre; Snell, Ronald; Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; Bergin, Edwin; Caselli, Paola; Caux, Emmanuel; Falgarone, Edith

    2011-08-20

    We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) in emission from the H{sub 2} Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} and widths of 3 km s{sup -1}. The beam-averaged column density is N(O{sub 2}) = 6.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and assuming that the source has an equal beam-filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19''), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O{sub 2} relative to H{sub 2} is (0.3-7.3) x 10{sup -6}. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a {approx}5'' diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is {approx}10 M{sub sun} and the dust temperature is {>=}150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O{sub 2} abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T {>=} 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O{sub 2}. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature {>=}180 K. The inferred O{sub 2} column density {approx_equal}5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} can be produced in Peak A, having N(H{sub 2}) {approx_equal} 4 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10-15 km s{sup -1}) C-shock, which can produce N(O{sub 2}) up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}.

  14. A 99 percent purity molecular sieve oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular sieve oxygen generating systems (MSOGS) have become the accepted method for the production of breathable oxygen on military aircraft. These systems separate oxygen for aircraft engine bleed air by application of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology. Oxygen is concentrated by preferential adsorption in nitrogen in a zeolite molecular sieve. However, the inability of current zeolite molecular sieves to discriminate between oxygen and argon results in an oxygen purity limitations of 93-95 percent (both oxygen and argon concentrate). The goal was to develop a new PSA process capable of exceeding the present oxygen purity limitations. A novel molecular sieve oxygen concentrator was developed which is capable of generating oxygen concentrations of up to 99.7 percent directly from air. The process is comprised of four absorbent beds, two containing a zeolite molecular sieve and two containing a carbon molecular sieve. This new process may find use in aircraft and medical breathing systems, and industrial air separation systems. The commercial potential of the process is currently being evaluated.

  15. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  16. Copper modified carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfunctional alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  17. Copper crystallite in carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfurfuryl alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  18. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND OZONE ON AMORPHOUS SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Dapeng; He Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco; Brucato, John Robert; Tozzetti, Lorenzo; De Sio, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Oxygen in the interstellar medium is seen in the gas phase, in ices (incorporated in H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}), and in grains such as (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} )SiO{sub 3} or (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} ){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, 0 < x < 1. In this investigation, we study the diffusion of oxygen atoms and the formation of oxygen molecules and ozone on the surface of an amorphous silicate film. We find that ozone is formed at low temperature (<30 K), and molecular oxygen forms when the diffusion of oxygen atoms becomes significant, at around 60 K. This experiment, besides being the first determination of the diffusion energy barrier (1785 {+-} 35 K) for oxygen atoms on a silicate surface, suggests bare silicates as a possible storage place for oxygen atoms in low-A{sub v} environments.

  19. Molecular Oxygen Uptake by a Solid Co(II) Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aymes, Daniel J.; Paris, Michel R.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed are preparation methods of the active and inactive forms of Cosalen. An experiment of heterogeneous kinetics that consists of following the time dependence of the oxygenation of the active solid and measuring the oxygenation capacity of the chelate is described. (CW)

  20. Search for molecular oxygen in dense interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, P F; Snell, R L; Erickson, N R; Dickman, R L; Schloerb, F P; Irvine, W M

    1985-02-15

    We have carried out a search for the 234 GHz N = 2 --> 0, J = 1 --> 1 transition of 16O18O using the 13.7 m FCRAO radio telescope. No emission was detected toward six giant molecular clouds. Observations of the 220 GHz J = 2 --> 1 transition of C18O yield column densities for this species 1-3 x 10(16) cm-2; the resulting limits on the [O2]/[CO] ratio lie between <0.5 and <4. According to various chemical models, the ratio of molecular oxygen to carbon monoxide is primarily sensitive to the age of a cloud and to its carbon to oxygen ratio. For ages exceeding 3 x 10(6) yr and total carbon-to-oxygen ratio < 1, [O2]/[CO] can approach unity. Our best limits can be interpreted as indicating that the observed clouds are not chemically "mature" or that [carbon]/[oxygen] > 1. However, significant exploitation of molecular oxygen as a tracer of cloud structure and evolution will require more sensitive observations, which may be best carried out from above Earth's atmosphere.

  1. Molecular beam studies of oxygen atom reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoltner, A.-M.

    1989-10-01

    The dynamics of several elementary reactions relevant to combustion was investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state oxygen atoms with small unsaturated hydrocarbons was studied using a crossed molecular beam apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The infrared and ultraviolet photodissociation of anisole was studied using a rotating beam source/fixed detector apparatus. 253 refs., 64 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Oxidative desulfurization of dibenzothiophene with molecular oxygen using emulsion catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Hongying; Gao, Jinbo; Jiang, Zongxuan; Yang, Yongxing; Song, Bo; Li, Can

    2007-01-14

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT) is oxidized to the corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone in an emulsion system (W/O) composed of polyoxometalate anion [C(18)H(37)N(CH(3))3](5)[PV(2)Mo(10)O(40)] as both the surfactant and catalyst, using molecular oxygen as the oxidant and aldehyde as the sacrificial agent under mild conditions. PMID:17180229

  3. Electrochemical investigations on the oxygen activation by cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Scheller, F; Renneberg, R; Schwarze, W; Strnad, G; Pommerening, K; Prümke, H J; Mohr, P

    1979-01-01

    The application of cytochrome P-450 in substrate conversion is complicated both due to the limited stability and the cofactor regeneration problems. To overcome the disadvantages of NADPH consumption the transfer of the reduction equivalents from an electrode into the cytochrome P-450-system was studied: 1. NADPH was cathodically reduced at a mercury pool electrode. By immobilization of NADP on dialdehyde Sephadex the reductive recycling was possible. 2. Different forms of reduced oxygen were produced by the cathode: a) The reaction of O2- with deoxycorticosterone yields a carboxylic acid derivative. In contrast the cytochrome P-450 catalyzed NADPH-dependent reaction with the same substrate gives corticosterone, O2- represents only an intermediate in the activation of oxygen and is not the "activated oxygen" species. b) Molecular oxygen was reduced to HO2- and H2O2, respectively. The interaction of adsorbed cytochrome P-450 on the electrode surface with the reduced oxygen species in the absence of NADPH was studied. The electrochemically generated peroxide seems to be more active than added H2O2. 3. In a model of electro-enzyme-reactor several substrates were hydroxylated by microsomal cytochrome P-450 with cathodically reduced oxygen which substitutes NADPH.

  4. MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND THE ADSORPTION OF PHENOLS - EFFECT OF FUNCTIONAL GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reveals that the presence of molecular oxygen (oxic conditions) has a significant impact on the exhibited adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon (GAC) for several phenolic compounds. The increase in the GAC adsorptive capacity under oxic conditions results f...

  5. Rate of reaction between molecular hydrogen and molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokaw, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The shock tube data of Jachimowski and Houghton were rigorously analyzed to obtain rate constants for the candidate initiation reactions H2 + O2 yields H + HO2, H2 + O2 yields H2O + O, and H2 + O2 yields OH + OH. Reaction (01) is probably not the initiation process because the activation energy obtained is less than the endothermicity and because the derived rates greatly exceed values inferred in the literature from the reverse of reaction (01). Reactions (02) and (03) remain as possibilities, with reaction (02) slightly favored on the basis of steric and statistical considerations. The solution of the differential equations is presented in detail to show how the kinetics of other ignition systems may be solved.

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen diving affects exhaled molecular profiles in men.

    PubMed

    van Ooij, P J A M; van Hulst, R A; Kulik, W; Brinkman, P; Houtkooper, A; Sterk, P J

    2014-07-01

    Exhaled breath contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are associated with respiratory pathophysiology. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen exposure (hyperoxia) generates a distinguishable VOC pattern. This study aimed to test this hypothesis in oxygen-breathing divers. VOCs in exhaled breath were measured in 10 male divers before and 4h after diving to 9msw (190kPa) for 1h. During the dive they breathed 100% oxygen or air in randomized order. VOCs were determined using two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Compared to air dives, after oxygen dives there was a significant increase in five VOCs (predominately methyl alkanes). Furthermore, a strong, positive correlation was found between increments in 2,4-dimethyl-hexane and those of 4-ethyl-5-methyl-nonane. Although non-submerged hyperoxia studies on VOCs have been performed, the present study is the first to demonstrate changes in exhaled molecular profiles after submerged oxygen diving. The pathophysiological background might be attributed to either a lipid peroxidation-induced pathway, an inflammatory pathway, or to both.

  7. Quenching of singlet molecular oxygen by Commiphora myrrha extracts and menthofuran.

    PubMed

    Racine, P; Auffray, B

    2005-06-01

    The quenching activity against singlet oxygen, an actor of lipid peroxidation and DNA degradation, of the essential oil and resinoid of Commiphora myrrha from Somalia has been studied and compared to DL-alpha-tocopherol using 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF) as a probe. To insure that the furan ring was the site of the reaction, experiments were conducted with menthofuran. The essential oil and menthofuran show a higher activity than DL-alpha-tocopherol, suggesting their potential usefulness to neutralise this deleterious form of molecular oxygen. PMID:15890469

  8. Quenching of singlet molecular oxygen by Commiphora myrrha extracts and menthofuran.

    PubMed

    Racine, P; Auffray, B

    2005-06-01

    The quenching activity against singlet oxygen, an actor of lipid peroxidation and DNA degradation, of the essential oil and resinoid of Commiphora myrrha from Somalia has been studied and compared to DL-alpha-tocopherol using 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF) as a probe. To insure that the furan ring was the site of the reaction, experiments were conducted with menthofuran. The essential oil and menthofuran show a higher activity than DL-alpha-tocopherol, suggesting their potential usefulness to neutralise this deleterious form of molecular oxygen.

  9. Carbon Quantum Dots Modified BiOCl Ultrathin Nanosheets with Enhanced Molecular Oxygen Activation Ability for Broad Spectrum Photocatalytic Properties and Mechanism Insight.

    PubMed

    Di, Jun; Xia, Jiexiang; Ji, Mengxia; Wang, Bin; Yin, Sheng; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Zhigang; Li, Huaming

    2015-09-16

    In this paper, carbon quantum dots (CQDs) modified BiOCl ultrathin nanosheets photocatalyst was synthesized via a facile solvothermal method. The structures, morphologies, optical properties, and photocatalytic properties were investigated in detail. The photocatalytic activity of the obtained CQDs modified BiOCl ultrathin nanosheets photocatalyst was evaluated by the degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) and rhodamine B (RhB) under ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared light irradiation. The CQDs/BiOCl materials exhibited significantly enhanced photocatalytic performance as compared with pure BiOCl and the 5 wt % CQDs/BiOCl materials displayed the best performance, which showed a broad spectrum of photocatalytic degradation activity. The main active species were determined to be hole and O2•- under visible light irradiation by electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis, XPS valence spectra, and free radicals trapping experiments. The crucial role of CQDs for the improved photocatalytic activity was mainly attributed to the superior electron transfer ability, enhanced light harvesting, and boosted catalytic active sites.

  10. Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian Kent; Quemener, Goulven; Balakrishman, Naduvalath

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

  11. Photochemistry of molecular and atomic oxygen in the terrestrial nightglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednyts'kyy, Olexandr; Von Savigny, Christian; Sinnhuber, Miriam

    2016-07-01

    The electronic states of molecular oxygen ({O}_2) are in constant communication through collisions in high vibrational levels of {O}_2 in the MLT (Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere) region. We assume that the Herzberg {O}_2 electronic states transfer energy to O-atoms to generate the green line. Our Multiple Nightglow Chemistry model is based on more than 80 (odd oxygen and odd hydrogen) aeronomical reactions to implement this concept. We retrieved atomic oxygen concentration ([O]) profiles in the MLT region with help of SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) and SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) infrared radiometer observations of the nightglow. Particularly, we obtained volume emission rate (VER) profiles (due to the infrared atmospheric {O}_2(a^1Δ_g) nightglow at 1.27 μm) from SABER to retrieve [O] profiles. We discussed quenching profiles that correspond to retrieved [O] profiles to reflect complex molecularity of infrared atmospheric and green line nightglow emissions.

  12. Biochar activated by oxygen plasma for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Dubey, Mukul; Kharel, Parashu; Gu, Zhengrong; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-01

    Biochar, also known as black carbon, is a byproduct of biomass pyrolysis. As a low-cost, environmental-friendly material, biochar has the potential to replace more expensive synthesized carbon nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes) for use in future supercapacitors. To achieve high capacitance, biochar requires proper activation. A conventional approach involves mixing biochar with a strong base and baking at a high temperature. However, this process is time consuming and energy inefficient (requiring temperatures >900 °C). This work demonstrates a low-temperature (<150 °C) plasma treatment that efficiently activates a yellow pine biochar. Particularly, the effects of oxygen plasma on the biochar microstructure and supercapacitor characteristics are studied. Significant enhancement of the capacitance is achieved: 171.4 F g-1 for a 5-min oxygen plasma activation, in comparison to 99.5 F g-1 for a conventional chemical activation and 60.4 F g-1 for untreated biochar. This enhancement of the charge storage capacity is attributed to the creation of a broad distribution in pore size and a larger surface area. The plasma activation mechanisms in terms of the evolution of the biochar surface and microstructure are further discussed.

  13. 4-N,N-Dimethylaminopyridine promoted selective oxidation of methyl aromatics with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan; Gao, Jin; Wang, Feng; Xu, Jie

    2012-03-30

    4-N,N-Dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as catalyst in combination with benzyl bromide was developed for the selective oxidation of methyl aromatics. DMAP exhibited higher catalytic activity than other pyridine analogues, such as 4-carboxypyridine, 4-cyanopyridine and pyridine. The sp3 hybrid carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds of different methyl aromatics were successfully oxygenated with molecular oxygen. The real catalyst is due to the formation of a pyridine onium salt from the bromide and DMAP. The onium salt was well characterized by NMR and the reaction mechanism was discussed.

  14. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  15. MOLECULAR OXYGEN IN OORT CLOUD COMET 1P/HALLEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Dishoeck, E. F. van; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-10

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O{sub 2}, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko of O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O{sub 2} is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O{sub 2} abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O{sub 2} of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O{sub 2} might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  16. Molecular Oxygen in Oort Cloud Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Schwehm, G.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the ROSINA mass spectrometer suite on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft discovered an abundant amount of molecular oxygen, O2, in the coma of Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko of O2/H2O = 3.80 ± 0.85%. It could be shown that O2 is indeed a parent species and that the derived abundances point to a primordial origin. Crucial questions are whether the O2 abundance is peculiar to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko or Jupiter family comets in general, and also whether Oort cloud comets such as comet 1P/Halley contain similar amounts of molecular oxygen. We investigated mass spectra obtained by the Neutral Mass Spectrometer instrument during the flyby by the European Space Agency's Giotto probe of comet 1P/Halley. Our investigation indicates that a production rate of O2 of 3.7 ± 1.7% with respect to water is indeed compatible with the obtained Halley data and therefore that O2 might be a rather common and abundant parent species.

  17. Chemisorption of a molecular oxygen on the UN(0 0 1) surface: Ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovskii, Yu. F.; Bocharov, D.; Kotomin, E. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of DFT GGA calculations on oxygen molecules adsorbed upon the (0 0 1) surface of uranium mononitride (UN) are presented and discussed. We demonstrate that O 2 molecules oriented parallel to the substrate can dissociate either (i) spontaneously when the molecular center lies above the surface hollow site or atop N ion, (ii) with the activation barrier when a molecule sits atop the surface U ion. This explains fast UN oxidation in air.

  18. A scenario for the origin of molecular oxygen in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinger, Yves; Ozgurel, Ozge; Pauzat, Françoise; Markovits, Alexis; Mousis, Olivier; Ronnet, Thomas; Brugger, Bastien; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille

    2016-10-01

    The detection of molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the ROSINA-DFMS instrument on board the Rosetta spacecraft raises a number of questions. This observation, showing abundances of O2 in the 1–10% range with respect to H2O, seems surprising at first sight, but might be more common than originally thought.We propose that the radiolysis of icy grains in low-density environments such as the pre-solar cloud or low density regions of the proto-solar nebula (PSN), leads to the production of large amounts of O2 issued from the destruction of the H2O environment via different chemical reactions between created fragments. We show that the molecular oxygen produced can be efficiently trapped in the ices formed in the PSN. These molecules would remain embedded in the environing ices, even through a moderate heating that could allow for a phase transition of the amorphous ices to crystalline ones. They are liberated simultaneously with the water ices, leading to the strong correlation observed.Computational chemistry models based on first principle periodic density functional theory (DFT) have shown to be well adapted to the description of compact ice and capable to provide the quantitative data to support the above scenario: i) no stabilization can be found neither for the inclusion of O2 in the hexagonal ice lattice, neither for the replacement of a H2O by O2, ii) by contrast, the irradiation of the ice by cosmic rays generates cavities in which molecular oxygen is perfectly stable under the form of O2 or dimers of O2.It should be stressed that the formation of one O2 requires at least the destruction of two H2O whatever the chemical reactions involved. The present simulation is fully consistent with the aforementioned radiolysis hypothesis, where the irradiation process is at the origin of both the formation of O2 and the development of the cavities in which it remains sequestered. The possibility of having both, the monomer as well as the

  19. Comparison of measured and calculated thermospheric molecular oxygen densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, W. E.; Kayser, D. C.; Brinton, H. C.; Brace, L. H.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1977-01-01

    The open source neutral mass spectrometers on the AE-C, -D, and -E satellites were equipped with a 'fly-through' mode of operation which has provided direct measurements of molecular oxygen densities over a large portion of the globe. A complementary set of O2 densities is derived by using AE ion measurements and a scheme based on the daytime ion chemistry of O2(+) in the thermosphere. A comparison of the two data sets reveals general agreement over northern latitudes during periods of relatively low Ap and F10.7. The simplifying assumptions made in the photochemical scheme require that caution be used in calculating O2, especially at high latitudes and altitudes below 200 km

  20. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  1. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, Daniil A; Boyd, Iain D

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  2. Dissociative electron attachment to CO2 produces molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Fei; Xuan, Chuan-Jin; Tian, Shan Xi

    2016-03-01

    Until recently, it was widely regarded that only one reaction pathway led to the production of molecular oxygen in Earth's prebiotic primitive atmosphere: a three-body recombination reaction of two oxygen atoms and a third body that removes excess energy. However, an additional pathway has recently been observed that involves the photodissociation of CO2 on exposure to ultraviolet light. Here we demonstrate a further pathway to O2 production, again from CO2, but via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). Using anion-velocity image mapping, we provide experimental evidence for a channel of DEA to CO2 that produces O2(X3Σ-g) + C-. This observed channel coexists in the same energy range as the competitive three-body dissociation of CO2 to give O + O + C-. The abundance of low-energy electrons in interstellar space and the upper atmosphere of Earth suggests that the contributions of these pathways are significant and should be incorporated into atmospheric chemistry models.

  3. A non-mass-dependent oxygen isotope effect in the production of ozone from molecular oxygen - The role of molecular symmetry in isotope chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidenreich, J. E., III; Thiemens, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    It was previously reported that the reaction products from the synthesis of ozone in an electric discharge through molecular oxygen display a nonmass-dependent (NoMaDic) oxygen isotope effect. In this paper, a detailed characterization of the isotope effect, including the effect of molecular oxygen pressure, and the presence of a chemically inert third body (helium), is reported. The NoMaDic effect is due to an isotopically selective stabilization of the O3 formation reaction intermediate, possibly resulting from the ability of the different isotopomers to exhibit different molecular symmetries.

  4. Superconductivity in oxygen doped iron telluride by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mao

    Iron base superconductor have gained much attention in the research community. They offer great potentials to improve our understanding of the subject of superconductivity by having another family of high temperature superconductors to compare and contrast to the cuprates. Practically, the iron based superconductors seems to be even better candidates for applications in power generation and power transmission. Iron telluride is regarded as the parent compound of the "11" family, the family of iron chalcogenide that has the simplest structure. Iron telluride itself is not a superconductor, by can become one when doped with oxygen. In this investigation, we developed the growth recipe of thin film iron telluride by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). We found the growth to be self-regulated, similar to that of GaAs. The initial layers of growth seem to experience a spontaneous crystallization, as the film quickly go from the initial polycrystalline phase to highly crystalline in just a few unit cells. We studied oxygen doping to the iron telluride thin films and the resultant superconductivity. We characterized the sample with AFM, XRD, transport, and STEM-EELS, and we found that interfacial strain is not an essential ingredient of superconductivity in this particular case. We investigated the doping conditions for two candidate oxygen doping modes: substitution and interstitial. We found that substitution occurs when the film grown in oxygen, while interstitial oxygen is primarily incorporated during annealing after growth. The substitutional oxygen are concentrated in small local regions where substitution is around 100%, but does not contribute to superconductivity. We estimated substitutional oxygen to be about 5%, and is the proximate cause of superconductivity. Hall experiment on our sample showed a shift of dominant carrier type from holes to electrons around 35 K, but the transition was set in motion as early as the structural phase transition around 70 K. We

  5. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS BY MOLECULAR OXYGEN OVER A PD/MGO CATALYST IN THE ABSENCE OF ANY ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective oxidation of alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl products using molecular oxygen is achieved over a simple and easily recyclable 1% Pd/MgO impregnated heterogeneous catalyst in the presence of trifluorotoluene. A variety of activated and non-activated alcohols are ef...

  6. Molecular fossils and the late rise of oxygenic photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocks, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Biomarkers are the molecular fossils of natural products such as lipids and pigments. They can yield a wealth of information about early microbial ecosystems and are particularly valuable when preserved in > 1 billion-year old (Ga) sedimentary rocks where conventional fossils are often lacking. Therefore, in 1999, the detection of traces of biomarkers in 2.5 to 2.7 Ga shales from Western Australia (Brocks et al. 1999, Summons et al. 1999) was celebrated as a breakthrough. The discovery, which was later confirmed by several independent studies, led to far reaching conclusions about the early evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis (Summons et al. 1999) and ancestral eukaryotes (Brocks et al. 1999). However, here we present new data based on the carbon isotopic composition of solidified hydrocarbons (Rasmussen et al. 2008) and the spatial distribution of liquid hydrocarbons within the original 2.5 and 2.7 Ga shales (Brocks 2011) that demonstrate that the molecules must have entered the rocks much later in Earth's history and therefore provide no information about the Archean (>2.5 Ga) biosphere or environment. The elimination of the Archean biomarker data has immense implications for our understanding of Earth's early biosphere. 2-Methylhopanes have been interpreted as evidence for the existence of cyanobacteria at 2.7 Ga, about ~300 million years before the atmosphere became mildly oxygenated in the Great Oxidation Event (GOE; between 2.45 and 2.32 Ga). Now, the oldest direct fossil evidence for cyanobacteria reverts back to 2.15 Ga, and the most ancient robust sign for oxygenic photosynthesis becomes the GOE itself. Moreover, the presence of steranes has been interpreted as evidence for the existence of ancestral eukaryotes at 2.7 Ga. However, without the steranes, the oldest fossil evidence for the domain falls into the range ~1.78-1.68 Ga. Recognition that the biomarkers from Archean rocks are not of Archean age renders permissive hypotheses about a late evolution

  7. Activation of Oxygen by Cytochrome P-450 and Other Haemoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelitsa, D. I.

    1982-11-01

    Data on the activation of molecular oxygen by the full microsomal hydroxylating system containing cytochrome P-450 as the terminal oxygenase are examined. The nature of the hydroxylating agent, which is the oxenoid Fe3+O, is analysed. The autoxidation reactions of cytochrome P-450 from various sources, haemoglobin, myoglobin, and peroxidases are compared and the role of the axial ligands of the haem iron and the structure of the active centres of the haemoproteins in this process is demonstrated. The possible mechanisms of the oxidation of organic compounds by peroxides with participation of cytochrome P-450, cytochrome c, haemoglobin, and catalase are examined critically. Haemoproteins have been divided into three groups in terms of the type of peroxide oxidation reactions. The relative contributions of the radical and two-electron reactions in the oxidation of compounds by peroxides with participation of different haemoproteins are analysed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  8. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  9. Henry's Law Activity of Oxygen in Molten Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, J. W.

    2015-09-01

    A model is proposed for the solubility of oxygen in molten iron in dilute solutions in which the oxygen exists in two states, free and associated. Only the free oxygen has thermodynamic activity in the sense of interaction with an electrochemical cell to produce the voltage described by the Nernst equation.

  10. Inactivation of viruses by chemically and photochemically generated singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Müller-Breitkreutz, K; Mohr, H; Briviba, K; Sies, H

    1995-09-01

    Inactivation of viruses in blood plasma can be achieved by photodynamic procedures using methylene blue (MB) or other photoactive dyes. Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) probably contributes to the virucidal effects of photosensitization. We report the inactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and suid herpes virus type 1 (SHV-1) by chemically generated singlet oxygen, produced by thermal decomposition of the endoperoxide of 3,3'-(1,4-naphthylidene)dipropionate (NDPO2). We demonstrate that viruses can be inactivated by 1O2 generated by chemiexcitation in a reaction in the dark, even in the presence of human plasma. Virus inactivation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was enhanced when water was replaced by deuterium oxide (D2O) and diminished when human plasma or quenchers (imidazole or histidine) were added. The singlet oxygen quenching activities of plasma, imidazole and histidine correlated with their inhibitory effects on virus inactivation. The production of 1O2 was assessed by an indicator reaction: the bleaching of p-nitrosodimethylaniline (RNO) with imidazole as 1O2 acceptor. Virus inactivation and singlet oxygen generation of NDPO2 were compared with those of MB/light-mediated photosensitization. Based on similar amounts of 1O2 generated by either procedure, virus inactivation by MB/light was more effective. Virus inactivation by MB/light was not affected by type I quenchers (e.g. mannitol), but was inhibited by human plasma or singlet oxygen quenchers. Furthermore, in D2O-based PBS, virus inactivation was more effective than that in H2O. These observations confirm that singlet oxygen is involved in virus inactivation by MB/light. Taken together, the results demonstrate that singlet oxygen produced by either procedure is virucidal. The enhanced effect of the photochemical procedure suggests that, in addition to type II, type I reactions and/or the binding affinity of the dye for the virus contribute to virus killing by MB/light.

  11. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: First Principles Simulation of Molecular Oxygen Adsorption on SiC Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, M. D.; Ahaz, B.

    2010-04-01

    We study the binding of molecular oxygen to a (5, 0) single walled SiC nanotube, by means of density functional calculations. The center of a hexagon of silicon and carbon atoms in sites on SiCNT surfaces is the most stable adsorption site for O2 molecule, with a binding energy of -38.22 eV and an average Si-O binding distance of 1.698 Å. We have also tested the stability of the O2-adsorbed SiCNT/CNT with ab initio molecular dynamics simulation which have been carried out at room temperature. Furthermore, the adsorption of O2 on the single walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated. Our first-principles calculations predict that the O2 adsorptive capability of silicon carbide nanotubes is much better than that of carbon nanotubes. This might have potential for gas detection and energy storage.

  12. Singlet molecular oxygen on natural snow and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2010-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) is a reactive intermediate formed when a chromophore absorbs light and subsequently transfers energy to dissolved oxygen. As an oxidant, 1O2* reacts rapidly with a number of electron-rich environmental pollutants. In our work, we show enhanced kinetics for 1O2* in frozen solutions, where its rate of formation (Rf) and steady state concentration ([1O2*]) can be many orders of magnitude higher than found in the same unfrozen solution. Our goal here is to identify the contribution of 1O2* to the decay of pollutants on snow and ice. We conducted experiments in laboratory solutions made to simulate the concentrations and characteristics of natural snow, as well as in natural snow collected in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California and at Summit, Greenland. Natural snow contains a mixture of inorganic salts and organic species that can function as sources and/or sinks for oxidants, as well as contribute colligative control on the volume of quasi-liquid layers that occur at the surface and grain boundaries of ice. In our experiments, solutions typically contained up to five components: (1) Furfuryl alcohol (FFA), a commonly used probe for 1O2*, (2) Rose Bengal (RB), a 1O2* sensitizer, (3) HOOH, a photochemical precursor for hydroxyl radical (●OH), (4) glycerol to simulate unknown, naturally occurring sinks for ●OH, and (5) sodium sulfate to control the total concentration of solutes. We illuminated samples in a temperature-controlled solar simulator and subsequently measured the loss of FFA using high performance liquid chromatography. To differentiate reactions of 1O2* from other sinks (e.g. ●OH), selective sink species were added to determine the fraction of FFA loss due to direct photolysis, reaction with 1O2*, and reaction with ●OH. We verified reactions of 1O2* with FFA by two methods. First, we utilized the kinetic solvent isotope effect, where an enhancement of FFA loss in a mixture of D2O/water is indicative 1O2* since [1

  13. Oxidation of silicon and germanium by atomic and molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisa, Maja

    2007-12-01

    Space vehicles residing in the low Earth orbit (LEO) are exposed to a harsh environment that rapidly degrades their materials. The LEO ranges from 200-700km in altitude from the Earth's surface, and the temperature varies between 200 and 400K. The most hazardous species in LEO is atomic oxygen (AO) containing 5eV kinetic energy due to the high velocity of the spacecrafts (8km/s). The goal of this research is the elucidation of the fundamental mechanisms of semiconductor degradation and passivation in LEO conditions by comparing the structural differences in the oxide films created by exposure to AO and molecular oxygen (MO). Silicon is the base material for solar cells used in LEO whereas Ge and SiOx films are common coatings to protect polymer materials that are used as structural materials in spacecrafts. Hyperthermal AO was created by the laser detonation of MO within a high vacuum (HV) chamber, that produces a high flux of AO. A variety of nano-characterization techniques, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to determine the microstructure and local chemistry of the oxide and the oxide/semiconductor interface. For Si, the amorphous silica formed by AO was nearly twice as thick, more ordered, and more homogeneous in composition, than the oxide formed by MO. The Si/SiOx interface formed by AO was atomically abrupt, with no suboxides detected near the interface or throughout the oxide. The oxide scale formed by MO on Si(100) consisted of transitional oxidation states. The oxide film formed on Ge(100) due to exposure to 5eV AO, is 2-3 times thicker and similarly to the Si/SiOx interfaces, the Ge/GeOx interface was found to be atomically abrupt. The oxidation kinetics of Si and Ge were monitored in situ using a research quartz crystal microbalance (RQCM) that was incorporated into the AO source. The oxidation kinetics in hyperthermal AO did not follow the standard linear to

  14. Extended Hartree-Fock theory of chemical reactions. IX. Diradical and perepoxide mechanisms for oxygenations of ethylene with molecular oxygen and iron-oxo species are revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kizashi; Yamanaka, Syusuke; Shimada, Jiro; Isobe, Hiroshi; Saito, Toru; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Okumura, Mitsutaka

    Symmetry and broken symmetry (BS) in molecular orbital description of transition structures and intermediates in oxygenation reactions have been revisited to elucidate states correlation diagrams and mechanisms for addition reactions of molecular oxygen and metal-oxo M=O (M = Mn(II) and Fe(II)) species to C=C double bonds. Relative stabilities between diradical (DR) and perepoxide (PE) intermediates were thoroughly investigated by several BS hybrid DFT (HDFT) methods and BS CCSD(T) method with and without spin projection. It has been found that recovery of spin symmetry, namely eliminating spin contamination error from the BS solutions, is crucial for the elucidation of reasonable state correlation diagrams and energy differences of the key structures in the oxygenation reactions because the singlet-triplet energy gap for molecular oxygen is large (22 kcal/mol). The BS HDFT followed by spin correction reproduced activation barriers for transition structures along both PE and DR reaction pathways by the use of the CASPT2 method. Basis set dependence on the relative stability between PE and DR intermediates were also examined thoroughly. Solvation effect for DR and PE intermediates was further examined with self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) and SCIPCM methods. Both BS HDFT and CASPT2 have concluded that the DR mechanism is favorable for the addition reaction of singlet oxygen to ethylene, supporting our previous conclusions. The BS HDFT with spin correction was concluded to be useful enough for theoretical investigations of mechanisms of oxygenation reactions. Implications of the computational results were discussed in relation to the theoretical framework (four configuration model) for elucidation of possible mechanisms of epoxidation reactions with Fe(IV)=O cores in metalloenzymes on the basis of isolobal analogies among O, O=O, and Fe(IV)=O. Correspondence between magnetic coupling mode and radical pathway in oxygenations with these species was clarified based

  15. The unusual reaction of semiquinone radicals with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Valgimigli, Luca; Amorati, Riccardo; Fumo, Maria Grazia; DiLabio, Gino A; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Ingold, Keith U; Pratt, Derek A

    2008-03-01

    Hydroquinones (benzene-1,4-diols) are naturally occurring chain-breaking antioxidants, whose reactions with peroxyl radicals yield 1,4-semiquinone radicals. Unlike the 1,2-semiquinone radicals derived from catechols (benzene-1,2-diols), the 1,4-semiquinone radicals do not always trap another peroxyl radical, and instead the stoichiometric factor of hydroquinones varies widely between 0 and 2 as a function of ring-substitution and reaction conditions. This variable antioxidant behavior has been attributed to the competing reaction of the 1,4-semiquinone radical with molecular oxygen. Herein we report the results of experiments and theoretical calculations focused on understanding this key reaction. Our experiments, which include detailed kinetic and mechanistic investigations by laser flash photolysis and inhibited autoxidation studies, and our theoretical calculations, which include detailed studies of the reactions of both 1,4-semiquinones and 1,2-semiquinones with O2, provide many important insights. They show that the reaction of O2 with 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-semiquinone radical (used as model compound) has a rate constant of 2.4 +/- 0.9 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 in acetonitrile and as high as 2.0 +/- 0.9 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 in chlorobenzene, i.e., similar to that previously reported in water at pH approximately 7. These results, considered alongside our theoretical calculations, suggest that the reaction occurs by an unusual hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism, taking place in a two-step process consisting first of addition of O2 to the semiquinone radical and second an intramolecular H-atom transfer concerted with elimination of hydroperoxyl to yield the quinone. This reaction appears to be much more facile for 1,4-semiquinones than for their 1,2-isomers. PMID:18260673

  16. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  17. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  18. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  19. The oxygen transfer rate influences the molecular mass of the alginate produced by Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Barrera, A; Peña, C; Galindo, E

    2007-09-01

    The influence of oxygen transfer rate (OTR) on the molecular mass of alginate was studied. In batch cultures without dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) control and at different agitation rates, the DOT was nearly zero and the OTR was constant during biomass growth, hence the cultures were oxygen-limited. The OTR reached different maximum levels (OTR(max)) and enabled to establish various relative respiration rates. Overall, the findings showed that OTR influences alginate molecular mass. The mean molecular mass (MMM) of the alginate increased as OTR(max) decreased. The molecular mass obtained at 3.0 mmol l(-1) h(-1) was 7.0 times higher (1,560 kDa) than at 9.0 mmol l(-1) h(-1) (220 kDa). An increase in molecular mass can be a bacterial response to adverse nutritional conditions such as oxygen limitation.

  20. Temperature dependence of oxygen evolution through catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović-Bijelić, A.; Bijelić, G.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.; Vukojević, V.

    2007-09-01

    By experimental investigations of the temperature dependence of catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase in the temperature range 278 328 K, different kinetic profiles for oxygen evolution were found below and above 298 K. Extension of the model is proposed to account for these observations. By numeric simulations of the reaction kinetics at different temperatures, it was found that enhanced evaporation of molecular oxygen from the reaction solution is the main root through which oxygen is lost at elevated temperatures in laboratory conditions.

  1. Molecular Evolution of the Oxygen-Binding Hemerythrin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis during Precambrian times entailed the diversification of strategies minimizing reactive oxygen species-associated damage. Four families of oxygen-carrier proteins (hemoglobin, hemerythrin and the two non-homologous families of arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins) are known to have evolved independently the capacity to bind oxygen reversibly, providing cells with strategies to cope with the evolutionary pressure of oxygen accumulation. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin was first studied in marine invertebrates but further research has made it clear that it is present in the three domains of life, strongly suggesting that its origin predated the emergence of eukaryotes. Results Oxygen-binding hemerythrins are a monophyletic sub-group of the hemerythrin/HHE (histidine, histidine, glutamic acid) cation-binding domain. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologs were unambiguously identified in 367/2236 bacterial, 21/150 archaeal and 4/135 eukaryotic genomes. Overall, oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues were found in the same proportion as single-domain and as long protein sequences. The associated functions of protein domains in long hemerythrin sequences can be classified in three major groups: signal transduction, phosphorelay response regulation, and protein binding. This suggests that in many organisms the reversible oxygen-binding capacity was incorporated in signaling pathways. A maximum-likelihood tree of oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues revealed a complex evolutionary history in which lateral gene transfer, duplications and gene losses appear to have played an important role. Conclusions Hemerythrin is an ancient protein domain with a complex evolutionary history. The distinctive iron-binding coordination site of oxygen-binding hemerythrins evolved first in prokaryotes, very likely prior to the divergence of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and spread into many bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species. The later

  2. Molecular characteristics versus biological activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Applegate, Vernon C.; Smith, Manning A.; Willeford, Bennett R.

    1967-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of mononitrophenols containing halogens not only play a key role in their biological activity but provide a novel example of selective toxicity among vertebrate animals. It has been reported that efforts to control the parasitic sea lamprey in the Great Lakes are directed at present to the applications of a selective toxicant to streams inhabited by lamprey larvae. Since 1961, the larvicide that has been used almost exclusively in the control program has been 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM). However, this is only one of about 15 closely related compounds, all halogen-containing mononitrophenols, that display a selectively toxic action upon lampreys. Although not all of the halogenated mononitrophenols are selectively toxic to lampreys (in fact, fewer than half of those tested), no other group of related compounds has displayed any useful larvicidal activity except for the substituted nitrosalicylanilides.

  3. Singlet molecular oxygen generated in dark biological process.

    PubMed

    Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa H G

    2014-10-01

    Ultraweak chemiluminescence arising from biomolecules oxidation has been attributed to the radiative deactivation of singlet molecular oxygen [(1)O2] and electronically excited triplet carbonyl products involving dioxetane intermediates. As examples, we will discuss the generation of (1)O2 from lipid hydroperoxides, which involves a cyclic mechanism from a linear tetraoxide intermediate. The generation of (1)O2 in aqueous solution via energy transfer from the excited triplet acetone arising from the thermodecomposition of dioxetane a chemical source, and horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-methylpropanal, as an enzymatic source, will also be discussed. The approach used to unequivocally demonstrate the generation of (1)O2 in these reactions is the use of (18)O-labeled hydroperoxide / triplet dioxygen ((18)[(3)O2]), the detection of labeled compounds by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and the direct spectroscopic detection and characterization of (1)O2 light emission. Characteristic light emission at 1,270nm, corresponding to the singlet delta state monomolecular decay was observed. Using(18)[(3)O2], we observed the formation of (18)O-labeled (1)O2 ((18)[(1)O2]) by the chemical trapping of (18)[(1)O2]with the anthracene-9,10-diyldiethane-2,1-diyl disulfate disodium salt (EAS) and detected the corresponding (18)O-labeled EAS endoperoxide usingHPLC-MS/MS. The combined use of the thermolysis of a water-soluble naphthalene endoperoxide as a generator of (18)O labeled (1)O2 and the sensitivity of HPLC-MS/MS allowed the study of (1)O2reactivity toward biomolecules. Photoemission properties and chemical trapping clearly demonstrate that the production of hydroperoxide and excited carbonyls generates (18)[(1)O2], and points to the involvement of (1)O2 in physiological and pathophysiological mechanism. Supported by FAPESP (2012/12663-1), CAPES, INCT Redoxoma (FAPESP/CNPq/CAPES; 573530/2008-4), NAP Redoxoma (PRPUSP; 2011.1.9352.1.8), CEPID

  4. Pulsed diode laser-based monitor for singlet molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonkyung; Zhu, Leyun; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Hinds, Michael F.; Vu, Danthu H.; Rosen, David I.; Davis, Steven J.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising cancer treatment. PDT uses the affinity of photosensitizers to be selectively retained in malignant tumors. When tumors, pretreated with the photosensitizer, are irradiated with visible light, a photochemical reaction occurs and tumor cells are destroyed. Oxygen molecules in the metastable singlet delta state O2(1Δ) are believed to be the species that destroys cancerous cells during PDT. Monitoring singlet oxygen produced by PDT may lead to more precise and effective PDT treatments. Our approach uses a pulsed diode laser-based monitor with optical fibers and a fast data acquisition system to monitor singlet oxygen during PDT. We present results of in vitro singlet oxygen detection in solutions and in a rat prostate cancer cell line as well as PDT mechanism modeling. PMID:18601555

  5. Pulsed diode laser-based monitor for singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonkyung; Zhu, Leyun; Minhaj, Ahmed M; Hinds, Michael F; Vu, Danthu H; Rosen, David I; Davis, Steven J; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising cancer treatment. PDT uses the affinity of photosensitizers to be selectively retained in malignant tumors. When tumors, pretreated with the photosensitizer, are irradiated with visible light, a photochemical reaction occurs and tumor cells are destroyed. Oxygen molecules in the metastable singlet delta state O2(1Delta) are believed to be the species that destroys cancerous cells during PDT. Monitoring singlet oxygen produced by PDT may lead to more precise and effective PDT treatments. Our approach uses a pulsed diode laser-based monitor with optical fibers and a fast data acquisition system to monitor singlet oxygen during PDT. We present results of in vitro singlet oxygen detection in solutions and in a rat prostate cancer cell line as well as PDT mechanism modeling.

  6. Selective oxidation of cyclooctane to cyclootanone with molecular oxygen in the presence of compressed carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Theyssen, Nils; Leitner, Walter

    2002-03-01

    The oxidation of cyclooctane (1) to cyclooctanone (3) with molecular oxygen and acetaldehyde (2) as a co-reductant occurs efficiently in the presence of compressed CO2. Up to 20% yields of 3 are obtained under optimised multiphase conditions.

  7. Copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization-oxygenation of thiocarbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen: an efficient method for the preparation of oxygen isotopically labeled carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, Fumitoshi; Suenami, Aiko; Yoshida, Atsunori; Murai, Toshiaki

    2007-06-21

    A novel copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization reaction of thiocarbonyl compounds, using molecular oxygen as an oxidant and leading to formation of carbonyl compounds, has been developed, and the utility of the process is demonstrated by its application to the preparation of a carbonyl-18O labeled sialic acid derivative. PMID:17844744

  8. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  9. Topological analysis of third-row main group dicarbides with molecular oxygen: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Parida, Saroj K.; Sahu, Sridhar

    2015-08-28

    Topological analysis of third-row main group dicarbides with molecular oxygen is calculated using density functional theory (DFT). In addition, Bader topological analysis show large electron density at the bond critical point (BCP) between carbon of C{sub 2}X cluster and oxygen (of molecular oxygen), inferring that the C–O bonding to be more shared-type as compared to that of X - O bonding. This fact is also confirmed by larger positive value of electron density (ρ) and negative ∇{sup 2}ρ. Similar conclusion is also obtained from the delocalization index (δ) which, in the case of C-O is found to be comparatively large.

  10. Molecular signalling mediating the protective effect of A1 adenosine and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptor activation against apoptosis by oxygen/glucose deprivation in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Renata; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Ballerini, Patrizia; D'Auro, Mariagrazia; Nargi, Eleonora; Buccella, Silvana; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Caciagli, Francesco

    2007-05-01

    Astrocyte death may occur in neurodegenerative disorders and complicates the outcome of brain ischemia, a condition associated with high extracellular levels of adenosine and glutamate. We show that pharmacological activation of A(1) adenosine and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors with N(6)-chlorocyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) and (-)2-oxa-4-aminocyclo-[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268), respectively, protects cultured astrocytes against apoptosis induced by a 3-h exposure to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Protection by CCPA and LY379268 was less than additive and was abrogated by receptor blockade with selective competitive antagonists or pertussis toxin. Both in control astrocytes and in astrocytes exposed to OGD, CCPA and LY379268 induced a rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which are known to support cell survival. In cultures exposed to OGD, CCPA and LY379268 reduced the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38/MAPK, reduced the levels of the proapoptotic protein Bad, increased the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-X(L), and were highly protective against apoptotic death, as shown by nuclear 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and measurements of caspase-3 activity. All of these effects were attenuated by treatment with 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(methylthio)butadiene (U0126) and 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride (LY294002), which inhibit the MAPK and the PI3K pathways, respectively. These data suggest that pharmacological activation of A(1) and mGlu3 receptors protects astrocytes against hypoxic/ischemic damage by stimulating the PI3K and ERK1/2 MAPK pathways. PMID:17293559

  11. Molecular sieve generation of aviator's oxygen: Performance of a prototype system under simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Ikels, K G; Lamb, M J; Boscola, E J; Ferguson, R H

    1980-07-01

    The molecular sieve method of generating an enriched-oxygen breathing gas is one of several candidate onboard oxygen generation (OBOG) systems under joint Army-Navy-Air Force development for application in tactical aircraft. The performance of a nominal two-man-capacity molecular sieve oxygen generation system was characterized under simulated flight conditions. Data are given on the composition of the molecular sieve-generated breathing gas (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon) as a function of inlet air pressure, altitude, breathing gas flow rate, and ambient temperature. The maximum oxygen concentration observed was 95%, with the balance argon. At low demand flow rates and certain conditions of pressure and altitude, the argon enrichment factor exceeded that of oxygen giving a maximum argon concentration of 6.6% with the balance oxygen. The structural integrity of the unit was verified by vibration and centrifuge testing. The performance of the molecular sieve unit is discussed in the context of aircraft operating envelopes using both diluter-demand and 100% delivery subsystems. PMID:6774707

  12. Molecular sieve generation of aviator's oxygen: Performance of a prototype system under simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Ikels, K G; Lamb, M J; Boscola, E J; Ferguson, R H

    1980-07-01

    The molecular sieve method of generating an enriched-oxygen breathing gas is one of several candidate onboard oxygen generation (OBOG) systems under joint Army-Navy-Air Force development for application in tactical aircraft. The performance of a nominal two-man-capacity molecular sieve oxygen generation system was characterized under simulated flight conditions. Data are given on the composition of the molecular sieve-generated breathing gas (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon) as a function of inlet air pressure, altitude, breathing gas flow rate, and ambient temperature. The maximum oxygen concentration observed was 95%, with the balance argon. At low demand flow rates and certain conditions of pressure and altitude, the argon enrichment factor exceeded that of oxygen giving a maximum argon concentration of 6.6% with the balance oxygen. The structural integrity of the unit was verified by vibration and centrifuge testing. The performance of the molecular sieve unit is discussed in the context of aircraft operating envelopes using both diluter-demand and 100% delivery subsystems.

  13. Role of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical in pyrite oxidation by molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Harrington, Andrea D.; Laffers, Richard; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2010-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are readily formed during the oxidation of pyrite with molecular oxygen over a wide range of pH conditions. However, pretreatment of the pyrite surface influences how much of the intermediates are formed and their fate. Acid-washed pyrite produces significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical when suspended in air-saturated water. However, the hydrogen peroxide concentration shows an exponential decrease with time. Suspensions made with partially oxidized pyrite yield significantly lower amounts of hydrogen peroxide product. The presence of Fe(III)-oxide or Fe(III)-hydroxide patches facilitates the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Hence, the degree to which a pyrite surface is covered with patches of Fe(III)-oxide or Fe(III)-hydroxide patches is an important control on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in solution. Hydrogen peroxide appears to be an important intermediate in the four-electron transfer from pyrite to molecular oxygen. Addition of catalase, an enzyme that decomposes hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, to a pyrite suspension reduces the oxidation rate by 40%. By contrast, hydroxyl radical does not appear to play a significant role in the oxidation mechanism. It is estimated on the basis of a molecular oxygen and sulfate mass balance that 5-6% of the molecular oxygen is consumed without forming sulfate.

  14. Atomic and molecular oxygen adsorbed on (111) transition metal surfaces: Cu and Ni

    SciTech Connect

    López-Moreno, S.; Romero, A. H.

    2015-04-21

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the reaction of oxygen with clean copper and nickel [111]-surfaces. We study several alternative adsorption sites for atomic and molecular oxygen on both surfaces. The minimal energy geometries and adsorption energies are in good agreement with previous theoretical studies and experimental data. From all considered adsorption sites, we found a new O{sub 2} molecular precursor with two possible dissociation paths on the Cu(111) surface. Cross barrier energies for the molecular oxygen dissociation have been calculated by using the climbing image nudge elastic band method, and direct comparison with experimental results is performed. Finally, the structural changes and adsorption energies of oxygen adsorbed on surface when there is a vacancy nearby the adsorption site are also considered.

  15. Molecular sieve oxygen generating system: the argon question--a brief review.

    PubMed

    Ikels, K G; Adams, J D

    1979-09-01

    The molecular sieve oxygen generating system (MSOG) is currently being considered as a replacement for liquid and gaseous stores on aircraft for the supply of aviator's breathing oxygen. Incorporation of onboard oxygen generation in aircraft not only increases system safety but also minimizes logistic requirements. However, a unique characteristic of the MSOG is that it concentrates not only oxygen but also argon in the process of removing nitrogen from engine bleed air. Maximum concentrations produced by present systems are in the order of 95% oxygen and 5% argon. These results have precipitated numerous questions relating to the physiological effects of argon in the product breathing gas. This report reviews the current literature concerning argon as a minor constituent (less than 10%) in gas breathing systems and recommends studies prior to human compatibility testing of the molecule sieve oxygen generating systems.

  16. Reporter cell activity within hydrogel constructs quantified from oxygen-independent bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Dennis; Roeffaers, Maarten; Kerckhofs, Greet; Hofkens, Johan; Van de Putte, Tom; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2014-09-01

    By providing a three-dimensional (3D) support to cells, hydrogels offer a more relevant in vivo tissue-like environment as compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Hydrogels can be applied as screening platforms to investigate in 3D the role of biochemical and biophysical cues on cell behaviour using bioluminescent reporter cells. Gradients in oxygen concentration that result from the interplay between molecular transport and cell metabolism can however cause substantial variability in the observed bioluminescent reporter cell activity. To assess the influence of these oxygen gradients on the emitted bioluminescence for various hydrogel geometries, a combined experimental and modelling approach was implemented. We show that the applied model is able to predict oxygen gradient independent bioluminescent intensities which correlate better to the experimentally determined viable cell numbers, as compared to the experimentally measured bioluminescent intensities. By analysis of the bioluminescence reaction dynamics we obtained a quantitative description of cellular oxygen metabolism within the hydrogel, which was validated by direct measurements of oxygen concentration within the hydrogel. Bioluminescence peak intensities can therefore be used as a quantitative measurement of reporter cell activity within a hydrogel, but an unambiguous interpretation of these intensities requires a compensation for the influence of cell-induced oxygen gradients on the luciferase activity.

  17. Reporter cell activity within hydrogel constructs quantified from oxygen-independent bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Dennis; Roeffaers, Maarten; Kerckhofs, Greet; Hofkens, Johan; Van de Putte, Tom; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2014-09-01

    By providing a three-dimensional (3D) support to cells, hydrogels offer a more relevant in vivo tissue-like environment as compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Hydrogels can be applied as screening platforms to investigate in 3D the role of biochemical and biophysical cues on cell behaviour using bioluminescent reporter cells. Gradients in oxygen concentration that result from the interplay between molecular transport and cell metabolism can however cause substantial variability in the observed bioluminescent reporter cell activity. To assess the influence of these oxygen gradients on the emitted bioluminescence for various hydrogel geometries, a combined experimental and modelling approach was implemented. We show that the applied model is able to predict oxygen gradient independent bioluminescent intensities which correlate better to the experimentally determined viable cell numbers, as compared to the experimentally measured bioluminescent intensities. By analysis of the bioluminescence reaction dynamics we obtained a quantitative description of cellular oxygen metabolism within the hydrogel, which was validated by direct measurements of oxygen concentration within the hydrogel. Bioluminescence peak intensities can therefore be used as a quantitative measurement of reporter cell activity within a hydrogel, but an unambiguous interpretation of these intensities requires a compensation for the influence of cell-induced oxygen gradients on the luciferase activity. PMID:24957291

  18. Silicon nanocrystals dispersed in water: Photosensitizers for molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goller, B.; Polisski, S.; Wiggers, H.; Kovalev, D.

    2010-05-01

    We report on the synthesis of freestanding silicon spheres having sizes in the range of 3-10 nm. As-prepared luminescent silicon nanocrystals have H-passivated surface. Therefore, energy transfer from excitons confined in Si nanocrystals to oxygen molecules is found to be efficient. It is demonstrated that a termination of silicon nanocrystal H-passivated hydrophobic surface by lipids provides their water solubility. We found that this procedure preserves photosensitizing ability of silicon nanocrystals. Therefore, this material system can potentially be employed for a variety of biomedical applications.

  19. Snapshots of enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger catalysis: oxygen activation and intermediate stabilization.

    PubMed

    Orru, Roberto; Dudek, Hanna M; Martinoli, Christian; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E; Royant, Antoine; Weik, Martin; Fraaije, Marco W; Mattevi, Andrea

    2011-08-19

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases catalyze the oxidation of carbonylic substrates to ester or lactone products using NADPH as electron donor and molecular oxygen as oxidative reactant. Using protein engineering, kinetics, microspectrophotometry, crystallography, and intermediate analogs, we have captured several snapshots along the catalytic cycle which highlight key features in enzyme catalysis. After acting as electron donor, the enzyme-bound NADP(H) forms an H-bond with the flavin cofactor. This interaction is critical for stabilizing the oxygen-activating flavin-peroxide intermediate that results from the reaction of the reduced cofactor with oxygen. An essential active-site arginine acts as anchoring element for proper binding of the ketone substrate. Its positively charged guanidinium group can enhance the propensity of the substrate to undergo a nucleophilic attack by the flavin-peroxide intermediate. Furthermore, the arginine side chain, together with the NADP(+) ribose group, forms the niche that hosts the negatively charged Criegee intermediate that is generated upon reaction of the substrate with the flavin-peroxide. The fascinating ability of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases to catalyze a complex multistep catalytic reaction originates from concerted action of this Arg-NADP(H) pair and the flavin subsequently to promote flavin reduction, oxygen activation, tetrahedral intermediate formation, and product synthesis and release. The emerging picture is that these enzymes are mainly oxygen-activating and "Criegee-stabilizing" catalysts that act on any chemically suitable substrate that can diffuse into the active site, emphasizing their potential value as toolboxes for biocatalytic applications.

  20. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  1. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of oxygen binding in hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toru; Thiel, Walter

    2014-05-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on the mechanism of reversible dioxygen binding in the active site of hemocyanin (Hc). The QM region is treated by broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) with spin projection corrections. The X-ray structures of deoxygenated (deoxyHc) and oxygenated (oxyHc) hemocyanin are well reproduced by QM/MM geometry optimizations. The computed relative energies strongly depend on the chosen density functional. They are consistent with the available thermodynamic data for oxygen binding in hemocyanin and in synthetic model complexes when the BH&HLYP hybrid functional with 50% Hartree-Fock exchange is used. According to the QM(BH&HLYP)/MM results, the reaction proceeds stepwise with two sequential electron transfer (ET) processes in the triplet state followed by an intersystem crossing to the singlet product. The first ET step leads to a nonbridged superoxo CuB(II)-O2(•-) intermediate via a low-barrier transition state. The second ET step is even more facile and yields a side-on oxyHc complex with the characteristic Cu2O2 butterfly core, accompanied by triplet-singlet intersystem crossing. The computed barriers are very small so that the two ET processes are expected to very rapid and nearly simultaneous. PMID:24762083

  2. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of oxygen binding in hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toru; Thiel, Walter

    2014-05-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on the mechanism of reversible dioxygen binding in the active site of hemocyanin (Hc). The QM region is treated by broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) with spin projection corrections. The X-ray structures of deoxygenated (deoxyHc) and oxygenated (oxyHc) hemocyanin are well reproduced by QM/MM geometry optimizations. The computed relative energies strongly depend on the chosen density functional. They are consistent with the available thermodynamic data for oxygen binding in hemocyanin and in synthetic model complexes when the BH&HLYP hybrid functional with 50% Hartree-Fock exchange is used. According to the QM(BH&HLYP)/MM results, the reaction proceeds stepwise with two sequential electron transfer (ET) processes in the triplet state followed by an intersystem crossing to the singlet product. The first ET step leads to a nonbridged superoxo CuB(II)-O2(•-) intermediate via a low-barrier transition state. The second ET step is even more facile and yields a side-on oxyHc complex with the characteristic Cu2O2 butterfly core, accompanied by triplet-singlet intersystem crossing. The computed barriers are very small so that the two ET processes are expected to very rapid and nearly simultaneous.

  3. Multiple forms of soluble monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine: oxygen oxidoreductase (EC 1.14.18.1) from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum). III. Influence of pH on the molecular weight distribution of enzyme activity in potato juice.

    PubMed

    Matheis, G; Belitz, H D

    1979-09-01

    Gel chromatography on Sepharose and on Sephadex was used to separate the soluble phenol oxidase in various potato juices into multiple molecular forms ranging from 36,000 to 800,000 daltons. Adjustment of potato juice from physiological pH (ca. 6) to pH 4.5 or to pH 7.8 resulted in the predominance of low-mol.-wt. (less than 150,000 daltons) or high-mol.-wt. (greater than 150,000 daltons) enzyme forms, respectively. This suggests association phenomena of subunits. In potato juice of physiological pH and in potato juice adjusted to pH 4.5, all enzyme forms exhibited both monophenol and o-diphenol oxidase activities (assayed at pH 6.0). In potato juice adjusted to pH 7.8 considerable loss of monophenol oxidase activity (assayed at pH 6.0) occurred. This suggests that o-diphenol oxidase is more alkali-stable than monophenol oxidase. The significance of these findings for enzyme purifications and for the in vivo action of the enzyme is discussed. PMID:41378

  4. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  5. Oxygen saturation during daily activities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Soguel Schenkel, N; Burdet, L; de Muralt, B; Fitting, J W

    1996-12-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently develop nocturnal oxygen desturation because of alveolar hypoventilation, worsening of ventilation-perfusion mismatch, and sometimes obstructive sleep apnoeas. In contrast, little is known about their oxygen status during the various activities of daily life. The aim of this study was to compare the oxygen saturation profile during day and night, and to assess the influence of different daily activities in COPD. During a rehabilitation programme, we studied 30 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD (median forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 37% of predicted), without marked hypoxaemia (median arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2) 9.1 kPa). Arterial oxygen saturation (Sa,O2) was assessed by pulse oximetry during night (8 h) and day (10.5 h). The mean and minimal Sa,O2 were calculated, and desaturations were defined as Sa,O2 falls > 4%.h-1. Daily activities were identified by the patients as resting, eating, washing, nebulization therapy and walking. Mean Sa,O2 was lower during the night (88%) than during the day (89%). In contrast, minimal Sa,O2 was lower during the day (69%) than during the night (72%), and the number of desaturations was higher during the day (8.6 desaturations.h-1) than during the night (6.8 desaturations.h-1). Mean Sa,O2 was 88% during walking, which was lower than during resting (90%), nebulization (90%), and meals (89%). The number of desaturations was higher during walking (13.1 desaturations.h-1), washing (12.6 desaturations.h-1), and eating (9.2 desaturations.h-1) than during resting (5.3 desaturations.h-1). We conclude that daily activities, such as walking, washing and eating, are associated with transient oxygen desaturation in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even without marked resting hypoxaemia.

  6. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  7. Evaluation of the Catalytic Activity and Cytotoxicity of Palladium Nanocubes. The Role of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photo-excitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,5,3′,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB), as well as, analyzed the cytotoxic properties of PdNC on HeLa cells. Our findings showed no evidence of singlet oxygen production by PdNC. The nanocubes’ activity is not necessarily linked to activation of oxygen. The oxidation of substrate on PdNC can be a first step followed by PdNC regeneration with oxygen or other oxidant. The catalytic activity of PdNC towards oxidation of TMB is very high and shows direct two-electrons oxidation when the surface of PdNC is clean and the ratio of TMB/PdNC is not very high. Sequential one electron oxidation is observed when the pristine quality of PdNC surface is compromised by serum or uncontrolled impurities and/or the ratio of TMB/PdNC is high. Clean PdNC in serum-free media efficiently induce apoptosis of HeLa cells. It is the primary route of cell death and is associated with hyperpolarization of mitochondria, contrary to a common mitochondrial depolarization initiated by ROS. Again, the effects are very sensitive to how well the pristine surface of PdNC is preserved, suggesting that PdNC can be used as an apoptosis inducing agent but only with appropriate drug delivery system. PMID:25886644

  8. Singlet molecular oxygen production in the reaction of peroxynitrite with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Di Mascio, P; Bechara, E J; Medeiros, M H; Briviba, K; Sies, H

    1994-12-01

    Peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide are mediators of cytotoxicity. This study shows that the peroxynitrite anion reacts with hydrogen peroxide to release oxygen accompanied by emission of chemiluminescence (CL). Direct characterization of this light emission attributes it to the transition of singlet molecular oxygen to the triplet ground state. Chemiluminescence was monitored: (i) by dimol light emission in the red spectral region (> 610 nm) using a red-sensitive photomultiplier; and (ii) by monomol light emission in the infrared (1270 nm) with a liquid nitrogen-cooled germanium diode. These properties of photoemission and the enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on CL intensity as well as the quenching effect of sodium azide are diagnostic of molecular oxygen in the excited singlet state. For comparison, singlet molecular oxygen arising from the thermolysis of the water-soluble endoperoxide of 3,3'-(1,4-naphthylidene)dipropionate or from the hypochlorite/H2O2 system was also monitored. These novel observations identify a potential singlet oxygen-dependent mechanism contributing to cytotoxicity mediated by peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide.

  9. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON THE SCALEUP OF GAC ADSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid small-scale column test (RSSCT), designed according to the assumption of no dependency of the intraparticle surface diffusion coefficient on the activated carbon particle size, was able to accurately predict breakthrough of three volatile organic chemicals as well as back...

  10. Early oxygen-utilization and brain activity in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Alderliesten, Thomas; de Vries, Linda S; Groenendaal, Floris; Toet, Mona C; Lemmers, Petra M A; Vosse van de, Renè E; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J N L

    2015-01-01

    The combined monitoring of oxygen supply and delivery using Near-InfraRed spectroscopy (NIRS) and cerebral activity using amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) could yield new insights into brain metabolism and detect potentially vulnerable conditions soon after birth. The relationship between NIRS and quantitative aEEG/EEG parameters has not yet been investigated. Our aim was to study the association between oxygen utilization during the first 6 h after birth and simultaneously continuously monitored brain activity measured by aEEG/EEG. Forty-four hemodynamically stable babies with a GA < 28 weeks, with good quality NIRS and aEEG/EEG data available and who did not receive morphine were included in the study. aEEG and NIRS monitoring started at NICU admission. The relation between regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE), and quantitative measurements of brain activity such as number of spontaneous activity transients (SAT) per minute (SAT rate), the interval in seconds (i.e. time) between SATs (ISI) and the minimum amplitude of the EEG in μV (min aEEG) were evaluated. rScO2 was negatively associated with SAT rate (β=-3.45 [CI=-5.76- -1.15], p=0.004) and positively associated with ISI (β=1.45 [CI=0.44-2.45], p=0.006). cFTOE was positively associated with SAT rate (β=0.034 [CI=0.009-0.059], p=0.008) and negatively associated with ISI (β=-0.015 [CI=-0.026- -0.004], p=0.007). Oxygen delivery and utilization, as indicated by rScO2 and cFTOE, are directly related to functional brain activity, expressed by SAT rate and ISI during the first hours after birth, showing an increase in oxygen extraction in preterm infants with increased early electro-cerebral activity. NIRS monitored oxygenation may be a useful biomarker of brain vulnerability in high-risk infants. PMID:25965343

  11. Nature of Activated Manganese Oxide for Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Michael; Shi, Chenyang; Billinge, Simon J L; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    Electrodeposited manganese oxide films (MnOx) are promising stable oxygen evolution catalysts. They are able to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction in acidic solutions but with only modest activity when prepared by constant anodic potential deposition. We now show that the performance of these catalysts is improved when they are "activated" by potential cycling protocols, as measured by Tafel analysis (where lower slope is better): upon activation the Tafel slope decreases from ∼120 to ∼70 mV/decade in neutral conditions and from ∼650 to ∼90 mV/decade in acidic solutions. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and structural methods were employed to study the activation process and support a mechanism where the original birnessite-like MnOx (δ-MnO2) undergoes a phase change, induced by comproportionation with cathodically generated Mn(OH)2, to a hausmannite-like intermediate (α-Mn3O4). Subsequent anodic conditioning from voltage cycling or water oxidation produces a disordered birnessite-like phase, which is highly active for oxygen evolution. At pH 2.5, the current density of activated MnOx (at an overpotential of 600 mV) is 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of the original MnOx and begins to approach that of Ru and Ir oxides in acid. PMID:26574923

  12. The role of molecular oxygen in the iron(III)-promoted oxidative dehydrogenation of amines.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Vázquez, Juan Pablo; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-03-28

    A mechanistic study is presented of the oxidative dehydrogenation of the iron(III) complex [Fe(III)L(3)](3+), 1, (L(3) = 1,9-bis(2'-pyridyl)-5-[(ethoxy-2''-pyridyl)methyl]-2,5,8-triazanonane) in ethanol in the presence of molecular oxygen. The product of the reaction was identified by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography as the identical monoimine complex [Fe(II)L(4)](2+), 2, (L(4) = 1,9-bis(2'-pyridyl)-5-[(ethoxy-2''-pyridyl)methyl]-2,5,8-triazanon-1-ene) also formed under an inert nitrogen atmosphere. Molecular oxygen is an active player in the oxidative dehydrogenation of iron(III) complex 1. Reduced oxygen species, e.g., superoxide, (O2˙(-)) and peroxide (O2(2-)), are formed and undergo single electron transfer reactions with ligand-based radical intermediates. The experimental rate law can be described by the third order rate equation, -d[(Fe(III)L(3))(3+)]/dt = kOD[(Fe(III)L(3))(3+)][EtO(-)][O2], with kOD = 3.80 ± 0.09 × 10(7) M(-2) s(-1) (60 °C, μ = 0.01 M). The reduction O2 → O2˙(-) represents the rate determining step, with superoxide becoming further reduced to peroxide as shown by a coupled heme catalase assay. In an independent study, with H2O2, replacing O2 as the oxidant, the experimental rate law depended on [H2O2]: -d[(Fe(III)L(3))(3+)]/dt = kH2O2[(Fe(III)L(3))(3+)][H2O2]), with kH2O2 = 6.25 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1). In contrast to the reaction performed under N2, no kinetic isotope effect (KIE) or general base catalysis was found for the reaction of iron(III) complex 1 with O2. Under N2, two consecutive one-electron oxidation steps of the ligand coupled to proton removal produced the iron(II)-monoimine complex [Fe(II)L(4)](2+) and the iron(II)-amine complex [Fe(II)L(3)](2+) in a 1 : 1 ratio (disproportionation), with the amine deprotonation being the rate determining step. Notably, the reaction is almost one order of magnitude faster in the presence of O2, with kEtO(-) = 3.02 ± 0.09 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (O2) compared to k

  13. Plant hemoglobins: a molecular fossil record for the evolution of oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Julie A; Robinson, Howard; Trent, James T; Kakar, Smita; Smagghe, Benoit J; Hargrove, Mark S

    2007-08-01

    The evolution of oxygen transport hemoglobins occurred on at least two independent occasions. The earliest event led to myoglobin and red blood cell hemoglobin in animals. In plants, oxygen transport "leghemoglobins" evolved much more recently. In both events, pentacoordinate heme sites capable of inert oxygen transfer evolved from hexacoordinate hemoglobins that have unrelated functions. High sequence homology between hexacoordinate and pentacoordinate hemoglobins in plants has poised them for potential structural analysis leading to a molecular understanding of this important evolutionary event. However, the lack of a plant hexacoordinate hemoglobin structure in the exogenously ligand-bound form has prevented such comparison. Here we report the crystal structure of the cyanide-bound hexacoordinate hemoglobin from barley. This presents the first opportunity to examine conformational changes in plant hexacoordinate hemoglobins upon exogenous ligand binding, and reveals structural mechanisms for stabilizing the high-energy pentacoordinate heme conformation critical to the evolution of reversible oxygen binding hemoglobins.

  14. Plant Hemoglobins: A Molecular Fossil Record for the Evolutin of Oxygen Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy,J.; Robinson, H.; Trent, lll, J.; Kakar, S.; Smagghe, B.; Hargrove, M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of oxygen transport hemoglobins occurred on at least two independent occasions. The earliest event led to myoglobin and red blood cell hemoglobin in animals. In plants, oxygen transport 'leghemoglobins' evolved much more recently. In both events, pentacoordinate heme sites capable of inert oxygen transfer evolved from hexacoordinate hemoglobins that have unrelated functions. High sequence homology between hexacoordinate and pentacoordinate hemoglobins in plants has poised them for potential structural analysis leading to a molecular understanding of this important evolutionary event. However, the lack of a plant hexacoordinate hemoglobin structure in the exogenously ligand-bound form has prevented such comparison. Here we report the crystal structure of the cyanide-bound hexacoordinate hemoglobin from barley. This presents the first opportunity to examine conformational changes in plant hexacoordinate hemoglobins upon exogenous ligand binding, and reveals structural mechanisms for stabilizing the high-energy pentacoordinate heme conformation critical to the evolution of reversible oxygen binding hemoglobins.

  15. Incorporation of Molecular Oxygen and Water during Enzymatic Oxidation of Cyanide by Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Kunz, D. A.; Venables, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    Cell extracts (high-speed [150,000 x g] supernatants) from Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764 catalyzed the oxidation of cyanide to CO(inf2) (and NH(inf3)). Conversion was both oxygen and NADH dependent, with 1 mol of each being consumed per mol of cyanide degraded. Analysis of (sup13)CO(inf2) by mass spectrometry indicated that one atom each of isotopically labelled oxygen 18 from molecular oxygen and water were incorporated during enzymatic conversion. The results confirm earlier reports of oxygenase-mediated cyanide conversion in this organism. A reaction pathway for cyanide oxidation involving initial monooxygenation followed by hydrolysis of a hypothetical oxygenated intermediate to CO(inf2) (and NH(inf3)) is proposed. PMID:16535345

  16. Atomic Oxygen Recombination at Surface Defects on Reconstructed (0001) α-Quartz Exposed to Atomic and Molecular Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Meana-Paneda, Ruben; Paukku, Yuliya Y.; Duanmu, Kaining; Norman, Paul; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-04-30

    The surface chemistry of silica is strongly affected by the nature of chemically active sites (or defects) occurring on the surface. Here, we employ quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations to study an uncoordinated silicon defect, a non-bridging oxygen defect, and a peroxyl defect on the reconstructed (0001) surface of α-quartz. We characterized the spin states and energies of the defects, and calculated the reaction profiles for atomic oxygen recombination at the defects. We elucidated the diradical character by analyzing the low-lying excited states using multireference wave function methods. We show that the diradical defects consist of weakly coupled doublet radicals, and the atomic oxygen recombination can take place through a barrierless process at defects. We have delineated the recombination mechanism and computed the formation energy of the peroxyl and non-bridging oxygen defects. We found that key recombination reaction paths are barrierless. In addition, we characterize the electronically excited states that may play a role in the chemical and physical processes that occur during recombination on these surface defect sites.

  17. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  18. Trends in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium.

    PubMed

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton, William A; Xu, Ye

    2012-04-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O2 on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  19. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James W A; Richmond, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  20. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  1. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James W A; Richmond, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health.

  2. Rheology, oxygen transfer, and molecular weight characteristics of poly(glutamic acid) fermentation by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Andrew; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2003-05-01

    Poly(glutamic acid) (PGA) is a water-soluble, biodegradable biopolymer that is produced by microbial fermentation. Recent research has shown that PGA can be used in drug delivery applications for the controlled release of paclitaxel (Taxol) in cancer treatment. A fundamental understanding of the key fermentation parameters is necessary to optimize the production and molecular weight characteristics of poly(glutamic acid) by Bacillus subtilis for paclitaxel and other applications of pharmaceuticals for controlled release. Because of its high molecular weight, PGA fermentation broths exhibit non-Newtonian rheology. In this article we present experimental results on the batch fermentation kinetics of PGA production, mass transfer of oxygen, specific oxygen uptake rate, broth rheology, and molecular weight characterization of the PGA biopolymer.

  3. Millennial-Scale Variations in Oxygen-18 of Atmospheric Molecular Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severinghaus, J. P.; Beaudette, R.; Brook, E. J.

    2006-12-01

    The oxygen-18 content of atmospheric dioxygen (δ18Oatm) is known from ice core trapped air records to vary on orbital timescales, primarily the ~21,000 year periodicity. The cause is thought to be a combination of 1) ice sheet growth and consequent variation in O-18 of ocean water, the original source of all substrate H2O used for photosynthetic O2, and 2) changes in the biogeochemical fractionation of O2 relative to ocean water, known as the Dole Effect. Because the turnover time of O2 in the atmosphere is ~1000 years, variations on shorter timescales are not expected and previous studies have not searched for them. Here we present a new record of δ18Oatm at approximately 100-year resolution from the Siple Dome ice core, Antarctica, covering the past 95 kyr. The record shows evidence of artifactual fractionation during gas loss, in the form of an inverse correlation of O2/N2 and δ18Oatm in pair differences with slope of -0.01, probably due to poor core quality (low O2/N2 is associated with highly fractured pieces of ice). The light isotope O-16 appears to escape more readily from the bubbles during leakage of gas out of the ice, leaving the remaining gas enriched in O-18. An empirical correction for gas loss fractionation is made using the measured δO2/N2 and a slope of -0.01. Both raw and corrected records show distinct millennial-duration positive anomalies in δ18Oatm, suggesting that the anomalies are real features of the paleo-atmosphere. They occur at times of Antarctic warmth (designated A1, A2, etc.), which are also times of weak Asian monsoons and Heinrich events or `mystery intervals' in the northern hemisphere. The anomalies typically have an amplitude of +0.15‰, which compares with analytical error of ±0.02‰. We speculate that the anomalies are caused by the increase in O-18 of terrestrial precipitation associated with the weak monsoons, as seen in Asian and Brazilian speleothem records, in addition to evaporative enrichment of leaf water O-18

  4. Effect of oxygen and shear stress on molecular weight of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xu-Jie; Yang, Li; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Wen-Song

    2008-04-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) and shear stress have pronounced effects on hyaluronic acid (HA) production, yet various views persist about their effect on the molecular weight of HA. Accordingly, this study investigated the effects of DO and shear stress during HA fermentation. The results showed that both cell growth and HA synthesis were suppressed under anaerobic conditions, and the HA molecular mass was only (1.22+/-0.02) x 106 Da. Under aerobic conditions, although the DO level produced no change in the biomass or HA yield, a high DO level favored the HA molecular mass, which reached a maximum value of (2.19+/- 0.05) x 106 Da at 50% DO. Furthermore, a high shear stress delayed the rate of HA synthesis and decreased the HA molecular weight, yet had no clear effect on the HA yield. Therefore, a high DO concentration and mild shear environment would appear to be essential to enhance the HA molecular weight.

  5. Molecular packing and magnetic properties of lithium naphthalocyanine crystals: hollow channels enabling permeability and paramagnetic sensitivity to molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Ramasamy P; Dolgos, Michelle; Marginean, Camelia; Woodward, Patrick M; Hammel, P Chris; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis, structural framework, magnetic and oxygen-sensing properties of a lithium naphthalocyanine (LiNc) radical probe are presented. LiNc was synthesized in the form of a microcrystalline powder using a chemical method and characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and mass spectrometry. X-Ray powder diffraction studies revealed a structural framework that possesses long, hollow channels running parallel to the packing direction. The channels measured approximately 5.0 × 5.4 Å(2) in the two-dimensional plane perpendicular to the length of the channel, enabling diffusion of oxygen molecules (2.9 × 3.9 Å(2)) through the channel. The powdered LiNc exhibited a single, sharp EPR line under anoxic conditions, with a peak-to-peak linewidth of 630 mG at room temperature. The linewidth was sensitive to surrounding molecular oxygen, showing a linear increase in pO(2) with an oxygen sensitivity of 31.2 mG per mmHg. The LiNc microcrystals can be further prepared as nano-sized crystals without the loss of its high oxygen-sensing properties. The thermal variation of the magnetic properties of LiNc, such as the EPR linewidth, EPR intensity and magnetic susceptibility revealed the existence of two different temperature regimes of magnetic coupling and hence differing columnar packing, both being one-dimensional antiferromagnetic chains but with differing magnitudes of exchange coupling constants. At a temperature of ∼50 K, LiNc crystals undergo a reversible phase transition. The high degree of oxygen-sensitivity of micro- and nano-sized crystals of LiNc, combined with excellent stability, should enable precise and accurate measurements of oxygen concentration in biological systems using EPR spectroscopy.

  6. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the oxygen binding and substrate hydroxylation step in AlkB repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-01

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N(1) -methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)-oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ- and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained.

  7. Screening of antibacterial activities of twenty-one oxygenated monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Kotan, Recep; Kordali, Saban; Cakir, Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    Plant essential oils are widely used as fragrances and flavours in the cosmetic, perfume, drug and food industries. Oxygenated monoterpenes are widespread components of the essential oils, usually occurring in high amount. In this paper, the antibacterial activities of twenty-one oxygenated monoterpenes (borneol, borneol acetate, camphor, carvone, 1,8-cineole, citronellal, beta-citronellol, dihydrocarvone, fenchol, fenchone, geraniol acetate, isomenthol, limonene oxide, linalool, linalool acetate, nerol, nerol acetate, terpinen-4-ol, alpha-terpineol, menthol and menthone) and penicillin (standard antibiotic) were determined using a disc diffusion method (in vitro) against 63 bacterial strains, belonging to 37 different genera and 54 species (plant, food and clinic origins). The results showed that the oxygenated monoterpenes exhibited a variable degree of antibacterial activities. These compounds also inhibited the growth of bacterial strains by producing a weak zone of inhibition from 7 to 11 mm in diameter, depending on the susceptibility of the tested bacteria. Among the tested compounds, nerol, linalool alpha-terpineol, fenchol and terpinen-4-ol showed antibacterial activity at a broad spectrum. However, their antibacterial activities were lower than those of penicillin. In contrast to these compounds, camphor and 1,8-cineole exhibited no inhibition effects on the growth of all tested bacteria.

  8. A rhenium complex doped in a silica molecular sieve for molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanxiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a diamine ligand and its Re(I) complex for potential application in oxygen sensing. The novelty of this diamine ligand localized at its increased conjugation chain which had a typical electron-withdrawing group of 1,3,4-oxadiazole. Electronic distribution of excited electrons and their lifetime were supposed to be increased, favoring oxygen sensing collision. This hypothesis was confirmed by single crystal analysis, theoretical calculation and photophysical measurement. It was found that this Re(I) complex had a long-lived emission peaking at 545 nm, favoring sensing application. By doping this complex into a silica matrix MCM-41, oxygen sensing performance and mechanism of the resulting composites were discussed in detail. Non-linear Stern-Volmer working curves were observed with maximum sensitivity of 5.54 and short response time of ~ 6 s.

  9. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  10. Atomic and electronic structures of carbon nanotube covalent connecting with graphene by oxygen molecular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianwei; Wei, Qiang; Ma, Zengwei; Zeng, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Based on density functional theories, we have investigated the nanostructure in which boron and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanotube (CNT)/graphene (GR) were connected by an oxygen molecular. The geometry structure and electronic properties of the system were calculated carefully. The band structures indicate that the impurity state of oxygen transfer the semiconducting co-doped carbon nanotube/graphene into a semimetallic composite material. The results show that the connection can be achieved with energy release under a wider range of distance between the nanotube and graphene. It indicates that the connection between the nanotube and the graphene might be a self-assemble process.

  11. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  12. Detection of molecular oxygen at low concentrations using quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  13. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  14. Hydroquinone-quinone oxidation by molecular oxygen: a simple tool for signal amplification through auto-generation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Sella, Eran; Shabat, Doron

    2013-08-21

    Signal amplification methods are of obvious importance for various diagnostic assays. We have developed a new small-molecule-based probe that, upon activation with sub-stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen peroxide, produces an auto-inductive amplification reaction. The signal is produced through the oxidation reaction of hydroquinone to the corresponding quinone derivative by molecular oxygen. This oxidation is accompanied by the formation of hydrogen peroxide, which can enter the amplification sequence and initiate a new diagnostic cycle. The generated quinone is composed of a donor-acceptor conjugated pair and fluoresces at a distinct wavelength, allowing the formation to be monitored by a convenient fluorescence assay.

  15. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of semiquinone and hydroquinone forms of Arabidopsis cryptochrome by molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    van Wilderen, Luuk J.G.W.; Silkstone, Gary; Mason, Maria; van Thor, Jasper J.; Wilson, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptochromes (crys) are flavoprotein photoreceptors present throughout the biological kingdom that play important roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in several organisms. Crys non-covalently bind flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) which undergoes photoreduction from the oxidised state to a radical form suggested to be active in signalling in vivo. Although the photoreduction reactions have been well characterised by a number of approaches, little is known of the oxidation reactions of crys and their mechanisms. In this work, a stopped-flow kinetics approach is used to investigate the mechanism of cry oxidation in the presence and absence of an external electron donor. This in vitro study extends earlier investigations of the oxidation of Arabidopsis cryptochrome1 by molecular oxygen and demonstrates that, under some conditions, a more complex model for oxidation of the flavin than was previously proposed is required to accommodate the spectral evidence (see P. Müller and M. Ahmad (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 21033–21040 [1]). In the absence of an electron donor, photoreduction leads predominantly to the formation of the radical FADH•. Dark recovery most likely forms flavin hydroperoxide (FADHOOH) requiring superoxide. In the presence of reductant (DTT), illumination yields the fully reduced flavin species (FADH−). Reaction of this with dioxygen leads to transient radical (FADH•) and simultaneous accumulation of oxidised species (FAD), possibly governed by interplay between different cryptochrome molecules or cooperativity effects within the cry homodimer. PMID:26649273

  16. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  17. Oxygen activation and intramolecular C-H bond activation by an amidate-bridged diiron(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew B; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; Hagen, Karl S; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-07-18

    A diiron(II) complex containing two μ-1,3-(κN:κO)-amidate linkages has been synthesized using the 2,2',2''-tris(isobutyrylamido)triphenylamine (H(3)L(iPr)) ligand. The resulting diiron complex, 1, reacts with dioxygen (or iodosylbenzene) to effect intramolecular C-H bond activation at the methine position of the ligand isopropyl group. The ligand-activated product, 2, has been isolated and characterized by a variety of methods including X-ray crystallography. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy of 2 prepared from(18)O(2) was used to confirm that the oxygen atom incorporated into the ligand framework is derived from molecular oxygen.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of hot molecular oxygen in flames using an alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes; Zhou, Bo; Zetterberg, Johan; Li, Zhongshan; Alden, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The use of an alexandrite laser for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and imaging of molecular oxygen in thermally excited vibrational states is demonstrated. The laser radiation after the third harmonic generation was used to excite the B-X (0-7) band at 257 nm in the Schumann-Runge system of oxygen. LIF emission was detected between 270 and 380 nm, revealing distinct bands of the transitions from B(0) to highly excited vibrational states in the electronic ground state, X (v > 7). At higher spectral resolution, these bands reveal the common P- and R-branch line splitting. Eventually, the proposed LIF approach was used for single-shot imaging of the two-dimensional distribution of hot oxygen molecules in flames.

  19. Oxygen evolution on a SrFeO3 anode - Mechanistic considerations from molecular orbital theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehandru, S. P.; Anderson, Alfred B.

    1989-01-01

    Various pathways proposed in the literature for the evolution of O2 in electrochemical oxidations are explored using the atom superposition and electron delocalization molecular orbital (ASED-MO) theory and the cluster models of the SrFeO3 surface as a prototype material. Calculations indicate that oxygen atoms can be easily formed on the (100) surface as well as on the edge cation sites of a SrFeO3 anode by the discharge of OH(-), followed by its deprotonation and electron transfer to the electrode. The O atoms can form O2 on the edge and corner sites, where the Fe(4+) is coordinated to four and three bulk oxygen anions, respectively. The calculations strongly disfavor mechanisms involving coupling of oxygen atoms adsorbed on different cations as well as a mechanism featuring an ozone intermediate.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of hot molecular oxygen in flames using an alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes; Zhou, Bo; Zetterberg, Johan; Li, Zhongshan; Alden, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The use of an alexandrite laser for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and imaging of molecular oxygen in thermally excited vibrational states is demonstrated. The laser radiation after the third harmonic generation was used to excite the B-X (0-7) band at 257 nm in the Schumann-Runge system of oxygen. LIF emission was detected between 270 and 380 nm, revealing distinct bands of the transitions from B(0) to highly excited vibrational states in the electronic ground state, X (v > 7). At higher spectral resolution, these bands reveal the common P- and R-branch line splitting. Eventually, the proposed LIF approach was used for single-shot imaging of the two-dimensional distribution of hot oxygen molecules in flames. PMID:25279538

  1. Real-time molecular monitoring of chemical environment in obligate anaerobes during oxygen adaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2009-01-01

    Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment can elucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms that enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bond structures in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of well orchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses. PMID:19541631

  2. Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2009-02-25

    Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

  3. On the Utility of the Molecular Oxygen Dayglow Emissions as Proxies for Middle Atmospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Olander, Daphne S.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular oxygen dayglow emissions arise in part from processes related to the Hartley band photolysis of ozone. It is therefore possible to derive daytime ozone concentrations from measurements of the volume emission rate of either dayglow. The accuracy to which the ozone concentration can be inferred depends on the accuracy to which numerous kinetic and spectroscopic rate constants are known, including rates which describe the excitation of molecular oxygen by processes that are not related to the ozone concentration. We find that several key rate constants must be known to better than 7 percent accuracy in order to achieve an inferred ozone concentration accurate to 15 percent from measurements of either dayglow. Currently, accuracies for various parameters typically range from 5 to 100 percent.

  4. Utilization of a BGO detector as an active oxygen target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveman, R.; Gozani, T.; Bendahan, J.; Krivicich, J.; Elias, E.; Altschuler, E.

    1994-12-01

    The (n, n'γx) cross section for the 6.13 MeV state in oxygen has recently become of general interest because of the possibility of using this process to assay oxygen as a part of non-intrusive inspections. Localized densities of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are particularly useful in determining the presence of explosives and/or drugs in containers of all sizes, from suitcases to cargo containers. The presence of oxygen in BGO (Bi 4Ge 3O 12) scintillator makes this detector suitable for use as an active target for the measurement of the energy dependence of the excitation, of the first (6.049 MeV O +) and second (6.130 MeV 3 -) excited states in 16O by fast neutron interactions. An active target functions as both a target and an active device such as a detector. The de-excitations of the 6.049 and 6.130 states take place by nuclear pair production and γ-ray emission respectively. There is a large probability of absorbing all of the de-excitation energy in the scintillator in either of these cases. Since the energies deposited in the scintillator by these transitions are very close, the de-excitations are indistinguishable. However, since the cross section for the excitation of the 6.13 MeV state is believed to be larger than that of the 6.049 MeV, the major measured features of the energy variations are those related to the second state. The validity of the technique was initially tested using (MCNP) calculations. The calculations established that the detected neutron count rate in the crystal was proportional to the cross-sections used as input for the calculations, and that the constant of proportionality did not vary with neutron energy. Subsequently, measurements were made with a BGO detector as an active oxygen target. The results clearly show a strong energy dependence including several resonances.

  5. Development of a novel electrochemical system for oxygen control (ESOC) to examine dissolved oxygen inhibition on algal activity.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Philip C; Pratt, Steven; Lant, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    The development of an Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) for examining algal photosynthetic activity as a function of dissolved oxygen (DO) is outlined. The main innovation of the tool is coulombic titration in order to balance the electrochemical reduction of oxygen with the oxygen input to achieve a steady DO set-point. ESOC allows quantification of algal oxygen production whilst simultaneously maintaining a desired DO concentration. The tool was validated abiotically by comparison with a mass transfer approach for quantifying oxygenation. It was then applied to quantify oxygen inhibition of algal activity. Five experiments, using an enriched culture of Scenedesmus sp. as the inoculum, are presented. For each experiment, ESOC was used to quantify algal activity at a series of DO set-points. In all experiments substantial oxygen inhibition was observed at DO >30 mgO2 L-1. Inhibition was shown to fit a Hill inhibition model, with a common Hill coefficient of 0.22±0.07 L mg-1 and common log10  CI50 of 27.2±0.7 mg L-1. This is the first time that the oxygen inhibition kinetic parameters have been quantified under controlled DO conditions.

  6. Mechanism and kinetics of interaction of Fe, Cr, Mo, and Mn atoms with molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmadov, U.S.; Zaslonko, I.S.; Smirnov, V.N.

    1988-09-01

    By means of resonance atomic absorption in shock waves, rate constants have been measured for the interaction of atoms of a number of transition metals (Fe, Cr, Mo, and Mn) with molecular oxygen. A new method is proposed and used for determining the exponent ..gamma.. in the modified Lambert-Beer law D = element of(ZN)/sup ..gamma../. The bond strength in CrO and MoO molecules has been estimated.

  7. Molecular complexity in envelopes of evolved Oxygen-rich stars: IK Tauri and OH231.8+4.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velilla Prieto, L.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Alcolea, J.; Agúndez, M.; Pardo, J. R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Herpin, F.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowsky, F.

    2013-05-01

    During the late phases of low-intermediate mass (0.1 to 8 solar masses) stars, a significant mass loss is produced creating a gas and dust envelope surrounding the central star. Due to the physical conditions in the envelope, gas is primarily molecular, placing these objects as efficient molecular factories that will enrich the interstellar medium. Observation and study of molecular emission allows deriving physical and chemical properties of these envelopes. As far as today, Oxygen rich objects are not so well studied as their Carbon counterparts, because Carbon chemistry is much more active than Oxygen chemistry. Importance of this work is that the Oxygen rich envelopes are not completely characterized yet. We present preliminary results from our on-going milimiter wavelength survey with the EMIR receivers of the IRAM 30 meters radiotelescope towards the envelopes of two evolved Oxygen rich objects: IK Tauri and OH231.8+4.2. We detect a wealth of lines ranging from few mK to K (with rms ranging from 1 to 3 mK in best cases). Both objects present significant differences in their molecular emission features due to contrast of evolutionary stage and physical properties and both show evidences of different chemical formation processes. Some of the molecules identified are CO, SiO, H_{2}O, NS, HCO^{+}, SO, SO_{2}, SH_{2}, OCS, HCN, HNC, CN, HC_{3}N, CS, H_{2}CO, HNCO, HNCS, SiS, N_{2}H^{+} and a number of isotopologues (bearing ^{13}C, ^{33}S, ^{34}S, ^{17}O, ^{18}O, ^{28}Si, ^{29}Si, ^{30}Si and ^{15}N atoms). Some of the molecules identified represent first detections in Oxygen rich AGB stars. We expect to get a better understanding of the chemistry and structure of these objects, in particular how interaction between AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) envelopes and post-AGB winds influences chemistry producing a reformation of molecules through shocked gas reactions. held in Valencia, July 9 - 13, 2012, Eds.: J.C. Guirado, L.M. Lara, V. Quilis, and J. Gorgas.

  8. Chlorite dismutases – a heme enzyme family for use in bioremediation and generation of molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite is a serious environmental concern, as rising concentrations of this harmful anthropogenic compound have been detected in groundwater, drinking water, and soil. Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are therefore important molecules in bioremediation as Clds catalyze the degradation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. Clds are heme b-containing oxidoreductases present in numerous bacterial and archaeal phyla. This review presents the phylogeny of functional Clds and Cld-like proteins, and demonstrates the close relationship of this novel enzyme family to the recently discovered dye-decolorizing peroxidases. The available X-ray structures, biophysical and enzymatic properties, as well as a proposed reaction mechanism, are presented and critically discussed. Open questions about structure-function relationships are addressed, including the nature of the catalytically relevant redox and reaction intermediates and the mechanism of inactivation of Clds during turnover. Based on analysis of currently available data, chlorite dismutase from “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” is suggested as a model Cld for future application in biotechnology and bioremediation. Additionally, Clds can be used in various applications as local generators of molecular oxygen, a reactivity already exploited by microbes that must perform aerobic metabolic pathways in the absence of molecular oxygen. For biotechnologists in the field of chemical engineering and bioremediation, this review provides the biochemical and biophysical background of the Cld enzyme family as well as critically assesses Cld's technological potential. PMID:24519858

  9. Origin of Molecular Oxygen in Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Ronnet, T.; Brugger, B.; Ozgurel, O.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Maggiolo, R.; Wurz, P.; Vernazza, P.; Lunine, J. I.; Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mandt, K. E.; Altwegg, K.; Bieler, A.; Markovits, A.; Rubin, M.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular oxygen has been detected in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with abundances in the 1%-10% range by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis-Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer instrument on board the Rosetta spacecraft. Here we find that the radiolysis of icy grains in low-density environments such as the presolar cloud may induce the production of large amounts of molecular oxygen. We also show that molecular oxygen can be efficiently trapped in clathrates formed in the protosolar nebula (PSN), and that its incorporation as crystalline ice is highly implausible, because this would imply much larger abundances of Ar and N2 than those observed in the coma. Assuming that radiolysis has been the only O2 production mechanism at work, we conclude that the formation of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is possible in a dense and early PSN in the framework of two extreme scenarios: (1) agglomeration from pristine amorphous icy grains/particles formed in ISM and (2) agglomeration from clathrates that formed during the disk’s cooling. The former scenario is found consistent with the strong correlation between O2 and H2O observed in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s coma while the latter scenario requires that clathrates formed from ISM icy grains that crystallized when entering the PSN.

  10. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    PubMed

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  11. Reaction mechanism of naphthyl radicals with molecular oxygen. 1. Theoretical study of the potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Kislov, Vadim V; Mebel, Alexander M

    2012-02-16

    Potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the reactions of 1- and 2-naphthyl radicals with molecular oxygen have been investigated at the G3(MP2,CC)//B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. Both reactions are shown to be initiated by barrierless addition of O(2) to the respective radical sites of C(10)H(7). The end-on O(2) addition leading to 1- and 2-naphthylperoxy radicals exothermic by 45-46 kcal/mol is found to be more preferable thermodynamically than the side-on addition. At the subsequent reaction step, the chemically activated 1- and 2-C(10)H(7)OO adducts can eliminate an oxygen atom leading to the formation of 1- and 2-naphthoxy radical products, respectively, which in turn can undergo unimolecular decomposition producing indenyl radical + CO via the barriers of 57.8 and 48.3 kcal/mol and with total reaction endothermicities of 14.5 and 10.2 kcal/mol, respectively. Alternatively, the initial reaction adducts can feature an oxygen atom insertion into the attacked C(6) ring leading to bicyclic intermediates a10 and a10' (from 1-naphthyl + O(2)) or b10 and b10' (from 2-naphthyl + O(2)) composed from two fused six-member C(6) and seven-member C(6)O rings. Next, a10 and a10' are predicted to decompose to C(9)H(7) (indenyl) + CO(2), 1,2-C(10)H(6)O(2) (1,2-naphthoquinone) + H, and 1-C(9)H(7)O (1-benzopyranyl) + CO, whereas b10 and b10' would dissociate to C(9)H(7) (indenyl) + CO(2), 2-C(9)H(7)O (2-benzopyranyl) + CO, and 1,2-C(10)H(6)O(2) (1,2-naphthoquinone) + H. On the basis of this, the 1-naphthyl + O(2) reaction is concluded to form the following products (with the overall reaction energies given in parentheses): 1-naphthoxy + O (-15.5 kcal/mol), indenyl + CO(2) (-123.9 kcal/mol), 1-benzopyranyl + CO (-97.2 kcal/mol), and 1,2-naphthoquinone + H (-63.5 kcal/mol). The 2-naphthyl + O(2) reaction is predicted to produce 2-naphthoxy + O (-10.9 kcal/mol), indenyl + CO(2) (-123.7 kcal/mol), 2-benzopyranyl + CO (-90.7 kcal/mol), and 1,2-naphthoquinone + H (-63.2 kcal

  12. Origin of Active Oxygen in a Ternary CuOx /Co3O4–CeO 2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Zili; Peng, Xihong; Binder, Andrew; Chai, Songhai; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we have studied CO oxidation over a ternary CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 catalyst and employed the techniques of N2 adsorption/desporption, XRD, TPR, TEM, in situ DRIFTS and QMS (Quadrupole mass spectrometer) to explore the origin of active oxygen. DRIFTS-QMS results with labeled 18O2 indicate that the origin of active oxygens in CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 obeys a model, called as queue mechanism. Namely gas-phase molecular oxygens are dissociated to atomic oxygens and then incorporate in oxygen vacancies located at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2 to form active crystalline oxygens, and these active oxygens diffuse to the CO-Cu+ sites thanks to the oxygen vacancy concentrationmore » magnitude and react with the activated CO to form CO2. This process, obeying a queue rule, provides active oxygens to form CO2 from gas-phase O2 via oxygen vacancies and crystalline oxygen at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2.« less

  13. A universal molecular clock of protein folds and its power in tracing the early history of aerobic metabolism and planet oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minglei; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Kim, Kyung Mo; Qu, Ge; Ji, Hong-Fang; Mittenthal, Jay E; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The standard molecular clock describes a constant rate of molecular evolution and provides a powerful framework for evolutionary timescales. Here, we describe the existence and implications of a molecular clock of folds, a universal recurrence in the discovery of new structures in the world of proteins. Using a phylogenomic structural census in hundreds of proteomes, we build phylogenies and time lines of domains at fold and fold superfamily levels of structural complexity. These time lines correlate approximately linearly with geological timescales and were here used to date two crucial events in life history, planet oxygenation and organism diversification. We first dissected the structures and functions of enzymes in simulated metabolic networks. The placement of anaerobic and aerobic enzymes in the time line revealed that aerobic metabolism emerged about 2.9 billion years (giga-annum; Ga) ago and expanded during a period of about 400 My, reaching what is known as the Great Oxidation Event. During this period, enzymes recruited old and new folds for oxygen-mediated enzymatic activities. Remarkably, the first fold lost by a superkingdom disappeared in Archaea 2.6 Ga ago, within the span of oxygen rise, suggesting that oxygen also triggered diversification of life. The implications of a molecular clock of folds are many and important for the neutral theory of molecular evolution and for understanding the growth and diversity of the protein world. The clock also extends the standard concept that was specific to molecules and their timescales and turns it into a universal timescale-generating tool.

  14. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  15. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  16. Physical properties and band structure of reactive molecular beam epitaxy grown oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2{+-}x}

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, Erwin; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert

    2012-12-01

    We have conducted a detailed thin film growth structure of oxygen engineered monoclinic HfO{sub 2{+-}x} grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. The oxidation conditions induce a switching between (111) and (002) texture of hafnium oxide. The band gap of oxygen deficient hafnia decreases with increasing amount of oxygen vacancies by more than 1 eV. For high oxygen vacancy concentrations, defect bands form inside the band gap that induce optical transitions and p-type conductivity. The resistivity changes by several orders of magnitude as a function of oxidation conditions. Oxygen vacancies do not give rise to ferromagnetic behavior.

  17. Expression of alginases and alginate polymerase genes in response to oxygen, and their relationship with the alginate molecular weight in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Flores, Celia; Moreno, Soledad; Espín, Guadalupe; Peña, Carlos; Galindo, Enrique

    2013-07-10

    The transcription of genes involved in alginate polymerization and depolymerization, as well as the alginase activity (extracellular and intracellular) under oxygen-limited and non oxygen-limited conditions in cultures of A. vinelandii, was studied. Two levels of dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) (1% and 5%, oxygen-limited and non-oxygen-limited, respectively) strictly controlled by gas blending, were evaluated in a wild type strain. In cultures at low DOT (1%), in which a high molecular weight alginate (1200 kDa) was synthesized, the transcription levels of alg8 and alg44 (genes encoding alginate polymerase complex), and algX (encoding a protein involved in polymer transport through periplasmic space) were considerably higher as compared to cultures conducted at 5% DOT, under which an alginate with a low MW (42 kDa) was produced. In the case of genes encoding for intracellular and extracellular alginases, the levels of these transcripts were higher at 1% DOT. However, intracellular and extracellular alginase activity were lower (0.017 and 0.01 U/mg protein, respectively) in cultures at 1% DOT, as compared with the activities measured at 5% DOT (0.027 and 0.052 U/mg protein for intracellular and extracellular maximum activity, respectively). The low alginase activity measured in cultures at 1% DOT and the high level of transcription of genes constituting alginate polymerase complex might be mechanisms by which oxygen regulates the production of alginates with a high MW.

  18. Increased levels of peroxisomal active oxygen-related enzymes in copper-tolerant pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, J.M.; Gomez, M.; Yanez, J.; Del Rio, L.A.

    1987-10-01

    The effect in vivo of high nutrient levels of copper (240 micromolar) on the activity of different metalloenzymes containing Cu, Mn, Fe, and Zn, distributed in chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria, was studied in leaves of two varieties of Pisum sativum L. plants with different sensitivity to copper. The metalloenzymes studied were: cytochrome c oxidase, Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase I (Cu,Zn-SOD I), for mitochondria; catalase and Mn-SOD, for peroxisomes; and isozyme Cu,Zn-SOD II for chloroplasts. The activity of mitochondrial SOD isozymes (Mn-SOD and Cu,Zn-SOD I) was very similar in Cu-tolerant and Cu-sensitive plants, whereas cytochrome c oxidase was lower in Cu-sensitive plants. Chloroplastid Cu,Zn-SOD activity was the same in the two plant varieties. In contrast, the peroxisomal Mn-SOD activity was considerably higher in Cu-tolerant than in Cu-sensitive plants, and the activity of catalase was also increased in peroxisomes of Cu-tolerant plants. The higher activities of these peroxisomal active oxygen-related enzymes in Cu-tolerant plants suggest the involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates (O/sub 2//sup -/, OH) in the mechanism of Cu lethality, and also imply a function for peroxisomal Mn-SOD in the molecular mechanisms of plant tolerance to Cu in Pisum sativum L.

  19. Tracing the oxygen triple isotopic composition of tropospheric molecular oxygen in biogenic apatite - a new tool for palaeoclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, A.; Süssenberger, A.; Gehler, A.; Wotzlaw, J.

    2009-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that tropospheric molecular oxygen posses a significant isotope anomaly [1, 2 and refs. therein]. Relative to the rocks- and minerals-defined terrestrial fractionation line (TFL), tropospheric O2 has an anomaly of -0.35‰ [2]. Because almost all oxygen on Earth is contained in rocks, we suggest that the rocks- and minerals-defined TFL [3] should be used as reference when reporting isotope anomalies with ∆17O = δ'17OSMOW - βTFL δ'18OSMOW. We have developed a new technique for the determination of δ17O and δ18O of silicates by means of laser fluorination GC-CF-irmMS. We have determined βTFL to 0.5247 (N > 100), which is identical to the value reported by other laboratories and techniques [2, 3]. The uncertainty in ∆17O is ±0.03 (1σ) for a single analysis. It was suggested that ∆17O of tropospheric O2 can be used as proxy for the global bioactivity rate [GBR, 1] as well as for past atmospheric CO2 concentrations [4]. Past ∆17O of tropospheric O2 can be determined by analyzing O2 trapped in ice [1, 5] or by analyzing sulfates from terrestrial sulphide oxidation [4]. Disadvantage of ice core data is the limitation in time back <1 Myrs. The sulfate approach is used to trace ∆17O of air O2 back to Proterozoic times. Disadvantage of this technique is the uncertainty in the proportion of oxygen from O2 and oxygen from ambient water during oxidation of the sulphides. We suggest that oxygen from tooth and bone phosphate can be used as proxy for the ∆17O of air O2. Mass balance calculations [e.g. 6] suggest that a considerable portion of oxygen in biogenic apatite sources from respired air O2. We have analyzed tooth (enamel, dentine) and bone material by means of direct fluorination for their δ17O and δ18O. We have chosen material of mammals of different body mass (Mb) from Northern Germany (except Indian Elephant). The ∆17O of apatite varies between -0.16‰ for a wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) and +0.04‰ for a wild boar

  20. Oxygen isotope effects as probes of electron transfer mechanisms and structures of activated O2.

    PubMed

    Roth, Justine P

    2009-03-17

    Competitively determined oxygen ((18)O) isotope effects can be powerful probes of chemical and biological transformations involving molecular oxygen as well as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. They play a complementary role to crystallography and spectroscopy in the study of activated oxygen intermediates by forging a link between electronic/vibrational structure and the bonding that occurs within ground and transition states along the reaction coordinate. Such analyses can be used to assess the plausibility of intermediates and their catalytic relevance in oxidative processes. This Account describes efforts to advance oxygen kinetic isotope effects ((18)O KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effects ((18)O EIEs) as mechanistic probes of reactive, oxygen-derived species. We focus primarily on transition metal mediated oxidations, outlining both advances over the past five years and current limitations of this approach. Computational methods are now being developed to probe transition states and the accompanying kinetic isotope effects. In particular, we describe the importance of using a full-frequency model to accurately predict the magnitudes as well as the temperature dependence of the isotope effects. Earlier studies have used a "cut-off model," which employs only a few isotopic vibrational modes, and such models tend to overestimate (18)O EIEs. Researchers in mechanistic biological inorganic chemistry would like to differentiate "inner-sphere" from "outer-sphere" reactivity of O(2), a designation that describes the extent of the bonding interaction between metal and oxygen in the transition state. Though this problem remains unsolved, we expect that this isotopic approach will help differentiate these processes. For example, comparisons of (18)O KIEs to (18)O EIEs provide benchmarks that allow us to calibrate computationally derived reaction coordinates. Once the physical origins of heavy atom isotope effects are better understood, researchers will be able to apply

  1. Visible-Light-Activated Molecular Switches.

    PubMed

    Bléger, David; Hecht, Stefan

    2015-09-21

    The ability to influence key properties of molecular systems by using light holds much promise for the fields of materials science and life sciences. The cornerstone of such systems is molecules that are able to reversibly photoisomerize between two states, commonly referred to as photoswitches. One serious restriction to the development of functional photodynamic systems is the necessity to trigger switching in at least one direction by UV light, which is often damaging and penetrates only partially through most media. This review provides a summary of the different conceptual strategies for addressing molecular switches in the visible and near-infrared regions of the optical spectrum. Such visible-light-activated molecular switches tremendously extend the scope of photoswitchable systems for future applications and technologies.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Abundance in Molecular Clouds: Absorption Toward Sagittarius B2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Keene, Jocelyn; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Werner, M. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 35 km/s) spectra toward the molecular cloud Sgr B2 at 63 micrometers, the wavelength of the ground-state fine-structure line of atomic oxygen (O(I)), using the ISO-LWS instrument. Four separate velocity components are seen in the deconvolved spectrum, in absorption against the dust continuum emission of Sgr B2. Three of these components, corresponding to foreground clouds, are used to study the O(I) content of the cool molecular gas along the line of sight. In principle, the atomic oxygen that produces a particular velocity component could exist in any, or all, of three physically distinct regions: inside a dense molecular cloud, in the UV illuminated surface layer (PDR) of a cloud, and in an atomic (H(I)) gas halo. For each of the three foreground clouds, we estimate, and subtract from the observed O(I) column density, the oxygen content of the H(I) halo gas, by scaling from a published high-resolution 21 cm spectrum. We find that the remaining O(I) column density is correlated with the observed (13)CO column density. From the slope of this correlation, an average [O(I)]/[(13)CO] ratio of 270 +/- 120 (3-sigma) is derived, which corresponds to [O(I)]/[(13)CO] = 9 for a CO to (13)CO abundance ratio of 30. Assuming a (13)CO abundance of 1x10(exp -6) with respect to H nuclei, we derive an atomic oxygen abundance of 2.7x10(exp -4) in the dense gas phase, corresponding to a 15% oxygen depletion compared to the diffuse ISM in our Galactic neighborhood. The presence of multiple, spectrally resolved velocity components in the Sgr B2 absorption spectrum allows, for the first time, a direct determination of the PDR contribution to the O(I) column density. The PDR regions should contain O(I) but not (13)CO, and would thus be expected to produce an offset in the O(I)-(13)CO correlation. Our data do not show such an offset, suggesting that within our beam O(I) is spatially coexistent with the molecular gas, as traced by (13)CO

  3. Promoted oxidation of phenol in aqueous solution using molecular oxygen at mild conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, F.; Harf, J.; Hug, A.; Rohr, P.R. von

    1999-05-01

    Wet oxidation with molecular oxygen at mild conditions (temperature < 200 C, pressure {le} 2 MPa) is an economically attractive pretreatment step for non-biodegradable aqueous waste streams. In order to overcome the low reactivity of molecular oxygen towards organic molecules at these mild process conditions, an initiator was used in combination with ferrous ions in the acidic range. The promoted oxidation of phenol in aqueous solution was investigated in a 4 liters stirred autoclave. It was possible to degrade the phenol at temperatures as low as 100 C without observing an induction time. The remaining solution contained mainly acetic and formic acid and was well biodegradable. The oxidative behavior of the oxygen/phenol system could be explained using the well-known autoxidation mechanism for aliphatic molecules. 4-hydroperoxy-phenol is suggested as a key intermediate. Measured products are p-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, catechol, maleic, oxalic, pyruvic, formic, and acetic acid. Dimers could also be identified in sample extracts. A global pathway including all identified products is presented.

  4. Diagnostic Tests for Quantitative Measurements of Singlet Molecular Oxygen on Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J.; McKellar, S.; Anastasio, C.

    2006-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (^1O_2^*) can rapidly react with atmospheric pollutants such as furans, phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and reduced sulfur species. Furthermore, ^1O_2^* might be an important oxidant of atmospheric trace species on frozen atmospheric particles and drops. Thus, a quantitative understanding of ^1O_2^* activity on ice is essential in assessing its importance to the chemistry of the troposphere of cold regions. In aqueous samples, the loss of furfuryl alcohol (FFA) can be measured to determine ^1O_2^* concentrations. Using this method, samples are illuminated and the photoformed ^1O_2^* reacts with FFA, decreasing its concentration over time. This process, however, is confounded by the fact that the decay of FFA can occur via other pathways, such as direct photolysis or reaction with other oxidants, including OH. The goal of this work is to investigate the behavior of ^1O_2^* on ice so that its concentrations can be determined using the decay of FFA. To achieve this, we are working through a series of diagnostic tests, taking into account complications presented by direct photolysis, reactions with other oxidants, and changes in quasi-liquid layer volume and composition. To examine effects of specific oxidants, sources of ^1O_2^* and OH (rose bengal and HOOH, respectively) are added to simulated snow solutions with and without methionine, an efficient ^1O_2^* quencher and OH scavenger. With these laboratory liquid and ice samples we hope to understand the photochemical behavior of ^1O_2^* on ice and use methionine, or other scavengers, to discriminate between decay due to ^1O_2^* and other loss mechanisms for FFA. We will discuss results from these tests, as well as preliminary measurements of ^1O_2^* concentrations on snow from Greenland.

  5. Antioxidative activity of lactobacilli measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity.

    PubMed

    Saide, J A O; Gilliland, S E

    2005-04-01

    The reducing ability and antioxidative activity of some species of Lactobacillus were compared under in vitro conditions. Cultures of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus casei were grown at 37 degrees C in de Man, Rogosa, Sharpe (MRS) broth supplemented with 0.5% 2,3,5 triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) to evaluate reducing activity. Reduced TTC was extracted from the cultures with acetone, and the intensity of the red color measured colorimetrically at 485 nm was an indication of reducing activity. The lactobacilli varied significantly in relative ability to reduce TTC when grown in MRS broth for 15 h. The relative amounts of growth as indicated by pH values at 18 h appeared to influence the amount of reduction. Antioxidative activity was evaluated by the ability of the whole cells or the cell-free extracts from cultures to protect a protein from being attacked by free radicals. These analyses were performed using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity method. All cultures tested exhibited some degree of antioxidative activity. Among the treatments, the cell-free extracts from cells grown in MRS broth exhibited significantly higher values than did whole cells. There was no apparent relationship between the reducing and antioxidative activities of the cultures evaluated. The results from this study show that these cultures can provide a source of dietary antioxidants. Furthermore, selection of cultures that produce antioxidants as starters could provide yet another health or nutritional benefit from cultured or culture-containing dairy products.

  6. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  7. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  8. Knee extensor muscle oxygen consumption in relation to muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, R D; Blaauboer, M E; Born, J R; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2006-12-01

    Recently, fatigability and muscle oxygen consumption (mVO(2)) during sustained isometric contractions were found to be less at shorter (30 degrees knee angle; 0 degrees = full extension) compared to longer knee extensor muscle lengths (90 degrees ) and, at low torques, less in the rectus femoris (RF) muscle than in the vastus lateralis and medialis. In the present study we hypothesized that these findings could be accounted for by a knee angle- and a muscle-dependent activation respectively. On two experimental days rectified surface EMG (rsEMG) was obtained as a measure of muscle activation in nine healthy young males. In addition, on day 1 maximal torque capacity (MTC) was carefully determined using superimposed nerve stimulation on brief high intensity contractions (> 70%MVC) at 30, 60 and 90 degrees knee angles. On day 2, subjects performed longer lasting isometric contractions (10-70%MTC) while mVO(2) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). At 30 degrees , maximal mVO(2) was reached significantly later (11.0 s +/- 6.5 s) and was 57.9 +/- 8.3% less (average +/- SD, across intensities and muscles) than mVO(2) at 60 and 90 degrees (p < 0.05). However, rsEMG was on average only 18.0 +/- 11.8% (p = 0.062) less at the start of the contraction at 30 degrees . At 10%MTC at all knee angles, maximal mVO(2) of the RF occurred significantly later (28.8 +/- 36.0 s) and showed a significantly smaller increase in rsEMG compared to both vasti. In conclusion, it is unlikely that the tendency for less intense muscle activation could fully account for the approximately 60% lower oxygen consumption at 30 degrees , but the later increase in RFmVO(2) seemed to be caused by a less strong activation of the RF.

  9. The interrelationship between muscle oxygenation, muscle activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake to incremental ramp exercise: influence of aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Boone, Jan; Barstow, Thomas J; Celie, Bert; Prieur, Fabrice; Bourgois, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether muscle and ventilatory responses to incremental ramp exercise would be influenced by aerobic fitness status by means of a cross-sectional study with a large subject population. Sixty-four male students (age: 21.2 ± 3.2 years) with a heterogeneous peak oxygen uptake (51.9 ± 6.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), range 39.7-66.2 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed an incremental ramp cycle test (20-35 W·min(-1)) to exhaustion. Breath-by-breath gas exchange was recorded, and muscle activation and oxygenation were measured with surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The integrated electromyography (iEMG), mean power frequency (MPF), deoxygenated [hemoglobin and myoglobin] (deoxy[Hb+Mb]), and total[Hb+Mb] responses were set out as functions of work rate and fitted with a double linear function. The respiratory compensation point (RCP) was compared and correlated with the breakpoints (BPs) (as percentage of peak oxygen uptake) in muscle activation and oxygenation. The BP in total[Hb+Mb] (83.2% ± 3.0% peak oxygen uptake) preceded (P < 0.001) the BP in iEMG (86.7% ± 4.0% peak oxygen uptake) and MPF (86.3% ± 4.1% peak oxygen uptake), which in turn preceded (P < 0.01) the BP in deoxy[Hb+Mb] (88.2% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake) and RCP (87.4% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake). Furthermore, the peak oxygen uptake was significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated to the BPs and RCP, indicating that the BPs in total[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.66; P < 0.001), deoxy[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.76; P < 0.001), iEMG (r = 0.61; P < 0.001), MPF (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), and RCP (r = 0.75; P < 0.001) occurred at a higher percentage of peak oxygen uptake in subjects with a higher peak oxygen uptake. In this study a close relationship between muscle oxygenation, activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake was found, occurring in a cascade of events. In subjects with a higher aerobic fitness level this cascade occurred at a higher relative intensity.

  10. [Several indicators of tissue oxygen during modeling of extravehicular activity of man].

    PubMed

    Lan'shina, O E; Loginov, V A; Akinfiev, A V; Kovalenko, E A

    1995-01-01

    Investigations of tissue oxygen indices during simulation of extravehicular activity (EVA) of cosmonauts demonstrated that breathing pure oxygen at approximately 280 mmHg elevates oxygen tension in capillary blood, and capillary-tissue gradient during physical work. Physical work alone stimulates tissue oxygenation due to, apparently, intensification of the processes of oxidative phosphorylation. The observed shifts in oxygen status reverse significantly within the first 5 min after completion of the experiment.

  11. Excellently guarded materials against UV and oxygen in the surfactant molecular complex crystal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Haruyo; Iimura, Nahoko; Hirata, Hirotaka

    2000-07-01

    Crystalline surfactant molecular complexes (SCMs) generated between quaternary ammonium cationic surfactants such as CTAB and various additives disclose their excellent protective properties from UV light and oxygen to complex additive materials, which are occluded in the complex crystal matrix. The effects of UV and oxygen were followed by the absorption decay of additive chromophores in comparing that of naked additive specimens with that of those in the complexed state. From the decay profiles, the rate constants and the half-life times were estimated under the assumptions in which the photo and oxidation processes were dominated in accordance with the first-ordered reaction. The results afford us promising prospects in extending the shelf-life of every material, above all medicinal drug, with the consequence that these obtained values evidently demonstrate the remarkably suppressed rate and extremely elongated half-life times.

  12. Immobilised activated sludge based biosensor for biochemical oxygen demand measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Björnsson, L; Mattiasson, B

    2000-02-01

    A biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor, based on an immobilised mixed culture of microorganisms in combination with a dissolved oxygen electrode, has been developed for the purpose of on-line monitoring of the biological treatment process for waste and wastewater. The sensor was designed for easy replacement of the biomembrane, thereby making it suitable for short-term use. The drawbacks of activated sludge based sensor, such as short sensor lifetime, were thereby circumvented. The sensor BOD measurements were carried out in the kinetic mode using a flow injection system, resulting in 25 s for one measurement followed by 4-8 min recovery time. Based on the results of normalised sensor responses, the OECD synthetic wastewater was considered to be a more suitable calibration solution in comparison with the GGA solution. Good agreement was achieved between the results of the sensor BOD measurement and those obtained from BOD5 analysis of a wastewater sample from a food-processing factory. Reproducibility of responses using one sensor was below +/- 5.6%, standard deviation. Reproducibility of responses using different sensors was within acceptable bias limits, viz. +/- 15% standard deviation.

  13. Metalloporphyrin catalysts for oxygen reduction developed using computer-aided molecular design

    SciTech Connect

    Ryba, G.N.; Hobbs, J.D.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of metalloporphyrin materials used as catalsyts for use in fuel cell applications. The metalloporphyrins are excellent candidates for use as catalysts at both the anode and cathode. The catalysts reduce oxygen in 1 M potassium hydroxide, as well as in 2 M sulfuric acid. Covalent attachment to carbon supports is being investigated. The computer-aided molecular design is an iterative process, in which experimental results feed back into the design of future catalysts.

  14. Base metal-catalyzed benzylic oxidation of (aryl)(heteroaryl)methanes with molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sterckx, Hans; De Houwer, Johan; Mensch, Carl; Herrebout, Wouter; Tehrani, Kourosch Abbaspour

    2016-01-01

    Summary The methylene group of various substituted 2- and 4-benzylpyridines, benzyldiazines and benzyl(iso)quinolines was successfully oxidized to the corresponding benzylic ketones using a copper or iron catalyst and molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. Application of the protocol in API synthesis is exemplified by the alternative synthesis of a precursor to the antimalarial drug Mefloquine. The oxidation method can also be used to prepare metabolites of APIs which is illustrated for the natural product papaverine. ICP–MS analysis of the purified reaction products revealed that the base metal impurity was well below the regulatory limit. PMID:26877817

  15. Molecular cloud origin for the oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi

    2004-09-17

    Meteorites and their components have anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions characterized by large variations in 18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios. On the basis of recent observations of star-forming regions and models of accreting protoplanetary disks, we suggest that these variations may originate in a parent molecular cloud by ultraviolet photodissociation processes. Materials with anomalous isotopic compositions were then transported into the solar nebula by icy dust grains during the collapse of the cloud. The icy dust grains drifted toward the Sun in the disk, and their subsequent evaporation resulted in the 17O- and 18O-enrichment of the inner disk gas. PMID:15375265

  16. First principles calculation of oxygen K edge absorption spectrum of acetic acid: Relationship between the spectrum and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Yoshiki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2016-04-01

    First principles calculation of the oxygen K-edge absorption near-edge structure of liquid acetic acid was performed to investigate the relationship between the spectrum and the molecular dynamics in a liquid. The single and double bonded oxygens gave strong peaks at different energies. A liquid model constructed using a molecular dynamics simulation reproduced the experimental spectrum. We revealed that the effect of the dynamic behavior of molecules in a liquid clearly appears in the particular peak from a single-bond oxygen. The relationship between the bonding nature and the dynamic information of a molecule in a spectrum was determined and presented.

  17. Ab initio study of molecular and atomic oxygen on GeTe(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Deringer, Volker L.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2014-11-07

    Oxidation of the phase-change material germanium telluride (GeTe) is an atomic-scale process of fundamental importance, as it is detrimental to the stability of GeTe-based data-storage devices. Here, we present comprehensive density-functional theory simulations of molecular and atomic oxygen in contact with GeTe(111) surfaces. Molecular O{sub 2} is predicted to readily adsorb on the Ge-terminated (111) surface; the pristine Te-terminated counterpart, by contrast, appears quite inert. The coverage-dependent adsorption of O atoms is then investigated, and based on these data, a surface phase diagram for GeTe(111)/O is constructed. These results afford a detailed, atom-resolved picture of the initial surface oxidation of GeTe, and they harmonize well with a previous X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on this very topic.

  18. Tandem oxidative processes catalyzed by polymer-incarcerated multimetallic nanoclusters with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Shū

    2014-04-15

    alcohols and the following Michael reaction catalyzed by trimetallic PI catalysts containing Au-Pd alloy nanoclusters and tetraalkoxyborates as cross-linkers. All of these heterogeneous catalysts could be recovered by simple operations and reused without significant loss of activity or any leaching of metals. We have demonstrated that the polymer incarceration method enables the simultaneous immobilization of several metals, with which we can achieve one-pot tandem oxidative processes using molecular oxygen as an oxidant within the multifunctional heterogeneous catalysts. Suitable choices of metals and bimetallic structures are crucial for the reactivity and the selection of reaction pathways.

  19. Correlation between the sorption of dissolved oxygen onto chitosan and its antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gylienė, Ona; Servienė, Elena; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Binkienė, Rima; Baranauskas, Mykolas; Lukša, Juliana

    2015-10-20

    The ability of chitosan to adsorb dissolved oxygen from solution depends on its physical shape and is related to the surface area. Depending on conditions chitosan is capable of adsorbing or releasing oxygen. Chitosan, modificated by the substances possessing antimicrobial activity, such as succinic acid, Pd(II) ions, metallic Pd or Ag, distinctly increases the ability to adsorb the dissolved oxygen. The additional treatment of chitosan with air oxygen or electrochemically produced oxygen also increases the uptake of dissolved oxygen by chitosan. A strong correlation between the amount of oxygen adsorbed onto chitosan and its antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli has been observed. This finding suggests that one of the sources of antimicrobial activity of chitosan is the ability to sorb dissolved oxygen, along with other well-known factors such as physical state and chemical composition.

  20. Study of Oxygen Induced Radicals in Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, Jason; Shah Jahan, M.

    2003-11-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used as a load-bearing component in hip and knee replacements for many years. Gamma irradiation is the method used by many industries to sterilize their joint components. This sterilization method causes primary free radicals (PR) to form throughout the polymer matrix. During post-sterilization exposure to oxygen, on shelf or in vivo, the free radicals react with oxygen and produce oxygen-induced radicals (OIR). These radicals make the polymer more brittle and accelerate polymer degradation. In this study we used electron spin resonance (ESR) technique to monitor the structural changes and concentration of radicals in gamma irradiated UHMWPE. The OIR's ESR spectrum tends to show a single line. Although there may be some contribution of polyenyle radicals in the single line spectrum, it can be shown that the spectrum detected following oxidation of PR is indeed due to the OIR. This result was reached by comparing the results of a long-term study of OIR's as well as studies in a vacuum or inert environment. *Work supported, in part, by funds from the NSF Industry/University Biosurface Center (IUCB)

  1. Production and Characterization of Active Transparent PET Films for Oxygen Sensitive Foods Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaria Galdi, Maria; Incarnato, Loredana

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate possible solutions to realize active, transparent PET film suitable for packaging oxygen sensitive foods. At this purpose, monolayer active PET films at different oxygen scavenger concentrations and multilayer active ones were produced by cast extrusion laboratory scale equipments. To assess their activity and to verify the efficacy of such solutions, O2 absorption analyses were carried out in continuous by an innovative oxygen meter.

  2. Experimental results on the dissociation of molecular iodine in the presence of singlet oxygen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Khvatov, N. A.; Malyshev, M. S.; Svistun, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The experimental results on the dissociation of iodine molecules in the presence of single oxygen molecules under a widerange variation of the oxygen-iodine composition are presented. The rate constants are determined as 4.3 × 10-17 cm3 s-1 for the reaction O2(1Δ) + O2(1Δ) → O2(1Σ) + O2(3Σ) (reaction 1), 2.8 × 10-13 cm3 s-1 for the reaction O2(1Δ) + I(2P1/2) → O2(1Σ) + I(2P3/2) (4) and 8.3 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 for the reaction O2(1Σ) + I2 → O2(3Σ) + 2I (2). The analysis of the experimental results shows that for different compositions of the active medium of the oxygen-iodine laser the iodine dissociation occurs via the chain of reactions 1, 2, O2(1Δ) + I(2P3/2) → O2(3Σ) + I(2P1/2), 4 and in the cascade process I2 + I(2P1/2) → I2(u) + I(2P3/2), I2(u) + O2(1Δ) → 2I + O2(3Σ). For typical active medium compositions of the supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser, the contributions of each of the mechanisms to the dissociation are comparable. The experiments carried out did not reveal any contribution from the vibrationally excited oxygen molecules to the iodine dissociation. Thus, the performed experiments and the conclusions drawn from them completely confirm the mechanism of iodine dissociation, proposed earlier.

  3. Differential production of active oxygen species in photo-symbiotic and non-symbiotic bivalves.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Maruyama, T

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the generation of active oxygen species in the bivalves, Crassostrea gigas, Fulvia mutica and Tridacna crocea in order to understand the defensive mechanisms in giant clams that allow a stable association with symbiotic zooxanthellae. C. gigas produced active oxygens, superoxide anion and nitric oxide upon stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate. F. mutica generated a little amount of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and contained significant phenoloxidase activity which catalyzes formation of quinones. T. crocea did not generate any apparent active oxygen species or quinones. The importance of lacking rapid cytotoxic responses consisting of active oxygen species to foreign organisms in the symbiotic clam is discussed.

  4. Effect of oxygen on the microbial activities of thermophilic anaerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Pedizzi, C; Regueiro, L; Rodriguez-Verde, I; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-07-01

    Low oxygen levels (μgO2L(-1)) in anaerobic reactors are quite common and no relevant consequences are expected. On the contrary, higher concentrations could affect the process. This work aimed to study the influence of oxygen (4.3 and 8.8mgO2L(-1), respectively) on the different microbial activities (hydrolytic, acidogenic and methanogenic) of thermophilic anaerobic biomass and on the methanogenic community structure. Batch tests in presence of oxygen were conducted using specific substrates for each biological activity and a blank (with minimum oxygen) was included. No effect of oxygen was observed on the hydrolytic and acidogenic activities. In contrast, the methane production rate decreased by 40% in all oxygenated batches and the development of active archaeal community was slower in presence of 8.8mgO2L(-1). However, despite this sensitivity of methanogens to oxygen at saturation levels, the inhibition was reversible. PMID:27020398

  5. Antioxidant Activity of Oxygen Evolving Enhancer Protein 1 Purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Young; Choi, Youn Hee; Lee, Jung Im; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the antioxidant activity of a protein purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens. The purification steps included sodium acetate (pH 6) extraction and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, reversed phase Shodex C4P-50 column chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the purified protein was 33 kDa. The N-terminus and partial peptide amino acid sequence of this protein was identical to the sequence of oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE) 1 protein. The antioxidant activity of the OEE 1 was determined in vitro using a scavenging test with 4 types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). OEE 1 had higher H2 O2 scavenging activity, which proved to be the result of enzymatic antioxidants rather than nonenzymatic antioxidants. In addition, OEE 1 showed less H2 O2 -mediated ROS formation in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that OEE 1 purified from C. fulvescens is an excellent antioxidant. PMID:25944160

  6. Singlet Molecular Oxygen on Ice: Rates of Formation and Steady State Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2007-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*), the first electronically excited state of molecular oxygen, reacts rapidly with certain types of environmental pollutants such as furans, phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its formation requires the absorption of light by a chromophore (a.k.a. sensitizer), which subsequently transfers energy to ground state molecular oxygen. In the environment, 1O2* chemistry has been studied primarily in the aqueous phase, such as in surface waters or cloud and fog drops. In this work, we expand our current understanding by investigating the rate of formation (Rf) and steady state concentration ([1O2*]) of 1O2* on ice. To investigate 1O2* kinetics, we use a chemical probe technique in which photoformed 1O2* reacts with furfuryl alcohol (FFA). To generate 1O2*, we illuminated frozen samples containing a sensitizer (Rose Bengal, RB) at 549 nm. The concentration of total solutes in each sample was controlled using sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). Following illumination, the decay of FFA was measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Ice tests were conducted at 253, 263, and 268 K. Liquid tests for comparison were conducted at 278 K. Results showed dramatically faster (~104) FFA decay on ice than in liquid samples prepared from the same solutions, in agreement with the calculated solute concentration factor in the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) on ice compared to bulk solution. Varying the concentration of RB resulted in similar changes in both Rf and [1O2*], with magnitudes of change close to those expected. Changing temperature and total solutes, both of which control the volume of the QLL on ice, revealed two model regimes: FFA as a major (1) or minor (2) sink of 1O2*. Experimental results from the former regime show good agreement with expected values for both Rf and [1O2*]. Experiments in the later regime are currently in progress. We will also discuss the potential implications of 1O2* to the chemistry of naturally

  7. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites

    PubMed Central

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen–oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O–O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described. PMID:17971328

  8. Micro- and Nanostructured Materials for Active Devices and Molecular Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Mast, Eric S.; Hall, Michael G.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional single layer barrier coatings are not adequate in preventing degradation of the performance of organic molecular electronic and other active devices. Most advanced devices used in display technology now consist of micro and nanostructured small molecule, polymer and inorganic coatings with thin high reactive group 1A metals. This includes organic electronics such as organic light emitting devices (OLED). The lifetimes of these devices rapidly degrades when they are exposed to atmospheric oxygen and water vapor. Thin film photovoltaics and batteries are also susceptible to degradation by moisture and oxygen. Using in-line coating techniques we apply a composite nanostructured inorganic/polymer thin film barrier that restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels using conventional permeation test equipment. We describe permeation mechanisms for this encapsulation coating and flat panel display and other device applications. Permeation through the multilayer barrier coating is defect and pore limited and can be described by Knudsen diffusion involving a long and tortuous path. Device lifetime is also enhanced by the long lag times required to reach the steady state flux regime. Permeation rates in the range of 10-6 cc,g/m2/d have been achieved and OLED device lifetimes. The structure is robust, yet flexible. The resulting device performance and lifetimes will also be described. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide yielding an engineered nanostructured device for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. This enables, for the first time, thin film encapsulation of emissive organic displays.

  9. Involvement of molecular oxygen in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted photosystem II membranes.

    PubMed

    Khorobrykh, A A; Klimov, V V

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown by Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry (Moscow) 67:683-688, 2002); Yanykin et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1797:516-523, 2010); Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry 50:10658-10665, 2011) that Mn-depleted photosystem II (PSII) membrane fragments are characterized by an enhanced oxygen photoconsumption on the donor side of PSII which is accompanied with hydroperoxide formation and it was suggested that the events are related to the oxidative photoinhibition of PSII. Experimental confirmation of this suggestion is presented in this work. The degree of photoinhibition was determined by the loss of the capability of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+) or sodium ascorbate) to the reactivation of electron transport [measured by the light-induced changes of chlorophyll fluorescence yield (∆F)] in Mn-depleted PSII membranes. The transition from anaerobic conditions to aerobic ones significantly activated photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes both in the absence and in the presence of exogenous electron acceptor, ferricyanide. The photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes was suppressed upon the addition of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+), diphenylcarbazide, and ferrocyanide). The addition of superoxide dismutase did not affect the photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes. It is concluded that the interaction of molecular oxygen (rather than superoxide anion radical formed on the acceptor side of PSII) with the oxidized components of the donor side of PSII reflects the involvement of O2 in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes.

  10. In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy study of the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface by supersonic molecular oxygen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden; Okada, Ryuta; Yamada, Yoichi; Sasaki, Masahiro

    2014-11-07

    In situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy was performed during the oxidation of the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface induced by a molecular oxygen beam with various incident energies up to 2.2 eV from the initial to saturation coverage of surface oxides. The saturation coverage of oxygen on the clean Ge(100) surface was much lower than one monolayer and the oxidation state of Ge was +2 at most. This indicates that the Ge(100) surface is so inert toward oxidation that complete oxidation cannot be achieved with only pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) gas, which is in strong contrast to Si surfaces. Two types of dissociative adsorption, trapping-mediated and direct dissociation, were confirmed by oxygen uptake measurements depending on the incident energy of O{sub 2}. The direct adsorption process can be activated by increasing the translational energy, resulting in an increased population of Ge{sup 2+} and a higher final oxygen coverage. We demonstrated that hyperthermal O{sub 2} beams remarkably promote the room-temperature oxidation with novel atomic configurations of oxides at the Ge(100) surface. Our findings will contribute to the fundamental understanding of oxygen adsorption processes at 300 K from the initial stages to saturated oxidation.

  11. Adsorption of molecular oxygen on VIIIB transition metal-doped graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehnia, F.; Seifi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of molecular oxygen with a triplet ground state on Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Ru-, Rh-, Pd-, OS-, Ir- and Pt-doped graphene is studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The calculations show that O2 molecule is chemisorbed on the doped graphene sheets with large adsorption energies ranging from -0.653 eV to -1.851 eV and the adsorption process is irreversible. Mulliken atomic charge analysis of the structure shows that charge transfer from doped graphene sheets to O2 molecule. The amounts of transferred charge are between 0.375e- to 0.650e-, indicating a considerable change in the structures conductance. These results imply that the effect of O2 adsorption on transition metal-doped graphene structures can alter the possibility of using these materials as a toxic-gas (carbon monoxide, hydrogen fluoride, etc.) sensor.

  12. Wall-collision line broadening of molecular oxygen within nanoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Can T.; Lewander, Maerta; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svensson, Tomas; Svanberg, Sune; Adolfsson, Erik

    2011-10-15

    Wall-collision broadening of near-infrared absorption lines of molecular oxygen confined in nanoporous zirconia is studied by employing high-resolution diode-laser spectroscopy. The broadening is studied for pores of different sizes under a range of pressures, providing new insights on how wall collisions and intermolecular collisions influence the total spectroscopic line profile. The pressure series show that wall-collision broadening is relatively more prominent under reduced pressures, enabling sensitive means to probe pore sizes of porous materials. In addition, we show that the total wall-collision-broadened profile strongly deviates from a Voigt profile and that wall-collision broadening exhibits an additive-like behavior to the pressure and Doppler broadening.

  13. Selective oxidation of cyclohexane on a novel catalyst Mg-Cu/SBA-15 by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaogang; Liu, Weimin; Yue, Lumin; Fu, Wei; Ha, Minh Ngoc; Li, Jun; Lu, Guanzhong

    2015-10-21

    The novel catalysts xMg-2.3Cu/SBA-15 with copper and magnesium oxide co-supported on mesoporous silica were synthesized by an impregnation method. The newly synthesized catalysts were characterized using a series of techniques such as BET, XRD, H2-TPR, UV-vis, XPS, EDS and TEM. The catalytic performance was evaluated by using selective oxidation of cyclohexane with molecular oxygen as the oxidant in a solvent free system. The incorporation of magnesium improved the dispersion of copper oxide and prevented the deep oxidation of cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. The selectivity of K/A oil was up to 99.3% with 12% conversion of cyclohexane over the 1.2Mg-2.3Cu/SBA-15 catalyst. To our knowledge, this is the best result for the heterogeneous oxidation of cyclohexane by O2. PMID:26388454

  14. Transgenic tobacco expressing a foreign calmodulin gene shows an enhanced production of active oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, S A; Oh, S H; Roberts, D M

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for elucidating specific molecular targets of calcium and calmodulin in plant defense responses has been developed. We have used a dominant-acting calmodulin mutant (VU-3, Lys to Arg115) to investigate the oxidative burst and nicotinamide co-enzyme fluxes after various stimuli (cellulase, harpin, incompatible bacteria, osmotic and mechanical) that elicit plant defense responses in transgenic tobacco cell cultures. VU-3 calmodulin differs from endogenous plant calmodulin in that it cannot be methylated post-translationally, and as a result it hyperactivates calmodulin-dependent NAD kinase. Cells expressing VU-3 calmodulin exhibited a stronger active oxygen burst that occurred more rapidly than in normal control cells challenged with the same stimuli. Increases in NADPH level were also greater in VU-3 cells and coincided both in timing and magnitude with development of the active oxygen species (AOS) burst. These data show that calmodulin is a target of calcium fluxes in response to elicitor or environmental stress, and provide the first evidence that plant NAD kinase may be a downstream target which potentiates AOS production by altering NAD(H)/NADP(H) homeostasis. PMID:9135130

  15. Mechanism of Oxygen Reduction in Cytochrome c Oxidase and the Role of the Active Site Tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A

    2016-01-26

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, reduces molecular oxygen to water and stores the released energy through electrogenic chemistry and proton pumping across the membrane. Apart from the heme-copper binuclear center, there is a conserved tyrosine residue in the active site (BNC). The tyrosine delivers both an electron and a proton during the O-O bond cleavage step, forming a tyrosyl radical. The catalytic cycle then occurs in four reduction steps, each taking up one proton for the chemistry (water formation) and one proton to be pumped. It is here suggested that in three of the reduction steps the chemical proton enters the center of the BNC, leaving the tyrosine unprotonated with radical character. The reproprotonation of the tyrosine occurs first in the final reduction step before binding the next oxygen molecule. It is also suggested that this reduction mechanism and the presence of the tyrosine are essential for the proton pumping. Density functional theory calculations on large cluster models of the active site show that only the intermediates with the proton in the center of the BNC and with an unprotonated tyrosyl radical have a high electron affinity of similar size as the electron donor, which is essential for the ability to take up two protons per electron and thus for the proton pumping. This type of reduction mechanism is also the only one that gives a free energy profile in accordance with experimental observations for the amount of proton pumping in the working enzyme.

  16. Active oxygen and cell death in cereal aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Fath, Angelika; Bethke, Paul; Beligni, Veronica; Jones, Russell

    2002-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue whose function is regulated by gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Aleurone cells lack functional chloroplasts, thus excluding photosynthesis as a source of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell death. Incubation of barley aleurone layers or protoplasts in GA initiated the cell death programme, but incubation in ABA delays programmed cell death (PCD). Light, especially blue and UV-A light, and H(2)O(2) accelerate PCD of GA-treated aleurone cells, but ABA-treated aleurone cells are refractory to light and H(2)O(2) and are not killed. It was shown that light elevated intracellular H(2)O(2), and that the rise in H(2)O(2) was greater in GA-treated cells compared to cells in ABA. Experiments with antioxidants show that PCD in aleurone is probably regulated by AOS. The sensitivity of GA-treated aleurone to light and H(2)O(2) is a result of lowered amounts of enzymes that metabolize AOS. mRNAs encoding catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are all reduced during 6-18 h of incubation in GA, but these mRNAs were present in higher amounts in cells incubated in ABA. The amounts of protein and enzyme activities encoded by these mRNAs were also dramatically reduced in GA-treated cells. Aleurone cells store and metabolize neutral lipids via the glyoxylate cycle in response to GA, and glyoxysomes are one potential source of AOS in the GA-treated cells. Mitochondria are another potential source of AOS in GA-treated cells. AOS generated by these organelles bring about membrane rupture and cell death.

  17. Photoassisted reduction of molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by oxoalkoxomolybdenum(V) porphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Ledon, H.J.; Bonnet, M.; Galland, D.

    1981-10-07

    Formation of the oxomolybdenum (IV) porphyrin O = M/sub 0//sup IV/(TPP)-OCH/sub 3/(2), by photoinduced hemolysis of the Mo-OCH/sub 3/ bond was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy and spin-trapping experiments. When an oxygen-free benzene solution of 0 = M/sub 0//sup V/(TPP)-OCH/sub 3/(1) was irradiated directly in the cavity of an EPR spectrometer, the intensity of the characteristic nine-line spectra of 1 slowly diminished with time but again was fully restored when the cell was open to air and one drop of methanol was added, confirming the formation of a diamagnetic molybdoporphyrin complex upon irradiation. The reoxidation of O = Mo/sup IV/(TPP)(2) in a benzene-methanol mixture was monitored by uv-visible spectrometry, which showed the reaction to follow strict second-order kinetics. This second dependence on molybdenum suggests a two-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide which was actually identified in separate experiments. In order to evaluate the efficiency and possible uses of the photoreduction of 1, a catalytic cycle was devised by coupling the reactions described. The results of these studies clearly established the ability of molybdenum porphyrins to harvest solar energy to produce reactive intermediates by redox processes.

  18. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    PubMed

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to < 3 nm. The effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on this oxidized carbon phosphide layer was subsequently probed in situ using XPS. Initially AO exposure resulted in a loss of carbon atoms from the surface, but increased the surface concentration of phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers.

  19. Liquid- and Ice-Phase Kinetics of Singlet Molecular Oxygen with Organic Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2012-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*), a reactive state of dissolved oxygen, is formed from a sensitizer chromophore that absorbs light and transfers energy to ground-state O2. The chemistry of 1O2* has been studied predominantly in surface waters and aqueous atmospheric drops, where 1O2* can be an important sink for electron-rich pollutants. In our recent work we have shown that 1O2* concentrations can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude on ice compared to in identical, but unfrozen, aqueous solutions. The goal of this work is to assess the potential importance of 1O2* to the decay of organic pollutants on ice in order to better understand pollutant cycling in the cryosphere. Using 549 nm radiation we illuminated liquid and bulk ice samples containing a 1O2* sensitizer (Rose Bengal), salt (NaCl), and an organic pollutant at a controlled temperature. Organic species were chosen to represent several chemical classes, including furans (furfuryl alcohol), phenols (bisphenol A), and amino acids (tryptophan). During illumination the decay of the pollutant was measured to determine the rate constant for loss by reaction with 1O2*. In all cases we observe enhanced loss of pollutants on ice relative to liquid samples. We will discuss how the magnitude of the ice-phase enhancement depends on the different pollutant classes, their aqueous solubility, and freezing point depression.

  20. Investigation of the radiation stimulated oxidation of sulfite by molecular oxygen in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Muratbekov, M.B.; Koroleva, G.Y.

    1986-09-01

    The principles of the radiation-stimulated oxidation of sulfite by molecular oxygen in the range of pH 11.0-14.6 were investigated. It was established that with increasing sulfite concentration, the kinetic order of the reaction with respect to sulfite falls from 1 to 0, and with respect to oxygen it increases from 0 to 1. This is explained by the fact that at low sulfite concentrations the rate-determining step of the process is the reaction SO/sub 5//sup -/ (HSO/sub 5/) + SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ ..-->.. SO/sub 4//sup -/ (HSO/sub 4/) + SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, while at high concentrations it is the reaction SO/sub 3/ + O/sub 2/ ..-->.. SO/sub 5//sup -/. The influence of the pH is explained on the assumption of the existence of two forms of the peroxomonosulfate radical, the more reactive of which is the acid. A number of ratios of reaction rate constants were determined.

  1. Oxidation of citronellal to citronellic acid by molecular oxygen using supported gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Martin, A; Armbruster, U; Decker, D; Gedig, T; Köckritz, A

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of citronellal to citronellic acid was studied using molecular oxygen as oxidant and gold-containing supported catalysts under aqueous conditions. The reactions were carried out at 60-90 degrees C, with 200 Nml min(-1) O2 and at pH values from 9 to 12. The alumina- or titania-supported catalysts were synthesized according to the deposition-precipitation procedure using urea or NaOH. Mechanistic studies have revealed that radical-initiated reactions lead to undesired by-products especially at pH <9, that is, the C=C bond is attacked and a diol is primarily formed probably via an epoxide intermediate. This side reaction can be suppressed to a large extent by increasing the pH to 12 and by raising the catalyst/oxygen ratio. Furthermore, detailed studies on the influence of reaction time, pH value, reactant concentration and amount of catalyst show that citronellic acid can be obtained in over 90% yield with total conversion of citronellal at pH 12 and a temperature of 80 degrees C.

  2. Radioprotective Action of Low-Intensity Light into the Red Absorption Band of Endogenous Molecular Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. V.; Mashalov, A. A.; Zakharov, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Application of ionizing radiation in oncology (radiation therapy) is a widespread way to eliminate malignant tumors. Normal tissues are inevitable included in any radiation field, and their reliable protection is actual till now. All attempts to solve the problem are based on search of effective radioprotectors, i.e. chemical compounds of various classes, which should be entered into the patient. To date about 50,000 compounds with some radioprotection properties had been tested, but the most effective of them have been simultaneously the most toxic. Here the preliminary results of researches devoted to development of an optical technique on basis of the light-oxygen effect for the protection of women with breast cancer from side effects of the radiation therapy are presented. A low intensity emission of the semiconductor laser in a red spectral interval was used to excite a very small quantity of endogenous molecular oxygen in O2(1Δg) state. It is shown, that application of the method at occurrence of earliest signs of radiation injury allows notably reducing dangerous breaks in radiation therapy course.

  3. A perovskite oxide optimized for oxygen evolution catalysis from molecular orbital principles.

    PubMed

    Suntivich, Jin; May, Kevin J; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Goodenough, John B; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-12-01

    The efficiency of many energy storage technologies, such as rechargeable metal-air batteries and hydrogen production from water splitting, is limited by the slow kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We found that Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ) (BSCF) catalyzes the OER with intrinsic activity that is at least an order of magnitude higher than that of the state-of-the-art iridium oxide catalyst in alkaline media. The high activity of BSCF was predicted from a design principle established by systematic examination of more than 10 transition metal oxides, which showed that the intrinsic OER activity exhibits a volcano-shaped dependence on the occupancy of the 3d electron with an e(g) symmetry of surface transition metal cations in an oxide. The peak OER activity was predicted to be at an e(g) occupancy close to unity, with high covalency of transition metal-oxygen bonds.

  4. A universal molecular clock of protein folds and its power in tracing the early history of aerobic metabolism and planet oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minglei; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Kim, Kyung Mo; Qu, Ge; Ji, Hong-Fang; Mittenthal, Jay E; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The standard molecular clock describes a constant rate of molecular evolution and provides a powerful framework for evolutionary timescales. Here, we describe the existence and implications of a molecular clock of folds, a universal recurrence in the discovery of new structures in the world of proteins. Using a phylogenomic structural census in hundreds of proteomes, we build phylogenies and time lines of domains at fold and fold superfamily levels of structural complexity. These time lines correlate approximately linearly with geological timescales and were here used to date two crucial events in life history, planet oxygenation and organism diversification. We first dissected the structures and functions of enzymes in simulated metabolic networks. The placement of anaerobic and aerobic enzymes in the time line revealed that aerobic metabolism emerged about 2.9 billion years (giga-annum; Ga) ago and expanded during a period of about 400 My, reaching what is known as the Great Oxidation Event. During this period, enzymes recruited old and new folds for oxygen-mediated enzymatic activities. Remarkably, the first fold lost by a superkingdom disappeared in Archaea 2.6 Ga ago, within the span of oxygen rise, suggesting that oxygen also triggered diversification of life. The implications of a molecular clock of folds are many and important for the neutral theory of molecular evolution and for understanding the growth and diversity of the protein world. The clock also extends the standard concept that was specific to molecules and their timescales and turns it into a universal timescale-generating tool. PMID:20805191

  5. Detection of molecular oxygen adsorbate during room-temperature oxidation of Si(100)2 × 1 surface: In situ synchrotron radiation photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Yamada, Yoichi; Taga, Ryo; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy during the oxidation of a Si(100)2 × 1 surface at room temperature revealed the existence of molecularly adsorbed oxygen, which was considered to be absent. The O 1s spectrum of such oxidation was found to be similar to that of Si(111)7 × 7 surface oxidation. Also, molecular oxygen appeared after the initial surface oxides were formed, indicating that it was not a precursor for dissociation oxygen adsorption on a clean surface. Considering this finding, we have proposed presumable structural models for atomic configurations, where molecular oxygen resided on the oxidized silicon with two oxygen atoms at the backbonds.

  6. Study of iron structure stability in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic with oxygen injection using molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkundato, Artoto; Su'ud, Zaki; Sudarko; Shafii, Mohammad Ali; Celino, Massimo

    2014-09-30

    Corrosion of structural materials in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic is a major problem for design of PbBi cooled reactor. One technique to inhibit corrosion process is to inject oxygen into coolant. In this paper we study and focus on a way of inhibiting the corrosion of iron using molecular dynamics method. For the simulation results we concluded that effective corrosion inhibition of iron may be achieved by injection 0.0532 wt% to 0.1156 wt% oxygen into liquid lead-bismuth. At this oxygen concentration the structure of iron material will be maintained at about 70% in bcc crystal structure during interaction with liquid metal.

  7. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  8. [Molecular mechanism at the presynaptic active zone].

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2011-07-01

    Our higher brain functions such as learning and memory, emotion, and consciousness depend on the precise regulation of complicated neural networks in the brain. Neurons communicate with each other through the synapse, which comprise 3 regions: the presynapse, synaptic cleft, and postsynapse. The active zone (AZ) beneath the presynaptic membrane is the principal site for Ca2+ -dependent neurotransmitter release: AZ is involved in determining the site for docking and synaptic vesicle fusion. Presently, the full molecular composition of AZ is unclear, but it is known to contain several AZ-specific proteins, including cytomatrix of the active zone-associated protein (CAST)/ERC2, ELKS, RIM1, Munc13-1, Piccolo/Aczonin, and Bassoon. CAST and ELKS are novel active zone proteins that directly bind to Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs), Bassoon, and Piccolo, and are thought to play a role in neurotransmitter release by binding these to AZ proteins. In this review, current advances in studies on AZ structure and function have been summarized, and the focus is mainly on protein-protein interactions among the AZ proteins.

  9. Activation of oxygen-mediating pathway using copper ions: fine-tuning of growth kinetics in gold nanorod overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqi; Zhang, Hui; Wen, Tao; Yan, Jiao; Hou, Shuai; Shi, Xiaowei; Hu, Zhijian; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2014-10-21

    Growth kinetics plays an important role in the shape control of nanocrystals (NCs). Herein, we presented a unique way to fine-tune the growth kinetics via oxidative etching activated by copper ions. For the overgrowth of gold nanorods (Au NRs), competitive adsorption of dissolved oxygen on rod surface was found to slow down the overgrowth rate. Copper ions were able to remove the adsorbed oxygen species from the Au surface via oxidative etching, thus exposing more reaction sites for Au deposition. In this way, copper ions facilitated the overgrowth process. Furthermore, Cu(2+) rather than Cu(+) acted as the catalyst for the oxidative etching. Comparative study with Ag(+) indicated that Cu(2+) cannot regulate NC shapes via an underpotential deposition mechanism. In contrast, Ag(+) led to the formation of Au tetrahexahedra (THH) and a slight decrease of the growth rate at similar growth conditions. Combining the distinct roles of the two ions enabled elongated THH to be produced. Copper ions activating the O2 pathway suggested that dissolved oxygen has a strong affinity for the Au surface. Moreover, the results of NC-sensitized singlet oxygen ((1)O2) indicated that the absorbed oxygen species on the surface of Au NCs bounded with low-index facets mainly existed in the form of molecular O2. PMID:25244407

  10. P38 activation is more important than ERK activation in lung injury induced by prolonged hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Fang, Yi-Qun; Gu, Ai-Mei; Wang, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Shi; Li, Kai-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to hyperbaric oxygen can cause pulmonary and nerve system toxicity. Although hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been used for a broad spectrum of ailments, the mechanisms of prolonged hyperbaric oxygen-induced lung injury are not fully understood. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the roles of ERK, p38, and caspase-3 in rat lung tissue exposed to hyperbaric oxygen at 2.3 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) for two, six and 10 hours. The results showed that the ERK and p38 were phosphorylated at two hours and reached a peak at six hours into exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. While the phosphorylation level of ERK decreased, p38 remained at a high level of activation at 10 hours. The activation of ERK and p38 was down-regulated when rats were exposed to normoxic hyperbaric nitrogen for 10 hours. However, caspase-3 was activated at six hours and 10 hours into exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. These results demonstrated different changes of activation of ERK and p38 during lung injury induced by prolonged exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. The time course changes of activated caspase-3 were similar to the process of p38 activation upon exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. In this way, activation of p38, not ERK, seems to be a mechanism associated with prolonged hyperbaric oxygen-induced lung injury.

  11. Reactive oxygen species-associated molecular signature predicts survival in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bime, Christian; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Ting; Slepian, Marvin J; Garcia, Joe G N; Hecker, Louise

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis-related multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. There is overwhelming evidence that oxidative stress plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated multiple organ failure; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated biomarkers and/or diagnostics that define mortality or predict survival in sepsis are lacking. Lung or peripheral blood gene expression analysis has gained increasing recognition as a potential prognostic and/or diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to identify ROS-associated biomarkers predictive of survival in patients with sepsis. In-silico analyses of expression profiles allowed the identification of a 21-gene ROS-associated molecular signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. Importantly, this signature performed well in a validation cohort consisting of sepsis patients aggregated from distinct patient populations recruited from different sites. Our signature outperforms randomly generated signatures of the same signature gene size. Our findings further validate the critical role of ROSs in the pathogenesis of sepsis and provide a novel gene signature that predicts survival in sepsis patients. These results also highlight the utility of peripheral blood molecular signatures as biomarkers for predicting mortality risk in patients with sepsis, which could facilitate the development of personalized therapies. PMID:27252846

  12. K(+) channel activity and redox status are differentially required for JNK activation by UV and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Wu, Dan; Guo, Taylor B; Ruan, Qin; Li, Tie; Lu, Zhenyu; Xu, Ming; Dai, Wei; Lu, Luo

    2004-07-15

    Upon exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, osmotic changes or the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are rapidly activated. Extensive studies have elucidated molecular components that mediate the activation of JNKs. However, it remains unclear whether activation of JNKs by various stress signals involves different pathways. Here we show that K(+) channel activity is involved in mediating apoptosis induced by UV but not by H(2)O(2) in myelocytic leukemic ML-1 cells. Specifically, JNKs were rapidly phosphorylated upon treatment of ML-1 cells with UV and H(2)O(2). UV-induced, but not H(2)O(2)-induced, JNK-1 phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a K(+) channel blocker. 4-AP also blocked UV-induced increase in JNK activity as well as p38 phosphorylation. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that phosphorylated JNKs were concentrated at centrosomes in ML-1 cells and that these proteins underwent rapid subcellular translocation upon UV treatment. Consistently, the subcellular translocation of JNKs induced by UV was largely blocked by 4-AP. Furthermore, UV-induced JNK activation was blocked by NEM, a sulfhydryl alkylating agent also affecting K(+) current. Both UV- and H(2)O(2)-induced JNK activities were inhibited by glutathione, suggesting that the redox status does play an important role in the activation of JNKs. Taken together, our findings suggest that JNK activation by UV and H(2)O(2) is mediated by distinct yet overlapping pathways and that K(+) channel activity and redox status are differentially required for UV- and H(2)O(2)-induced activation of JNKs.

  13. Fast oxygen atom studies related to low Earth orbit activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.; Holtzclaw, K. W.; Sonnenfroh, D.

    1993-06-01

    The technique of laser induced gas breakdown to develop a high flux pulsed source of fast oxygen atoms (v = 5 to 12 km/s) is considered. The technique is also used to produce high velocity beams of N/N2 mixtures and can be extended to produce beams of other species. The fast oxygen atoms are of particular current interest since this is the dominant atmospheric species encountered by spacecraft operating in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The fast oxygen atom source has proven extremely versatile and is used to study a variety of gas-surface and gas-gas collision phenomena. The fast atom facility has reproducibly provided good comparison with LEO observations. Expanded programs involving material testing and measurement of O atom momentum and energy accommodation coefficients with surfaces are presently underway.

  14. Protein-templated gold nanoclusters: size dependent inversion of fluorescence emission in the presence of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Das, Tarasankar; Ghosh, Prasun; Shanavas, M S; Maity, Arnab; Mondal, Somen; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2012-09-28

    Gold nanoclusters are promising candidates as biological markers without having toxic effects like fluorescent quantum dots. Herein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein stabilized gold nanoclusters of two different sizes emitting at 410 and 645 nm have been synthesized. These nanoclusters have been shown to interact with molecular oxygen differentially. Spectroscopic and chemical evidences show that dioxygen molecule gets adsorbed at two different orientations on the nanoclusters. The orientation motifs have been hypothesized to be superoxo and peroxo types on the smaller and the larger gold nanoclusters, respectively. Due to the difference in attachments, the oxygen molecule shows opposite changes in fluorescence intensity for the nanoclusters. The fluorescence intensity of the blue emitting nanocluster shows a profuse enhancement whereas the red emitting species shows quenching of emission. Superoxo type adsorption of the oxygen molecule on the blue emitting gold nanoclusters induce formation of singlet oxygen that in turn enhances the fluorescence intensity of the species. This could be verified by oxidation of diaminobenzidine (DAB) by singlet oxygen. Enhancement in fluorescence intensity of the blue emitting gold nanoclusters with an increase in concentration of molecular oxygen may enable them to be good candidates in bioimaging and detection.

  15. Oxygen dependence of two-photon activation of zinc and copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Mir, Youssef; van Lier, Johan E; Paquette, Benoit; Houde, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), the use of light-activated drugs, is a promising treatment of cancer as well as several nonmalignant conditions. However, the efficacy of one-photon (1-gamma) PDT is limited by hypoxia, which can prevent the production of the cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) species, leading to tumor resistance to PDT. To solve this problem, we propose an irradiation protocol based on a simultaneous, two-photon (2-gamma) excitation of the photosensitizer (Ps). Excitation of the Ps triplet state leads to an upper excited triplet state T(n) with distinct photochemical properties, which could inflict biologic damage independent of the presence of molecular oxygen. To determine the potential of a 2-gamma excitation process, Jurkat cells were incubated with zinc or copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (ZnPcS(4) or CuPcS(4)). ZnPcS(4) is a potent (1)O(2) generator in 1-gamma PDT, while CuPcS(4) is inactive under these conditions. Jurkat cells incubated with either ZnPcS(4) or CuPcS(4) were exposed to a 670 nm continuous laser (1-gamma PDT), 532 nm pulsed-laser light (2-gamma PDT), or a combination of 532 and 670 nm (2-gamma PDT). The efficacy of ZnPcS(4) to photoinactivate the Jurkat cells decreased as the concentration of oxygen decreased for both the 1-gamma and 2-gamma protocols. In the case of CuPcS(4), cell phototoxicity was measured only following 2-gamma irradiation, and its efficacy also decreased at a lower oxygen concentration. Our results suggest that for CuPcS(4) the T(n) excited state can be populated after 2-gamma irradiation at 532 nm or the combination of 532 and 670 nm light. Dependency of phototoxicity upon aerobic conditions for both 1-gamma and 2-gamma PDT suggests that reactive oxygen species play an important role in 1-gamma and 2-gamma PDT.

  16. Ruthenium-functionalized nickel hydroxide catalyst for highly efficient alcohol oxidations in the presence of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, S; Senthil Kumar, A; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Chan, Ting-Shan; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-04-14

    Ru/Ni(OH)(2) composite, prepared by simple wetness impregnation method, has demonstrated highly efficient alcohol oxidation reaction in the presence of molecular oxygen at T = 363 K with good selectivity (>99%) and excellent reaction yield (TOF approximately 132 h(-1)).

  17. Effect of the solution temperature in a singlet-oxygen generator on the formation of active medium in an ejector oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zagidullin, M V; Nikolaev, V D; Svistun, M I; Khvatov, N A; Palina, N Yu

    2002-02-28

    The influence of the solution temperature in a singlet-oxygen generator on the formation of the active medium in the ejector oxygen - iodine laser is investigated. The following parameters of the active medium at the solution temperature -20{sup 0}C are obtained: the gain is 7.2 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup -1}, the Mach number is M=2, the temperature is 205 K, and the static pressure is 9.3 mmHg. As the solution temperature is increased to -4{sup 0}C, the gain decreases to 5 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup -1}, the Mach number decreases to 1.78, while the temperature and the static pressure increase to 241 K and 10.7 mmHg, respectively. As the solution temperature increases from -20 to -4{sup 0}C, the losses in O{sub 2}({sup 1}{Delta}) increase by less than 20%, while the dissociation efficiency of molecular iodine decreases by less than 21%. (lasers, active media)

  18. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results

  19. Glutathione modifies the oxidation products of 2'-deoxyguanosine by singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Peres, Patrícia S; Valerio, Andressa; Cadena, Silvia M S C; Winnischofer, Sheila M B; Scalfo, Alexsandra C; Di Mascio, Paolo; Martinez, Glaucia R

    2015-11-15

    The oxidation of the free nucleoside 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) by singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O2) has been studied over the three last decades due to the major role of DNA oxidation products in process such as ageing, mutation and carcinogenesis. In the present work we investigated the dGuo oxidation by (1)O2 in the presence of the important low molecular antioxidant, glutathione, in its reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) forms. There were applied different conditions of concentration, pH, time of incubation, and the use of a [(18)O]-labeled thermolabile endoperoxide naphthalene derivative as a source of [(18)O]-labeled (1)O2. Data was obtained through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and HPLC coupled to micrOTOF Q-II analysis of the main oxidation products: the diastereomers of spiroiminodihydantoin-2'-deoxyribonucleosides (dSp) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). An intriguing result was that 8-oxodGuo levels increased by 100 fold when dGuo was oxidized by (1)O2 in the presence of GSH and by 2 fold in the presence of GSSG, while dSp levels dropped to zero for both conditions. All data from dGuo, 8-oxodGuo and dSp quantification together with the analysis of residual GSH/GSSG content in each sample strongly suggest that glutathione modifies the mechanism of dGuo oxidation by (1)O2 by disfavoring the pathway of dSp formation.

  20. Method of Separating Oxygen From Spacecraft Cabin Air to Enable Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Extravehicular activities (EVAs) require high-pressure, high-purity oxygen. Shuttle EVAs use oxygen that is stored and transported as a cryogenic fluid. EVAs on the International Space Station (ISS) presently use the Shuttle cryo O2, which is transported to the ISS using a transfer hose. The fluid is compressed to elevated pressures and stored as a high-pressure gas. With the retirement of the shuttle, NASA has been searching for ways to deliver oxygen to fill the highpressure oxygen tanks on the ISS. A method was developed using low-pressure oxygen generated onboard the ISS and released into ISS cabin air, filtering the oxygen from ISS cabin air using a pressure swing absorber to generate a low-pressure (high-purity) oxygen stream, compressing the oxygen with a mechanical compressor, and transferring the high-pressure, high-purity oxygen to ISS storage tanks. The pressure swing absorber (PSA) can be either a two-stage device, or a single-stage device, depending on the type of sorbent used. The key is to produce a stream with oxygen purity greater than 99.5 percent. The separator can be a PSA device, or a VPSA device (that uses both vacuum and pressure for the gas separation). The compressor is a multi-stage mechanical compressor. If the gas flow rates are on the order of 5 to 10 lb (.2.3 to 4.6 kg) per day, the compressor can be relatively small [3 16 16 in. (.8 41 41 cm)]. Any spacecraft system, or other remote location that has a supply of lowpressure oxygen, a method of separating oxygen from cabin air, and a method of compressing the enriched oxygen stream, has the possibility of having a regenerable supply of highpressure, high-purity oxygen that is compact, simple, and safe. If cabin air is modified so there is very little argon, the separator can be smaller, simpler, and use less power.

  1. Determination of differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of electronic states of molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.; Green, M. A.; Brunger, M. J.; Teubner, P. J. O.; Cartwright, D. C.

    2000-02-01

    The development and initial results of a method for the determination of differential cross sections for electron scattering by molecular oxygen are described. The method has been incorporated into an existing package of computer programs which, given spectroscopic factors, dissociation energies and an energy-loss spectrum for electron-impact excitation, determine the differential cross sections for each electronic state relative to that of the elastic peak. Enhancements of the original code were made to deal with particular aspects of electron scattering from O{sub 2}, such as the overlap of vibrational levels of the ground state with transitions to excited states, and transitions to levels close to and above the dissocation energy in the Herzberg and Schumann-Runge continua. The utility of the code is specifically demonstrated for the ''6-eV states'' of O{sub 2}, where we report absolute differential cross sections for their excitation by 15-eV electrons. In addition an integral cross section, derived from the differential cross section measurements, is also reported for this excitation process and compared against available theoretical results. The present differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the ''6-eV states'' of O{sub 2} are the first to be reported in the literature for electron-impact energies below 20 eV. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Abundant molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bieler, A; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Berthelier, J-J; Bochsler, P; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; van Dishoeck, E F; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Hässig, M; Jäckel, A; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Maggiolo, R; Marty, B; Mousis, O; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Walsh, C; Wurz, P

    2015-10-29

    The composition of the neutral gas comas of most comets is dominated by H2O, CO and CO2, typically comprising as much as 95 per cent of the total gas density. In addition, cometary comas have been found to contain a rich array of other molecules, including sulfuric compounds and complex hydrocarbons. Molecular oxygen (O2), however, despite its detection on other icy bodies such as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, has remained undetected in cometary comas. Here we report in situ measurement of O2 in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, with local abundances ranging from one per cent to ten per cent relative to H2O and with a mean value of 3.80 ± 0.85 per cent. Our observations indicate that the O2/H2O ratio is isotropic in the coma and does not change systematically with heliocentric distance. This suggests that primordial O2 was incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation, which is unexpected given the low upper limits from remote sensing observations. Current Solar System formation models do not predict conditions that would allow this to occur. PMID:26511578

  3. Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous Solid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kavetski, Alexandre G.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2006-02-16

    The low-energy, electron-stimulated production of molecular oxygen from pure amorphous solid water (ASW) films and ASW films co-dosed with H2O2 is investigated. Layered films of H216O and H218O are used to determine the spatial profile of the reactions in the films leading to O2. The O2 yield is dose-dependent, indicating that precursors are involved in the O2 production. For temperatures below {approx}80 K, the O2 yield at steady state is relatively low and nearly independent of temperature. At higher temperatures, the yield increases rapidly. The O2 yield is enhanced from H2O2-dosed water films, but the experiments show that H2O2 is not the final precursor in the reactions leading to O2. Instead, a stable precursor for O2 is produced through a multi-step reaction sequence probably involving the reactions of OH radicals to produce H2O2 and then HO2. The O2 is produced in a non-thermal reaction from the HO2. For relatively thick films, the reactions leading to O2 occur at or near the ASW/vacuum interface. However, the electronic excitations which initiate the reactions occur over a larger range in the film. A kinetic model which qualitatively accounts for all of the observations is presented.

  4. Molecular oxygen migration through the xenon docking sites of human hemoglobin in the R-state.

    PubMed

    Lepeshkevich, Sergei V; Gilevich, Syargey N; Parkhats, Marina V; Dzhagarov, Boris M

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond laser flash-photolysis technique was used to study bimolecular and geminate molecular oxygen (O2) rebinding to tetrameric human hemoglobin and its isolated α and β chains in buffer solutions equilibrated with 1atm of air and up to 25atm of xenon. Xenon binding to the isolated α chains and to the α subunits within tetrameric hemoglobin was found to cause a decrease in the efficiency of O2 escape by a factor of ~1.30 and 3.3, respectively. A kinetic model for O2 dissociation, rebinding, and migration through two alternative pathways in the hemoglobin subunits was introduced and discussed. It was shown that, in the isolated α chains and α subunits within tetrameric hemoglobin, nearly one- and two-third escaping molecules of O2 leave the protein via xenon docking sites, respectively. The present experimental data support the idea that O2 molecule escapes from the β subunits mainly through the His(E7) gate, and show unambiguously that, in the α subunits, in addition to the direct E7 channel, there is at least one alternative escape route leading to the exterior via the xenon docking sites. PMID:27288155

  5. Abundant molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bieler, A; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Berthelier, J-J; Bochsler, P; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; van Dishoeck, E F; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Hässig, M; Jäckel, A; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Maggiolo, R; Marty, B; Mousis, O; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Walsh, C; Wurz, P

    2015-10-29

    The composition of the neutral gas comas of most comets is dominated by H2O, CO and CO2, typically comprising as much as 95 per cent of the total gas density. In addition, cometary comas have been found to contain a rich array of other molecules, including sulfuric compounds and complex hydrocarbons. Molecular oxygen (O2), however, despite its detection on other icy bodies such as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, has remained undetected in cometary comas. Here we report in situ measurement of O2 in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, with local abundances ranging from one per cent to ten per cent relative to H2O and with a mean value of 3.80 ± 0.85 per cent. Our observations indicate that the O2/H2O ratio is isotropic in the coma and does not change systematically with heliocentric distance. This suggests that primordial O2 was incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation, which is unexpected given the low upper limits from remote sensing observations. Current Solar System formation models do not predict conditions that would allow this to occur.

  6. The Effect of 30% Oxygen on Visuospatial Performance and Brain Activation: An Fmri Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, S.C.; Tack, G.R.; Lee, B.; Eom, G.M.; Lee, S.Y.; Sohn, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that administration of the air with 30% oxygen compared with normal air (21% oxygen) enhances cognitive functioning through increased activation in the brain. A visuospatial task was presented while brain images were scanned by a 3 T fMRI system. The results showed that there was an improvement in…

  7. Biosynthesis of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus using oxygen vector and optimum impeller tip speed.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zee-Wei; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2012-09-01

    The potential use of n-dodecane and n-hexadecane as oxygen vectors for enhancing hyaluronic acid (HA) biosynthesis by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920 was investigated using a 2-L stirred-tank bioreactor equipped with helical ribbon or Rushton turbine impellers. The volumetric fraction of the oxygen vector influenced the gas-liquid volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) positively. Batch HA fermentation with 1% (v/v) n-dodecane or 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane addition was carried out at different impeller tip speeds. Even though cell growth was lower in the fermentation with oxygen vector addition, the HA productivity and molecular weight were higher when compared to the fermentation without oxygen vector at low impeller tip speed. The highest HA concentration (4.25 gHA/l) and molecular weight (1.54 × 10(7) Da) were obtained when 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane and 0.785 m/s impeller tip speed of helical ribbon were used.

  8. Biosynthesis of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus using oxygen vector and optimum impeller tip speed.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zee-Wei; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2012-09-01

    The potential use of n-dodecane and n-hexadecane as oxygen vectors for enhancing hyaluronic acid (HA) biosynthesis by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920 was investigated using a 2-L stirred-tank bioreactor equipped with helical ribbon or Rushton turbine impellers. The volumetric fraction of the oxygen vector influenced the gas-liquid volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) positively. Batch HA fermentation with 1% (v/v) n-dodecane or 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane addition was carried out at different impeller tip speeds. Even though cell growth was lower in the fermentation with oxygen vector addition, the HA productivity and molecular weight were higher when compared to the fermentation without oxygen vector at low impeller tip speed. The highest HA concentration (4.25 gHA/l) and molecular weight (1.54 × 10(7) Da) were obtained when 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane and 0.785 m/s impeller tip speed of helical ribbon were used. PMID:22608992

  9. Ascorbic acid enhanced activation of oxygen by ferrous iron: A case of aerobic degradation of rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaojing; Shen, Wenjuan; Huang, Xiaopeng; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-05-01

    Molecular oxygen activation by ferrous ions (Fe(II)) in aqueous solution could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) with high oxidation potential via reaction between Fe(II) and oxygen molecules (Fe(II)/air), however, ROS yielded in the Fe(II)/air process is insufficient for removal of organic pollutants due to the irreversible ferric ions (Fe(III)) accumulation. In this study, we demonstrate that ascorbic acid (AA) could enhance ROS generation via oxygen activation by ferrous irons (AA/Fe(II)/air) and thus improve the degradation of rhodamine (RhB) significantly. It was found that the first-order aerobic degradation rate of RhB in the AA/Fe(II)/air process in the presence of ascorbic acid is more than 4 times that of the Fe(II)/Air system without adding ascorbic acid. The presence of ascorbic acid could relieve the accumulation of Fe(III) by reductive accelerating the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles, as well as lower the redox potential of Fe(III)/Fe(II) through chelating effect, leading to enhanced ROS generation for promoting RhB degradation. This study not only sheds light on the effect of ascorbic acid on aerobic Fe(II) oxidation, but also provides a green method for effective remediation of organic pollutants.

  10. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsoy, Olga V.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis.

  11. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsoy, Olga V; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis.

  12. Experimental results on the dissociation of molecular iodine in the presence of singlet oxygen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Khvatov, N. A.; Malyshev, M. S.; Svistun, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The experimental results on the dissociation of iodine molecules in the presence of single oxygen molecules under a widerange variation of the oxygen–iodine composition are presented. The rate constants are determined as 4.3 × 10-17 cm3 s-1 for the reaction O2(1Δ) + O2(1Δ) → O2(1Σ) + O2(3Σ) (reaction 1), 2.8 × 10-13 cm3 s-1 for the reaction O2(1Δ) + I(2P1/2) → O2(1Σ) + I(2P3/2) (4) and 8.3 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 for the reaction O2(1Σ) + I2 → O2(3Σ) + 2I (2). The analysis of the experimental results shows that for different compositions of the active medium of the oxygen–iodine laser the iodine dissociation occurs via the chain of reactions 1, 2, O2(1Δ) + I(2P3/2) → O2(3Σ) + I(2P1/2), 4 and in the cascade process I2 + I(2P1/2) → I2(u) + I(2P3/2), I2(u) + O2(1Δ) → 2I + O2(3Σ). For typical active medium compositions of the supersonic chemical oxygen–iodine laser, the contributions of each of the mechanisms to the dissociation are comparable. The experiments carried out did not reveal any contribution from the vibrationally excited oxygen molecules to the iodine dissociation. Thus, the performed experiments and the conclusions drawn from them completely confirm the mechanism of iodine dissociation, proposed earlier.

  13. Design of high pressure oxygen filter for extravehicular activity life support system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The experience of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with extravehicular activity life support emergency oxygen supply subsystems has shown a large number of problems associated with particulate contamination. These problems have resulted in failures of high pressure oxygen component sealing surfaces. A high pressure oxygen filter was designed which would (a) control the particulate contamination level in the oxygen system to a five-micron glass bead rating, ten-micron absolute condition (b) withstand the dynamic shock condition resulting from the sudden opening of 8000 psi oxygen system shutoff valve. Results of the following program tasks are reported: (1) contaminant source identification tests, (2) dynamic system tests, (3) high pressure oxygen filter concept evaluation, (4) design, (5) fabrication, (6) test, and (7) application demonstration.

  14. Catalytic Chan–Lam coupling using a ‘tube-in-tube’ reactor to deliver molecular oxygen as an oxidant

    PubMed Central

    Mallia, Carl J; Burton, Paul M; Smith, Alexander M R; Walter, Gary C

    2016-01-01

    Summary A flow system to perform Chan–Lam coupling reactions of various amines and arylboronic acids has been realised employing molecular oxygen as an oxidant for the re-oxidation of the copper catalyst enabling a catalytic process. A tube-in-tube gas reactor has been used to simplify the delivery of the oxygen accelerating the optimisation phase and allowing easy access to elevated pressures. A small exemplification library of heteroaromatic products has been prepared and the process has been shown to be robust over extended reaction times. PMID:27559412

  15. Catalytic Chan-Lam coupling using a 'tube-in-tube' reactor to deliver molecular oxygen as an oxidant.

    PubMed

    Mallia, Carl J; Burton, Paul M; Smith, Alexander M R; Walter, Gary C; Baxendale, Ian R

    2016-01-01

    A flow system to perform Chan-Lam coupling reactions of various amines and arylboronic acids has been realised employing molecular oxygen as an oxidant for the re-oxidation of the copper catalyst enabling a catalytic process. A tube-in-tube gas reactor has been used to simplify the delivery of the oxygen accelerating the optimisation phase and allowing easy access to elevated pressures. A small exemplification library of heteroaromatic products has been prepared and the process has been shown to be robust over extended reaction times. PMID:27559412

  16. Communication: A novel method for generating molecular mixtures at extreme conditions: The case of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael Sneed, Daniel; White, Melanie; Wang, Yonggang

    2014-09-07

    We have successfully created a segregated mixture of hydrogen and oxygen at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell using hard x-ray photochemistry. A keyhole (two holes connected by an opening) sample chamber was created in a metallic gasket to support two segregated powders of ammonia borane and potassium perchlorate, respectively, in each hole at a pressure of ∼5.0 GPa. Both holes were separately irradiated with synchrotron hard x-rays to release molecular oxygen and molecular hydrogen, respectively. Upon irradiation of the first KClO{sub 4}-containing hole, solid reddish-orange O{sub 2} appeared in the region of irradiation and molecular oxygen was found to diffuse throughout the entire sample region. The second ammonia borane-containing hole was then irradiated and H{sub 2} was observed to form via Raman spectroscopy. Water also was observed in the ammonia borane-containing hole and possibly (in the form of ice VII) in the second hole. This unique experiment demonstrates the ability to easily create solid mixtures of simple molecular systems via x-ray irradiation and then react them via further irradiation which will aid the study of chemistry under extreme conditions.

  17. Reactive oxygen scavenging activity of matured whiskey and its active polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Taguchi, A; Koshimizu, S; Suwa, Y; Yamada, Y; Shirasaka, N; Yoshizumi, H

    2007-04-01

    The quality of whiskey is known to improve remarkably by its storage over many years. This process is commonly termed "maturing." In this process, polyphenols derived from lignin and tannin of the barrel have an important role in not only forming the matured flavor and taste but also contributing to the advance of clustering ethanol and water in whiskey. It is also likely that polyphenols generally possess reactive oxygen (RO) scavenging activity. The present study evaluated the RO scavenging activity (free-radical scavenging activity, H(2)O(2) reduction activity under peroxidase coculture, and H(2)O(2)scavenging activity) of 24 single malt whiskeys with a maturation age of 10 to 30 y produced in Japanese, Scotch (Islay), or Scotch (Speyside and Highland) regions. Single malt whiskey not only showed RO scavenging activity but there was also a positive correlation between this activity and the maturation age of whiskey exceeding the difference resulting from the manufacturing region. A nonvolatile fraction derived from the barrel was responsible for RO scavenging activity. In particular, the contents of ellagic and gallic acids and lyoniresinol, the main polyphenolic compounds in whiskey, increased with maturation age. For the free-radical scavenging activity per molecule, each compound was 1.68 to 3.14 times that of trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E). The activities of ellagic acid, gallic acid, and lyoniresinol in the whiskey (Yamazaki 18) were equivalent to that of 80.3, 31.2, and 11.1 ppm trolox, respectively. Accordingly, the total activity of these 3 compounds accounted for about 20% of the activity of the whiskey (630.7 ppm trolox).

  18. Reactive oxygen scavenging activity of matured whiskey and its active polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Taguchi, A; Koshimizu, S; Suwa, Y; Yamada, Y; Shirasaka, N; Yoshizumi, H

    2007-04-01

    The quality of whiskey is known to improve remarkably by its storage over many years. This process is commonly termed "maturing." In this process, polyphenols derived from lignin and tannin of the barrel have an important role in not only forming the matured flavor and taste but also contributing to the advance of clustering ethanol and water in whiskey. It is also likely that polyphenols generally possess reactive oxygen (RO) scavenging activity. The present study evaluated the RO scavenging activity (free-radical scavenging activity, H(2)O(2) reduction activity under peroxidase coculture, and H(2)O(2)scavenging activity) of 24 single malt whiskeys with a maturation age of 10 to 30 y produced in Japanese, Scotch (Islay), or Scotch (Speyside and Highland) regions. Single malt whiskey not only showed RO scavenging activity but there was also a positive correlation between this activity and the maturation age of whiskey exceeding the difference resulting from the manufacturing region. A nonvolatile fraction derived from the barrel was responsible for RO scavenging activity. In particular, the contents of ellagic and gallic acids and lyoniresinol, the main polyphenolic compounds in whiskey, increased with maturation age. For the free-radical scavenging activity per molecule, each compound was 1.68 to 3.14 times that of trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E). The activities of ellagic acid, gallic acid, and lyoniresinol in the whiskey (Yamazaki 18) were equivalent to that of 80.3, 31.2, and 11.1 ppm trolox, respectively. Accordingly, the total activity of these 3 compounds accounted for about 20% of the activity of the whiskey (630.7 ppm trolox). PMID:17995817

  19. Non-plasmonic metal nanoparticles as visible light photocatalysts for the selective oxidation of aliphatic alcohols with molecular oxygen at near ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Tana, Tana; Guo, Xiao-Wei; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Yiming; Sarina, Sarina; Christopher, Phillip; Jia, Jianfeng; Wu, Haishun; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of Pd and Pt were used for the selective oxidation of aliphatic alcohols with molecular oxygen as an oxidant at near ambient temperatures under visible light irradiation. Distinct final products were obtained under identical reaction conditions, aliphatic esters formed over the Pd NPs while aldehydes formed over the Pt NPs. The reason for this different product selectivity is proven to be due to the much stronger interaction of Pd NPs with alcohol and aldehyde compared to Pt NPs. The photocatalytic activity is tuneable by light intensity or a moderate change in the reaction temperature. PMID:27606378

  20. Effects of Molecular Oxygen, Solvent, and Light on Iridium-Photoredox/Nickel Dual-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Oderinde, Martins S; Varela-Alvarez, Adrian; Aquila, Brian; Robbins, Daniel W; Johannes, Jeffrey W

    2015-08-01

    In order to achieve reproducibility during iridium-photoredox and nickel dual-catalyzed sp(3)-sp(2) carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, we investigated the role that molecular oxygen (O2), solvent and light-source (CF lamp or blue LED) play in a variety of Ir-photoredox mediated transformations. The presence of O2 was discovered to be important for catalyst activation when air-stable Ni(II) precatalysts were used in DMF under CF lamp irradiation; however, O2 was not required for catalysis when conducted with Ni(COD)2 in the same reaction system. O2 is believed to promote rapid reduction of the Ni(II) precatalyst by Ir(II) to Ni(0). In addition to O2, the effects that solvent and light-source have on the dual-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling reactions will be discussed. These findings have enabled us to develop a more robust dual-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling protocol.

  1. Using singlet molecular oxygen to probe the solute and temperature dependence of liquid-like regions in/on ice.

    PubMed

    Bower, Jonathan P; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-08-01

    Liquid-like regions (LLRs) are found at the surfaces and grain boundaries of ice and as inclusions within ice. These regions contain most of the solutes in ice and can be (photo)chemically active hotspots in natural snow and ice systems. If we assume all solutes partition into LLRs as a solution freezes, freezing-point depression predicts that the concentration of a solute in LLRs is higher than its concentration in the prefrozen (or melted) solution by the freeze-concentration factor (F). Here we use singlet molecular oxygen production to explore the effects of total solute concentration ([TS]) and temperature on experimentally determined values of F. For ice above its eutectic temperature, measured values of F agree well with freezing-point depression when [TS] is above ∼1 mmol/kg; at lower [TS] values, measurements of F are lower than predicted from freezing-point depression. For ice below its eutectic temperature, the influence of freezing-point depression on F is damped; the extreme case is with Na2SO4 as the solute, where F shows essentially no agreement with freezing-point depression. In contrast, for ice containing 3 mmol/kg NaCl, measured values of F agree well with freezing-point depression over a range of temperatures, including below the eutectic. Our experiments also reveal that the photon flux in LLRs increases in the presence of salts, which has implications for ice photochemistry in the lab and, perhaps, in the environment. PMID:23841666

  2. Iridium Oxide Coatings with Templated Porosity as Highly Active Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Bernicke, Michael; Ortel, Erik; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Ferreira de Araujo, Jorge; Strasser, Peter; Kraehnert, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Iridium oxide is the catalytic material with the highest stability in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performed under acidic conditions. However, its high cost and limited availability demand that IrO2 is utilized as efficiently as possible. We report the synthesis and OER performance of highly active mesoporous IrO2 catalysts with optimized surface area, intrinsic activity, and pore accessibility. Catalytic layers with controlled pore size were obtained by soft-templating with micelles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). A systematic study on the influence of the calcination temperature and film thickness on the morphology, phase composition, accessible surface area, and OER activity reveals that the catalytic performance is controlled by at least two independent factors, that is, accessible surface area and intrinsic activity per accessible site. Catalysts with lower crystallinity show higher intrinsic activity. The catalyst surface area increases linearly with film thickness. As a result of the templated mesopores, the pore surface remains fully active and accessible even for thick IrO2 films. Even the most active multilayer catalyst does not show signs of transport limitations at current densities as high as 75 mA cm(-2) . PMID:25958795

  3. Iridium Oxide Coatings with Templated Porosity as Highly Active Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Bernicke, Michael; Ortel, Erik; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Ferreira de Araujo, Jorge; Strasser, Peter; Kraehnert, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Iridium oxide is the catalytic material with the highest stability in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performed under acidic conditions. However, its high cost and limited availability demand that IrO2 is utilized as efficiently as possible. We report the synthesis and OER performance of highly active mesoporous IrO2 catalysts with optimized surface area, intrinsic activity, and pore accessibility. Catalytic layers with controlled pore size were obtained by soft-templating with micelles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). A systematic study on the influence of the calcination temperature and film thickness on the morphology, phase composition, accessible surface area, and OER activity reveals that the catalytic performance is controlled by at least two independent factors, that is, accessible surface area and intrinsic activity per accessible site. Catalysts with lower crystallinity show higher intrinsic activity. The catalyst surface area increases linearly with film thickness. As a result of the templated mesopores, the pore surface remains fully active and accessible even for thick IrO2 films. Even the most active multilayer catalyst does not show signs of transport limitations at current densities as high as 75 mA cm(-2) .

  4. Effects of carbohydrate on the internal oxygen concentration, oxygen uptake, and nitrogenase activity in detached pea nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    The interaction between carbon substrates and O{sub 2} and their effects on nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were examined in detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle). The internal O{sub 2} concentration was estimated from the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin measured by reflectance spectroscopy. Lowering the endogenous carbohydrate content of nodules by excising the shoots 16 hours before nodule harvest or by incubating detached nodules at 100 kPa O{sub 2} for 2 hours resulted in a 2- to 10-fold increase in internal O{sub 2}, and a decline in nitrogenase activity. Conversely, when detached nodules were supplied with 100 millimolar succinate, the internal O{sub 2} was lowered. Nitrogenase activity was stimulated by succinate but only at high external O{sub 2}. Oxygen uptake increased linearly with external O{sub 2} but was affected only slightly by the carbon treatments. The apparent diffusion resistance in the nodule cortex was similar in all of the treatments. Carbon substrates can thus affect nitrogenase activity indirectly by affecting the O{sub 2} concentration within detached nodules.

  5. Origin of Active Oxygen in a Ternary CuOx /Co3O4–CeO 2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Zili; Peng, Xihong; Binder, Andrew; Chai, Songhai; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we have studied CO oxidation over a ternary CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 catalyst and employed the techniques of N2 adsorption/desporption, XRD, TPR, TEM, in situ DRIFTS and QMS (Quadrupole mass spectrometer) to explore the origin of active oxygen. DRIFTS-QMS results with labeled 18O2 indicate that the origin of active oxygens in CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 obeys a model, called as queue mechanism. Namely gas-phase molecular oxygens are dissociated to atomic oxygens and then incorporate in oxygen vacancies located at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2 to form active crystalline oxygens, and these active oxygens diffuse to the CO-Cu+ sites thanks to the oxygen vacancy concentration magnitude and react with the activated CO to form CO2. This process, obeying a queue rule, provides active oxygens to form CO2 from gas-phase O2 via oxygen vacancies and crystalline oxygen at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2.

  6. Study of oxygen scavenging PET-based films activated by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2016-05-01

    In this work an active barrier system consisting of a thin and transparent film based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied. Dynamic oxygen absorption measurements were performed at different values of relative humidity and temperature, pointing out that humidity is a key factor in activating the oxidation of the polymer sample. Moreover, the thermal and optical properties of the films were investigated and a good correlation was found between the crystallinity increase and the consequent transparency reduction occurring after the oxygen absorption.

  7. Effect of arsenic on the activity of oxygen dissolved in dilute liquid copper solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walqui, H.; Seetharaman, S.; Staffansson, L. I.

    1985-06-01

    The influence of arsenic additions on the activity of oxygen in liquid copper was studied by the solid-electrolyte galvanic cell (-) Pt, W/Cu-O-As ∥ ZrO2-CaO ∥ NiO-Ni/Pt (+) in the temperature range 1373 to 1473 K. The activity coefficient of oxygen in liquid copper was found to be unaffected by the addition of arsenic. The interaction parameter values for group V B elements in the periodic table with respect to oxygen are discussed in the light of the solute interactions in copper.

  8. Oxygen requirements for formation and activity of the squalene expoxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on squalene epoxidase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. In cells grown in standing cultures, the epoxidase was localized mainly in the 'mitochondrial' fraction. Upon aeration, enzyme activity increased and the newly formed enzyme was associated with the 'microsomal' fraction. At 0.03 percent (vol/vol) oxygen, epoxidase levels doubled, whereas the ergosterol level was only slightly increased. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in epoxidase under these conditions. An apparent K sub m for oxygen of 0.38 percent (vol/vol) was determined from a crude particulate preparation for the epoxidase.

  9. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  10. The role of beaded activated carbon's surface oxygen groups on irreversible adsorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of surface oxygen groups to irreversible adsorption (aka heel formation) during cyclic adsorption/regeneration of organic vapors commonly found in industrial systems, including vehicle-painting operations. For this purpose, three chemically modified activated carbon samples, including two oxygen-deficient (hydrogen-treated and heat-treated) and one oxygen-rich sample (nitric acid-treated) were prepared. The samples were tested for 5 adsorption/regeneration cycles using a mixture of nine organic compounds. For the different samples, mass balance cumulative heel was 14 and 20% higher for oxygen functionalized and hydrogen-treated samples, respectively, relative to heat-treated sample. Thermal analysis results showed heel formation due to physisorption for the oxygen-deficient samples, and weakened physisorption combined with chemisorption for the oxygen-rich sample. Chemisorption was attributed to consumption of surface oxygen groups by adsorbed species, resulting in formation of high boiling point oxidation byproducts or bonding between the adsorbates and the surface groups. Pore size distributions indicated that different pore sizes contributed to heel formation - narrow micropores (<7Å) in the oxygen-deficient samples and midsize micropores (7-12Å) in the oxygen-rich sample. The results from this study help explain the heel formation mechanism and how it relates to chemically tailored adsorbent materials. PMID:27295065

  11. L-ascorbic acid quenching of singlet delta molecular oxygen in aqueous media: generalized antioxidant property of vitamin C

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.T.; Khan, A.U.

    1983-09-30

    L-ascorbic acid quenches singlet (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/) molecular oxygen in aqueous media (pH 6.8 for (/sup 1/H)H/sub 2/O and pD 7.2 for (/sup 2/H)D/sub 2/O) as measured directly by monitoring (0,0) /sup 1/..delta../sub g/ ..-->.. /sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/ emission at 1.28 micron. Singlet oxygen was generated at room temperature in the solutions via photosensitization of sodium chrysene sulfonate; this sulfonated polycyclic hydrocarbon was synthesized to provide a water soluble chromophore inert to usual dye-ascorbate photobleaching. A marked isotope effect is found; k/sub Q//sup H/sub 2/O/ is 3.3 times faster than k/sub Q//sup D/sub 2/O/, suggesting ascorbic acid is chemically quenching singlet oxygen.

  12. Synergistic H4NI-AcOH Catalyzed Oxidation of the Csp(3)-H Bonds of Benzylpyridines with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lanhui; Wang, Lianyue; Lv, Ying; Li, Guosong; Gao, Shuang

    2015-05-01

    The oxidation of benzylpyridines forming benzoylpyridines was achieved based on a synergistic H4NI-AcOH catalyst and molecular oxygen in high yield under solvent-free conditions. This is the first nonmetallic catalytic system for this oxidation transformation using molecular oxygen as the oxidant. The catalytic system has a wide scope of substrates and excellent chemoselectivity, and this procedure can also be scaled up. The study of a preliminary reaction mechanism demonstrated that the oxidation of the Csp(3)-H bonds of benzylpyridines was promoted by the pyridinium salts formed by AcOH and benzylpyridines. The synergistic effect of H4NI-AcOH was also demonstrated by control experiments. PMID:25885281

  13. The argon-induced decline in nitrogenase activity commences before the beginning of a decline in nodule oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Fischinger, Stephanie A; Schulze, Joachim

    2010-09-01

    Replacement of N(2) by argon in the air around nodules directs nitrogenase electron flow in its total onto H(+) resulting in increased nodule H(2) evolution (total nitrogenase activity (TNA)). However, argon application induces a so-called argon-induced decline in nitrogenase activity (Ar-ID) connected with decreased nodule oxygen permeability. Consequently, TNA measurements tend to underestimate total nitrogenase activity. It is unclear whether the decline in oxygen diffusion into nodules induces the Ar-ID, or whether a decline in nitrogenase activity is followed by lower nodule O(2) uptake. The objective of the present work was to examine the time sequence of the decline in nodule H(2) evolution and O(2) uptake after argon application. In addition, the reliability of TNA values, taken as quickly as possible after the switch to Ar/O(2), was tested through comparative measurement of (15)N(2) uptake of the same plants. Short-term TNA measurements in an optimized gas exchange measurement system yielded reliable results, verified by parallel determination of (15)N(2) uptake. A five min application of Ar/O(2) was without effect on the subsequent H(2) evolution in ambient air. A parallel experiment on control plants revealed that a decrease in nodule oxygen uptake began several minutes after the onset of the decline in H(2) evolution. We conclude that the primary effect of the replacement of N(2) by argon differs from oxygen diffusion control. A gas exchange system allowing an immediate taking of TNA yields reliable results and does not disturb nodule activity. Gas exchange measurements provide a powerful tool for studying nodule physiology and should be combined with material from molecular studies.

  14. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-14

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs. PMID:27083744

  15. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs.

  16. Interpolation constants for calculation of transmittance and rate of dissociation of molecular oxygen in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. D.; Mahle, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Values of band oscillator strengths and rotational line widths for the Schumann-Runge band system have been used to derive interpolation constants from which the transmittance and rate of dissociation of molecular oxygen can be calculated. These constants, valid for temperatures between 150 and 300 K and for column densities between 1 x 10 to the 17th power/cm sq and 7 x 10 to the 24th power/cm sq, cover the wavelength range 1750 and 2050A.

  17. Monitoring helicase activity with molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Belon, Craig A; Frick, David N

    2008-10-01

    A high-throughput, fluorescence-based helicase assay using molecular beacons is described. The assay is tested using the NS3 helicase encoded by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and is shown to accurately monitor helicase action on both DNA and RNA. In the assay, a ssDNA oligonucleotide molecular beacon, featuring a fluorescent moiety attached to one end and a quencher attached to the other, is annealed to a second longer DNA or RNA oligonucleotide. Upon strand separation by a helicase and ATP, the beacon strand forms an intramolecular hairpin that brings the tethered fluorescent and quencher molecules into juxtaposition, quenching fluorescence. Unlike currently available real-time helicase assays, the molecular beacon-based helicase assay is irreversible. As such, it does not require the addition of extra DNA strands to prevent products from re-annealing. Several variants of the new assay are described and experimentally verified using both Cy3 and Cy5 beacons, including one based on a sequence from the HCV genome. The HCV genome-based molecular beacon helicase assay is used to demonstrate how such an assay can be used in high-throughput screens and to analyze HCV helicase inhibitors.

  18. Powerful Molecular Outflows in Nearby Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain; Meléndez, Marcio

    2014-07-01

    We report the results from a systematic search for molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows with Herschel-PACS† in a sample of 43 nearby (z < 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. We find that the character of the OH feature (strength of the absorption relative to the emission) correlates with that of the 9.7-μm silicate feature, a measure of obscuration in ULIRGs. Unambiguous evidence for molecular outflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than -50 km s-1, is seen in 26 (70%) of the 37 OH-detected targets, suggesting a wide-angle (~ 145°) outflow geometry. Conversely, unambiguous evidence for molecular inflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than +50 km s-1, is seen in only 4 objects, suggesting a planar or filamentary geometry for the inflowing gas. Terminal outflow velocities of ~ -1000 km s-1 are measured in several objects, but median outflow velocities are typically ~ -200 km s-1. While the outflow velocities show no statistically significant dependence on the star formation rate, they are distinctly more blueshifted among systems with large AGN fractions and luminosities [log (L AGN/L ⊙) >= 11.8 +/- 0.3]. The quasars in these systems play a dominant role in driving the molecular outflows. In contrast, the most AGN dominated systems, where OH is seen purely in emission, show relatively modest OH line widths, despite their large AGN luminosities, perhaps indicating that molecular outflows subside once the quasar has cleared a path through the obscuring material.

  19. Charge transfer, bonding conditioning and solvation effect in the activation of the oxygen reduction reaction on unclustered graphitic-nitrogen-doped graphene.

    PubMed

    Ferre-Vilaplana, Adolfo; Herrero, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    The monodentate associative chemisorption of molecular oxygen on unclustered graphitic-nitrogen-doped graphene requires two nitrogen dopants per activated molecule. Significant charge transfers from regions corresponding to distant nitrogen-dopants, the presence of a nitrogen-dopant adjacent to the carbon atom acting as an active site, which favours its transition from a sp(2) hybridization state to sp(3), and the solvation effect turn the investigated mechanism to a favourable process.

  20. Oxygen vacancy induced photoluminescence and ferromagnetism in SrTiO{sub 3} thin films by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wenfei; Yang, Jing; Bai, Wei; Tang, Kai; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-10-21

    SrTiO{sub 3} thin films were epitaxially grown on (100) SrTiO{sub 3} substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The temperature for growth of the films was optimized, which was indicated by x-ray diffraction and further confirmed by microstructural characterization. Photoluminescence spectra show that oxygen-vacancy contributes to red and blue luminescence of oxygen-deficient post-annealed films, and a red shift was observed in blue region. On the other hand, ferromagnetism in film form SrTiO{sub 3} was observed from 5 K to 400 K and could be further enhanced with decreasing oxygen plasma partial pressure in annealing processes, which might be explained by the theory involving d{sup 0} magnetism related to oxygen-vacancy. From the cooperative investigations of optical and magnetic properties, we conclude that intrinsic defects, especially oxygen-vacancy, can induce and enhance luminescence and magnetism in SrTiO{sub 3} films.

  1. Correction for intravascular activity in the oxygen-15 steady-state technique is independent of the regional hematocrit

    SciTech Connect

    Lammertsma, A.A.; Baron, J.C.; Jones, T.

    1987-06-01

    The oxygen-15 steady-state technique to measure the regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen requires a correction for the nonextracted intravascular molecular oxygen-15. To perform this correction, an additional procedure is carried out using RBCs labeled with /sup 11/CO or C/sup 15/O. The previously reported correction method, however, required knowledge of the regional cerebral to large vessel hematocrit ratio. A closer examination of the underlying model eliminated this ratio. Both molecular oxygen and carbon monoxide are carried by RBCs and are therefore similarly affected by a change in hematocrit.

  2. Molecular emission in chemically active protostellar outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.

    2011-12-01

    Protostellar outflows play an important role in the dynamical and chemical evolution of cloud through shocks. The Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) brings new insight both on the molecular content and the physical conditions in protostellar shocks through high spectral and angular resolution studies of the emission of major gas cooling agents and hydrides. The Herschel/CHESS key-program is carrying out an in depth study of the prototypical shock region L1157-B1. Analysis of the line profiles detected allows to constrain the formation/destruction route of various molecular species, in relation with the predictions of MHD shock models. The Herschel/WISH key-program investigates the properties and origin of water emission in a broad sample of protostellar outflows and envelopes. Implications of the first results for future studies on mass-loss phenomena are discussed.

  3. The effect of mayfly (Hexagenia spp.) burrowing activity on sediment oxygen demand in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, William J.; Soster, Frederick M.; Matisoff, Gerald; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies support the hypothesis that large numbers of infaunal burrow-irrigating organisms in the western basin of Lake Erie may increase significantly the sediment oxygen demand, thus enhancing the rate of hypolimnetic oxygen depletion. We conducted laboratory experiments to quantify burrow oxygen dynamics and increased oxygen demand resulting from burrow irrigation using two different year classes of Hexagenia spp. nymphs from western Lake Erie during summer, 2006. Using oxygen microelectrodes and hot film anemometry, we simultaneously determined oxygen concentrations and burrow water flow velocities. Burrow oxygen depletion rates ranged from 21.7 mg/nymph/mo for 15 mm nymphs at 23 °C to 240.7 mg/nymph/mo for 23 mm nymphs at 13 °C. Sealed microcosm experiments demonstrated that mayflies increase the rate of oxygen depletion by 2-5 times that of controls, depending on size of nymph and water temperature, with colder waters having greater impact. At natural population densities, nymph pumping activity increased total sediment oxygen demand 0.3-2.5 times compared to sediments with no mayflies and accounted for 22-71% of the total sediment oxygen demand. Extrapolating laboratory results to the natural system suggest that Hexagenia spp. populations may exert a significant control on oxygen depletion during intermittent stratification. This finding may help explain some of the fluctuations in Hexagenia spp. population densities in western Lake Erie and suggests that mayflies, by causing their own population collapse irrespective of other environmental conditions, may need longer term averages when used as a bio-indicator of the success of pollution-abatement programs in western Lake Erie and possibly throughout the Great Lakes.

  4. Activation kinetics of zipper molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tracy W; Chen, Juan; Burgess, Laura; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang; Zhan, Lixin; Liu, Wing-Ki; Ha, Bae-Yeun

    2015-01-01

    Proteases play key roles in the regulation of normal cellular function, and thus, their deregulation leads to many disease states. Molecular beacons are promising protease-imaging probes for the detection and characterization of disease as well as for the evaluation of treatment. Inspired by this, we examined the efficiency of zipper molecular beacons (ZMBs) as imaging probes. First, we showed experimentally that the symmetrical ZMB (zip5e5r), bearing 5-arginine and 5-glutamate arms, is as efficient as the asymmetrical zip5e8r in enhancing cell uptake but without the dark toxicity exhibited by the asymmetric zipper. Also, zip5e5r was shown to dissociate more efficiently at pH’s greater than 5. Using a simple two-state binding model, we attributed this to a larger number of charge-pair conformations for zip5e8r. We then measured the ability of soluble matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to cleave zip5e5r, and compared their cleavage efficiency with the original photodynamic molecular beacon (PMB). Finally, as a first step toward understanding our observations quantitatively, we simulated the native structures of the peptides GPLGLARK and EGPLGLARRK with charged termini NH3(+) and COO(-) that approximate the PMB and ZMB (with one pair of arginine/glutamate electrostatic zipper), respectively. We concluded that inclusion of the zipper changes the native structure of the MBs, altering the cleavage efficiency of different MMPs.

  5. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsoy, Olga V; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis. PMID:27617010

  6. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsoy, Olga V.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis. PMID:27617010

  7. Singlet oxygen scavenging activity and cytotoxicity of essential oils from rutaceae.

    PubMed

    Ao, Yoko; Satoh, Kazue; Shibano, Katsushige; Kawahito, Yukari; Shioda, Seiji

    2008-07-01

    Since we have been exposed to excessive amounts of stressors, aromatherapy for the relaxation has recently become very popular recently. However, there is a problem which responds to light with the essential oil used by aromatherapy. It is generally believed that singlet oxygen is implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases such as light-induced skin disorders and inflammatory responses. Here we studied whether essential oils can effectively scavenge singlet oxygen upon irradiation, using the electron spin resonance (ESR) method. Green light was used to irradiate twelve essential oils from rutaceae. Among these twelve essential oils, eight were prepared by the expression (or the compression) method (referred to as E oil), and four samples were prepared by the steam distillation method (referred to as SD oil). Five E oils enhanced singlet oxygen production. As these essential oils may be phototoxic, it should be used for their use whit light. Two E oils and three SD oils showed singlet oxygen scavenging activity. These results may suggest that the antioxidant activity of essential oils are judged from their radical scavenging activity. Essential oils, which enhance the singlet oxygen production and show higher cytotoxicity, may contain much of limonene. These results suggest that limonene is involved not only in the enhancement of singlet oxygen production but also in the expression of cytotoxic activity, and that attention has to be necessary for use of blended essential oils.

  8. Stable isotope analysis of molecular oxygen from silicates and oxides using CO2 laser extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    A laser-excited system for determination of the oxygen isotope composition of small quantities of silicate and oxide minerals was constructed and tested at JSC. This device is the first reported to use a commercially available helium cryostat to transfer and purify oxygen gas quantitatively within the system. The system uses oxygen gas instead of the conventional CO2 for mass spectrometer analyses. This modification of technique permits determination of all three stable oxygen isotopes, an essential requirement for oxygen isotope analysis of meteoritic material. Tests of the system included analysis of standard silicate materials NBS 28 and UWMG2 garnet, six SNC meteorites, and inclusions and chondrules from the Allende meteorite. Calibration with terrestrial standards was excellent. Meteorite values are close to published values and show no evidence of terrestrial oxygen contamination. The one limitation observed is that, in some runs on fine-grained SNC matrix material, sample results were affected by other samples in the sample holder within the reaction chamber. This reemphasizes the need for special precautions in dealing with fine-grained, reactive samples. Performance of the JSC instrument compares favorably with that of any other instrument currently producing published oxygen isotope data.

  9. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  10. Reactive oxygen species inhibit polycystin-2 (TRPP2) cation channel activity in term human syncytiotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Montalbetti, N; Cantero, M R; Dalghi, M G; Cantiello, H F

    2008-06-01

    Pregnancy is often associated with oxidative stress (OS) and lower antioxidant defences, which are both implicated in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, free radical-induced birth defects, and abortions, as well as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), where products of lipid peroxidation are increased. The molecular target(s) of increased oxygen free radicals and consequent lipid peroxidation in the human placenta remains ill defined. The human syncytiotrophoblast (hST) expresses abundant polycystin-2 (PC2, TRPP2), a TRP-type Ca(2+)-permeable non-selective cation channel. Here, we explored the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on PC2 channel activity of term hST. Apical membranes of the hST were reconstituted in a lipid bilayer chamber. Addition of either hydrogen-peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) to the cis chamber (intracellular side) rapidly and completely inhibited PC2-mediated cation channel activity in reconstituted hST vesicles. A dose-response titration with increasing concentrations of H(2)O(2) gave an IC(50)=131 nM. The effect of H(2)O(2) on the isolated protein from in vitro transcribed/translated material was significantly different. H(2)O(2) inhibited PC2 cation channel activity, with a much lower affinity (IC(50)=193 microM). To correlate these findings with H(2)O(2)-induced lipid peroxidation, TBARS where measured in hST apical membranes incubated with H(2)O(2). Increased TBARS by exposure of hST apical membranes to H(2)O(2) (625 microM) returned to control value in the presence of catalase (167 microg/ml). Taken together these data indicate that ROS affect PC2 channel function by targetting both membrane lipids and the channel protein. Thus, OS in human pregnancy may be linked to dysregulation of channels such as PC2, which allow the transport of Ca(2+) into the placenta. Oxidative complications in pregnancy may implicate dysfunctional cation transfer between mother and fetus. PMID:18417208

  11. Activation energies to characterize ease of removal of various kinds of oxygen from bismuth molybdate

    SciTech Connect

    Dadyburjor, D.B.; Ruckenstein, E.

    1980-06-01

    Calculations by the method of minimum energy paths showed that oxygen(-2) anions are more easily displaced from molybdenum(VI) or from the layer between molybdenum and bismuth than from bismuth(III) of a 2:1 bismuth molybdate (Bi/sub 2/MoO/sub 6/). However, available experimental evidence suggests that the oxygen of the bismuth layer is active in the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons; apparently the presence of the hydrocarbon decreases the energy barrier required for transfer of the oxygen anion, and anion vacancies generated, e.g., in a prereduction of the catalyst, also decrease the energy barrier.

  12. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg{sup 2+} ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn{sup 2+}); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg{sup 2+} causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn{sup 2+} release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg{sup 2+}-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  13. Ferrous iron oxidation by molecular oxygen under acidic conditions: The effect of citrate, EDTA and fulvic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Adele M.; Griffin, Philippa J.; Waite, T. David

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the rates of Fe(II) oxidation by molecular oxygen in the presence of citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were determined over the pH range 4.0-5.5 and, for all of the ligands investigated, found to be substantially faster than oxidation rates in the absence of any ligand. EDTA was found to be particularly effective in enhancing the rate of Fe(II) oxidation when sufficient EDTA was available to complex all Fe(II) present in solution, with a kinetic model of the process found to adequately describe all results obtained. When Fe(II) was only partially complexed by EDTA, reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heterogeneous Fe(II) oxidation were found to contribute significantly to the removal rate of iron from solution at different stages of oxidation. This was possible due to the rapid rate at which EDTA enhanced Fe(II) oxidation and formed ROS and Fe(III). The rapid rate of Fe(III) generation facilitated the formation of free ferric ion activities in excess of those required for ferric oxyhydroxide precipitation following Fe(III)-EDTA dissociation. In comparison, the rate of Fe(II) oxidation was slower in the presence of citrate, and therefore the concentrations of free Fe(III) able to form in the initial stages of Fe(II) oxidation were much lower than those formed in the presence of EDTA, despite the resultant Fe(III)-citrate complex being less stable than that of Fe(III)-EDTA. The slower rate of citrate enhanced oxidation also resulted in slower rates of ROS generation, and, as such, oxidation of the remaining inorganic Fe(II) species by ROS was negligible. Overall, this study demonstrates that organic ligands may substantially enhance the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Even under circumstances where the ligand is not present at sufficient concentrations to complex all of the Fe(II) in solution, ensuing oxidative processes may sustain an enhanced rate of Fe(II) oxidation relative to that of

  14. Oxygen control of breathing by an olfactory receptor activated by lactate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andy J.; Ortega, Fabian E.; Riegler, Johannes; Madison, Daniel V.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animals have evolved homeostatic responses to changes in oxygen availability that act on different time scales. Although the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional pathway that controls long term responses to low oxygen (hypoxia) has been established1, the pathway that mediates acute responses to hypoxia in mammals is not well understood. Here we show that the olfactory receptor Olfr78 is highly and selectively expressed in oxygen-sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body, a chemosensory organ at the carotid artery bifurcation that monitors blood oxygen and stimulates breathing within seconds when oxygen declines2. Olfr78 mutants fail to increase ventilation in hypoxia but respond normally to hypercapnia. Glomus cells are present in normal numbers and appear structurally intact, but hypoxia-induced carotid body activity is diminished. Lactate, a metabolite that rapidly accumulates in hypoxia and induces hyperventilation3–6, activates Olfr78 in heterologous expression experiments, induces calcium transients in glomus cells, and stimulates carotid sinus nerve activity through Olfr78. We propose that in addition to its role in olfaction, Olfr78 acts as a hypoxia sensor in the breathing circuit by sensing lactate produced when oxygen levels decline. PMID:26560302

  15. Limits on the Natural Oxygen-18 Abundance of Cellulose: Intra-molecular Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, L.; Jahren, H.; Anderson, W.; Pinzon, M. C.

    2005-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of tree-ring cellulose is an often-invoked quantitative proxy for multiple environmental factors, including paleotemperature, paleohumidity and paleoprecipitation patterns. A broad survey of aerial and aquatic plants reveals an upper limit to the 18O enrichment of cellulose relative to water at the site of cellulose synthesis, which we explain via the comparison of individual oxygen atoms within the cellulose molecule. We collected stems from various geographical regions, extracted stem water and cellulose and determined the oxygen isotope ratios of these two components. The cellulose was hydrolyzed to its glucose moieties and derivatized to determine the oxygen isotope ratios of the oxygens attached to carbon 3, 4, 5, 6 of the glucose moieties, which allowed us to calculate the oxygen isotope ratios of the oxygen attached to the carbon 2 of the glucose moieties. A compilation of results from our collection and from previous publications shows that δ18O values of cellulose increase with δ18O values of stem water only for samples having stem water with δ18O values below -10‰ (SMOW). However, the δ18O values of stem cellulose levels off and remains constant for stems having water with δ18O values greater than -10‰. This pattern suggests a limit on the enrichment of stem (and by inference tree ring) cellulose. This limitation had previously been ascribed to environmental factors affecting leaf water (e.g., humidity, stomatal conductance, solute potential). A compilation of the δ18O values of cellulose from aquatic plants versus that of their ambient water, however, shows the same general pattern which has been previously explained on the basis of evaporation rates and heterogeneities of lake water. We disprove the previous explanations by demonstrating differential isotopic effects on the oxygen atoms of the cellulose molecule. Our observation on the δ18O values of oxygen attached to carbon 2 versus those attached to carbon 3

  16. Catalytic activity trends of oxygen reduction reaction for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-11-30

    We report the intrinsic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline palladium, platinum, ruthenium, gold, and glassy carbon surfaces in 0.1 M LiClO(4) 1,2-dimethoxyethane via rotating disk electrode measurements. The nonaqueous Li(+)-ORR activity of these surfaces primarily correlates to oxygen adsorption energy, forming a "volcano-type" trend. The activity trend found on the polycrystalline surfaces was in good agreement with the trend in the discharge voltage of Li-O(2) cells catalyzed by nanoparticle catalysts. Our findings provide insights into Li(+)-ORR mechanisms in nonaqueous media and design of efficient air electrodes for Li-air battery applications.

  17. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Terence M.; Nyati, Shyam; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  18. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  19. Lewis Acid Pairs for the Activation of Biomass-derived Oxygenates in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Yuriy

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project is to understand the mechanistic aspects behind the cooperative activation of oxygenates by catalytic pairs in aqueous media. Specifically, we will investigate how the reactivity of a solid Lewis acid can be modulated by pairing the active site with other catalytic sites at the molecular level, with the ultimate goal of enhancing activation of targeted functional groups. Although unusual catalytic properties have been attributed to the cooperative effects promoted by such catalytic pairs, virtually no studies exist detailing the use heterogeneous water-tolerant Lewis pairs. A main goal of this work is to devise rational pathways for the synthesis of porous heterogeneous catalysts featuring isolated Lewis pairs that are active in the transformation of biomass-derived oxygenates in the presence of bulk water. Achieving this technical goal will require closely linking advanced synthesis techniques; detailed kinetic and mechanistic investigations; strict thermodynamic arguments; and comprehensive characterization studies of both materials and reaction intermediates. For the last performance period (2014-2015), two technical aims were pursued: 1) C-C coupling using Lewis acid and base pairs in Lewis acidic zeolites. Tin-, zirconium-, and hafnium containing zeolites (e.g., Sn-, Zr-, and Hf-Beta) are versatile solid Lewis acids that selectively activate carbonyl functional groups. In this aim, we demonstrate that these zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. 2) One-pot synthesis of MWW zeolite nanosheets for activation of bulky substrates. Through

  20. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y. . E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

  1. A tumor mRNA-triggered photodynamic molecular beacon based on oligonucleotide hairpin control of singlet oxygen production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Lovell, Jonathan F; Lo, Pui-Chi; Stefflova, Klara; Niedre, Mark; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang

    2008-07-01

    We report a new class of photodynamic molecular beacon (PMB) with tumor specific mRNA-triggered control of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) production. The beacon contains a single-stranded oligonucleotide linker that forms a stem-loop structure (hairpin) in which the sequence is an antisense oligonucleotide (AS-ON) complementary to a target mRNA. The stem is formed by the annealing of two complementary arm sequences that are on either side of the loop sequence. A photosensitizer molecule (PS) is attached to the end of one arm and a quencher (Q) is similarly attached to the other end. The conformationally-restricted hairpin forces Q to efficiently silence the photoreactivity of PS. In the presence of target mRNA, the hairpin opens and the PS is no longer silenced. Upon irradiating with light, the PS then emits fluorescence and generates cytotoxic (1)O(2). To show proof of concept, we have synthesized a c-raf-1 mRNA-triggered PMB using pyropheophorbide (Pyro) as PS, carotenoid as Q and c-raf-1 mRNA-targeted AS-ON as the loop sequence. We show that the (1)O(2) production of Pyro is quenched in its native state by 15-fold and is restored 9-fold by the addition of the target RNA. Comparing this to our recently reported self-folding peptide linker-based PMB, the hairpin effect results in an enhanced (1)O(2) quenching efficiency that decreases the residual (1)O(2) production by over 3-fold, thus providing enhanced control of (1)O(2) production upon target-linker interactions. When incubated with c-raf-1 expressing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells, the PMB displayed efficient cellular uptake and subsequently effective PDT activation in targeted cells.

  2. Using the singlet oxygen scavenging property of carotenoid in photodynamic molecular beacons to minimize photodamage to non-targeted cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Jarvi, Mark; Lo, Pui-Chi; Stefflova, Klara; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang

    2007-12-01

    We recently introduced the concept of photodynamic molecular beacons (PMB) for selective control of photodynamic therapy (PDT). The PMB consists of a peptide linker that is sequence specific to a cancer-associated protease. A photosensitizer (PS) and a singlet oxygen (1O2) quencher are conjugated to the opposite ends of this linker. Proximity of the PS and quencher can efficiently inhibit 1O2 generation. In the presence of a targeted protease, the substrate sequence is cleaved and the PS and quencher will separate so that the PS can be photo-activated. There are two ways to optimize the PMB selectivity to cancer cells. The first is to increase the protease specificity to targeted cells and the second is to minimize the phototoxicity of intact (uncleaved) PMBs in non-targeted (normal) cells. Carotenoids (CARs) are well known in nature for their role in quenching excited states of PS and in directly scavenging 1O2. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the CAR with dual quenching modes (PS excited states deactivation and 1O2 scavenging) can be used to minimize the photodamage of intact PMBs to non-targeted cells. Thus, we synthesized a beacon (PPC) with a caspase-3 cleavable peptide linking a PS and a CAR quencher. It was confirmed that CAR deactivates the PS excited states and also directly scavenges 1O2. Moreover, the in vitro PDT response showed that CAR completely shuts off the photodynamic effect in non-targeted HepG(2) cells, while PS without CAR (control) remains highly potent even at a much lower (30-fold) dose.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and molecular hydrogen in oxygen-rich planetary nebulae: the case of NGC 6720

    PubMed Central

    Cox, N. L. J.; Pilleri, P.; Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Joblin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Evolved stars are primary sources for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dust grains. Their circumstellar chemistry is usually designated as either oxygen-rich or carbon-rich, although dual-dust chemistry objects, whose infrared spectra reveal both silicate- and carbon-dust features, are also known. The exact origin and nature of this dual-dust chemistry is not yet understood. Spitzer-IRS mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging of the nearby, oxygen-rich planetary nebula NGC 6720 reveals the presence of the 11.3 μm aromatic (PAH) emission band. It is attributed to emission from neutral PAHs, since no band is observed in the 7–8 μm range. The spatial distribution of PAHs is found to closely follow that of the warm clumpy molecular hydrogen emission. Emission from both neutral PAHs and warm H2 is likely to arise from photo-dissociation regions associated with dense knots that are located within the main ring. The presence of PAHs together with the previously derived high abundance of free carbon (relative to CO) suggest that the local conditions in an oxygen-rich environment can also become conducive to in-situ formation of large carbonaceous molecules, such as PAHs, via a bottom-up chemical pathway. In this scenario, the same stellar source can enrich the interstellar medium with both oxygen-rich dust and large carbonaceous molecules. PMID:26924856

  4. Oxygen Activation at Mononuclear Nonheme Iron Centers: A Superoxo Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anusree; Cranswick, Matthew A.; Chakraborti, Mrinmoy; Paine, Tapan K.; Fujisawa, Kiyoshi; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Dioxygen activation by iron enzymes is responsible for many metabolically important transformations in biology. Often a high-valent iron-oxo oxidant is proposed to form upon dioxygen activation at a mononuclear nonheme iron center, presumably via intervening iron-superoxo and iron-peroxo species. While iron(IV)-oxo intermediates have been trapped and characterized in enzymes and models, less is known of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species. Utilizing a synthetic model for the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent monoiron enzymes, [(TpiPr2)FeII(O2CC(O)CH3)], we have obtained indirect evidence for the formation of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species, which can undergo one-electron reduction, hydrogen-atom transfer, or conversion to an iron(IV)-oxo species, depending on the reaction conditions. These results demonstrate the various roles the iron(III)-superoxo species can play in the course of dioxygen activation at a nonheme iron center. PMID:20380464

  5. Conversion of {Fe(NO)2}10 dinitrosyl iron to nitrato iron(III) species by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Skodje, Kelsey M; Williard, Paul G; Kim, Eunsuk

    2012-07-14

    A new {Fe(NO)(2)}(10) dinitrosyl iron complex possessing a 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline ligand has been prepared. This complex exhibits dioxygenase activity, converting NO to nitrate (NO(3)(-)) anions. During the oxygenation reaction, formation of reactive nitrating species is implicated, as shown in the effective o-nitration with a phenolic substrate.

  6. Photocatalytic evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen over La-doped NaTaO3 particles: Effect of different cocatalysts (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Irina; Kandiel, Tarek; Hakki, Amer; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef W.

    2015-09-01

    To solve the global energy and environmental issues highly efficient systems for solar energy conversion and storage are needed. One of them involves the photocatalytic conversion of solar energy into the storable fuel molecular hydrogen via the water splitting process utilizing metal-oxide semiconductors as catalysts. Since photocatalytic water splitting is still a rather poorly understood reaction, fundamental research in this field is required. Herein, the photocatalytic activity for water splitting was investigated utilizing La-doped NaTaO3 as a model photocatalyst. The activity of La-doped NaTaO3 was assessed by the determination of the overall quantum yield of molecular hydrogen and molecular oxygen evolution. In pure water La-doped NaTaO3 exhibits rather poor activity for the photocatalytic H2 evolution whereby no O2 was detected. To enhance the photocatalytic activity the surface of La-doped NaTaO3 was modified with various cocatalysts including noble metals (Pt, Au and Rh) and metal oxides (NiO, CuO, CoO, AgO and RuO2). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated in pure water, in aqueous methanol solution, and in aqueous silver nitrate solution. The results reveal that cocatalysts such as RuO2 or CuO exhibiting the highest catalytic activity for H2 evolution from pure water, possess, however, the lowest activity for O2 evolution from aqueous silver nitrate solution. La-doped NaTaO3 modified with Pt shows the highest quantum yield of 33 % with respect to the H2 evolution in the presence of methanol. To clarify the role of methanol in such a photocatalytic system, long-term investigations and isotopic studies were performed. The underlying mechanisms of methanol oxidation were elucidated.

  7. Highly vibrationally excited CO generated in a low-temperature chemical reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jans, E.; Frederickson, K.; Yurkovich, M.; Musci, B.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A chemical flow reactor is used to study the vibrational population distribution of CO produced by a reaction between carbon vapor generated in an arc discharge and molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate formation of highly vibrationally excited CO, up to vibrational level v = 14, at low temperatures, T = 400-450 K, with population inversion at v = 4-7, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of reaction enthalpy. The results show feasibility of development of a new CO chemical laser using carbon vapor and oxygen as reactants.

  8. Interaction of molecular oxygen with the donor side of photosystem II after destruction of the water-oxidizing complex.

    PubMed

    Yanykin, D V; Khorobrykh, A A; Zastrizhnaya, O M; Klimov, V V

    2014-03-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a pigment-protein complex of thylakoid membrane of higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria where light energy is used for oxidation of water and reduction of plastoquinone. Light-dependent reactions (generation of excited states of pigments, electron transfer, water oxidation) taking place in PSII can lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species. In this review attention is focused on the problem of interaction of molecular oxygen with the donor site of PSII, where after the removal of manganese from the water-oxidizing complex illumination induces formation of long-lived states (P680(+•) and TyrZ(•)) capable of oxidizing surrounding organic molecules to form radicals.

  9. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  10. Higher respiratory activity decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen release and increases life span in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Barros, Mario H; Bandy, Brian; Tahara, Erich B; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2004-11-26

    Increased replicative longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because of calorie restriction has been linked to enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity. Here we have further investigated how mitochondrial respiration affects yeast life span. We found that calorie restriction by growth in low glucose increased respiration but decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production relative to oxygen consumption. Calorie restriction also enhanced chronological life span. The beneficial effects of calorie restriction on mitochondrial respiration, reactive oxygen species release, and replicative and chronological life span could be mimicked by uncoupling agents such as dinitrophenol. Conversely, chronological life span decreased in cells treated with antimycin (which strongly increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation) or in yeast mutants null for mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (which removes superoxide radicals) and for RTG2 (which participates in retrograde feedback signaling between mitochondria and the nucleus). These results suggest that yeast aging is linked to changes in mitochondrial metabolism and oxidative stress and that mild mitochondrial uncoupling can increase both chronological and replicative life span.

  11. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts.

  12. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts. PMID:26178185

  13. Catalytic methods using molecular oxygen for treatment of PMMS and ECLSS waste streams, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation has proven to be an effective addition to the baseline sorption, ion exchange water reclamation technology which will be used on Space Station Freedom (SSF). Low molecular weight, polar organics such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, and thiocarbamides which are poorly removed by the baseline multifiltration (MF) technology can be oxidized to carbon dioxide at low temperature (121 C). The catalytic oxidation process by itself can reduce the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) to below 500 ppb for solutions designed to model these waste waters. Individual challenges by selected contaminants have shown only moderate selectivity towards particular organic species. The combined technology is applicable to the more complex waste water generated in the Process Materials Management System (PMMS) and Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard SSF. During the phase 3 Core Module Integrated Facility (CMIF) water recovery tests at NASA MSFC, real hygiene waste water and humidity condensate were processed to meet potable specifications by the combined technology. A kinetic study of catalytic oxidation demonstrates that the Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation for heterogeneous catalysts accurately represent the kinetic behavior. From this relationship, activation energy and rate constants for acetone were determined.

  14. Antioxidative activity and growth regulation of Brassicaceae induced by oxygen radical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Ono, Reoto; Shiratani, Masaharu; Yonesu, Akira

    2015-06-01

    The growth regulation characteristics of plants are investigated when plant seeds are irradiated with atmospheric discharge plasma. Enhancement of the germination and lengths of the stem and root of plants are observed after seeding. The total length of the stem and root increases approximately 1.6 times after a cultivation period of 72 h. The growth regulation effect is found to be maintained for 80 h of cultivation after seeding. The growth regulation originates from the change in the antioxidative activity of plant cells induced by active oxygen species generated in the oxygen plasma, which leads to the production of growth factor in plants.

  15. On-Orbit Checkout and Activation of the ISS Oxygen Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Prokhorov, Kimberlee S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has developed and; deployed an Oxygen Generation System (OGS) into the Destiny Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The major. assembly; included in this system is the Oxygen Generator Assembly. (OGA) which was developed under NASA contract by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc. This paper summarizes the installation of the system into the Destiny Module, its initial checkout and periodic preventative maintenance activities, and its operational activation. Trade studies and analyses that were conducted with the goal of mitigating on-orbit operational risks are also discussed.

  16. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-12-01

    It has been considered that drinking oxygenated water improves oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improve immune functions. The present study evaluated the effects of oxygenated drinking water on immune function in pigs. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation, interleukin-1β expression level and the CD4(+):CD8(+) cell ratio in pigs. During Salmonella Typhimurium infection, total leukocytes and relative cytokines expression levels were significantly increased in pigs consuming oxygenated water compared with pigs consuming tap water. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during S. Typhimurium Infection.

  17. The relationship between brain cortical activity and brain oxygenation in the prefrontal cortex during hypergravity exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig; Goswami, Nandu; Robinson, Ryan; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Schneider, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Artificial gravity has been proposed as a method to counteract the physiological deconditioning of long-duration spaceflight; however, the effects of hypergravity on the central nervous system has had little study. The study aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between prefrontal cortex brain activity and prefrontal cortex oxygenation during exposure to hypergravity. Twelve healthy participants were selected to undergo hypergravity exposure aboard a short-arm human centrifuge. Participants were exposed to hypergravity in the +Gz axis, starting from 0.6 +Gz for women, and 0.8 +Gz for men, and gradually increasing by 0.1 +Gz until the participant showed signs of syncope. Brain cortical activity was measured using electroencephalography (EEG) and localized to the prefrontal cortex using standard low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Prefrontal cortex oxygenation was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A significant increase in prefrontal cortex activity (P < 0.05) was observed during hypergravity exposure compared with baseline. Prefrontal cortex oxygenation was significantly decreased during hypergravity exposure, with a decrease in oxyhemoglobin levels (P < 0.05) compared with baseline and an increase in deoxyhemoglobin levels (P < 0.05) with increasing +Gz level. No significant correlation was found between prefrontal cortex activity and oxy-/deoxyhemoglobin. It is concluded that the increase in prefrontal cortex activity observed during hypergravity was most likely not the result of increased +Gz values resulting in a decreased oxygenation produced through hypergravity exposure. No significant relationship between prefrontal cortex activity and oxygenation measured by NIRS concludes that brain activity during exposure to hypergravity may be difficult to measure using NIRS. Instead, the increase in prefrontal cortex activity might be attributable to psychological stress, which could pose a problem for the use of a

  18. Nonstoichiometric perovskite CaMnO(3-δ) for oxygen electrocatalysis with high activity.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Zhang, Tianran; Cheng, Fangyi; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Ziyu; Chen, Jun

    2014-09-01

    Perovskite oxides offer efficient and cheap electrocatalysts for both oxygen reduction reactions and oxygen evolution reactions (ORR/OER) in diverse oxygen-based electrochemical technologies. In this study, we report a facile strategy to enhance the electrocatalytic activity of CaMnO3 by introducing oxygen defects. The nonstoichiometric CaMnO(3-δ) (0 < δ ≤ 0.5) was prepared through thermal reduction of pristine perovskite microspheres and nanoparticles, which were synthesized from thermal-decomposition of carbonate precursors and the Pechini route, respectively. The as-prepared samples were analyzed by chemical titration, structural refinement, thermogravimetric analysis, and energy spectrometry. In 0.1 M KOH aqueous solution, the nonstoichiometric CaMnO(3-δ) with δ near 0.25 and an average Mn valence close to 3.5 exhibited the highest ORR activity (36.7 A g(-1) at 0.70 V vs RHE, with onset potential of 0.96 V), which is comparable to that of benchmark Pt/C. Density functional theory (DFT) studies and electrical conductivity measurement revealed that the enhanced ORR kinetics is due to facilitated oxygen activation and improved electrical properties. Besides high activity, the nonstoichiometric perovskite oxides showed respectable catalytic stability. Furthermore, the moderate oxygen-defective CaMnO(3-δ) (δ ≈ 0.25) favored the OER because of the improved electrical conductivity. This study makes nonstoichiometric CaMnO(3-δ) a promising active, inexpensive bifunctional catalytic material for reversible ORR and OER.

  19. Fast molecular evolution associated with high active metabolic rates in poison frogs.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juan C

    2012-08-01

    Molecular evolution is simultaneously paced by mutation rate, genetic drift, and natural selection. Life history traits also affect the speed of accumulation of nucleotide changes. For instance, small body size, rapid generation time, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and high resting metabolic rate (RMR) are suggested to be associated with faster rates of molecular evolution. However, phylogenetic correlation analyses failed to support a relationship between RMR and molecular evolution in ectotherms. In addition, RMR might underestimate the metabolic budget (e.g., digestion, reproduction, or escaping predation). An alternative is to test other metabolic rates, such as active metabolic rate (AMR), and their association with molecular evolution. Here, I present comparative analyses of the associations between life history traits (i.e., AMR, RMR, body mass, and fecundity) with rates of molecular evolution of and mitochondrial loci from a large ectotherm clade, the poison frogs (Dendrobatidae). My results support a strong positive association between mass-specific AMR and rates of molecular evolution for both mitochondrial and nuclear loci. In addition, I found weaker and genome-specific covariates such as body mass and fecundity for mitochondrial and nuclear loci, respectively. No direct association was found between mass-specific RMR and rates of molecular evolution. Thus, I provide a mechanistic hypothesis of the link between AMRs and the rate of molecular evolution based on an increase in ROS within germ line cells during periodic bouts of hypoxia/hyperoxia related to aerobic exercise. Finally, I propose a multifactorial model that includes AMR as a predictor of the rate of molecular evolution in ectothermic lineages.

  20. Effects of Hydration and Oxygen Vacancy on CO2 Adsorption and Activation on β-Ga2O3(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yunxiang; Liu, Chang-jun; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

    2010-01-04

    The effects of hydration and oxygen vacancy on CO2 adsorption on the β-Ga2O3(100) surface have been studied using density functional theory slab calculations. Adsorbed CO2 is activated on the dry perfect β-Ga2O3(100) surface, resulting in a carbonate species. This adsorption is slightly endothermic, with an adsorption energy of 0.07 eV. Water is preferably adsorbed molecularly on the dry perfect β-Ga2O3(100) surface with an adsorption energy of -0.56 eV, producing a hydrated perfect β-Ga2O3(100) surface. Adsorption of CO2 on the hydrated surface as a carbonate species is also endothermic, with an adsorption energy of 0.14 eV, indicating a slight repulsive interaction when H2O and CO2 are coadsorbed. The carbonate species on the hydrated perfect surface can be protonated by the co-adsorbed H2O to a bicarbonate species, making the overall process exothermic with an adsorption energy of -0.13 eV. The effect of defects on CO2 adsorption and activation has been examined by creating an oxygen vacancy on the dry β-Ga2O3(100) surface. The formation of an oxygen vacancy is endothermic, by 0.34 eV, with respect to a free O2 molecule in the gas phase. Presence of the oxygen vacancy promoted the adsorption and activation of CO2. In the most stable CO2 adsorption configuration on the dry defective β-Ga2O3(100) surface with an oxygen vacancy, one of the oxygen atoms of the adsorbed CO2 occupies the oxygen vacancy site and the CO2 adsorption energy is -0.31 eV. Water favors dissociative adsorption at the oxygen vacancy site on the defective surface. This process is instantaneous with an adsorption energy of -0.62 eV. These results indicate that, when water and CO2 are both present in the adsorption system simultaneously, the water molecule will compete with CO2 for the oxygen vacancy sites and impact CO2 adsorption and conversion negatively. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. A portion of the computing time was

  1. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  2. Theoretical study on photooxidation mechanism of ruthenium complex [Ru(II)-(bpy)2 (TMBiimH2 )](2+) with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Hong; Wu, Dan; Xia, Shu-Hua; Cui, Ganglong

    2016-09-15

    Photoinduced reactions of ruthenium complexes with molecular oxygen have attracted a lot of experimental attention; however, the reaction mechanism remains elusive. In this work, we have used the density functional theory method to scrutinize the visible-light induced photooxidation mechanism of the ruthenium complex [Ru(II)-(bpy)2 (TMBiimH2 )](2+) (bpy: 2, 2-bipyridine and TMBiimH2 : 4, 5, 4, 5-tetramethyl-2, 2-biimidazole) initiated by the attack of molecular oxygen. The present computational results not only explain very well recent experiments, also provide new mechanistic insights. We found that: (1) the triplet energy transfer process between the triplet molecular oxygen and the metal-ligand charge transfer triplet state of the ruthenium complex, which leads to singlet molecular oxygen, is thermodynamically favorable; (2) the singlet oxygen addition process to the S0 ruthenium complex is facile in energy; (3) the chemical transformation from endoperoxide to epidioxetane intermediates can be either two- or one-step reaction (the latter is energetically favored). These findings contribute important mechanistic information to photooxidation reactions of ruthenium complexes with molecular oxygen. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27384925

  3. Trapping cold molecules and atoms: Simultaneous magnetic deceleration and trapping of cold molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelink, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-05-01

    Cooling molecules to the ultra-cold regime remains a major challenge in the growing field of cold molecules. The molecular internal degrees of freedom complicate the effort of direct application of laser cooling. An alternative and general path towards ultra-cold molecules relies on sympathetic cooling via collisions with laser-cooled atoms. Here, we demonstrate the first step towards application of sympathetic cooling by co-trapping of molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms in a magnetic trap at a temperature of 300 mK. Our experiment begins with a pulsed supersonic beam which is a general source for cold high-flux atomic and molecular beams. Although the supersonic expansion efficiently cools the beam to temperatures below 1K, it also accelerates the beam to high mean velocities. We decelerate a beam of O2 in a moving magnetic trap decelerator from 375 m/s to a stop. We entrained the molecular beam with Li atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading the molecules and atoms into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 109 trapped molecules with background limited lifetime of 0.6 Sec. Our achievement enables application of laser cooling on the Li atoms in order to sympathetically cool the O2.

  4. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks and increases survivability against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Nam, Kyoung-Woo; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that drinking oxygenated water may improve oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improving immune activity. The present study evaluated the immune enhancing effects of oxygenated drinking water in broiler chicks and demonstrated the protective efficacy of oxygenated drinking water against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased serum lysozyme activity, peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) splenocyte ratio in broiler chicks. In the chicks experimentally infected with S. Gallinarum, oxygenated drinking water alleviated symptoms and increased survival. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks, and increases survivability against S. Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

  5. Low-temperature anomalies in the magnetic and thermal properties of molecular cryocrystals doped with oxygen impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiman, Yu. A.; Tretyak, S. M.; JeŻowski, A.

    2000-09-01

    The magnetic properties of oxygen pair clusters are investigated theoretically for different cluster geometries which can be realized by doping molecular cryomatrices with oxygen. Anomalous temperature and pressure behavior of the magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, and entropy is predicted. It is proposed to use these anomalies for studying the parameters characterizing the oxygen clusters and the parameters of the host matrix: the effective spin-figure interaction constant D for the molecule in the matrix, the exchange parameter J, and the number of pair clusters Np, which can deviate markedly from the purely random value Np=6Nc2 (N is Avogadro's number, and c is the molar concentration of the impurity). The data on the magnetic susceptibility may be used to analyze the character of the positional and orientational short-range order in the solid solution. The value of D contains information about the orientational order parameter; the distance and angular dependence of the exchange interaction parameter are still subject to discussion in the literature. The temperature dependence of Np contains information about diffusion and clusterization processes in the system.

  6. Temperature sensitivity of molecular oxygen resonant-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra involving the C 3Π g intermediate state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili; Adams, Steven F.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of measuring O2 rotational temperature by coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (Radar REMPI) has been studied to determine temperature sensitivity and range. The molecular oxygen Rydberg state of ( {3sσ } )C{{}3}Πg ( {v^' } = 2} ) has been selected as the intermediate state in the 2 + 1 REMPI process, which is known to provide a relatively strong REMPI signal. Rotational-resolved spectra representing the two-photon C{{}3}Πg ( {v^' } = 2} ) leftarrow leftarrow X{{}3}Σ g^{ - } ( {v^' ' } = 0} ) transition have been obtained under several gas conditions including pure oxygen, air-like syngas, ambient air, and flame environments from room temperature ( 300 K) to flame temperature ( 1700 K). An O2 REMPI spectral model has been developed to simulate the experimental spectral line intensity distribution which is dependent on the O2 ground-state temperature. The model has been verified at a low-temperature condition ( 5 K) and then applied to various oxygen environments over an extended temperature range with an overall error of less than ±10 %. The current O2 REMPI spectral model is an improvement over a previously reported version in both accuracy and the quantity of lines fit to provide rotational temperature measurements. This work details an optimized model that fits simulated spectra to full experimental spectral bands over various conditions with a wide temperature range, including both low temperature (<300 K) and high temperature ranges (>1300 K).

  7. Chemical analysis and molecular models for calcium-oxygen-carbon interactions in black carbon found in fertile Amazonian anthrosoils.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, Braulio S; Araujo, Joyce R; Silva, Alexander M; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Falcão, Newton P S; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Carbon particles containing mineral matter promote soil fertility, helping it to overcome the rather unfavorable climate conditions of the humid tropics. Intriguing examples are the Amazonian Dark Earths, anthropogenic soils also known as "Terra Preta de Índio'' (TPI), in which chemical recalcitrance and stable carbon with millenary mean residence times have been observed. Recently, the presence of calcium and oxygen within TPI-carbon nanoparticles at the nano- and mesoscale ranges has been demonstrated. In this work, we combine density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of TPI-carbons to elucidate the chemical arrangements of calcium-oxygen-carbon groups at the molecular level in TPI. The molecular models are based on graphene oxide nanostructures in which calcium cations are strongly adsorbed at the oxide sites. The application of material science techniques to the field of soil science facilitates a new level of understanding, providing insights into the structure and functionality of recalcitrant carbon in soil and its implications for food production and climate change. PMID:24892495

  8. Chemical analysis and molecular models for calcium-oxygen-carbon interactions in black carbon found in fertile Amazonian anthrosoils.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, Braulio S; Araujo, Joyce R; Silva, Alexander M; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Falcão, Newton P S; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Carbon particles containing mineral matter promote soil fertility, helping it to overcome the rather unfavorable climate conditions of the humid tropics. Intriguing examples are the Amazonian Dark Earths, anthropogenic soils also known as "Terra Preta de Índio'' (TPI), in which chemical recalcitrance and stable carbon with millenary mean residence times have been observed. Recently, the presence of calcium and oxygen within TPI-carbon nanoparticles at the nano- and mesoscale ranges has been demonstrated. In this work, we combine density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of TPI-carbons to elucidate the chemical arrangements of calcium-oxygen-carbon groups at the molecular level in TPI. The molecular models are based on graphene oxide nanostructures in which calcium cations are strongly adsorbed at the oxide sites. The application of material science techniques to the field of soil science facilitates a new level of understanding, providing insights into the structure and functionality of recalcitrant carbon in soil and its implications for food production and climate change.

  9. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  10. Active oxygen species as mediators of plant immunity: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Sandermann, H

    2000-08-01

    A burst of active oxygen species (AOS) is known to be involved in local cell death as part of plant defence against pathogens. It is, however, under dispute to what extent AOS can induce pathogen resistance and immunity throughout the plant. Three experimental strategies that reveal a primary role for AOS and a surprisingly low chemical and spatial specificity are now described for tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Ozone is a gaseous AOS that was applied to non-transgenic plants. Hydrogen peroxide or singlet oxygen are AOS that were induced by high-light treatment of transgenic plants that contained antisense constructs inhibiting catalase activity or chlorophyll biosynthetic enzymes. In all cases, activated oxygen species, cellular lesions, ethylene and salicylic acid, and components of major plant defence systems (systemic acquired resistance, hypersensitive response) were induced, as was resistance towards pathogens (tobacco mosaic virus, Pseudomonas syringae or Peronospora parasitica). It is concluded that active oxygen species can act as mediators of plant immunity so that new non-pesticidal plant protection strategies could be developed.

  11. Molecular tools for investigating microbial community structure and function in oxygen-deficient marine waters.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Alyse K; Kheirandish, Sam; Mueller, Andreas; Leung, Hilary T C; Norbeck, Angela D; Brewer, Heather M; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Water column oxygen (O2)-deficiency shapes food-web structure by progressively directing nutrients and energy away from higher trophic levels into microbial community metabolism resulting in fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Although respiratory O2 consumption during organic matter degradation is a natural outcome of a productive surface ocean, global-warming-induced stratification intensifies this process leading to oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) expansion. Here, we describe useful tools for detection and quantification of potential key microbial players and processes in OMZ community metabolism including quantitative polymerase chain reaction primers targeting Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota, SUP05, Arctic96BD-19, and SAR324 small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes and protein extraction methods from OMZ waters compatible with high-resolution mass spectrometry for profiling microbial community structure and functional dynamics.

  12. Activation of Methanogenesis in Arid Biological Soil Crusts Despite the Presence of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Roey; Matthies, Diethart; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Methanogenesis is traditionally thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. Wetland and rice field soils are well known sources for atmospheric methane, while aerated soils are considered sinks. Although methanogens have been detected in low numbers in some aerated, and even in desert soils, it remains unclear whether they are active under natural oxic conditions, such as in biological soil crusts (BSCs) of arid regions. To answer this question we carried out a factorial experiment using microcosms under simulated natural conditions. The BSC on top of an arid soil was incubated under moist conditions in all possible combinations of flooding and drainage, light and dark, air and nitrogen headspace. In the light, oxygen was produced by photosynthesis. Methane production was detected in all microcosms, but rates were much lower when oxygen was present. In addition, the δ13C of the methane differed between the oxic/oxygenic and anoxic microcosms. While under anoxic conditions methane was mainly produced from acetate, it was almost entirely produced from H2/CO2 under oxic/oxygenic conditions. Only two genera of methanogens were identified in the BSC-Methanosarcina and Methanocella; their abundance and activity in transcribing the mcrA gene (coding for methyl-CoM reductase) was higher under anoxic than oxic/oxygenic conditions, respectively. Both methanogens also actively transcribed the oxygen detoxifying gene catalase. Since methanotrophs were not detectable in the BSC, all the methane produced was released into the atmosphere. Our findings point to a formerly unknown participation of desert soils in the global methane cycle. PMID:21655270

  13. Assessments of Muscle Oxygenation and Cortical Activity Using Functional Near-infrared Spectroscopy in Healthy Adults During Hybrid Activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-You; Wu, Jin-Shang; Lin, Linda L; Ho, Ting-Chuan; Lin, Pei-Yi; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid activation (HA), patterned electrical stimulation (ES) superimposed on attempted voluntary movement in close synchrony, can augment muscle force output. It has been proposed for limb function restoration and neuromodulation. Limited studies have been performed to investigate the influences of HA on muscle oxygenation and brain cortical activity. The present study investigates muscle oxygenation and cortical activity during isometric knee extension tasks with voluntary contraction (VOL) only, ES only, and with HA at three stimulation intensities, namely 10 mA (HA-I), 30 mA (HA-II), and 50 mA (HA-III). A frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy system was employed to assess the muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis as well as the cortical activity from the bilateral sensorimotor cortices (SMCs), premotor cortices (PMCs), and supplementary motor areas (SMAs). Our results show that the increased ES contribution during HA significantly increased O2 demand in working muscle, implying that the intervention of ES accelerates the muscle metabolism during muscle contraction. For cortical activation, ES only had a similar cortical activation pattern to that during VOL but with lower activation in SMCs, PMCs, and SMAs. Augmented sensorimotor activation was observed during the HA-II condition. The enhanced level of cortical activation during HA was not only affected by the ES contribution within HA but also related to the functional specificity of cortical areas. Our results suggest that HA can effectively enhance the muscle oxygen demand as well as the activation of cortical regions, and that the ES contribution within HA is a key factor.

  14. In Situ Observation of Active Oxygen Species in Fe-Containing Ni-Based Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: The Effect of pH on Electrochemical Activity.

    PubMed

    Trześniewski, Bartek J; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Vermaas, David A; Longo, Alessandro; Bras, Wim; Koper, Marc T M; Smith, Wilson A

    2015-12-01

    Ni-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OECs) are cost-effective and very active materials that can be potentially used for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion process toward sustainable energy generation. We present a systematic spectroelectrochemical characterization of two Fe-containing Ni-based OECs, namely nickel borate (Ni(Fe)-B(i)) and nickel oxyhydroxide (Ni(Fe)OOH). Our Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results show that both OECs are chemically similar, and that the borate anions do not play an apparent role in the catalytic process at pH 13. Furthermore, we show spectroscopic evidence for the generation of negatively charged sites in both OECs (NiOO(-)), which can be described as adsorbed "active oxygen". Our data conclusively links the OER activity of the Ni-based OECs with the generation of those sites on the surface of the OECs. The OER activity of both OECs is strongly pH dependent, which can be attributed to a deprotonation process of the Ni-based OECs, leading to the formation of the negatively charged surface sites that act as OER precursors. This work emphasizes the relevance of the electrolyte effect to obtain catalytically active phases in Ni-based OECs, in addition to the key role of the Fe impurities. This effect should be carefully considered in the development of Ni-based compounds meant to catalyze the OER at moderate pHs. Complementarily, UV-vis spectroscopy measurements show strong darkening of those catalysts in the catalytically active state. This coloration effect is directly related to the oxidation of nickel and can be an important factor limiting the efficiency of solar-driven devices utilizing Ni-based OECs.

  15. Fluorescence molecular tomography resolves protease activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Bremer, Christoph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2002-07-01

    Systematic efforts are under way to develop novel technologies that would allow molecular sensing in intact organisms in vivo. Using near-infrared fluorescent molecular beacons and inversion techniques that take into account the diffuse nature of photon propagation in tissue, we were able to obtain three-dimensional in vivo images of a protease in orthopic gliomas. We demonstrate that enzyme-activatable fluorochromes can be detected with high positional accuracy in deep tissues, that molecular specificities of different beacons towards enzymes can be resolved and that tomography of beacon activation is linearly related to enzyme concentration. The tomographic imaging method offers a range of new capabilities for studying biological function; for example, identifying molecular-expression patterns by multispectral imaging or continuously monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic drugs.

  16. Unciaphenol, an Oxygenated Analogue of the Bergman Cyclization Product of Uncialamycin Exhibits Anti-HIV Activity.

    PubMed

    Williams, David E; Bottriell, Helen; Davies, Julian; Tietjen, Ian; Brockman, Mark A; Andersen, Raymond J

    2015-11-01

    Unciaphenol (2), an oxygenated analogue of the Bergman cyclization product of the enediyne uncialamycin (1), has been isolated along with 1 from cultures of the actinomycete Streptomyces uncialis. It is proposed that the C-22 OH substituent in 2 might arise from the attack of a nucleophilic oxygen species on the p-benzyne diradical intermediate IA in the Bergman cyclization of 1. 2 shows in vitro anti-HIV activity against viral strains that are resistant to clinically utilized anti-retroviral therapies.

  17. Spectroscopic evidence for the formation of singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/. delta. /sub g/O/sub 2/) upon irradiation of a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/Sigma/sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1988-01-20

    It is well-known that the presence of molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) in a variety of organic solvents causes an often substantial red shift in the solvent absorption spectrum. This extra, broad absorption feature is reversibly removed by purging the solvent with nitrogen gas. Mulliken and Tsubomura assigned the oxygen-dependent absorption band to a transition from a ground state solvent-oxygen complex to a solvent-oxygen charge transfer (CT) state (sol/sup .+/O/sub 2//sup .-/). In addition to the broad Mulliken CT band, there are, often in the same spectral region, distinct singlet-triplet transitions (T/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/) which are enhanced by molecular oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/). Since both of these solvent-oxygen cooperative transitions may result in the formation of reactive oxygenating species, singlet molecular oxygen (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/) and/or the superoxide ion (O/sub 2//sup .-/), it follows that recent studies have focused on unsaturated hydrocarbon oxygenation subsequent to the irradiation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands in both the solution phase and cryogenic (10 K) glasses. In these particular experiments, oxygenated products characteristic of both /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sub .-/ were obtained, although the systems studied appeared to involve the participation of one intermediate at the exclusion of the other. In this communication, the authors provide, for the first time, direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2/ following a solvent-oxygen (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/O/sub 2/) cooperative absorption. They have observed, in a time-resolved experiment, a near-IR luminescence subsequent to laser excitation of the oxygen-induced absorption bands of mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, and benzene at 355 nm and 1,4-dioxane at 266 nm. They suggest that this signal is due to /sup 1/..delta../sub g/O/sub 2

  18. Highly oxygenated triterpenoids from the roots of Schisandra chinensis and their anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiu-Yan; Gao, Kun; Nan, Zhi-Biao

    2016-01-01

    A new highly oxygenated triterpenoid, schinchinenlactone D (1), and three known compounds (2-4) were isolated from the roots of Schisandra chinensis. Their structures were determined by combining the spectroscopic analysis with the theoretical computations. The anti-inflammatory activities of compounds 1-4 were evaluated, and compound 3 exhibits the most significant activity in the inhibition of NO production with an IC50 value of 10.6 μM.

  19. Direct oxidation of L-sorbose to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid with molecular oxygen on platinum- and palladium-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Broennimann, C.; Bodnar, Z.; Mallat, T.; Baiker, A.; Hug, P.

    1994-11-01

    The selective oxidation of the C1 hydroxyl group of L-sorbose to a carboxylic group without protection of the four other hydroxyl functions was investigated. The reactions were performed in slightly alkaline aqueous solutions with molecular oxygen over various alumina- and carbon-supported Pt and Pd catalysts. Optimum reaction conditions were 50{degrees}C, pH 7.3, and a catalyst:reactant ratio of 1:4 (wt/wt). The lower the pH and the temperature, the higher the selectivity toward 2-keto-L-gluonic acid. Catalyst deactivation was also found to increase with lower pH and temperature. A 5 wt% Pt/alumina catalyst showed the best catalytic performance (67% selectivity at 58% conversion). Promotion with Bi or Pb had a detrimental effect on selectivity for 2-keto-L-gulonic acid. Electrochemical measurements indicated that the reaction occurs in a rather narrow potential range, which corresponds to a moderate oxygen coverage of Pt or Pd. Four types of catalyst deactivation processes were identified, based on XPS and ICP-AES analysis and on the in situ determination of the oxidation state by monitoring the catalyst potential during reaction. A significant chemical poisoning of the active noble metal sites occurred during the initial, destructive adsorption of L-sorbose and during the oxidation reaction. The successive contamination of active sites resulted in overoxidation (too high oxygen coverage of Pt or Pd). The partially oxidized promoters and noble metals were corroded and dissolved in the presence of 2-keto-L-gulonic acid, resulting in an irreversible deactivation. 66 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Tuning the activity of Pt(111) for oxygen electroreduction by subsurface alloying.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Ifan E L; Bondarenko, Alexander S; Perez-Alonso, Francisco J; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Bech, Lone; Johansson, Tobias P; Jepsen, Anders K; Frydendal, Rasmus; Knudsen, Brian P; Rossmeisl, Jan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2011-04-13

    To enable the development of low temperature fuel cells, significant improvements are required to the efficiency of the Pt electrocatalysts at the cathode, where oxygen reduction takes place. Herein, we study the effect of subsurface solute metals on the reactivity of Pt, using a Cu/Pt(111) near-surface alloy. Our investigations incorporate electrochemical measurements, ultrahigh vacuum experiments, and density functional theory. Changes to the OH binding energy, ΔE(OH), were monitored in situ and adjusted continuously through the subsurface Cu coverage. The incorporation of submonolayer quantities of Cu into Pt(111) resulted in an 8-fold improvement in oxygen reduction activity. The most optimal catalyst for oxygen reduction has an ΔE(OH) ≈ 0.1 eV weaker than that of pure Pt, validating earlier theoretical predictions. PMID:21417329

  1. Metal oxide nanoparticle growth on graphene via chemical activation with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Johns, James E; Alaboson, Justice M P; Patwardhan, Sameer; Ryder, Christopher R; Schatz, George C; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-12-01

    Chemically interfacing the inert basal plane of graphene with other materials has limited the development of graphene-based catalysts, composite materials, and devices. Here, we overcome this limitation by chemically activating epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) using atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen produces epoxide groups on graphene, which act as reactive nucleation sites for zinc oxide nanoparticle growth using the atomic layer deposition precursor diethyl zinc. In particular, exposure of epoxidized graphene to diethyl zinc abstracts oxygen, creating mobile species that diffuse on the surface to form metal oxide clusters. This mechanism is corroborated with a combination of scanning probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory and can likely be generalized to a wide variety of related surface reactions on graphene.

  2. Oxygen plasma etching of graphene: A first-principles dynamical inspection of the reaction mechanisms and related activation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Boero, Mauro; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Oshiyama, Atsushi; Dept. of Applied Physics Team; Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Strasbourg (IPCMS) Collaboration; Department Of Materials Engineering Science Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen plasma etching is a crucial step in the fabrication of electronic circuits and has recently received a renovated interest in view of the realization of carbon-based nanodevices. In an attempt at unraveling the atomic-scale details and to provide guidelines for the control of the etching processes mechanisms, we inspected the possible reaction pathways via reactive first principles simulations. These processes involve breaking and formation of several chemical bonds and are characterized by different free-energy barriers. Free-energy sampling techniques (metadynamics and blue moon), used to enhance the standard Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, provide us a detailed microscopic picture of the etching of graphene surfaces and a comprehensive scenario of the activation barriers involved in the various steps. MEXT, Japan - contract N. 22104005

  3. Activities of oxygen in liquid copper and silver from electrochemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Shinya; Kozuka, Zensaku

    1981-09-01

    Modified coulometric titrations on the galvanic cell: O in liquid Cu or Ag / ZrO2( + CaO) / Air, Pt, were performed to determine precisely the oxygen activities in liquid copper and silver in the range of relatively low oxygen concentration. The present experimental results were remarkably reproducible in comparison with the published data. The standard Gibbs energies of solution of oxygen in liquid copper and liquid silver for 1/2 O2(l atm) → O(l at. pct) were determined respectively to be ΔG° (in Cu) = -18040 -0.03 T(K) (± 120) cal · g-atom-1 = -75500 -0.12 T(K)(± 500) J · g-atom-1, ΔG°(inAg)= -3860+ 1.56 T(K) (±90) cal · g-atom-1 = -16140 + 6.52 T(K)(±380) J · g-atom-1 where the reference state for dissolved oxygen was an infinitely dilute solution. The present value of the partial entropy of oxygen dissolved in liquid copper differs significantly from that suggested by many investigators. Further, the present equation for liquid copper has been found to be consistent with a correlation proposed previously by the present authors. The equation for liquid silver is in good agreement with the published ones.

  4. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  5. Effect of axial ligands on the molecular configurations, stability, reactivity, and photodynamic activities of silicon phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Luan, Liqiang; Ding, Lanlan; Shi, Jiawei; Fang, Wenjuan; Ni, Yuxing; Liu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    To demonstrate the effect of axial ligands on the structure-activity relationship, a series of axially substituted silicon phthalocyanines (SiPcs) have been synthesized with changes to the axial ligands. The reactivity of the axial ligand upon shielding by the phthalocyanine ring current, along with their stability, photophysical, and photodynamic therapy (PDT) activities were compared and evaluated for the first time. As revealed by single-crystal XRD analysis, rotation of the axial -OMe ligands was observed in SiPc 3, which resulted in two molecular configurations coexisting synchronously in both the solid and solution states and causing a split of the phthalocyanine α protons in the (1)H NMR spectra that is significantly different from all SiPcs reported so far. The remarkable photostability, good singlet oxygen quantum yield, and efficient in vitro photodynamic activity synergistically show that compound 3 is one of the most promising photosensitizers for PDT.

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  7. [pi] Backbonding in Carbonyl Complexes and Carbon-Oxygen Stretching Frequencies: A Molecular Modeling Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is described that has illustrated the effect of various factors on [pi] backbonding to carbonyl ligands, where the students can view the molecular orbitals corresponding to the M-CO [pi] interaction as well as the competing interaction between the metal and co-ligands. The visual and hands-on nature of the modeling exercise has helped…

  8. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins. PMID:14514663

  9. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins.

  10. Deciphering molecular mechanism underlying hypolipidemic activity of echinocystic Acid.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Lai, Peng; Du, Jun-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA) and oleanolic acid (OA) at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0) to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139  μ M, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT. PMID:24669228

  11. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:25334050

  12. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts.

  13. Molecular rotational line profiles from oxygen-rich red giant winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justtanont, K.; Skinner, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a radiative transfer model of the dust and gas envelopes around late-type stars. The gas kinetic temperature for each star is calculated by solving equations of motion and the energy balance simultaneously. The main processes include viscous heating and adiabatic and radiative cooling. Heating is dominated by viscosity as the grains stream outward through the gas, with some contribution in oxygen-rich stars by near-IR pumping of H2O followed by collisional de-excitation in the inner envelope. For O-rich stars, rotational H2O cooling is a dominant mechanism in the middle part of the envelope, with CO cooling being less significant. We have applied our model to three well-studied oxygen-rich red giant stars. The three stars cover a wide range of mass-loss rates, and hence they have different temperature structures. The derived temperature structures are used in calculating CO line profiles for these objects. Comparison of the dust and gas mass-loss rates suggests that mass-loss rates are not constant during the asymptotic giant branch phase. In particular, the results show that the low CO 1-0 antenna temperatures of OH/IR stars reflect an earlier phase of much lower mass-loss rate.

  14. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  15. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant. PMID:26430780

  16. Effects of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Proton Activity on The Mechanism of Oxygen Reduction in Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Robert August

    Mechanisms for oxygen reduction are proposed for three distinct cases covering two ionic liquids of fundamentally different archetypes and almost thirty orders of magnitude of proton activity. Proton activity is treated both extrinsically by varying the concentration and intrinsically by selecting proton donors with a wide range of aqueous pKa values. The mechanism of oxygen reduction in ionic liquids is introduced by way of the protic ionic liquid (pIL) triethylammonium triflate (TEATf) which shares some similarities with aqueous acid solutions. Oxygen reduction in TEATf begins as the one electron rate limited step to form superoxide, O2 *-, which is then rapidly protonated by the pIL cation forming the perhydroxyl radical, HO2*. The perhydroxyl radical is further reduced to peroxidate (HO2-) and hydrogen peroxide in proportions in accordance with their pKa. The reaction does not proceed beyond this point due to the adsorption of the conjugate base triethylammine interfering with the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that this mechanism is consistent across Pt, Au, Pd, and Ag electrodes. Two related sets of experiments were performed in the inherently aprotic ionic liquid 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium triflate (C4dMImTf). The first involved the titration of acidic species of varying aqueous pKa into the IL while monitoring the extent of oxygen reduction as a function of pKa and potential on Pt and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These experiments confirmed the greater propensity of Pt to reduce oxygen by its immediate and abrupt transition from one electron reduction to four electron reduction, while oxygen reduction on GC gradually approaches four electron reduction as the potentials were driven more cathodic. The potential at which oxygen reduction initiates shows general agreement with the Nernst equation and the acid's tabulated aqueous pKa value, however at the extremely acidic end, a small deviation is observed. The second set

  17. A simple fluorescent probe for the determination of dissolved oxygen based on the catalytic activation of oxygen by iron(II) chelates.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Abbas, M E; Zhu, Lihua; Zhou, Wenyi; Li, Kejing; Tang, Heqing; Liu, Shushen; Li, Weiying

    2009-04-27

    This work aims at establishing a simple fluorescent probe for the determination of dissolved oxygen. It is found that iron(II) ions activate oxygen to produce reactive species being capable of oxidizing non-fluorescent coumarin to fluorescent 7-hydroxycoumarin. However, this process is not effective because the yield of the reactive species is very low in the presence of simple iron(II) salts alone. The addition of organic ligands such as oxalate results in the formation of complexes between iron(II) ions, which leads to considerable increase in the yield of reactive species (such as hydroxyl radicals) and then increase in the fluorescence intensity of 7-hydroxycoumarin to a significant level. It has been observed that in the mixture solution of iron(II) ions, ligand, coumarin, and dissolved oxygen, there is an excellent linear response between the fluorescence and dissolved oxygen. Therefore, a new spectrofluorimetric method has been proposed for the determination of dissolved oxygen by using catalytic activation of O(2) by iron(II) chelates. Under optimized conditions, a linear correlation (r=0.995) has been observed between the fluorescence intensity of 7-hydroxycoumarin at 456 nm and the concentration of dissolved oxygen over the range of 0.96-9.22 mg L(-1). The limit of detection for dissolved oxygen at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 has been estimated to be 0.35 mg L(-1). The proposed method has been applied to determine the concentration of dissolved oxygen in practical water samples with results as satisfactory as that obtained by the standard iodometric method.

  18. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of niobium oxides by solid/liquid state oxygen source and lithium assisted metal-halide chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Greenlee, Jordan D.; Shank, Joshua C.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2015-09-01

    In order to consistently grow high quality niobium oxides and lithium niobium oxides, a novel solid/liquid state oxygen source, LiClO4, has been implemented in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. LiClO4 is shown to decompose into both molecular and atomic oxygen upon heating. This allows oxidation rates similar to that of molecular oxygen but at a reduced overall beam flux, quantified by in situ Auger analysis. LiClO4 operation is decomposition limited to less than 400 °C, and other material limitations are identified. The design of a custom near-ambient NbCl5 effusion cell is presented, which improves both short and long term stability. Films of Nb oxidation state +2, +3, and +5 are grown using these new tools, including the multi-functional sub-oxide LiNbO2.

  19. The Trapping Of Laser-Generated Biradicals With Molecular Oxygen: The Synthesis Of Peroxides Related To Vitamin K, Insect Pheromones And Prostaglandins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1984-05-01

    The theoretical and experimental considerations involved in laser-generated biradical trapping with molecular oxygen are discussed. This method has been applied in the elucidation of the mechanism of the photodegradation of Vitamin K via oxygen trapping of a preoxe-tane biradical. The trapping of biradicals derived from azoalkanes has been applied to the syntheses of pine beetle pheromone mimics and prostaglandin endoperoxide analogues.

  20. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Guided transmission of oxygen ions through Al2O3 nanocapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Feng; Chen, Xi-Meng; Lou, Feng-Jun; Xu, Jin-Zhang; Shao, Jian-Xiong; Sun, Guang-Zhi; Wang, Jun; Xi, Fa-Yuan; Yin, Young-Zhi; Wang, Xing-An; Xu, Jun-Kui; Cui, Ying; Ding, Bao-Wei

    2009-07-01

    The transmissions of oxygen ions through Al2O3 nanocapillaries each 50 nm in diameter and 10 μm in length at a series of different tilt angles are measured, where the ions with energies ranging from 10 to 60 keV and charge states from 1 up to 6 are involved. The angular distribution and the transmission yields of transported ions are investigated. Our results indicate both the existence of a guiding effect when ions pass through the capillary and a significant dependence of the ion transmission on the energy and the charge state of the ions. The guiding effects are observed to be enhanced at lower projectile energies and higher charge states. Meanwhile, the results also exhibit that the transmission yields increase as the tilt angle decreases at a given energy and charge state.

  1. Molecular imaging of macrophage enzyme activity in cardiac inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is highly advantageous as various insidious inflammatory events can be imaged in a serial and quantitative fashion. Combined with the conventional imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear imaging, it helps us resolve the extent of ongoing pathology, quantify inflammation and predict outcome. Macrophages are increasingly gaining importance as an imaging biomarker in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. Macrophages, recruited to the site of injury, internalize necrotic or foreign material. Along with phagocytosis, activated macrophages release proteolytic enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins into the extracellular environment. Pro-inflammatory monocytes and macrophages also induce tissue oxidative damage through the inflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). In this review we will highlight recent advances in molecular macrophage imaging. Particular stress will be given to macrophage functional and enzymatic activity imaging which targets phagocytosis, proteolysis and myeloperoxidase activity imaging. PMID:24729833

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Potato Tuber Mitochondria Is Modulated by Mitochondrially Bound Hexokinase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Meyer, Laudiene Evangelista; Machado, Lilia Bender; Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Galina, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria (PTM) have a mitochondrially bound hexokinase (HK) activity that exhibits a pronounced sensitivity to ADP inhibition. Here we investigated the role of mitochondrial HK activity in PTM reactive oxygen species generation. Mitochondrial HK has a 10-fold higher affinity for glucose (Glc) than for fructose (KMGlc = 140 μm versus KMFrc = 1,375 μm). Activation of PTM respiration by succinate led to an increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release that was abrogated by mitochondrial HK activation. Mitochondrial HK activity caused a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in oxygen consumption by PTM. Inhibition of Glc phosphorylation by mannoheptulose or GlcNAc induced a rapid increase in H2O2 release. The blockage of H2O2 release sustained by Glc was reverted by oligomycin and atractyloside, indicating that ADP recycles through the adenine nucleotide translocator and F0F1ATP synthase is operative during the mitochondrial HK reaction. Inhibition of mitochondrial HK activity by 60% to 70% caused an increase of 50% in the maximal rate of H2O2 release. Inhibition in H2O2 release by mitochondrial HK activity was comparable to, or even more potent, than that observed for StUCP (S. tuberosum uncoupling protein) activity. The inhibition of H2O2 release in PTM was two orders of magnitude more selective for the ADP produced from the mitochondrial HK reaction than for that derived from soluble yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) HK. Modulation of H2O2 release and oxygen consumption by Glc and mitochondrial HK inhibitors in potato tuber slices shows that hexoses and mitochondrial HK may act as a potent preventive antioxidant mechanism in potato tubers. PMID:19109413

  3. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospísil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  4. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  5. Oxygen plasma power dependence on ZnO grown on porous silicon substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Giwoong; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Do Yeob; Yim, Kwang Gug; Kim, Soaram; Kim, Sung-O.; Lee, Dong-Yul; Leem, Jae-Young

    2012-10-15

    ZnO thin films were deposited on porous silicon by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy using different radio frequency power settings. Optical emission spectrometry was applied to study the characteristics of the oxygen plasma, and the effects of the radio frequency power on the properties of the ZnO thin films were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. The grain sizes for radio frequency powers of 100, 200, and 300 W were 46, 48, and 62 nm, respectively. In addition, the photoluminescence intensities of the ultraviolet and the visible range increased at 300 W, because the density of the atomic oxygen transitions increased. The quality of the ZnO thin films was enhanced, but the deep-level emission peaks increased with increasing radio frequency power. The structural and optical properties of the ZnO thin films were improved at the radio frequency power of 300 W. Moreover, the optical properties of the ZnO thin films were improved with porous silicon, instead of Si.

  6. Synthesis, antiproliferative activity and molecular docking of Colchicine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Huczyński, Adam; Majcher, Urszula; Maj, Ewa; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Janczak, Jan; Moshari, Mahshad; Tuszynski, Jack A; Bartl, Franz

    2016-02-01

    In order to create more potent anticancer agents, a series of five structurally different derivatives of Colchicine have been synthesised. These compounds were characterised spectroscopically and structurally and their antiproliferative activity against four human tumour cell lines (HL-60, HL-60/vinc, LoVo, LoVo/DX) was evaluated. Additionally the activity of the studied compounds was calculated using computational methods involving molecular docking of the Colchicine derivatives to β-tubulin. The experimental and computational results are in very good agreement indicating that the antimitotic activity of Colchicine derivatives can be readily predicted using computational modeling methods.

  7. Doped LaFeO3 as SOFC Catalysts: Control of Oxygen Mobility Oxidation Activity

    SciTech Connect

    N Lakshminarayanan; J Kuhn; S Rykov; J Millet; U Ozkan; T Rao; J Smedley; E Wang; E Muller; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The bulk structure and surface properties of Fe-based perovskite-type oxides with the formula La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-{delta}} for y = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 have been investigated. The properties were found to strongly depend upon Co content, temperature, and environment. The materials were selected due to their potential use as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The intermediate Co loading formed oxygen vacancies most easily and several other properties including oxidation activity and surface sites showed a similar non-linear trend. Trends are related to a possible transition in electronic structure. Activity for oxidation of methane, oxygen storage and chemical compatibility was shown to be superior to that of the La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3}.

  8. Selective nitrogen doping in graphene: Enhanced catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Huang, Sheng-Feng; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Boero, Mauro; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki; Miyata, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of N-doped zigzag graphene ribbons with various ratios of dihydrogenated to monohydrogenated edge carbons are investigated within the density functional theory framework. We find that the stability of graphitic N next to the edge, which is claimed to play important roles in the catalytic activity in our previous work, will be enhanced with increasing the concentration of dihydrogenated carbons. Furthermore, the dihydrogenated edge carbons turn out to be easily converted into monohydrogenated ones in the presence of oxygen molecules at room temperature. Based on our results, we propose a possible way to enhance the oxygen reduction catalytic activity of N-doped graphene by controlling the degrees of hydrogenation of edge carbons. The characteristic features in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra for each specific N site considered here will also be given.

  9. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L.; Schauer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  10. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  11. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2015-12-04

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success.

  12. A General Method for Multimetallic Platinum Alloy Nanowires as Highly Active and Stable Oxygen Reduction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-25

    An unconventional class of high-performance Pt alloy multimetallic nanowires (NWs) is produced by a general method. The obtained PtNi NWs exhibit amazingly specific and mass oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities with improvement factors of 51.1 and 34.6 over commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively, and are also stable in ORR conditions, making them among the most efficient electrocatalysts for ORR.

  13. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particles located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.

  14. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael D; Christen, Hans M; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active than the (110) surface that has been traditionally explored by density functional theory studies. The relation between the OER activity and density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites exposed on each rutile crystallographic facet is discussed. The surface-orientation dependent activities can guide the design of high-surface-area catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  15. Copper(II) as an efficient scavenger of singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Joshi, P C

    1998-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to play an important role in tissue injury that damages DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Increased production of ROS and/or decreased efficiency of antioxidant defense system has been shown to contribute to a number of degenerative processes including cancer and AIDS. Among the various forms of ROS, singlet oxygen (1O2), which is generated predominantly in photosensitization reactions, is of particular physiologic significance because of its selectively long life in aqueous solution, its ability to cross the cell membrane barrier and high reactivity towards biomolecules. In the present study, the 1O2 scavenging potential of Cu(II) has been evaluated by (i) generating 1O2 by photosensitization of rose bengal (RB), (ii) establishing 1O2 quenching with recognized 1O2 scavengers like sodium azide, DABCO and (iii) examining the effect of Cu(II) in scavenging of 1O2. The results revealed that Cu(II) inhibited the rate of 1O2 production by 88%, 68%, 40%, 21% and 10% at a concentration of 10(-2) M, 5 x 10(-3) M, 10(-3) M; 5 x 10(-4) M, and 10(-4) M, respectively. Under similar experimental condition, sodium azide or DABCO at 10(-2) M inhibited the 1O2 production by 86% and 88%, respectively. Other 1O2 generating photosensitizer like hematoporphyrin, riboflavin and methylene blue also produced identical results with Cu(II) but Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) or As(III) did not produce any quenching of 1O2. Presence of a copper binding peptide (Gly-Gly-His) in the reaction system reduced the 1O2 scavenging capacity of Cu(II) by 52-66% depending upon the UV dose. The 1O2 scavenging property of metal ion appears to have an advantage to reduce the oxidative damage of photodynamic reactions in order to prevent ROS-induced toxicity reactions. PMID:9854900

  16. Carotenoid radical cations as a probe for the molecular mechanism of nonphotochemical quenching in oxygenic photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Amarie, Sergiu; Standfuss, Jörg; Barros, Tiago; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Dreuw, Andreas; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2007-04-01

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is a fundamental mechanism in photosynthesis which protects plants against excess excitation energy and is of crucial importance for their survival and fitness. Recently, carotenoid radical cation (Car*+) formation has been discovered to be a key step for the feedback deexcitation quenching mechanism (qE), a component of NPQ, of which the molecular mechanism and location is still unknown. We have generated and characterized carotenoid radical cations by means of resonant two color, two photon ionization (R2C2PI) spectroscopy. The Car*+ bands have maxima located at 830 nm (violaxanthin), 880 nm (lutein), 900 nm (zeaxanthin), and 920 nm (beta-carotene). The positions of these maxima depend strongly on solution conditions, the number of conjugated C=C bonds, and molecular structure. Furthermore, R2C2PI measurements on the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC II) samples with or without zeaxanthin (Zea) reveal the violaxanthin (Vio) radical cation (Vio*+) band at 909 nm and the Zea*+ band at 983 nm. The replacement of Vio by Zea in the light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) has no influence on the Chl excitation lifetime, and by exciting the Chls lowest excited state, no additional rise and decay corresponding to the Car*+ signal observed previously during qE was detected in the spectral range investigated (800-1050 nm). On the basis of our findings, the mechanism of qE involving the simple replacement of Vio with Zea in LHC II needs to be reconsidered.

  17. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  18. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  19. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst. PMID:25229121

  20. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  1. Improvement of photocatalytic activity of silver nanoparticles by radio frequency oxygen plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yingcui; Zhang, Bing; Hong, Liu; Yao, Damao; Xie, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Photocatalytic activity (PA) of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) induced by radio frequency (RF) oxygen plasma irradiation (OPI) is investigated in this paper. An improvement in PA by 365% and 181% has been achieved when 15 nm AgNPs irradiated by oxygen plasma for 2 s were used to degrade 10-5 M Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) under ultraviolet (UV) and visible lights, respectively. The PA caused by OPI is better than that induced by the localized surface plasma resonance (LSPR) of AgNPs. The mechanism for the improvement was explored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis absorption spectra. The OPI-induced formation of AgO/AgNP and Ag2O/AgNP-heterogeneous photocatalysts and electrophilic oxygen are considered to be responsible for the PA improvement. This investigation deepens our understanding of oxygen-assisted photocatalysis of AgNPs and provides a practical approach using solar light for broad spectra photocatalysis with high efficiency.

  2. Adair-based hemoglobin equilibrium with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen ion activity.

    PubMed

    Mateják, Marek; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    As has been known for over a century, oxygen binding onto hemoglobin is influenced by the activity of hydrogen ions (H⁺), as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO₂). As is also known, the binding of both CO₂and H⁺ on terminal valine-1 residues is competitive. One-parametric situations of these hemoglobin equilibria at specific levels of H⁺, O₂or CO₂are also well described. However, we think interpolating or extrapolating this knowledge into an 'empirical' function of three independent variables has not yet been completely satisfactory. We present a model that integrates three orthogonal views of hemoglobin oxygenation, titration, and carbamination at different temperatures. The model is based only on chemical principles, Adair's oxygenation steps and Van't Hoff equation of temperature dependences. Our model fits the measurements of the Haldane coefficient and CO₂hemoglobin saturation. It also fits the oxygen dissociation curve influenced by simultaneous changes in H⁺, CO₂and O₂, which makes it a strong candidate for integration into more complex models of blood acid-base with gas transport, where any combination of mentioned substances can appear. PMID:25594800

  3. Adair-based hemoglobin equilibrium with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen ion activity.

    PubMed

    Mateják, Marek; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    As has been known for over a century, oxygen binding onto hemoglobin is influenced by the activity of hydrogen ions (H⁺), as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO₂). As is also known, the binding of both CO₂and H⁺ on terminal valine-1 residues is competitive. One-parametric situations of these hemoglobin equilibria at specific levels of H⁺, O₂or CO₂are also well described. However, we think interpolating or extrapolating this knowledge into an 'empirical' function of three independent variables has not yet been completely satisfactory. We present a model that integrates three orthogonal views of hemoglobin oxygenation, titration, and carbamination at different temperatures. The model is based only on chemical principles, Adair's oxygenation steps and Van't Hoff equation of temperature dependences. Our model fits the measurements of the Haldane coefficient and CO₂hemoglobin saturation. It also fits the oxygen dissociation curve influenced by simultaneous changes in H⁺, CO₂and O₂, which makes it a strong candidate for integration into more complex models of blood acid-base with gas transport, where any combination of mentioned substances can appear.

  4. Microbial activities and phosphorus cycling: An application of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Lisa M.; Joshi, Sunendra R.; Kana, Todd M.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms carry out biochemical transformations of nutrients that make up their cells. Therefore, understanding how these nutrients are transformed or cycled in natural environments requires knowledge of microbial activity. Commonly used indicators for microbial activity typically include determining microbial respiration by O2/CO2 measurements, cell counts, and measurement of enzyme activities. However, coupled studies on nutrient cycling and microbial activity are not given enough emphasis. Here we apply phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18OP) as a tool for measurement of microbial activity and compare the rate of isotope exchange with methods of measuring microbial activities that are more commonly applied in environmental studies including respiration, dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell counts. Our results show that different bacteria may have different strategies for P uptake, storage and release, their respiration and consequently expression of DHA and APase activities, but in general the trend of their enzyme activities are comparable. Phosphate δ18OP values correlated well with these other parameters used to measure microbial activity with the strongest linear relationships between δ18OP and CO2 evolution (r = -0.99). Even though the rate of isotope exchange for each microorganism used in this study is different, the rate per unit CO2 respiration showed one general trend, where δ18OP values move towards equilibrium while CO2 is generated. While this suggests that P cycling among microorganisms used in this study can be generalized, further research is needed to determine whether the microorganism-specific isotope exchange trend may occur in natural environments. In summary, phosphate oxygen isotope measurements may offer an alternative for use as a tracer to measure microbial activity in soils, sediments, and many other natural environments.

  5. Nox family NADPH oxidases: Molecular mechanisms of activation.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Ralf P; Weissmann, Norbert; Schröder, Katrin

    2014-11-01

    NADPH oxidases of the Nox family are important enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Numerous homologue-specific mechanisms control the activity of this enzyme family involving calcium, free fatty acids, protein-protein interactions, intracellular trafficking, and posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation. After a brief review on the classic pathways of Nox activation, this article will focus on novel mechanisms of homologue-specific activity control and on cell-specific aspects which govern Nox activity. From these findings of the recent years it must be concluded that the activity control of Nox enzymes is much more complex than anticipated. Moreover, depending on the cellular activity state, Nox enzymes are selectively activated or inactivated. The complex upstream signaling aspects of these events make the development of "intelligent" Nox inhibitors plausible, which selectively attenuate disease-related Nox-mediated ROS formation without altering physiological signaling ROS. This approach might be of relevance for Nox-mediated tissue injury in ischemia-reperfusion and inflammation and also for chronic Nox overactivation as present in cancer initiation and cardiovascular disease.

  6. Enhancing effect of oxygen radical scavengers on murine macrophage anticryptococcal activity through production of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    TOHYAMA, M.; KAWAKAMI, K.; FUTENMA, M.; SAITO, A.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the roles of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced cryptococcostatic activity of murine peritoneal macrophages using NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a competitive inhibitor of RNI synthesis, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, oxygen radical scavengers. IFN-γ-activated macrophages produced nitric oxide (NO) in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by increased nitrite concentration in the culture supernatant. IFN-γ also enhanced the suppressive effect on cryptococcal growth in a similar dose-dependent manner. The induction of killing activity and NO production by an optimal dose of IFN-γ (100 U/ml) was virtually suppressed by 500 μM L-NMMA. These results confirmed the importance of the RNI-mediated effector mechanism in anticryptococcal activity of macrophages. SOD and catalase significantly enhanced the cryptococcostatic activity of macrophages induced by a suboptimal dose of IFN-γ (20 U/ml). The augmenting effect of these reagents was mediated by NO, since they potentiated the production of NO by macrophages and their effects were totally blocked by L-NMMA. Our results indicate that the IFN-γ-induced anticryptococcal activity of macrophages is dependent mostly on RNI, and suggest that the ROI system down-regulates the effector mechanism for cryptococcostasis by suppressing the RNI system. PMID:8608643

  7. An optimized molecular inclusion complex of diferuloylmethane: enhanced physical properties and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qunyou; Li, Yi; Wu, Jianyong; Mei, Hu; Zhao, Chunjing; Zhang, Jingqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate the enhanced physical properties and biological activity of a molecular inclusion complex (MICDH) comprising diferuloylmethane (DFM) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. Methods The preparation conditions of MICDH were optimized using an orthogonal experimental design. The solubility, in vitro release and model fitting, microscopic morphology, molecular structure simulation, anti-lung cancer activity, and action mechanism of MICDH were evaluated. Results The solubility of DFM was improved 4400-fold upon complexation with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. The release rate of DFM was significantly higher from MICDH than from free DFM. MICDH exhibited higher antitumor activity against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells than free DFM. More cells were arrested in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle or were induced to undergo apoptosis when treated with MICDH than when treated with free DFM. Furthermore, increased reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium ion levels and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed in cells treated with MICDH. Conclusion MICDH markedly improved the physical properties and antitumor activity of DFM. MICDH may prove to be a preferred alternative to free DFM as a formulation for DFM delivery in lung cancer treatment. PMID:23091376

  8. The 14C-Cluster and Molecular bands in the Oxygen Isotopes 18,20O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Dorsch, T.; Bohlen, H. G.

    2009-08-01

    We have studied states in 18O and 20O with the (7Li,p) reaction on 12C and 14C targets at Elab(7Li) = 44 MeV, using the high resolution Q3D magnetic spectrometer at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory in Munich. The systematics of the excitation energies and cross sections were used to construct rotational bands with high moments of inertia. The bands observed are discussed in terms of underlying (14C⊗4He)-cluster structure for 18O, and for 20O the cluster structures are (14C⊗6He) and (14C⊗2n⊗α). The intrinsically reflection asymmetric shapes give rise to molecular bands, which appear as parity inversion doublets.

  9. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  10. Function of reactive oxygen species during animal development: passive or active?

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Luis; Hernández-García, David; Schnabel, Denhí; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Castro-Obregón, Susana

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative stress is considered causal of aging and pathological cell death, however, very little is known about its function in the natural processes that support the formation of an organism. It is generally thought that cells must continuously protect themselves from the possible damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) (passive ROS function). However, presently, ROS are recognized as physiologically relevant molecules that mediate cell responses to a variety of stimuli, and the activities of several molecules, some developmentally relevant, are directly or indirectly regulated by oxidative stress (active ROS function). Here we review recent data that are suggestive of specific ROS functions during development of animals, particularly mammals.

  11. Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant enzymes activity of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Cyanobacterium) under simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gen-bao; Liu, Yong-ding; Wang, Gao-hong; Song, Li-rong

    2004-12-01

    It was found that reactive oxygen species in Anabaena cells increased under simulated microgravity provided by clinostat. Activities of intracellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase were higher than those in the controlled samples during the 7 days' experiment. However, the contents of gluathione, an intracellular antioxidant, decreased in comparison with the controlled samples. The results suggested that microgravity provided by clinostat might break the oxidative/antioxidative balance. It indicated a protective mechanism in algal cells, that the total antioxidant system activity increased, which might play an important role for algal cells to adapt the environmental stress of microgravity.

  12. Active-medium inhomogeneities and optical quality of radiation of supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Boreysho, A S; Druzhinin, S L; Lobachev, V V; Savin, A V; Strakhov, S Yu; Trilis, A V

    2007-09-30

    Optical inhomogeneities of the active medium of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) and their effect on the radiation parameters are studied in the case when an unstable resonator is used. Classification of optical inhomogeneities and the main factors affecting the quality of COIL radiation are considered. The results of numerical simulation of a three-dimensional gas-dynamic active medium and an unstable optical resonator in the diffraction approximation are presented. The constraints in the fabrication of large-scale COILs associated with a deterioration of the optical quality of radiation are determined. (lasers)

  13. Singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g O sub 2 ) formation upon irradiation of an oxygen ( sup 3. Sigma. sub g sup minus O sub 2 )-organic molecule charge-transfer absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R. )

    1989-07-13

    Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) phosphorescence ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2} {l arrow} {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}: 1270 nm) has been observed in a time-resolved experiment subsequent to pulsed UV laser irradiation of the oxygen ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2})-organic molecule charge-transfer bands of liquid aromatic hydrocarbons (mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, benzene), ethers (tetrahydrofuran, 1,4-dioxane, glyme, diglyme, triglyme), alcohols (methanol, propanol), and aliphatic hydrocarbons (cyclohexane, cyclooctane, decahydronaphthalene). Although {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} could originate from a variety of different processes in these oxygenated solvent systems, we have used the results of several independent experiments to indicate that an oxygen-solvent charge-transfer (CT) state is the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} precursor. Other transient species have also been observed in time-resolved absorption experiments subsequent to pulsed UV irradiation of the oxygen-solvent CT bands. Some of these molecular transients, or species derived from these intermediates, may be responsible for an observed increase in the rate of {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} decay under certain conditions.

  14. Pt5Gd as a highly active and stable catalyst for oxygen electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Escribano, María; Verdaguer-Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo; Grønbjerg, Ulrik; Knudsen, Brian P; Jepsen, Anders K; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-10-10

    The activity and stability of Pt(5)Gd for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied, using a combination of electrochemical measurements, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS), and density functional theory calculations. Sputter-cleaned, polycrystalline Pt(5)Gd shows a 5-fold increase in ORR activity, relative to pure Pt at 0.9 V, approaching the most active in the literature for catalysts prepared in this way. AR-XPS profiles after electrochemical measurements in 0.1 M HClO(4) show the formation of a thick Pt overlayer on the bulk Pt(5)Gd, and the enhanced ORR activity can be explained by means of compressive strain effects. Furthermore, these novel bimetallic electrocatalysts are highly stable, which, in combination with their enhanced activity, makes them very promising for the development of new cathode catalysts for fuel cells. PMID:22998588

  15. Evidence that reactive oxygen species do not mediate NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Makio; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Isao; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hideyo; Karin, Michael; Kikugawa, Kiyomi

    2003-01-01

    It has been postulated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as second messengers leading to nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. This hypothesis is mainly based on the findings that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), compounds recognized as potential antioxidants, can inhibit NF-κB activation in a wide variety of cell types. Here we reveal that both NAC and PDTC inhibit NF-κB activation independently of antioxidative function. NAC selectively blocks tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced signaling by lowering the affinity of receptor to TNF. PDTC inhibits the IκB–ubiquitin ligase activity in the cell-free system where extracellular stimuli-regulated ROS production does not occur. Furthermore, we present evidence that endogenous ROS produced through Rac/NADPH oxidase do not mediate NF-κB signaling, but instead lower the magnitude of its activation. PMID:12839997

  16. Coupling of total hemoglobin concentration, oxygenation, and neural activity in rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Devor, Anna; Dunn, Andrew K; Andermann, Mark L; Ulbert, Istvan; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M

    2003-07-17

    Recent advances in brain imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), offer great promise for noninvasive mapping of brain function. However, the indirect nature of the imaging signals to the underlying neural activity limits the interpretation of the resulting maps. The present report represents the first systematic study with sufficient statistical power to quantitatively characterize the relationship between changes in blood oxygen content and the neural spiking and synaptic activity. Using two-dimensional optical measurements of hemodynamic signals, simultaneous recordings of neural activity, and an event-related stimulus paradigm, we demonstrate that (1) there is a strongly nonlinear relationship between electrophysiological measures of neuronal activity and the hemodynamic response, (2) the hemodynamic response continues to grow beyond the saturation of electrical activity, and (3) the initial increase in deoxyhemoglobin that precedes an increase in blood volume is counterbalanced by an equal initial decrease in oxyhemoglobin. PMID:12873390

  17. An Inner-Sphere Mechanism for Molecular Oxygen Reduction Catalyzed by Copper Amine Oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Smirnov, Valeriy V.; Lanci, Michael P.; Brown, Doreen E.; Shepard, Eric M.; Dooley, David M.; Roth, Justine P.

    2008-01-01

    Copper and topaquinone (TPQ) containing amine oxidases utilize O2 for the metabolism of biogenic amines while concomitantly generating H2O2 for use by the cell. The mechanism of O2 reduction has been the subject of long-standing debate due to the obscuring influence of a proton-coupled electron transfer between the tyrosine-derived TPQ and copper, a rapidly established equilibrium precluding assignment of the enzyme in its reactive form. Here we show that substrate-reduced pea seedling amine oxidase (PSAO) exists predominantly in the CuI, TPQ semiquinone state. A new mechanistic proposal for O2 reduction is advanced on the basis of thermodynamic considerations together with kinetic studies (at varying pH, temperature and viscosity), the identification of steady-state intermediates and the analysis of competitive oxygen kinetic isotope effects: 18O KIEs, [kcat/KM(16,16O2)]/[kcat/KM(16,18O2)]. The 18O KIE = 1.0136 ± 0.0013 at pH 7.2 is independent of temperature from 5 to 47°C and insignificantly changed to 1.0122 ± 0.0020 upon raising the pH to 9, thus indicating the absence of kinetic complexity. Using density functional methods, the effect is found to be precisely in the range expected for reversible O2 binding to CuI to afford a superoxide, [CuII(η1-O2)−I]+, intermediate. Electron transfer from the TPQ semiquinone follows in the first irreversible step to form a peroxide, CuII(η1-O2)−II, intermediate driving the reduction of O2. The similar 18O KIEs reported for copper amine oxidases from other sources raise the possibility that all enzymes react by related inner-sphere mechanisms although additional experiments are needed to test this proposal. PMID:18582059

  18. Transcript levels of antioxidative genes and oxygen radical scavenging enzyme activities in chilled zucchini squash in response to superatmospheric oxygen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcript levels of antioxidative genes including Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), Cu/Zn SOD, ascorbate peroxidise (APX), and catalase (CAT) do not vary significantly during storage at 5 °C with high oxygen treatment in freshly harvested zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Elite). However, ...

  19. The activation strain model and molecular orbital theory

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Lando P; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The activation strain model is a powerful tool for understanding reactivity, or inertness, of molecular species. This is done by relating the relative energy of a molecular complex along the reaction energy profile to the structural rigidity of the reactants and the strength of their mutual interactions: ΔE(ζ) = ΔEstrain(ζ) + ΔEint(ζ). We provide a detailed discussion of the model, and elaborate on its strong connection with molecular orbital theory. Using these approaches, a causal relationship is revealed between the properties of the reactants and their reactivity, e.g., reaction barriers and plausible reaction mechanisms. This methodology may reveal intriguing parallels between completely different types of chemical transformations. Thus, the activation strain model constitutes a unifying framework that furthers the development of cross-disciplinary concepts throughout various fields of chemistry. We illustrate the activation strain model in action with selected examples from literature. These examples demonstrate how the methodology is applied to different research questions, how results are interpreted, and how insights into one chemical phenomenon can lead to an improved understanding of another, seemingly completely different chemical process. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:324–343. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1221 PMID:26753009

  20. Indirect Attractions between Superionic Di-interstitial Protons on Mid-Oxygens in Water at Extreme Conditions: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Kazuo; Tasaka, Tomofumi; Nagayama, Hisashi; Tsumuraya, Mary I.; Tsumuraya, Masato

    2014-10-01

    The first principles molecular dynamics study enables us to elucidate attractions between the di-interstitial protons on mid-oxygens in superionic water at an extreme high pressure and the temperature. The present analyses elucidate the existence of inner and outer bonded interstitial protons around oxygens and reveal two types of attractions between the protons and oxygens in the water. One is a covalent attraction between them which induces a covalent bonded indirect attraction between the di-interstitial protons on the mid-oxygens. The other is a Coulomb attraction between them which induces a Coulomb type indirect attraction between the di-interstitial protons on the mid-oxygens. The indirect attractions decrease the impurity diffusion of the protons which reduces Haven's ratios of the protons in the water. The negligible amount of the instantaneously formed proton dimers indicates a failure of the caterpillar diffusion mechanism or the Frenkel-Kontorova model for the water. The incomplete electron transfer from the protons to the oxygens reduces the Coulomb atraction between the ionized oxygens and the protons which weakens the sublattice of the mobile protons with smaller mass and size than the oxygens.

  1. Molecular dissection of AKT activation in lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Du, Jinyan; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2013-01-01

    AKT is a critical signaling node downstream of PI3K, which is often activated in cancer. We analyzed the state of activation of AKT in 80 human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines under serum starvation conditions. We identified 13 lines which showed persistent AKT activation in the absence of serum. In 12 of the 13 lines, AKT activation could be attributed to loss of PTEN, activating mutation in EGFR or PIK3CA, or amplification of ERBB2. HCC2429 was the only cell line that had no alterations in those genes, but had high phospho-AKT(Ser473) levels under serum starvation conditions. However, the activation of AKT in HCC2429 was PI3K- and mTORC2-dependent based upon use of specific inhibitors. Kinome tyrosine phosphorylation profiling showed that both Notch and SRC were highly activated in this cell line. Despite the activation of Notch, AKT activation and cell survival were not affected by Notch inhibitors DAPT or Compound E. In contrast, SRC inhibitors PP2 and dasatinib both significantly decreased pAKT(Ser473) levels and reduced cell survival by inducing apoptosis. Further, a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibition synergistically blocked activation of AKT and induced apoptosis. Over-expression of SRC has been identified previously in human lung cancers, and these results suggest that a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibitors may have unique therapeutic benefit for a subset of lung cancers with these molecular features. PMID:23319332

  2. The fate of hydrogen peroxide as an oxygen source for bioremediation activities within saturated aquifer systems.

    PubMed

    Zappi, M; White, K; Hwang, H M; Bajpai, R; Qasim, M

    2000-10-01

    In situ bioremediation is an innovative technique for the remediation of contaminated aquifers that involves the use of microorganisms to remediate soils and groundwaters polluted by hazardous substances. During its application, this process may require the addition of nutrients and/or electron acceptors to stimulate appropriate biological activity. Hydrogen peroxide has been commonly used as an oxygen source because of the limited concentrations of oxygen that can be transferred into the groundwater using above-ground aeration followed by reinjection of the oxygenated groundwater into the aquifer or subsurface air sparging of the aquifer. Because of several potential interactions of H2O2 with various aquifer material constituents, its decomposition may be too rapid, making effective introduction of the H2O2 into targeted treatment zones extremely difficult and costly. Therefore, a bench-scale study was conducted to determine the fate of H2O2 within subsurface aquifer environments. The purpose of this investigation was to identify those aquifer constituents, both biotic and abiotic, that are most active in controlling the fate of H2O2. The decomposition rates of H2O2 were determined using both equilibrated water samples and soil slurries. Results showed H2O2 decomposition to be effected by several commonly found inorganic soil components; however, biologically mediated catalytic reactions were determined to be the most substantial.

  3. Composition-controlled PtCo alloy nanocubes with tuned electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Il; Lee, Su-Un; Kim, Woo Youn; Choi, Ran; Hong, Kwangwoo; Nam, Ki Min; Han, Sang Woo; Park, Joon T

    2012-11-01

    Modification of the electronic structure and lattice contraction of Pt alloy nanocatalysts through control over their morphology and composition has been a crucial issue for improving their electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. In the present work, we synthesized PtCo alloy nanocubes with controlled compositions (Pt(x)Co NCs, x = 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9) by regulating the ratio of surfactants and the amount of Co precursor to elucidate the effect of the composition of nanocatalysts on their ORR activity. Pt(x)Co NCs had a Pt-skin structure after electrochemical treatment. The electrocatalysis experiments revealed a strong correlation between ORR activity and Co composition. Pt₃Co NCs exhibited the best ORR performance among the various Pt(x)Co NCs. From density functional theory calculations, a typical volcano-type relationship was established between ORR activity and oxygen binding energy (E(OB)) on NC surfaces, which showed that Pt₃Co NCs had the optimal E(OB) to achieve the maximum ORR activity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements demonstrated that the electronic structure and lattice contraction of the Pt(x)Co NCs could be tuned by controlling the composition of NCs, which are highly correlated with the trends of E(OB) change.

  4. Design Insights for Tuning the Electrocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Oxides for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Manivannan, A; Balasubramanian, M; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2015-04-16

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers based on aqueous alkaline electrolytes hold the potential to be sustainable solutions to address the challenge of storing large amounts of electrical energy generated from solar and wind resources. For these batteries and electrolyzers to be economically viable, it is essential to have efficient, durable, and inexpensive electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction. In this article, we describe new insights for predicting and tuning the activity of inexpensive transition metal oxides for designing efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts. We have focused on understanding the factors determining the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in a strong alkaline medium. To this end, we have conducted a systematic investigation of nanophase calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt manganese oxide, an example of a mixed metal oxide that can be tuned for its electrocatalytic activity by varying the transition metal composition. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical polarization experiments, and analysis of mechanisms, we have identified the key determinants of electrocatalytic activity. We have found that the Tafel slopes are determined by the oxidation states and the bond energy of the surface intermediates of Mn-OH and Co-OH bonds while the catalytic activity increased with the average d-electron occupancy of the sigma* orbital of the M-OH bond. We anticipate that such understanding will be very useful in predicting the behavior of other transition metal oxide catalysts.

  5. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology. PMID:24264379

  6. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-11-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology.

  7. Cigarette smoke reversibly activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Daijo, Hiroki; Hoshino, Yuma; Kai, Shinichi; Suzuki, Kengo; Nishi, Kenichiro; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Harada, Hiroshi; Hirota, Kiichi

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a major contributor to the development of a large number of fatal and debilitating disorders. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of CS in lung disease are largely unknown. To elucidate these pathophysiological processes, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CS extract (CSE) and CS on the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). CSE induced concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of HIF-1α protein in human lung epithelial-like cells under non-hypoxic conditions. Genes upregulated by HIF-1, including vascular endothelial growth factor and regulated in development and DNA damage response 1, both of which are involved in smoking-induced emphysematous changes, were increased by CSE treatment under non-hypoxic conditions in vitro and in vivo. Further investigation revealed that reactive oxygen species were generated in cells exposed to CSE and were required for CSE-mediated induction of HIF-1α protein, as was activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. In conclusion, we demonstrated that CSE and CS induced HIF-1 activation in vitro and in vivo, respectively. The evidence warrants further investigation to indicate that HIF-1 plays an important role in CS-induced gene expression, which is deeply involved in pulmonary cellular stress and small airway remodelling. PMID:27680676

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Activation in Diabetic Nephropathy: A Hidden Target

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Shaaban; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, oxidative stress and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) dysfunction have been implicated in diabetic nephropathy (DN) progression, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are far from being fully understood. In addition to the systemic RAS, the existence of a local intrarenal RAS in renal proximal tubular cells has been recognized. Angiotensinogen is the sole precursor of all angiotensins (Ang). Intrarenal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, Ang II level and RAS gene expression are up-regulated in diabetes, indicating that intrarenal ROS and RAS activation play an important role in DN. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is one of the major protective processes that occurs in response to intracellular oxidative stress. Nrf2 stimulates an array of antioxidant enzymes that convert excessive ROS to less reactive or less damaging forms. Recent studies have, however, revealed that Nrf2 activation might have other undesirable effects in diabetic animals and in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of the relationship between ROS, Nrf2 and intra renal RAS activation in DN progression as well as possible novel target(s) for DN treatment. PMID:26213634

  9. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  10. Tuning the surface oxygen concentration of {111} surrounded ceria nanocrystals for enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Kaneti, Yusuf Valentino; Li, Sean

    2015-12-01

    For oxide semiconductors, the morphology, particle size and oxygen vacancies are usually considered as key influential parameters for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants/dyes. It is widely accepted that cation doping not only modifies their phase and microstructures but also introduces variations in oxygen vacancy concentration. Herein, we report the fabrication of sub-10 nm sized pure and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals (NCs) via a facile, green hydrothermal method for the investigation of photocatalytic activities. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the crystal phase and morphology of the as-prepared nanocrystals. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques were implemented to investigate the presence and variations in oxygen vacancy concentration in un-doped and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals. The photocatalytic activity results revealed that 10 at% doping is the optimal indium doping level to demonstrate superior dye removal efficiency (~40%) over un-doped and doped CeO2 NCs. Moreover, the 10% In-doped CeO2 nanocrystals expressed excellent cycling stability and superior photocatalytic performance toward other dye pollutants. Finally, on the basis of our findings, a possible photocatalytic mechanism in which indium doping can generate more surface oxygen vacancies in the ceria lattice which delay the electron-hole recombination rates, thus increasing the lifetime of electron-hole separation for enhanced photocatalytic performances was proposed.For oxide semiconductors, the morphology, particle size and oxygen vacancies are usually considered as key influential parameters for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants/dyes. It is widely accepted that cation doping not only modifies their phase and microstructures but also introduces variations in oxygen vacancy concentration. Herein, we report the fabrication of sub-10 nm sized pure and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals (NCs) via a facile

  11. Effect of surface phosphorus functionalities of activated carbons containing oxygen and nitrogen on electrochemical capacitance

    PubMed Central

    Hulicova-Jurcakova, Denisa; Seredych, Mykola; Lu, Gao Qing; Kodiweera, N.K.A.C.; Stallworth, Phillip E.; Greenbaum, Steven; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2009-01-01

    Micro/mesoporous activated carbons containing oxygen and phosphorus heteroatoms were modified by incorporation of nitrogen using melamine and urea precursors. The surface chemistry was analyzed by the means of elemental analysis, XPS, and 31P MAS NMR. The results indicate that upon the incorporation of nitrogen at high temperatures not only new species involving carbon/nitrogen/oxygen are formed but also the phosphorous environment is significantly altered. Both urea and melamine precursors have similar effects on formation of P–N and P–C bonds. These compounds, although present in small but measurable quantities seem to affect the performance of carbons in electrochemical capacitors. With an increase in the heterogeneity of phosphorus containing species and with a decrease in the content pyrophosphates the capacitance increases and the retention ratio of the capacitor is improved. PMID:20354586

  12. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  13. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-07

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  14. Oxygen deficient ZnO1-x nanosheets with high visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong-Li; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Xi-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Xie, Xiao; Xu, An-Wu

    2015-04-01

    Zinc oxide is one of the most important wide-band-gap (3.2 eV) materials with versatile properties, however, it can not be excited by visible light. In this work, we have developed an exquisite and simple way to prepare oxygen-deficient ZnO1-x nanosheets with a gray-colored appearance and excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. Detailed analysis based on UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra confirms the existence of oxygen vacancies in ZnO1-x. The incorporation of oxygen defects could effectively extend the light absorption of ZnO1-x into the visible-light region due to the fact that the energy of the localized state is located in the forbidden gap. Thus, our obtained ZnO1-x shows a higher photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) compared to defect-free ZnO under visible light illumination. Additionally, the high content of &z.rad;OH radicals with a strong photo-oxidation capability over the ZnO1-x nanosheets significantly contributes to the improvement in the photocatalytic performance. Our oxygen deficient ZnO1-x sample shows a very high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO even after 5 cycles without any obvious decline. The results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the optoelectronic and photocatalytic performances of nanomaterials.Zinc oxide is one of the most important wide-band-gap (3.2 eV) materials with versatile properties, however, it can not be excited by visible light. In this work, we have developed an exquisite and simple way to prepare oxygen-deficient ZnO1-x nanosheets with a gray-colored appearance and excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. Detailed analysis based on UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra confirms the existence of oxygen vacancies in ZnO1-x. The incorporation of oxygen defects could effectively extend the light

  15. High performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Clement, Jason T.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-10-01

    The roundtrip electrochemical energy efficiency is improved from 63% to 76% at a current density of 200 mA cm-2 in an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) by utilizing modified carbon paper electrodes in the high-performance no-gap design. Heat treatment of the carbon paper electrodes in a 42% oxygen/58% nitrogen atmosphere increases the electrochemically wetted surface area from 0.24 to 51.22 m2 g-1, resulting in a 100-140 mV decrease in activation overpotential at operationally relevant current densities. An enriched oxygen environment decreases the amount of treatment time required to achieve high surface area. The increased efficiency and greater depth of discharge doubles the total usable energy stored in a fixed amount of electrolyte during operation at 200 mA cm-2.

  16. Toward Understanding the Molecular Bases of Stretch Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Sanz-Hernández, Máximo; de Simone, Alfonso; Bullard, Belinda; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Muscles are usually activated by calcium binding to the calcium sensory protein troponin-C, which is one of the three components of the troponin complex. However, in cardiac and insect flight muscle activation is also produced by mechanical stress. Little is known about the molecular bases of this calcium-independent activation. In Lethocerus, a giant water bug often used as a model system because of its large muscle fibers, there are two troponin-C isoforms, called F1 and F2, that have distinct roles in activating the muscle. It has been suggested that this can be explained either by differences in structural features or by differences in the interactions with other proteins. Here we have compared the structural and dynamic properties of the two proteins and shown how they differ. We have also mapped the interactions of the F2 isoform with peptides spanning the sequence of its natural partner, troponin-I. Our data have allowed us to build a model of the troponin complex and may eventually help in understanding the specialized function of the F1 and F2 isoforms and the molecular mechanism of stretch activation. PMID:27226601

  17. Incorporation of small molecular weight active agents into polymeric components.

    PubMed

    Iconomopoulou, Sofia M; Kallitsis, Joannis K; Voyiatzis, George A

    2008-01-01

    The incorporation of small molecular weight active agents into polymeric matrixes bearing controlled release characteristics represents an interesting strategy with numerous useful applications. Antimicrobials, biocides, fungicides or drugs, encapsulated into erodible or non-erodible polymeric micro-spheres, micro-capsules and micro-shells or/and embedded into continuous polymeric matrixes, are controlled released either by particular degradation routes or/and by specific stimuli. Cross-linking, curing or micro-porosity generating agents acting during polymerization impart additional controlled encapsulation characteristics to the active substances. Release modulating agents, like retardants or carrier materials used as vehicles are often encapsulated into microspheres or dispersed within polymeric compositions for the controlled introduction of an active agent into a liquid-based medium. The aim of this review is to reveal relevant strategies reported in recent patents on the encapsulation or incorporation of low molecular weight active agents into the matrix of polymers bearing controlled release characteristics. The inventions described implicate the formation of both erodible and non erodible polymer microparticles that contain active ingredients. Modification of polymer matrix and inorganic porous carriers represent pertinent major strategies that have been also developed and patented.

  18. Reactive oxygen species in signalling the transcriptional activation of WIPK expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Yoo, Seung Jin; Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-07-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases represented by tobacco WIPK (wounding-induced protein kinase) and its orthologs in other species are unique in their regulation at transcriptional level in response to stress and pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation of WIPK is essential for induced WIPK activity, and activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) by the constitutively active NtMEK2(DD) is sufficient to induce WIPK gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of SIPK on WIPK gene expression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a combination of pharmacological and gain-of-function transgenic approaches, we studied the relationship among SIPK activation, WIPK gene activation in response to fungal cryptogein, light-dependent ROS generation in chloroplasts, and ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In the conditional gain-of-function GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic tobacco, induction of WIPK expression is dependent on the ROS generation in chloroplasts. Consistently, methyl viologen, an inducer of ROS generation in chloroplasts, highly activated WIPK expression. In addition to chloroplast-originated ROS, H(2)O(2) generated from the cell-surface NADPH oxidase could also activate WIPK gene expression, and inhibition of cryptogein-induced ROS generation also abolished WIPK gene activation. Our data demonstrate that WIPK gene activation is mediated by ROS, which provides a mechanism by which ROS influence cellular signalling processes in plant stress/defence response.

  19. Influence of molecular oxygen on iodine atoms production in an RF discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheyev, P. A.; Ufimtsev, N. I.; Demyanov, A. V.; Kochetov, I. V.; Azyazov, V. N.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The results of the experiments and modeling of CH3I dissociation in a 40 MHz RF discharge plasma are presented. A discharge chamber of an original design, consisting of quartz tubes between two planar electrodes, permitted us to produce iodine atoms with a number density up to 2  ×  1016 cm‑3. In this discharge chamber, contrary to the previous experiments with a DC discharge and RF discharge with bare planar electrodes, contamination of the walls of the tubes did not disturb discharge stability, thus increasing iodine production rate. A substantial increase in CH3I dissociation efficiency due to the addition of oxygen into Ar(He) : CH3I mixtures was observed. Complete CH3I dissociation in the Ar : CH3I : O2 mixture occurred at 200 W discharge power, while a fraction of discharge power spent on iodine atoms production at 0.17 mmol s‑1 CH3I flow rate amounted to 16%. Extensive numerical modeling showed satisfactory agreement with the experiments and permitted us to estimate a previously unknown rate of constants for the processes: Ar*  +  CH2I2  →  Ar  +  CH2  +  I  +  I – 1.5  ×  10‑11 cm3 s‑1 Ar*  +  CH2I2  →  Ar  +  CH2I+  +  I  +  e – 10‑11 cm3 s‑1. Also, the cross section for the process CH2I2  +  e  →  CH2  +  I  +  I  +  e was estimated to be five times smaller than for the analogous process with CH3I.

  20. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Disease Activity in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Aikawa, Elena; Newby, David E; Tarkin, Jason M; Rudd, James H F; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-07-01

    Major focus has been placed on the identification of vulnerable plaques as a means of improving the prediction of myocardial infarction. However, this strategy has recently been questioned on the basis that the majority of these individual coronary lesions do not in fact go on to cause clinical events. Attention is, therefore, shifting to alternative imaging modalities that might provide a more complete pan-coronary assessment of the atherosclerotic disease process. These include markers of disease activity with the potential to discriminate between patients with stable burnt-out disease that is no longer metabolically active and those with active atheroma, faster disease progression, and increased risk of infarction. This review will examine how novel molecular imaging approaches can provide such assessments, focusing on inflammation and microcalcification activity, the importance of these processes to coronary atherosclerosis, and the advantages and challenges posed by these techniques. PMID:27390335

  1. Palladium(II) Catalyzed Cyclization-Carbonylation-Cyclization Coupling Reaction of (ortho-Alkynyl Phenyl) (Methoxymethyl) Sulfides Using Molecular Oxygen as the Terminal Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rong; Kusakabe, Taichi; Yatsu, Tomofumi; Kanno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Keisuke; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Kato, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    An efficient Pd(II)/Pd⁰-p-benzoquinone/hydroquinone-CuCl₂/CuCl catalyst system was developed that uses environmentally friendly molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant to catalyze the cyclization-carbonylation-cyclization coupling reaction (CCC-coupling reaction) of (o-alkynyl phenyl) (methoxymethyl) sulfides. PMID:27607997

  2. Palladium(II) Catalyzed Cyclization-Carbonylation-Cyclization Coupling Reaction of (ortho-Alkynyl Phenyl) (Methoxymethyl) Sulfides Using Molecular Oxygen as the Terminal Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rong; Kusakabe, Taichi; Yatsu, Tomofumi; Kanno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Keisuke; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Kato, Keisuke

    2016-09-05

    An efficient Pd(II)/Pd⁰-p-benzoquinone/hydroquinone-CuCl₂/CuCl catalyst system was developed that uses environmentally friendly molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant to catalyze the cyclization-carbonylation-cyclization coupling reaction (CCC-coupling reaction) of (o-alkynyl phenyl) (methoxymethyl) sulfides.

  3. CHEMISTRY OF FOG WATERS IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY: 1. IN SITU PHOTOFORMATION OF HYDROXYL RADICAL AND SINGLET MOLECULAR OXYGEN. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aqueous-phase photoformation of hydroxyl radical (characterOH) and singlet molecular oxygen (O2(1Δg) or 1O*

  4. Singlet molecular oxygen evolution upon simple acidification of aqueous hypochlorite: Application to studies on the deleterious health effects of chlorinated drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.U. ); Kasha, M. )

    1994-12-20

    A study of the pH profile of the decomposition of aqueous hypochlorite has revealed the evolution (onset at pH 8) of single ([sup 1][Delta][sub g]) molecular oxygen (singlet spin state dioxygen) detected spectroscopically (1268 nm), prior to the appearance of chlorine (onset at pH 5.5). The possible mechanism of the singlet state dioxygen evolution is presented, and the origin of its chloride ion dependence is discussed, especially in reference to chloride ion dependence of singlet molecular oxygen evolution in biological systems. Recent epidemiological analyses of the correlation of human cancer with chlorinated water supplies focus attention on the singlet oxygen mechanisms of DNA lesion formation. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  6. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF.

  7. Pd-Pt Bimetallic Nanodendrites with High Activity for Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Tao, J.; Jiang, M.; Camargo, P.H.C.; Cho, E.C.; Lu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Xia, Y.

    2009-06-05

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide a great opportunity to improve their catalytic properties and increase their activity on a mass basis. We synthesized Pd-Pt bimetallic nanodendrites consisting of a dense array of Pt branches on a Pd core by reducing K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} with L-ascorbic acid in the presence of uniform Pd nanocrystal seeds in an aqueous solution. The Pt branches supported on faceted Pd nanocrystals exhibited relatively large surface areas and particularly active facets toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the rate-determining step in a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell. The Pd-Pt nanodendrites were two and a half times more active on the basis of equivalent Pt mass for the ORR than the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst and five times more active than the first-generation supportless Pt-black catalyst.

  8. State-selective reaction dynamics of atomic oxygen with molecular hydrogen, methanethiol, and ethanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiande

    2000-11-01

    Reaction dynamics have been studied for the following four systems: (1)The rotational state distribution of the nascent NO fragment generated from the photodissociation of (i- C3H7) 3SiONO near 226 nm (S2 absorption band) has been obtained via 1+1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy and with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). The absence of vibrational excitation and relative cold rotational distribution suggest a direct dissociation mechanism upon photolysis of the parent molecule. (2)The reaction dynamics of O(3P) and H2(v = 1). The quantum state specific reactant H2(v = 1) was prepared effectively via Stimulated Raman Pumping (SRP). The internal quantum state distribution of the product OH (X 2Π1/2,3/2) was interrogated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. The one-quantum vibrational excitation of hydrogen not only dramatically increases the reaction rate, but also may have slightly changed the reaction mechanism from the known ground-state hydrogen reaction. (3)Experimental and ab initio studies of the reaction dynamics of O(3P) + CH3SH. Experiments utilized LIF detection of OH, CH3S, SO, and also HSO. Theoretically, ab initio energy evaluations using Gaussian 94 software and G2MP2 theory, and ab initio molecular dynamics were carried out for the reaction. The combination of the experimental and theoretical works has resulted in great insight into the reaction mechanism. (4)Experimental study of the reaction dynamics of O(3P) + C2H 5SH by the similar experimental measurements to the reaction O( 3P) + CH3SH. The reaction O(3P) + C 2H5SD further eliminated the ambiguity in confirming the each other in suggesting the proper reaction mechanisms for the two reaction systems.

  9. Interactions of dietary carotenoids with activated (singlet) oxygen and free radicals: potential effects for human health.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Fritz; Edge, Ruth; Truscott, George

    2012-02-01

    Molecular mechanisms associated with the anti-/pro-oxidative properties of carotenoids (CARs) are described in organic solvents, micro-heterogeneous environments and model lipid membranes and in cellular suspensions. Singlet oxygen is important in the skin and eye and CARs are efficient singlet oxygen (SO) quenchers with corresponding rate constants near diffusion controlled (typically app. 10¹⁰ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) with lycopene (LYC) exhibiting the most efficient quenching in organic solvents. However, in membrane environments there is little or no difference in the quenching efficiency between the dietary CARs. Furthermore, aggregation of CARs, particularly those in the macula (lutein and zeaxanthin), markedly reduces SO quenching efficiency. Free radical interactions with CARs leads to at least three processes, electron and hydrogen atom transfer and adduct formation. The most studied is electron transfer where the CAR loses an electron to become a radical cation. The reactivity/lifetime of such CAR radicals may lead to a switch from anti- to pro-oxidant behaviour of CARs. These reactions are related to CAR redox potentials with LYC being the lowest (most easily oxidised) allowing LYC to reduce/repair all other CAR radical cations and LYC 'sacrificed' where mixtures of CARs are present in oxidative environments. Such redox-controlled reactions may lead to deleterious as well as beneficial health effects.

  10. Structural Basis for Oxygen Activation at a Heterodinuclear Manganese/Iron Cofactor.

    PubMed

    Griese, Julia J; Kositzki, Ramona; Schrapers, Peer; Branca, Rui M M; Nordström, Anders; Lehtiö, Janne; Haumann, Michael; Högbom, Martin

    2015-10-16

    Two recently discovered groups of prokaryotic di-metal carboxylate proteins harbor a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor. These are the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase R2 proteins and a group of oxidases that are found predominantly in pathogens and extremophiles, called R2-like ligand-binding oxidases (R2lox). We have recently shown that the Mn/Fe cofactor of R2lox self-assembles from Mn(II) and Fe(II) in vitro and catalyzes formation of a tyrosine-valine ether cross-link in the protein scaffold (Griese, J. J., Roos, K., Cox, N., Shafaat, H. S., Branca, R. M., Lehtiö, J., Gräslund, A., Lubitz, W., Siegbahn, P. E., and Högbom, M. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 17189-17194). Here, we present a detailed structural analysis of R2lox in the nonactivated, reduced, and oxidized resting Mn/Fe- and Fe/Fe-bound states, as well as the nonactivated Mn/Mn-bound state. X-ray crystallography and x-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrate that the active site ligand configuration of R2lox is essentially the same regardless of cofactor composition. Both the Mn/Fe and the diiron cofactor activate oxygen and catalyze formation of the ether cross-link, whereas the dimanganese cluster does not. The structures delineate likely routes for gated oxygen and substrate access to the active site that are controlled by the redox state of the cofactor. These results suggest that oxygen activation proceeds via similar mechanisms at the Mn/Fe and Fe/Fe center and that R2lox proteins might utilize either cofactor in vivo based on metal availability.

  11. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  12. Structural Basis for Oxygen Activation at a Heterodinuclear Manganese/Iron Cofactor*

    PubMed Central

    Griese, Julia J.; Kositzki, Ramona; Schrapers, Peer; Branca, Rui M. M.; Nordström, Anders; Lehtiö, Janne; Haumann, Michael; Högbom, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Two recently discovered groups of prokaryotic di-metal carboxylate proteins harbor a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor. These are the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase R2 proteins and a group of oxidases that are found predominantly in pathogens and extremophiles, called R2-like ligand-binding oxidases (R2lox). We have recently shown that the Mn/Fe cofactor of R2lox self-assembles from MnII and FeII in vitro and catalyzes formation of a tyrosine-valine ether cross-link in the protein scaffold (Griese, J. J., Roos, K., Cox, N., Shafaat, H. S., Branca, R. M., Lehtiö, J., Gräslund, A., Lubitz, W., Siegbahn, P. E., and Högbom, M. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 17189–17194). Here, we present a detailed structural analysis of R2lox in the nonactivated, reduced, and oxidized resting Mn/Fe- and Fe/Fe-bound states, as well as the nonactivated Mn/Mn-bound state. X-ray crystallography and x-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrate that the active site ligand configuration of R2lox is essentially the same regardless of cofactor composition. Both the Mn/Fe and the diiron cofactor activate oxygen and catalyze formation of the ether cross-link, whereas the dimanganese cluster does not. The structures delineate likely routes for gated oxygen and substrate access to the active site that are controlled by the redox state of the cofactor. These results suggest that oxygen activation proceeds via similar mechanisms at the Mn/Fe and Fe/Fe center and that R2lox proteins might utilize either cofactor in vivo based on metal availability. PMID:26324712

  13. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Alter Sympathetic Activity During Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Josiane C; Flôr, Atalia F L; França-Silva, Maria S; Balarini, Camille M; Braga, Valdir A

    2015-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II), which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs), mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO). Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS): dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin, and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS. PMID:26779026

  15. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  16. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  17. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments.

    PubMed

    Thureborn, Petter; Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  18. Activation of Akt protects alveoli from neonatal oxygen-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Coltan, Lavinia; Eaton, Farah; Barr, Amy J; Dyck, Jason R B; Thébaud, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the main complication of extreme prematurity, resulting in part from mechanical ventilation and oxygen therapy. Currently, no specific treatment exists for BPD. BPD is characterized by an arrest in alveolar development and increased apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Type 2 AECs are putative distal lung progenitor cells, capable of regenerating alveolar homeostasis after injury. We hypothesized that the protection of AEC2 death via the activation of the prosurvival Akt pathway prevents arrested alveolar development in experimental BPD. We show that the pharmacologic inhibition of the prosurvival factor Akt pathway with wortmannin during the critical period of alveolar development impairs alveolar development in newborn rats, resulting in larger and fewer alveoli, reminiscent of BPD. Conversely, in an experimental model of BPD induced by oxygen exposure of newborn rats, alveolar simplification is associated with a decreased activation of lung Akt. In vitro studies with rat lung epithelial (RLE) cells cultured in hyperoxia (95% O(2)) showed decreased apoptosis and improved cell survival after the forced expression of active Akt by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. In vivo, adenovirus-mediated Akt gene transfer preserves alveolar architecture in the newborn rat model of hyperoxia-induced BPD. We conclude that inhibition of the prosurvival factor Akt disrupts normal lung development, whereas the expression of active Akt in experimental BPD preserves alveolar development. We speculate that the modulation of apoptosis may have therapeutic potential in lung diseases characterized by alveolar damage. PMID:20348209

  19. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular water is an important pool of oxygen and hydrogen atoms for biosynthesis. Intracellular water is usually assumed to be isotopically identical to extracellular water, but an unexpected experimental result caused us to question this assumption. Heme O isolated from Escherichia coli cells grown in 95% H218O contained only a fraction of the theoretical value of labeled oxygen at a position where the O atom was known to be derived from water. In fact, fewer than half of the oxygen atoms were labeled. In an effort to explain this surprising result, we developed a method to determine the isotope ratios of intracellular water in cultured cells. The results of our experiments showed that during active growth, up to 70% of the oxygen atoms and 50% of the hydrogen atoms in the intracellular water of E. coli are generated during metabolism and can be isotopically distinct from extracellular water. The fraction of isotopically distinct atoms was substantially less in stationary phase and chilled cells, consistent with our hypothesis that less metabolically-generated water would be present in cells with lower metabolic activity. Our results were consistent with and explained the result of the heme O labeling experiment. Only about 40% of the O atoms on the heme O molecule were labeled because, presumably, only about 40% of the water inside the cells was 18O water that had diffused in from the culture medium. The rest of the intracellular water contained 16O atoms derived from either nutrients or atmospheric oxygen. To test whether we could also detect metabolically-derived hydrogen atoms in cellular constituents, we isolated fatty acids from log-phase and stationary phase E. coli and determined the H isotope ratios of individual fatty acids. The results of these experiments showed that environmental water contributed more H atoms to fatty acids isolated in stationary phase than to the same fatty acids isolated from log-phase cells. Stable isotope analyses of

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Inflammasome Activation during Microbial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Petr; Monack, Denise M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The innate immune system plays a crucial role in the rapid recognition and elimination of invading microbes. Detection of microbes relies on germ-line encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize essential bacterial molecules, so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). A subset of PRRs, belonging to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) and the PYHIN protein families, detects viral and bacterial pathogens in the cytosol of host cells and induces the assembly of a multi-protein signaling platform called the inflammasome. The inflammasome serves as an activation platform for the mammalian cysteine protease caspase-1, a central mediator of innate immunity. Active caspase-1 promotes the maturation and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 as well as protein involved in cytoprotection and tissue repair. In addition, caspase-1 initiates a novel form of cell death called pyroptosis. Here we discuss latest advances and our insights on inflammasome stimulation by two model intracellular pathogens, Francisella tularensis and Salmonella typhimurium. Recent studies on these pathogens have significantly shaped our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation and how microbes can evade or manipulate inflammasome activity. In addition, we review the role of the inflammasome adapter ASC in the caspase-1 autoproteolysis and new insights into the structure of the inflammasome complex. PMID:21884176

  1. Mutagenicity of Maillard reaction products from D-glucose-amino acid mixtures and possible roles of active oxygens in the mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Kim, I S; Yeum, D M; Park, Y H

    1991-01-01

    The mutagenicity for Salmonella typhimurium TA100 without S9 mix of Maillard reaction products (MRP) obtained from equimolar amounts of glucose and amino acids under different pHs was investigated. MRP derived from arginine and lysine exhibited the strongest mutagenicity, and weaker mutagenicity was shown by the mixtures with alanine, serine, threonine and monosodium glutamate. MRP from proline and cysteine had no detectable mutagenicity. Furthermore, glucose-arginine and glucose-lysine reaction mixtures, which presented a marked mutagenicity, showed pH- and browning intensity-dependent expression of their mutagenic activities. The mutagenicity of MRP, especially glucose-arginine and glucose-lysine mixtures, was significantly suppressed by active oxygen scavengers such as cysteine, mannitol, alpha-tocopherol, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reducing agents such as sodium bisulfite and glutathione. Among these desmutagenic factors tested, cysteine, catalase, sodium bisulfite and glutathione had higher desmutagenic activities than the others. Accordingly, it is assumed that the mutagenicity of MRP is due to the direct action of low-molecular-weight compounds such as carbonyls and heterocyclics produced by the Maillard reaction and is enhanced by active oxygens, especially singlet oxygen and hydrogen peroxide derived from their autoxidation. PMID:1986274

  2. MODELING THE MOLECULAR COMPOSITION IN AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nanase; Thompson, Todd A.; Herbst, Eric

    2013-03-10

    We use a high-temperature chemical network to derive the molecular abundances in axisymmetric accretion disk models around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) within 100 pc using simple radial and vertical density and temperature distributions motivated by more detailed physical models. We explore the effects of X-ray irradiation and cosmic-ray ionization on the spatial distribution of the molecular abundances of CO, CN, CS, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HC{sub 3}N, C{sub 2}H, and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} using a variety of plausible disk structures. These simple models have molecular regions with an X-ray-dominated region layer, a midplane without the strong influence of X-rays, and a high-temperature region in the inner portion with moderate X-ray flux where families of polyynes (C{sub n}H{sub 2}) and cyanopolyynes can be enhanced. For the high midplane density disks we explore, we find that cosmic rays produced by supernovae do not significantly affect the regions unless the star formation efficiency significantly exceeds that of the Milky Way. We highlight molecular abundance observations and ratios that may distinguish among theoretical models of the density distribution in AGN disks. Finally, we assess the importance of the shock crossing time and the accretion time relative to the formation time for various chemical species. Vertical column densities are tabulated for a number of molecular species at both the characteristic shock crossing time and steady state. Although we do not attempt to fit any particular system or set of observations, we discuss our models and results in the context of the nearby AGN NGC 1068.

  3. Chemistry in the Molecular Disks of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are the centers of galaxies with supermassive blackholes whose accretion of mass causes very high luminosities of L˜1044-46erg s-1. An accretion disk has a molecular component that extends to hundreds of pc from the central AGN core. The question of how much central illumination affects the disk and how much star formation is present near the core have been astrophysical interests. Rotational lines from these disks at a sub-kpc scale have been observed for molecules such as CO, HCO+, HCN, and HNC. When ALMA becomes fully operational, it will be able to resolve these disks at much higher resolution than currently. Molecular observations at higher resolution may give some hints on the physics in the molecular disk. We modeled the chemical composition of a molecular disk in an AGN on a scale of tens of pc. To do this, we extended our standard gas-phase OSU network to include important processes at much higher temperatures, approaching 1000 K. We used the density model of Thompson et al., and determined the temperature by the blackbody approximation from the luminosity of the AGN core. The ionization by X-rays from the AGN core, by cosmic-rays from the AGN core, supernovae and stellar winds, and by UV-photons from OB stars are considered. We will briefly mention the effects from other factors that may change the molecular abundances such as shock waves and inhomogeneity of the density of the disk. T. Thompson, E. Quataert, and N. Murray, Astrophysical J. 630, 167 (2005)

  4. Investigating Molecular Hydrogen in Active Regions with IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Saar, Steven H.; Daw, Adrian N.; Innes, Davina

    2014-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen should be the most abundant molecular species in sunspots, but recent observations with IRIS show that its florescent signature is absent from above the sunspot umbra, but appears brightly during flares. In this poster we continue the analysis of FUV observations of H2 in active regions, examining the correlation between the intensity of the H2 lines and the lines of C II and Si IV which are responsible for their excitation. We particularly focus on differentiating places where H2 is abundant, holes in the chromospheric opacity where FUV photons can enter more deeply into the solar atmosphere, and places where the FUV radiation field is intense, as in flares.

  5. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further

  6. Towards a self consistent picture of odd nitrogen and molecular oxygen chemistry in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siskind, D. E.; Bishop, J.; Picone, J. M.; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Lumpe, J.

    2006-05-01

    Recent observations by the technique of FUV solar occultation have provided new information on the variation of the O2 density in the mid thermosphere (140-200 km) with respect to solar activity. Surprisingly, at the highest levels of solar activity, the mid thermospheric O2 is less than at solar minimum. Such a variation is inconsistent with expectations based upon thermal expansion of the atmosphere and diffusive equilibrium, but is suggestive of a chemical sink for O2 that is more rapid at high levels of solar activity. The dominant chemical loss for mid-thermospheric O2 is oxidation by atomic nitrogen, both the ground state N4S and the excited state N2D. Since these reactions produce nitric oxide (NO), a consideration of O2 chemistry also needs to account for observed profiles of NO and atomic nitrogen. Here we use two photochemical models of the thermosphere to address this question. One model uses NRLMSIS to specify the O2 and then calculates odd nitrogen profiles which can be compared with specific observations. We use this to compare with rocket profiles of NO and a satellite measurement of the FUV spectrum of atomic nitrogen. The second model is a global mean model of thermosphere. It is used to calculate the O2 profile for solar maximum and solar minimum. Taken together, we use these models to evaluate the consistency of the odd nitrogen kinetic scheme with our understanding of O2 chemistry. Our results suggest that the temperature dependence of the oxidation of O2 by atomic nitrogen is a critical parameter to quantify. Also, the sources of atomic nitrogen from N2 dissociation need better understanding.

  7. Biochemical properties of Paracoccus denitrificans FnrP: reactions with molecular oxygen and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Crack, Jason C; Hutchings, Matthew I; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E

    2016-03-01

    In Paracoccus denitrificans, three CRP/FNR family regulatory proteins, NarR, NnrR and FnrP, control the switch between aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) respiration. FnrP is a [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing homologue of the archetypal O2 sensor FNR from E. coli and accordingly regulates genes encoding aerobic and anaerobic respiratory enzymes in response to O2, and also NO, availability. Here we show that FnrP undergoes O2-driven [4Fe-4S] to [2Fe-2S] cluster conversion that involves up to 2 O2 per cluster, with significant oxidation of released cluster sulfide to sulfane observed at higher O2 concentrations. The rate of the cluster reaction was found to be ~sixfold lower than that of E. coli FNR, suggesting that FnrP can remain transcriptionally active under microaerobic conditions. This is consistent with a role for FnrP in activating expression of the high O2 affinity cytochrome c oxidase under microaerobic conditions. Cluster conversion resulted in dissociation of the transcriptionally active FnrP dimer into monomers. Therefore, along with E. coli FNR, FnrP belongs to the subset of FNR proteins in which cluster type is correlated with association state. Interestingly, two key charged residues, Arg140 and Asp154, that have been shown to play key roles in the monomer-dimer equilibrium in E. coli FNR are not conserved in FnrP, indicating that different protomer interactions are important for this equilibrium. Finally, the FnrP [4Fe-4S] cluster is shown to undergo reaction with multiple NO molecules, resulting in iron nitrosyl species and dissociation into monomers. PMID:26790880

  8. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-08-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol-1s-1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells.

  9. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering.

  10. UV-B-Induced PR-1 Accumulation Is Mediated by Active Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Green, R.; Fluhr, R.

    1995-02-01

    Depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer may result in an increase in the levels of potentially harmful UV-B radiation reaching the surface of the earth. We have found that UV-B is a potent inducer of the plant pathogenesis-related protein PR-1 in tobacco leaves. UV-B fluences required for PR-1 accumulation are similar to those of other UV-B-induced responses. The UV-B-induced PR-1 accumulation was confined precisely to the irradiated area of the leaf but displayed no leaf tissue specificity. A study of some of the possible components of the signal transduction pathway between UV-B and PR-1 induction showed that photosynthetic processes are not essential, and photoreversible DNA damage is not involved. Antioxidants and cycloheximide were able to block the induction of PR-1 by UV-B, and treatment of leaves with a generator of reactive oxygen resulted in the accumulation of PR-1 protein. These results demonstrate an absolute requirement for active oxygen species and protein synthesis in this UV-B signal transduction pathway. In contrast, we also show that other elicitors, notably salicylic acid, are able to elicit PR-1 via nonreactive oxygen species-requiring pathways.

  11. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering. PMID:25817808

  12. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s −0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol−1s−1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material–over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  13. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Charlette M; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A; Mudalige, Thilak K; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material's -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 10(6) mol(-1)s(-1) was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  14. Theoretical study of nitrodibenzofurans: A possible relationship between molecular properties and mutagenic activity.

    PubMed

    Stanković, B; Ostojić, B D; Popović, A; Gruden, M А; Đorđević, D S

    2016-11-15

    In this study we present a theoretical investigation of the molecular properties of nitrodibenzofurans (NDFs) and dinitrodibenzofurans (DNDFs) and their relation to mutagenic activity. Equilibrium geometries, relative energies, vertical ionization potentials (IP), vertical electron activities (EA), electronic dipole polarizabilities, and dipole moments of all NDFs and three DNDFs calculated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods are reported. The Ziegler/Rauk Energy Decomposition Analysis (EDA) is employed for a direct estimate of the variations of the orbital interaction and steric repulsion terms corresponding to the nitro group and the oxygen of the central ring of NDFs. The results indicate differences among NDF isomers for the cleavage of the related bonds and steric effects in the active site. The results show a good linear relationship between polarizability (<α>), anisotropy of polarizability (Δα), the summation of IR intensities (ΣIIR) and the summation of Raman activities (ΣARaman) over all 3N-6 vibrational modes and experimental mutagenic activities of NDF isomers in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain. The polarizability changes with respect to the νsNO+CN vibrational mode are in correlation with the mutagenic activities of NDFs and suggest that intermolecular interactions are favoured along this coordinate. PMID:27475460

  15. Phosphate oxygen isotopic evidence for a temperate and biologically active Archaean ocean.

    PubMed

    Blake, Ruth E; Chang, Sae Jung; Lepland, Aivo

    2010-04-15

    Oxygen and silicon isotope compositions of cherts and studies of protein evolution have been interpreted to reflect ocean temperatures of 55-85 degrees C during the early Palaeoarchaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago). A recent study combining oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of cherts, however, makes a case for Archaean ocean temperatures being no greater than 40 degrees C (ref. 5). Ocean temperature can also be assessed using the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate. Recent studies show that (18)O:(16)O ratios of dissolved inorganic phosphate (delta(18)O(P)) reflect ambient seawater temperature as well as biological processing that dominates marine phosphorus cycling at low temperature. All forms of life require and concentrate phosphorus, and as a result of biological processing, modern marine phosphates have delta(18)O(P) values typically between 19-26 per thousand (VSMOW), highly evolved from presumed source values of approximately 6-8 per thousand that are characteristic of apatite in igneous rocks and meteorites. Here we report oxygen isotope compositions of phosphates in sediments from the 3.2-3.5-billion-year-old Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We find that delta(18)O(P) values range from 9.3 per thousand to 19.9 per thousand and include the highest values reported for Archaean rocks. The temperatures calculated from our highest delta(18)O(P) values and assuming equilibrium with sea water with delta(18)O = 0 per thousand (ref. 12) range from 26 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The higher delta(18)O(P) values are similar to those of modern marine phosphate and suggest a well-developed phosphorus cycle and evolved biologic activity on the Archaean Earth. PMID:20393560

  16. Phosphate oxygen isotopic evidence for a temperate and biologically active Archaean ocean.

    PubMed

    Blake, Ruth E; Chang, Sae Jung; Lepland, Aivo

    2010-04-15

    Oxygen and silicon isotope compositions of cherts and studies of protein evolution have been interpreted to reflect ocean temperatures of 55-85 degrees C during the early Palaeoarchaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago). A recent study combining oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of cherts, however, makes a case for Archaean ocean temperatures being no greater than 40 degrees C (ref. 5). Ocean temperature can also be assessed using the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate. Recent studies show that (18)O:(16)O ratios of dissolved inorganic phosphate (delta(18)O(P)) reflect ambient seawater temperature as well as biological processing that dominates marine phosphorus cycling at low temperature. All forms of life require and concentrate phosphorus, and as a result of biological processing, modern marine phosphates have delta(18)O(P) values typically between 19-26 per thousand (VSMOW), highly evolved from presumed source values of approximately 6-8 per thousand that are characteristic of apatite in igneous rocks and meteorites. Here we report oxygen isotope compositions of phosphates in sediments from the 3.2-3.5-billion-year-old Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We find that delta(18)O(P) values range from 9.3 per thousand to 19.9 per thousand and include the highest values reported for Archaean rocks. The temperatures calculated from our highest delta(18)O(P) values and assuming equilibrium with sea water with delta(18)O = 0 per thousand (ref. 12) range from 26 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The higher delta(18)O(P) values are similar to those of modern marine phosphate and suggest a well-developed phosphorus cycle and evolved biologic activity on the Archaean Earth.

  17. Evaluation of the persistence of micropollutants through pure-oxygen activated sludge nitrification and denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, A.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Kish, G.

    2006-01-01

    The persistence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and household and industrial chemicals through a pure-oxygen activated sludge, nitrification, denitrification wastewater treatment facility was evaluated. Of the 125 micropollutants that were tested in this study, 55 compounds were detected in the untreated wastewater, and 27 compounds were detected in the disinfected effluent. The persistent compounds included surfactants, fire-retardant chemicals, pesticides, fragrance compounds, hormones, and one pharmaceutical. Physical-chemical properties of micropollutants that affected partitioning onto wastewater solids included vapor pressure and octanol-water partition coefficients.

  18. An ultrastable bimetallic carbide as platinum electrocatalyst support for highly active oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Zhang, Mingmei; Xie, Jimin; Shen, Pei Kang

    2015-11-01

    Stable bimetallic carbide (Fe2MoC) with graphitized carbon (GC) as matrix has been synthesized through an ion-exchange method. The Pt nanoparticles are loaded on the GC-Fe2MoC composite to form Pt/GC-Fe2MoC electrocatalyst which shows much higher activity and stability than those of commercial Pt/C for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic media. The excellent performances of Pt/GC-Fe2MoC are mainly due to the inherent stability of GC-Fe2MoC and the promotion effect between Fe2MoC and Pt.

  19. Testing and Oxygen Assessment Results for a Next Generation Extravehicular Activity Portable Life Support System Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Rivera, Fatonia L.; Martin, Devin

    2011-01-01

    NASA is designing a next generation Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use in future surface exploration endeavors. To meet the new requirements for ventilation flow at nominal and buddy modes, a fan has been developed and tested. This paper summarizes the results of the performance and life cycle testing efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Additionally, oxygen compatibility assessment results from an evaluation conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) are provided, and lessons learned and future recommendations are outlined.

  20. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resulting in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.

  1. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  2. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  3. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  4. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  5. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resultingmore » in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.« less

  6. Electrochemical activation of commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Xia, Guangsen; Liu, Haining; Xia, Shuwei; Lu, Yonghong

    2015-03-28

    Nitrogen (N)-doped carbon and its non-noble metal composite replacing platinum-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts still have some fundamental problems that remain. Here the micron-sized commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber (PAN-CF) electrode was modified using an electrochemical method, converting its inherent pyridinic-N into 2-pyridone (or 2-hydroxyl pyridine) functional group existing in three-dimensional active layers with remarkable ORR catalytic activity and stability. The carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen and oxygen atoms is prone to act as an active site to efficiently catalyze a two-electron ORR process. However, after coordinating pyridone to the Cu(2+) ion, together with the electrochemical reaction, the chemical redox between Cu(+) and ORR intermediates synergistically tends towards a four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. In different medium, the complexation and dissociation can induce the charge transfer and reconstruction among proton, metal ion and pyridone functionalities, eventually leading to the changes of ORR performance. PMID:25712410

  7. Catalytic activity of metal oxides in hydrogen sulfide oxidation by oxygen and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marshneva, V.I.; Mokrinskii, V.V.

    1989-02-01

    Separate investigations have been made of the catalytic activities of a wide range of oxides by groups I-VIII metals in the Claus reaction and oxidation of H/sub 2/S by oxygen. Only 9 of 21 oxides used in the Claus reaction exhibit stable activity. The remaining oxides are deactivated, mainly by absorbing H/sub 2/S and being converted into sulfides. There are similar tendencies in the changes of sulfur formation specific velocities in both processes in the series of stable oxides V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, TiO/sub 2/, Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgO, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Vanadium pentoxide is the most active catalyst in the total and partial oxidations of H/sub 2/S and the Claus reaction.

  8. Elucidating the activity of stepped Pt single crystals for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S; Hansen, Heine A; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L

    2014-07-21

    The unexpectedly high measured activity of Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystal surfaces towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is explained utilizing the hydroxyl binding energy as the activity descriptor. Using this descriptor (estimated using experimental data obtained by different groups), a well-defined Sabatier-type volcano is observed for the activities measured for the Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystals, in remarkable agreement with earlier theoretical studies. We propose that the observed destabilisation of *OH species at these surfaces is due to the decreased solvation of the adsorbed hydroxyl intermediates on adjacent terrace sites. PMID:24643715

  9. Reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity during epididymal sperm maturation in Corynorhinus mexicanus bats.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Ríos, Edith; Rosado García, Adolfo; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Königsberg, Mina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; Rodríguez-Tobón, Ahiezer; Fuentes-Mascorro, Gisela; León-Galván, Miguel Angel

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged sperm storage in the epididymis of Corynorhinus mexicanus bats after testicular regression has been associated with epididymal sperm maturation in the caudal region, although the precise factors linked with this phenomenon are unknown. The aim of this work is to determine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in antioxidant enzymatic activity occurring in the spermatozoa and epididymal fluid over time, in sperm maturation and storage in the caput, corpus and cauda of the bat epididymis. Our data showed that an increment in ROS production coincided with an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in epididymal fluid and with a decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the spermatozoa in at different time points and epididymal regions. The increase in ROS production was not associated with oxidative damage measured by lipid peroxidation. The results of the current study suggest the existence of a shift in the redox balance, which might be associated with sperm maturation and storage.

  10. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  11. Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption on Activated Carbon through Manipulation of Surface Oxygen Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John; Qu, Deyang; Foster, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    Passive energy storage is a necessary component for balancing the lifecycle budget with new forms of green energy. The work presented describes how surface oxygen groups (SOG) on granulated activated carbon have been manipulated using Nitric Acid in a controlled, stepwise fashion. The structure and surface functionality of the activated carbon samples were characterized using DRIFTS, Raman Spectroscopy and Porosimetry. Total surface area was found to increase proportionally with the removal of heteroatom material, exposing previously insulated active sites responsible for SOG attachment. Broad oxide peaks were deconvoluted and analyzed, allowing for absolute identification of evolving functionality at each oxidation stage. SOGs were maximized on the third oxidation cycle with the presence of conjugated aromatic, phenol, lactone, and carboxylic acid groups. FSN Zonyl nonionic was applied to all oxidized samples at various concentrations. Total adsorbed surfactant was quantified for each concentration / oxidation scheme using attenuated total reflection. The relative quantity and polarity of chemisorbed surfactant were qualitatively assessed for each equilibrium concentration.

  12. Oxygen reduction activity of N-doped carbon-based films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Shunya; Kawaguchi, Kazuhiro; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-based films with nitrogen species on their surface were prepared on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate for application as a non-platinum cathode catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Cobalt and carbon were deposited in the presence of N 2 gas using a pulsed laser deposition method and then the metal Co was removed by HCl-washing treatment. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was electrochemically determined using a rotating disk electrode system in which the film samples on the GC substrate were replaceable. The ORR activity increased with the temperature of the GC substrate during deposition. A carbon-based film prepared at 600 °C in the presence of N 2 at 66.7 Pa showed the highest ORR activity among the tested samples (0.66 V vs. NHE). This film was composed of amorphous carbons doped with pyridine type nitrogen atoms on its surface.

  13. Active Oxygen Metabolites and Thromboxane in Phorbol Myristate Acetate Toxicity to the Isolated, Perfused Rat Lung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Laurie Jean

    When administered intravenously or intratracheally to rats, rabbits and sheep, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) produces changes in lung morphology and function are similar to those seen in humans with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Therefore, it is thought that information about the mechanism of ARDS development can be gained from experiments using PMA-treated animals. Currently, the mechanisms by which PMA causes pneumotoxicity are unknown. Results from other studies in rabbits and in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs suggest that PMA-induced lung injury is mediated by active oxygen species from neutrophils (PMN), whereas studies in sheep and rats suggest that PMN are not required for the toxic response. The role of PMN, active oxygen metabolites and thromboxane (TxA_2) in PMA-induced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs (IPLs) was examined in this thesis. To determine whether PMN were required for PMA to produce toxicity to the IPL, lungs were perfused for 30 min with buffer containing various concentrations of PMA (in the presence or absence of PMN). When concentrations >=q57 ng/ml were added to medium devoid of added PMN, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. When a concentration of PMA (14-28 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to the perfusion medium containing PMN (1 x 10 ^8), perfusion pressure increased, and lungs accumulated fluid. These results indicate that high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of PMN, whereas injury induced by lower concentrations is PMN-dependent. To examine whether active oxygen species were involved in mediating lung injury induced by PMA and PMN, lungs were coperfused with the oxygen radical scavengers SOD and/or catalase. Coperfusion with either or both of these enzymes totally protected lungs against injury caused by PMN and PMA. These results suggest that active oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical in particular), mediate lung injury in

  14. Kinetics of an oxygen - iodine active medium with iodine atoms optically pumped on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Malyshev, M. S.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetics of the processes occurring in an O2 - I2 - He - H2O gas flow in which photodissociation of molecular iodine at a wavelength close to 500 nm and excitation of atomic iodine on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition by narrow-band radiation near 1315 nm are implemented successively has been analysed. It is shown that implementation of these processes allows one to form an oxygen - iodine medium with a high degree of dissociation of molecular iodine and a relative content of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ) exceeding 10%. Having formed a supersonic gas flow with a temperature ~100 K from this medium, one can reach a small-signal gain of about 10-2 cm-1 on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition in iodine atoms. The specific power per unit flow cross section in the oxygen - iodine laser with this active medium may reach ~100 W cm-2.

  15. Activation of the JAK-STAT pathway by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Simon, A R; Rai, U; Fanburg, B L; Cochran, B H

    1998-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including the acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson's disease, pulmonary fibrosis, and Alzheimer's disease. In mammalian cells, several genes known to be induced during the immediate early response to growth factors, including the protooncogenes c-fos and c-myc, have also been shown to be induced by ROS. We show that members of the STAT family of transcription factors, including STAT1 and STAT3, are activated in fibroblasts and A-431 carcinoma cells in response to H2O2. This activation occurs within 5 min, can be inhibited by antioxidants, and does not require protein synthesis. STAT activation in these cell lines is oxidant specific and does not occur in response to superoxide- or nitric oxide-generating stimuli. Buthionine sulfoximine, which depletes intracellular glutathione, also activates the STAT pathway. Moreover, H2O2 stimulates the activity of the known STAT kinases JAK2 and TYK2. Activation of STATs by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is significantly inhibited by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and diphenylene iodonium, indicating that ROS production contributes to STAT activation in response to PDGF. These findings indicate that the JAK-STAT pathway responds to intracellular ROS and that PDGF uses ROS as a second messenger to regulate STAT activation.

  16. Molecular details of the activation of the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jihyun; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2013-07-01

    Molecular details of μ opioid receptor activations were obtained using molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor in the presence of three agonists, three antagonists, and a partial agonist and on the constitutively active T279K mutant. Agonists have a higher probability of direct interactions of their basic nitrogen (N) with Asp147 as compared with antagonists, indicating that direct ligand-Asp147 interactions modulate activation. Medium-size substituents on the basic N of antagonists lead to steric interactions that perturb N-Asp147 interactions, while additional favorable interactions occur with larger basic N substituents, such as in N-phenethylnormorphine, restoring N-Asp147 interactions, leading to agonism. With the orvinols, the increased size of the C19 substituent in buprenorphine over diprenorphine leads to increased interactions with residues adjacent to Asp147, partially overcoming the presence of the cyclopropyl N substituent, such that buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Results also indicate different conformational properties of the intracellular regions of the transmembrane helices in agonists versus antagonists. PMID:23758404

  17. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  18. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  19. Negative Regulation of Leptin-induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Formation by Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Activation in Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Letizia; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Martella, Andrea; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-05-29

    The adipocyte-derived, anorectic hormone leptin was recently shown to owe part of its regulatory effects on appetite-regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Leptin is also known to exert a negative regulation on hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels and hence on cannabinoid CB1 receptor activity. Here we investigated the possibility of a negative regulation by CB1 receptors of leptin-mediated ROS formation in the ARC. Through pharmacological and molecular biology experiments we report data showing that leptin-induced ROS accumulation is 1) blunted by arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) in a CB1-dependent manner in both the mouse hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-N41 and ARC neuron primary cultures, 2) likewise blocked by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, troglitazone, in a manner inhibited by T0070907, a PPAR-γ antagonist that also inhibited the ACEA effect on leptin, 3) blunted under conditions of increased endocannabinoid tone due to either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation in mHypoE-N41 and primary ARC neuronal cultures from MAGL(-/-) mice, respectively, and 4) associated with reduction of both PPAR-γ and catalase activity, which are reversed by both ACEA and troglitazone. We conclude that CB1 activation reverses leptin-induced ROS formation and hence possibly some of the ROS-mediated effects of the hormone by preventing PPAR-γ inhibition by leptin, with subsequent increase of catalase activity. This mechanism might underlie in part CB1 orexigenic actions under physiopathological conditions accompanied by elevated hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels.

  20. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  1. Antituberculosis activity of the molecular libraries screening center network library.

    PubMed

    Maddry, Joseph A; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Goldman, Robert C; Hobrath, Judith V; Kwong, Cecil D; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Reynolds, Robert C; Secrist, John A; Sosa, Melinda I; White, E Lucile; Zhang, Wei

    2009-09-01

    There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein.

  2. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNA footprinting

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L; Lee, Luke P

    2013-10-29

    This invention provides a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of nucleic acid (e.g., DNA) length changes and perform nucleic acid footprinting. In various embodiments the ruler comprises a nucleic acid attached to a nanoparticle, such that changes in the nucleic acid length are detectable using surface plasmon resonance. The nanoplasmonic ruler provides a fast and convenient platform for mapping nucleic acid-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other footprinting related methods.

  3. PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE FROM CARBON SURFACES COATED WITH OXYGEN: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, D.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A. E-mail: ur5n@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    We investigate via infrared spectroscopy the synthesis of CO{sub 2} by ultraviolet irradiation (6.41 eV) of amorphous carbon covered with solid O{sub 2} at 21 K. Oxidation occurs at the O{sub 2}-carbon interface promoted by photon excitation or dissociation of O{sub 2} molecules. The CO{sub 2} production is linear with photon fluence with a yield of 3.3 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} CO{sub 2} photon{sup -1}; the yield does not decrease at high fluences (at least up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} photons cm{sup -2}) since CO{sub 2} is not photodissociated at this photon energy. Replacing oxygen with water ice did not produce CO{sub 2} since H{sub 2}O does not dissociate at this photon energy. The CO{sub 2} synthesis process discussed in this Letter does not require H{sub 2}O or CO and may be important in cold astrophysical environments where O{sub 2} could be locally segregated on carbonaceous grains, such as in molecular clouds and icy objects in the outer solar system.

  4. Maximal Oxygen Intake and Maximal Work Performance of Active College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Susanne L.

    Maximal oxygen intake and associated physiological variables were measured during strenuous exercise on women subjects (N=20 physical education majors). Following assessment of maximal oxygen intake, all subjects underwent a performance test at the work level which had elicited their maximal oxygen intake. Mean maximal oxygen intake was 41.32…

  5. Ferritin-Mediated Iron Sequestration Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α upon LPS Activation in the Presence of Ample Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Isabel; Schödel, Johannes; Nairz, Manfred; Schatz, Valentin; Dettmer, Katja; Dick, Christopher; Kalucka, Joanna; Franke, Kristin; Ehrenschwender, Martin; Schley, Gunnar; Beneke, Angelika; Sutter, Jörg; Moll, Matthias; Hellerbrand, Claus; Wielockx, Ben; Katschinski, Dörthe M; Lang, Roland; Galy, Bruno; Hentze, Matthias W; Koivunen, Peppi; Oefner, Peter J; Bogdan, Christian; Weiss, Günter; Willam, Carsten; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2015-12-15

    Both hypoxic and inflammatory conditions activate transcription factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which play a crucial role in adaptive responses to these challenges. In dendritic cells (DC), lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HIF1α accumulation requires NF-κB signaling and promotes inflammatory DC function. The mechanisms that drive LPS-induced HIF1α accumulation under normoxia are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that LPS inhibits prolyl hydroxylase domain enzyme (PHD) activity and thereby blocks HIF1α degradation. Of note, LPS-induced PHD inhibition was neither due to cosubstrate depletion (oxygen or α-ketoglutarate) nor due to increased levels of reactive oxygen species, fumarate, and succinate. Instead, LPS inhibited PHD activity through NF-κB-mediated induction of the iron storage protein ferritin and subsequent decrease of intracellular available iron, a critical cofactor of PHD. Thus, hypoxia and LPS both induce HIF1α accumulation via PHD inhibition but deploy distinct molecular mechanisms (lack of cosubstrate oxygen versus deprivation of co-factor iron). PMID:26628374

  6. Molecular Abundances in the Disk of AN Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, N.; Thompson, T. A.; Herbst, E.

    2011-06-01

    There are galactic nuclei that emit high luminosities L˜1044-46 erg S-1 including luminosity produced by X-rays from high mass accretion onto the central black holes. These nuclei are called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and they are accompanied by molecular disks. Observations show high abundances of CN and HCN in the disks; the molecules are proposed to be probes of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) created by the X-rays from AGNs. We have constructed a spatially-dependent chemical-abundance model of the molecular disk in NGC 1068, a typical AGN-dominated galaxy. Recently, new observations of CN and HCN have been made at much higher spatial resolution, and there are also detections of polyatomic molecules such as HC3N, c-C3H2, and C2H. We discuss how these observations and our simulations can help us to better understand the physical conditions, the disk structure, and conditions for star formation within molecular disks, which are still uncertain. We also include a comparison with other types of galaxies such as (ultra-) luminous infrared galaxies. Usero et al.Astronomy and Astrophysics. 419 (897), 2004. Initial results were presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy 2010, RF05 Garcia-Burillo et al. Astronomy and Astrophysics. 519 (2), 2010. Garcia-Burillo et al. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 131 (12031), 2008. Costagliola et al. ArXiv e-print arXiv:1101.2122, 2011. Nakajima et al. Astrophysical Journal Letters 728 (L38), 2008.

  7. Measuring the activities of higher organisms in activated sludge by means of mechanical shearing pretreatment and oxygen uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-07-01

    A pretreatment method was developed to assess the activities of higher organisms. The method is based on mechanical shearing to damage the large cells of the protozoan and metazoan community in activated sludge. The procedure was confirmed through experimentation to be effective in determining the activities of higher organisms by comparing oxygen uptake rates (OURs) before and after the higher organisms were eradicated. Shearing led to disintegration of flocs, which could be effectively reconstituted by centrifugation. The reconstitution of the sludge flocs was essential since otherwise the activity of the floc mass would be too high due to lack of diffusion limitation. Mechanical shearing had no influence on the morphology, quantity and specific activity of yeasts, and it was inferred that bacteria smaller than yeasts in size would also not be influenced by the applied shearing procedure. Moreover, the effect of filamentous organisms on the measured activities of higher organisms was experimentally demonstrated and analyzed, and determined to be so weak that it could be ignored. Based on these tests, five typical activated sludge processes were selected to measure the contribution of higher organisms to the original OUR. The measured activities of higher organisms ranged from 9.4 to 25.0% of the original OURs.

  8. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    COPD - oxygen safety; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - oxygen safety; Chronic obstructive airways disease - oxygen safety; Emphysema - oxygen safety; Heart failure - oxygen-safety; Palliative care - oxygen safety; ...

  9. Structure-activity correlations in a nickel-borate oxygen evolution catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bediako, D Kwabena; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Surendranath, Yogesh; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K; Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-04-18

    An oxygen evolution catalyst that forms as a thin film from Ni(aq)(2+) solutions containing borate electrolyte (Ni-B(i)) has been studied by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A dramatic increase in catalytic rate, induced by anodic activation of the electrodeposited films, is accompanied by structure and oxidation state changes. Coulometric measurements correlated with X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra of the active catalyst show that the nickel centers in activated films possess an average oxidation state of +3.6, indicating that a substantial proportion of nickel centers exist in a formal oxidation state of Ni(IV). In contrast, nickel centers in nonactivated films exist predominantly as Ni(III). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure reveals that activated catalyst films comprise bis-oxo/hydroxo-bridged nickel centers organized into sheets of edge-sharing NiO(6) octahedra. Diminished long-range ordering in catalyst films is due to their ostensibly amorphous nature. Nonactivated films display a similar oxidic nature but exhibit a distortion in the local coordination geometry about nickel centers, characteristic of Jahn-Teller distorted Ni(III) centers. Our findings indicate that the increase in catalytic activity of films is accompanied by changes in oxidation state and structure that are reminiscent of those observed for conversion of β-NiOOH to γ-NiOOH and consequently challenge the long-held notion that the β-NiOOH phase is a more efficient oxygen-evolving catalyst. PMID:22417283

  10. Ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons with very high electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Taeyoung; Choi, YongMan; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Min Gyu; Sa, Young Jin; Kim, Jaesik; Lee, Zonghoon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kwon, Kyungjung; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Gu-Gon; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of the platinum-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has impeded the widespread application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We report on a new family of non-precious metal catalysts based on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons (M-OMPC; M = Fe, Co, or FeCo) with high surface areas and tunable pore structures, which were prepared by nanocasting mesoporous silica templates with metalloporphyrin precursors. The FeCo-OMPC catalyst exhibited an excellent ORR activity in an acidic medium, higher than other non-precious metal catalysts. It showed higher kinetic current at 0.9 V than Pt/C catalysts, as well as superior long-term durability and MeOH-tolerance. Density functional theory calculations in combination with extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed a weakening of the interaction between oxygen atom and FeCo-OMPC compared to Pt/C. This effect and high surface area of FeCo-OMPC appear responsible for its significantly high ORR activity. PMID:24056308

  11. Molecular Remodeling of the Presynaptic Active Zone of Drosophila Photoreceptors via Activity-Dependent Feedback.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Atsushi; Hakeda-Suzuki, Satoko; Suzuki, Emiko; Silies, Marion; Shimozono, Mai; Möhl, Christoph; Suzuki, Takashi; Tavosanis, Gaia

    2015-05-01

    Neural activity contributes to the regulation of the properties of synapses in sensory systems, allowing for adjustment to a changing environment. Little is known about how synaptic molecular components are regulated to achieve activity-dependent plasticity at central synapses. Here, we found that after prolonged exposure to natural ambient light the presynaptic active zone in Drosophila photoreceptors undergoes reversible remodeling, including loss of Bruchpilot, DLiprin-α, and DRBP, but not of DSyd-1 or Cacophony. The level of depolarization of the postsynaptic neurons is critical for the light-induced changes in active zone composition in the photoreceptors, indicating the existence of a feedback signal. In search of this signal, we have identified a crucial role of microtubule meshwork organization downstream of the divergent canonical Wnt pathway, potentially via Kinesin-3 Imac. These data reveal that active zone composition can be regulated in vivo and identify the underlying molecular machinery.

  12. Oxidation of primary amines to oximes with molecular oxygen using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and WO3/Al2O3 as catalysts.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ken; Watanabe, Tomonari; Murahashi, Shun-Ichi

    2013-03-15

    The oxidative transformation of primary amines to their corresponding oximes proceeds with high efficiency under molecular oxygen diluted with molecular nitrogen (O2/N2 = 7/93 v/v, 5 MPa) in the presence of the catalysts 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and tungusten oxide/alumina (WO3/Al2O3). The method is environmentally benign, because the reaction requires only molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant and gives water as a side product. Various alicyclic amines and aliphatic amines can be converted to their corresponding oximes in excellent yields. It is noteworthy that the oxidative transformation of primary amines proceeds chemoselectively in the presence of other functional groups. The key step of the present oxidation is a fast electron transfer from the primary amine to DPPH followed by proton transfer to give the α-aminoalkyl radical intermediate, which undergoes reaction with molecular oxygen and hydrogen abstraction to give α-aminoalkyl hydroperoxide. Subsequent reaction of the peroxide with WO3/Al2O3 gives oximes. The aerobic oxidation of secondary amines gives the corresponding nitrones. Aerobic oxidative transformation of cyclohexylamines to cyclohexanone oximes is important as a method for industrial production of ε-caprolactam, a raw material for Nylon 6.

  13. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids. PMID:25176328

  14. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids.

  15. Electron transport chain inhibitors induce microglia activation through enhancing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junli; Jiang, Zhongxin; Chen, Xuehong; Liu, Mengyang; Li, Jing; Liu, Na

    2016-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be mediators of excessive microglial activation, yet the resources and mechanism are not fully understood. Here we stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells and primary microglial cells with different inhibitors of electron transport chain (ETC), rotenone, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), antimycin A, and NaN3 to induce mitochondrial ROS production and we observed the role of mitochondrial ROS in microglial activation. Our results showed that ETC inhibitors resulted in significant changes in cell viability, microglial morphology, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial ROS production in a dose-dependent manner in both primary cultural microglia and BV-2 cell lines. Moreover, ETC inhibitors, especially rotenone and antimycin A stimulated secretion of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by microglia with marked activation of mitogen-activated proteinkinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which could be blocked by specific inhibitors of MAPK and NF-κB and mitochondrial antioxidants, Mito-TEMPO. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain in microglia led to production of mitochondrial ROS and therefore may activate MAPK/NF-кB dependent inflammatory cytokines release in microglia, which indicated that mitochondrial-derived ROS were contributed to microglial activation.

  16. Segregated Pt on Pd nanotubes for enhanced oxygen reduction activity in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    St John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W; Dyck, Ondrej; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Papandrew, Alexander B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscaled Pt domains were integrated with Pd nanotubes via vapor deposition to yield a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The surface-area-normalized ORR activity of these bi-metallic Pt-on-Pd nanotubes (PtPdNTs) was nearly 6× the corresponding carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt/C) activity at 0.9 V vs. RHE (1.5 vs. 0.24 mA cmmetal(-2), respectively). Furthermore, the high specific activity of the PtPdNTs was achieved without sacrificing mass-normalized activity, which is more than twice that of Pt/C (0.333 A mgPtPdNT(-1)vs. 0.141 A mgPt/C(-1)) and also greater than that of Pd/C (0.221 A mgPd/C(-1)). We attribute the enhancements in specific and mass activity to modifications of the segregated Pt electronic structure and to nanoscale porosity, respectively. PMID:26553367

  17. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiuli; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shuang; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-17

    Developing inexpensive and non-precious metal electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is among the major goals in fuel cells. Herein, by using density-functional theory calculations, we show that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids exhibit unexpectedly high ORR catalytic activity-even comparable to that of the Pt(111) surface. Both graphitic-type and pyridine-type N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids are highly active for the ORR and have good CO tolerance. The formation of the second H2O molecule is the rate-determining step for the ORR with the graphitic-type hybrid, whereas on the pyridine-type hybrid, it is the formation of OOH. Note that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrid materials combine the high reactivity of olympicene and the high electrical conductivity of graphene, which allows them to be potentially used as low-cost and non-precious-metal ORR catalysts.

  18. Oxide Defect Engineering Enables to Couple Solar Energy into Oxygen Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xiyu; Ye, Huacheng; Chen, Shuangming; Ju, Huanxin; Liu, Daobin; Lin, Yue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-07-20

    Modern development of chemical manufacturing requires a substantial reduction in energy consumption and catalyst cost. Sunlight-driven chemical transformation by metal oxides holds great promise for this goal; however, it remains a grand challenge to efficiently couple solar energy into many catalytic reactions. Here we report that defect engineering on oxide catalyst can serve as a versatile approach to bridge light harvesting with surface reactions by ensuring species chemisorption. The chemisorption not only spatially enables the transfer of photoexcited electrons to reaction species, but also alters the form of active species to lower the photon energy requirement for reactions. In a proof of concept, oxygen molecules are activated into superoxide radicals on defect-rich tungsten oxide through visible-near-infrared illumination to trigger organic aerobic couplings of amines to corresponding imines. The excellent efficiency and durability for such a highly important process in chemical transformation can otherwise be virtually impossible to attain by counterpart materials.

  19. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

    2015-03-11

    Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode.

  20. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haohao; Yin, Jun-Jie; Wamer, Wayne G; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-03-01

    Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase), and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances.

  1. NOx reduction Activity over Phosphate-supported Platinum Catalysts with Hydrogen under Oxygen-rich Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, M.; Takehara, M.; Saito, M.; Machida, K.

    2011-10-01

    The phosphate supported Pt catalysts (Pt/AlPO4, Pt/CePO4, Pt/CeP2O7, Pt/SnP2O7, Pt/TiP2O7, Pt/Zn3(PO4)2) were prepared by a conventional impregnation method to evaluate their selective catalytic reduction activity of NOx under excess oxygen condition. Among them, good NOx reduction activity was obtained on the Pt/AlPO4 catalyst. Specific adsorption species during the NOx reduction were checked by a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrum (DRIFTs) measurement to examine the reaction mechanism. Also NH3 temperature programmed desorption measurements were performed for all catalysts and their catalytic properties were discussed from the viewpoints of solid acidity.

  2. Auxin-induced reactive oxygen species production requires the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jung Hee; Yoo, Ho Jung; Hwang, Inhwan; Lee, June Seung; Nam, Kyoung Hee; Bae, Yun Soo

    2005-02-14

    We recently reported that production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential for auxin-induced gravitropic signaling. Here, we investigated the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and its product, PtdIns(3)P, in auxin-mediated ROS production and the root gravitropic response. Pretreatment with LY294002, an inhibitor of PtdIns 3-kinase activity, blocked auxin-mediated ROS generation, and reduced the sensitivity of root tissue to gravistimulation. The amount of PtdIns(3)P increased in response to auxin, and this effect was abolished by pretreatment with LY294002. In addition, sequestration of PtdIns(3)P by transient expression of the endosome binding domain in protoplasts abrogated IAA-induced ROS accumulation. These results indicate that activation of PtdIns 3-kinase and its product PtdIns(3)P are required for auxin-induced production of ROS and root gravitropism. PMID:15710420

  3. Oxide Defect Engineering Enables to Couple Solar Energy into Oxygen Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xiyu; Ye, Huacheng; Chen, Shuangming; Ju, Huanxin; Liu, Daobin; Lin, Yue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-07-20

    Modern development of chemical manufacturing requires a substantial reduction in energy consumption and catalyst cost. Sunlight-driven chemical transformation by metal oxides holds great promise for this goal; however, it remains a grand challenge to efficiently couple solar energy into many catalytic reactions. Here we report that defect engineering on oxide catalyst can serve as a versatile approach to bridge light harvesting with surface reactions by ensuring species chemisorption. The chemisorption not only spatially enables the transfer of photoexcited electrons to reaction species, but also alters the form of active species to lower the photon energy requirement for reactions. In a proof of concept, oxygen molecules are activated into superoxide radicals on defect-rich tungsten oxide through visible-near-infrared illumination to trigger organic aerobic couplings of amines to corresponding imines. The excellent efficiency and durability for such a highly important process in chemical transformation can otherwise be virtually impossible to attain by counterpart materials. PMID:27351805

  4. Rationalizing the Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution Reaction Activity of Two-Dimensional Hydrogenated Silicene and Germanene.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Caroline J; Chakraborty, Sudip; Anversa, Jonas; Baierle, Rogério J; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-20

    We have undertaken first-principles electronic structure calculations to show that the chemical functionalization of two-dimensional hydrogenated silicene (silicane) and germanene (germanane) can become a powerful tool to increase the photocatalytic water-splitting activity. Spin-polarized density functional theory within the GGA-PBE and HSE06 types of exchange correlation functionals has been used to obtain the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicane and germanane functionalized with a series of nonmetals (N, P, and S), alkali metals (Li, Na, and K) and alkaline-earth metals (Mg and Ca). The surface-adsorbate interaction between the functionalized systems with H2 and O2 molecules that leads to envisaged hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction activity has been determined.

  5. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  6. Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Activity In Acid By Tin-Oxide Supported Au Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker,W.; Pietron, J.; Teliska, M.; Bouwman, P.; Ramaker, D.; Swider-Lyons, K.

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on hydrous tin-oxide (Au-SnO{sub x}) are active for the four-electron oxygen reduction reaction in an acid electrolyte. The unique electrocatalytic of the Au-SnO is confirmed by the low amount of peroxide detected with rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry and Koutecky-Levich analysis. In comparison, 10 wt % Au supported on Vulcan carbon and SnO{sub x} catalysts both produce significant peroxide in the acid electrolyte, indicating only a two-electron reduction reaction. Characterization of the Au-SnO{sub x} catalyst reveals a high-surface area, amorphous support with 1.7 nm gold metal particles. The high catalytic activity of the Au-SnO is attributed to metal support interactions. The results demonstrate a possible path to non-Pt catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes.

  7. Activation of NF-kappa B by reactive oxygen intermediates in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kaltschmidt, B; Sparna, T; Kaltschmidt, C

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) is a transcription factor crucially involved in glial and neuronal function. NF-kappa B is ubiquitously distributed within the nervous system, and its inducible activity can be discerned from constitutive activity. Prototypic inducible NF-kappa B in the nervous system is composed of the DNA-binding subunits p50 and p65 complexed with an inhibitory I kappa B-alpha molecule. A number of signals from the cell surface can lead to rapid activation of NK-kappa B, thus releasing the inhibition by I kappa B. This activates translocation of NF-kappa B to the nucleus, where it binds to kappa B motifs of target genes and activates transcription. Previous findings have identified reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) as a common denominator of NF-kappa B activating signals. More specifically, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) might be used as second messenger in the NF-kappa B system, despite its cytotoxicity. Analysis of pathways leading to NF-kappa B activation in the nervous system has identified a number of ROI-dependent pathways such as cytokine- and neurotrophin-mediated activation, glutamatergic signal transduction, and various diseases with crucial ROI involvement (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and injury). A number of NF-kappa B-specific target genes contribute to the production of ROI or are involved in detoxification of ROIs. In this review, possible mechanisms and regulatory pathways of ROI-mediated NF-kappa B activation are discussed.

  8. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  9. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1R) is activated by adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 µs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1R activation. PMID:27460867

  10. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGES

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; Sohn, Young-Jun; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.; et al

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  11. Complement activation by in vivo neonatal and in vitro extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Graulich, Johannes; Sonntag, Joseph; Marcinkowski, Monika; Bauer, Karl; Kössel, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Obladen, Michael; Versmold, Hans T

    2002-01-01

    Complment activation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in newborns can be caused by both the underlying disease processes and by blood contact with the ECMO circuit. We investigated the relative importance of these mechanisms by measuring C3a, C5a and sC5b-9 before, during and after neonatal ECMO in six consecutive newborn patients using enzyme-linked immunoassay. In addition complement activation during in vitro ECMO with repeated flow of the same blood volume was measured using blood from healthy adult donors. C3a increased significantly in vivo after 1 h (from 1035+/-193 to 1865+/-419 microg/l) and in vitro ECMO (from 314+/-75 to 1962+/-1062 microg/l). C5a increased during ECMO without significant differences between in vivo and in vitro activation. In neonatal patients, sC5b-9 rose faster than in vitro, but the rapid increase was also significant for in vitro experiments (in vivo: from 328+/-63 to 1623+/-387 microg/l after 2 h; and in vitro: from 78+/-32 to 453+/-179 microg/l after 8 h). After this initial peak at 1-2 h, complement activation decreased gradually until 2-3 days after the initiation of ECMO. We conclude that in newborns the rapid activation of the complement system after the start of ECMO is predominantly caused by contact with artificial surfaces rather than the patient's underlying disease. PMID:12061426

  12. Activity and stability trends of perovskite oxides for oxygen evolution catalysis at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Binghong; Risch, Marcel; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Ling, Chen; Jia, Hongfei; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Perovskite oxides (ABO3) have been studied extensively to promote the kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline electrolytes. However, developing highly active catalysts for OER at near-neutral pH is desirable for many photoelectrochemical/electrochemical devices. In this paper, we systematically studied the activity and stability of well-known perovskite oxides for OER at pH 7. Previous activity descriptors established for perovskite oxides at pH 13, such as having an eg occupancy close to unity or having an O p-band center close to Fermi level, were shown to scale with OER activity at pH 7. Stability was a greater challenge at pH 7 than at pH 13, where two different modes of instability were identified from combined transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory analyses. Perovskites with O p-band close to Fermi level showed leaching of A-site atoms and surface amorphization under all overpotentials examined at pH 7, while those with O p-band far from Fermi level were stable under low OER current/potential but became unstable at high current/potential accompanied by leaching of B-site atoms. Therefore, efforts are needed to enhance the activity and stability of perovskites against A-site or B-site loss if used at neutral pH. PMID:26271910

  13. Activity and stability trends of perovskite oxides for oxygen evolution catalysis at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Binghong; Risch, Marcel; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Ling, Chen; Jia, Hongfei; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Perovskite oxides (ABO3) have been studied extensively to promote the kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline electrolytes. However, developing highly active catalysts for OER at near-neutral pH is desirable for many photoelectrochemical/electrochemical devices. In this paper, we systematically studied the activity and stability of well-known perovskite oxides for OER at pH 7. Previous activity descriptors established for perovskite oxides at pH 13, such as having an eg occupancy close to unity or having an O p-band center close to Fermi level, were shown to scale with OER activity at pH 7. Stability was a greater challenge at pH 7 than at pH 13, where two different modes of instability were identified from combined transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory analyses. Perovskites with O p-band close to Fermi level showed leaching of A-site atoms and surface amorphization under all overpotentials examined at pH 7, while those with O p-band far from Fermi level were stable under low OER current/potential but became unstable at high current/potential accompanied by leaching of B-site atoms. Therefore, efforts are needed to enhance the activity and stability of perovskites against A-site or B-site loss if used at neutral pH.

  14. Activity and stability of the oxygen evolution reaction on electrodeposited Ru and its thermal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Choi, Jihui; Kim, Ho Young; Hwang, Eunkyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2015-12-01

    The activity and stability of Ru metal and its thermal oxide films for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) were investigated. The metallic Ru films were prepared by electrodeposition on a Ti substrate and then thermally oxidized at various temperatures under atmospheric conditions. During long-term operation of the OER with cyclic voltammetry (CV) in H2SO4 electrolyte, changes in the properties of the Ru and its thermal oxides were monitored in terms of their morphology, crystal structure, and electronic structure. In the initial stages of the OER, all of the Ru thermal oxide films underwent an activation process that was related to the continuous removal of low-activity Ru oxides from the surface. With further cycling, the OER activity decreased. The rate of decrease was different for each Ru film and was related to the annealing temperatures. Monitoring of material properties indicates that the amount of stable anhydrous RuO2 is important for OER stability because it prevents both the severe dissolution of metallic Ru beneath the oxide surface and the formation of a less active hydrous RuO2 at the surface.

  15. Different activation of ERK1/2 and p38 with hyperbaric oxygen in dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai-Cheng; Bao, Xiao-Chen; Fang, Yi-Qun; Ma, Jun; Meng, Miao; Chen, Hai-Ting; Li, Chi

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged hyperbaric oxygen exposure causes pulmonary and nervous system toxicity, although hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been used to treat a broad spectrum of ailments. In the current study, animals have been exposed to 100% oxygen at a pressure of 2.3 atmospheres absolute (ATA) for two, six and 10 hours or 0.23 MPa normoxic hyperbaric nitrogen (N2-O2 mixture, oxygen partial pressure = 21 kPa) for 10 hours. Then we investigated whether ERK1/2 and p38 had been activated in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by hyperbaric conditions. Using Western blot analysis, we found that the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2) increased significantly (p < 0.05, n = 3 for each group) in the six-hour treatment of 100% oxygen at a pressure of 2.3 ATA. The phosphorylation levels of p38 (phospho-p38) increased significantly (p < 0.05, n = 3 for each group) in the 10-hour treatment of 100% oxygen at a pressure of 2.3 ATA--which was consistent with time course changes of an apoptosis marker, cleavage caspase-3--while the phospho-p38 decreased in the 10 hours of N2-O2 mixture. These results demonstrate that the ERK1/2 and p38 have been differently activated in the DRG by prolonged hyperbaric oxygen exposure.

  16. Effect of the oxygen pressure on the microstructure and optical properties of ZnO films prepared by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changzheng; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Haiquan; Zhang, Dong

    2009-11-01

    A series of ZnO films were prepared on the Si (1 0 0) or glass substrate at 773 K under various oxygen pressures by using a laser molecular beam epitaxy system. The microstructure and optical properties were investigated through the X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrometer, scanning electron microscope, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer and spectrofluorophotometer. The results showed that ZnO thin film prepared at 1 Pa oxygen pressure displayed the best crystalinity and all ZnO films formed a columnar structure. Meanwhile, all ZnO films exhibited an abrupt absorption edge near the wavelength of 380 nm in transmission spectra. With increasing the oxygen pressure, the transmission intensity changed non-monotonically and reached a maximum of above 80% at 1 Pa oxygen pressure, based on which the band gaps of all ZnO films were calculated to be about 3.259-3.315 eV. Photoluminescence spectra indicated that there occurred no emission peak at a low oxygen pressure of 10 -5 Pa. With the increment of the oxygen pressure, there occurred a UV emission peak of 378 nm, a weak violet emission peak of 405 nm and a wide green emission band centered at 520 nm. As the oxygen pressure increased further, the position of UV emission peak remained and its intensity changed non-monotonically and reached a maximum at 1 Pa. Meanwhile the intensity of green emission band increased monotonically with increasing the oxygen pressure. In addition, it was also found that the intensity of UV emission peak decreased as the measuring temperature shifted from 80 to 300 K. The analyses indicated that the UV emission peak originated from the combination of free excitons and the green emission band originated from the energy level jump from conduction band to O Zn defect.

  17. Microscale and Molecular Assessment of Impacts of Nickel, Nutrients, and Oxygen Level on Structure and Function of River Biofilm Communities

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. R.; Chenier, M. R.; Roy, R.; Beaumier, D.; Fortin, N.; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Neu, T. R.; Greer, C. W.

    2004-01-01

    Studies were carried out to assess the influence of nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, and nickel (Ni) on river biofilm development, structure, function, and community composition. Biofilms were cultivated in rotating annular reactors with river water at a DO concentration of 0.5 or 7.5 mg liter−1, with or without a combination of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus (CNP) and with or without Ni at 0.5 mg liter−1. The effects of Ni were apparent in the elimination of cyanobacterial populations and reduced photosynthetic biomass in the biofilm. Application of lectin-binding analyses indicated changes in exopolymer abundance and a shift in the glycoconjugate makeup of the biofilms, as well as in the response to all treatments. Application of the fluorescent live-dead staining (BacLight Live-Dead staining kit; Molecular Probes, Eugene, Oreg.) indicated an increase in the ratio of live to dead cells under low-oxygen conditions. Nickel treatments had 50 to 75% fewer ‘live’ cells than their corresponding controls. Nickel at 0.5 mg liter−1 corresponding to the industrial release rate concentration for nickel resulted in reductions in carbon utilization spectra relative to control and CNP treatments without nickel. In these cases, the presence of nickel eliminated the positive influence of nutrients on the biofilm. Other culture-dependent analyses (plate counts and most probable number) revealed no significant treatment effect on the biofilm communities. In the presence of CNP and at both DO levels, Ni negatively affected denitrification but had no effect on hexadecane mineralization or sulfate reduction. Analysis of total community DNA indicated abundant eubacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), whereas Archaea were not detected. Amplification of the alkB gene indicated a positive effect of CNP and a negative effect of Ni. The nirS gene was not detected in samples treated with Ni at 0.5 mg liter−1, indicating a negative effect on specific populations of

  18. Activated human neutrophil response to perfluorocarbon nanobubbles: oxygen-dependent and -independent cytotoxic responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Li-Jia; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-06-10

    Nanobubbles, a type of nanoparticles with acoustically active properties, are being utilized as diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles to better understand, detect, and treat human diseases. The objective of this work was to prepare different nanobubble formulations and investigate their physicochemical characteristics and toxic responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-activated human neutrophils. The nanobubbles were prepared using perfluoropentane and coconut oil as the respective core and shell, with soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and/or cationic surfactants as the interfacial layers. The cytotoxic effect of the nanobubbles on neutrophils was determined by extracellular O₂(.)⁻ release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and elastase release. Particle sizes of the nanobubbles with different percentages of perfluorocarbon, oil, and surfactants in ranged 186-432 nm. The nanobubbles were demonstrated to inhibit the generation of superoxide and intracellular ROS. The cytotoxicity of nanobubbles may be mainly associated with membrane damage, as indicated by the high LDH leakage. Systems with Forestall (FE), a cationic surfactant, or higher SPC contents exhibited the greatest LDH release by 3-fold compared to the control. The further addition of an oil component reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the nanobubbles. Exposure to most of the nanobubble formulations upregulated elastase release by activated neutrophils. Contrary to this result, stearylamine (SA)-containing systems slightly but significantly suppressed elastase release. FE and SA in a free form caused stronger responses by neutrophils than when they were incorporated into nanobubbles. In summary, exposure to nanobubbles resulted in a formulation-dependent toxicity toward human neutrophils that was associated with both oxygen-dependent and -independent pathways. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution when using nanobubbles in patients

  19. A method to determine photosynthetic activity from oxygen microsensor data in biofilms subjected to evaporation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Podola, Björn; de Beer, Dirk; Melkonian, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Phototrophic biofilms are widely distributed in nature and their ecological importance is well recognized. More recently, there has been a growing interest in using artificial phototrophic biofilms in innovative photobioreactors for production of microalgal biomass in biotechnological applications. To study physiological processes within these biofilms, microsensors have been applied in several studies. Here, the 'light-dark shift method' relies on measurement of photosynthetic activity in terms of light-induced oxygen production. However, when applied to non-submerged biofilms that can be found in numerous locations in nature, as well as in some types of photobioreactors, limitations of this approach are obvious due to rapid removal of gaseous species at the biofilm surface. Here, we introduce a mathematical correction to recover the distribution of the actual photosynthetic activity along the depth gradient in the biofilm, based on a numerical solution of the inversed diffusion equation of oxygen. This method considers changes in mass transport during the measurement period as can found on biofilms possessing a thin flow/mass transfer boundary layer (e. g., non-submerged biofilms). Using both simulated and real microsensor data, the proposed method was shown to be much more accurate than the classical method, which leads to underestimations of rates near the biofilm surface. All test profiles could be recovered with a high fit. According to our simulated microsensor measurements, a depth resolution of ≤20 μm is recommended near the surface. We conclude that our method strongly improves the quality of data acquired from light-dark measurements of photosynthetic activity in biofilms.

  20. Tumour-promoting activity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their oxygenated or nitrated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Misaki, Kentaro; Takamura-Enya, Takeji; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji; Yanagida, Mitsuaki

    2016-03-01

    Various types of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in diesel exhaust particles are thought to contribute to carcinogenesis in mammals. Although the carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and tumour-initiating activity of these compounds have been evaluated, their tumour-promoting activity is unclear. In the present study, to determine the tumour-inducing activity of PACs, including previously known mutagenic compounds in atmospheric environments, a transformation assay for promoting activity mediated by the release of contact inhibition was conducted for six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), seven oxygenated PAHs (oxy-PAHs) and seven nitrated PAHs (nitro-PAHs) using mouse embryonic fibroblast cells transfected with the v-Ha-ras gene (Bhas 42 cells). Of these, two PAHs [benzo[k]fluoranthene (B[k]FA) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]FA)], one oxy-PAH [6H-benzo[cd]pyren-6-one (BPO)] and two nitro-PAHs (3-nitro-7H-benz[de]anthracen-7-one and 6-nitrochrysene) were found to exhibit particularly powerful tumour-promoting activity (≥10 foci following exposure to <100nM). In addition, clear mRNA expression of CYP1A1, which is associated with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activation, was observed following the exposure of cells to two PAHs (B[k]FA and B[b]FA) and three oxy-PAHs (1,2-naphthoquinone, 11H-benzo[b]fluoren-11-one and BPO). Further, an HO-1 antioxidant response activation was observed following exposure to B[k]FA, B[b]FA and BPO, suggesting that the induction of tumour-promoting activity in these compounds is correlated with the dysfunction of signal transduction via AhR-mediated responses and/or oxidative stress responses.