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Sample records for activate protein kinases

  1. MAPKAP kinase-2; a novel protein kinase activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, D; Campbell, D G; Nakielny, S; Hidaka, H; Leevers, S J; Marshall, C; Cohen, P

    1992-01-01

    A novel protein kinase, which was only active when phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), has been purified 85,000-fold to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle. This MAP kinase activated protein kinase, termed MAPKAP kinase-2, was distinguished from S6 kinase-II (MAPKAP kinase-1) by its response to inhibitors, lack of phosphorylation of S6 peptides and amino acid sequence. MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylated glycogen synthase at Ser7 and the equivalent serine (*) in the peptide KKPLNRTLS*VASLPGLamide whose sequence is similar to the N terminus of glycogen synthase. MAPKAP kinase-2 was resolved into two monomeric species of apparent molecular mass 60 and 53 kDa that had similar specific activities and substrate specificities. Peptide sequences of the 60 and 53 kDa species were identical, indicating that they are either closely related isoforms or derived from the same gene. MAP kinase activated the 60 and 53 kDa forms of MAPKAP kinase-2 by phosphorylating the first threonine residue in the sequence VPQTPLHTSR. Furthermore, Mono Q chromatography of extracts from rat phaeochromocytoma and skeletal muscle demonstrated that two MAP kinase isoforms (p42mapk and p44mapk) were the only enzymes in these cells that were capable of reactivating MAPKAP kinase-2. These results indicate that MAP kinase activates at least two distinct protein kinases, suggesting that it represents a point at which the growth factor-stimulated protein kinase cascade bifurcates. Images PMID:1327754

  2. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases. PMID:19489726

  3. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  4. Cyclic-GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, M; Li, H; Lohmann, S M; Boss, G R; Pilz, R B

    1998-12-01

    Agents which increase the intracellular cyclic GMP (cGMP) concentration and cGMP analogs inhibit cell growth in several different cell types, but it is not known which of the intracellular target proteins of cGMP is (are) responsible for the growth-suppressive effects of cGMP. Using baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which are deficient in cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase), we show that 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate and 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate inhibit cell growth in cells stably transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector but not in untransfected cells or in cells transfected with a catalytically inactive G-kinase. We found that the cGMP analogs inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and nuclear translocation of MAP kinase in G-kinase-expressing cells but not in G-kinase-deficient cells. Ras activation by EGF was not impaired in G-kinase-expressing cells treated with cGMP analogs. We show that activation of G-kinase inhibited c-Raf kinase activation and that G-kinase phosphorylated c-Raf kinase on Ser43, both in vitro and in vivo; phosphorylation of c-Raf kinase on Ser43 uncouples the Ras-Raf kinase interaction. A mutant c-Raf kinase with an Ala substitution for Ser43 was insensitive to inhibition by cGMP and G-kinase, and expression of this mutant kinase protected cells from inhibition of EGF-induced MAP kinase activity by cGMP and G-kinase, suggesting that Ser43 in c-Raf is the major target for regulation by G-kinase. Similarly, B-Raf kinase was not inhibited by G-kinase; the Ser43 phosphorylation site of c-Raf is not conserved in B-Raf. Activation of G-kinase induced MAP kinase phosphatase 1 expression, but this occurred later than the inhibition of MAP kinase activation. Thus, in BHK cells, inhibition of cell growth by cGMP analogs is strictly dependent on G-kinase and G-kinase activation inhibits the Ras/MAP kinase pathway (i) by

  5. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Danai, Laura V.; DiStefano, Marina T.; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B.; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K.; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C.; Czech, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo. After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  6. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  7. Protein kinase C activity in boar sperm.

    PubMed

    Teijeiro, J M; Marini, P E; Bragado, M J; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2017-03-01

    Male germ cells undergo different processes within the female reproductive tract to successfully fertilize the oocyte. These processes are triggered by different extracellular stimuli leading to activation of protein phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key regulatory enzyme in signal transduction mechanisms involved in many cellular processes. Studies in boar sperm demonstrated a role for PKC in the intracellular signaling involved in motility and cellular volume regulation. Experiments using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) showed increases in the Serine/Threonine phosphorylation of substrates downstream of PKC in boar sperm. In order to gain knowledge about those cellular processes regulated by PKC, we evaluate the effects of PMA on boar sperm motility, lipid organization of plasma membrane, integrity of acrosome membrane and sperm agglutination. Also, we investigate the crosstalk between PKA and PKC intracellular pathways in spermatozoa from this species. The results presented here reveal a participation of PKC in sperm motility regulation and membrane fluidity changes, which is probably associated to acrosome reaction and to agglutination. Also, we show the existence of a hierarchy in the kinases pathway. Previous works on boar sperm suggest a pathway in which PKA is positioned upstream to PKC and this new results support such model.

  8. AMP-activated protein kinase--an archetypal protein kinase cascade?

    PubMed

    Hardie, D G; MacKintosh, R W

    1992-10-01

    Mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase is the central component of a protein kinase cascade which inactivates three key enzymes involved in the synthesis or release of free fatty acids and cholesterol inside the cell. The kinase cascade is activated by elevation of AMP, and perhaps also by fatty acid and cholesterol metabolites. The system may fulfil a protective function, preventing damage caused by depletion of ATP or excessive intracellular release of free lipids, a type of stress response. Recent evidence suggests that it may have been in existence for at least a billion years, since a very similar protein kinase cascade is present in higher plants. This system therefore represents an early eukaryotic protein kinase cascade, which is unique in that it is regulated by intracellular metabolites rather than extracellular signals or cell cycle events.

  9. MAP kinase activator from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle is a protein threonine/tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Nakielny, S; Cohen, P; Wu, J; Sturgill, T

    1992-01-01

    A 'MAP kinase activator' was purified several thousand-fold from insulin-stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle, which resembled the 'activator' from nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells in that it could be inactivated by incubation with protein phosphatase 2A, but not by protein tyrosine phosphatases and its apparent molecular mass was 45-50 kDa. In the presence of MgATP, 'MAP kinase activator' converted the normal 'wild-type' 42 kDa MAP kinase from an inactive dephosphorylated form to the fully active diphosphorylated species. Phosphorylation occurred on the same threonine and tyrosine residues which are phosphorylated in vivo in response to growth factors or phorbol esters. A mutant MAP kinase produced by changing a lysine at the active centre to arginine was phosphorylated in an identical manner by the 'MAP kinase activator', but no activity was generated. The results demonstrate that 'MAP kinase activator' is a protein kinase (MAP kinase kinase) and not a protein that stimulates the autophosphorylation of MAP kinase. MAP kinase kinase is the first established example of a protein kinase that can phosphorylate an exogenous protein on threonine as well as tyrosine residues. Images PMID:1318193

  10. AKAP-Lbc nucleates a protein kinase D activation scaffold.

    PubMed

    Carnegie, Graeme K; Smith, F Donelson; McConnachie, George; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D

    2004-09-24

    The transmission of cellular signals often proceeds through multiprotein complexes where enzymes are positioned in proximity to their upstream activators and downstream substrates. In this report we demonstrate that the A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP-Lbc assembles an activation complex for the lipid-dependent enzyme protein kinase D (PKD). Using a combination of biochemical, enzymatic, and immunofluorescence techniques, we show that the anchoring protein contributes to PKD activation in two ways: it recruits an upstream kinase PKCeta and coordinates PKA phosphorylation events that release activated protein kinase D. Thus, AKAP-Lbc synchronizes PKA and PKC activities in a manner that leads to the activation of a third kinase. This configuration illustrates the utility of kinase anchoring as a mechanism to constrain the action of broad-spectrum enzymes.

  11. Identification of intracellular receptor proteins for activated protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Khaner, H; Lopez, J

    1991-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) translocates from the cytosol to the particulate fraction on activation. This activation-induced translocation of PKC is thought to reflect PKC binding to the membrane lipids. However, immunological and biochemical data suggest that PKC may bind to proteins in the cytoskeletal elements in the particulate fraction and in the nuclei. Here we describe evidence for the presence of intracellular receptor proteins that bind activated PKC. Several proteins from the detergent-insoluble material of the particulate fraction bound PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine and calcium; binding was further increased with the addition of diacylglycerol. Binding of PKC to two of these proteins was concentration-dependent, saturable, and specific, suggesting that these binding proteins are receptors for activated C-kinase, termed here "RACKs." PKC binds to RACKs via a site on PKC distinct from the substrate binding site. We suggest that binding to RACKs may play a role in activation-induced translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1850844

  12. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera. PMID:26257761

  13. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  14. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα.

  15. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A.; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Sadler, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity. PMID:28281686

  16. Cadmium activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene and MBP kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Hsiao, Lin-June; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2004-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are modules involved in the transduction of extracellular signals to intracellular targets in all eukaryotes. In plants, it has been evidenced that MAPKs play a role in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stresses, plant hormones, and cell cycle cues. However, the effect of heavy metals on plant MAPKs has not been well examined. The Northern blot analysis of OsMAPK mRNA levels has shown that only OsMAPK2, but not OsMAPK3 and OsMAPK4, expressed in suspension-cultured cells in response to 100-400 microM Cd treatments. The OsMAPK2 transcripts increased within 12 h upon 400 microM Cd treatment. In addition, we found that 42- and 50-kDa MBP kinases were significantly activated by Cd treatment in rice suspension-cultured cells. And 40-, 42-, 50- and 64-kDa MBP kinases were activated in rice roots. Furthermore, GSH inhibits Cd-induced 40-kDa MBP kinase activation. By immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation followed by in-gel kinase assay, we confirmed that Cd-activated 42-kDa MBP kinase is a MAP kinase. Our results suggest that a MAP kinase cascade may function in the Cd-signalling pathway in rice.

  17. Activation of fat cell adenylate cyclase by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, S.; Noguchi, M.; Huang, K.P.; Londos, C.

    1986-05-01

    Purified protein kinase C (C-kinase) from guinea pig pancreas and rat brain stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in purified rat adipocyte membranes. Cyclase stimulation occurred over 100 to 1000 mU/ml of C-kinase activity, required greater than 10 ..mu..M calcium, proceeded without a lag, was not readily reversible, and required no exogenous phospholipid. Moreover, C-kinase inhibitors, such as chlorpromazine and palmitoyl carnitine, inhibited selectively adenylate cyclase which was activated by C-kinase and calcium. Depending on assay conditions, 10 nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either enhanced or was required for kinase action on cyclase. Also, TPA plus calcium promoted the quantitative association of C-kinase with membranes. Adenylate cyclase activation by C-kinase was seen both in the presence and absence of exogenous GTP, indicating that the kinase effect does not result from an action on the GTP-binding, inhibitory regulatory component (N/sub i/) of the cyclase system. Moreover, the kinase effect was seen in the presence of non-phosphorylating ATP analogs, such as AppNHp and AppCH/sub 2/p, suggesting that the effects of C-kinase described herein may result from association with, rather than phosphorylation of, adenylate cyclase.

  18. Protein kinase C activators inhibit capillary endothelial cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binds specifically to bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cells (K/sub d/ = 8nM) and inhibits the proliferation (K/sub 50/ = 6 +/- 4 nM). Under similar conditions, PDBu does not inhibit the growth of bovine aortic endothelial or smooth muscle cells. PDBu markedly attenuates the response of BCE cells to purified human hepatoma-derived growth factor which, in the absence of PDBu, stimulates BCE cell growth by about 3-fold. Several observations suggest that the inhibition of BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated by protein kinase C: (1) different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to the relative potencies as protein kinase C activators (12-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate > PDBu >> phorbol 12,13-diacetate >>>..beta..-phorbol; ..cap alpha..-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). (2) Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/), a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2-dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. (3) A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a Ca/sup 2 +//phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase that is activated by diC/sub 8/ and PDBu, but not by ..beta..-phorbol. These results support a role for protein kinase C in suppressing capillary endothelial cell growth and may therefore have implications in the intracellular regulation of angiogenesis.

  19. Protein kinase C-associated kinase regulates NF-κB activation through inducing IKK activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Schifano, Matthew; Oleksyn, David; Jordan, Craig T; Ryan, Daniel; Insel, Richard; Zhao, Jiyong; Chen, Luojing

    2014-10-01

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-κB induced by extracellular stimuli requires IKKα and IKKβ kinase activity. How IKKα and IKKβ are activated by various upstream signaling molecules is not fully understood. We previously showed that protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK, also known as DIK/RIP4), which belongs to the receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase family, mediates the B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF)-induced NF-κB activation in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines. Here we have investigated the mechanism underlying NF-κB activation regulated by PKK. Our results suggest that PKK can activate both the classical and the alternative NF-κB activation pathways. PKK associates with IKKα and IKKβ in mammalian cells and induces activation of both IKKα and IKKβ via phosphorylation of their serine residues 176/180 and 177/181, respectively. Unlike other members of the RIP family that activate NF-κB through a kinase-independent pathway, PKK appears to activate IKK and NF-κB mainly in a kinase-dependent manner. Suppression of PKK expression by RNA interference inhibits phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ as well as activation of NF-κB in human cancer cell lines. Thus, PKK regulates NF-κB activation by modulating activation of IKKα and IKKβ in mammalian cells. We propose that PKK may provide a critical link between IKK activation and various upstream signaling cascades, and may represent a potential target for inhibiting abnormal NF-κB activation in human cancers.

  20. Endothelial Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 Is Critical for Lymphatic Vascular Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-An; Danai, Laura V.; Yawe, Joseph C.; Gujja, Sharvari; Edwards, Yvonne J. K.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying lymphatic vascular development and function are not well understood. Recent studies have suggested a role for endothelial cell (EC) mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) in developmental angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. Here, we show that constitutive loss of EC Map4k4 in mice causes postnatal lethality due to chylothorax, suggesting that Map4k4 is required for normal lymphatic vascular function. Mice constitutively lacking EC Map4k4 displayed dilated lymphatic capillaries, insufficient lymphatic valves, and impaired lymphatic flow; furthermore, primary ECs derived from these animals displayed enhanced proliferation compared with controls. Yeast 2-hybrid analyses identified the Ras GTPase-activating protein Rasa1, a known regulator of lymphatic development and lymphatic endothelial cell fate, as a direct interacting partner for Map4k4. Map4k4 silencing in ECs enhanced basal Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activities, and primary ECs lacking Map4k4 displayed enhanced lymphatic EC marker expression. Taken together, these results reveal that EC Map4k4 is critical for lymphatic vascular development by regulating EC quiescence and lymphatic EC fate. PMID:27044870

  1. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  2. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  3. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  4. Protein kinase C phosphorylates AMP-activated protein kinase α1 Ser487

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Helen R.; Mancini, Sarah J.; Strembitska, Anastasiya; Jamal, Kunzah; Reihill, James A.; Palmer, Timothy M.; Gould, Gwyn W.; Salt, Ian P.

    2016-01-01

    The key metabolic regulator, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), is reported to be down-regulated in metabolic disorders, but the mechanisms are poorly characterised. Recent studies have identified phosphorylation of the AMPKα1/α2 catalytic subunit isoforms at Ser487/491, respectively, as an inhibitory regulation mechanism. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates AMPK and protein kinase B (Akt) in cultured human endothelial cells. As Akt has been demonstrated to be an AMPKα1 Ser487 kinase, the effect of VEGF on inhibitory AMPK phosphorylation in cultured primary human endothelial cells was examined. Stimulation of endothelial cells with VEGF rapidly increased AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation in an Akt-independent manner, without altering AMPKα2 Ser491 phosphorylation. In contrast, VEGF-stimulated AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) and PKC activation using phorbol esters or overexpression of PKC-stimulated AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation. Purified PKC and Akt both phosphorylated AMPKα1 Ser487 in vitro with similar efficiency. PKC activation was associated with reduced AMPK activity, as inhibition of PKC increased AMPK activity and phorbol esters inhibited AMPK, an effect lost in cells expressing mutant AMPKα1 Ser487Ala. Consistent with a pathophysiological role for this modification, AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity in human muscle. These data indicate a novel regulatory role of PKC to inhibit AMPKα1 in human cells. As PKC activation is associated with insulin resistance and obesity, PKC may underlie the reduced AMPK activity reported in response to overnutrition in insulin-resistant metabolic and vascular tissues. PMID:27784766

  5. Prostaglandin E2 negatively regulates AMP-activated protein kinase via protein kinase A signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Koji; Cao, Xia; Yamauchi, Masako; Kozaki, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kambe, Fukushi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated possible involvement of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). When osteoblastic MG63 cells were cultured in serum-deprived media, Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK alpha-subunit was markedly increased. Treatment of the cells with PGE2 significantly reduced the phosphorylation. Ser-79 phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a direct target for AMPK, was also reduced by PGE2. On the other hand, PGE2 reciprocally increased Ser-485 phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit that could be associated with inhibition of AMPK activity. These effects of PGE2 were mimicked by PGE2 receptor EP2 and EP4 agonists and forskolin, but not by EP1 and EP3 agonists, and the effects were suppressed by an adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 and a protein kinase A inhibitor H89. Additionally, the PGE2 effects were duplicated in primary calvarial osteoblasts. Together, the present study demonstrates that PGE2 negatively regulates AMPK activity via activation of protein kinase A signaling pathway.

  6. The regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, S C; Woods, A; Jones, N A; Davison, M D; Carling, D

    2000-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cascade is activated by an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio within the cell. AMPK is regulated allosterically by AMP and by reversible phosphorylation. Threonine-172 within the catalytic subunit (alpha) of AMPK (Thr(172)) was identified as the major site phosphorylated by the AMP-activated protein kinase kinase (AMPKK) in vitro. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to study the role of phosphorylation of Thr(172) on AMPK activity. Mutation of Thr(172) to an aspartic acid residue (T172D) in either alpha1 or alpha2 resulted in a kinase complex with approx. 50% the activity of the corresponding wild-type complex. The activity of wild-type AMPK decreased by greater than 90% following treatment with protein phosphatases, whereas the activity of the T172D mutant complex fell by only 10-15%. Mutation of Thr(172) to an alanine residue (T172A) almost completely abolished kinase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation of Thr(172) accounts for most of the activation by AMPKK, but that other sites are involved. In support of this we have shown that AMPKK phosphorylates at least two other sites on the alpha subunit and one site on the beta subunit. Furthermore, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of Thr(172) may be involved in the sensitivity of the AMPK complex to AMP. PMID:10642499

  7. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID.

    PubMed

    Zourelidou, Melina; Absmanner, Birgit; Weller, Benjamin; Barbosa, Inês C R; Willige, Björn C; Fastner, Astrid; Streit, Verena; Port, Sarah A; Colcombet, Jean; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; Kuster, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-06-19

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the--in many cells--asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant.

  8. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  9. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  10. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-08-24

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes.

  11. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    DOE PAGES

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; ...

    2015-08-24

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics,more » the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes.« less

  12. Interaction of SNF1 Protein Kinase with Its Activating Kinase Sak1▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Xinjing; Carlson, Marian

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNF1 protein kinase, a member of the SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family, is activated by three kinases, Sak1, Tos3, and Elm1, which phosphorylate the Snf1 catalytic subunit on Thr-210 in response to glucose limitation and other stresses. Sak1 is the primary Snf1-activating kinase and is associated with Snf1 in a complex. Here we examine the interaction of Sak1 with SNF1. We report that Sak1 coimmunopurifies with the Snf1 catalytic subunit from extracts of both glucose-replete and glucose-limited cultures and that interaction occurs independently of the phosphorylation state of Snf1 Thr-210, Snf1 catalytic activity, and other SNF1 subunits. Sak1 interacts with the Snf1 kinase domain, and nonconserved sequences C terminal to the Sak1 kinase domain mediate interaction with Snf1 and augment the phosphorylation and activation of Snf1. The Sak1 C terminus is modified in response to glucose depletion, dependent on SNF1 activity. Replacement of the C terminus of Elm1 (or Tos3) with that of Sak1 enhanced the ability of the Elm1 kinase domain to interact with and phosphorylate Snf1. These findings indicate that the C terminus of Sak1 confers its function as the primary Snf1-activating kinase and suggest that the physical association of Sak1 with SNF1 facilitates responses to environmental change. PMID:21216941

  13. Dual activators of Protein Kinase R (PKR) and Protein Kinase R Like Kinase (PERK) Identify Common and Divergent Catalytic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Jie; Sun, Hong; Cao, Peng; Fusco, Dahlene N.; Chung, Raymond T.; Chorev, Michael; Jin, Qi; Aktas, Bertal H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical genetics has evolved into a powerful tool for studying gene function in normal- and patho-biology. PKR and PERK, two eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) kinases, play critical roles in maintenance of cellular hemostasis, metabolic stability, and anti-viral defenses. Both kinases interact with and phosphorylate additional substrates including tumor suppressor p53 and nuclear protein 90. Loss of function of both kinases has been studied by reverse genetics and recently identified inhibitors. In contrast, activating probes for studying the role of catalytic activity of these kinases are not available. We identified a 3-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxin-6-yl)-5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one (DHBDC) as specific dual activator of PKR and PERK by screening a chemical library of 20,000 small molecules in a dual luciferase surrogate eIF2α phosphorylation assay. We present here extensive biological characterization and preliminary structure-activity relationship of DHBDC, which phosphorylate eIF2α by activating PKR and PERK but no other eIF2α kinases. These agents also activate downstream effectors of eIF2α phosphorylation; inducing CHOP and suppressing cyclin D1 expression and inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, all in a manner dependent on PKR and PERK. Consistent with the role of eIF2α phosphorylation in viral infection, DHBDC inhibits proliferation of human hepatitis C virus. Finally, DHBDC induces phosphorylation of Ikβα, and activates NF-κB pathway. Surprisingly, activation of NF-κB pathway is dependent on PERK but independent of PKR activity. These data indicate that DHBDC is an invaluable probe for elucidating the role of PKR and PERK in normal- and patho-biology. PMID:23784735

  14. Measuring protein kinase and sugar kinase activity in plant pathogenic fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Burton H; Zhao, Xinhua

    2010-01-01

    As ubiquitous metabolic and signaling intermediaries, kinases regulate innumerable aspects of fungal growth and development. At its simplest, the enzymatic function of a kinase is to transfer a phosphate from a donor molecule (such as adenosine triphosphate) to an acceptor molecule, such as a protein, carbohydrate, or lipid. Kinase activity is intricately interwoven into signal transduction, and ultimately modulates gene expression, downstream phosphorylation events, and other mechanisms of posttranslational modification. Therefore, sensitive and reproducible techniques to measure kinase activity are crucial to elucidate cellular signaling and for fungal functional genomics.Protein and sugar kinases regulate multiple aspects of pathogenesis in the mycotoxigenic, plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium graminearum, and Fusarium verticillioides. Here, we present protocols to (1) quantify phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in F. graminearum, and (2) determine glucokinase activity in F. verticillioides. The mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation assay utilizes immunological methods to quantify substrate phosphorylation, whereas the glucokinase assay is a coupled enzyme assay, in which phosphorylation of glucose by glucokinase is measured indirectly through the subsequent reduction of NADP+ to NADPH, a substrate more amenable for spectrophotometric detection.

  15. Actions of Rho family small G proteins and p21-activated protein kinases on mitogen-activated protein kinase family members.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Xu, S; Hutchison, M R; Marcus, S; Cobb, M H

    1996-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are regulated by distinct extracellular stimuli. The currently known members include extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 (ERK1), ERK2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), and p38 MAP kinases. We find that overexpression of the Ste20-related enzymes p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and PAK2 in 293 cells is sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK and to a lesser extent p38 MAP kinase but not ERK2. Rat MAP/ERK kinase kinase 1 can stimulate the activity of each of these MAP kinases. Although neither activated Rac nor the PAKs stimulate ERK2 activity, overexpression of either dominant negative Rac2 or the N-terminal regulatory domain of PAK1 inhibits Ras-mediated activation of ERK2, suggesting a permissive role for Rac in the control of the ERK pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Rac2, Cdc42hs, and RhoA synergize with an activated form of Raf to increase ERK2 activity. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized connection between Rho family small G proteins and the ERK pathway. PMID:8668187

  16. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Beale, Elmus G

    2008-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been called "the metabolic master switch" because of its central role in regulating fuel homeostasis. AMPK, a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase composed of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, is activated by upstream kinases and by 5'-AMP in response to various nutritional and stress signals. Downstream effects include regulation of metabolism, protein synthesis, cell growth, and mediation of the actions of a number of hormones, including leptin. However, AMPK research represents a young and growing field; hence, there are many unanswered questions regarding the control and action of AMPK. This review presents evidence for the existence of AMPK signaling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, a genetically tractable model organism that has yet to be fully exploited to elucidate AMPK signaling mechanisms.

  17. Effects of butyltins on mitogen-activated-protein kinase kinase kinase and Ras activity in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Celada, Lindsay J; Whalen, Margaret M

    2014-09-01

    Butyltins (BTs) contaminate the environment and are found in human blood. BTs, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) diminish the cytotoxic function and levels of key proteins of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against tumors, virally infected cells and antibody-coated cells and thus critical to human health. The signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions include mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Studies have shown that exposure to BTs leads to activation of specific MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks) in human NK cells. MAP2K kinases (MAP3Ks) are upstream activators of MAP2Ks, which then activate MAPKs. The current study examined if BT-induced activation of MAP3Ks was responsible for MAP2K and thus, MAPK activation. This study examines the effects of TBT and DBT on the total levels of two MAP3Ks, c-Raf and ASK1, as well as activating and inhibitory phosphorylation sites on these MAP3Ks. In addition, the immediate upstream activator of c-Raf, Ras, was examined for BT-induced alterations. Our results show significant activation of the MAP3K, c-Raf, in human NK cells within 10 min of TBT exposure and the MAP3K, ASK1, after 1 h exposures to TBT. In addition, our results suggest that both TBT and DBT affect the regulation of c-Raf.

  18. The protein activator of protein kinase R, PACT/RAX, negatively regulates protein kinase R during mouse anterior pituitary development.

    PubMed

    Dickerman, Benjamin K; White, Christine L; Kessler, Patricia M; Sadler, Anthony J; Williams, Bryan R G; Sen, Ganes C

    2015-12-01

    The murine double-stranded RNA-binding protein termed protein kinase R (PKR)-associated protein X (RAX) and the human homolog, protein activator of PKR (PACT), were originally characterized as activators of PKR. Mice deficient in RAX show reproductive and developmental defects, including reduced body size, craniofacial defects and anterior pituitary hypoplasia. As these defects are not observed in PKR-deficient mice, the phenotype has been attributed to PKR-independent activities of RAX. Here we further investigated the involvement of PKR in the physiological function of RAX, by generating rax(-/-) mice deficient in PKR, or carrying a kinase-inactive mutant of PKR (K271R) or an unphosphorylatable mutant of the PKR substrate eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 α subunit (eIF2α) (S51A). Ablating PKR expression rescued the developmental and reproductive deficiencies in rax(-/-) mice. Generating rax(-/-) mice with a kinase-inactive mutant of PKR resulted in similar rescue, confirming that the rax(-/-) defects are PKR dependent; specifically that the kinase activity of PKR was required for these defects. Moreover, generating rax(-/-) mice that were heterozygous for an unphosphorylatable mutant eIF2α provides partial rescue of the rax(-/-) defect, consistent with mutation of one copy of the Eif2s1 gene. These observations were further investigated in vitro by reducing RAX expression in anterior pituitary cells, resulting in increased PKR activity and induction of the PKR-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1). These results demonstrate that PKR kinase activity is required for onset of the rax(-/-) phenotype, implying an unexpected function for RAX as a negative regulator of PKR in the context of postnatal anterior pituitary tissue, and identify a critical role for the regulation of PKR activity for normal development.

  19. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activity].

    PubMed

    Haga, T; Haga, K; Kameyama, K; Nakata, H

    1994-09-01

    Recent progress on the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases is reviewed. beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is activated by G protein beta gamma -subunits, which interact with the carboxyl terminal portion of beta ARK. Muscarinic receptor m2-subtypes are phosphorylated by beta ARK1 in the central part of the third intracellular loop (I3). Phosphorylation of I3-GST fusion protein by beta ARK1 is synergistically stimulated by the beta gamma -subunits and mastoparan or a peptide corresponding to portions adjacent to the transmembrane segments of m2-receptors or by beta gamma -subunits and the agonist-bound I3-deleted m2 variant. These results indicate that agonist-bound receptors serve as both substrates and activators of beta ARK.

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a major regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis that coordinates metabolic pathways in order to balance nutrient supply with energy demand. It is now recognized that pharmacological activation of AMPK improves blood glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents. Indeed, AMPK activation mimics the beneficial effects of physical activity or those of calorie restriction by acting on multiple cellular targets. In addition it is now demonstrated that AMPK is one of the probable (albeit indirect) targets of major antidiabetic drugs including, the biguanides (metformin) and thiazolidinediones, as well as of insulin sensitizing adipokines (e.g., adiponectin). Taken together, such findings highlight the logic underlying the concept of targeting the AMPK pathway for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21484577

  1. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-08

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD.

  2. Protein kinase A regulates the osteogenic activity of Osterix.

    PubMed

    He, Siyuan; Choi, You Hee; Choi, Joong-Kook; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Chun, ChangJu; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2014-10-01

    Osterix belongs to the SP gene family and is a core transcription factor responsible for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Activation of protein kinase A (PKA), a serine/threonine kinase, is essential for controlling bone formation and BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation. However, the relationship between Osterix and PKA is still unclear. In this report, we investigated the precise role of the PKA pathway in regulating Osterix during osteoblast differentiation. We found that PKA increased the protein level of Osterix; PKA phosphorylated Osterix, increased protein stability, and enhanced the transcriptional activity of Osterix. These results suggest that Osterix is a novel target of PKA, and PKA modulates osteoblast differentiation partially through the regulation of Osterix.

  3. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Scheel, Dierk

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554) in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins) as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression—including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding, and degradation) steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:26579181

  4. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Paul D; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Koul, Hari K

    2004-01-01

    The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy. PMID:15219238

  5. Protein kinase Calpha activation by RET: evidence for a negative feedback mechanism controlling RET tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Francesco; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Carlomagno, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Miele, Claudia; Fiory, Francesca; Santopietro, Stefania; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Beguinot, Francesco; Santoro, Massimo; Formisano, Pietro

    2003-05-15

    We have studied the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in signaling of the RET tyrosine kinase receptor. By using a chimeric receptor (E/R) in which RET kinase can be tightly controlled by the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF), we have found that RET triggering induces a strong increase of PKCalpha, PKCdelta and PKCzeta activity and that PKCalpha, not PKCdelta and PKCzeta, forms a ligand-dependent protein complex with E/R. We have identified tyrosine 1062 in the RET carboxyl-terminal tail as the docking site for PKCalpha. Block of PKC activity by bisindolylmaleimide or chronic phorbol esters treatment decreased EGF-induced serine/threonine phosphorylation of E/R, while it caused a similarly sized increase of EGF-induced E/R tyrosine kinase activity and mitogenic signaling. Conversely, acute phorbol esters treatment, which promotes PKC activity, increased the levels of E/R serine/threonine phosphorylation and significantly decreased its phosphotyrosine content. A threefold reduction of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of the constitutively active RET/MEN2A oncoprotein was observed upon coexpression with PKCalpha. We conclude that RET binds to and activates PKCalpha. PKCalpha, in turn, causes RET phosphorylation and downregulates RET tyrosine kinase and downstream signaling, thus functioning as a negative feedback loop to modulate RET activity.

  6. Pivotal Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Inflammatory Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Wang, Gang; Ye, Richard D.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) is exclusively regulated by p38 MAPK in vivo. Upon activation of p38 MAPK, MK2 binds with p38 MAPK, leading to phosphorylation of TTP, Hsp27, Akt and Cdc25 that are involved in regulation of various essential cellular functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of MK2 in regulation of TNF-α production, NADPH oxidase activation, neutrophil migration, and DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest which are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and non-small-cell lung cancer. Collectively current and emerging new information indicate that developing MK2 inhibitors and blocking MK2-mediated signal pathways is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases and lung cancer. PMID:26119506

  7. Synthetic phosphorylation of p38α recapitulates protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chooi, K Phin; Galan, Sébastien R G; Raj, Ritu; McCullagh, James; Mohammed, Shabaz; Jones, Lyn H; Davis, Benjamin G

    2014-02-05

    Through a "tag-and-modify" protein chemical modification strategy, we site-selectively phosphorylated the activation loop of protein kinase p38α. Phosphorylation at natural (180) and unnatural (172) sites created two pure phospho-forms. p38α bearing only a single phosphocysteine (pCys) as a mimic of pThr at 180 was sufficient to switch the kinase to an active state, capable of processing natural protein substrate ATF2; 172 site phosphorylation did not. In this way, we chemically recapitulated triggering of a relevant segment of the MAPK-signaling pathway in vitro. This allowed detailed kinetic analysis of global and stoichiometric phosphorylation events catalyzed by p38α and revealed that site 180 is a sufficient activator alone and engenders dominant mono-phosphorylation activity. Moreover, a survey of kinase inhibition using inhibitors with different (Type I/II) modes (including therapeutically relevant) revealed unambiguously that Type II inhibitors inhibit phosphorylated p38α and allowed discovery of a predictive kinetic analysis based on cooperativity to distinguish Type I vs II.

  8. Evaluation of the enzyme activity of protozoan protein kinases by using an in vitro kinase assay.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    The life cycles of parasites are more complicated than those of other biological species. Protein kinases (PKs) encoded by parasites are the main triggers of life stage conversions. Phosphorylation by cellular PKs regulates important cellular processes, and the protozoan genome contains many PKs. Some PK inhibitors inhibit specific parasite life cycle event. In this report, I present a practical approach to expressing and purifying protozoan PKs by using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system and I assess the phosphorylation activities of protozoan PKs by using an in vitro kinase assay.

  9. Implications of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in glioma.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vimal; Bhaskara, Vasantha Kumar; Babu, Phanithi Prakash

    2016-02-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary central nervous system tumors. Gliomas originate from astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neural stem cells or their precursors. According to WHO classification, gliomas are classified into four different malignant grades ranging from grade I to grade IV based on histopathological features and related molecular aberrations. The induction and maintenance of these tumors can be attributed largely to aberrant signaling networks. In this regard, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) network has been widely studied and is reported to be severely altered in glial tumors. Mutations in MAPK pathways most frequently affect RAS and B-RAF in the ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 pathways leading to malignant transformation. Also, it is linked to both inherited and sequential accumulations of mutations that control receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-activated signal transduction pathways, cell cycle growth arrest pathways, and nonresponsive cell death pathways. Genetic alterations that modulate RTK signaling can also alter several downstream pathways, including RAS-mediated MAP kinases along with JNK pathways, which ultimately regulate cell proliferation and cell death. The present review focuses on recent literature regarding important deregulations in the RTK-activated MAPK pathway during gliomagenesis and progression.

  10. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  11. Glucagon receptor activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 via cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youwei; Cypess, Aaron M.; Muse, Evan D.; Wu, Cui-Rong; Unson, Cecilia G.; Merrifield, R. B.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    We prepared a stable cell line expressing the glucagon receptor to characterize the effect of Gs-coupled receptor stimulation on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity. Glucagon treatment of the cell line caused a dose-dependent increase in cAMP concentration, activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and transient release of intracellular calcium. Glucagon treatment also caused rapid dose-dependent phosphorylation and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Inhibition of either PKA or MEK1/2 blocked ERK1/2 activation by glucagon. However, no significant activation of several upstream activators of MEK, including Ras, Rap1, and Raf, was observed in response to glucagon treatment. In addition, chelation of intracellular calcium reduced glucagon-mediated ERK1/2 activation. In transient transfection experiments, glucagon receptor mutants that bound glucagon but failed to increase intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations showed no glucagon-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We conclude that glucagon-induced MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation is mediated by PKA and that an increase in intracellular calcium concentration is required for maximal ERK activation. PMID:11517300

  12. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  13. Functional modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by cereblon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Jo, Sooyeon; Kim, Hyunyoung; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in cereblon (CRBN), a substrate binding component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, cause a form of mental retardation in humans. However, the cellular proteins that interact with CRBN remain largely unknown. Here, we report that CRBN directly interacts with the α1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK α1) and inhibits the activation of AMPK activation. The ectopic expression of CRBN reduces phosphorylation of AMPK α1 and, thus, inhibits the enzyme in a nutrient-independent manner. Moreover, AMPK α1 can be potently activated by suppressing endogenous CRBN using CRBN-specific small hairpin RNAs. Thus, CRBN may act as a negative modulator of the AMPK signaling pathway in vivo.

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is required for integrin-stimulated AKT and Raf-1/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.

    PubMed Central

    King, W G; Mattaliano, M D; Chan, T O; Tsichlis, P N; Brugge, J S

    1997-01-01

    Cell attachment to fibronectin stimulates the integrin-dependent interaction of p85-associated phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase with integrin-dependent focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as activation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. However, it is not known if this PI 3-kinase-FAK interaction increases the synthesis of the 3-phosphorylated phosphoinositides (3-PPIs) or what role, if any, is played by activated PI 3-kinase in integrin signaling. We demonstrate here the integrin-dependent accumulation of the PI 3-kinase products, PI 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3, as well as activation of AKT kinase, a serine/threonine kinase that can be stimulated by binding of PI(3,4)P2. The PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 significantly decreased the integrin-induced accumulation of the 3-PPIs and activation of AKT kinase, without having significant effects on the levels of PI(4,5)P2 or tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin. These inhibitors also reduced cell adhesion/spreading onto fibronectin but had no effect on attachment to polylysine. Interestingly, integrin-mediated Erk-2, Mek-1, and Raf-1 activation, but not Ras-GTP loading, was inhibited at least 80% by wortmannin and LY294002. In support of the pharmacologic results, fibronectin activation of Erk-2 and AKT kinases was completely inhibited by overexpression of a dominant interfering p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase. We conclude that integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin results in the accumulation of the PI 3-kinase products PI(3,4)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as the PI 3-kinase-dependent activation of the kinases Raf-1, Mek-1, Erk-2, and AKT and that PI 3-kinase may function upstream of Raf-1 but downstream of Ras in integrin activation of Erk-2 MAP and AKT kinases. PMID:9234699

  15. Role of diacylglycerol-regulated protein kinase C isotypes in growth factor activation of the Raf-1 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H; Smola, U; Wixler, V; Eisenmann-Tappe, I; Diaz-Meco, M T; Moscat, J; Rapp, U; Cooper, G M

    1997-01-01

    The Raf protein kinases function downstream of Ras guanine nucleotide-binding proteins to transduce intracellular signals from growth factor receptors. Interaction with Ras recruits Raf to the plasma membrane, but the subsequent mechanism of Raf activation has not been established. Previous studies implicated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in Raf activation; therefore, we investigated the role of the epsilon isotype of protein kinase C (PKC), which is stimulated by PC-derived diacylglycerol, as a Raf activator. A dominant negative mutant of PKC epsilon inhibited both proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells and activation of Raf in COS cells. Conversely, overexpression of active PKC epsilon stimulated Raf kinase activity in COS cells and overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative Ras in NIH 3T3 cells. PKC epsilon also stimulated Raf kinase in baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells and was able to directly activate Raf in vitro. Consistent with its previously reported activity as a Raf activator in vitro, PKC alpha functioned similarly to PKC epsilon in both NIH 3T3 and COS cell assays. In addition, constitutively active mutants of both PKC alpha and PKC epsilon overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative mutants of the other PKC isotype, indicating that these diacylglycerol-regulated PKCs function as redundant activators of Raf-1 in vivo. PMID:9001227

  16. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kappaB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chk1 and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  17. Prevention of neuronal apoptosis by phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C: blockade of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Behrens, M M; Strasser, U; Koh, J Y; Gwag, B J; Choi, D W

    1999-01-01

    Consistent with previous studies on cell lines and non-neuronal cells, specific inhibitors of protein kinase C induced mouse primary cultured neocortical neurons to undergo apoptosis. To examine the complementary hypothesis that activating protein kinase C would attenuate neuronal apoptosis, the cultures were exposed for 1 h to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, which activated protein kinase C as evidenced by downstream enhancement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Exposure to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, or another active phorbol ester, phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, but not to the inactive ester, 4alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate, markedly attenuated neuronal apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate also attenuated neuronal apoptosis induced by exposure to beta-amyloid peptide 1-42, or oxygen-glucose deprivation in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists. The neuroprotective effects of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate were blocked by brief (non-toxic) concurrent exposure to the specific protein kinase C inhibitors, but not by a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 inhibitor. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate blocked the induction of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and specific inhibition of this kinase by SB 203580 attenuated serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 activity was high at rest and not modified by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate treatment. These data strengthen the idea that protein kinase C is a key modulator of several forms of central neuronal apoptosis, in part acting through inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase regulated pathways.

  18. A Fluorescence-Based Thermal Shift Assay Identifies Inhibitors of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Sankar N.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Mishra, Rama K.; Xu, Li; Scheidt, Karl A.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second highest cause of cancer death in United States males. If the metastatic movement of PCa cells could be inhibited, then mortality from PCa could be greatly reduced. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) has previously been shown to activate pro-invasion signaling pathways in human PCa. Recognizing that MAP2K4 represents a novel and validated therapeutic target, we sought to develop and characterize an efficient process for the identification of small molecules that target MAP2K4. Using a fluorescence-based thermal shift assay (FTS) assay, we first evaluated an 80 compound library of known kinase inhibitors, thereby identifying 8 hits that thermally stabilized MAP2K4 in a concentration dependent manner. We then developed an in vitro MAP2K4 kinase assay employing the biologically relevant downstream substrates, JNK1 and p38 MAPK, to evaluate kinase inhibitory function. In this manner, we validated the performance of our initial FTS screen. We next applied this approach to a 2000 compound chemically diverse library, identified 7 hits, and confirmed them in the in vitro kinase assay. Finally, by coupling our structure-activity relationship data to MAP2K4's crystal structure, we constructed a model for ligand binding. It predicts binding of our identified inhibitory compounds to the ATP binding pocket. Herein we report the creation of a robust inhibitor-screening platform with the ability to inform the discovery and design of new and potent MAP2K4 inhibitors. PMID:24339940

  19. Activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meikrantz, W; Gisselbrecht, S; Tam, S W; Schlegel, R

    1994-01-01

    Apoptosis was induced in S-phase-arrested HeLa cells by staurosporine, caffeine, 6-dimethylaminopurine, and okadaic acid, agents that activate M-phase-promoting factor and induce premature mitosis in similarly treated hamster cell lines. Addition of these agents to asynchronously growing HeLa cells or to cells arrested in early G1 phase with lovastatin had little or no effect. S-phase arrest also promoted tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis, eliminating the normal requirement for simultaneous cycloheximide treatment. For all of the apoptosis-inducing agents tested, the appearance of condensed chromatin was accompanied by 2- to 7-fold increases in cyclin A-associated histone H1 kinase activity, levels approximating the mitotic value. Where examined, both Cdc2 and Cdk2, the catalytic subunits known to associate with cyclin A, were activated. Stable overexpression of bcl-2 suppressed the apoptosis-inducing activity of all agents tested and reduced the amount of Cdc2 and Cdk2 in the nucleus, suggesting a possible mechanism by which bcl-2 inhibits the chromatin condensation characteristic of apoptosis. These findings suggest that at least one of the biochemical steps required for mitosis, activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases, is also an important event during apoptosis. Images PMID:8170983

  20. Rassf Proteins as Modulators of Mst1 Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bitra, Aruna; Sistla, Srinivas; Mariam, Jessy; Malvi, Harshada; Anand, Ruchi

    2017-01-01

    Rassf1A/5 tumor suppressors serve as adaptor proteins possessing a modular architecture with the C-terminal consisting of a coiled-coil SARAH (Salvador-Rassf-Hippo) domain and the central portion being composed of Ras associated (RA) domain. Here, we investigate the effect of Rassf effectors on Mst1 function by mapping the interaction of various domains of Rassf1A/5 and Mst1 kinase using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The results revealed that apart from the C-terminal SARAH domain of Mst1 which interacts to form heterodimers with Rassf1A/5, the N-terminal kinase domain of Mst1 plays a crucial role in the stabilization of this complex. In addition, SPR experiments show that the RA domains play an important role in fine-tuning the Mst1-Rassf interaction, with Rassf5 being a preferred partner over a similar Rassf1A construct. It was also demonstrated that the activity profile of Mst1 in presence of Rassf adaptors completely switches. A Rassf-Mst1 complexed version of the kinase becomes apoptotic by positively regulating Mst1-H2B mediated serine 14 histone H2B phosphorylation, a hallmark of chromatin condensation. In contrast, the heterodimerization of Mst1 with Rassf1A/5 suppresses the phosphorylation of FoxO, thereby inhibiting the downstream Mst1-FoxO signalling pathway. PMID:28327630

  1. Homology modeling and ligand docking of Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 5 (MK5)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 5 (MK5) is involved in one of the major signaling pathways in cells, the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. MK5 was discovered in 1998 by the groups of Houng Ni and Ligou New, and was found to be highly conserved throughout the vertebrates. Studies, both in vivo and in vitro, have shown that it is implicated in tumor suppression as well as tumor promotion, embryogenesis, anxiety, locomotion, cell motility and cell cycle regulation. Methods In order to obtain a molecular model of MK5 that can be used as a working tool for development of chemical probes, three MK5 models were constructed and refined based on three different known crystal structures of the closely related MKs; MK2 [PDB: 2OZA and PDB: 3M2W] and MK3 [PDB: 3FHR]. The main purpose of the present MK5 molecular modeling study was to identify the best suited template for making a MK5 model. The ability of the generated models to effectively discriminate between known inhibitors and decoys was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results According to the ROC curve analyzes, the refined model based on 3FHR was most effective in discrimination between known inhibitors and decoys. Conclusions The 3FHR-based MK5 model may serve as a working tool for development of chemical probes using computer aided drug design. The biological function of MK5 still remains elusive, but its role as a possible drug target may be elucidated in the near future. PMID:24034446

  2. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  3. Spatial distribution of protein kinase A activity during cell migration is mediated by A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP Lbc.

    PubMed

    Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A; Vergara, Leoncio A; Bellot, Larry J; Canton, David; Scott, John D; O'Connor, Kathleen L

    2009-02-27

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been suggested to be spatially regulated in migrating cells due to its ability to control signaling events that are critical for polarized actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR1), we find that PKA activity gradients form with the strongest activity at the leading edge and are restricted to the basal surface in migrating cells. The existence of these gradients was confirmed using immunocytochemistry using phospho-PKA substrate antibodies. This observation holds true for carcinoma cells migrating randomly on laminin-1 or stimulated to migrate on collagen I with lysophosphatidic acid. Phosphodiesterase inhibition allows the formation of PKA activity gradients; however, these gradients are no longer polarized. PKA activity gradients are not detected when a non-phosphorylatable mutant of AKAR1 is used, if PKA activity is inhibited with H-89 or protein kinase inhibitor, or when PKA anchoring is perturbed. We further find that a specific A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP-Lbc, is a major contributor to the formation of these gradients. In summary, our data show that PKA activity gradients are generated at the leading edge of migrating cells and provide additional insight into the mechanisms of PKA regulation of cell motility.

  4. Spatial Distribution of Protein Kinase A Activity during Cell Migration Is Mediated by A-kinase Anchoring Protein AKAP Lbc*

    PubMed Central

    Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A.; Vergara, Leoncio A.; Bellot, Larry J.; Canton, David; Scott, John D.; O'Connor, Kathleen L.

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been suggested to be spatially regulated in migrating cells due to its ability to control signaling events that are critical for polarized actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR1), we find that PKA activity gradients form with the strongest activity at the leading edge and are restricted to the basal surface in migrating cells. The existence of these gradients was confirmed using immunocytochemistry using phospho-PKA substrate antibodies. This observation holds true for carcinoma cells migrating randomly on laminin-1 or stimulated to migrate on collagen I with lysophosphatidic acid. Phosphodiesterase inhibition allows the formation of PKA activity gradients; however, these gradients are no longer polarized. PKA activity gradients are not detected when a non-phosphorylatable mutant of AKAR1 is used, if PKA activity is inhibited with H-89 or protein kinase inhibitor, or when PKA anchoring is perturbed. We further find that a specific A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP-Lbc, is a major contributor to the formation of these gradients. In summary, our data show that PKA activity gradients are generated at the leading edge of migrating cells and provide additional insight into the mechanisms of PKA regulation of cell motility. PMID:19106088

  5. Effects of AMP-activated protein kinase in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D

    2010-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine threonine kinase that is highly conserved through evolution. AMPK is found in most mammalian tissues including the brain. As a key metabolic and stress sensor/effector, AMPK is activated under conditions of nutrient deprivation, vigorous exercise, or heat shock. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that changes in AMPK activation not only signal unmet metabolic needs, but also are involved in sensing and responding to 'cell stress', including ischemia. The downstream effect of AMPK activation is dependent on many factors, including the severity of the stressor as well as the tissue examined. This review discusses recent in vitro and in vivo studies performed in the brain/neuronal cells and vasculature that have contributed to our understanding of AMPK in stroke. Recent data on the potential role of AMPK in angiogenesis and neurogenesis and the interaction of AMPK with 3-hydroxy-3-methy-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) agents are highlighted. The interaction between AMPK and nitric oxide signaling is also discussed.

  6. Effects of AMP-activated protein kinase in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D

    2010-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine threonine kinase that is highly conserved through evolution. AMPK is found in most mammalian tissues including the brain. As a key metabolic and stress sensor/effector, AMPK is activated under conditions of nutrient deprivation, vigorous exercise, or heat shock. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that changes in AMPK activation not only signal unmet metabolic needs, but also are involved in sensing and responding to ‘cell stress', including ischemia. The downstream effect of AMPK activation is dependent on many factors, including the severity of the stressor as well as the tissue examined. This review discusses recent in vitro and in vivo studies performed in the brain/neuronal cells and vasculature that have contributed to our understanding of AMPK in stroke. Recent data on the potential role of AMPK in angiogenesis and neurogenesis and the interaction of AMPK with 3-hydroxy-3-methy-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) agents are highlighted. The interaction between AMPK and nitric oxide signaling is also discussed. PMID:20010958

  7. Teaching resources. Protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Avrom

    2005-02-22

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein kinases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the genomics and evolutionary relationships among kinases and then proceeds to describe the structure-function relationships of specific kinases, the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate specificity, and selected issues in regulation of kinase activity.

  8. DHEA improves glucose uptake via activations of protein kinase C and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, T; Kajita, K; Miura, A; Ishizawa, M; Kanoh, Y; Itaya, S; Kimura, M; Muto, N; Mune, T; Morita, H; Yasuda, K

    1999-01-01

    We have examined the effect of adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), on glucose uptake, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC) activity in rat adipocytes. DHEA (1 microM) provoked a twofold increase in 2-[3H]deoxyglucose (DG) uptake for 30 min. Pretreatment with DHEA increased insulin-induced 2-[3H]DG uptake without alterations of insulin specific binding and autophosphorylation of insulin receptor. DHEA also stimulated PI 3-kinase activity. [3H]DHEA bound to purified PKC containing PKC-alpha, -beta, and -gamma. DHEA provoked the translocation of PKC-beta and -zeta from the cytosol to the membrane in rat adipocytes. These results suggest that DHEA stimulates both PI 3-kinase and PKCs and subsequently stimulates glucose uptake. Moreover, to clarify the in vivo effect of DHEA on Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and Otsuka Long-Evans fatty (OLETF) rats, animal models of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) were treated with 0.4% DHEA for 2 wk. Insulin- and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-induced 2-[3H]DG uptakes of adipocytes were significantly increased, but there was no significant increase in the soleus muscles in DHEA-treated GK/Wistar or OLETF/Long-Evans Tokushima (LETO) rats when compared with untreated GK/Wistar or OLETF/LETO rats. These results indicate that in vivo DHEA treatment can result in increased insulin-induced glucose uptake in two different NIDDM rat models.

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in male reproductive function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Michelle W.M.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that male reproductive function is modulated via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The MAPK cascade is involved in numerous male reproductive processes, including spermatogenesis, sperm maturation and activation, capacitation and acrosome reaction, before fertilization of the oocyte. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in this rapidly developing field regarding the role of MAPK in male reproduction in animal models and in human spermatozoa in vitro. This research will facilitate the design of future studies in humans, although much work is needed before this information can be used to manage male infertility and environmental toxicant-induced testicular injury in men, such as blood–testis-barrier disruption. PMID:19303360

  10. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  11. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  12. Positive feedback of protein kinase C proteolytic activation during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leverrier, Sabrina; Vallentin, Alice; Joubert, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and PKCepsilon, which are better known for promoting cell survival, PKCdelta is known for its pro-apoptotic function, which is exerted mainly through a caspase-3-dependent proteolytic activation pathway. In the present study, we used the rat GH3B6 pituitary adenoma cell line to show that PKCalpha and PKCepsilon are activated and relocalized together with PKCdelta when apoptosis is induced by a genotoxic stress. Proteolytic activation is a crucial step used by the three isoforms since: (1) the catalytic domains of the PKCalpha, PKCepsilon or PKCdelta isoforms (CDalpha, CDepsilon and CDdelta respectively) accumulated, and this accumulation was dependent on the activity of both calpain and caspase; and (2) transient expression of CDalpha, CDepsilon or CDdelta sufficed to induce apoptosis. However, following this initial step of proteolytic activation, the pathways diverge; cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation are induced by CDepsilon and CDdelta, but not by CDalpha. Another interesting finding of the present study is the proteolysis of PKCdelta induced by CDepsilon expression that revealed the existence of a cross-talk between PKC isoforms during apoptosis. Hence the PKC family may participate in the apoptotic process of pituitary adenoma cells at two levels: downstream of caspase and calpain, and via retro-activation of caspase-3, resulting in the amplification of its own proteolytic activation. PMID:12238950

  13. SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein interacts with cellular pyruvate kinase protein and inhibits its activity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Yen; Li, Hui-Chun; Chen, Chiung-Yao; Yang, Chee-Hing; Lee, Shen-Kao; Wang, Chia-Wen; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Juang, Yue-Li; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2012-04-01

    The pathogenesis of SARS-CoV remains largely unknown. To study the function of the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein, we have conducted a yeast two-hybrid screening experiment to identify cellular proteins that may interact with the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein. Pyruvate kinase (liver) was found to interact with SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein in this experiment. The binding domains of these two proteins were also determined using the yeast two-hybrid system. The physical interaction between the SARS-CoV nucleocapsid and cellular pyruvate kinase (liver) proteins was further confirmed by GST pull-down assay, co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopy. Cellular pyruvate kinase activity in hepatoma cells was repressed by SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein in either transiently transfected or stably transfected cells. PK deficiency in red blood cells is known to result in human hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia. It is reasonable to assume that an inhibition of PKL activity due to interaction with SARS-CoV N protein is likely to cause the death of the hepatocytes, which results in the elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase and liver dysfunction noted in most SARS patients. Thus, our results suggest that SARS-CoV could reduce pyruvate kinase activity via its nucleocapsid protein, and this may in turn cause disease.

  14. Interleukin-1 activates a novel protein kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of Hsp27.

    PubMed

    Freshney, N W; Rawlinson, L; Guesdon, F; Jones, E; Cowley, S; Hsuan, J; Saklatvala, J

    1994-09-23

    An IL-1-stimulated protein kinase cascade resulting in phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein hsp27 has been identified in KB cells. It is distinct from the p42 MAP kinase cascade. An upstream activator kinase phosphorylated a 40 kDa kinase (p40) upon threonine and tyrosine residues, which in turn phosphorylated a 50 kDa kinase (p50) upon threonine (and some serine) residues. p50 phosphorylated hsp27 upon serine. p40 and p50 were purified to near homogeneity. All three components were inactivated by protein phosphatase 2A, and p40 was inactivated by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. The substrate specificity of p40 differed from that of p42 and p54 MAP kinases. The upstream activator was not a MAP kinase kinase. p50 resembled MAPKAPK-2 and may be identical.

  15. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways used by interleukin 1 in tissues in vivo: activation of hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1 and 2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 4 and 7.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, A; Davis, W; Carter, W G; Saklatvala, J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of interleukin 1 (IL-1) are mediated by the activation of protein kinase signalling pathways, which have been well characterized in cultured cells. We have investigated the activation of these pathways in rabbit liver and other tissues after the systemic administration of IL-1alpha. In liver there was 30-40-fold activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and 5-fold activation of both JNK kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MKK)4 and MKK7. IL-1alpha also caused 2-3-fold activation of p38 MAPK and degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB ('IkappaB'), although no activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) (p42/44 MAPK) was observed. The use of antibodies against specific JNK isoforms showed that, in liver, short (p46) JNK1 and long (p54) JNK2 are the predominant forms activated, with smaller amounts of long JNK1 and short JNK2. No active JNK3 was detected. A similar pattern of JNK activation was seen in lung, spleen, skeletal muscle and kidney. Significant JNK3 activity was detectable only in the brain, although little activation of the JNK pathway in response to IL-1alpha was observed in this tissue. This distribution of active JNK isoforms probably results from a different expression of JNKs within the tissues, rather than from a selective activation of isoforms. We conclude that IL-1alpha might activate a more restricted set of signalling pathways in tissues in vivo than it does in cultured cells, where ERK and JNK3 activation are often observed. Cultured cells might represent a 'repair' phenotype that undergoes a broader set of responses to the cytokine. PMID:11139391

  16. Regulation of the activity of protein kinases by endogenous heat stable protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Szmigielski, A

    1985-01-01

    Protein kinase activities are regulated by endogenous thermostable protein inhibitors. Type I inhibitor is a protein of MW 22,000-24,000 which inhibits specifically cyclic AMP-(cAMP) dependent protein kinase (APK) as a competitive inhibitor of catalytic subunits of the enzyme. Type I inhibitor activity changes inversely according to the activation of adenylate cyclase and the changes in cAMP content in tissues. It seems that type I inhibitor serves as a factor preventing spontaneous cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in unstimulated cell. The other thermostable protein which inhibits APK activity has been found in Sertoli cell-enriched testis (testis inhibitor). Physiological role of the testis inhibitor is unknown. Type II inhibitor is a protein of MW 15,000 which blocks phosphorylation mediated by cAMP and cyclic GMP (cGMP) dependent (APK and GPK) and cyclic nucleotide independent protein kinases as a competitive inhibitor of substrate proteins. Activity of this inhibitor specifically changes in reciprocal manner to the changes in cGMP content. It seems that type II inhibitor serves as a factor preventing the phosphorylation catalyzed by GPK when cGMP content is low. Stimulation of guanylate cyclase and activation of GPK is followed by a decrease of type II inhibitor activity. This change in relationship between activities of GPK and type II inhibitor allows for effective phosphorylation catalyzed by this enzyme when cGMP content is increased.

  17. 3pK, a new mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase located in the small cell lung cancer tumor suppressor gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Sithanandam, G; Latif, F; Duh, F M; Bernal, R; Smola, U; Li, H; Kuzmin, I; Wixler, V; Geil, L; Shrestha, S

    1996-01-01

    NotI linking clones, localized to the human chromosome 3p21.3 region and homozygously deleted in small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H740 and NCI-H1450, were used to search for a putative tumor suppressor gene(s). One of these clones, NL1G210, detected a 2.5-kb mRNA in all examined human tissues, expression being especially high in the heart and skeletal muscle. Two overlapping cDNA clones containing the entire open reading frame were isolated from a human heart cDNA library and fully characterized. Computer analysis and a search of the GenBank database to reveal high sequence identity of the product of this gene to serine-threonine kinases, especially to mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2, a recently described substrate of mitogen-activated kinases. Sequence identitiy was 72% at the nucleotide level and 75% at the amino acid level, strongly suggesting that this protein is a serine-threonine kinase. Here we demonstrate that the new gene, referred to as 3pK (for chromosome 3p kinase), in fact encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated protein serine-threonine kinase with a novel substrate specificity. PMID:8622688

  18. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  19. Activation of S6 kinase in human neutrophils by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: protein kinase C-dependent and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tudan, C; Jackson, J K; Charlton, L; Pelech, S L; Sahl, B; Burt, H M

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been shown previously to be a central enzyme in crystal-induced neutrophil activation. Since activation of the 70 kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K) has been shown to be dependent on PI 3-kinase activation in mammalian cells, and since the former is a key enzyme in the transmission of signals to the cell nucleus, activation of p70(S6K) was investigated in crystal-stimulated neutrophils. Cytosolic fractions from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)-crystal-activated neutrophils were separated by Mono Q chromatography and analysed for phosphotransferase activity using a range of substrates and probed by Western analysis using antibodies to p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). CPPD crystals induced a robust, transient activation (peak activity at 2 min) of p70(S6K) that was fully inhibited by pretreatment with rapamycin. This is the first report of the activation of p70(S6K) in neutrophil signal transduction pathways induced by an agonist. This crystal-induced activation of p70(S6K) could also be inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Compound 3), but not by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. CPPD crystals also activated the ERK1 and ERK2 forms of MAP kinase (wortmannin insensitive), PKC (Compound 3 sensitive) and protein kinase B (wortmannin sensitive) in neutrophils. These data suggest that activation of p70(S6K) may proceed through a PI 3-kinase- and protein kinase B-independent but PKC-dependent pathway in crystal-activated neutrophils. PMID:9531494

  20. Glucose regulates diacylglycerol intracellular levels and protein kinase C activity by modulating diacylglycerol kinase subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Miele, Claudia; Paturzo, Flora; Teperino, Raffaele; Sakane, Fumio; Fiory, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Ungaro, Paola; Valentino, Rossella; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2007-11-02

    Although chronic hyperglycemia reduces insulin sensitivity and leads to impaired glucose utilization, short term exposure to high glucose causes cellular responses positively regulating its own metabolism. We show that exposure of L6 myotubes overexpressing human insulin receptors to 25 mm glucose for 5 min decreased the intracellular levels of diacylglycerol (DAG). This was paralleled by transient activation of diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) and of insulin receptor signaling. Following 30-min exposure, however, both DAG levels and DGK activity returned close to basal levels. Moreover, the acute effect of glucose on DAG removal was inhibited by >85% by the DGK inhibitor R59949. DGK inhibition was also accompanied by increased protein kinase C-alpha (PKCalpha) activity, reduced glucose-induced insulin receptor activation, and GLUT4 translocation. Glucose exposure transiently redistributed DGK isoforms alpha and delta, from the prevalent cytosolic localization to the plasma membrane fraction. However, antisense silencing of DGKdelta, but not of DGKalpha expression, was sufficient to prevent the effect of high glucose on PKCalpha activity, insulin receptor signaling, and glucose uptake. Thus, the short term exposure of skeletal muscle cells to glucose causes a rapid induction of DGK, followed by a reduction of PKCalpha activity and transactivation of the insulin receptor signaling. The latter may mediate, at least in part, glucose induction of its own metabolism.

  1. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  2. SKK4, a novel activator of stress-activated protein kinase-1 (SAPK1/JNK).

    PubMed

    Lawler, S; Cuenda, A; Goedert, M; Cohen, P

    1997-09-01

    A cDNA was cloned and expressed that encodes human stress-activated protein kinase kinase-4 (SKK4), a novel MAP kinase kinase family member whose mRNA is widely expressed in human tissues. SKK4 activated SAPK1/JNK in vitro, but not SAPK2a/p38, SAPK2b/p38beta, SAPK3/ERK6 or SAPK4. It appears to be the mammalian homologue of HEP, an activator of SAPK1/JNK in Drosophila. In human epithelial KB cells SKK4 and SKK1/MKK4 (another activator of SAPK1/JNK) were both activated by stressful stimuli, but only SKK4 was activated by proinflammatory cytokines. The identification of SKK4 explains why the major SAPK1/JNK activator detected in many mammalian cell extracts is chromatographically separable from SKK1/MKK4.

  3. Autophosphorylation Activity of a Soluble Hexameric Histidine Kinase Correlates with the Shift in Protein Conformational Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wojnowska, Marta; Yan, Jun; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Cryar, Adam; Gor, Jayesh; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a commonly accepted model, in response to stimuli, bacterial histidine kinases undergo a conformational transition between an active and inactive form. Structural information on histidine kinases is limited. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate an exchange between two conformational populations of histidine kinase ExsG that are linked to different levels of kinase activity. ExsG is an atypical signaling protein that incorporates an uncommon histidine kinase catalytic core at the C terminus preceded by an N-terminal “receiver domain” that is normally associated with the response regulator proteins in two-component signal transduction systems. IM-MS analysis and enzymatic assays indicate that phosphorylation of the ExsG receiver domain stabilizes the “compact” form of the protein and inhibits kinase core activity; in contrast, nucleotide binding required for kinase activity is associated with the more open conformation of ExsG. PMID:24210218

  4. Inhibition of a signaling pathway in cardiac muscle cells by active mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, J; Carlson, M; Mansour, S J; Chien, K R; Ahn, N G; Thorburn, A

    1995-01-01

    Signaling via the Ras pathway involves sequential activation of Ras, Raf-1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MKK), and the extracellular signal-regulated (ERK) group of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Expression from the c-Fos, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), and myosin light chain-2 (MLC-2) promoters during phenylephrine-induced cardiac muscle cell hypertrophy requires activation of this pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Ras or Raf-1 can mimic the action of phenylephrine in inducing expression from these promoters. In this study, we tested whether constitutively active MKK, the molecule immediately downstream of Raf, was sufficient to induce expression. Expression of constitutively active MKK induce ERK2 kinase activity and caused expression from the c-Fos promoter, but did not significantly activate expression of reporter genes under the control of either the ANF or MLC-2 promoters. Expression of CL100, a phosphatase that inactivates ERKs, prevented expression from all of the promoters. Taken together, these data suggest that ERK activation is required for expression from the Fos, ANF, and MLC-2 promoters but MKK and ERK activation is sufficient for expression only from the Fos promoter. Constitutively active MKK synergized with phenylephrine to increase expression from a c-Fos- or an AP1-driven reporter. However, active MKK inhibited phenylephrine- and Raf-1-induced expression from the ANF and MLC-2 promoters. A DNA sequence in the MLC-2 promoter that is a target for inhibition by active MKK, but not CL100, was mapped to a previously characterized DNA element (HF1) that is responsible for cardiac specificity. Thus, activation of cardiac gene expression during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy requires ERK activation but constitutive activation by MKK can inhibit expression by targeting a DNA element that controls the cardiac specificity of gene expression. PMID:8589450

  5. Depletion of WRN protein causes RACK1 to activate several protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Massip, L; Garand, C; Labbé, A; Perreault, E; Turaga, R V N; Bohr, V A; Lebel, M

    2010-03-11

    Werner's syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal disease characterized by the premature onset of several age-associated pathologies. The protein defective in patients with WS (WRN) is a helicase/exonuclease involved in DNA repair, replication, transcription and telomere maintenance. In this study, we show that a knock down of the WRN protein in normal human fibroblasts induces phosphorylation and activation of several protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. Using a tandem affinity purification strategy, we found that WRN physically and functionally interacts with receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1), a highly conserved anchoring protein involved in various biological processes, such as cell growth and proliferation. RACK1 binds strongly to the RQC domain of WRN and weakly to its acidic repeat region. Purified RACK1 has no impact on the helicase activity of WRN, but selectively inhibits WRN exonuclease activity in vitro. Interestingly, knocking down RACK1 increased the cellular frequency of DNA breaks. Depletion of the WRN protein in return caused a fraction of nuclear RACK1 to translocate out of the nucleus to bind and activate PKCdelta and PKCbetaII in the membrane fraction of cells. In contrast, different DNA-damaging treatments known to activate PKCs did not induce RACK1/PKCs association in cells. Overall, our results indicate that a depletion of the WRN protein in normal fibroblasts causes the activation of several PKCs through translocation and association of RACK1 with such kinases.

  6. Depletion of WRN protein causes RACK1 to activate several protein kinase C isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Massip, L; Garand, C; Labbé, A; Perreault, È; Turaga, RVN; Bohr, VA; Lebel, M

    2015-01-01

    Werner’s syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal disease characterized by the premature onset of several age-associated pathologies. The protein defective in patients with WS (WRN) is a helicase/exonuclease involved in DNA repair, replication, transcription and telomere maintenance. In this study, we show that a knock down of the WRN protein in normal human fibroblasts induces phosphorylation and activation of several protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. Using a tandem affinity purification strategy, we found that WRN physically and functionally interacts with receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1), a highly conserved anchoring protein involved in various biological processes, such as cell growth and proliferation. RACK1 binds strongly to the RQC domain of WRN and weakly to its acidic repeat region. Purified RACK1 has no impact on the helicase activity of WRN, but selectively inhibits WRN exonuclease activity in vitro. Interestingly, knocking down RACK1 increased the cellular frequency of DNA breaks. Depletion of the WRN protein in return caused a fraction of nuclear RACK1 to translocate out of the nucleus to bind and activate PKCδ and PKCβII in the membrane fraction of cells. In contrast, different DNA-damaging treatments known to activate PKCs did not induce RACK1/PKCs association in cells. Overall, our results indicate that a depletion of the WRN protein in normal fibroblasts causes the activation of several PKCs through translocation and association of RACK1 with such kinases. PMID:19966859

  7. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by ultraviolet A radiation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Rozen; Dubertret, Louis; Coulomb, Bernard

    2003-08-01

    UVA radiation penetrates deeply into the skin reaching both the epidermis and the dermis. We thus investigated the effects of naturally occurring doses of UVA radiation on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities in human dermal fibroblasts. We demonstrated that UVA selectively activates p38 MAPK with no effect on extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK1-ERK2) or JNK-SAPK (cJun NH2-terminal kinase-stress-activated protein kinase) activities. We then investigated the signaling pathway used by UVA to activate p38 MAPK. L-Histidine and sodium azide had an inhibitory effect on UVA activation of p38 MAPK, pointing to a role of singlet oxygen in transduction of the UVA effect. Afterward, using prolonged cell treatments with growth factors to desensitize their signaling pathways or suramin to block growth factor receptors, we demonstrated that UVA signaling pathways shared elements with growth factor signaling pathways. In addition, using emetine (a translation inhibitor altering ribosome functioning) we detected the involvement of ribotoxic stress in p38 MAPK activation by UVA. Our observations suggest that p38 activation by UVA in dermal fibroblasts involves singlet oxygen-dependent activation of ligand-receptor signaling pathways or ribotoxic stress mechanism (or both). Despite the activation of these two distinct signaling mechanisms, the selective activation of p38 MAPK suggests a critical role of this kinase in the effects of UVA radiation.

  8. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Regulates Seed Dormancy in Barley.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingo; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Morishige, Hiromi; Kubo, Yuta; Nakamura, Masako; Ichimura, Kazuya; Seo, Shigemi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ando, Tsuyu; Hensel, Goetz; Sameri, Mohammad; Stein, Nils; Sato, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yano, Masahiro; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-03-21

    Seed dormancy has fundamental importance in plant survival and crop production; however, the mechanisms regulating dormancy remain unclear [1-3]. Seed dormancy levels generally decrease during domestication to ensure that crops successfully germinate in the field. However, reduction of seed dormancy can cause devastating losses in cereals like wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) due to pre-harvest sprouting, the germination of mature seed (grain) on the mother plant when rain occurs before harvest. Understanding the mechanisms of dormancy can facilitate breeding of crop varieties with the appropriate levels of seed dormancy [4-8]. Barley is a model crop [9, 10] and has two major seed dormancy quantitative trait loci (QTLs), SD1 and SD2, on chromosome 5H [11-19]. We detected a QTL designated Qsd2-AK at SD2 as the single major determinant explaining the difference in seed dormancy between the dormant cultivar "Azumamugi" (Az) and the non-dormant cultivar "Kanto Nakate Gold" (KNG). Using map-based cloning, we identified the causal gene for Qsd2-AK as Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3). The dormant Az allele of MKK3 is recessive; the N260T substitution in this allele decreases MKK3 kinase activity and appears to be causal for Qsd2-AK. The N260T substitution occurred in the immediate ancestor allele of the dormant allele, and the established dormant allele became prevalent in barley cultivars grown in East Asia, where the rainy season and harvest season often overlap. Our findings show fine-tuning of seed dormancy during domestication and provide key information for improving pre-harvest sprouting tolerance in barley and wheat.

  9. Isozymic forms of rat brain CA/sup 2 +/-activated and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.P.; Huang, F.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three forms of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) were purified from the cytosolic fraction of rat brain. These enzymes, designated as type I, II, and III protein kinase C, all have the similar molecular weight of 80 Kd, bind (/sup 3/H)-phorbol dibutyrate in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, and undergo autophosphorylation in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, phosphatidylserine, and diolein. Autophosphorylation of these kinases resulted in an incorporation of 1- 1.5 mol /sup 32/P/mol of enzyme. Analysis of the /sup 32/P-labeled tryptic peptides derived from the autophosphorylated protein kinase C by two-dimensional peptide mapping revealed that these kinases had different sites of autophosphorylation. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the type I and type III protein kinase C mainly phosphorylated at Ser residue while the type II kinase phosphorylated at both Ser and Thr residues. In addition, polyclonal antibodies previously prepared against a mixed enzyme fraction preferentially inhibited the type I and type II enzymes but less effectively toward the type III enzyme. Monoclonal antibody specifically against the type II protein kinase C did not inhibit the type I or type III enzymes. These kinases also had different susceptibility to limited proteolysis by trypsin and upon proteolytic degradation they generate distinct fragments. These results demonstrate the presence of isozymic forms of protein kinase C in rat brain.

  10. The CDC2-related kinase PITALRE is the catalytic subunit of active multimeric protein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Garriga, J; Mayol, X; Graña, X

    1996-01-01

    PITALRE is a human protein kinase identified by means of its partial sequence identity to the cell division cycle regulatory kinase CDC2. Immunopurified PITALRE protein complexes exhibit an in vitro kinase activity that phosphorylates the retinoblastoma protein, suggesting that PITALRE catalyses this phosphorylation reaction. However, the presence of other kinases in the immunopurified complex could not be ruled out. In the present work, an inactive mutant of the PITALRE kinase has been used to demonstrate that PITALRE is the catalytic subunit responsible for the PITALRE-complex-associated kinase activity, Ectopic overexpression of PITALRE did not increase the total PITALRE kinase activity in the cell, suggesting that PITALRE is regulated by limiting cellular factor(s). Characterization of the PITALRE-containing protein complexes indicated that most of the cellular PITALRE protein exists as a subunit in at least two different active multimeric complexes. Although monomeric PITALRE is also active in vitro, PITALRE present in multimeric complexes exhibits several-fold higher activity than monomeric PITALRE. In addition, overexpression of PITALRE demonstrated the existence of two new associated proteins of approx. 48 and 98 kDa. Altogether these results suggest that, in contrast to the situation with cyclin-dependent kinases, monomeric PITALRE is active, and that association with other proteins modulates its activity and/or its ability to recognize substrates in vivo. PMID:8870681

  11. Phosphorylation of the mitochondrial protein Sab by stress-activated protein kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Court, Naomi W; Kuo, Ivana; Quigley, Oonagh; Bogoyevitch, Marie A

    2004-06-18

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) transduce extracellular signals into responses such as growth, differentiation, and death through their phosphorylation of specific substrate proteins. Early studies showed the consensus sequence (Pro/X)-X-(Ser/Thr)-Pro to be phosphorylated by MAPKs. Docking domains such as the "kinase interaction motif" (KIM) also appear to be crucial for efficient substrate phosphorylation. Here, we show that stress-activated protein kinase-3 (SAPK3), a p38 MAPK subfamily member, localizes to the mitochondria. Activated SAPK3 phosphorylates the mitochondrial protein Sab, an in vitro substrate of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Sab phosphorylation by SAPK3 was dependent on the most N-terminal KIM (KIM1) of Sab and occurred primarily on Ser321. This appeared to be dependent on the position of Ser321 within Sab and the sequence immediately surrounding it. Our results suggest that SAPK3 and JNK may share a common target at the mitochondria and provide new insights into the substrate recognition by SAPK3.

  12. Wounding systemically activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase in forage and turf grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage and turf grasses are continually cut and grazed by livestock, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to wounding. Mechanical wounding rapidly activated a 46 kDa and a 44 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in six different grass species. In the m...

  13. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Is Activated as a Consequence of Lipolysis in the Adipocyte

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated in adipocytes during exercise and other states in which lipolysis is stimulated. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect and its physiological relevance are unclear. To examine these questions, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with agents...

  14. Expression and activity of the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in selected tissues during chicken embryonic development.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 5’-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase and a key part of a kinase signaling cascade that senses cellular energy status (AMP/ATP ratio) and acts to maintain energy homeostasis by coordinately regulating energy-consuming and energy-generating m...

  15. Protein interactome analysis of 12 mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase in rice using a yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raksha; Lee, Jae-Eun; Dangol, Sarmina; Choi, Jihyun; Yoo, Ran Hee; Moon, Jae Sun; Shim, Jae-Kyung; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is composed at least of MAP3K (for MAPK kinase kinase), MAP2K, and MAPK family modules. These components together play a central role in mediating extracellular signals to the cell and vice versa by interacting with their partner proteins. However, the MAP3K-interacting proteins remain poorly investigated in plants. Here, we utilized a yeast two-hybrid system and bimolecular fluorescence complementation in the model crop rice (Oryza sativa) to map MAP3K-interacting proteins. We identified 12 novel nonredundant interacting protein pairs (IPPs) representing 11 nonredundant interactors using 12 rice MAP3Ks (available as full-length cDNA in the rice KOME (http://cdna01.dna.affrc.go.jp/cDNA/) at the time of experimental design and execution) as bait and a rice seedling cDNA library as prey. Of the 12 MAP3Ks, only six had interacting protein partners. The established MAP3K interactome consisted of two kinases, three proteases, two forkhead-associated domain-containing proteins, two expressed proteins, one E3 ligase, one regulatory protein, and one retrotransposon protein. Notably, no MAP3K showed physical interaction with either MAP2K or MAPK. Seven IPPs (58.3%) were confirmed in vivo by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Subcellular localization of 14 interactors, together involved in nine IPPs (75%) further provide prerequisite for biological significance of the IPPs. Furthermore, GO of identified interactors predicted their involvement in diverse physiological responses, which were supported by a literature survey. These findings increase our knowledge of the MAP3K-interacting proteins, help in proposing a model of MAPK modules, provide a valuable resource for developing a complete map of the rice MAPK interactome, and allow discussion for translating the interactome knowledge to rice crop improvement against environmental factors.

  16. Acute hypertension activates mitogen-activated protein kinases in arterial wall.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Liu, Y; Gorospe, M; Udelsman, R; Holbrook, N J

    1996-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are rapidly activated in cells stimulated with various extracellular signals by dual phosphorylation of tyrosine and threonine residues. They are thought to play a pivotal role in transmitting transmembrane signals required for cell growth and differentiation. Herein we provide evidence that two distinct classes of MAP kinases, the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK), are transiently activated in rat arteries (aorta, carotid and femoral arteries) in response to an acute elevation in blood pressure induced by either restraint or administration of hypertensive agents (i.e., phenylephrine and angiotensin II). Kinase activation is followed by an increase in c-fos and c-jun gene expression and enhanced activating protein 1 (AP-1) DNA-binding activity. Activation of ERK and JNK could contribute to smooth muscle cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia during arterial remodeling due to frequent and/or persistent elevations in blood pressure. PMID:8567974

  17. Ischemia induced activation of heat shock protein 27 kinases and casein kinase 2 in the preconditioned rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Kim, S O; Baines, C P; Critz, S D; Pelech, S L; Katz, S; Downey, J M; Cohen, M V

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC), p38 MAP kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated kinases 2 and 3 (MAPKAPK2 and MAPKAPK3) have been implicated in ischemic preconditioning (PC) of the heart to reduce damage following a myocardial infarct. This study examined whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1, p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6K), casein kinase 2 (CK2), and other hsp27 kinases are also activated by PC, and if they are required for protection in rabbit hearts. CK2 and hsp27 kinase activities declined during global ischemia in control hearts, whereas PC with 5 min ischemia and 10 min reperfusion increased their activities during global ischemia. Resource Q chromatography resolved two distinct peaks of hsp27 phosphotransferase activities; the first peak (at 0.36 M NaCl) appeared to correspond to the 55-kDa MAPKAPK2. Erk1 activity was elevated in both control and PC hearts after post-ischemic reperfusion, but no change was observed in p70 S6K activity. Infarct size (measured by triphenyltetrazolium staining) in isolated rabbit hearts subjected to 30 min regional ischemia and 2 h reperfusion was 31.0+/-2.6% of the risk zone in controls and was 10.3+/-2.2% in PC hearts (p<0.001). Neither the CK2 inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) nor the Mek1/2 inhibitor PD98059 infused during ischemia blocked protection by PC. The activation of CK2 and Erk1 in ischemic preconditioned hearts appear to be epiphenomena and not required for the reduction of infarction from myocardial ischemia.

  18. Inhibitory activity for the interferon-induced protein kinase is associated with the reovirus serotype 1 sigma 3 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imani, F; Jacobs, B L

    1988-01-01

    In this report we demonstrate that reovirus serotype 1-infected cells contain an inhibitor of the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase. We provide evidence that suggests that the virus-encoded sigma 3 protein is likely responsible for this kinase inhibitory activity. We could not detect activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated reovirus serotype 1-infected mouse L cells under conditions that led to activation of the kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated, uninfected cells. Extracts from reovirus-infected cells blocked activation of kinase in extracts from interferon-treated cells when the two were mixed prior to assay. The kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of reovirus-infected cells could be overcome by adding approximately 100-fold excess of dsRNA over the amount required to activate kinase in extracts of uninfected cells. Kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of interferon-treated, virus-infected cells could be overcome with somewhat less dsRNA (approximately 10-fold excess). Most of the inhibitory activity in the extracts could be removed by adsorption with immobilized anti-reovirus sigma 3 serum or immobilized dsRNA, suggesting that the dsRNA-binding sigma 3 protein is necessary for kinase inhibitory activity. Purified sigma 3 protein, when added to reaction mixtures containing partially purified kinase, inhibited enzyme activation. Control of activation of this kinase, which can modify eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 2, may be relevant to the sensitivity of reovirus replication to treatment of cells with interferon and to the shutoff of host protein synthesis in reovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:2460857

  19. Protein Kinase Activity Decreases with Higher Braak Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Andrea F.N.; Hilhorst, Riet; Coart, Elisabeth; García Barrado, Leandro; Naji, Faris; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.M.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Scheltens, Philip; Hoozemans, Jeroen J.M.; van der Vies, Saskia M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a long pre-clinical phase (20–30 years), during which significant brain pathology manifests itself. Disease mechanisms associated with pathological hallmarks remain elusive. Most processes associated with AD pathogenesis, such as inflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and hyper-phosphorylation of tau are dependent on protein kinase activity. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of protein kinases in AD pathogenesis. Protein kinase activity was determined in postmortem hippocampal brain tissue of 60 patients at various stages of AD and 40 non-demented controls (Braak stages 0-VI) using a peptide-based microarray platform. We observed an overall decrease of protein kinase activity that correlated with disease progression. The phosphorylation of 96.7% of the serine/threonine peptides and 37.5% of the tyrosine peptides on the microarray decreased significantly with increased Braak stage (p-value <0.01). Decreased activity was evident at pre-clinical stages of AD pathology (Braak I-II). Increased phosphorylation was not observed for any peptide. STRING analysis in combination with pathway analysis and identification of kinases responsible for peptide phosphorylation showed the interactions between well-known proteins in AD pathology, including the Ephrin-receptor A1 (EphA1), a risk gene for AD, and sarcoma tyrosine kinase (Src), which is involved in memory formation. Additionally, kinases that have not previously been associated with AD were identified, e.g., protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6/BRK), feline sarcoma oncogene kinase (FES), and fyn-associated tyrosine kinase (FRK). The identified protein kinases are new biomarkers and potential drug targets for early (pre-clinical) intervention. PMID:26519433

  20. Protein Kinase A-independent Ras Protein Activation Cooperates with Rap1 Protein to Mediate Activation of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinases (ERK) by cAMP.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanping; Dillon, Tara J; Takahashi, Maho; Earley, Keith T; Stork, Philip J S

    2016-10-07

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important mediator of hormonal stimulation of cell growth and differentiation through its activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Two small G proteins, Ras and Rap1, have been proposed to mediate this activation, with either Ras or Rap1 acting in distinct cell types. Using Hek293 cells, we show that both Ras and Rap1 are required for cAMP signaling to ERKs. The roles of Ras and Rap1 were distinguished by their mechanism of activation, dependence on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and the magnitude and kinetics of their effects on ERKs. Ras was required for the early portion of ERK activation by cAMP and was activated independently of PKA. Ras activation required the Ras/Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) PDZ-GEF1. Importantly, this action of PDZ-GEF1 was disrupted by mutation within its putative cyclic nucleotide-binding domain within PDZ-GEF1. Compared with Ras, Rap1 activation of ERKs was of longer duration. Rap1 activation was dependent on PKA and required Src family kinases and the Rap1 exchanger C3G. This is the first report of a mechanism for the cooperative actions of Ras and Rap1 in cAMP activation of ERKs. One physiological role for the sustained activation of ERKs is the transcription and stabilization of a range of transcription factors, including c-FOS. We show that the induction of c-FOS by cAMP required both the early and sustained phases of ERK activation, requiring Ras and Rap1, as well as for each of the Raf isoforms, B-Raf and C-Raf.

  1. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  2. Stimulation of Leishmania tropica protein kinase CK2 activities by platelet-activating factor (PAF).

    PubMed

    Dutra, Patricia M L; Vieira, Danielle P; Meyer-Fernandes, Jose R; Silva-Neto, Mario A C; Lopes, Angela H

    2009-09-01

    Leishmania tropica is one of the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid mediator in diverse biological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that PAF promoted a three-fold increase on ecto-protein kinase and a three-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity of L. tropica live promastigotes. When casein was added to the reaction medium, along with PAF, there was a four-fold increase on the ecto-kinase activity. When live L. tropica promastigotes were pre-incubated for 30 min in the presence of PAF-plus casein, a six-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity was observed. Also, a protein released from L. tropica promastigotes reacted with polyclonal antibodies for the mammalian CK2 alpha catalytic subunit. Furthermore, in vitro mouse macrophage infection by L. tropica was doubled when promastigotes were pre-treated for 2 h with PAF. Similar results were obtained when the interaction was performed in the presence of purified CK2 or casein. TBB and DRB, CK2 inhibitors, reversed PAF enhancement of macrophage infection by L. tropica. WEB 2086, a competitive PAF antagonist, reversed all PAF effects here described. This study shows for the first time that PAF promotes the activation of two isoforms of CK2, secreted and membrane-bound, correlating these activities to infection of mouse macrophages.

  3. Mechanical Impact Induces Cartilage Degradation via Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Heying, Emily; Nicholson, Nathan; Stroud, Nicolas J.; Homandberg, Gene A.; Guo, Danping; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the activation of MAP kinases in and around cartilage subjected to mechanical damage and to determine the effects of their inhibitors on impaction induced chondrocyte death and cartilage degeneration. Design The phosphorylation of MAP kinases was examined with confocal microscopy and immunoblotting. The effects of MAP kinase inhibitors on impaction-induced chondrocyte death and proteoglycan loss were determined with fluorescent microscopy and DMMB assay. The expression of catabolic genes at mRNA levels was examined with quantitative real time PCR. Results Early p38 activation was detected at 20 min and 1 hr post-impaction. At 24 hr, enhanced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 was visualized in chondrocytes from in and around impact sites. The phosphorylation of p38 was increased by 3.0-fold in impact sites and 3.3-fold in adjacent cartilage. The phosphorylation of ERK-1 was increased by 5.8-fold in impact zone and 5.4-fold in adjacent cartilage; the phosphorylation of ERK-2 increased by 4.0-fold in impacted zone and 3.6-fold in adjacent cartilage. Furthermore, the blocking of p38 pathway did not inhibit impaction-induced ERK activation. The inhibition of p38 or ERK pathway significantly reduced injury-related chondrocyte death and proteoglycan losses. Quantative Real-time PCR analysis revealed that blunt impaction significantly up-regulated MMP-13, TNF-α, and ADAMTS-5 expression. Conclusion These findings implicate p38 and ERK MAPKs in the post injury spread of cartilage degeneration and suggest that the risk of PTOA following joint trauma could be decreased by blocking their activities, which might be involved in up-regulating expressions of MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, and TNF-α. PMID:20813194

  4. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Activated Protein Kinase 2 Regulates Actin Polymerization and Vascular Leak in Ventilator Associated Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Damarla, Mahendra; Hasan, Emile; Boueiz, Adel; Le, Anne; Pae, Hyun Hae; Montouchet, Calypso; Kolb, Todd; Simms, Tiffany; Myers, Allen; Kayyali, Usamah S.; Gaestel, Matthias; Peng, Xinqi; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Damico, Rachel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation, a fundamental therapy for acute lung injury, worsens pulmonary vascular permeability by exacting mechanical stress on various components of the respiratory system causing ventilator associated lung injury. We postulated that MK2 activation via p38 MAP kinase induced HSP25 phosphorylation, in response to mechanical stress, leading to actin stress fiber formation and endothelial barrier dysfunction. We sought to determine the role of p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 on HSP25 phosphorylation and actin stress fiber formation in ventilator associated lung injury. Wild type and MK2−/− mice received mechanical ventilation with high (20 ml/kg) or low (7 ml/kg) tidal volumes up to 4 hrs, after which lungs were harvested for immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and lung permeability assays. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation resulted in significant phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, MK2, HSP25, actin polymerization, and an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability in wild type mice as compared to spontaneous breathing or low tidal volume mechanical ventilation. However, pretreatment of wild type mice with specific p38 MAP kinase or MK2 inhibitors abrogated HSP25 phosphorylation and actin polymerization, and protected against increased lung permeability. Finally, MK2−/− mice were unable to phosphorylate HSP25 or increase actin polymerization from baseline, and were resistant to increases in lung permeability in response to HVT MV. Our results suggest that p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 mediate lung permeability in ventilator associated lung injury by regulating HSP25 phosphorylation and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:19240800

  5. Peroxide Sensors for the Fission Yeast Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Vicky; Quinn, Janet; Pino, Teresa Soto; Martin, Humberto; Saldanha, Jose; Makino, Kozo; Morgan, Brian A.; Millar, Jonathan B.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe stress-activated Sty1p/Spc1p mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase regulates gene expression through the Atf1p and Pap1p transcription factors, homologs of human ATF2 and c-Jun, respectively. Mcs4p, a response regulator protein, acts upstream of Sty1p by binding the Wak1p/Wis4p MAP kinase kinase kinase. We show that phosphorylation of Mcs4p on a conserved aspartic acid residue is required for activation of Sty1p only in response to peroxide stress. Mcs4p acts in a conserved phospho-relay system initiated by two PAS/PAC domain-containing histidine kinases, Mak2p and Mak3p. In the absence of Mak2p or Mak3p, Sty1p fails to phosphorylate the Atf1p transcription factor or induce Atf1p-dependent gene expression. As a consequence, cells lacking Mak2p and Mak3p are sensitive to peroxide attack in the absence of Prr1p, a distinct response regulator protein that functions in association with Pap1p. The Mak1p histidine kinase, which also contains PAS/PAC repeats, does not regulate Sty1p or Atf1p but is partially required for Pap1p- and Prr1p-dependent transcription. We conclude that the transcriptional response to free radical attack is initiated by at least two distinct phospho-relay pathways in fission yeast. PMID:11179424

  6. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Shaw, E.K.; Bennett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg/sup 2 +/ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Low salt concentrations activate AMP-activated protein kinase in mouse macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Natasha; Fraser, Scott A; Katerelos, Marina; Katsis, Frosa; Gleich, Kurt; Mount, Peter F; Steinberg, Gregory R; Levidiotis, Vicki; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2009-04-01

    The energy-sensing kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is associated with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2 in the kidney and phosphorylates it on a regulatory site in vitro. To identify a potential role for AMPK in salt sensing at the macula densa, we have used the murine macula densa cell line MMDD1. In this cell line, AMPK was rapidly activated by isosmolar low-salt conditions. In contrast to the known salt-sensing pathway in the macula densa, AMPK activation occurred in the presence of either low sodium or low chloride and was unaffected by inhibition of NKCC2 with bumetanide. Assays using recombinant AMPK demonstrated activation of an upstream kinase by isosmolar low salt. The specific calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase inhibitor STO-609 failed to suppress AMPK activation, suggesting that it was not part of the signal pathway. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of the specific substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79), as well as increased NKCC2 phosphorylation at Ser(126). AMPK activation due to low salt concentrations was inhibited by an adenovirus construct encoding a kinase dead mutant of AMPK, leading to reduced ACC Ser(79) and NKCC2 Ser(126) phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that AMPK activation in macula densa-like cells occurs via isosmolar changes in sodium or chloride concentration, leading to phosphorylation of ACC and NKCC2. Phosphorylation of these substrates in vivo is predicted to increase intracellular chloride and so reduce the effect of salt restriction on tubuloglomerular feedback and renin secretion.

  8. Changes in the nuclear protein kinase activities in the regenerating liver of partially irradiated rat

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujiwara, A.; Yasumasu, I. )

    1989-09-01

    X rays (4.8 Gy) inhibit both DNA synthesis and phosphorylation of histone H1 in the regenerating liver of the rat. To determine the cause of the inhibition of histone H1 phosphorylation, changes in the nuclear protein kinase activities during the prereplicative phase of regeneration were measured. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity was low during regeneration, and the changes in the activity were not statistically significant. The cAMP-independent protein kinase activity increased at 15 h, decreased at 18 h, and increased again at 24 h after partial hepatectomy. X irradiation prior to partial hepatectomy did not inhibit the increase at 15 h, but it did inhibit the increase at 24 h. The activity was not inhibited by isoquinolinesulfonamide inhibitors such as H-7, and it was activated by a commercial preparation of an inhibitor protein of the cAMP-dependent kinase. It was also inhibited by quercetin. The possibility that the radiation-sensitive nuclear protein kinase is a nuclear cAMP-independent protein kinase specific for histone H1 is considered.

  9. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  10. Interferon-. alpha. selectively activates the. beta. isoform of protein kinase C through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, L.M.; Saltiel, A.R. ); Strulovici, B. )

    1990-09-01

    The early events that occur after interferon binds to discrete cell surface receptors remain largely unknown. Human leukocyte interferon (interferon-{alpha}) rapidly increases the binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol dibutyrate to intact HeLa cells a measure of protein kinase C activation, and induces the selective translocation of the {beta} isoform of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the particulate fraction of HeLa cells. The subcellular distribution of the {alpha} and {epsilon} isoforms is unaffected by interferon-{alpha} treatment. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters mimics the inhibitory action of interferon-{alpha} on HeLa cell proliferation and down-regulation of protein kinase C blocks the induction of antiviral activity by interferon-{alpha} in HeLa cells. Increased phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis and phosphorylcholine production is accompanied by diacylglycerol production in response to interferon. However, inositol phospholipid turnover and free intracellular calcium concentration are unaffected. These results suggest that the transient increase in diacylglycerol, resulting from phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis, may selectively activate the {beta} isoform of protein kinase C. Moreover, the activation of protein kinase C is a necessary element in interferon action on cells.

  11. Protective benefits of AMP-activated protein kinase in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Yang, Dan; Gong, Xianqiong; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (HIRI) is a major cause of hepatic failure and death after liver trauma, haemorrhagic shock, resection surgery and liver transplantation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy sensitive kinase that plays crucial roles in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis. In HIRI, ischemia induces the decline of ATP and the increased ratio of AMP/ATP, which promotes the phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Three AMPK kinases, liver kinase B1 (LKB1), Ca2+/calmodulin-depedent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) and TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), are main upstream kinases for the phosphorylation of AMPK. In addition to the changed AMP/ATP ratio, the activated CaMKKβ by increased intracelluar Ca2+ and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also involved in the activation of AMPK during HIRI. The activated AMPK might provide protective benefits in HIRI via prevention of energy decline, inhibition of inflammatory response, suppression of hepatocyte apoptosis and attenuation of oxidative stress. Thus, AMPK might become a novel target for the pharmacological intervention of HIRI. PMID:28386315

  12. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Activation by Resveratrol Modulates Amyloid-β Peptide Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giliberto, Luca; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Wu, Qingli; Simon, James E.; Janle, Elsa M.; Lobo, Jessica; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition into cerebral amyloid plaques. The natural polyphenol resveratrol promotes anti-aging pathways via the activation of several metabolic sensors, including the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Resveratrol also lowers Aβ levels in cell lines; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. Moreover, the bioavailability of resveratrol in the brain remains uncertain. Here we show that AMPK signaling controls Aβ metabolism and mediates the anti-amyloidogenic effect of resveratrol in non-neuronal and neuronal cells, including in mouse primary neurons. Resveratrol increased cytosolic calcium levels and promoted AMPK activation by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β. Direct pharmacological and genetic activation of AMPK lowered extracellular Aβ accumulation, whereas AMPK inhibition reduced the effect of resveratrol on Aβ levels. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the AMPK target mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) to trigger autophagy and lysosomal degradation of Aβ. Finally, orally administered resveratrol in mice was detected in the brain where it activated AMPK and reduced cerebral Aβ levels and deposition in the cortex. These data suggest that resveratrol and pharmacological activation of AMPK have therapeutic potential against Alzheimer disease. PMID:20080969

  13. Genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase genes in Capsicum annuum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqin; Shi, Lanping; Liu, Yanyan; Tang, Qian; Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Cai, Jinsen; Yu, Huanxin; Wang, Rongzhang; Wen, Jiayu; Lin, Youquan; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have been implicated in plant growth, development, and environment adaptation, but a comprehensive understanding of MAPK signaling at genome-wide level is limited in Capsicum annuum. Herein, genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of MAPK and MAPK kinase (MAPKK) were performed in pepper. A total of 19 pepper MAPK (CaMAPKs) genes and five MAPKK (CaMAPKKs) genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CaMAPKs and CaMAPKKs could be classified into four groups and each group contains similar exon-intron structures. However, significant divergences were also found. Notably, five members of the pepper MAPKK family were much less conserved than those found in Arabidopsis, and 9 Arabidopsis MAPKs did not have orthologs in pepper. Additionally, 7 MAPKs in Arabidopsis had either two or three orthologs in the pepper genome, and six pepper MAPKs and one MAPKK differing in sequence were found in three pepper varieties. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the majority of MAPK and MAPKK genes were ubiquitously expressed and transcriptionally modified in pepper leaves after treatments with heat, salt, and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation as well as exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, ethephon, and abscisic acid. The MAPKK-MAPK interactome was tested by yeast two-hybrid assay, the results showed that one MAPKK might interact with multiple MAPKs, one MAPK might also interact with more than one MAPKKs, constituting MAPK signaling networks which may collaborate in transmitting upstream signals into appropriate downstream cellular responses and processes. These results will facilitate future functional characterization of MAPK cascades in pepper. PMID:26442088

  14. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  15. Counteracting Protein Kinase Activity in the Heart: The Multiple Roles of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Silvio; Meyer-Roxlau, Stefanie; Wagner, Michael; Dobrev, Dobromir; El-Armouche, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Decades of cardiovascular research have shown that variable and flexible levels of protein phosphorylation are necessary to maintain cardiac function. A delicate balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states of proteins is guaranteed by a complex interplay of protein kinases (PKs) and phosphatases. Serine/threonine phosphatases, in particular members of the protein phosphatase (PP) family govern dephosphorylation of the majority of these cardiac proteins. Recent findings have however shown that PPs do not only dephosphorylate previously phosphorylated proteins as a passive control mechanism but are capable to actively control PK activity via different direct and indirect signaling pathways. These control mechanisms can take place on (epi-)genetic, (post-)transcriptional, and (post-)translational levels. In addition PPs themselves are targets of a plethora of proteinaceous interaction partner regulating their endogenous activity, thus adding another level of complexity and feedback control toward this system. Finally, novel approaches are underway to achieve spatiotemporal pharmacologic control of PPs which in turn can be used to fine-tune misleaded PK activity in heart disease. Taken together, this review comprehensively summarizes the major aspects of PP-mediated PK regulation and discusses the subsequent consequences of deregulated PP activity for cardiovascular diseases in depth. PMID:26617522

  16. Increased activity of rat liver nucleolar protein kinase following triiodothyronine administration.

    PubMed

    Fugassa, E; Gallo, G; Pertica, M; Voci, A; Orunesu, M

    1977-12-08

    Triiodothyronine (T3) administration to thyroidectomized rats induces a significant increase in the nucleolus-associated protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) activity. The general properties of the protein kinase solubilized from liver nucleoli have been investigated. Mg2+ (20 mM) is essential for the reaction and an appropriate concentration of NaCl (100 mM) is required to achieve maximal phosphorylation rates. The optimal pH for casein phosphorylation is 7.6. The kinase phosphorylates casein more efficiently than phosvitin and displays an almost undetectable activity towards histones and protamine. No significant stimulation of the kinase activity by cyclic AMP has been detected. The apparent Km values for casein and ATP are 1.5 mg/ml and 1.5-10(-5) M, respectively, and are not affected by the hormone administration.

  17. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase revealed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Goswami, Devrishi; Rajamohan, Francis; Harris, Melissa S.; Calabrese, Matthew; Hoth, Lise R.; Magyar, Rachelle; Pascal, Bruce D.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Busby, Scott A.; Kurumbail, Ravi; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary AMP-Activated protein kinase (AMPK) monitors cellular energy, regulates genes involved in ATP synthesis and consumption, and is allosterically activated by nucleotides and synthetic ligands. Analysis of the intact enzyme by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry reveals conformational perturbations of AMPK in response to binding of nucleotides, cyclodextrin and a synthetic small molecule activator, A769662. Results from this analysis clearly show that binding of AMP leads to conformational changes primarily in the γ subunit of AMPK and subtle changes in the α and β subunits. In contrast, A769662 causes profound conformational changes in the glycogen binding module of the β subunit and in the kinase domain of the α subunit suggesting that the molecular binding site of latter resides between the α and β subunits. The distinct short and long-range perturbations induced upon binding of AMP and A769662 suggest fundamentally different molecular mechanisms for activation of AMPK by these two ligands. PMID:24076403

  18. Conserved herpesvirus protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Conserved herpesviral protein kinases (CHPKs) are a group of enzymes conserved throughout all subfamilies of Herpesviridae. Members of this group are serine/threonine protein kinases that are likely to play a conserved role in viral infection by interacting with common host cellular and viral factors; however along with a conserved role, individual kinases may have unique functions in the context of viral infection in such a way that they are only partially replaceable even by close homologues. Recent studies demonstrated that CHPKs are crucial for viral infection and suggested their involvement in regulation of numerous processes at various infection steps (primary infection, nuclear egress, tegumentation), although the mechanisms of this regulation remain unknown. Notwithstanding, recent advances in discovery of new CHPK targets, and studies of CHPK knockout phenotypes have raised their attractiveness as targets for antiviral therapy. A number of compounds have been shown to inhibit the activity of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded UL97 protein kinase and exhibit a pronounced antiviral effect, although the same compounds are inactive against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase BGLF4, illustrating the fact that low homology between the members of this group complicates development of compounds targeting the whole group, and suggesting that individualized, structure-based inhibitor design will be more effective. Determination of CHPK structures will greatly facilitate this task. PMID:17881303

  19. A tumor suppressor C53 protein antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint (1). More recently, Wang et al (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting NF-κB signaling (2). We report here identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexrepsssion. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell cycle progression and DNA damage response. PMID:19223857

  20. Stress-activated protein kinase-mediated down-regulation of the cell integrity pathway mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1p by protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Marisa; Núñez, Andrés; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2007-11-01

    Fission yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1p is involved in morphogenesis, cytokinesis, and ion homeostasis as part of the cell integrity pathway, and it becomes activated under multiple stresses, including hyper- or hypotonic conditions, glucose deprivation, cell wall-damaging compounds, and oxidative stress. The only protein phosphatase known to dephosphorylate and inactivate Pmk1p is Pmp1p. We show here that the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathway and its main effector, Sty1p MAPK, are essential for proper deactivation of Pmk1p under hypertonic stress in a process regulated by Atf1p transcription factor. We demonstrate that tyrosine phosphatases Pyp1p and Pyp2p, and serine/threonine phosphatase Ptc1p, that negatively regulate Sty1p activity and whose expression is dependent on Sty1p-Atf1p function, are involved in Pmk1p dephosphorylation under osmostress. Pyp1p and Ptc1p, in addition to Pmp1p, also control the basal level of MAPK Pmk1p activity in growing cells and associate with, and dephosphorylate Pmk1p both in vitro and in vivo. Our results with Ptc1p provide the first biochemical evidence for a PP2C-type phosphatase acting on more than one MAPK in yeast cells. Importantly, the SAPK-dependent down-regulation of Pmk1p through Pyp1p, Pyp2p, and Ptc1p was not complete, and Pyp1p and Ptc1p phosphatases are able to negatively regulate MAPK Pmk1p activity by an alternative regulatory mechanism. Our data also indicate that Pmk1p phosphorylation oscillates as a function of the cell cycle, peaking at cell separation during cytokinesis, and that Pmp1p phosphatase plays a main role in regulating this process.

  1. Stress-activated Protein Kinase-mediated Down-Regulation of the Cell Integrity Pathway Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pmk1p by Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Marisa; Núñez, Andrés; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Cansado, José

    2007-01-01

    Fission yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1p is involved in morphogenesis, cytokinesis, and ion homeostasis as part of the cell integrity pathway, and it becomes activated under multiple stresses, including hyper- or hypotonic conditions, glucose deprivation, cell wall-damaging compounds, and oxidative stress. The only protein phosphatase known to dephosphorylate and inactivate Pmk1p is Pmp1p. We show here that the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathway and its main effector, Sty1p MAPK, are essential for proper deactivation of Pmk1p under hypertonic stress in a process regulated by Atf1p transcription factor. We demonstrate that tyrosine phosphatases Pyp1p and Pyp2p, and serine/threonine phosphatase Ptc1p, that negatively regulate Sty1p activity and whose expression is dependent on Sty1p-Atf1p function, are involved in Pmk1p dephosphorylation under osmostress. Pyp1p and Ptc1p, in addition to Pmp1p, also control the basal level of MAPK Pmk1p activity in growing cells and associate with, and dephosphorylate Pmk1p both in vitro and in vivo. Our results with Ptc1p provide the first biochemical evidence for a PP2C-type phosphatase acting on more than one MAPK in yeast cells. Importantly, the SAPK-dependent down-regulation of Pmk1p through Pyp1p, Pyp2p, and Ptc1p was not complete, and Pyp1p and Ptc1p phosphatases are able to negatively regulate MAPK Pmk1p activity by an alternative regulatory mechanism. Our data also indicate that Pmk1p phosphorylation oscillates as a function of the cell cycle, peaking at cell separation during cytokinesis, and that Pmp1p phosphatase plays a main role in regulating this process. PMID:17761528

  2. Visible-Light-Triggered Activation of a Protein Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Danielle; Li, Jason W; Branda, Neil R

    2017-02-20

    A photoresponsive small molecule undergoes a ring-opening reaction when exposed to visible light and becomes an active inhibitor of the enzyme protein kinase C. This "turning on" of enzyme inhibition with light puts control into the hands of the user, creating the opportunity to regulate when and where enzyme catalysis takes place.

  3. A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor induced compound skin toxicity with oedema in metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C L; Mortimer, P S; Larkin, J M; Basu, T N; Gore, M E; Fearfield, L

    2016-04-01

    We report three cases of skin toxicity associated with oral mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma (MM). All three patients developed oedema, and a single patient experienced eyelash trichomegaly. This is the first known report of eyelash trichomegaly secondary to MEK inhibitor use. We also discuss possible mechanisms for MEK inhibitor-associated oedema development. This series supports the role of the dermatologist in the screening and management of patients in the rapidly developing oncology setting, as new targeted agents can give rise to marked skin toxicity.

  4. Conserved intermolecular salt bridge required for activation of protein kinases PKR, GCN2, and PERK.

    PubMed

    Dey, Madhusudan; Cao, Chune; Sicheri, Frank; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-03-02

    The protein kinases PKR, GCN2, and PERK phosphorylate translation initiation factor eIF2alpha to regulate general and genespecific protein synthesis under various cellular stress conditions. Recent x-ray crystallographic structures of PKR and GCN2 revealed distinct dimeric configurations of the kinase domains. Whereas PKR kinase domains dimerized in a back-to-back and parallel orientation, the GCN2 kinase domains displayed an antiparallel orientation. The dimerization interfaces on PKR and GCN2 were localized to overlapping surfaces on the N-terminal lobes of the kinase domains but utilized different intermolecular contacts. A key feature of the PKR dimerization interface is a salt bridge interaction between Arg(262) from one protomer and Asp(266) from the second protomer. Interestingly, these two residues are conserved in all eIF2alpha kinases, although in the GCN2 structure, the two residues are too remote to interact. To test the importance of this potential salt bridge interaction in PKR, GCN2, and PERK, the residues constituting the salt bridge were mutated either independently or together to residues with the opposite charge. Single mutations of the Asp (or Glu) and Arg residues blocked kinase function both in yeast cells and in vitro. However, for all three kinases, the double mutation designed to restore the salt bridge interaction with opposite polarity resulted in a functional kinase. Thus, the salt bridge interaction and dimer interface observed in the PKR structure is critical for the activity of all three eIF2alpha kinases. These results are consistent with the notion that the PKR structure represents the active state of the eIF2alpha kinase domain, whereas the GCN2 structure may represent an inactive state of the kinase.

  5. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levelsand impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  6. Expression and purification of active protein kinases from wheat germ extracts.

    PubMed

    Sonkoly, Boglárka; Bardóczy, Viola; Mészáros, Tamás

    2011-01-01

    In vitro functional studies of eukaryotic kinases are often constrained by the availability of pure and -enzymatically active kinase of interest. Though numerous proteins have been synthesized by cell-based systems, in vivo production of properly folded, eukaryotic proteins remains a challenging task. Current wheat-germ-based cell-free in vitro translation systems present a plausible alternative for protein synthesis since majority of eukaryotic proteins could be obtained in their native folded form with general protocols. The use of special in vitro translation vectors with ligation-independent cloning sites and cleavable affinity tags eliminates further bottlenecks of the protein producing procedure and makes this system a reasonable method for simultaneous generation of active kinases.

  7. One reporter for in-cell activity profiling of majority of protein kinase oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Gudernova, Iva; Foldynova-Trantirkova, Silvie; Ghannamova, Barbora El; Fafilek, Bohumil; Varecha, Miroslav; Balek, Lukas; Hruba, Eva; Jonatova, Lucie; Jelinkova, Iva; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; Trantirek, Lukas; Mayer, Jiri; Krejci, Pavel

    2017-02-15

    In-cell profiling enables the evaluation of receptor tyrosine activity in a complex environment of regulatory networks that affect signal initiation, propagation and feedback. We used FGF-receptor signaling to identify EGR1 as a locus that strongly responds to the activation of a majority of the recognized protein kinase oncogenes, including 30 receptor tyrosine kinases and 154 of their disease-associated mutants. The EGR1 promoter was engineered to enhance trans-activation capacity and optimized for simple screening assays with luciferase or fluorescent reporters. The efficacy of the developed, fully synthetic reporters was demonstrated by the identification of novel targets for two clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nilotinib and osimertinib. A universal reporter system for in-cell protein kinase profiling will facilitate repurposing of existing anti-cancer drugs and identification of novel inhibitors in high-throughput screening studies.

  8. One reporter for in-cell activity profiling of majority of protein kinase oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gudernova, Iva; Foldynova-Trantirkova, Silvie; Ghannamova, Barbora El; Fafilek, Bohumil; Varecha, Miroslav; Balek, Lukas; Hruba, Eva; Jonatova, Lucie; Jelinkova, Iva; Bosakova, Michaela Kunova; Trantirek, Lukas; Mayer, Jiri; Krejci, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    In-cell profiling enables the evaluation of receptor tyrosine activity in a complex environment of regulatory networks that affect signal initiation, propagation and feedback. We used FGF-receptor signaling to identify EGR1 as a locus that strongly responds to the activation of a majority of the recognized protein kinase oncogenes, including 30 receptor tyrosine kinases and 154 of their disease-associated mutants. The EGR1 promoter was engineered to enhance trans-activation capacity and optimized for simple screening assays with luciferase or fluorescent reporters. The efficacy of the developed, fully synthetic reporters was demonstrated by the identification of novel targets for two clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nilotinib and osimertinib. A universal reporter system for in-cell protein kinase profiling will facilitate repurposing of existing anti-cancer drugs and identification of novel inhibitors in high-throughput screening studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21536.001 PMID:28199182

  9. Manganese modulation of MAPK pathways: effects on upstream mitogen activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs) and mitogen activated kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Patrick L.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that manganese (Mn) exposure potentiates inflammatory mediator output from activated glia; this increased output is associated with enhanced mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK: p38, ERK, and JNK) activity. We hypothesized that Mn activates MAPK by activating the kinases upstream of MAPK, i.e., MKK-3/6, MKK-1/2, and MKK-4 (responsible for activation of p38, ERK, and JNK, respectively), and/or by inhibiting a major phosphatase responsible for MAPK inactivation, MKP-1. Exposure of N9 microglia to Mn (250μM), LPS (100 ng/ml), or Mn+LPS increased MKK-3/6 and MKK-4 activity at 1 h; the effect of Mn+LPS on MKK-4 activation was greater than the rest. At 4 h, Mn, LPS, and Mn+LPS increased MKK-3/6 and MKK-1/2 phosphorylation, whereas MKK-4 was activated only by Mn and Mn+LPS. Besides activating MKK-4 via Ser257/Thr261 phosphorylation, Mn (4 h) prevented MKK-4’s phosphorylation on Ser80, which negatively regulates MKK-4 activity. Exposure to Mn or Mn+LPS (1 h) decreased both mRNA and protein expression of MKP-1, the negative MAPK regulator. In addition, we observed that at 4 h, but not at 1 h, a time point coinciding with increased MAPK activity, Mn+LPS markedly increased TNF-α , IL-6, and Cox-2 mRNA, suggesting a delayed effect. The fact that all three major groups of MKKs, MKK-1/2, MKK-3/6, and MKK-4 are activated by Mn suggests that Mn-induced activation of MAPK occurs via traditional mechanisms, which perhaps involve the MAPKs farthest upstream, MKKKs (MAP3Ks). In addition, for all MKKs, Mn-induced activation was persistent at least for 4 h, indicating a long-term effect. PMID:20589745

  10. Proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta by an ICE-like protease in apoptotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Y; Manome, Y; Meinhardt, G; Kisaki, H; Kharbanda, S; Robertson, M; Ghayur, T; Wong, W W; Kamen, R; Weichselbaum, R

    1995-01-01

    These studies demonstrate that treatment of human U-937 cells with ionizing radiation (IR) is associated with activation of a cytoplasmic myelin basic protein (MBP) kinase. Characterization of the kinase by gel filtration and in-gel kinase assays support activation of a 40 kDa protein. Substrate and inhibitor studies further support the induction of protein kinase C (PKC)-like activity. The results of N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the purified protein demonstrate identity of the kinase with an internal region of PKC delta. Immunoblot analysis was used to confirm proteolytic cleavage of intact 78 kDa PKC delta in control cells to the 40 kDa C-terminal fragment after IR exposure. The finding that both IR-induced proteolytic activation of PKC delta and endonucleolytic DNA fragmentation are blocked by Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL supports an association with physiological cell death (PCD). Moreover, cleavage of PKC delta occurs adjacent to aspartic acid at a site (QDN) similar to that involved in proteolytic activation of interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE). The specific tetrapeptide ICE inhibitor (YVAD) blocked both proteolytic activation of PKC delta and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in IR-treated cells. These findings demonstrate that PCD is associated with proteolytic activation of PKC delta by an ICE-like protease. Images PMID:8557034

  11. Muscarinic activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Berkeley, J L; Levey, A I

    2000-08-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) activate many downstream signaling pathways, some of which can lead to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and activation. MAPKs play roles in regulating cell growth, differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. Here, the activation of MAPK was examined in PC12 cells endogenously expressing mAChRs. Western blot analysis using a phosphospecific MAPK antibody revealed a dose-dependent and atropine-sensitive increase in MAPK phosphorylation in cells stimulated with carbachol (CCh). The maximal response occurred after 5 min and was rapidly reduced to baseline. To investigate the receptors responsible for CCh activation of MAPK in PC12 cells, the mAChR subtypes present were determined using RT-PCR and immunoprecipitation. RT-PCR was used to amplify fragments of the appropriate sizes for m1, m4, and m5, and the identities of the bands were confirmed with restriction digests. Immunoprecipitation using subtype-specific antibodies showed that approximately 95% of the expressed receptors were m4, whereas the remaining approximately 5% were m1 and m5. A highly specific m1 toxin completely blocked MAPK phosphorylation in response to CCh stimulation. The mAChR-induced MAPK activation was abolished by protein kinase C down-regulation and partially inhibited by pertussis toxin. Although m1 represents a small proportion of the total mAChR population, pharmacological evidence suggests that m1 is responsible for MAPK activation in PC12 cells.

  12. AOP-1 interacts with cardiac-specific protein kinase TNNI3K and down-regulates its kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Dong-Qing; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao; Cao, Hui-Qing; Wang, Lai-Yuan; Shi, Na; Meng, Xian-Min

    2007-11-01

    In the present study, a yeast two-hybrid screening system was used to identify the interaction partners of cardiac troponin I-interacting kinase (TNNI3K) that might serve as regulators or targets, and thus in turn to gain some insights on the roles of TNNI3K. After screening the adult heart cDNA library with a bait construct encoding the ANK motif of TNNI3K, antioxidant protein 1 (AOP-1) was isolated. The interaction between TNNI3K and AOP-1 was confirmed by the in vitro binding assay and coexpression experiments in vivo. The colocalization of TNNI3K and AOP-1 was clarified by confocal immunofluorescence. Moreover, coexpression of AOP-1 inhibited TNNI3K kinase activity in the in vitro kinase assay.

  13. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinases (CaMKKs) Effects on AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Regulation of Chicken Sperm Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Combarnous, Yves; Praud, Christophe; Duittoz, Anne; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Sperm require high levels of energy to ensure motility and acrosome reaction (AR) accomplishment. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated to be strongly involved in the control of these properties. We address here the question of the potential role of calcium mobilization on AMPK activation and function in chicken sperm through the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases (CaMKKs) mediated pathway. The presence of CaMKKs and their substrates CaMKI and CaMKIV was evaluated by western-blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. Sperm were incubated in presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, or of CaMKKs inhibitor (STO-609). Phosphorylations of AMPK, CaMKI, and CaMKIV, as well as sperm functions were evaluated. We demonstrate the presence of both CaMKKs (α and β), CaMKI and CaMKIV in chicken sperm. CaMKKα and CaMKI were localized in the acrosome, the midpiece, and at much lower fluorescence in the flagellum, whereas CaMKKβ was mostly localized in the flagellum and much less in the midpiece and the acrosome. CaMKIV was only present in the flagellum. The presence of extracellular calcium induced an increase in kinases phosphorylation and sperm activity. STO-609 reduced AMPK phosphorylation in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not in its absence. STO-609 did not affect CaMKIV phosphorylation but decreased CaMKI phosphorylation and this inhibition was quicker in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ than in its absence. STO-609 efficiently inhibited sperm motility and AR, both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+. Our results show for the first time the presence of CaMKKs (α and β) and one of its substrate, CaMKI in different subcellular compartments in germ cells, as well as the changes in the AMPK regulation pathway, sperm motility and AR related to Ca2+ entry in sperm through the Ca2+/CaM/CaMKKs/CaMKI pathway. The Ca2+/CaMKKs/AMPK pathway is activated only under conditions of extracellular Ca2+ entry in the cells

  14. Mutational activation of ErbB2 reveals a new protein kinase autoinhibition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying-Xin; Wong, Lily; Ding, Jinhui; Spiridonov, Nikolay A; Johnson, Richard C; Johnson, Gibbes R

    2008-01-18

    Autoinhibition plays a key role in the control of protein kinase activity. ErbB2 is a unique receptor-tyrosine kinase that does not bind ligand but possesses an extracellular domain poised to engage other ErbBs. Little is known about the molecular mechanism for ErbB2 catalytic regulation. Here we show that ErbB2 kinase is strongly autoinhibited, and a loop connecting the alphaC helix and beta4 sheet within the kinase domain plays a major role in the control of kinase activity. Mutations of two Gly residues at positions 776 and 778 in this loop dramatically increase ErbB2 catalytic activity. Kinetic analysis demonstrates that mutational activation is due to approximately 10- and approximately 7-fold increases in ATP binding affinity and turnover number, respectively. Expression of the activated ErbB2 mutants in cells resulted in elevated ligand-independent ErbB2 autophosphorylation, ErbB3 phosphorylation, and stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Molecular modeling suggests that the ErbB2 kinase domain is stabilized in an inactive state via a hydrophobic interaction between the alphaC-beta4 and activation loops. Importantly, many ErbB2 human cancer mutations have been identified in the alphaC-beta4 loop, including the activating G776S mutation studied here. Our findings reveal a new kinase regulatory mechanism in which the alphaC-beta4 loop functions as an intramolecular switch that controls ErbB2 activity and suggests that loss of alphaC-beta4 loop-mediated autoinhibition is involved in oncogenic activation of ErbB2.

  15. Sucrose increases calcium-dependent protein kinase and phosphatase activities in potato plants.

    PubMed

    Raíces, M; MacIntosh, G C; Ulloa, R M; Gargantini, P R; Vozza, N F; Téllez-Inón, M T

    2003-09-01

    The effect of sucrose on tuber formation, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and phosphatase activities was analysed using in vitro cultured potato plants. In short treatments, sucrose induced CDPK and phosphatase activities. In long treatments, sucrose induced tuber formation in the absence of other tuber inducing stimuli. Sorbitol caused a minor increase in CDPK activity and affected plant morphology but did not induce tuber development. The addition of the protein kinase inhibitor Staurosporine precluded sucrose-induced tuberization. Altogether, our results suggest that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events are involved in sucrose-induced tuber development.

  16. Mechanism of activation of protein kinase B by insulin and IGF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, D R; Andjelkovic, M; Caudwell, B; Cron, P; Morrice, N; Cohen, P; Hemmings, B A

    1996-01-01

    Insulin activated endogenous protein kinase B alpha (also known as RAC/Akt kinase) activity 12-fold in L6 myotubes, while after transfection into 293 cells PKBalpha was activated 20- and 50-fold in response to insulin and IGF-1 respectively. In both cells, the activation of PKBalpha was accompanied by its phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473 and, like activation, phosphorylation of both of these residues was prevented by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Thr308 and/or Ser473 were mutated to Ala or Asp and activities of mutant PKBalpha molecules were analysed after transfection into 293 cells. The activity of wild-type and mutant PKBalpha was also measured in vitro after stoichiometric phosphorylation of Ser473 by MAPKAP kinase-2. These experiments demonstrated that activation of PKBalpha by insulin or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) results from phosphorylation of both Thr308 and Ser473, that phosphorylation of both residues is critical to generate a high level of PKBalpha activity and that the phosphorylation of Thr308 in vivo is not dependent on phosphorylation of Ser473 or vice versa. We propose a model whereby PKBalpha becomes phosphorylated and activated in insulin/IGF-1-stimulated cells by an upstream kinase(s). Images PMID:8978681

  17. Modulation of Leishmania major aquaglyceroporin activity by a mitogen-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Goutam; Sharma, Mansi; Kruse, Martin; Sander-Juelch, Claudia; Munro, Laura Anne; Wang, Yong; Vilg, Jenny Veide; Tamás, Markus J; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Wiese, Martin; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Summary Leishmania major aquaglyceroporin (LmjAQP1) adventitiously facilitates the uptake of antimonite [Sb(III)], an active form of Pentostam® or Glucantime®, which are the first line of defense against all forms of leishmaniasis. The present paper shows that LmjAQP1 activity is modulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase, LmjMPK2. Leishmania parasites co-expressing LmjAQP1 and LmjMPK2 show increased Sb(III) uptake and increased Sb(III) sensitivity. When subjected to a hypo-osmotic stress, these cells show faster volume recovery than cells expressing LmjAQP1 alone. LmjAQP1 is phosphorylated in vivo at Thr197 and this phosphorylation requires LmjMPK2 activity. Lys42 of LmjMPK2 is critical for its kinase activity. Cells expressing altered T197A LmjAQP1 or K42A LmjMPK2 showed decreased Sb(III) influx and a slower volume recovery than cells expressing wild type proteins. Phosphorylation of LmjAQP1 led to a decrease in its turnover rate affecting LmjAQP1 activity. Although LmjAQP1 is localized to the flagellum of promastigotes, upon phosphorylation, it is relocalized to the entire surface of the parasite. L. mexicana promastigotes with an MPK2 deletion showed reduced Sb(III) uptake and slower volume recovery than wild type cells. This is the first report where a parasite aquaglyceroporin activity is post-translationally modulated by a MAP kinase. PMID:22779703

  18. Protein kinase C activators suppress stimulation of capillary endothelial cell growth by angiogenic endothelial mitogens

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The intracellular events regulating endothelial cell proliferation and organization into formalized capillaries are not known. We report that the protein kinase C activator beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) suppresses bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cell proliferation (K50 = 6 +/- 4 nM) and DNA synthesis in response to human hepatoma-derived growth factor, an angiogenic endothelial mitogen. In contrast, PDBu has no effect on the proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells and is mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth muscle and BALB/c 3T3 cells. Several observations indicate that the inhibition of human hepatoma- derived growth factor-stimulated BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated through protein kinase C. Different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to their potencies as protein kinase C activators (12- O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate greater than PDBu much greater than beta-phorbol 12,13-diacetate much much greater than beta-phorbol; alpha- phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate; alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). PDBu binds to a single class of specific, saturable sites on the BCE cell with an apparent Kd of 8 nM, in agreement with reported affinities of PDBu for protein kinase C in other systems. Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2- dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a calcium/phosphatidylserine-dependent protein kinase that is activated by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol and PDBu, but not by beta-phorbol. These findings indicate that protein kinase C activation can cause capillary endothelial cells to become desensitized to angiogenic endothelial mitogens. This intracellular regulatory mechanism might be invoked during certain phases of angiogenesis, for example when proliferating endothelial cells become

  19. Zn(II)-Coordinated Quantum Dot-FRET Nanosensors for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Butaek; Park, Ji-In; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Jin-Won; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple detection of protein kinase activity using Zn(II)-mediated fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and dye-tethered peptides. With neither complex chemical ligands nor surface modification of QDs, Zn(II) was the only metal ion that enabled the phosphorylated peptides to be strongly attached on the carboxyl groups of the QD surface via metal coordination, thus leading to a significant FRET efficiency. As a result, protein kinase activity in intermixed solution was efficiently detected by QD-FRET via Zn(II) coordination, especially when the peptide substrate was combined with affinity-based purification. We also found that mono- and di-phosphorylation in the peptide substrate could be discriminated by the Zn(II)-mediated QD-FRET. Our approach is expected to find applications for studying physiological function and signal transduction with respect to protein kinase activity. PMID:26213934

  20. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaofeng; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Sun, Gongqin

    2005-01-01

    Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1) binds to ATP, and the other (M2) acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator. PMID:16305747

  1. Regulation of membrane associated protein kinase C activity by guanine nucleotide in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.K.; Devanney, J.F.

    1986-03-05

    Addition of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (0.1 ..mu..g/ml) or guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP..gamma..S) (10..mu..M) to the membrane fraction from rabbit peritoneal neutrophils results in an increase of phosphorylation of several membrane proteins. To test whether membrane associated protein kinase C is involved in the activation, histone is added to the membrane as a substrate for protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of histone is determined by counting the gel pieces containing histone IIIS after separation from other membrane components by SDS-gel electrophoresis. In the presence of CaC12 (20 ..mu..M), GTP..gamma..S (10 ..mu..M) or PMA (0.1 ..mu..g/ml) stimulates the phosphorylation of histone IIIS (40% to 70% increase). To achieve this effect calcium is required for GTP..gamma..S but not for PMA. The effect of GTP..gamma..S but not PMA is inhibited in membranes obtained from cells pretreated with pertussis toxin. Membrane protein kinase C is solubilized with Triton X-100 (1%) and then applied to a DEAE-52 cellulose column chromatography. Two peaks of protein kinase C activity are observed. Peak one is eluted at 40 mM NaCl, peak two is eluted at 140 mM NaCl. The activity of peak one is stimulated with phosphatidylserine (PS) and PMA but not with PS and calcium. The activity of peak two is stimulated with either PS and PMA or PS and calcium. The results suggest that GTP binding protein is involved in the activation of membrane associated protein kinase C and the kinase may exist in two forms, calcium sensitive and calcium insensitive.

  2. Effect of Flos carthami on stress-activated protein kinase activity in the isolated reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Siow, Y L; Choy, P C; Leung, W M; O, K

    2000-04-01

    The apoptotic death of cardiomyocytes due to ischemia/reperfusion is one of the major complications of heart disease. Ischemia/reperfusion has been shown to lead to the activation of the stress-activated protein (SAP) kinases and the p38/reactivating kinase (p38/RK). In this study, the direct effect of an aqueous Flos carthami (FC) extract on SAP kinases was investigated. When isolated rat hearts were perfused by Langendorff mode with media containing FC extract prior to the induction of global ischemia and the subsequent reperfusion, SAP kinase activity was inhibited 95%. Untreated ischemic/reperfused hearts showed a 57% elevation in the activity of SAP kinase. The in vitro effect of these FC extracts on SAP kinase was also tested. At a concentration of 10 microg/ml, the aqueous FC extract resulted in 50% inhibition of SAP kinase activity in ischemic heart tissue. Our results showed that FC affected both the interaction of SAP kinase with c-jun as well as the phosphotransferase reaction. These results clearly demonstrate that extracts from Flos carthami exerted inhibitory effects on SAP kinase. The administration of the FC extract may lead to a modulation of the apoptotic effect of SAP kinase activation induced during ischemia/reperfusion.

  3. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  4. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-down Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ. C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ has noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems. PMID:26489410

  5. Diacylglycerol generated by exogenous phospholipase C activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway independent of Ras- and phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase C: dependence on protein kinase C-zeta.

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, M; Muriana, F J; van Der Hoeven, P C; de Widt, J; Schaap, D; Moolenaar, W H; van Blitterswijk, W J

    1997-01-01

    The role of diacylglycerol (DG) formation from phosphatidylcholine in mitogenic signal transduction is poorly understood. We have generated this lipid at the plasma membrane by treating Rat-1 fibroblasts with bacterial phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC). This treatment leads to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). However, unlike platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or epidermal growth factor (EGF), PC-PLC fails to activate Ras and to induce DNA synthesis, and activates MAPK only transiently (<45 min). Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) -alpha, -delta and -epsilon isotypes has little or no effect on MAPK activation by either PC-PLC or growth factors. However, Ro 31-8220, a highly selective inhibitor of all PKC isotypes, including atypical PKC-zeta but not Raf-1, blocks MAPK activation by PDGF and PC-PLC, but not that by EGF, suggesting that atypical PKC mediates the PDGF and PC-PLC signal. In line with this, PKC-zeta is activated by PC-PLC and PDGF, but not by EGF, as shown by a kinase assay in vitro, using biotinylated epsilon-peptide as a substrate. Furthermore, dominant-negative PKC-zeta inhibits, while (wild-type) PKC-zeta overexpression enhances MAPK activation by PDGF and PC-PLC. The results suggest that DG generated by PC-PLC can activate the MAPK pathway independent of Ras and phorbol-ester-sensitive PKC but, instead, via PKC-zeta. PMID:9169602

  6. A Placental Polypeptide Activator of a Membranous Protein Kinase and Its Relation to Histone 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Ghany, M.; Riegler, C.; Racker, E.

    1984-12-01

    Crude transforming growth factor preparations of placenta contain a polypeptide that is required for the activity of a protein kinase that has been purified from plasma membrane preparations of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. The kinase activator has been separated from transforming growth factor β by reversed-phase HPLC and affinity chromatography. Like the transforming growth factor, it is heat stable and trypsin labile, but it is not inactivated by dithiothreitol. In sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the purified preparation shows a major double band at about 31,000 daltons. Comparisons of electrophoretic mobility, protein kinase stimulatory activity, and cross-reactivity with an antibody against histone 1 suggest that the placental activator is identical with histone 1.

  7. β-Adrenergic stimulation activates protein kinase Cε and induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Cai, Hongyan; Liu, Hua; Guo, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The cardiac adrenergic signaling pathway is important in the induction of cardiac hypertrophy. The cardiac adrenergic pathway involves two main branches, phospholipase C (PLC)/protein kinase C (PKC) and the adenylate cyclase (cAMPase)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathways. It is hypothesized that PLC/PKC and cAMPase/PKA are activated by the α‑adrenergic receptor (αAR) and the β‑adrenergic receptor (βAR), respectively. Previous studies have demonstrated that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a guanine exchange factor, activates phospholipase Cε. It is possible that there are βAR‑activated PKC pathways mediated by Epac and PLC. In the present study, the role of Epac and PLC in βAR activated PKC pathways in cardiomyocytes was investigated. It was found that PKCε activation and translocation were induced by the βAR agonist, isoproterenol (Iso). Epac agonist 8‑CPT‑2'OMe‑cAMP also enhanced PKCε activation. βAR stimulation activated PKCε in the cardiomyocytes and was regulated by Epac. Iso‑induced change in PKCε was not affected in the cardiomyocytes, which were infected with adenovirus coding rabbit muscle cAMP‑dependent protein kinase inhibitor. However, Iso‑induced PKCε activation was inhibited by the PLC inhibitor, U73122. The results suggested that Iso‑induced PKCε activation was independent of PKA, but was regulated by PLC. To further investigate the downstream signal target of PKCε activation, the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (pERK)1/2 and the levels of ERK phosphorylation was analyzed. The results revealed that Iso‑induced PKCε activation led to an increase in the expression of pERK1/2. ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by the PKCε inhibitor peptide. Taken together, these data demonstrated that the βAR is able to activate PKCε dependent on Epac and PLC, but independent of PKA.

  8. MsERK1: a mitogen-activated protein kinase from a flowering plant.

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, B; Gawienowski, M; Ropp, T; Jacobs, T

    1993-01-01

    The induction of proliferation and differentiation in cultured mammalian cells is mediated by a cascade of protein phosphorylations. A key enzyme in this signaling pathway is mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (or ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase). We report the recovery of a full-length cDNA clone encoding a MAP kinase from alfalfa. We have named the 44-kD protein encoded by this clone MsERK1. Recombinant MsERK1 (rMsERK1), when overexpressed in Escherichia coli, is recognized by antibodies raised against MAP kinases from rat, Xenopus, and sea star and by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Site-directed mutagenesis of MsERK1 demonstrated that Tyr-215 is either directly or indirectly responsible for recognition of the protein by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Semipurified rMsERK1 phosphorylated itself and a model substrate, myelin basic protein, in vitro, but the Tyr-215 mutant did neither. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis suggested that the gene that encodes MsERK1 is either a member of a small multigene family or a member of a polymorphic allelic series in alfalfa. Because MAP kinase activation has been associated with mitotic stimulation in animal systems, such an enzyme may play a role in the mitogenic induction of symbiotic root nodules on alfalfa by Rhizobium signal molecules. PMID:8439746

  9. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation.

  10. Suborganelle sensing of mitochondrial cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Agnes, Richard S; Jernigan, Finith; Shell, Jennifer R; Sharma, Vyas; Lawrence, David S

    2010-05-05

    A fluorescent sensor of protein kinase activity has been developed and used to characterize the compartmentalized location of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in mitochondria. The sensor functions via a phosphorylation-induced release of a quencher from a peptide-based substrate, producing a 150-fold enhancement in fluorescence. The quenching phenomenon transpires via interaction of the quencher with Arg residues positioned on the peptide substrate. Although the cAMP-dependent protein kinase is known to be present in mitochondria, the relative amount of enzyme positioned in the major compartments (outer membrane, intermembrane space, and the matrix) of the organelle is unclear. The fluorescent sensor developed in this study was used to reveal the relative matrix/intermembrane space/outer membrane (85:6:9) distribution of PKA in bovine heart mitochondria.

  11. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway as a Discovery Target in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Nan, Guangxian

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases are critical modulators of a variety of intracellular and extracellular signal transduction pathways, and abnormal phosphorylation events can contribute to disease progression in a variety of diseases. As a result, protein kinases have emerged as important new drug targets for small molecule therapeutics. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway transmits signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to a variety of different stimuli. Because this pathway controls a broad spectrum of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and stress responses, it is accepted as a therapeutic target for cancer and peripheral inflammatory disorders. There is also increasing evidence that MAPK is an important regulator of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral vascular disease, raising the possibility that it might be a drug discovery target for stroke. In this review, we discuss the MAPK signaling pathway in association with its activation in stroke-induced brain injury.

  12. Development of Novel Alkene Oxindole Derivatives As Orally Efficacious AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is emerging as a promising drug target for its regulatory function in both glucose and lipid metabolism. Compound PT1 (5) was originally identified from high throughput screening as a small molecule activator of AMPK through the antagonization of the autoinhibition in α subunits. In order to enhance its potency at AMPK and bioavailability, structure–activity relationship studies have been performed and resulted in a novel series of AMPK activators based on an alkene oxindole scaffold. Following their evaluation in pharmacological AMPK activation assays, lead compound 24 was identified to possess improved potency as well as favorable pharmacokinetic profile. In the diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model, compound 24 was found to improve glucose tolerance and alleviate insulin resistance. The in vitro and in vivo data for these alkene oxindoles warrant further studies for their potential therapeutic medications in metabolic associated diseases. PMID:24900695

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 in angiotensin II-induced inflammation and hypertension: regulation of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Talin; Li, Melissa Wei; Lemarié, Catherine A; Simeone, Stefania M C; Pagano, Patrick J; Gaestel, Matthias; Paradis, Pierre; Wassmann, Sven; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2011-02-01

    Vascular oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in angiotensin II-induced hypertension, and mitogen-activated protein kinases participate in these processes. We questioned whether mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a downstream target of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, is involved in angiotensin II-induced vascular responses. In vivo experiments were performed in wild-type and Mk2 knockout mice infused intravenously with angiotensin II. Angiotensin II induced a 30 mm Hg increase in mean blood pressure in wild-type that was delayed in Mk2 knockout mice. Angiotensin II increased superoxide production and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in blood vessels of wild-type but not in Mk2 knockout mice. Mk2 knockdown by small interfering RNA in mouse mesenteric vascular smooth muscle cells caused a 42% reduction in MK2 protein and blunted the angiotensin II-induced 40% increase of MK2 expression. Mk2 knockdown blunted angiotensin II-induced doubling of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, 2.4-fold increase of nuclear p65, and 1.4-fold increase in Ets-1. Mk2 knockdown abrogated the angiotensin II-induced 4.7-fold and 1.3-fold increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA and protein. Angiotensin II enhanced reactive oxygen species levels (by 29%) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity (by 48%), both abolished by Mk2 knockdown. Reduction of MK2 blocked angiotensin II-induced p47phox translocation to the membrane, associated with a 53% enhanced catalase expression. Angiotensin II-induced increase of MK2 was prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor Nox2ds-tat. Mk2 small interfering RNA prevented the angiotensin II-induced 30% increase of proliferation. In conclusion, MK2 plays a critical role in angiotensin II signaling, leading to hypertension, oxidative stress via activation of p47phox and inhibition of antioxidants, and vascular inflammation

  14. Role of receptor desensitization, phosphatase induction and intracellular cyclic AMP in the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in UTP-stimulated EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, A; McLees, A; Malarkey, K; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms that bring about the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) activation in response to UTP in EAhy 926 endothelial cells. UTP-stimulated MAP kinase activity was transient, returning to basal values by 60 min. At this time MAP kinase activation was desensitized; re-application of UTP did not further activate MAP kinase, full re-activation of MAP kinase being only apparent after a 1-2 h wash period. However, activation of MAP kinase by UTP could be sustained beyond 60 min by preincubation of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. UTP also stimulated expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 and this was abolished after pretreatment with cycloheximide. Pretreatment of cells with forskolin abolished the initial activation of MAP kinase kinase or c-Raf-1 by UTP, but only affected MAP kinase activity during prolonged stimulation. The effect of forskolin on prolonged MAP kinase activation was also prevented by cycloheximide. These results suggest that the termination of MAP kinase activity in response to UTP involves a number of interacting mechanisms including receptor desensitization and the induction of a phosphatase. However, several pieces of evidence do not support a major role for MAP kinase phosphatase-1 in termination of the MAP kinase signal. Raising intracellular cyclic AMP may also be involved but only after an initial protein-synthesis step and by a mechanism that does not involve the inactivation of c-Raf-1 or MAP kinase kinase. PMID:8615830

  15. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  16. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D.; Corson, Timothy W.; Crews, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects. PMID:23674677

  17. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D; Corson, Timothy W; Crews, Craig M

    2013-05-28

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects.

  18. Protein Corona of Magnetic Hydroxyapatite Scaffold Improves Cell Proliferation via Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Yang, Qi; Yang, Minggang; Zhan, Xiaohui; Lan, Fang; He, Jing; Gu, Zhongwei; Wu, Yao

    2017-03-21

    The beneficial effect of magnetic scaffolds on the improvement of cell proliferation has been well documented. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms about the magnetic scaffolds stimulating cell proliferation remain largely unknown. Once the scaffold enters into the biological fluids, a protein corona forms and directly influences the biological function of scaffold. This study aimed at investigating the formation of protein coronas on hydroxyapatite (HA) and magnetic hydroxyapatite (MHA) scaffolds in vitro and in vivo, and consequently its effect on regulating cell proliferation. The results demonstrated that magnetic nanoparticles (MNP)-infiltrated HA scaffolds altered the composition of protein coronas and ultimately contributed to increased concentration of proteins related to calcium ions, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and MAPK/ERK cascades as compared with pristine HA scaffolds. Noticeably, the enriched functional proteins on MHA samples could efficiently activate of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, resulting in promoting MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, as evidenced by the higher expression levels of the key proteins in the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, including mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases1/2 (MEK1/2) and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Artificial down-regulation of MEK expression can significantly down-regulate the MAPK/ERK signaling and consequently suppress the cell proliferation on MHA samples. These findings not only provide a critical insight into the molecular mechanism underlying cellular proliferation on magnetic scaffolds, but also have important implications in the design of magnetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Activity and regulation by growth factors of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (elongation factor 2-kinase) in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, T G; Ward, M D; Yurkow, E J; Vyas, V H; Kearney, T J; Hait, W N

    1999-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (CaM kinase III, elongation factor-2 kinase) is a unique member of the Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase family. Activation of CaM kinase III leads to the selective phosphorylation of elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) and transient inhibition of protein synthesis. Recent cloning and sequencing of CaM kinase III revealed that this enzyme represents a new superfamily of protein kinases. The activity of CaM kinase III is selectively activated in proliferating cells; inhibition of the kinase blocked cells in G0/G1-S and decreased viability. To determine the significance of CaM kinase III in breast cancer, we measured the activity of the kinase in human breast cancer cell lines as well as in fresh surgical specimens. The specific activity of CaM kinase III in human breast cancer cell lines was equal to or greater than that seen in a variety of cell lines with similar rates of proliferation. The specific activity of CaM kinase III was markedly increased in human breast tumour specimens compared with that of normal adjacent breast tissue. The activity of this enzyme was regulated by breast cancer mitogens. In serum-deprived MDA-MB-231 cells, the combination of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated cell proliferation and activated CaM kinase III to activities observed in the presence of 10% serum. Inhibition of enzyme activity blocked cell proliferation induced by growth factors. In MCF-7 cells separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, CaM kinase III was increased in S-phase over that of other phases of the cell cycle. In summary, the activity of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase III is controlled by breast cancer mitogens and appears to be constitutively activated in human breast cancer. These results suggest that CaM kinase III may contribute an important link between growth factor/receptor interactions, protein synthesis and the induction of cellular proliferation in human breast

  20. Differential regulation of the mitogen-activated protein and stress-activated protein kinase cascades by adrenergic agonists in quiescent and regenerating adult rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, M S; Auer, K L; Jarvis, W D; Ishac, E J; Gao, B; Kunos, G; Dent, P

    1997-01-01

    To study the mechanisms by which catecholamines regulate hepatocyte proliferation after partial hepatectomy (PHX), hepatocytes were isolated from adult male rats 24 h after sham operation or two-thirds PHX and treated with catecholamines and other agonists. In freshly isolated sham cells, p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity was stimulated by the alpha1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PHE). Activation of p42 MAP kinase by growth factors was blunted by pretreatment of sham hepatocytes with glucagon but not by that with the beta2-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (ISO). In PHX cells, the ability of PHE to activate p42 MAP kinase was dramatically reduced, whereas ISO became competent to inhibit p42 MAP kinase activation. PHE treatment of sham but not PHX and ISO treatment of PHX but not sham hepatocytes also activated the stress-activated protein (SAP) kinases p46/54 SAP kinase and p38 SAP kinase. These data demonstrate that an alpha1- to beta2-adrenergic receptor switch occurs upon PHX and results in an increase in SAP kinase versus MAP kinase signaling by catecholamines. In primary cultures of hepatocytes, ISO treatment of PHX but not sham cells inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation. In contrast, PHE treatment of sham but not PHX cells stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation, which was reduced by approximately 25 and approximately 95% with specific inhibitors of p42 MAP kinase and p38 SAP kinase function, respectively. Inhibition of the p38 SAP kinase also dramatically reduced basal [3H]thymidine incorporation. These data suggest that p38 SAP kinase plays a permissive role in liver regeneration. Alterations in the abilities of catecholamines to modulate the activities of protein kinase A and the MAP and SAP kinase pathways may represent one physiological mechanism by which these agonists can regulate hepatocyte proliferation after PHX. PMID:9199291

  1. Molecular basis of MAPK-activated protein kinase 2:p38 assembly

    PubMed Central

    White, Andre; Pargellis, Christopher A.; Studts, Joey M.; Werneburg, Brian G.; Farmer, Bennett T.

    2007-01-01

    p38 MAPK and MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) are key components of signaling pathways leading to many cellular responses, notably the proinflammatory cytokine production. The physical association of p38α isoform and MK2 is believed to be physiologically important for this signaling. We report the 2.7-Å resolution crystal structure of the unphosphorylated complex between p38α and MK2. These protein kinases bind “head-to-head,” present their respective active sites on approximately the same side of the heterodimer, and form extensive intermolecular interactions. Among these interactions, the MK2 Ile-366–Ala-390, which includes the bipartite nuclear localization signal, binds to the p38α-docking region. This binding supports the involvement of noncatalytic regions to the tight binding of the MK2:p38α binary assembly. The MK2 residues 345–365, containing the nuclear export signal, block access to the p38α active site. Some regulatory phosphorylation regions of both protein kinases engage in multiple interactions with one another in this complex. This structure gives new insights into the regulation of the protein kinases p38α and MK2, aids in the better understanding of their known cellular and biochemical studies, and provides a basis for understanding other regulatory protein–protein interactions involving signal transduction proteins. PMID:17395714

  2. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  3. Telencephalin protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis by activating the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heping; Wu, Dapeng; Zhang, Xiaojie; Wang, Xiang; Peng, Yi; Hu, Zhiping

    2012-10-05

    Telencephalin is a neural glycoprotein that reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid beta protein in the human neural tumor cell line PAJU. In this study, we examined the role of the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway in this process. Western blot analysis demonstrated that telencephalin, phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B were not expressed in PAJU cells transfected with empty plasmid, while they were expressed in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid. After treatment with 1.0 nM amyloid beta protein 42, expression of telencephalin and phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B in the transfected cells gradually diminished, while levels of phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin increased. In addition, the high levels of telencephalin, phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B expression in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid could be suppressed by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. These findings indicate that telencephalin activates the ezrin/radixin/moesin family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis.

  4. Contraction inhibits insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate-1/2-associated phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity, but not protein kinase B activation or glucose uptake, in rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, J P; Soos, M A; Aslesen, R; O'rahilly, S; Jensen, J

    2000-01-01

    The initial stages of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake are thought to involve tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRSs), which recruit and activate phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), leading to the activation of protein kinase B (PKB) and other downstream effectors. In contrast, contraction stimulates glucose uptake via a PI 3-kinase-independent mechanism. The combined effects of insulin and contraction on glucose uptake are additive. However, it has been reported that contraction causes a decrease in insulin-stimulated IRS-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity. To investigate this paradox, we have examined the effects of contraction on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and proximal insulin-signalling events in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle. Stimulation by insulin or contraction produced a 3-fold increase in glucose uptake, with the effects of simultaneous treatment by insulin and contraction being additive. Wortmannin completely blocked the additive effect of insulin in contracting skeletal muscle, indicating that this is a PI 3-kinase-dependent effect. Insulin-stimulated recruitment of PI 3-kinase to IRS-1 was unaffected by contraction; however, insulin produced no discernible increase in PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1 or IRS-2 immunocomplexes in contracting skeletal muscle. Consistent with this, contraction inhibited insulin-stimulated p70(S6K) activation. In contrast, insulin-stimulated activation of PKB was unaffected by contraction. Thus, in contracting skeletal muscle, insulin stimulates glucose uptake and activates PKB, but not p70(S6K), by a PI 3-kinase-dependent mechanism that is independent of changes in IRS-1- and IRS-2-associated PI 3-kinase activity. PMID:10903138

  5. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1 activity during meiosis resumption in mammals.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Radek; Blaha, Milan

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, resumption of oocyte meiosis occurs in large ovarian follicles after the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). The LH surge leads to the activation of a broad signaling network in mural granulosa cells equipped with LH receptors. The signals generated in the mural granulosa cells are further augmented by locally produced peptides or steroids and transferred to the cumulus cell compartment and the oocyte itself. Over the last decade, essential progress has been made in the identification of molecular events associated with the final maturation and ovulation of mammalian oocytes. All new evidence argues for a multiple roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1 (MAPK3/1) in the gonadotropin-induced ovulation processes. However, the knowledge of gonadotropin-induced signaling pathways leading to MAPK3/1 activation in follicular cells seems limited. To date, only the LH-induced transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor/MAPK3/1 pathway has been described in granulosa/cumulus cells even though other mechanisms of MAPK3/1 activation have been detected in other types of cells. In this review, we aimed to summarize recent advances in the elucidation of gonadotropin-induced mechanisms leading to the activation of MAPK3/1 in preovulatory follicles and cultured cumulus-oocyte complexes and to point out a specific role of this kinase in the processes accompanying final maturation of the mammalian oocyte.

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase induces actin cytoskeleton reorganization in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Lisa; Carpentier, Sarah; Platek, Anna; Hussain, Nusrat; Gueuning, Marie-Agnès; Vertommen, Didier; Ozkan, Yurda; Sid, Brice; Hue, Louis; Courtoy, Pierre J; Rider, Mark H; Horman, Sandrine

    2010-06-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a known regulator of cellular and systemic energy balance, is now recognized to control cell division, cell polarity and cell migration, all of which depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Here we report the effects of A769662, a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on cytoskeletal organization and signalling in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We show that AMPK activation induced shortening or radiation of stress fibers, uncoupling from paxillin and predominance of cortical F-actin. In parallel, Rho-kinase downstream targets, namely myosin regulatory light chain and cofilin, were phosphorylated. These effects resembled the morphological changes in MDCK cells exposed to hyperosmotic shock, which led to Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK activation via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta(CaMKKbeta), a known upstream kinase of AMPK. Indeed, hypertonicity-induced AMPK activation was markedly reduced by the STO-609 CaMKKbeta inhibitor, as was the increase in MLC and cofilin phosphorylation. We suggest that AMPK links osmotic stress to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  7. MKP-7, a novel mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase, functions as a shuttle protein.

    PubMed

    Masuda, K; Shima, H; Watanabe, M; Kikuchi, K

    2001-10-19

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (MKPs) negatively regulate MAPK activity. In the present study, we have identified a novel MKP, designated MKP-7, and mapped it to human chromosome 12p12. MKP-7 possesses a long C-terminal stretch containing both a nuclear export signal and a nuclear localization signal, in addition to the rhodanese-like domain and the dual specificity phosphatase catalytic domain, both of which are conserved among MKP family members. When expressed in mammalian cells MKP-7 protein was localized exclusively in the cytoplasm, but this localization became exclusively nuclear following leptomycin B treatment or introduction of a mutation in the nuclear export signal. These findings indicate that MKP-7 is the first identified leptomycin B-sensitive shuttle MKP. Forced expression of MKP-7 suppressed activation of MAPKs in COS-7 cells in the order of selectivity, JNK p38 > ERK. Furthermore, a mutant form MKP-7 functioned as a dominant negative particularly against the dephosphorylation of JNK, suggesting that MKP-7 works as a JNK-specific phosphatase in vivo. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and histological analysis suggested that MKP-7 determines the localization of MAPKs in the cytoplasm.

  8. A plant triterpenoid, avicin D, induces autophagy by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z-X; Liang, J; Haridas, V; Gaikwad, A; Connolly, F P; Mills, G B; Gutterman, J U

    2007-11-01

    Avicins, a family of plant triterpene electrophiles, can trigger apoptosis-associated tumor cell death, and suppress chemical-induced carcinogenesis by its anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, and antioxidant properties. Here, we show that tumor cells treated with benzyloxycarbonylvalyl-alanyl-aspartic acid (O-methyl)-fluoro-methylketone, an apoptosis inhibitor, and Bax(-/-)Bak(-/-) apoptosis-resistant cells can still undergo cell death in response to avicin D treatment. We demonstrate that this non-apoptotic cell death is mediated by autophagy, which can be suppressed by chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, and by specific knockdown of autophagy-related gene-5 (Atg5) and Atg7. Avicin D decreases cellular ATP levels, stimulates the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6 kinase activity. Suppression of AMPK by compound C and dominant-negative AMPK decreases avicin D-induced autophagic cell death. Furthermore, avicin D-induced autophagic cell death can be abrogated by knockdown of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), a key mediator linking AMPK to mTOR inhibition, suggesting that AMPK activation is a crucial event targeted by avicin D. These findings indicate the therapeutic potential of avicins by triggering autophagic cell death.

  9. PD98059 and U0126 activate AMP-activated protein kinase by increasing the cellular AMP:ATP ratio and not via inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Dokladda, Kanchana; Green, Kevin A; Pan, David A; Hardie, D Grahame

    2005-01-03

    The MAP kinase pathway inhibitor U0126 caused phosphorylation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased phosphorylation of its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase, in HEK293 cells. This effect only occurred in cells expressing the upstream kinase, LKB1. Of two other widely used MAP kinase pathway inhibitors not closely related in structure to U0126, PD98059 also activated AMPK but PD184352 did not. U0126 and PD98059, but not PD184352, also increased the cellular ADP:ATP and AMP:ATP ratios, accounting for their ability to activate AMPK. These results suggest the need for caution in interpreting experiments conducted using U0126 and PD98059.

  10. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits potassium currents in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Weir, B; Daniel, E E

    1995-04-01

    The effect of protein kinase C on potassium channels in cultured endothelial cells was investigated by using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), but not phorbol 12-monomyristate (PMM), an inactive analogue of phorbol esters, depressed an outward calcium-dependent potassium current. The inhibitory actions of PMA and PDBu could be reversed by the kinase inhibitor H-7. Cyclopiazonic acid, an inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, and LP-805, a novel vasodilator which also releases endothelium-derived relaxing factors, activated the outward calcium-dependent potassium conductance. PMA and PDBu, but not PMM, reduced the outward conductance induced by cyclopiazonic acid and LP-805. These effects of PMA and PDBu on potassium currents may be mediated either by phosphorylation of ion channels, or by decreasing intracellular calcium concentration.

  11. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  12. Timing of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Ho, A K; Price, D M; Terriff, D; Chik, C L

    2006-06-27

    Activation of members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family of signaling cascades is a tightly controlled event in rat pinealocytes. Cell culture studies indicate that whereas the NE-->cGMP activation of p42/44MAPK is rapid and transient, the NE-->cAMP activation of p38MAPK is slower and more sustained. The decline in the p42/44MAPK response is in part due to the induction of MAPK phosphatase-1 by NE. In comparison, p38MAPK activation is tightly coupled to the synthesis and degradation of an upstream element in its activation cascade. Whole animal studies confirm activation of p42/44MAPK occurring during the early part of night and precedes p38MAPK activation. Studies with selective MAPK inhibitors reveal a modulating effect of MAPKs on arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferse (AA-NAT) activity, with involvement of p42/44MAPK in the induction of AA-NAT and p38MAPK participating in the amplitude and duration of the AA-NAT response. These effects of p42/44MAPK and p38MAPK on AA-NAT activity match their timing of activation. Taken together, our studies on the timing of MAPK activation and regulation of AA-NAT by MAPKs add to the importance of MAPKs in regulating the circadian biology of the pineal gland.

  13. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) target a variety of protein substrates to regulate cellular signaling processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the number of identified MAPK substrates that control plant defense responses is still limited. Here, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with an inducible system to simulate in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3, and MPK6. Metabolome analysis revealed that this artificial MPK3/6 activation (without any exposure to pathogens or other stresses) is sufficient to drive the production of major defense-related metabolites, including various camalexin, indole glucosinolate and agmatine derivatives. An accompanying (phospho)proteome analysis led to detection of hundreds of potential phosphoproteins downstream of MPK3/6 activation. Besides known MAPK substrates, many candidates on this list possess typical MAPK-targeted phosphosites and in many cases, the corresponding phosphopeptides were detected by mass spectrometry. Notably, several of these putative phosphoproteins have been reported to be associated with the biosynthesis of antimicrobial defense substances (e.g., WRKY transcription factors and proteins encoded by the genes from the "PEN" pathway required for penetration resistance to filamentous pathogens). Thus, this work provides an inventory of candidate phosphoproteins, including putative direct MAPK substrates, for future analysis of MAPK-mediated defense control. (Proteomics data are available with the identifier PXD001252 via ProteomeXchange, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org).

  14. Crosstalk and Signaling Switches in Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Dirk; Croucher, David R.; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades control cell fate decisions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis by integrating and processing intra- and extracellular cues. However, similar MAPK kinetic profiles can be associated with opposing cellular decisions depending on cell type, signal strength, and dynamics. This implies that signaling by each individual MAPK cascade has to be considered in the context of the entire MAPK network. Here, we develop a dynamic model of feedback and crosstalk for the three major MAPK cascades; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and also include input from protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Focusing on the bistable activation characteristics of the JNK pathway, this model explains how pathway crosstalk harmonizes different MAPK responses resulting in pivotal cell fate decisions. We show that JNK can switch from a transient to sustained activity due to multiple positive feedback loops. Once activated, positive feedback locks JNK in a highly active state and promotes cell death. The switch is modulated by the ERK, p38, and AKT pathways. ERK activation enhances the dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) mediated dephosphorylation of JNK and shifts the threshold of the apoptotic switch to higher inputs. Activation of p38 restores the threshold by inhibiting ERK activity via the PP1 or PP2A phosphatases. Finally, AKT activation inhibits the JNK positive feedback, thus abrogating the apoptotic switch and allowing only proliferative signaling. Our model facilitates understanding of how cancerous deregulations disturb MAPK signal processing and provides explanations for certain drug resistances. We highlight a critical role of DUSP1 and DUSP2 expression patterns in facilitating the switching of JNK activity and show how oncogene induced ERK hyperactivity prevents the normal apoptotic switch explaining the failure of certain drugs to

  15. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Protein Kinase C Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals Slt2 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-dependent Phosphorylation of Eisosome Core Components*

    PubMed Central

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J.; Molina, María

    2013-01-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1–cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module. PMID:23221999

  16. MAPK-Activated Protein Kinase 2 Contributes to Clostridium difficile-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, Linda D.; El Feghaly, Rana E.; Chen, Yee-Shiuan; Dubberke, Erik R.; Han, Zhuolin; Baker, Alexandra H.; Li, Jinmei; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) results in toxin-induced epithelial injury and marked intestinal inflammation. Fecal markers of intestinal inflammation correlate with CDI disease severity, but regulation of the inflammatory response is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that C. difficile toxin TcdA activates p38 kinase in tissue culture cells and mouse ilium, resulting in interleukin-8 (IL-8) release. Here, we investigated the role of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2 kinase, pMK2), a key mediator of p38-dependent inflammation, in CDI. Exposure of cultured intestinal epithelial cells to the C. difficile toxins TcdA and TcdB resulted in p38-dependent MK2 activation. Toxin-induced IL-8 and GROα release required MK2 activity. We found that p38 and MK2 are activated in response to other actin-disrupting agents, suggesting that toxin-induced cytoskeleton disruption is the trigger for kinase-dependent cytokine response. Phosphorylated MK2 was detected in the intestines of C. difficile-infected hamsters and mice, demonstrating for the first time that the pathway is activated in infected animals. Furthermore, we found that elevated pMK2 correlated with the presence of toxigenic C. difficile among 100 patient stool samples submitted for C. difficile testing. In conclusion, we find that MK2 kinase is activated by TcdA and TcdB and regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Activation of p38-MK2 in infected animals and humans suggests that this pathway is a key driver of intestinal inflammation in patients with CDI. PMID:23264053

  17. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  18. Reverse relationship between malignancy and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Yoshida rat ascites hepatomas.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Nakamura, S; Nomura, M; Yamamoto, H; Sanae, F; Hidaka, H

    1993-08-31

    Rat ascites hepatoma (AH) cells (10(6) cells/head) inoculated intraperitoneally into rats had host-killing ability (malignancy) in the order AH66F > AH44 > AH13 > AH7974 > AH109A > AH66 > AH130. The life span of the rats after inoculation closely correlated with the activity of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) in the tumor cells but not the activity of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C). N-[2-[N-[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-2-propenyl]amino]ethyl]-5- isoquinoline-sulfonamide (H-87), a potent, selective inhibitor of protein kinase A, inhibited in vitro growth of these hepatoma cells with a similar potency and, intraperitoneally injected, prolonged the lives of rats bearing less malignant AH66 cells (with high protein kinase A activity) but did not affect the life span of rats bearing highly malignant AH66F cells (with low protein kinase A activity). On the other hand N-(2-methylpiperazyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-7), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, inhibited AH66F cells more than AH66 cells, but did not influence the life span of rats bearing either hepatoma. From these results it is deduced that protein kinase A may be important in the regulation of malignancy and in vivo proliferation of AH cells.

  19. Inhibition of fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis by stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Henin, N; Vincent, M F; Gruber, H E; Van den Berghe, G

    1995-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase is a multisubstrate protein kinase that, in liver, inactivates both acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. AICAR (5-amino 4-imidazolecarboxamide ribotide, ZMP) was found to stimulate up to 10-fold rat liver AMP-activated protein kinase, with a half-maximal effect at approximately 5 mM. In accordance with previous observations, addition to suspensions of isolated rat hepatocytes of 50-500 microM AICAriboside, the nucleoside corresponding to ZMP, resulted in the accumulation of millimolar concentrations of the latter. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent inactivation of both acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Addition of 50-500 microM AICAriboside to hepatocyte suspensions incubated in the presence of various substrates, including glucose and lactate/pyruvate, caused a parallel inhibition of both fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. With lactate/pyruvate (10/1 mM), half-maximal inhibition was obtained at approximately 100 microM, and near-complete inhibition at 500 microM AICAriboside. These findings open new perspectives for the simultaneous control of triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis by pharmacological stimulators of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  20. Reduced Activity of Mutant Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Is Compensated in Plasmodium falciparum through the Action of Protein Kinase G

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Kayode K.; Mu, Jianbing; Maly, Dustin J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used a sensitization approach that involves replacement of the gatekeeper residue in a protein kinase with one with a different side chain. The activity of the enzyme with a bulky gatekeeper residue, such as methionine, cannot be inhibited using bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs). Here, we have used this approach to study Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1). The methionine gatekeeper substitution, T145M, although it led to a 47% reduction in transphosphorylation, was successfully introduced into the CDPK1 locus using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9. As methionine is a bulky residue, BKI 1294 had a 10-fold-greater effect in vitro on the wild-type enzyme than on the methionine mutant. However, in contrast to in vitro data with recombinant enzymes, BKI 1294 had a slightly greater inhibition of the growth of CDPK1 T145M parasites than the wild type. Moreover, the CDPK1 T145M parasites were more sensitive to the action of compound 2 (C2), a specific inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). These results suggest that a reduction in the activity of CDPK1 due to methionine substitution at the gatekeeper position is compensated through the direct action of PKG or of another kinase under the regulation of PKG. The transcript levels of CDPK5 and CDPK6 were significantly upregulated in the CDPK1 T145M parasites. The increase in CDPK6 or some other kinase may compensate for decrease in CDPK1 activity during invasion. This study suggests that targeting two kinases may be more effective in chemotherapy to treat malaria so as not to select for mutations in one of the enzymes. PMID:27923926

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase–Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Angiotensin II–Induced Inflammation and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimian, Talin; Li, Melissa Wei; Lemarié, Catherine A.; Simeone, Stefania M.C.; Pagano, Patrick J.; Gaestel, Matthias; Paradis, Pierre; Wassmann, Sven; Schiffrin, Ernesto L.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in angiotensin II–induced hypertension, and mitogen-activated protein kinases participate in these processes. We questioned whether mitogen-activated protein kinase–activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a downstream target of p38 mitogen–activated protein kinase, is involved in angiotensin II–induced vascular responses. In vivo experiments were performed in wild-type and Mk2 knockout mice infused intravenously with angiotensin II. Angiotensin II induced a 30 mm Hg increase in mean blood pressure in wild-type that was delayed in Mk2 knockout mice. Angiotensin II increased superoxide production and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in blood vessels of wild-type but not in Mk2 knockout mice. Mk2 knockdown by small interfering RNA in mouse mesenteric vascular smooth muscle cells caused a 42% reduction in MK2 protein and blunted the angiotensin II–induced 40% increase of MK2 expression. Mk2 knockdown blunted angiotensin II–induced doubling of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, 2.4-fold increase of nuclear p65, and 1.4-fold increase in Ets-1. Mk2 knockdown abrogated the angiotensin II–induced 4.7-fold and 1.3-fold increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA and protein. Angiotensin II enhanced reactive oxygen species levels (by 29%) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity (by 48%), both abolished by Mk2 knockdown. Reduction of MK2 blocked angiotensin II–induced p47phox translocation to the membrane, associated with a 53% enhanced catalase expression. Angiotensin II–induced increase of MK2 was prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor Nox2ds-tat. Mk2 small interfering RNA prevented the angiotensin II–induced 30% increase of proliferation. In conclusion, MK2 plays a critical role in angiotensin II signaling, leading to hypertension, oxidative stress via activation of p47phox and inhibition of antioxidants, and

  2. Conformation-selective ATP-competitive inhibitors control regulatory interactions and noncatalytic functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-05-22

    Most potent protein kinase inhibitors act by competing with ATP to block the phosphotransferase activity of their targets. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that ATP-competitive inhibitors can affect kinase interactions and functions in ways beyond blocking catalytic activity. Here, we show that stabilizing alternative ATP-binding site conformations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38α and Erk2 with ATP-competitive inhibitors differentially, and in some cases divergently, modulates the abilities of these kinases to interact with upstream activators and deactivating phosphatases. Conformation-selective ligands are also able to modulate Erk2's ability to allosterically activate the MAPK phosphatase DUSP6, highlighting how ATP-competitive ligands can control noncatalytic kinase functions. Overall, these studies underscore the relationship between the ATP-binding and regulatory sites of MAPKs and provide insight into how ATP-competitive ligands can be designed to confer graded control over protein kinase function.

  3. Functional mapping of protein kinase A reveals its importance in adult Schistosoma mansoni motor activity.

    PubMed

    de Saram, Paulu S R; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Walker, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and 'smart' anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology.

  4. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are required for melatonin-mediated defense responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-04-01

    Melatonin enhances pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of a number of plant defense-related genes. To examine whether the melatonin-mediated pathogen resistance is associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves were treated with melatonin and investigated for MAPK activation using an antiphospho-p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) monoclonal antibody. Two MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, were activated rapidly and transiently by 1 μm melatonin treatment in Arabidopsis. Its tobacco ortholog MAPKs were also activated. The activation of MPK3 and MPK6 by 2-hydroxymelatonin and N-acetylserotonin was also observed, albeit to a lesser degree than that by melatonin. Furthermore, MAPK activation by melatonin was uncoupled from G-protein signaling, because melatonin efficiently activated two MAPKs in a G-protein β knockout mutant (agb1). Suppression of both MPK3 and MPK6 in transgenic Arabidopsis exhibited significant decreases in the induction of defense-related gene expression and pathogen resistance relative to wild-type plants. Using an array of MAP kinase kinase (MKK) knockout mutants, we found that four MKKs, namely MKK4, MKK5, MKK7, and MKK9, are responsible for the activation of MPK3 and MPK6 by melatonin, indicating that melatonin-mediated innate immunity is triggered by MAPK signaling through MKK4/5/7/9-MPK3/6 cascades.

  5. The intact CFTR protein mediates ATPase rather than adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Ugwu, Francisca; Stratford, Fiona L L; Huan, Ling-Jun; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2008-06-01

    The two NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) proteins function in a complex to mediate ATPase activity and this activity has been linked to their regulated transport activity. A similar model has been proposed for CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), the chloride channel defective in cystic fibrosis, wherein ATP binding and hydrolysis regulate the channel gate. Recently, it was shown that the individual NBDs isolated from CFTR primarily mediate adenylate kinase activity, raising the possibility that this activity may also contribute to gating of the CFTR channel. However, this present study shows that whereas the isolated NBDs exhibit adenylate kinase activity, the full-length purified and reconstituted CFTR protein functions as an ATPase, arguing that the enzymatic activity of the NBDs is dependent on their molecular context and appropriate domain-domain assembly. As expected, the disease-causing mutant bearing a mutation in the ABC signature motif, CFTR-G551D, exhibited a markedly reduced ATPase activity. Furthermore, mutation of the putative catalytic base in CFTR caused a reduction in ATPase activity, with the CFTR-E1371Q mutant supporting a low level of residual activity. Neither of these mutants exhibited detectable adenylate kinase activity. Together, these findings support the concept that the molecular mechanism of action of CFTR is dependent on ATP binding and hydrolysis, and that the structure of prokaryotic ABC ATPases provide a useful template for understanding their mechanism of action.

  6. Protein Kinase D Regulates RhoA Activity via Rhotekin Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Eiseler, Tim; Rykx, An; Vandoninck, Sandy; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Van Lint, Johan; von Wichert, Götz; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The members of the protein kinase D (PKD) family of serine/threonine kinases are major targets for tumor-promoting phorbol esters, G protein-coupled receptors, and activated protein kinase C isoforms (PKCs). The expanding list of cellular processes in which PKDs exert their function via phosphorylation of various substrates include proliferation, apoptosis, migration, angiogenesis, and vesicle trafficking. Therefore, identification of novel PKD substrates is necessary to understand the profound role of this kinase family in signal transduction. Here, we show that rhotekin, an effector of RhoA GTPase, is a novel substrate of PKD. We identified Ser-435 in rhotekin as the potential site targeted by PKD in vivo. Expression of a phosphomimetic S435E rhotekin mutant resulted in an increase of endogenous active RhoA GTPase levels. Phosphorylation of rhotekin by PKD2 modulates the anchoring of the RhoA in the plasma membrane. Consequently, the S435E rhotekin mutant displayed enhanced stress fiber formation when expressed in serum-starved fibroblasts. Our data thus identify a novel role of PKD as a regulator of RhoA activity and actin stress fiber formation through phosphorylation of rhotekin. PMID:22228765

  7. Activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinases and cAMP-binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol during dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenina, M.N.; Solenov, E.I.; Ivanova, L.N.

    1985-09-20

    The activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, the binding of cAMP, and the spectrum of cAMP-binding proteins in the cytosol of the renal papilla was studied in intact rats and in rats after 24 h on a water-deprived diet. It was found that the activation of protein kinases by 10/sup -6/ M cAMP is significantly higher in the experimental animals than in the intact animals. In chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, the positions of the peaks of specific reception of cAMP corresponded to the peaks of the regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases of types I and II. In this case, in intact animals more than 80% of the binding activity was detected in peaks II, whereas in rats subjected to water deprivation, more than 60% of the binding was observed in peak I. The general regulatory activity of the cytosol was unchanged in the experimental animals in comparison with intact animals. It is suggested that during dehydration there is an induction of the synthesis of the regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the renal papilla.

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated AZI1 - an attractive candidate for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Datta, Sneha; Persak, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases and their targets have been in the limelight of plant stress research. Signaling pathways mediating the responses to multiple stresses deserve particular attention. In a recent study, we reported AZI1, a member of the lipid transfer protein family, to play a role in MPK3-mediated responses to salt stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. MPK3 controls AZI1 at the transcriptional and posttranslational level. The AZI1 protein has several properties that make it very attractive for genetic engineering. A model of multi-level control of AZI1 by MPK3 is proposed, and strategies toward optimizing AZI1 protein properties are briefly discussed.

  9. Effects of protein kinase C activators on germinal vesicle breakdown and polar body emission of mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bornslaeger, E.A.; Poueymirou, W.T.; Mattei, P.; Schultz, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase is instrumental in maintaining meiotic arrest of mouse oocytes. To assess whether protein phosphorylation mediated by calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) might also inhibit the resumption of meiosis, oocytes were treated with activators of this enzyme. The active phorbol esters 12-O-tetra-decanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 4..beta..-phorbol, 12,13-didecanoate (4..beta..-PDD) inhibited germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), as did a more natural activator of protein kinase, C, sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/). An inactive phorbol ester, 4a-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4..cap alpha..-PDD), did not inhibit GVBD. TPA did not inhibit the maturation-associated decrease in oocyte cAMP. Microinjected heat-stable protein inhibitor of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase failed to induce GVBD in the presence of TPA. Both TPA and diC/sub 8/ partially inhibited specific changes in oocyte phosphoprotein metabolism that are tightly correlated with resumption of meiosis; these agents also induced the apparent phosphorylation of specific oocyte proteins. These results suggest that protein kinase C activators may inhibit resumption of meiosis by acting distal to a decrease in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, but prior to changes in oocyte phosphoprotein metabolism that are presumably required for resumption of meiosis.

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation of protein kinase CK2 by Src-related tyrosine kinases correlates with increased catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Donella-Deana, Arianna; Cesaro, Luca; Sarno, Stefania; Ruzzene, Maria; Brunati, Anna Maria; Marin, Oriano; Vilk, Greg; Doherty-Kirby, Amanda; Lajoie, Gilles; Litchfield, David W; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2003-01-01

    Casein kinase-2 (CK2) is a pleiotropic and constitutively active serine/threonine protein kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory beta-subunits, whose regulation is still not well understood. In the present study, we show that the catalytic subunits of human CK2, but not the regulatory beta-subunits, are readily phosphorylated by the Src family protein tyrosine kinases Lyn and c-Fgr to a stoichiometry approaching 2 mol phosphotyrosine/mol CK2alpha with a concomitant 3-fold increase in catalytic activity. We also show that endogenous CK2alpha becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in pervanadate-treated Jurkat cells. Both tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of activity are suppressed by the specific Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4- d ]pyrimidine. By comparison, mutations giving rise to inactive forms of CK2alpha do not abrogate and, in some cases, stimulate Lyn and c-Fgr-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of CK2. Several radiolabelled phosphopeptides could be resolved by HPLC, following tryptic digestion of CK2alpha that had been phosphoradiolabelled by incubation with [(32)P]ATP and c-Fgr. The most prominent phosphopeptide co-migrates with a synthetic peptide encompassing the 248-268 sequence, phosphorylated previously by c-Fgr at Tyr(255) in vitro. The identification of Tyr(255) as a phosphorylated residue was also supported by MS sequencing of both the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated 248-268 tryptic fragments from CK2alpha and by on-target phosphatase treatment. A CK2alpha mutant in which Tyr(255) was replaced by phenylalanine proved less susceptible to phosphorylation and refractory to stimulation by c-Fgr. PMID:12628006

  11. Small molecule adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulators and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2015-01-08

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor of cellular energy status that plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. AMPK is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by upstream kinases LKB1, CaMKKβ, and Tak1, among others. AMPK exists as αβγ trimeric complexes that are allosterically regulated by AMP, ADP, and ATP. Dysregulation of AMPK has been implicated in a number of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Recent studies have associated roles of AMPK with the development of cancer and neurological disorders, making it a potential therapeutic target to treat human diseases. This review focuses on the structure and function of AMPK, its role in human diseases, and its direct substrates and provides a brief synopsis of key AMPK modulators and their relevance in human diseases.

  12. Berberine promotes glucose consumption independently of AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Yin, Jun; Hou, Wolin; Yu, Xueying; Shen, Li; Liu, Fang; Wei, Li; Jia, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with anti-diabetic action. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway has been proposed as mechanism for berberine's action. This study aimed to examine whether AMPK activation was necessary for berberine's glucose-lowering effect. We found that in HepG2 hepatocytes and C2C12 myotubes, berberine significantly increased glucose consumption and lactate release in a dose-dependent manner. AMPK and acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACC) phosphorylation were stimulated by 20 µmol/L berberine. Nevertheless, berberine was still effective on stimulating glucose utilization and lactate production, when the AMPK activation was blocked by (1) inhibition of AMPK activity by Compound C, (2) suppression of AMPKα expression by siRNA, and (3) blockade of AMPK pathway by adenoviruses containing dominant-negative forms of AMPKα1/α2. To test the effect of berberine on oxygen consumption, extracellular flux analysis was performed in Seahorse XF24 analyzer. The activity of respiratory chain complex I was almost fully blocked in C2C12 myotubes by berberine. Metformin, as a positive control, showed similar effects as berberine. These results suggest that berberine and metformin promote glucose metabolism by stimulating glycolysis, which probably results from inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I, independent of AMPK activation.

  13. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  14. Apoptosis and melanogenesis in human melanoma cells induced by anthrax lethal factor inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Han-Mo; Vanbrocklin, Matt; McWilliams, Mary Jane; Leppla, Stephan H.; Duesbery, Nicholas S.; Vande Woude, George F.

    2002-03-01

    Lethal factor, the principal virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by proteolytically cleaving MAPK kinases. Edema factor, another component of anthrax toxin, is an adenylate cyclase, which increases intracellular cAMP. Inhibition of MAPK signaling with either anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) or small molecule MAPK kinase inhibitors triggers apoptosis in human melanoma cells. Normal melanocytes do not undergo apoptosis in response to MAPK inhibition but arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, in vivo treatment of human melanoma xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice with LeTx results in significant or complete tumor regression without apparent side effects, suggesting that inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathway may be a useful strategy for treating melanoma. Additionally, interrupting MAPK signaling with LeTx and elevating cAMP with anthrax edema toxin in both melanoma cells and melanocytes lead to dramatic melanin production, perhaps explaining the formation of blackened eschars in cutaneous anthrax.

  15. Berberine regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and inhibits colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Saud, Shakir M; Lin, Hongsheng; Hou, Wei; Matter, Matthias S; Jia, Libin; Colburn, Nancy H; Young, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, has been linked to inflammation and obesity. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes and anti-tumor properties. In the azoxymethane initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) promoted colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, berberine treated mice showed a 60% reduction in tumor number (P = 0.009), a 48% reduction in tumors <2 mm, (P = 0.05); 94% reduction in tumors 2-4 mm, (P = 0.001), and 100% reduction in tumors >4 mm (P = 0.02) compared to vehicle treated mice. Berberine also decreased AOM/DSS induced Ki-67 and COX-2 expression. In vitro analysis showed that in addition to its anti-proliferation activity, berberine also induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Berberine activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of metabolic pathways, and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of AMPK. Furthermore, 4E-binding protein-1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinases, downstream targets of mTOR, were down regulated by berberine treatment. Berberine did not affect Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) activity or the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Berberine inhibited Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, induced phosphorylation of p53 and increased caspase-3 cleavage in vitro. Berberine inhibition of mTOR activity and p53 phosphorylation was found to be AMPK dependent, while inhibition NF-κB was AMPK independent. In vivo, berberine also activated AMPK, inhibited mTOR and p65 phosphorylation and activated caspase-3 cleavage. Our data suggests that berberine suppresses colon epithelial proliferation and tumorigenesis via AMPK dependent inhibition of mTOR activity and AMPK independent inhibition of NF-κB.

  16. Biological or pharmacological activation of protein kinase C alpha constrains hepatitis E virus replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshi; Wang, Yijin; Debing, Yannick; Zhou, Xinying; Yin, Yuebang; Xu, Lei; Herrera Carrillo, Elena; Brandsma, Johannes H; Poot, Raymond A; Berkhout, Ben; Neyts, Johan; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatitis E has emerged as a global health issue, there is limited knowledge of its infection biology and no FDA-approved medication is available. Aiming to investigate the role of protein kinases in hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection and to identify potential antiviral targets, we screened a library of pharmacological kinase inhibitors in a cell culture model, a subgenomic HEV replicon containing luciferase reporter. We identified protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) as an essential cell host factor restricting HEV replication. Both specific inhibitor and shRNA-mediated knockdown of PKCα enhanced HEV replication. Conversely, over-expression of the activated form of PKCα or treatment with its pharmacological activator strongly inhibited HEV replication. Interestingly, upon the stimulation by its activator, PKCα efficiently activates its downstream Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) pathway, leading to the induction of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). This process is independent of the JAK-STAT machinery and interferon production. However, PKCα induced HEV inhibition appears independent of the AP1 cascade. The discovery that activated PKCα restricts HEV replication reveals new insight of HEV-host interactions and provides new target for antiviral drug development.

  17. Protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase pathways regulate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide synthase activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, A; Pendreigh, R H; Plevin, R

    1995-01-01

    1. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gamma-interferon (IFN gamma) alone or in combination stimulated the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and increased the expression of the 130 kDa isoform of NOS. 2. LPS-induced NOS activity was reduced by incubation with CD14 neutralising antibodies and abolished in macrophages deprived of serum. 3. LPS stimulated a small increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages which was dependent on the presence of serum. However, IFN gamma did not potentiate LPS-stimulated PKC activity. 4. The protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-318220, abolished both LPS- and IFN gamma-stimulated protein kinase C activity and the induction of NOS activity. 5. LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genestein. Genestein also reduced LPS-stimulated protein kinase C activity but did not affect the response to the protein kinase C activator, tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA). 6. Nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly-ADP ribosylation, abolished LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity. 7. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of a factor which stimulates nucleotide exchange activity on the 21 kDa ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF, reduced LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity by approximately 80%. 8. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and poly-ADP ribosylation pathways in the regulation of the induction of nitric oxide synthase in RAW 264.7 macrophages by LPS and IFN gamma. Images Figure 2 PMID:7533621

  18. Adenovirus infection targets the cellular protein kinase CK2 and RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) into viral inclusions of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Souquere-Besse, Sylvie; Pichard, Evelyne; Filhol, Odile; Legrand, Valerie; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Hovanessian, Ara G; Cochet, Claude; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine

    2002-03-15

    The effects of the adenovirus infection on the distribution of the cellular protein kinase CK2 and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) were examined at the ultrastructural level. Immunogold labeling revealed the redistribution of CK2 subunits and PKR to morphologically distinct structures of the cell nucleus. The electron-clear amorphous structures, designated pIX nuclear bodies in our previous work (Rosa-Calatrava et al., 2001), contained CK2 alpha and PKR. The protein crystals, which result from the regular assembly of hexon, penton base, and fiber proteins [Boulanger et al. (1970) J Gen Virol 6:329-332], contained CK2 beta and PKR. Both viral structures were devoid of viral RNA, including the PKR-inhibitor VA1 RNA generated by the RNA polymerase III. Instead, VA1 RNA accumulated in PKR-free viral compact rings in which the viral RNA generated by the RNA polymerase II was excluded.

  19. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by natural and synthetic activators

    PubMed Central

    Grahame Hardie, David

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that is almost universally expressed in eukaryotic cells. While it appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes to regulate energy balance in a cell-autonomous manner, during the evolution of multicellular animals its role has become adapted so that it also regulates energy balance at the whole body level, by responding to hormones that act primarily on the hypothalamus. AMPK monitors energy balance at the cellular level by sensing the ratios of AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP, and recent structural analyses of the AMPK heterotrimer that have provided insight into the complex mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. Given the central importance of energy balance in diseases that are major causes of morbidity or death in humans, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders, there has been a major drive to develop pharmacological activators of AMPK. Many such activators have been described, and the various mechanisms by which these activate AMPK will be discussed. A particularly large class of AMPK activators are natural products of plants derived from traditional herbal medicines. While the mechanism by which most of these activate AMPK has not yet been addressed, I will argue that many of them may be defensive compounds produced by plants to deter infection by pathogens or grazing by insects or herbivores, and that many of them will turn out to be inhibitors of mitochondrial function. PMID:26904394

  20. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits calcium-activated potassium channels in rat pituitary tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shipston, M J; Armstrong, D L

    1996-01-01

    1. The regulation of large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-dependent potassium (BK) channels by protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated in clonal rat anterior pituitary cells (GH4C1), which were voltage clamped at -40 mV in a physiological potassium gradient through amphotericin-perforated patches. 2. Maximal activation of PKC by 100 nM phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PdBu) almost completely inhibited the voltage-activated outward current through BK channels. In contrast PdBu had no significant effect on the residual outward current after block of BK channels with 2 mM TEA or 30 nM charybdotoxin. In single-channel recordings from cell-attached patches, PdBu reduced the open probability of BK channels more than eightfold with no significant effect on mean open lifetime or unitary conductance. 3. The effects of PdBu on BK channels were not mimicked by the 4 alpha-isomer, which does not activate PKC, and were blocked almost completely by 25 microM chelerythrine, a specific, noncompetitive PKC inhibitor. 4. PdBu had no significant effect on the amplitude of the pharmacologically isolated, high voltage-activated calcium current. 5. Inhibition of BK channel activity by PKC provides the first molecular mechanism linking hormonal activation of phospholipase C to sustained excitability in pituitary cells. PMID:8799890

  1. Methylglyoxal activates the target of rapamycin complex 2-protein kinase C signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr(1125) and Ser(1143). Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1(T1125) affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser(473). Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes.

  2. Methylglyoxal Activates the Target of Rapamycin Complex 2-Protein Kinase C Signaling Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr1125 and Ser1143. Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser1143, which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1T1125 affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser1143, in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser473. Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes. PMID:25624345

  3. Agonist-Biased Signaling via Proteinase Activated Receptor-2: Differential Activation of Calcium and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Mathur, Maneesh; Rochdi, Moulay Driss; Bouvier, Michel; DeFea, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of different trypsin-revealed tethered ligand (TL) sequences of rat proteinase-activated receptor 2 (rPAR2) and the corresponding soluble TL-derived agonist peptides to trigger agonist-biased signaling. To do so, we mutated the proteolytically revealed TL sequence of rPAR2 and examined the impact on stimulating intracellular calcium transients and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The TL receptor mutants, rPAR2-Leu37Ser38, rPAR2-Ala37–38, and rPAR2-Ala39–42 were compared with the trypsin-revealed wild-type rPAR2 TL sequence, S37LIGRL42—. Upon trypsin activation, all constructs stimulated MAP kinase signaling, but only the wt-rPAR2 and rPAR2-Ala39–42 triggered calcium signaling. Furthermore, the TL-derived synthetic peptide SLAAAA-NH2 failed to cause PAR2-mediated calcium signaling but did activate MAP kinase, whereas SLIGRL-NH2 triggered both calcium and MAP kinase signaling by all receptors. The peptides AAIGRL-NH2 and LSIGRL-NH2 triggered neither calcium nor MAP kinase signals. Neither rPAR2-Ala37–38 nor rPAR2-Leu37Ser38 constructs recruited β-arrestins-1 or -2 in response to trypsin stimulation, whereas both β-arrestins were recruited to these mutants by SLIGRL-NH2. The lack of trypsin-triggered β-arrestin interactions correlated with impaired trypsin-activated TL-mutant receptor internalization. Trypsin-stimulated MAP kinase activation by the TL-mutated receptors was not blocked by inhibitors of Gαi (pertussis toxin), Gαq [N-cyclohexyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-6-methylindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide (GP2A)], Src kinase [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], or the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor [4-(3′-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline (AG1478)], but was inhibited by the Rho-kinase inhibitor (R)-(+)-trans-N-(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-aminoethyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide, 2HCl (Y27362). The data indicate that the proteolytically revealed TL sequence(s) and the mode

  4. Active zone proteins are transported via distinct mechanisms regulated by Par-1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Kara R.; Sherman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of synapses underlies a plethora of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease. Presynaptic specialization called the active zone plays a critical role in the communication with postsynaptic neuron. While the role of many proteins at the active zones in synaptic communication is relatively well studied, very little is known about how these proteins are transported to the synapses. For example, are there distinct mechanisms for the transport of active zone components or are they all transported in the same transport vesicle? Is active zone protein transport regulated? In this report we show that overexpression of Par-1/MARK kinase, a protein whose misregulation has been implicated in Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and neurodegenerative disorders, lead to a specific block in the transport of an active zone protein component- Bruchpilot at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions. Consistent with a block in axonal transport, we find a decrease in number of active zones and reduced neurotransmission in flies overexpressing Par-1 kinase. Interestingly, we find that Par-1 acts independently of Tau-one of the most well studied substrates of Par-1, revealing a presynaptic function for Par-1 that is independent of Tau. Thus, our study strongly suggests that there are distinct mechanisms that transport components of active zones and that they are tightly regulated. PMID:28222093

  5. The FRK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from Solanum chacoense is involved in embryo sac and pollen development.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Edith; Kapfer, Christelle; Joly, Valentin; Liu, Yang; Tebbji, Faiza; Daigle, Caroline; Gray-Mitsumune, Madoka; Cappadocia, Mario; Nantel, André; Matton, Daniel P

    2015-04-01

    The fertilization-related kinase 1 (ScFRK1), a nuclear-localized mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from the wild potato species Solanum chacoense, belongs to a small group of pMEKKs that do not possess an extended N- or C-terminal regulatory domain. Initially selected based on its highly specific expression profile following fertilization, in situ expression analyses revealed that the ScFRK1 gene is also expressed early on during female gametophyte development in the integument and megaspore mother cell and, later, in the synergid and egg cells of the embryo sac. ScFRK1 mRNAs are also detected in pollen mother cells. Transgenic plants with lower or barely detectable levels of ScFRK1 mRNAs lead to the production of small fruits with severely reduced seed set, resulting from a concomitant decline in the number of normal embryo sacs produced. Megagametogenesis and microgametogenesis were affected, as megaspores did not progress beyond the functional megaspore (FG1) stage and the microspore collapsed around the first pollen mitosis. As for other mutants that affect embryo sac development, pollen tube guidance was severely affected in the ScFRK1 transgenic lines. Gametophyte to sporophyte communication was also affected, as observed from a marked change in the transcriptomic profiles of the sporophytic tissues of the ovule. The ScFRK1 MAPKKK is thus involved in a signalling cascade that regulates both male and female gamete development.

  6. Dobesilate diminishes activation of the mitogen - activated protein kinase ERK1/2 in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, P; Diaz-González, Diana; Garcia-Martin-Córdova, C; Sánchez, I; Lozano, Rosa Maria; Giménez-Gallego, G; Dujovny, M

    2006-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors, regularly expressed at high levels in gliomas, are further upregulated during the transition of the tumor from low- to high-grade malignancy, and are essential for glioma progression. FGFs induce upregulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade in cultured glioma cells, which suggests that MAPK pathway participates in the FGF-dependent glioma development. Recently, it has been shown that dobesilate, an inhibitor of FGF mitogenic activity, shows antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in glioma cell cultures. Accordingly, it should be expected this new synthetic FGF inhibitor to affect the activation levels of MAPK. Here we report that immunocytochemical and Western blot data unequivocally show that treatment of cell cultures with dobesilate causes a significant decrease of the intracellular levels of ERK1/2 activation, one of the components of the MAPK signalling cascade. This finding supports an important role for dobesilate in glioma growth, suggesting that dobesilate should be a treatment to be born in mind for glioma management. PMID:16563234

  7. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E; Zompetta, C; Pelicci, G; Salcini, A E; Falini, B; Pelicci, P G; Torrisi, M R

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular localization of Shc proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in normal cells and cells expressing the epidermal growth factor receptor or the EGFR/erbB2 chimera. In unstimulated cells, the immunolabeling was localized in the central perinuclear area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane and endocytic structures, such as coated pits and endosomes, and with the peripheral cytosol. Receptor activation in cells expressing phosphorylation-defective mutants of Shc and erbB-2 kinase showed that receptor autophosphorylation, but not Shc phosphorylation, is required for redistribution of Shc proteins. The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein. PMID:8628261

  8. Dissimilar effects of phorbol ester and diacylglycerol derivative on protein kinase activity in the monoblastoid U937 cell.

    PubMed

    Ways, D K; Dodd, R C; Earp, H S

    1987-07-01

    Mechanism, in addition to protein kinase C activation may mediate 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulated differentiation of leukemic cells. We compared the effect of pretreating intact monoblastoid U937 cells with TPA or the diacylglycerol derivative, 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG), by studying the protein kinase C dependent and independent histone phosphotransferase activity, the phosphorylation of endogenous substrates, and the ability to stimulate differentiation. In cellular fractions derived from cells treated with TPA or OAG, cytosolic protein kinase C activity decreased. In the detergent extracted particulate fraction, TPA produced a time and dose dependent decrease in protein kinase C activity. In contrast, OAG increased particulate protein kinase C activity. In addition, the particulate fraction derived from cells treated with TPA exhibited increased phosphatidyl serine and diolein independent histone phosphotransferase activity as well as an increase in the phosphorylation of two endogenous substrates with molecular weights of 120,000 and 80,000. OAG did not mimic these effects. When exposed to 32P-labeled intact cells, OAG and TPA stimulated phosphorylation of three substrates. Thus, the inability of OAG to mimic the effects of TPA was not due to lack of protein kinase C activation. TPA, but not OAG, stimulated differentiation of the U937 cell to a monocyte-like cell. These data demonstrate that TPA and OAG have dissimilar effects on protein kinase activity and differentiation in the U937 monoblastoid cell.

  9. Zinc differentially regulates mitogen-activated protein kinases in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Hönscheid, Andrea; Dubben, Svenja; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient with remarkable importance for immunity, in particular for T-cell function. This is, at least in part, based on an involvement of zinc ions in immune cell signal transduction; dynamic changes of the intracellular free zinc concentration have recently been recognized as signaling events. Because the molecular targets of zinc signals remain incompletely understood, we investigated the impact of elevated intracellular free zinc on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and MAPK-dependent cytokine production in human T-cells. p38 was activated by treatment with zinc and the ionophore pyrithione, whereas ERK1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases were unaffected. In contrast, after T-cell receptor stimulation with antibodies against CD3, ERK1/2-phosphorylation was selectively suppressed by intracellular zinc. Mechanisms that had been shown to mediate zinc-effects in other cells, such as activation of the Src kinase Lck, inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 or MAPK phosphatases and cyclic nucleotide/protein kinase A signaling were not involved. This indicates that the differential impact of zinc on the MAPK families in T-cells is mediated by mechanisms that differ from the ones observed in other cell types. Further investigation of the activation of p38 by zinc demonstrated that this MAPK is responsible for the zinc-mediated activation of CREB and mRNA expression of the Th1 cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-2. In conclusion, regulation of MAPK activity contributes to the impact of zinc on T-cell function.

  10. Agents that activate protein kinase C reduce acetylcholine sensitivity in cultured myotubes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have examined acetylcholine (ACh)-elicited potentials or currents in current- or voltage-clamped cultured myotubes exposed to 12-O- tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent tumor promoter that activates protein kinase C. Although this agent had little action on either membrane resting potential or electrical resistance, a reversible decrease in ACh sensitivity was induced on 3-4-d-old chick myotubes. Depression of transmitter action by TPA was extended to 7-8-d mouse myotubes only when they were treated with phosphatidylserine. Glyceryl dioleate had effects on myotubes similar to those of TPA but with a reduced efficacy. We conclude that the activation of protein kinase C might be involved with the capacity of ACh receptors to respond to transmitter stimulation. PMID:3156868

  11. Exchange Protein Activated by cAMP Enhances Long-Term Memory Formation Independent of Protein Kinase A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Nan; Abel, Ted; Hernandez, Pepe J.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that cAMP signaling within neurons plays a major role in the formation of long-term memories--signaling thought to proceed through protein kinase A (PKA). However, here we show that exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) is able to enhance the formation of long-term memory in the hippocampus and appears to do so…

  12. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits ER stress and renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyosang; Moon, Soo Young; Kim, Joon-Seok; Baek, Chung Hee; Kim, Miyeon; Min, Ji Yeon; Lee, Sang Koo

    2015-02-01

    It has been suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress facilitates fibrotic remodeling. Therefore, modulation of ER stress may serve as one of the possible therapeutic approaches to renal fibrosis. We examined whether and how activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppressed ER stress induced by chemical ER stress inducers [tunicamycin (TM) and thapsigargin (TG)] and also nonchemical inducers in tubular HK-2 cells. We further investigated the in vivo effects of AMPK on ER stress and renal fibrosis. Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, small interfering (si)RNA experiments, and immunohistochemical staining were performed. Metformin (the best known clinical activator of AMPK) suppressed TM- or TG-induced ER stress, as shown by the inhibition of TM- or TG-induced upregulation of glucose-related protein (GRP)78 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-2α through induction of heme oxygenase-1. Metformin inhibited TM- or TG-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transitions as well. Compound C (AMPK inhibitor) blocked the effect of metformin, and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1β riboside (another AMPK activator) exerted the same effects as metformin. Transfection with siRNA targeting AMPK blocked the effect of metformin. Consistent with the results of cell culture experiments, metformin reduced renal cortical GRP78 expression and increased heme oxygenase-1 expression in a mouse model of ER stress-induced acute kidney injury by TM. Activation of AMPK also suppressed ER stress by transforming growth factor-β, ANG II, aldosterone, and high glucose. Furthermore, metformin reduced GRP78 expression and renal fibrosis in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. In conclusion, AMPK may serve as a promising therapeutic target through reducing ER stress and renal fibrosis.

  13. Melatonin alleviates myosin light chain kinase expression and activity via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway during atherosclerosis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, XIAOWEN; WAN, YUFENG; XU, YUANHONG; ZHOU, QING; WANG, YUAN; ZHU, HUAQING

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin (MLT) is an endogenous indole compound with numerous biological activities that has been associated with atherosclerosis (AS). In the present study, rabbits were used as an AS model in order to investigate whether MLT affects endothelial cell permeability, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity and MLCK expression via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Expression and activity of MLCK were measured using western blot analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and γ-32P-adenosine triphosphate incorporation. Endothelial permeability was detected using rhodamine phalloidin fluorescence staining. The phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 in endothelial cells were also analyzed using western blot analysis. Atheromatous plaques were formed in rabbits with a high cholesterol diet; however, following treatment with MLT, the number and areas of atheromatous plaques were significantly reduced. In addition, MLT treatment reversed the increase of MLCK activity and expression that occurred in rabbits with high cholesterol intake. Furthermore, levels of phosphorylated ERK, JNK and p38 decreased following MLT treatment. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that AS may be associated with increased MLCK expression and activity, which was reduced following treatment with MLT. The mechanism of action of MLT was thought to proceed via modulating MAPK pathway signal transduction; however, further studies are required in order to fully elucidate the exact regulatory mechanisms involved. PMID:25339116

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 inhibition and sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation in camptothecin-induced human colon cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minyoung; Young Kim, Sun; Kim, JongGuk; Kim, Hak-Su; Kim, Sang-Man; Kim, Eun Ju

    2013-01-01

    Camptothecins are commonly used chemotherapeutics; in some models, they enhance signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway through effects on upstream kinases. To evaluate the impact of camptothecin (CPT) on MAPKs in human colon cancer, we studied HCT116 and CaCo2 colon cancer cells. We found that HCT116 cells highly express mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP1), which selectively inactivates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas MKP1 levels were undetectable in CaCo2 cells. CPT did not affect ERK activity in CaCo2 cells, but did induce a striking increase in ERK activity in HCT116 cells in association with a corresponding decrease in MKP1. The reduction in MKP1 expression occurred at a posttranscriptional level and was blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, whereas that CPT-induced downregulation of MKP1 was not due to proteasome-mediated degradation. Treatment of HCT116 cells with CPT induced a sustained activation of nuclear ERK, which was required for CPT-induced apoptosis. P38 and JNK activity were unaffected by CPT, suggesting that the effects of CPT are mediated specifically by ERK. These results suggest that targeting dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases in colon cancer cells may be a viable strategy for optimizing camptothecin-based therapeutic protocols. PMID:24005240

  15. Electrochemical detection of protein kinase activity based on carboxypeptidase Y digestion triggered signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huanshun; Wang, Xinxu; Guo, Yunlong; Zhou, Yunlei; Ai, Shiyun

    2015-04-15

    An effective assay method for monitoring protein kinase activity and screening inhibitors is greatly beneficial to kinase-related drug discovery, early diagnosis of diseases, and therapeutic effect evaluation. Herein, we develop a simple electrochemical method for detecting the activity of casein kinase II (CK2) based on phosphorylation against carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) digestion triggered signal amplification, where CK2 catalyzed phosphorylation event protects the substrate peptide from the digestion of CPY, maintains the repulsive force of the substrate peptide towards the redox probe, and results in a weak electrochemical signal. Whereas, without phosphorylation, the substrate peptide is digested by CPY and a strong electrochemical signal is obtained. The detection feasibility is demonstrated for the assay of CK2 activity with low detection limit of 0.047unit/mL. Moreover, the biosensor was used for the analysis of kinase inhibition. Based on the electrochemical signal dependent inhibitor concentration, the IC50 value of ellagic acid was estimated to be 39.77nM. The proposed method is also successfully applied to analyze CK2 activity in cell lysates, proving the applicability in complex biological samples.

  16. Metastasis suppressor NM23 limits oxidative stress in mammals by preventing activation of stress-activated protein kinases/JNKs through its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Peuchant, Evelyne; Bats, Marie-Lise; Moranvillier, Isabelle; Lepoivre, Michel; Guitton, Jérôme; Wendum, Dominique; Lacombe, Marie-Lise; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Boissan, Mathieu; Dabernat, Sandrine

    2017-04-01

    NME1 (nonmetastatic expressed 1) gene, which encodes nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) A [also known as nonmetastatic clone 23 (NM23)-H1 in humans and NM23-M1 in mice], is a suppressor of metastasis, but several lines of evidence-mostly from plants-also implicate it in the regulation of the oxidative stress response. Here, our aim was to investigate the physiologic relevance of NDPK A with respect to the oxidative stress response in mammals and to study its molecular basis. NME1-knockout mice died sooner, suffered greater hepatocyte injury, and had lower superoxide dismutase activity than did wild-type (WT) mice in response to paraquat-induced acute oxidative stress. Deletion of NME1 reduced total NDPK activity and exacerbated activation of the stress-related MAPK, JNK, in the liver in response to paraquat. In a mouse transformed hepatocyte cell line and in primary cultures of normal human keratinocytes, MAPK activation in response to H2O2 and UVB, respectively, was dampened by expression of NM23-M1/NM23-H1, dependent on its NDPK catalytic activity. Furthermore, excess or depletion of NM23-M1/NM23-H1 NDPK activity did not affect the intracellular bulk concentration of nucleoside di- and triphosphates. NME1-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts grew poorly in culture, were more sensitive to stress than WT fibroblasts, and did not immortalize, which suggested that they senesce earlier than do WT fibroblasts. Collectively, these results indicate that the NDPK activity of NM23-M1/NM23-H1 protects cells from acute oxidative stress by inhibiting activation of JNK in mammal models.-Peuchant, E., Bats, M.-L., Moranvillier, I., Lepoivre, M., Guitton, J., Wendum, D., Lacombe, M.-L., Moreau-Gaudry, F., Boissan, M., Dabernat, S. Metastasis suppressor NM23 limits oxidative stress in mammals by preventing activation of stress-activated protein kinases/JNKs through its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity.

  17. Structure-activity relationship of synthetic branched-chain distearoylglycerol (distearin) as protein kinase C activators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qingzhong; Raynor, R.L.; Wood, M.G. Jr.; Menger, F.M.; Kuo, J.F. )

    1988-09-20

    Several representative branched-chain analogues of distearin (DS) were synthesized and tested for their abilities to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and to compete for the binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) to the enzyme. Substitutions of stearoyl moieties at sn-1 and sn-2 with 8-methylstearate decreased activities on these parameters, relative to those of the parental diacylglycerol DS, a weak PKC activator. Substitutions with 8-butyl, 4-butyl, or 8-phenyl derivatives, on the other hand, increased activities of the resulting analogues to levels comparable to those seen for diolein (DO), a diacylglycerol prototype shown to be a potent PKC activator. Kinetic analysis indicated that 8-methyldistearin (8-MeDS) acted by decreasing, whereas 8-butyldistearin (8-BuDS) and 8-phenyldistearin (8-PhDS) acted by increasing, the affinities of PKC for phosphatidylserine (PS, a phospholipid cofactor) and Ca{sup 2+} compared to the values seen in the absence or presence of DS. The stimulatory effect of 8-BuDS and 8-PhDS on PKC, as DO, was additive to that of 1,2-(8-butyl)distearoylphosphatidylcholine (1,2(8-Bu)DSPC) and, moreover, they abolished the marked inhibition of the enzyme activity caused by high concentrations of 1,2(8-Bu)DSPC. The present findings demonstrated a structure-activity relationship of the branched-chain DS analogues in the regulation of PKC, perhaps related to their abilities to specifically modify interactions of PKC with PS and/or Ca{sup 2+} critically involved in enzyme activation/inactivation.

  18. Corosolic acid protects hepatocytes against ethanol-induced damage by modulating mitogen-activated protein kinases and activating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaolan; Cui, Ruibing; Zhao, Jianjian; Mo, Rui; Peng, Lei; Yan, Ming

    2016-11-15

    The reactive oxygen species(ROS)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) destroyed autophagy and the reactive oxygen species/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway are considered closely related to ethanol-induced hepatocellular injury. Previous work indicated that corosolic acid, the natural extracts of leaves of the banaba tree, Lagerstroemia speciosa L., could protect the liver against ethanol-induced damage, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the study we found that corosolic acid significantly inhibited ethanol-induced apoptosis, increased level of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) and reactive oxygen species accumulation in vitro. Corosolic acid inhibited ethanol-activated p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase MAPK signaling in BRL-3A and HepG2 cells as well as in experimental rats. Corosolic acid restored the ethanol-suppressed expression of autophagy-related genes, including beclin-1 and the ratio of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3II/I (LC3II/I) via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation both in vitro and in vivo. In experimental rats, corosolic acid ameliorated the detrimental histopathological findings. Corosolic acid may protect the liver against ethanol-induced injury by modulation of MAPK signaling and autophagy activation. These findings suggested that corosolic acid might be a promising agent in treatment of alcoholic liver diseases.

  19. Threonine-497 is a critical site for permissive activation of protein kinase C alpha.

    PubMed

    Cazaubon, S; Bornancin, F; Parker, P J

    1994-07-15

    Phosphorylation of the region containing Thr-494, Thr-495 and Thr-497, present in the catalytic domain of protein kinase C alpha (PKC alpha), is a preliminary event necessary for subsequent PKC activation [Cazaubon and Parker (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 17559-17563]. To define the essential residues in this region, various combinations of alanine substitutions for threonine residues 494, 495 and 497 have been tested. These mutations yielded expressed polypeptides of 76 and 80 kDa in ratios that vary from 100% 80 kDa (wild-type kinase, active) to 100% 76 kDa (AAA mutant, inactive) with the hierarchy being wild-type PKC alpha (TTT), ATT, AAT, TTA, ATA, TAA, AAA (the nomenclature indicates the location of alanine residues substituted for Thr-494, Thr-495 and Thr-497 respectively). Only the mutants retaining Thr-497 displayed kinase activity in vitro. The results overall indicate that Thr-497 plays the dominant role in the regulation of PKC alpha activity but that in the wild-type protein, Thr-495 may also be important. Consistent with the need for phosphorylation in this region, an intrinsically active PKC alpha could be produced in bacteria by exchanging Thr-495 for a glutamic acid residue.

  20. Biological significance of nuclear localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-07-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level.

  1. Activation of the Lck tyrosine protein kinase by hydrogen peroxide requires the phosphorylation of Tyr-394.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J S; Sefton, B M

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of cells to H2O2 mimics many of the effects of treatment of cells with extracellular ligands. Among these is the stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation. In this study, we show that exposure of cells to H2O2 increases the catalytic activity of the lymphocyte-specific tyrosine protein kinase p56lck (Lck) and induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-394, the autophosphorylation site. Using mutant forms of Lck, we found that Tyr-394 is required for H2O2-induced activation of Lck, suggesting that phosphorylation of this site may activate Lck. In addition, H2O2 treatment induced phosphorylation at Tyr-394 in a catalytically inactive mutant of Lck in cells that do not express endogenous Lck. This demonstrates that a kinase other than Lck itself is capable of phosphorylating Lck at the so-called autophosphorylation site and raises the possibility that this as yet unidentified tyrosine protein kinase functions as an activator of Lck. Such an activating enzyme could play an important role in signal transduction in T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7538674

  2. Biological Significance of Nuclear Localization of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pmk1 in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M. Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level. PMID:22685296

  3. Protein receptor for activated C kinase 1 is involved in morphine reward in mice.

    PubMed

    Wan, L; Su, L; Xie, Y; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z

    2009-07-07

    Opiate addiction is associated with upregulation of cAMP signaling in the brain. cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), a nuclear transcription factor, is a downstream component of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway, which has been shown to regulate different physiological and psychological responses of drug addiction. RACK1, the protein receptor for activated C kinase 1, is a multifunctional scaffolding protein known to be a key regulator of various signaling cascades in the CNS. RACK1 functions specifically in integrin mediated activation of ERK cascade and targets active ERK. We examined if RACK1 is involved in the mechanism of drug addiction by regulating CREB in mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Several expressions were observed. Chronic administration of morphine made the expression of RACK1 and CREB mRNA increase in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The expression of RACK1 and CREB protein was strongly positive in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus of morphine-treated mice brain, especially the pyramidal neurons in the DG of the hippocampus. Using the small interfering RNA technology, we determined that the expression of CREB mRNA was decreased in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of morphine-treated mice. The expression of RACK1 and CREB protein was negative in CA1, CA3 and DG of hippocampus. These findings suggest that morphine reward can influence the expression of RACK1 in mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex through regulating CREB transcription.

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylates CtBP1 and down-regulates its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Soo-Youn; Kang, Byung-Hee; Lee, Soon-Min; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► AMPK phosphorylates CtBP1 on serine 158. ► AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of CtBP1 causes the ubiquitination and nuclear export of CtBP1. ► AMPK downregulates the CtBP1-mediated repression of Bax transcription. -- Abstract: CtBP is a transcriptional repressor which plays a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation and tumor progression. It was reported that glucose withdrawal causes induction of Bax due to the dissociation of CtBP from the Bax promoter. However, the precise mechanism involved in the regulation of CtBP still remains unclear. In this study, we found that an activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylates CtBP1 on Ser-158 upon metabolic stresses. Moreover, AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of CtBP1 (S158) attenuates the repressive function of CtBP1. We also confirmed that triggering activation of AMPK by various factors resulted in an increase of Bax gene expression. These findings provide connections of AMPK with CtBP1-mediated regulation of Bax expression for cell death under metabolic stresses.

  5. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and suppression of inflammatory response by cell stretching in rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kunanusornchai, Wanlop; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-12-01

    Joint mobilization is known to be beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of stretching on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and its role in modulating inflammation in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretching of isolated rabbit synovial fibroblasts for ten min was performed. Stretching-induced AMPK activation, its underlying mechanism, and its anti-inflammatory effect were investigated using Western blot. Static stretching at 20 % of initial length resulted in AMPK activation characterized by expression of phosphorylated AMPK and phosphorylated acetyl-Co A carboxylase. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation peaked 1 h after stretching and declined toward resting activity. Using cell viability assays, static stretching did not appear to cause cellular damage. Activation of AMPK involves Ca(2+) influx via a mechanosensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel, which subsequently raises intracellular Ca(2+) and activates AMPK via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Interestingly, stretching suppressed TNFα-induced expression of COX-2, iNOS, and phosphorylated NF-κB. These effects were prevented by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that mechanical stretching suppressed inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts via a L-type Ca(2+)-channel-CaMKKβ-AMPK-dependent pathway which may underlie joint mobilization's ability to alleviate OA symptoms.

  6. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase α1-sensitive activation of AP-1 in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Primessnig, Uwe; Feger, Martina; Mia, Sobuj; Jungmann, Andreas; Castor, Tatsiana; Viereck, Robert; Stöckigt, Florian; Borst, Oliver; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schrickel, Jan Wilko; Metzler, Bernhard; Katus, Hugo A; Müller, Oliver J; Pieske, Burkert; Heinzel, Frank R; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk) regulates myocardial energy metabolism and plays a crucial role in the response to cell stress. In the failing heart, an isoform shift of the predominant Ampkα2 to the Ampkα1 was observed. The present study explored possible isoform specific effects of Ampkα1 in cardiomyocytes. To this end, experiments were performed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes, as well as in Ampkα1-deficient and corresponding wild-type mice and mice following AAV9-mediated cardiac overexpression of constitutively active Ampkα1. As a result, in HL-1 cardiomyocytes, overexpression of constitutively active Ampkα1 increased the phosphorylation of Pkcζ. Constitutively active Ampkα1 further increased AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity and mRNA expression of the AP-1 target genes c-Fos, Il6 and Ncx1, effects blunted by Pkcζ silencing. In HL-1 cardiomyocytes, angiotensin-II activated AP-1, an effect blunted by silencing of Ampkα1 and Pkcζ, but not of Ampkα2. In wild-type mice, angiotensin-II infusion increased cardiac Ampkα1 and cardiac Pkcζ protein levels, as well as c-Fos, Il6 and Ncx1 mRNA expression, effects blunted in Ampkα1-deficient mice. Pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) similarly increased cardiac Ampkα1 and Pkcζ abundance as well as c-Fos, Il6 and Ncx1 mRNA expression, effects again blunted in Ampkα1-deficient mice. AAV9-mediated cardiac overexpression of constitutively active Ampkα1 increased Pkcζ protein abundance and the mRNA expression of c-Fos, Il6 and Ncx1 in cardiac tissue. In conclusion, Ampkα1 promotes myocardial AP-1 activation in a Pkcζ-dependent manner and thus contributes to cardiac stress signaling.

  8. Focal adhesion kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in chondrocyte activation by the 29-kDa amino-terminal fibronectin fragment.

    PubMed

    Gemba, Takefumi; Valbracht, Jean; Alsalameh, Saifeddin; Lotz, Martin

    2002-01-11

    The 29-kDa amino-terminal fibronectin fragment (FN-f) has a potent chondrolytic effect and is thought to be involved in cartilage degradation in arthritis. However, little is known about signal transduction pathways that are activated by FN-f. Here we demonstrated that FN-f induced nitric oxide (NO) production from human articular chondrocytes. Expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and NO production were observed at 6 and 48 h after FN-f treatment, respectively. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) mRNA up-regulation was stimulated by FN-f in human chondrocytes. To address the possibility that FN-f-induced NO release is mediated by IL-1beta production, the effect of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) was determined. IL-1ra partially inhibited FN-f-induced NO release although it almost completely inhibited IL-1beta-induced NO release. Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase was induced transiently by FN-f treatment. Blocking antibodies to alpha(5) or beta(1) integrin and Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptides did not inhibit FN-f-induced NO production. PP2, a Src family kinase inhibitor, or cytochalasin D, which selectively disrupts the network of actin filaments, inhibited both FAK phosphorylation and NO production induced by FN-f, but the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin had no effect. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) showed activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK. High concentrations of SB203580, which inhibit both JNK and p38 MAPK, and PD98059 a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2 that blocks ERK activation, inhibited FN-f induced NO production. These data suggest that focal adhesion kinase and MAPK mediate FN-f induced activation of human articular chondrocytes.

  9. EphB4 cellular kinase activity assayed using an enzymatic protein interaction system.

    PubMed

    Wehrman, Tom; Nguyen, Mimi; Feng, Wei; Bader, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are important players in various cellular processes, including proliferation, migration, metabolism, and neuronal development. EphB4 RTK is essential for the development of a functional arterial-venous network in embryonic and adult neoangiogenesis. To develop novel inhibitors of EphB4 that might have applications in severe diseases like cancer and retinopathies, assays need to be in place that resemble, in a most physiological fashion, the activation and downstream function of the kinase. In addition, such assays need to be amenable to high-throughput screening to serve efficiently the modern drug discovery processes in the pharmaceutical industry. The authors have developed an enzyme fragment complementation assay that measures the interaction of a downstream docking protein to the activated and phosphorylated full-length EphB4 kinase in cells. The assay is specific, robust, and amenable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. It covers most steps in the activation process of EphB4, including ligand binding, autophosphorylation, and docking of a downstream interactor. This assay format can be transferred to other RTKs and adds an important cell-based kinase assay option to researchers in the field.

  10. Activation of Protein Kinase C and Protein Kinase D in Human Natural Killer Cells: Effects of Tributyltin, Dibutyltin, and Tetrabromobisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the ability of target cells to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase D (PKD) (which is often a downstream target of PKC) has not been examined in natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. Here we examined whether exposure of human NK cells to lysis sensitive tumor cells activated PKC and PKD. The results of these studies show for the first time that activation of PKC and PKD occurs in response to target cell binding to NK cells. Exposure of NK cells to K562 tumor cells for 10 and 30 minutes increased phosphorylation/activation of both PKC and PKD by roughly 2 fold. Butyltins (tributyltin (TBT); dibutyltin (DBT)) and brominated compounds (tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)) are environmental contaminants that are found in human blood. Exposures of NK cells to TBT, DBT or TBBPA decrease NK cell lytic function in part by activating the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are part of the NK lytic pathway. We established that PKC and PKD are part of the lytic pathway upstream of MAPKs and thus we investigated whether DBT, TBT, and TBBPA exposures activated PKC and PKD. TBT activated PKC by 2–3 fold at 10 min at concentrations ranging from 50–300 nM while DBT caused a 1.3 fold activation at 2.5 μM at 10 min. Both TBT and DBT caused an approximately 2 fold increase in phosphorylation/activation of PKC. Exposures to TBBPA caused no statistically significant changes in either PKC or PKD activation. PMID:26228090

  11. Activation of protein kinase C and protein kinase D in human natural killer cells: effects of tributyltin, dibutyltin, and tetrabromobisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the ability of target cells to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase D (PKD) (which is often a downstream target of PKC) has not been examined in natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. Here we examined whether exposure of human NK cells to lysis sensitive tumor cells activated PKC and PKD. The results of these studies show for the first time that activation of PKC and PKD occurs in response to target cell binding to NK cells. Exposure of NK cells to K562 tumor cells for 10 and 30 min increased phosphorylation/activation of both PKC and PKD by roughly 2-fold. Butyltins (tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT)) and brominated compounds (tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)) are environmental contaminants that are found in human blood. Exposures of NK cells to TBT, DBT, or TBBPA decrease NK cell lytic function in part by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are part of the NK lytic pathway. We established that PKC and PKD are part of the lytic pathway upstream of MAPKs and thus we investigated whether DBT, TBT, and TBBPA exposures activated PKC and PKD. TBT-activated PKC by 2-3-folds at 10 min at concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 nM while DBT caused a 1.3-fold activation at 2.5 µM at 10 min. Both TBT and DBT caused an approximately 2-fold increase in phosphorylation/activation of PKC. Exposures to TBBPA caused no statistically significant changes in either PKC or PKD activation.

  12. Spermine signalling in tobacco: activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by spermine is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Berberich, Thomas; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Seo, Shigemi; Ohashi, Yuko; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2003-12-01

    Polyamines (PAs) play important roles in cell proliferation, growth and environmental stress responses of all living organisms. In this study, we examine whether these compounds act as signal mediators. Spermine (Spm) specifically activated protein kinases of tobacco leaves, which were identified as salicylic acid (SA)-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK), using specific antibodies. Upon Spm treatment, upregulation of WIPK, but not SIPK, was observed. Spm-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation and WIPK upregulation were prevented upon pre-treatment with antioxidants and Ca2+ channel blockers. Additionally, Spm specifically stimulated expression of the alternative oxidase (AOX) gene, which was disrupted by these antioxidants and Ca2+ channel blockers. Bongkrekic acid (BK), an inhibitor of the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) pores, suppressed MAPKs activation and accumulation of WIPK and AOX mRNA. Our data collectively suggest that Spm causes mitochondrial dysfunction via a signalling pathway in which reactive oxygen species and Ca2+ influx are involved. As a result, the phosphorylation activities of the two MAPK enzymes SIPK and WIPK are stimulated.

  13. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J.; Hastie, C. James; Lamont, Douglas J.; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  14. Functional Roles of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanyan; Yu, Tao; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a natural host defensive process that is largely regulated by macrophages during the innate immune response. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are proline-directed serine and threonine protein kinases that regulate many physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. p38 MAPKs are key MAPKs involved in the production of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). p38 MAPK signaling plays an essential role in regulating cellular processes, especially inflammation. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of p38 signaling in macrophage-mediated inflammation. In addition, we discuss the potential of using inhibitors targeting p38 expression in macrophages to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:24771982

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in signaling plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Zhang, Shuqun

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are ubiquitous signaling modules in eukaryotes. Early research of plant MAPKs has been focused on their functions in immunity and stress responses. Recent studies reveal that they also play essential roles in plant growth and development downstream of receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs). With only a limited number of MAPK components, multiple functional pathways initiated from different receptors often share the same MAPK components or even a complete MAPK cascade. In this review, we discuss how MAPK cascades function as molecular switches in response to spatiotemporal-specific ligand-receptor interactions and the availability of downstream substrates. In addition, we discuss other possible mechanisms governing the functional specificity of plant MAPK cascades, a question central to our understanding of MAPK functions.

  16. Metformin reduces airway inflammation and remodeling via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Sun; Bang, Bo-Ram; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Moon, Keun-Ai; Kim, Tae-Bum; Lee, Ki-Young; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2012-12-15

    Recent reports have suggested that metformin has anti-inflammatory and anti-tissue remodeling properties. We investigated the potential effect of metformin on airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma. The effect of metformin treatment on airway inflammation and pivotal characteristics of airway remodeling were examined in a murine model of chronic asthma generated by repetitive challenges with ovalbumin and fungal-associated allergenic protease. To investigate the underlying mechanism of metformin, oxidative stress levels and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation were assessed. To further elucidate the role of AMPK, we examined the effect of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR) as a specific activator of AMPK and employed AMPKα1-deficient mice as an asthma model. The role of metformin and AMPK in tissue fibrosis was evaluated using a bleomycin-induced acute lung injury model and in vitro experiments with cultured fibroblasts. Metformin suppressed eosinophilic inflammation and significantly reduced peribronchial fibrosis, smooth muscle layer thickness, and mucin secretion. Enhanced AMPK activation and decreased oxidative stress in lungs was found in metformin-treated asthmatic mice. Similar results were observed in the AICAR-treated group. In addition, the enhanced airway inflammation and fibrosis in heterozygous AMPKα1-deficient mice were induced by both allergen and bleomycin challenges. Fibronectin and collagen expression was diminished by metformin through AMPKα1 activation in cultured fibroblasts. Therefore metformin reduced both airway inflammation and remodeling at least partially through the induction of AMPK activation and decreased oxidative stress. These data provide insight into the beneficial role of metformin as a novel therapeutic drug for chronic asthma.

  17. Novel, potent and selective inhibitors of protein kinase C show oral anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Nixon, J S; Bishop, J; Bradshaw, D; Davis, P D; Hill, C H; Elliott, L H; Kumar, H; Lawton, G; Lewis, E J; Mulqueen, M

    1991-01-01

    Clarification of the precise role of protein kinase C (PKC) in cellular functional responses has been hampered by a lack of potent, selective inhibitors. The structural lead provided by staurosporine, a potent but non-selective protein kinase (PK) inhibitor, was used to derive a series of bis(indolyl)maleimides of which the most potent, Ro 31-8425 (I50: PKC = 8 nM) showed 350-fold selectivity for PKC over cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Ro 31-8425 antagonised cellular processes triggered by phorbol esters (potent, specific PKC activators) and inhibited the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, suggesting a role for PKC in T-cell activation. Methylation of the primary amine in Ro 31-8425 produced an analogue. Ro 31-8830 which, when administered orally, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of a phorbol ester-induced paw oedema in mice (minimum effective dose = 15 mg/kg). Ro 31-8830 also selectively inhibited the secondary inflammation in a developing adjuvant arthritis model in the rat. The results presented here suggest that these selective inhibitors of PKC may have therapeutic value in the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  18. Mitogen activated protein kinase 14-1 regulates serum glucocorticoid kinase 1 during seawater acclimation in Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Notch, Emily G; Chapline, Chris; Flynn, Erin; Lameyer, Tess; Lowell, Alyson; Sato, Denry; Shaw, Joseph R; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-08-01

    The Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is an environmental sentinel organism used extensively for studies of environmental toxicants and osmoregulation. Previous research in our laboratory has shown that acute acclimation to seawater is mediated by an increase in SGK1. SGK1 promotes the trafficking of CFTR chloride channels from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane of the gill within the first hour in seawater resulting in increased chloride secretion. Although we have shown that the increase in gill SGK1 does not require activation of the glucocorticoid receptor, the mechanisms that mediate the rise SGK1 during acute acclimation is unknown. To test the hypothesis that mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK14) is responsible for the rise in SGK1 we identified the coding sequence of killifish MAPK14-1 and designed a translational blocking vivo-morpholino targeting MAPK14-1. Injection of the MAPK14-1 vivo-morpholino resulted in a 30% reduction of MAPK14-1 and a 45% reduction in phosphorylated-MAPK14-1 protein in the gill of killifish transitioned from freshwater to seawater. Knock down of phosphorlyated-MAPK14-1 completely blocked the rise in SGK1 mRNA and protein in the killifish gill, providing the first direct and in vivo evidence that MAPK14-1 is necessary for acute seawater acclimation.

  19. Stimulation of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells by Dentin Matrix Protein 1 Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Sangeetha; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Eapen, Asha; George, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontitis can ultimately result in tooth loss. Many natural and synthetic materials have been tried to achieve periodontal regeneration, but the results remain variable and unpredictable. We hypothesized that exogenous treatment with dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) activates specific genes and results in phenotypic and functional changes in human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs). Methods hPDLSCs were isolated from extracted teeth and cultured in the presence or absence of DMP1. Quantitative polymerase chain reactions were performed to analyze the expression of several genes involved in periodontal regeneration. hPDLSCs were also processed for immunocytochemical and Western blot analysis using phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and ERK antibodies. Alkaline phosphatase and von Kossa staining were performed to characterize the differentiation of hPDLSCs into osteoblasts. Field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis of the treated and control cell cultures were also performed. Results Treatment with DMP1 resulted in the upregulation of genes, such as matrix metalloproteinase-2, alkaline phosphatase, and transforming growth factor β1. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and translocation of pERK from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was observed. Overall, DMP1-treated cells showed increased expression of alkaline phosphatase, increased matrix, and mineralized nodule formation when compared with untreated controls. Conclusion DMP1 can orchestrate a coordinated expression of genes and phenotypic changes in hPDLSCs by activation of the ERK signaling pathway, which may provide a valuable strategy for tissue engineering approaches in periodontal regeneration. PMID:22612367

  20. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Dunmyer, J; Herbert, B; Li, Q; Zinna, R; Martin, K; Yu, H; Kirkwood, K L

    2012-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative facultative capnophile involved in pathogenesis of aggressive forms of periodontal disease. In the present study, we interrogated the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to stimulate innate immune signaling and cytokine production and established that A. actinomycetemcomitans causes bone loss in a novel rat calvarial model. In vitro studies indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulated considerable production of soluble cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in both primary bone marrow-derived macrophages and NR8383 macrophages. Immunoblot analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans exhibits sustained activation of all major mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, as well as the negative regulator of MAPK signaling, MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), for at least 8 h. In a rat calvarial model of inflammatory bone loss, high and low doses of formalin-fixed A. actinomycetemcomitans were microinjected into the supraperiosteal calvarial space for 1-2 weeks. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography of rat calvariae revealed a significant increase of inflammatory and fibroblast infiltrate and increased bone resorption as measured by total lacunar pit formation. From these data, we provide new evidence that fixed whole cell A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation elicits a pro-inflammatory host response through sustained MAPK signaling, leading to enhanced bone resorption within the rat calvarial bone.

  1. Apelin-13 protects against apoptosis by activating AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in ischemia stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Zhang, Xiang-Jian; Li, Li-Tao; Cui, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Cong; Zhu, Chun-Hua; Miao, Jiang-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Apelin has been proved to be protective against apoptosis induced by ischemic reperfusion. However, mechanisms whereby apelin produces neuroprotection remain to be elucidated. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master energy sensor that monitors levels of key energy metabolites. It is activated via AMPKαThr172 phosphorylation during cerebral ischemia and appears to be neuroprotective. In this study, we investigated the effect of apelin on AMPKα and tested whether apelin protecting against apoptosis was associated with AMPK signals. Focal transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) model in male ICR mice was induced by 60 min of ischemia followed by reperfusion. Apelin-13 was injected intracerebroventricularly 15 min before reperfusion. AMPK inhibitor, compound C, was injected to mice intraperitoneally at the onset of ischemia. In experiment 1, the effect of apelin-13 on AMPKα was measured. In experiment 2, the relevance of AMPKα and apelin-13' effect on apoptosis was measured. Data showed that apelin-13 significantly increased AMPKα phosphorylation level after cerebral I/R. Apelin-13, with the co-administration of saline, reduced apoptosis cells, down-regulated Bax and cleaved-caspase3 and up-regulated Bcl2. However, with the co-administration of compound C, apelin-13 was inefficient in affecting apoptosis and Bax, Bcl2 and cleaved-caspase3. The study provided the evidence that apelin-13 up-regulated AMPKα phosphorylation level in cerebral ischemia insults and AMPK signals participated in the mechanism of apelin-mediated neuroprotection.

  2. Phosphoinositide-3-kinase and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathways mediate acute NGF sensitization of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiguo; Oxford, Gerry S

    2007-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces an acute sensitization of nociceptive DRG neurons, in part, through sensitization of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 via the high affinity trkA receptor. The mechanisms linking trkA and TRPV1 remain controversial with several candidate signaling pathways proposed. Utilizing adult rat and mouse DRG neurons and CHO cells co-expressing trkA and TRPV1, we have investigated the signaling events underlying acute TRPV1 sensitization by NGF combining biochemical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, mutational and genetic knockout approaches. Pharmacological interference with p42/p44 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) or phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), but not PLC abrogated sensitization of capsaicin responses. Co-expression of TRPV1 with wild-type or Y785F (PLC signal deficient) mutant human trkA reconstituted NGF sensitization. In contrast, TRPV1 co-expressed with MAPK signaling deficient Y490A or PI3K signaling deficient Y751F trkA mutants exhibited weaker sensitization. Biochemical analysis of p42/p44 and Akt phosphorylation confirmed the specificity of pharmacological agents and trkA mutants. Finally, NGF sensitization of capsaicin responses was greatly reduced in neurons from p85alpha (regulatory subunit of PI3K) null mice. These data strongly suggest that PI3K and MAPK pathways, but not the PLC pathway underlie the acute sensitization of TRPV1 by NGF.

  3. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K.; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  4. Botulinum Toxin Complex Increases Paracellular Permeability in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    MIYASHITA, Shin-ichiro; SAGANE, Yoshimasa; INUI, Ken; HAYASHI, Shintaro; MIYATA, Keita; SUZUKI, Tomonori; OHYAMA, Tohru; WATANABE, Toshihiro; NIWA, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum produces a large toxin complex (L-TC) that increases paracellular permeability in intestinal epithelial cells by a mechanism that remains unclear. Here, we show that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in this permeability increase. Paracellular permeability was measured by FITC-dextran flux through a monolayer of rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells, and MAPK activation was estimated from western blots. L-TC of C. botulinum serotype D strain 4947 increased paracellular dextran flux and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in IEC-6 cells. The permeability increase induced by L-TC was abrogated by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results indicate that L-TC increases paracellular permeability by activating p38, but not JNK and ERK. PMID:23884081

  5. Sensing of energy and nutrients by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Hardie, D Grahame

    2011-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor that exists in almost all eukaryotes. Genetic studies in lower eukaryotes suggest that the ancestral role of AMPK was in response to starvation for a carbon source and that AMPK is involved in life-span extension in response to caloric restriction. In mammals, AMPK is activated by an increasing cellular AMP:ATP ratio (which signifies a decrease in energy) caused by metabolic stresses that interfere with ATP production (eg, hypoxia) or that accelerate ATP consumption (eg, muscle contraction). Because glucose deprivation can increase the AMP:ATP ratio, AMPK can also act as a glucose sensor. AMPK activation occurs by a dual mechanism that involves allosteric activation and phosphorylation by upstream kinases. Once activated, AMPK switches on catabolic pathways that generate ATP (eg, the uptake and oxidation of glucose and fatty acids and mitochondrial biogenesis) while switching off ATP-consuming, anabolic pathways (eg, the synthesis of lipids, glucose, glycogen, and proteins). In addition to the acute effects via direct phosphorylation of metabolic enzymes, AMPK has longer-term effects by regulating transcription. These features make AMPK an ideal drug target in the treatment of metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The antidiabetic drug metformin (which is derived from an herbal remedy) works in part by activating AMPK, whereas many xenobiotics or "nutraceuticals," including resveratrol, quercetin, and berberine, are also AMPK activators. Most of these agents activate AMPK because they inhibit mitochondrial function.

  6. Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates S6 phosphorylation and induced activation of S6 protein kinase in rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, C.; Okabayashi, Y.; Williams, J.

    1987-05-01

    CCK and insulin stimulate pancreatic protein synthesis at a post transcriptional step. To better understand this regulation the authors evaluated the phosphorylation state of ribosomal protein S6 and the presence of a specific S6 protein kinase in pancreatic acini from diabetic rats. Both CCK and insulin increased S6 phosphorylation by up to 400% in intact TSP-labelled acini. The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate also stimulated both protein synthesis and S6 phosphorlyation suggesting a role for protein kinase C in mediating the effect of CCK. By contrast, the CaS ionophore ionomycin had no effect on either parameter. Recently, insulin has been shown to activate a unique S6 kinase in various cells. To test for its presence, cytosolic extracts were prepared from acini stimulated with CCK and insulin by homogenization in US -glycerophosphate buffer and assayed for the kinase using el-TSP ATP and rat pancreatic ribosomes followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. CCK and insulin both increased S6 kinase activity which required neither CaS or phospholipid. The dose response for CCk was similar to S6 phosphorlyation in the intact acini. TPA did not stimulate the S6 kinase. Thus, CCK may induce S6 phosphorylation both via C kinase and by activation of a unique S6 kinase.

  7. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  8. CUL3 and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Thibaud; Kleiss, Charlotte; Sumara, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational mechanisms drive fidelity of cellular processes. Phosphorylation and ubiquitination of substrates represent very common, covalent, posttranslational modifications and are often co-regulated. Phosphorylation may play a critical role both by directly regulating E3-ubiquitin ligases and/or by ensuring specificity of the ubiquitination substrate. Importantly, many kinases are not only critical regulatory components of these pathways but also represent themselves the direct ubiquitination substrates. Recent data suggest the role of CUL3-based ligases in both proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of protein kinases. Our own recent study identified the mitotic kinase PLK1 as a direct target of the CUL3 E3-ligase complex containing BTB-KELCH adaptor protein KLHL22.1 In this study, we aim at gaining mechanistic insights into CUL3-mediated regulation of the substrates, in particular protein kinases, by analyzing mechanisms of interaction between KLHL22 and PLK1. We find that kinase activity of PLK1 is redundant for its targeting for CUL3-ubiquitination. Moreover, CUL3/KLHL22 may contact 2 distinct motifs within PLK1 protein, consistent with the bivalent mode of substrate targeting found in other CUL3-based complexes. We discuss these findings in the context of the existing knowledge on other protein kinases and substrates targeted by CUL3-based E3-ligases. PMID:24067371

  9. Mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 modulates photic entrainment of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Butcher, Greg Q; Karelina, Kate; Arthur, J Simon; Obrietan, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The master circadian clock in mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is under the entraining influence of the external light cycle. At a mechanistic level, intracellular signaling via the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway appears to play a central role in light-evoked clock entrainment; however, the precise downstream mechanisms by which this pathway influences clock timing are not known. Within this context, we have previously reported that light stimulates activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase effector mitogen-stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) in the SCN. In this study, we utilised MSK1(-/-) mice to further investigate the potential role of MSK1 in circadian clock timing and entrainment. Locomotor activity analysis revealed that MSK1 null mice entrained to a 12 h light/dark cycle and exhibited circadian free-running rhythms in constant darkness. Interestingly, the free-running period in MSK1 null mice was significantly longer than in wild-type control animals, and MSK1 null mice exhibited a significantly greater variance in activity onset. Further, MSK1 null mice exhibited a significant reduction in the phase-delaying response to an early night light pulse (100 lux, 15 min), and, using an 8 h phase-advancing 'jet-lag' experimental paradigm, MSK1 knockout animals exhibited a significantly delayed rate of re-entrainment. At the molecular level, early night light-evoked cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, histone phosphorylation and Period1 gene expression were markedly attenuated in MSK1(-/-) animals relative to wild-type mice. Together, these data provide key new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which MSK1 affects the SCN clock.

  10. Evidence for a role of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/mitogen-activated protein kinase in the development of testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Antonuccio, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo; Nicòtina, Piero Antonio; Bitto, Alessandra; Arena, Salvatore; Polito, Francesca; Altavilla, Domenica; Turiaco, Nunzio; Cutrupi, Antonio; Zuccarello, Biagio; Squadrito, Francesco

    2005-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 3/MAPK1 (also known as ERK1/ERK2) plays an important role in the signal transduction pathways. To our knowledge, however, its role in the development of testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury has not yet been investigated. Therefore, we studied the pattern of MAPK3/MAPK1 activation in a experimental model of testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury. We also investigated MAPK8 to understand whether an association exists between these two MAPKs. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 1 h of testicular ischemia followed by 24 h of reperfusion or to a sham testicular ischemia-reperfusion. Animals were randomized to receive PD98059, which is an inhibitor of MAPK3/MAPK1 (10 mg/kg i.p. administered immediately after detorsion), or its vehicle. The time course of MAPK3/MAPK1, MAPK8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF; also known as TNF alpha) expression and a histological examination in both the ischemic-reperfused testis and the contralateral one were performed. In both testes, MAPK3/MAPK1 and MAPK8 expression appeared following 10 min of reperfusion and reached their highest activation after 30 min. The MAPK levels slowly decreased, and no significant expression of either kinase was observed following 2 h of reperfusion. Expression of TNF was evident after 1 h of reperfusion and reached its maximum increase after 3 h. PD98059 blunted MAPK3/MAPK1 and MAPK8, reduced TNF expression, and improved the testicular damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury in both testes. These data emphasize that MAPK3/MAPK1 has a role in testicular damage and that its blockade might have a future therapeutic role for the management of patients with unilateral testicular torsion.

  11. Roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in the regulation of protein kinase C-alpha activation in interferon-gamma-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Diallo, Tamsir O; Matte, Christine; Descoteaux, Albert

    2009-09-01

    Members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family are activated by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and modulate IFN-gamma-induced cellular responses by regulating the activity of transcription factors. We previously reported that PKC-alpha enhances the ability of IFN regulatory factor-1 to transactivate the class II transactivator (CIITA) promoter IV in IFN-gamma-stimulated macrophages. In addition, we showed that IFN-gamma induces the nuclear translocation of PKC-alpha but the mechanisms for this remain to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to identify signalling pathways involved in IFN-gamma-induced activation of PKC-alpha and to characterize their potential roles in modulating IFN-gamma-induced responses in macrophages. IFN-gamma-mediated nuclear translocation of PKC-alpha was a Janus activated kinase 2 (JAK2)-independent process, which required phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). However, PKC-alpha phosphorylation was independent of PI3K and p38 MAPK, indicating that IFN-gamma-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of PKC-alpha are mediated by distinct mechanisms. In addition, inhibition of PI3K, but not of p38 MAPK, strongly impaired IFN-gamma-induced CIITA and MHC II gene expression. Finally, PKC-alpha associated with signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and was required for the phosphorylation of STAT1 on serine 727 in IFN-gamma-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, our data indicate that PI3K and p38 MAPK modulate IFN-gamma-stimulated PKC-alpha nuclear translocation independently of JAK2 activity and that both PI3K and PKC-alpha are required for type IV CIITA and MHC II gene expression in IFN-gamma-stimulated macrophages.

  12. Secretin induces neurite outgrowth of PC12 through cAMP-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Soo; Yumkham, Sanatombi; Kim, Sun-Hee; Yea, Kyungmoo; Shin, You Chan; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2006-02-28

    The gastrointestinal functions of secretin have been fairly well established. However, its function and mode of action within the nervous system remain largely unclear. To gain insight into this area, we have attempted to determine the effects of secretin on neuronal differentiation. Here, we report that secretin induces the generation of neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. The expressions of Tau and beta-tubulin, neuronal differentiation markers, are increased upon secretin stimulation. In addition, secretin induces sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and also stimulates the cAMP secretion. Moreover, the neurite outgrowth elicited by secretin is suppressed to a marked degree in the presence of either PD98059, a specific MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor, or H89, a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that secretin induces neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells through cAMP- MAPK pathway, and provide a novel insight into the manner in which secretin participates in neuritogenesis.

  13. Protein kinase A activation of the surfactant protein B gene is mediated by phosphorylation of thyroid transcription factor 1.

    PubMed

    Yan, C; Whitsett, J A

    1997-07-11

    Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) is a homeodomain-containing nuclear transcription factor expressed in epithelial cells of the lung and thyroid. TTF-1 binds to and activates the transcription of genes expressed selectively in the respiratory epithelium including pulmonary surfactant A, B, C and Clara cell secretory protein. Transfection with a plasmid encoding the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A; PKA) catalytic subunit, Cat-beta, stimulated the phosphorylation of a TTF-1-flag fusion protein 6-7-fold in H441 pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells. Recombinant TTF-1 was phosphorylated by purified PKA catalytic subunit in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP. PKA catalytic subunit family members, Cat-alpha and Cat-beta, markedly enhanced the transcriptional activation of surfactant B gene promoters by TTF-1 in vitro. Peptide mapping was used to identify a PKA phosphorylation site at the NH2 terminus of TTF-1. A 17-amino acid synthetic peptide comprising this site completely inhibited the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of TTF-1 in vitro. A substitution mutation of TTF-1 (Thr9 two head right arrow Ala) abolished phosphorylation by PKA and reduced transactivation of the surfactant B gene promoter. Transfection with a plasmid encoding the cAMP regulatory element binding factor inhibited transcriptional activity of the surfactant protein B gene promoter. Phosphorylation of TTF-1 mediates PKA-dependent activation of surfactant protein B gene transcription.

  14. Decoding the Interactions Regulating the Active State Mechanics of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Meharena, Hiruy S.; Fan, Xiaorui; Ahuja, Lalima G.; Keshwani, Malik M.; McClendon, Christopher L.; Chen, Angela M.; Adams, Joseph A.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases regulate most cellular functions by phosphorylating targeted protein substrates through a highly conserved catalytic core. In the active state, the catalytic core oscillates between open, intermediate, and closed conformations. Currently, the intramolecular interactions that regulate the active state mechanics are not well understood. Here, using cAMP-dependent protein kinase as a representative model coupled with biochemical, biophysical, and computational techniques, we define a set of highly conserved electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions working harmoniously to regulate these mechanics. These include the previously identified salt bridge between a lysine from the β3-strand and a glutamate from the αC-helix as well as an electrostatic interaction between the phosphorylated activation loop and αC-helix and an ensemble of hydrophobic residues of the Regulatory spine and Shell. Moreover, for over three decades it was thought that the highly conserved β3-lysine was essential for phosphoryl transfer, but our findings show that the β3-lysine is not required for phosphoryl transfer but is essential for the active state mechanics. PMID:27902690

  15. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase in human cells by the mycotoxin patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.-S.; Yu, F.-Y.; Su, C.-C.; Kan, J.-C.; Chung, C.-P.; Liu, B.-H. . E-mail: bingliu@csmu.edu.tw

    2005-09-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by certain species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, is often detectable in moldy fruits and their derivative products. PAT led to a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Exposure of HEK293 cells to concentrations above 5 {mu}M PAT for 30 min induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation; activation of ERK1/2 was also observed after 24 h incubation with 0.05 {mu}M of PAT. Treatment of human PBMCs for 30 min with 30 {mu}M PAT dramatically increased the phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Both MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suppressed ERK1/2 activation in either HEK293 or MDCK cells. In HEK293 cells, U0126-mediated inhibition of PAT-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulted in a significant decrease in levels of DNA damage, expressed as tail moment values, in the single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Conversely, U0126 did not affect cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the DNA synthesis rate in PAT-treated cultures. Exposure of HEK293 cells for 90 min to 15 {mu}M PAT elevated the levels of early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) mRNA, but not of c-fos, fosB, and junB mRNAs. These results indicate that in human cells, PAT causes a rapid and persistent activation of ERK1/2 and this signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating PAT-induced DNA damage and egr-1 gene expression.

  16. p38delta Mitogen-activated protein kinase is essential for skin tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Eva M; Hindes, Anna; Gribben, Erin L; Burns, Carole J; Yin, Yan; Lin, Meei-Hua; Owen, Robert J; Longmore, Gregory D; Kissling, Grace E; Arthur, J Simon C; Efimova, Tatiana

    2009-06-01

    Activating Ras mutations occur in a large portion of human tumors. Yet, the signaling pathways involved in Ras-induced tumor formation remain incompletely understood. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are among the best studied Ras effector pathways. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase isoforms are important regulators of key biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, inflammation, senescence, and tumorigenesis. However, the specific in vivo contribution of individual p38 isoforms to skin tumor development has not been elucidated. Recent studies have shown that p38delta, a p38 family member, functions as an important regulator of epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and survival. In the present study, we have assessed the effect of p38delta deficiency on skin tumor development in vivo by subjecting p38delta knockout mice to a two-stage 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate chemical skin carcinogenesis protocol. We report that mice lacking p38delta gene exhibited a marked resistance to development of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced skin papillomas, with increased latency and greatly reduced incidence, multiplicity, and size of tumors compared with wild-type mice. Our data suggest that the underlying mechanism for reduced susceptibility to skin carcinogenesis in p38delta-null mice involves a defect in proliferative response associated with aberrant signaling through the two major transformation-promoting pathways: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-activator protein 1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. These findings strongly suggest an in vivo role for p38delta in promoting cell proliferation and tumor development in epidermis and may have therapeutic implication for skin cancer.

  17. Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Sty1 in Regulation of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α Kinases in Response to Environmental Stress in Schizosaccharomyces pombe▿

    PubMed Central

    Berlanga, Juan José; Rivero, Damariz; Martín, Ruth; Herrero, Saturnino; Moreno, Sergio; de Haro, César

    2010-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Sty1 is essential for the regulation of transcriptional responses that promote cell survival in response to different types of environmental stimuli in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In fission yeast, three distinct eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) kinases, two mammalian HRI-related protein kinases (Hri1 and Hri2) and the Gcn2 ortholog, regulate protein synthesis in response to cellular stress conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that both Hri1 and Hri2 exhibited an autokinase activity, specifically phosphorylated eIF2α, and functionally replaced the endogenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gcn2. We further show that Gcn2, but not Hri1 or Hri2, is activated early after exposure to hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Cells lacking Gcn2 exhibit a later activation of Hri2. The activated MAPK Sty1 negatively regulates Gcn2 and Hri2 activities under oxidative stress but not in response to MMS. In contrast, Hri2 is the primary activated eIF2α kinase in response to heat shock. In this case, the activation of Sty1 appears to be transitory and does not contribute to the modulation of the eIF2α kinase stress pathway. In strains lacking Hri2, a type 2A protein phosphatase is activated soon after heat shock to reduce eIF2α phosphorylation. Finally, the MAPK Sty1, but not the eIF2α kinases, is essential for survival upon oxidative stress or heat shock, but not upon MMS treatment. These findings point to a regulatory coordination between the Sty1 MAPK and eIF2α kinase pathways for a particular range of stress responses. PMID:19880757

  18. A Gammaherpesvirus Complement Regulatory Protein Promotes Initiation of Infection by Activation of Protein Kinase Akt/PKB

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Beatrix; Adler, Barbara; Jonjic, Stipan; Stewart, James P.; Adler, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Background Viruses have evolved to evade the host's complement system. The open reading frames 4 (ORF4) of gammaherpesviruses encode homologs of regulators of complement activation (RCA) proteins, which inhibit complement activation at the level of C3 and C4 deposition. Besides complement regulation, these proteins are involved in heparan sulfate and glycosaminoglycan binding, and in case of MHV-68, also in viral DNA synthesis in macrophages. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we made use of MHV-68 to study the role of ORF4 during infection of fibroblasts. While attachment and penetration of virions lacking the RCA protein were not affected, we observed a delayed delivery of the viral genome to the nucleus of infected cells. Analysis of the phosphorylation status of a variety of kinases revealed a significant reduction in phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt in cells infected with ORF4 mutant virus, when compared to cells infected with wt virus. Consistent with a role of Akt activation in initial stages of infection, inhibition of Akt signaling in wt virus infected cells resulted in a phenotype resembling the phenotype of the ORF4 mutant virus, and activation of Akt by addition of insulin partially reversed the phenotype of the ORF4 mutant virus. Importantly, the homologous ORF4 of KSHV was able to rescue the phenotype of the MHV-68 ORF4 mutant, indicating that ORF4 is functionally conserved and that ORF4 of KSHV might have a similar function in infection initiation. Conclusions/Significance In summary, our studies demonstrate that ORF4 contributes to efficient infection by activation of the protein kinase Akt and thus reveal a novel function of a gammaherpesvirus RCA protein. PMID:20657771

  19. Activin A induces skeletal muscle catabolism via p38β mitogen‐activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Zhang, Guohua; Sin, Ka Wai Thomas; Liu, Zhelong; Lin, Ren‐Kuo; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Activation of type IIB activin receptor (ActRIIB) in skeletal muscle leads to muscle atrophy because of increased muscle protein degradation. However, the intracellular signalling mechanism that mediates ActRIIB‐activated muscle catabolism is poorly defined. Methods We investigated the role of p38β mitogen‐activated protein kinases (MAPK) in mediating ActRIIB ligand activin A‐activated muscle catabolic pathways in C2C12 myotubes and in mice with perturbation of this kinase pharmacologically and genetically. Results Treatment of C2C12 myotubes with activin A or myostatin rapidly activated p38 MAPK and its effector C/EBPβ within 1 h. Paradoxically, Akt was activated at the same time through a p38 MAPK‐independent mechanism. These events were followed by up‐regulation of ubiquitin ligases atrogin1 (MAFbx) and UBR2 (E3α‐II), as well as increase in LC3‐II, a marker of autophagosome formation, leading to myofibrillar protein loss and myotube atrophy. The catabolic effects of activin A were abolished by p38α/β MAPK inhibitor SB202190. Using small interfering RNA‐mediated gene knockdown, we found that the catabolic activity of activin A was dependent on p38β MAPK specifically. Importantly, systemic administration of activin A to mice similarly activated the catabolic pathways in vivo, and this effect was blocked by SB202190. Further, activin A failed to activate the catabolic pathways in mice with muscle‐specific knockout of p38β MAPK. Interestingly, activin A up‐regulated MuRF1 in a p38 MAPK‐independent manner, and MuRF1 did not appear responsible for activin A‐induced myosin heavy chain loss and muscle atrophy. Conclusions ActRIIB‐mediated activation of muscle catabolism is dependent on p38β MAPK‐activated signalling. PMID:27897407

  20. Small-molecule FRET probes for protein kinase activity monitoring in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vaasa, Angela; Lust, Marje; Terrin, Anna; Uri, Asko; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2010-07-09

    In this study, the applicability of fluorescently labeled adenosine analogue-oligoarginine conjugates (ARC-Photo probes) for monitoring of protein kinase A (PKA) activity in living cells was demonstrated. ARC-Photo probes possessing subnanomolar affinity towards the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) and competitive with the regulatory subunit (PKAr), penetrate cell plasma membrane and associate with PKAc fused with yellow fluorescent protein (PKAc-YFP). Detection of inter-molecular Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency between the fluorophores of the fusion protein and ARC-Photo probe can be used for both the evaluation of non-labeled inhibitors of PKAc and for monitoring of cAMP signaling via detection of changes in the activity of PKA as a cAMP downstream effector.

  1. Unfolded protein response activates glycogen synthase kinase-3 via selective lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Nijholt, Diana A T; Nölle, Anna; van Haastert, Elise S; Edelijn, Hessel; Toonen, Ruud F; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; Scheper, Wiep

    2013-07-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response that is activated upon disturbed homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In Alzheimer's disease, as well as in other tauopathies, the UPR is activated in neurons that contain early tau pathology. A recent genome-wide association study identified genetic variation in a UPR transducer as a risk factor for tauopathy, supporting a functional connection between UPR activation and tau pathology. Here we show that UPR activation increases the activity of the major tau kinase glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 in vitro via a selective removal of inactive GSK-3 phosphorylated at Ser(21/9). We demonstrate that this is mediated by the autophagy/lysosomal pathway. In brain tissue from patients with different tauopathies, lysosomal accumulations of pSer(21/9) GSK-3 are found in neurons with markers for UPR activation. Our data indicate that UPR activation increases the activity of GSK-3 by a novel mechanism, the lysosomal degradation of the inactive pSer(21/9) GSK-3. This may provide a functional explanation for the close association between UPR activation and early tau pathology in neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Sertraline, an antidepressant, induces apoptosis in hepatic cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Xuan, Jiekun; Wan, Liqing; Lin, Haixia; Couch, Letha; Mei, Nan; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei

    2014-02-01

    Sertraline is generally used for the treatment of depression and is also approved for the treatment of panic, obsessive-compulsive, and posttraumatic stress disorders. Previously, using rat primary hepatocytes and isolated mitochondria, we demonstrated that sertraline caused hepatic cytotoxicity and mitochondrial impairment. In the current study, we investigated and characterized molecular mechanisms of sertraline toxicity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Sertraline decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sertraline activated the intrinsic checkpoint protein caspase-9 and caused the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol; this process was Bcl-2 family dependent because antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins were decreased. Pretreatment of the HepG2 cells with caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 inhibitors partially but significantly reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase, indicating that sertraline-induced apoptosis is mediated by both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Moreover, sertraline markedly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the phosphorylation of JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), and p38. In sertraline-treated cells, the induction of apoptosis and cell death was shown to be the result of activation of JNK, but not ERK1/2 or p38 in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Furthermore, silencing MAP4K4, the upstream kinase of JNK, attenuated both apoptosis and cell death caused by sertraline. Taken together, our findings suggest that sertraline induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells at least partially via activation of the TNF-MAP4K4-JNK cascade signaling pathway.

  3. Expression of proteins and protein kinase activity during germination of aerial spores of Streptomyces granaticolor.

    PubMed

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Bezousková, Silvia; Benada, Oldrich; Kofronová, Olga

    2002-11-29

    Dormant aerial spores of Streptomyces granaticolor contain pre-existing pool of mRNA and active ribosomes for rapid translation of proteins required for earlier steps of germination. Activated spores were labeled for 30 min with [35S]methionine/cysteine in the presence or absence of rifamycin (400 microg/ml) and resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis. About 320 proteins were synthesized during the first 30 min of cultivation at the beginning of swelling, before the first DNA replication. Results from nine different experiments performed in the presence of rifamycin revealed 15 protein spots. Transition from dormant spores to swollen spores is not affected by the presence of rifamycin but further development of spores is stopped. To support existence of pre-existing pool of mRNA in spores, cell-free extract of spores (S30 fraction) was used for in vitro protein synthesis. These results indicate that RNA of spores possesses mRNA functionally competent and provides templates for protein synthesis. Cell-free extracts isolated from spores, activated spores, and during spore germination were further examined for in vitro protein phosphorylation. The analyses show that preparation from dormant spores catalyzes phosphorylation of only seven proteins. In the absence of phosphatase inhibitors, several proteins were partially dephosphorylated. The activation of spores leads to a reduction in phosphorylation activity. Results from in vitro phosphorylation reaction indicate that during germination phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of proteins is a complex function of developmental changes.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  5. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolution, and Co-expression Network Analysis of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinases in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kewei; Liu, Fuyan; Zou, Jinwei; Xing, Guangwei; Deng, Pingchuan; Song, Weining; Tong, Wei; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are the conserved and universal signal transduction modules in all eukaryotes, which play the vital roles in plant growth, development, and in response to multiple stresses. In this study, we used bioinformatics methods to identify 86 MAPKKK protein encoded by 73 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKKK family from Arabidopsis, rice, and Brachypodium has classified them into three subfamilies, of which 28 belonged to MEKK, 52 to Raf, and 6 to ZIK subfamily, respectively. Conserved protein motif, exon-intron organization, and splicing intron phase in kinase domains supported the evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis. And gene duplication analysis suggested the chromosomal segment duplication happened before the divergence of the rice and Brachypodium, while all of three tandem duplicated gene pairs happened after their divergence. We further demonstrated that the MAPKKKs have evolved under strong purifying selection, implying the conservation of them. The splicing transcripts expression analysis showed that the splicesome translating longest protein tended to be adopted. Furthermore, the expression analysis of BdMAPKKKs in different organs and development stages as well as heat, virus and drought stresses revealed that the MAPKKK genes were involved in various signaling pathways. And the circadian analysis suggested there were 41 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium showing cycled expression in at least one condition, of which seven MAPKKK genes expressed in all conditions and the promoter analysis indicated these genes possessed many cis-acting regulatory elements involved in circadian and light response. Finally, the co-expression network of MAPK, MAPKK, and MAPKKK in Brachypodium was constructed using 144 microarray and RNA-seq datasets, and ten potential MAPK cascades pathway were predicted. To conclude, our study provided the important information for evolutionary and

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase: a target for drugs both ancient and modern.

    PubMed

    Hardie, D Grahame; Ross, Fiona A; Hawley, Simon A

    2012-10-26

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status. It is activated, by a mechanism requiring the tumor suppressor LKB1, by metabolic stresses that increase cellular ADP:ATP and/or AMP:ATP ratios. Once activated, it switches on catabolic pathways that generate ATP, while switching off biosynthetic pathways and cell-cycle progress. These effects suggest that AMPK activators might be useful for treatment and/or prevention of type 2 diabetes and cancer. Indeed, AMPK is activated by the drugs metformin and salicylate, the latter being the major breakdown product of aspirin. Metformin is widely used to treat diabetes, while there is epidemiological evidence that both metformin and aspirin provide protection against cancer. We review the mechanisms of AMPK activation by these and other drugs, and by natural products derived from traditional herbal medicines.

  7. The activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst by anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA) from patients with systemic vasculitis requires tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C activation

    PubMed Central

    Radford, D J; Lord, J M; Savage, C O S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) from patients with systemic vasculitis to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and tyrosine kinases was examined in human neutrophils. Using the superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome C, the kinetics of ANCA-induced superoxide (O2−) production were characterized and subsequently manipulated by specific inhibitors of PKC and tyrosine kinases. With this approach, ANCA IgG, but not normal IgG or ANCA F(ab′)2 fragments caused a time and dose dependent release of O2− from TNF-α primed neutrophils. The kinetics of ANCA-induced O2− production showed an initial 10–15 min lag phase compared to the N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine response, suggesting differences in the signalling pathways recruited by these two stimuli. Inhibitor studies revealed that ANCA-activation involved members of both the Ca2+-dependent and -independent PKC isoforms and also tyrosine kinases. ANCA IgG resulted in the translocation of the βII isoform of PKC at a time corresponding to the end of the lag phase of O2− production, suggesting that PKC activity may be instrumental in processes regulating the activity of the NADPH oxidase in response to ANCA. Tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins also peaked 10–15 min after stimulation with ANCA but not normal IgG. These data suggest that PKC and tyrosine kinases regulate O2− production from neutrophils stimulated with autoantibodies from patients with systemic vasculitis. PMID:10540175

  8. Reciprocal regulation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatase-3

    SciTech Connect

    Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Mauro, Laura J.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2008-11-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) is a putative tumor suppressor. When transiently overexpressed, MKP-3 dephosphorylates and inactivates extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Little is known about the roles of endogenous MKP-3, however. We previously showed that MKP-3 is upregulated in cell lines that express oncogenic Ras. Here we tested the roles of endogenous MKP-3 in modulating ERK1/2 under conditions of chronic stimulation of the Ras/Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 pathway by expression of oncogenic Ras. We used two cell lines: H-ras MCF10A, breast epithelial cells engineered to express H-Ras, and DLD-1, colon cancer cells that express endogenous Ki-Ras. First, we found that MKP-3 acts in a negative feedback loop to suppress basal ERK1/2 when oncogenic Ras stimulates the Ras/Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 cascade. ERK1/2 was required to maintain elevated MKP-3, indicative of a negative feedback loop. Accordingly, knockdown of MKP-3, via siRNA, increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Second, by using siRNA, we found that MKP-3 helps establish the sensitivity of ERK1/2 to extracellular activators by limiting the duration of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Third, we found that the regulation of ERK1/2 by MKP-3 is countered by the complex regulation of MKP-3 by ERK1/2. Potent ERK1/2 activators stimulated the loss of MKP-3 within 30 min due to an ERK1/2-dependent decrease in MKP-3 protein stability. MKP-3 levels recovered within 120 min due to ERK1/2-dependent resynthesis. Preventing MKP-3 resynthesis, via siRNA, prolonged ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Altogether, these results suggest that under the pressure of oncogenic Ras expression, MKP-3 reins in ERK1/2 by serving in ERK1/2-dependent negative feedback pathways.

  9. Control of thrombopoietin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Rouyez, M C; Boucheron, C; Gisselbrecht, S; Dusanter-Fourt, I; Porteu, F

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the major regulator of both growth and differentiation of megakaryocytes. We previously showed that both functions can be generated by TPO in the megakaryoblastic cell line UT7, in which murine Mpl was introduced, and are independently controlled by distinct regions of the cytoplasmic domain of Mpl. Particularly, residues 71 to 94 of this domain (deleted in the mutant mpl delta3) were found to be required for megakaryocytic maturation but dispensable for proliferation. We show here that TPO-induced differentiation in UT7 cells is tightly dependent on a strong, long-lasting activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Indeed, (i) in UT7-mpl cells, TPO induced a strong activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) which was persistent until at least 4 days in TPO-containing medium; (ii) a specific MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitor inhibited TPO-induced megakaryocytic gene expression; (iii) the Mpl mutant mpl delta3, which displayed no maturation activity, transduced only a weak and transient ERK activation in UT7 cells; and (iv) TPO-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in UT7-mpl delta3 cells was partially restored by expression of a constitutively activated mutant of MEK. The capacity of TPO to trigger a strong and prolonged MAPK signal depended on the cell in which Mpl was introduced. In BAF3-mpl cells, TPO triggered a weak and transient ERK activation, similar to that induced in UT7-mpl delta3 cells. In these cells, no difference in MAPK activation was found between normal Mpl and mpl delta3. Thus, depending on the cellular context, several distinct regions of the cytoplasmic domain of Mpl and signaling pathways may contribute to generate quantitative variations in MAPK activation. PMID:9271377

  10. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits high glucose-induced matrix protein synthesis by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak Joo; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Feliers, Denis; Cavaglieri, Rita C; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Abboud, Hanna E; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogen sulfide, a signaling gas, affects several cell functions. We hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide modulates high glucose (30 mm) stimulation of matrix protein synthesis in glomerular epithelial cells. High glucose stimulation of global protein synthesis, cellular hypertrophy, and matrix laminin and type IV collagen content was inhibited by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an H(2)S donor. High glucose activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), shown by phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, was inhibited by NaHS. High glucose stimulated mTORC1 to promote key events in the initiation and elongation phases of mRNA translation: binding of eIF4A to eIF4G, reduction in PDCD4 expression and inhibition of its binding to eIF4A, eEF2 kinase phosphorylation, and dephosphorylation of eEF2; these events were inhibited by NaHS. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, was examined. NaHS dose-dependently stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and restored AMPK phosphorylation reduced by high glucose. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, abolished NaHS modulation of high glucose effect on events in mRNA translation as well as global and matrix protein synthesis. NaHS induction of AMPK phosphorylation was inhibited by siRNA for calmodulin kinase kinase β, but not LKB1, upstream kinases for AMPK; STO-609, a calmodulin kinase kinase β inhibitor, had the same effect. Renal cortical content of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, hydrogen sulfide-generating enzymes, was significantly reduced in mice with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, coinciding with renal hypertrophy and matrix accumulation. Hydrogen sulfide is a newly identified modulator of protein synthesis in the kidney, and reduction in its generation may contribute to kidney injury in diabetes.

  11. Crystal Structures of the Adenylate Sensor from Fission Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Townley,R.; Shapiro, L.

    2007-01-01

    The 5'-AMP (adenosine monophosphate)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) coordinates metabolic function with energy availability by responding to changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP levels. Here we report crystal structures at 2.6 and 2.9 Angstrom resolution for ATP- and AMP-bound forms of a core {alpha}{beta}{gamma} adenylate-binding domain from the fission yeast AMPK homologue. ATP and AMP bind competitively to a single site in the {gamma} subunit, with their respective phosphate groups positioned near function-impairing mutants. Surprisingly, ATP binds without counter ions, amplifying its electrostatic effects on a critical regulatory region where all three subunits converge.

  12. Structure of protein O-mannose kinase reveals a unique active site architecture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinyu; Venzke, David; Walimbe, Ameya S; Anderson, Mary E; Fu, Qiuyu; Kinch, Lisa N; Wang, Wei; Chen, Xing; Grishin, Nick V; Huang, Niu; Yu, Liping; Dixon, Jack E; Campbell, Kevin P; Xiao, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    The ‘pseudokinase’ SgK196 is a protein O-mannose kinase (POMK) that catalyzes an essential phosphorylation step during biosynthesis of the laminin-binding glycan on α-dystroglycan. However, the catalytic mechanism underlying this activity remains elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of Danio rerio POMK in complex with Mg2+ ions, ADP, aluminum fluoride, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man trisaccharide substrate, thereby providing a snapshot of the catalytic transition state of this unusual kinase. The active site of POMK is established by residues located in non-canonical positions and is stabilized by a disulfide bridge. GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man is recognized by a surface groove, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc moiety mediates the majority of interactions with POMK. Expression of various POMK mutants in POMK knockout cells further validated the functional requirements of critical residues. Our results provide important insights into the ability of POMK to function specifically as a glycan kinase, and highlight the structural diversity of the human kinome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22238.001 PMID:27879205

  13. Cadmium induces apoptosis in primary rat osteoblasts through caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dai, Nannan; Gu, Jianhong; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Xuezhong; Bian, Jianchun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to cadmium (Cd) induces apoptosis in osteoblasts (OBs); however, little information is available regarding the specific mechanisms of Cd-induced primary rat OB apoptosis. In this study, Cd reduced cell viability, damaged cell membranes and induced apoptosis in OBs. We observed decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potentials, ultrastructure collapse, enhanced caspase-3 activity, and increased concentrations of cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3 following Cd treatment. Cd also increased the phosphorylation of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in OBs. Pretreatment with the caspase inhibitor, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone, ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126), p38 inhibitor (SB203580) and JNK inhibitor (SP600125) abrogated Cd-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, Cd-treated OBs exhibited signs of oxidative stress protection, including increased antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase levels and decreased formation of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, the results of our study clarified that Cd has direct cytotoxic effects on OBs, which are mediated by caspase- and MAPK pathways in Cd-induced apoptosis of OBs. PMID:26425111

  14. Stimulation of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis, protein kinase C translocation, and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity by bradykinin in rat ventricular myocytes: dissociation from the hypertrophic response.

    PubMed Central

    Clerk, A; Gillespie-Brown, J; Fuller, S J; Sugden, P H

    1996-01-01

    In ventricular myocytes cultured from neonatal rat hearts, bradykinin (BK), kallidin or BK(1-8) [(Des-Arg9)BK] stimulated PtdinsP2 hydrolysis by 3-4-fold. EC50 values were 6 nM (BK), 2 nM (kallidin), and 14 microM [BK(1-8)]. BK or kallidin stimulated the rapid (less than 30 s) translocation of more than 80% of the novel protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms nPKC-delta and nPKC-epsilon from the soluble to the particulate fraction. EC50 values for nPKC-delta translocation by BK or kallidin were 10 and 2 nM respectively. EC50 values for nPKC-epsilon translocation by BK or kallidin were 2 and 0.6 nM respectively. EC50 values for the translocation of nPKC-delta and nPKC-epsilon by BK(1-8) were more than 5 microM. The classical PKC, cPKC-alpha, and the atypical PKC, nPKC-zeta, did not translocate. BK caused activation and phosphorylation of p42-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (maximal at 3-5 min, 30-35% of p42-MAPK phosphorylated). p44-MAPK was similarly activated. EC50 values for p42/p44-MAPK activation by BK were less than 1 nM whereas values for BK(1-8) were more than 10 microM. The order of potency [BK approximately equal to kallidin >> BK (1-8)] for the stimulation of PtdInsP2 hydrolysis, nPKC-delta and nPKC-epsilon translocation, and p42/p44-MAPK activities suggests involvement of the B2 BK receptor subtype. In addition, stimulation of all three processes by BK was inhibited by the B2BK receptor-selective antagonist HOE140 but not by the B1-selective antagonist Leu8BK(1-8). Exposure of cells to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate for 24 h inhibited subsequent activation of p42/p44-MAPK by BK suggesting participation of nPKC (and possibly cPKC) isoforms in the activation process. Thus, like hypertrophic agents such as endothelin-1 (ET-1) and phenylephrine (PE), BK activates PtdInsP2 hydrolysis, translocates nPKC-delta, and nPKC-epsilon, and activates p42/p44-MAPK. However, in comparison with ET-1 and PE, BK was only weakly hypertrophic as assessed by cell morphology

  15. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase (Erk1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) and tristetraprolin (TTP) comprehensively regulate injury-induced immediate early gene (IEG) response in in vitro liver organ culture.

    PubMed

    Tran, Doan Duy Hai; Koch, Alexandra; Saran, Shashank; Armbrecht, Marcel; Ewald, Florian; Koch, Martina; Wahlicht, Tom; Wirth, Dagmar; Braun, Armin; Nashan, Björn; Gaestel, Matthias; Tamura, Teruko

    2016-05-01

    Differentiated hepatocytes are long-lived and normally do not undergo cell division, however they have the unique capacity to autonomously decide their replication fate after liver injury. In this context, the key players of liver regeneration immediately after injury have not been adequately studied. Using an in vitro liver culture system, we show that after liver injury, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (Erk)1/2 were activated within 15 min and continued to be phosphorylated for more than 2h. Both p38MAPK and Erk1/2 were activated at the edge of the cut as well as on the liver surface where the mesothelial cell sheet expresses several cytokines. Notably, in human liver Erk1/2 was also activated under the mesothelial cell sheet shortly after liver resections. Furthermore, in in vitro liver slice culture immediate early genes (IEGs) were upregulated within 1-2 h and the S phase marker proliferation-cell-nuclear-antigen (PCNA) appeared 24 h after injury. Although Erk1/2 was activated after injury, in MK2 depleted liver a set of IEGs, such as Dusp1, Cox2, or c-Myc and proliferation marker gene Ki67 were not induced. In addition, in immortalized hepatocyte cells, THLE-2, the same subset of genes was upregulated upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. The protein level of tristetraprolin (TTP), a substrate for MK2 that plays a role in mRNA degradation, was increased in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. In this context, the depletion of TTP gene rescued Dusp1, Cox2, or c-Myc upregulation in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. These data imply that MK2 pathway is positively involved in Erk1/2 induced IEG response after liver injury. These data also suggest that in vitro liver culture may be a useful tool for measuring the proliferation potential of hepatocytes in individual liver.

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase and energy balance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Orhan, Yelda C; Zha, Xiaoming; Esencan, Ecem; Chatterton, Robert T; Bulun, Serdar E

    2017-01-01

    Cancer growth and metastasis depends on the availability of energy. Energy-sensing systems are critical in maintaining a balance between the energy supply and utilization of energy for tumor growth. A central regulator in this process is AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In times of energy deficit, AMPK is allosterically modified by the binding of increased levels of AMP and ADP, making it a target of specific AMPK kinases (AMPKKs). AMPK signaling prompts cells to produce energy at the expense of growth and motility, opposing the actions of insulin and growth factors. Increasing AMPK activity may thus prevent the proliferation and metastasis of tumor cells. Activated AMPK also suppresses aromatase, which lowers estrogen formation and prevents breast cancer growth. Biguanides can be used to activate AMPK, but AMPK activity is modified by many different interacting factors; understanding these factors is important in order to control the abnormal growth processes that lead to breast cancer neoplasia. Fatty acids, estrogens, androgens, adipokines, and another energy sensor, sirtuin-1, alter the phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Isoforms of AMPK differ among tissues and may serve specific functions. Targeting AMPK regulatory processes at points other than the upstream AMPKKs may provide additional approaches for prevention of breast cancer neoplasia, growth, and metastasis. PMID:28337254

  17. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-02-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing approx. 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise ( SVI). Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training.

  18. Rewiring mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade by positive feedback confers potato blight resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamizo, Chihiro; Kuchimura, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Akira; Katou, Shinpei; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Jones, Jonathan D G; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2006-02-01

    Late blight, caused by the notorious pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and during the 1840s caused the Irish potato famine and over one million fatalities. Currently, grown potato cultivars lack adequate blight tolerance. Earlier cultivars bred for resistance used disease resistance genes that confer immunity only to some strains of the pathogen harboring corresponding avirulence gene. Specific resistance gene-mediated immunity and chemical controls are rapidly overcome in the field when new pathogen races arise through mutation, recombination, or migration from elsewhere. A mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a pivotal role in plant innate immunity. Here we show that the transgenic potato plants that carry a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase driven by a pathogen-inducible promoter of potato showed high resistance to early blight pathogen Alternaria solani as well as P. infestans. The pathogen attack provoked defense-related MAPK activation followed by induction of NADPH oxidase gene expression, which is implicated in reactive oxygen species production, and resulted in hypersensitive response-like phenotype. We propose that enhancing disease resistance through altered regulation of plant defense mechanisms should be more durable and publicly acceptable than engineering overexpression of antimicrobial proteins.

  19. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  20. Protein Kinase A Activity and Anchoring Are Required for Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Andrew J.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, due in part to its clinically occult metastasis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms governing EOC dissemination and invasion may provide new targets for antimetastatic therapies or new methods for detection of metastatic disease. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is often dysregulated in EOC. Furthermore, PKA activity and subcellular localization by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. Thus, we sought to study the role of PKA and AKAP function in both EOC cell migration and invasion. Using the plasma membrane-directed PKA biosensor, pmAKAR3, and an improved migration/invasion assay, we show that PKA is activated at the leading edge of migrating SKOV-3 EOC cells, and that inhibition of PKA activity blocks SKOV-3 cell migration. Furthermore, we show that while the PKA activity within the leading edge of these cells is mediated by anchoring of type-II regulatory PKA subunits (RII), inhibition of anchoring of either RI or RII PKA subunits blocks cell migration. Importantly, we also show – for the first time – that PKA activity is up-regulated at the leading edge of SKOV-3 cells during invasion of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix and, as seen for migration, inhibition of either PKA activity or AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring blocks matrix invasion. These data are the first to demonstrate that the invasion of extracellular matrix by cancer cells elicits activation of PKA within the invasive leading edge and that both PKA activity and anchoring are required for matrix invasion. These observations suggest a role for PKA and AKAP activity in EOC metastasis. PMID:22028904

  1. Intramolecular activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase is disrupted by insertions in the tether that connects the calmodulin-like domain to the kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitart, V.; Christodoulou, J.; Huang, J. F.; Chazin, W. J.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) have a calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD) tethered to the C-terminal end of the kinase. Activation is proposed to involve intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to a junction sequence that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase domain. Consistent with this model, a truncated CDPK (DeltaNC) in which the CaM-LD has been deleted can be activated in a bimolecular interaction with an isolated CaM-LD or calmodulin, similar to the activation of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) by calmodulin. Here we provide genetic evidence that this bimolecular activation requires a nine-residue binding segment from F436 to I444 (numbers correspond to CPK-1 accession number L14771). Two mutations at either end of this core segment (F436/A and VI444/AA) severely disrupted bimolecular activation, whereas flanking mutations had only minor effects. Intramolecular activation of a full-length kinase was also disrupted by a VI444/AA mutation, but surprisingly not by a F436/A mutation (at the N-terminal end of the binding site). Interestingly, intramolecular but not bimolecular activation was disrupted by insertion mutations placed immediately downstream of I444. To show that mutant enzymes were not misfolded, latent kinase activity was stimulated through binding of an antijunction antibody. Results here support a model of intramolecular activation in which the tether (A445 to G455) that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase provides an important structural constraint and is not just a simple flexible connection.

  2. Phosphorylation of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase and liver kinase B1 is increased after a single oral dose of green tea extract to mice.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Subhashis; Ghoshal, Sarbani; Porter, Todd D

    2012-12-01

    We have previously shown that green and black tea extracts increase the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and HMG-CoA reductase in rat hepatoma cells in culture, concomitant with a decrease in cholesterol synthesis. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of a single oral dose of green or black tea extract to promote the phosphorylation of AMPK, liver kinase B1 (LKB1, an AMPK-kinase), and HMG-CoA reductase in mouse liver. Green tea extract administered by gavage at 50 and 100 mg/kg caused a 2- to 3-fold increase in hepatic AMPK phosphorylation at 3 and 6 hours after dosing and a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in LKB1 phosphorylation at these same time points. The phosphorylation of HMG-CoA reductase at these and later time points was not significantly increased. Black tea administered by gavage at up to 250 mg/kg was ineffective in increasing hepatic AMPK phosphorylation. Both green and black tea extracts increased LKB1 phosphorylation in hepatoma cells in culture at 15 μg/mL, and black tea also increased the phosphorylation of protein kinase A in hepatoma cells. These results suggest that compounds in both tea extracts activate AMPK by activating its upstream kinase, LKB1, and that black tea may do so by first activating protein kinase A, a known kinase for LKB1. Only green tea, at 50 and 100 mg/kg, was able to activate AMPK and LKB1 in mouse liver after oral dosing, suggesting that the polymerized catechins present in black tea do not reach the liver in sufficient concentration to affect AMPK activity.

  3. Hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine couples Ras to activation of Raf protein kinase during mitogenic signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H; Erhardt, P; Troppmair, J; Diaz-Meco, M T; Sithanandam, G; Rapp, U R; Moscat, J; Cooper, G M

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the relationship between hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and activation of the Raf-1 protein kinase in Ras-mediated transduction of mitogenic signals. As previously reported, cotransfection of a PC-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) expression plasmid bypassed the block to cell proliferation resulting from expression of the dominant inhibitory mutant Ras N-17. In contrast, PC-PLC failed to bypass the inhibitory effect of dominant negative Raf mutants, suggesting that PC-PLC functions downstream of Ras but upstream of Raf. Consistent with this hypothesis, treatment of quiescent cells with exogenous PC-PLC induced Raf activation, even when normal Ras function was blocked by Ras N-17 expression. Further, activation of Raf in response to mitogenic growth factors was blocked by inhibition of endogenous PC-PLC. Taken together, these results indicate that hydrolysis of PC mediates Raf activation in response to mitogenic growth factors. Images PMID:8246981

  4. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, inhibits insulin-induced activation of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis and associated protein kinase C translocation in rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Standaert, M L; Avignon, A; Yamada, K; Bandyopadhyay, G; Farese, R V

    1996-01-01

    We questioned whether phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and protein kinase C (PKC) function as interrelated signalling mechanisms during insulin action in rat adipocytes. Insulin rapidly activated a phospholipase D that hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC), and this activation was accompanied by increases in diacylglycerol and translocative activation of PKC-alpha and PKC-beta in the plasma membrane. Wortmannin, an apparently specific PI 3-kinase inhibitor, inhibited insulin-stimulated, phospholipase D-dependent PC hydrolysis and subsequent translocation of PKC-alpha and PKC-beta to the plasma membrane. Wortmannin did not inhibit PKC directly in vitro, or the PKC-dependent effects of phorbol esters on glucose transport in intact adipocytes. The PKC inhibitor RO 31-8220 did not inhibit PI 3-kinase directly or its activation in situ by insulin, but inhibited both insulin-stimulated and phorbol ester-stimulated glucose transport. Our findings suggest that insulin acts through PI 3-kinase to activate a PC-specific phospholipase D and causes the translocative activation of PKC-alpha and PKC-beta in plasma membranes of rat adipocytes. PMID:8611143

  5. Response gene to complement 32 protein promotes macrophage phagocytosis via activation of protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-08-15

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis.

  6. Abscisic acid activates a Ca2+-calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase involved in antioxidant defense in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shucheng

    2010-09-01

    The role of a calcium-dependent and calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated protein kinase in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense was determined in leaves of maize (Zea mays). In-gel kinase assays showed that treatments with ABA or H(2)O(2) induced the activation of a 49-kDa protein kinase and a 52-kDa protein kinase significantly. Furthermore, we showed that the 52-kDa protein kinase has the characteristics of CaM-stimulating activity and is sensitive to calcium-CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) inhibitor KN-93 or CaM antagonist W-7. Treatments with ABA or H(2)O(2) not only induced the activation of the 52-kDa protein kinase, but also enhanced the total activities of the antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and superoxide dismutase. Such enhancements were blocked by pretreatment with a CaMK inhibitor and a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor or scavenger. Pretreatment with the CaMK inhibitor also substantially arrested the ABA-induced H(2)O(2) production. Kinase activity enhancements induced by ABA were attenuated by pretreatment with an ROS inhibitor or scavenger. These results suggest that the 52-kDa CaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defense and that cross-talk between CaMK and H(2)O(2) plays a pivotal role in ABA signaling. We infer that CaMK acts both upstream and downstream of H(2)O(2), but mainly acts between ABA and H(2)O(2) in ABA-induced antioxidant-defensive signaling.

  7. Commitment to the CD4 lineage mediated by extracellular signal-related kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase and lck signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharp, L L; Hedrick, S M

    1999-12-15

    The development of T cells results in a concordance between the specificity of the TCR for MHC class I and class II molecules and the expression of CD8 and CD4 coreceptors. Based on analogy to simple metazoan models of organ development and lineage commitment, we sought to determine whether extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway signaling acts as an inductive signal for the CD4 lineage. Here, we show that, by altering the intracellular signaling involving the Erk/MAP kinase pathway, T cells with specificity for MHC class I can be diverted to express CD4, and, conversely, T cells with specificity for MHC class II can be diverted to express CD8. Furthermore, we find that activation of the src-family tyrosine kinase, p56lck is an upstream mediator of lineage commitment. These results suggest a simple mechanism for lineage commitment in T cell development.

  8. Epigallocatechin activates haem oxygenase-1 expression via protein kinase Cδ and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Ogborne, Richard M.; Rushworth, Stuart A.; O’Connell, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    The Nrf2/anti-oxidant response element (ARE) pathway plays an important role in regulating cellular anti-oxidants, including haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Various kinases have been implicated in the pathways leading to Nrf2 activation. Here, we investigated the effect of epigallocatechin (EGC) on ARE-mediated gene expression in human monocytic cells. EGC time and dose dependently increased HO-1 mRNA and protein expression but had minimal effect on expression of other ARE-regulated genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, glutathione cysteine ligase and ferritin. siRNA knock down of Nrf2 significantly inhibited EGC-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, inhibition of PKC by Ro-31-8220 dose dependently decreased EGC-induced HO-1 mRNA expression, whereas MAP kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway inhibitors had no significant effect. EGC stimulated phosphorylation of PKCαβ and δ in THP-1 cells. PKCδ inhibition significantly decreased EGC-induced HO-1 mRNA expression, whereas PKCα- and β-specific inhibitors had no significant effect. These results demonstrate for the first time that EGC-induced HO-1 expression occurs via PKCδ and Nrf2. PMID:18586007

  9. Iron regulates glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle via AMP-activated protein kinase in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingyu; Simcox, Judith; Mitchell, T. Creighton; Jones, Deborah; Cox, James; Luo, Bai; Cooksey, Robert C.; Boros, Laszlo G.; McClain, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Excess iron is associated with hepatic damage and diabetes in humans, although the detailed molecular mechanisms are not known. To investigate how iron regulates glucose homeostasis, we fed C57BL/6J male mice with high-iron (HI) diets (2 or 20 g Fe/kg chow). Mice fed an HI diet exhibited elevated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and liver. Consistent with the increased AMPK activity, glucose uptake was enhanced in mice fed an HI diet. The effects of improved glucose tolerance induced by HI feeding were abolished in transgenic mice with expression of muscle specific dominant-negative AMPK. Glucose output was suppressed in the liver of wild-type mice fed an HI diet, due to decreased expression of gluconeogenic genes and decreased substrate (lactate) from peripheral glycolysis. Iron activated AMPK by increasing deacetylase and decreasing LKB1 acetylation, in turn stimulating the phosphorylation of LKB1 and AMPK. The effects of HI diet were abrogated by treatment of the mice with N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting a redox-dependent mechanism for increasing deacetylase activity. In addition, tissue from iron-fed mice exhibited an elevated AMP/ATP ratio, further contributing to AMPK activation. In summary, a diet high in iron improves glucose tolerance by activating AMPK through mechanisms that include deacetylation.—Huang J., Simcox, J., Mitchell, T. C., Jones, D., Cox, J., Luo, B., Cooksey, R. C., Boros, L. G., McClain, D. A. Iron regulates glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle via AMP-activated protein kinase in mice. PMID:23515442

  10. CREB is activated by UVC through a p38/HOG-1-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Iordanov, M; Bender, K; Ade, T; Schmid, W; Sachsenmaier, C; Engel, K; Gaestel, M; Rahmsdorf, H J; Herrlich, P

    1997-01-01

    Changes in environmental conditions such as the addition of growth factors or irradiation of cells in culture first affect immediate response genes. We have shown previously that short wavelength UV irradiation (UVC) elicits massive activation of several growth factor receptor-dependent pathways. At the level of the immediate response gene c-fos, these pathways activate the transcription factor complex serum response factor (SRF)-p62TCF which mediates part of the UV-induced transcriptional response. These studies have, however, suggested that more that one pathway is required for full UV responsiveness of c-fos. Using appropriate promoter mutations and dominant-negative cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB), we now find that UVC-induced transcriptional activation depends also on the CRE at position -60 of the c-fos promoter and on the functionality of a CREB. Upon UV irradiation, CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated at serines 133 and 63, respectively, preceded by and dependent on activation of p38/RK/HOG-1 and of a p38/RK/HOG-1-dependent p108 CREB kinase. Although p90RSK1 and MAPKAP kinase 2 are also activated by UV, p90RSK1 does not, at least not decisively, participate in this signalling pathway to CREB and ATF-1 as it is not p38/RK/HOG-1 dependent, and CREB is a poor substrate for MAPKAP kinase 2 in vitro. On the basis of resistance to the growth factor receptor inhibitor suramin and of several types of cross-refractoriness experiments, the UVC-induced CREB/ATF-1 phosphorylation represents an as yet unrecognized route of UVC-induced signal transduction, independent of suramin-inhibitable growth factor receptors and different from the Erk 1,2-p62TCF pathway. PMID:9118940

  11. Novel protein kinase C inhibitors: alpha-terthiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Ashendel, C L; Zhou, Q; Chang, C T; Lee, E S; Chang, C J

    1998-10-06

    A series of alpha-terthiophene derivatives were prepared and their protein kinase C inhibitory activity were evaluated. The aldehyde derivatives were most potent inhibitors (IC50 < 1 microM). alpha-Terthiophene monoaldehyde was inactive in the inhibitions of protein kinase A, mitogen activated protein kinase and protein tyrosine kinase.

  12. Activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase blocks cumulus cell expansion through inhibition of protein synthesis during in vitro maturation in Swine.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Sasseville, Maxime; Laforest, Martin; Guillemette, Christine; Gilchrist, Robert B; Richard, François J

    2014-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric protein known as a metabolic switch, is involved in oocyte nuclear maturation in mice, cattle, and swine. The present study analyzed AMPK activation in cumulus cell expansion during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) is a well-known activator of AMPK. It inhibited oocyte meiotic resumption in COC. Moreover, cumulus cell expansion did not occur in the presence of AICAR, demonstrating its marked impact on cumulus cells. Activation of AMPK was supported by AICAR-mediated phosphorylation of alpha AMPK subunits. Furthermore, the presence of AICAR increased glucose uptake, a classical response to activation of this metabolic switch in response to depleted cellular energy levels. Neither nuclear maturation nor cumulus expansion was reversed by glucosamine, an alternative substrate in hyaluronic acid synthesis, through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which ruled out possible depletion of substrates. Both increased gap junction communication and phosphodiesterase activity in COC are dependent on protein synthesis during the initial hours of IVM; however, both were inhibited in the presence of AICAR, which supports the finding that activation of AMPK by AICAR mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, this protein synthesis inhibition was equivalent to that of the well-known protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, as observed on cumulus expansion and protein concentration. Finally, the phosphorylation level of selected kinases was investigated. The pattern of raptor phosphorylation is supportive of activation of AMPK-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. In conclusion, AICAR-mediated AMPK activation in porcine COC inhibited cumulus cell expansion and protein synthesis. These results bring new considerations to the importance of this kinase in ovarian

  13. The mitogen-activated protein kinase Slt2 modulates arsenite transport through the aquaglyceroporin Fps1.

    PubMed

    Ahmadpour, Doryaneh; Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Babazadeh, Roja; Dahal, Sita; Migocka, Magdalena; Andersson, Mikael; Wysocki, Robert; Tamás, Markus J; Hohmann, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Arsenite is widely present in nature; therefore, cells have evolved mechanisms to prevent arsenite influx and promote efflux. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the aquaglyceroporin Fps1 mediates arsenite influx and efflux. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Hog1 has previously been shown to restrict arsenite influx through Fps1. In this study, we show that another MAPK, Slt2, is transiently phosphorylated in response to arsenite influx. Our findings indicate that the protein kinase activity of Slt2 is required for its role in arsenite tolerance. While Hog1 prevents arsenite influx via phosphorylation of T231 at the N-terminal domain of Fps1, Slt2 promotes arsenite efflux through phosphorylation of S537 at the C terminus. Our data suggest that Slt2 physically interacts with Fps1 and that this interaction depends on phosphorylation of S537. We hypothesize that Hog1 and Slt2 may affect each other's binding to Fps1, thereby controlling the opening and closing of the channel.

  14. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  15. Protein kinase CK2 activates the atypical Rio1p kinase and promotes its cell-cycle phase-dependent degradation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, Michaela; Hochleitner, Elisabeth; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Bandlow, Wolfhard

    2007-09-01

    Using co-immunoprecipitation combined with MS analysis, we identified the alpha' subunit of casein kinase 2 (CK2) as an interaction partner of the atypical Rio1 protein kinase in yeast. Co-purification of Rio1p with CK2 from Deltacka1 or Deltacka2 mutant extracts shows that Rio1p preferentially interacts with Cka2p in vitro. The C-terminal domain of Rio1p is essential and sufficient for this interaction. Six C-terminally located clustered serines were identified as the only CK2 sites present in Rio1p. Replacement of all six serine residues by aspartate, mimicking constitutive phosphorylation, stimulates Rio1p kinase activity about twofold in vitro compared with wild-type or the corresponding (S > A)(6) mutant proteins. Both mutant alleles (S > A)(6) or (S > D)(6) complement in vivo, however, growth of the RIO1 (S > A)(6) mutant is greatly retarded and shows a cell-cycle phenotype, whereas the behaviour of the RIO1 (S > D)(6) mutant is indistinguishable from wild-type. This suggests that phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2 leads to moderate activation of Rio1p in vivo and promotes cell proliferation. Physiological studies indicate that phosphorylation by CK2 renders the Rio1 protein kinase susceptible to proteolytic degradation at the G(1)/S transition in the cell-division cycle, whereas the non-phosphorylated version is resistant.

  16. The Interplay of AMP-activated Protein Kinase and Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Min; Zhang, Zhen; Ratnam, Manohar; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently emerged as a potential target for cancer therapy due to the observation that activation of AMPK inhibits tumor cell growth. It is well-known that androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a major driver for the development and progression of prostate cancer and that downregulation of AR is a critical step in the induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. However, little is known about the potential interaction between AMPK and AR signaling pathways. In the current study, we showed that activation of AMPK by metformin caused decrease of AR protein level through suppression of AR mRNA expression and promotion of AR protein degradation, demonstrating that AMPK activation is upstream of AR downregulation. We also showed that inhibition of AR function by an anti-androgen or its siRNA enhanced AMPK activation and growth inhibition whereas overexpression of AR delayed AMPK activation and increased prostate cancer cellular resistance to metformin treatment, suggesting that AR suppresses AMPK signaling-mediated growth inhibition in a feedback mechanism. Our findings thus reveal a novel AMPK-AR regulatory loop in prostate cancer cells and should have a potential clinical significance. PMID:24129850

  17. Regulation of WRKY46 Transcription Factor Function by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Arsheed H.; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Sinha, Alok K.; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are central signaling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defense as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defense. PMID:26870073

  18. Identification of positive-acting domains in GCN2 protein kinase required for translational activation of GCN4 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wek, R.C.; Ramirez, M.; Jackson, B.M.; Hinnebusch, A.G. )

    1990-06-01

    GCN4 is a transcriptional activator of amino acid-biosynthetic genes in the yeast {ital Saccharomyces cerevisiae}. GCN2, a translational activator of {ital GCN4} expression, contains a domain homologous to the catalytic subunit of eukaryotic protein kinases. Substitution of a highly conserved lysine residue in the kinase domain abolished GCN2 regulatory function in vivo and its ability to autophosphorylate in vitro, indicating that GCN2 acts as a protein kinase in stimulating {ital GCN4} expression. Elevated {ital GCN2} gene dosage led to depression of {ital GCN4} under nonstarvation conditions; however, the authors found that {ital GCN2} mRNA and protein levels did not increase in wild-type cells in response to amino acid starvation. Therefore, it appears that GCN2 protein kinase function is stimulated postranslationally in amino acid-starved cells. Three dominant-constitutive {ital GCN2} point mutations were isolated that led to derepressed {ital GCN4} expression under nonstarvation conditions. Two of the {ital GCN2}(Con) mutations mapped in the kinase domain itself. The third mapped just downstream from a carboxyl-terminal segment homologous to histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS), which the authors suggest might function to detect uncharged tRNA in amino acid-starved cells and activate the adjacent protein kinase moiety.

  19. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  20. Changes in Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Activity during in Vitro Tuberization in Potato.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, G. C.; Ulloa, R. M.; Raices, M.; Tellez-Inon, M. T.

    1996-12-01

    A soluble Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) was purified to homogeneity in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants. Potato CDPK was strictly dependent on Ca2+ (one-half maximal activation 0.6 [mu]M) and phosphorylated a wide diversity of substrates, in which Syntide 2 was the best phosphate acceptor (Michaelis constant = 30 [mu]M). The kinase was inhibited by Ca2+-chelating agents, phenotiazine derivatives, and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (one-half maximal inhibition = 0.25 mM). Polyclonal antibodies directed against the regulatory region of the soybean CDPK recognized a 53-kD polypeptide. In an autophosphorylation assay, this same band was strongly labeled with [[gamma]-32P]ATP in the presence of Ca2+. CDPK activity was high in nontuberized plants, but increased 2.5-fold at the onset of tuber development and was reduced to one-half of its original activity when the tuber had completed formation. In the early stages of tuberization, Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation of endogenous targets (specific bands of 68, 51, and 46 kD) was observed. These polypeptides were not labeled in nontuberizing plants or in completely formed tubers, indicating that this phosphorylation is a stage-specific event. In addition, dephosphorylation of specific polypeptides was detected in tuberizing plants, suggesting the involvement of a phosphatase. Preincubation of crude extracts with phosphatase inhibitors rendered a 100% increase in CDPK activity.

  1. Chemerin Stimulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Carotid Neointimal Hyperplasia by Activating Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Luo, Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Huadong; Li, Jianghua; Liao, Bihong; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular neointimal hyperplasia and remodeling arising from local inflammation are characteristic pathogeneses of proliferative cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and post angioplasty restenosis. The molecular mechanisms behind these pathological processes have not been fully determined. The adipokine chemerin is associated with obesity, metabolism, and control of inflammation. Recently, chemerin has gained increased attention as it was found to play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemerin on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and carotid neointimal formation after angioplasty. We found that circulating chemerin levels increased after carotid balloon injury, and that knockdown of chemerin significantly inhibited the proliferative aspects of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vitro as well as prohibited carotid neointimal hyperplasia and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vivo after angioplasty. Additionally, inhibition of chemerin down-regulated the expression of several proteins, including phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B p65, and proliferation cell nuclear antigen. The novel finding of this study is that chemerin stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and carotid intimal hyperplasia through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, which may lead to vascular inflammation and remodeling, and is relevant to proliferative cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27792753

  2. Escitalopram Ameliorates Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Spatial Memory Deficits Induced by Protein Kinase A Activation in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qing-Guo; Wang, Yan-Juan; Gong, Wei-Gang; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the effect of escitalopram pretreatment on protein kinase A (PKA)-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and spatial memory deficits in rats using western blot and behavioral tests, respectively. We demonstrated that escitalopram effectively ameliorated tau hyperphosphorylation and the spatial memory deficits induced by PKA activation. We measured the total and activity-dependent Ser9-phosphorylated levels of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β in hippocampal extracts. No significant change in the total level of GSK-3β was observed between the different groups. However, compared with forskolin injection alone, pretreatment with escitalopram increased the level of Ser9-phosphorylated GSK-3β. We also demonstrated that escitalopram increased Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 (the active form of Akt). Furthermore, we identified other important kinases and phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase 2A, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, and MAP kinase kinase-1/2, that have previously been reported to play a crucial role in tau phosphorylation; however, we did not detect any significant change in the activation of these kinases or phosphatases in our study. We unexpectedly demonstrated that forskolin caused anxiety-like behavior in rats, and pretreatment with escitalopram did not significantly ameliorate the anxiety-like behavior induced by forskolin. These data provide the first evidence that escitalopram ameliorates forskolin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and spatial memory impairment in rats; these effects do not occur via the anti-anxiety activity of escitalopram but may involve the Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  3. Cross-talk between protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling in the adaptive changes observed during morphine withdrawal in the heart.

    PubMed

    Almela, P; Atucha, N M; Milanés, M V; Laorden, M L

    2009-09-01

    Our previous studies have shown that morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the expression of protein kinase (PK) A and mitogen-activated extracellular kinase (MAPK) pathways in the heart during morphine withdrawal. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction between PKA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways mediating the cardiac adaptive changes observed after naloxone administration to morphine-dependent rats. Dependence on morphine was induced by a 7-day subcutaneous implantation of morphine pellets. Morphine withdrawal was precipitated on day 8 by an injection of naloxone (2 mg/kg). ERK1/2 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation was determined by quantitative blot immunolabeling using phosphorylation state-specific antibodies. Naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal activates ERK1/2 and phosphorylates TH at Ser31 in the right and left ventricle, with an increase in the mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate. When N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), a PKA inhibitor, was infused, concomitantly with morphine, it diminished the expression of ERK1/2. In contrast, the infusion of calphostin C (a PKC inhibitor) did not modify the morphine withdrawal-induced activation of ERK1/2. The ability of morphine withdrawal to activate ERK that phosphorylates TH at Ser31 was reduced by HA-1004. The present findings demonstrate that the enhancement of ERK1/2 expression and the phosphorylation state of TH at Ser31 during morphine withdrawal are dependent on PKA and suggest cross-talk between PKA and ERK1/2 transduction pathway mediating morphine withdrawal-induced activation (phosphorylation) of TH.

  4. Mitogen-activated protein kinase in Pfiesteria piscicida and its growth rate-related expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Senjie; Zhang, Huan

    2003-01-01

    A full-length cDNA (1,434 bp) of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), a key molecule of a signal transduction cascade, was isolated from the estuarine heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. This cDNA (Ppmapk1) encoded a protein (PpMAPK1) of 428 amino acid residues that shared about 30 to 40% amino acid similarity with MAPKs in other organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PpMAPK1 was tightly clustered with MAPK3 in protozoans. Using reverse transcription-PCR, expression of this gene was evaluated for P. piscicida cultures grown under different conditions. While salinity shock, heat shock, starvation, and a subsequent encounter with prey did not appear to affect expression of this gene, Ppmapk1 expression level was correlated with growth rate, suggesting involvement of this gene in the regulation of cell proliferation in the organism.

  5. The selective protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-31-8220, inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression, induces c-Jun expression, and activates Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Beltman, J; McCormick, F; Cook, S J

    1996-10-25

    The role of protein kinase C (PKC) in inflammation, mitogenesis, and differentiation has been deduced in part through the use of a variety of PKC inhibitors. Two widely used inhibitors are the structurally related compounds GF109203X and Ro-31-8220, both of which potently inhibit PKC activity and are believed to be highly selective. While using GF109203X and Ro-31-8220 to address the role of PKC in immediate early gene expression, we observed striking differential effects by each of these two compounds. Growth factors induce the expression of the immediate early gene products MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), c-Fos and c-Jun. Ro-31-8220 inhibits growth factor-stimulated expression of MKP-1 and c-Fos but strongly stimulated c-Jun expression, even in the absence of growth factors. GF109203X displays none of these properties. These data suggest that Ro-31-8220 may have other pharmacological actions in addition to PKC inhibition. Indeed, Ro-31-8220 strongly stimulates the stress-activated protein kinase, JNK1. Furthermore, Ro-31-8220 apparently activates JNK in a PKC-independent manner. Neither the down-regulation of PKC by phorbol esters nor the inhibition of PKC by GF109203X affected the ability of Ro-31-8220 to activate JNK1. These data suggest that, in addition to potently inhibiting PKC, Ro-31-8220 exhibits novel pharmacological properties which are independent of its ability to inhibit PKC.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide Activation of the TPL-2/MEK/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade Is Regulated by IκB Kinase-Induced Proteolysis of NF-κB1 p105†

    PubMed Central

    Beinke, S.; Robinson, M. J.; Hugunin, M.; Ley, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    The MEK kinase TPL-2 (also known as Cot) is required for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in macrophages and consequent upregulation of genes involved in innate immune responses. In resting cells, TPL-2 forms a stoichiometric complex with NF-κB1 p105, which negatively regulates its MEK kinase activity. Here, it is shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of primary macrophages causes the release of both long and short forms of TPL-2 from p105 and that TPL-2 MEK kinase activity is restricted to this p105-free pool. Activation of TPL-2, MEK, and ERK by LPS is also demonstrated to require proteasome-mediated proteolysis. p105 is known to be proteolysed by the proteasome following stimulus-induced phosphorylation of two serines in its PEST region by the IκB kinase (IKK) complex. Expression of a p105 point mutant, which is not susceptible to signal-induced proteolysis, in RAW264.7 macrophages impairs LPS-induced release of TPL-2 from p105 and its subsequent activation of MEK. Furthermore, expression of wild-type but not mutant p105 reconstitutes LPS stimulation of MEK and ERK phosphorylation in primary NF-κB1-deficient macrophages. Consistently, pharmacological blockade of IKK inhibits LPS-induced release of TPL-2 from p105 and TPL-2 activation. These data show that IKK-induced p105 proteolysis is essential for LPS activation of TPL-2, thus revealing a novel function of IKK in the regulation of the ERK MAP kinase cascade. PMID:15485931

  7. Differential Role of β1C and β1A Integrin Cytoplasmic Variants in Modulating Focal Adhesion Kinase, Protein Kinase B/AKT, and Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Mara; Steger, Craig A.; Bennett, Anton M.; Wu, J. Julie; Languino, Lucia R.

    2000-01-01

    The integrin cytoplasmic domain modulates cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and intracellular signaling. The β1 integrin subunits, β1C and β1A, that contain variant cytoplasmic domains differentially affect cell proliferation; β1C inhibits proliferation, whereas β1A promotes it. We investigated the ability of β1C and β1A to modulate integrin-mediated signaling events that affect cell proliferation and survival in Chinese hamster ovary stable cell lines expressing either human β1C or human β1A. The different cytodomains of either β1C or β1A did not affect either association with the endogenous α2, αV, and α5 subunits or cell adhesion to fibronectin or TS2/16, a mAb to human β1. Upon engagement of endogenous and exogenous integrins by fibronectin, cells expressing β1C showed significantly inhibited extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) 2 activation compared with β1A stable cell lines. In contrast, focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and Protein Kinase B/AKT activity were not affected. Selective engagement of the exogenously expressed β1C by TS2/16 led to stimulation of Protein Kinase B/AKT phosphorylation but not of ERK2 activation; in contrast, β1A engagement induced activation of both proteins. We show that Ras activation was strongly reduced in β1C stable cell lines in response to fibronectin adhesion and that expression of constitutively active Ras, Ras 61 (L), rescued β1C-mediated down-regulation of ERK2 activation. Inhibition of cell proliferation in β1C stable cell lines was attributable to an inhibitory effect of β1C on the Ras/MAP kinase pathway because expression of activated MAPK kinase rescued β1C antiproliferative effect. These findings show that the β1C variant, by means of a unique signaling mechanism, selectively inhibits the MAP kinase pathway by preventing Ras activation without affecting either survival signals stimulated by integrins or cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. These findings

  8. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  9. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  10. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  11. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  12. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  13. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  14. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  15. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  16. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  18. Cryptococcus neoformans activates RhoGTPase proteins followed by protein kinase C, focal adhesion kinase, and ezrin to promote traversal across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Chul; Crary, Benjamin; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Kim, Kee J

    2012-10-19

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis. Previous studies have demonstrated that Cryptococcus binding and invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) is a prerequisite for transmigration across the blood-brain barrier. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the cryptococcal blood-brain barrier traversal is poorly understood. In this study we examined the signaling events in HBMEC during interaction with C. neoformans. Analysis with inhibitors revealed that cryptococcal association, invasion, and transmigration require host actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Rho pulldown assays revealed that Cryptococcus induces activation of three members of RhoGTPases, e.g. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, and their activations are required for cryptococcal transmigration across the HBMEC monolayer. Western blot analysis showed that Cryptococcus also induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), ezrin, and protein kinase C α (PKCα), all of which are involved in the rearrangement of host actin cytoskeleton. Down-regulation of FAK, ezrin, or PKCα by shRNA knockdown, dominant-negative transfection, or inhibitors significantly reduces cryptococcal ability to traverse the HBMEC monolayer, indicating their positive role in cryptococcal transmigration. In addition, activation of RhoGTPases is the upstream event for phosphorylation of FAK, ezrin, and PKCα during C. neoformans-HBMEC interaction. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that C. neoformans activates RhoGTPases and subsequently FAK, ezrin, and PKCα to promote their traversal across the HBMEC monolayer, which is the critical step for cryptococcal brain infection and development of meningitis.

  19. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  20. An Inhibition of p38 Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Delays the Platelet Storage Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Skripchenko, Andrey; Awatefe, Helen; Thompson-Montgomery, Dedeene; Myrup, Andrew; Turgeon, Annette; Wagner, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Platelets during storage undergo diverse alterations collectively known as the platelet storage lesion, including metabolic, morphological, functional and structural changes. Some changes correlate with activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Another MAPK, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), is involved in PLT activation. The aim of this study was to compare the properties of platelets stored in plasma in the presence or absence of p38 and ERK MAPK inhibitors. Materials and Methods A single Trima apheresis platelet unit (n = 12) was aliquoted into five CLX storage bags. Two aliquots were continuously agitated with or without MAPK inhibitors. Two aliquots were subjected to 48 hours of interruption of agitation with or without MAPK inhibitors. One aliquot contained the same amount of solvent vehicle used to deliver the inhibitor. Platelets were stored at 20–24°C for 7 days and sampled on Days 1, 4, and 7 for 18 in vitro parameters. Results Inhibition of p38 MAPK by VX-702 leads to better maintenance of all platelet in vitro storage parameters including platelet mitochondrial function. Accelerated by interruption of agitation, the platelet storage lesion of units stored with VX-702 was diminished to that of platelets stored with continuous agitation. Inhibition of ERK MAPK did not ameliorate decrements in any in vitro platelet properties. Conclusion Signaling through p38 MAPK, but not ERK, is associated with platelet deterioration during storage. PMID:23967093

  1. Genetic analysis of rolled, which encodes a Drosophila mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y M; Nishizawa, K; Nishi, Y; Tsuda, L; Inoue, Y H; Nishida, Y

    1999-01-01

    Genetic and molecular characterization of the dominant suppressors of D-raf(C110) on the second chromosome identified two gain-of-function alleles of rolled (rl), which encodes a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in Drosophila. One of the alleles, rl(Su23), was found to bear the same molecular lesion as rl(Sem), which has been reported to be dominant female sterile. However, rl(Su23) and the current stock of rl(Sem) showed only a weak dominant female sterility. Detailed analyses of the rl mutations demonstrated moderate dominant activities of these alleles in the Torso (Tor) signaling pathway, which explains the weak dominant female sterility observed in this study. The dominant rl mutations failed to suppress the terminal class maternal-effect mutations, suggesting that activation of Rl is essential, but not sufficient, for Tor signaling. Involvement of rl in cell proliferation was also demonstrated by clonal analysis. Branching and integration of signals in the MAP kinase cascade is discussed. PMID:10511556

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5)-mediated signalling cascade regulates expression of iron superoxide dismutase gene in Arabidopsis under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yu; Chen, Wei-hua; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are involved in plant adaptive responses to biotic and abiotic stresses but the upstream signalling process that modulates their expression is not clear. Expression of two iron SODs, FSD2 and FSD3, was significantly increased in Arabidopsis in response to NaCl treatment but blocked in transgenic MKK5-RNAi plant, mkk5. Using an assay system for transient expression in protoplasts, it was found that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5) was also activated in response to salt stress. Overexpression of MKK5 in wild-type plants enhanced their tolerance to salt treatments, while mkk5 mutant exhibited hypersensitivity to salt stress in germination on salt-containing media. Moreover, another kinase, MPK6, was also involved in the MKK5-mediated iron superoxide dismutase (FSD) signalling pathway in salt stress. The kinase activity of MPK6 was totally turned off in mkk5, whereas the activity of MPK3 was only partially blocked. MKK5 interacted with the MEKK1 protein that was also involved in the salt-induced FSD signalling pathway. These data suggest that salt-induced FSD2 and FSD3 expressions are influenced by MEKK1 via MKK5-MPK6-coupled signalling. This MAP kinase cascade (MEKK1, MKK5, and MPK6) mediates the salt-induced expression of iron superoxide dismutases.

  3. Sirtuin 2 aggravates postischemic liver injury by deacetylating mitogen‐activated protein kinase phosphatase‐1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Koh, Hyoung‐Won; Zhou, Lu; Bae, Ui‐Jin; Lee, Hwa‐Suk; Bang, In Hyuk; Ka, Sun‐O; Oh, Seon‐Hee; Bae, Eun Ju

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 2 (Sirt2) is known to negatively regulate anoxia‐reoxygenation injury in myoblasts. Because protein levels of Sirt2 are increased in ischemia‐reperfusion (I/R)‐injured liver tissues, we examined whether Sirt2 is protective or detrimental against hepatic I/R injury. We overexpressed Sirt2 in the liver of C57BL/6 mice using a Sirt2 adenovirus. Wild‐type and Sirt2 knockout mice were subjected to a partial (70%) hepatic ischemia for 45 minutes, followed by various periods of reperfusion. In another set of experiments, wild‐type mice were pretreated intraperitoneally with AGK2, a Sirt2 inhibitor. Isolated hepatocytes and Kupffer cells from wild‐type and Sirt2 knockout mice were subjected to hypoxia‐reoxygenation injury to determine the in vitro effects of Sirt2. Mice subjected to I/R injury showed typical patterns of hepatocellular damage. Prior injection with Sirt2 adenovirus aggravated liver injury, as demonstrated by increases in serum aminotransferases, prothrombin time, proinflammatory cytokines, hepatocellular necrosis and apoptosis, and neutrophil infiltration relative to control virus‐injected mice. Pretreatment with AGK2 resulted in significant improvements in serum aminotransferase levels and histopathologic findings. Similarly, experiments with Sirt2 knockout mice also revealed reduced hepatocellular injury. The molecular mechanism of Sirt2's involvement in this aggravation of hepatic I/R injury includes the deacetylation and inhibition of mitogen‐activated protein kinase phosphatase‐1 and consequent activation of mitogen‐activated protein kinases. Conclusion: Sirt2 is an aggravating factor during hepatic I/R injury. (Hepatology 2017;65:225‐236). PMID:27532371

  4. AIK1, A Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase, Modulates Abscisic Acid Responses through the MKK5-MPK6 Kinase Cascade1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Yang, Fengbo; Zhang, Guozeng; Song, Shufei; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Miao, Yuchen

    2017-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction module involved in transducing extracellular signals to the nucleus for appropriate cellular adjustment. This cascade essentially consists of three components: a MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK), a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK, connected to each other by the event of phosphorylation. Here, we report the characterization of a MAPKKK, ABA-INSENSITIVE PROTEIN KINASE1 (AIK1), which regulates abscisic acid (ABA) responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). T-DNA insertion mutants of AIK1 showed insensitivity to ABA in terms of both root growth and stomatal response. AIK1 functions in ABA responses via regulation of root cell division and elongation, as well as stomatal responses. The activity of AIK1 is induced by ABA in Arabidopsis and tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), and the Arabidopsis protein phosphatase type 2C, ABI1, a negative regulator of ABA signaling, restricts AIK1 activity by dephosphorylation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis showed that MPK3, MPK6, and AIK1 interact with MKK5. The single mutant seedlings of mpk6 and mkk5 have similar phenotypes to aik1, but mkk4 does not. AIK1 was localized in the cytoplasm and shown to activate MKK5 by protein phosphorylation, which was an ABA-activated process. Constitutively active MKK5 in aik1 mutant seedlings complements the ABA-insensitive root growth phenotype of aik1. The activity of MPK6 was increased by ABA in wild-type seedlings, but its activation by ABA was impaired in aik1 and aik1 mkk5 mutants. These findings clearly suggest that the AIK1-MKK5-MPK6 cascade functions in the ABA regulation of primary root growth and stomatal response. PMID:27913741

  5. Roles of tyrosine kinase-, 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathways in ethanol-induced contractions of rat aortic smooth muscle: possible relation to alcohol-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-wei; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Tao; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2002-08-01

    Insights into the relations between and among ethanol-induced contractions in rat aorta, tyrosine kinases (including src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases), 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI-3Ks), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and regulation of intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) were investigated in the present study. Ethanol-induced concentration-dependent contractions in isolated rat aortic rings were attenuated greatly by pretreatment of the arteries with low concentrations of an antagonist of protein tyrosine kinases (genistein), an src homology domain 2 (SH2) inhibitor peptide, a highly specific antagonist of p38 MAPK (SB-203580), a potent, selective antagonist of two specific MAPK kinases-MEK1/MEK2 (U0126)-and a selective antagonist of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) (PD-98059), as well as by treatment with wortmannin or LY-294002 (both are selective antagonists of PI-3Ks). Inhibitory concentration 50 (IC(50)) levels obtained for these seven antagonists were consistent with reported inhibition constant (Ki) values for these tyrosine kinase, MAPK, and MAPKK antagonists. Ethanol-induced transient and sustained increases in [Ca(2+)](i) in primary single smooth muscle cells from rat aorta were markedly attenuated in the presence of genistein, an SH2 domain inhibitor peptide, SB-203580, U0126, PD-98059, wortmannin, and LY-294002. A variety of specific antagonists of known endogenously formed vasoconstrictors did not inhibit or attenuate either the ethanol-induced contractions or the elevations of [Ca(2+)](i). Results of the present study support the suggestion that activation of tyrosine kinases (including the src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases), PI-3Ks, and MAPK seems to play an important role in ethanol-induced contractions and the elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in smooth muscle cells from rat aorta. These signaling pathways thus may be important in hypertension in human beings associated with chronic alcohol

  6. Insulin receptors mediate growth effects in cultured fetal neurons. II. Activation of a protein kinase that phosphorylates ribosomal protein S6

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, K.A.; Toledo, S.P. )

    1989-09-01

    As an initial attempt to identify early steps in insulin action that may be involved in the growth responses of neurons to insulin, we investigated whether insulin receptor activation increases the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 in cultured fetal neurons and whether activation of a protein kinase is involved in this process. When neurons were incubated for 2 h with 32Pi, the addition of insulin (100 ng/ml) for the final 30 min increased the incorporation of 32Pi into a 32K microsomal protein. The incorporation of 32Pi into the majority of other neuronal proteins was unaltered by the 30-min exposure to insulin. Cytosolic extracts from insulin-treated neurons incubated in the presence of exogenous rat liver 40S ribosomes and (gamma-32P)ATP displayed a 3- to 8-fold increase in the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 compared to extracts from untreated cells. Inclusion of cycloheximide during exposure of the neurons to insulin did not inhibit the increased cytosolic kinase activity. Activation of S6 kinase activity by insulin was dose dependent (seen at insulin concentration as low as 0.1 ng/ml) and reached a maximum after 20 min of incubation. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diolein, and Ca2+ to the in vitro kinase reaction had no effect on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Likewise, treatment of neurons with (Bu)2cAMP did not alter the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 by neuronal cytosolic extracts. We conclude that insulin activates a cytosolic protein kinase that phosphorylates ribosomal S6 in neurons and is distinct from protein kinase-C and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Stimulation of this kinase may play a role in insulin signal transduction in neurons.

  7. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: Demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Block, L.H.; Abraham, W.M.; Groscurth, P.; Qiao, B.Y.; Perruchoud, A.P. )

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  8. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Block, L H; Abraham, W M; Groscurth, P; Qiao, B Y; Perruchoud, A P

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  9. Activation of K+ channels in renal medullary vesicles by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.B.; McDonald, G.A.; Mehta, P.; Andreoli, T.E. )

    1989-07-01

    ADH, acting through cAMP, increases the potassium conductance of apical membranes of mouse medullary thick ascending limbs of Henle. The present studies tested whether exposure of renal medullary apical membranes in vitro to the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase resulted in an increase in potassium conductance. Apical membrane vesicles prepared from rabbit outer renal medulla demonstrated bumetanide- and chloride-sensitive {sup 22}Na+ uptake and barium-sensitive, voltage-dependent {sup 86}Rb+ influx. When vesicles were loaded with purified catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (150 mU/ml), 1 mM ATP, and 50 mM KCl, the barium-sensitive {sup 86}Rb+ influx increased from 361 {plus minus} 138 to 528 {plus minus} 120 pM/mg prot.30 sec (P less than 0.01). This increase was inhibited completely when heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor (1 microgram/ml) was also present in the vesicle solutions. The stimulation of {sup 86}Rb+ uptake by protein kinase required ATP rather than ADP. It also required opening of the vesicles by hypotonic shock, presumably to allow the kinase free access to the cytoplasmic face of the membranes. We conclude that cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of apical membranes from the renal medulla increases the potassium conductance of these membranes. This mechanism may account for the ADH-mediated increase in potassium conductance in the mouse mTALH.

  10. Regulation of protein kinase Cmu by basic peptides and heparin. Putative role of an acidic domain in the activation of the kinase.

    PubMed

    Gschwendt, M; Johannes, F J; Kittstein, W; Marks, F

    1997-08-15

    Protein kinase Cmu is a novel member of the protein kinase C (PKC) family that differs from the other isoenzymes in structural and enzymatic properties. No substrate proteins of PKCmu have been identified as yet. Moreover, the regulation of PKCmu activity remains obscure, since a structural region corresponding to the pseudosubstrate domains of other PKC isoenzymes has not been found for PKCmu. Here we show that aldolase is phosphorylated by PKCmu in vitro. Phosphorylation of aldolase and of two substrate peptides by PKCmu is inhibited by various proteins and peptides, including typical PKC substrates such as histone H1, myelin basic protein, and p53. This inhibitory activity seems to depend on clusters of basic amino acids in the protein/peptide structures. Moreover, in contrast to other PKC isoenzymes PKCmu is activated by heparin and dextran sulfate. Maximal activation by heparin is about twice and that by dextran sulfate four times as effective as maximal activation by phosphatidylserine plus 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, the conventional activators of c- and nPKC isoforms. We postulate that PKCmu contains an acidic domain, which is involved in the formation and stabilization of an active state and which, in the inactive enzyme, is blocked by an intramolecular interaction with a basic domain. This intramolecular block is thought to be released by heparin and possibly also by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate/phosphatidylserine, whereas basic peptides and proteins inhibit PKCmu activity by binding to the acidic domain of the active enzyme.

  11. Activity of protein kinase C during the differentiation of chick limb bud mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Sonn, J K; Solursh, M

    1993-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) and chondrogenesis, PKC activity was assayed in cultures of stage 23/24 chick limb bud mesenchymal cells under various conditions. PKC activities of cytosolic and particulate fractions were low in 1 day cultured cells. As chondrogenesis proceeds, cytosolic PKC activity increased more than twofold, while that of the particulate fraction increased only slightly. Three days' treatment of cultures with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, 5 x 10(-8) M) inhibited chondrogenesis judged by the accumulation of Alcian blue bound to the extracellular matrix and depressed PKC activity in cytosolic fraction. When cells were grown for 3 days in control medium after 3 days' treatment with PMA, chondrogenesis resumed and PKC activity recovered to normal values. PKC activity in cultures plated at low density (5 x 10(6) cells/ml) where chondrogenesis is reduced was as low as that in 1 day cultured cells plated at high density (2 x 10(7) cells/ml) or that in PMA treated cells. On the other hand, staurosporine promoted chondrogenesis without affecting PKC activity. Furthermore, reversal of PMA's inhibitory effect on chondrogenesis by staurosporine was not accompanied by recovery of PKC activity. These data indicate that increases in PKC activity is closely related to chondrogenesis and that PMA inhibits chondrogenesis by depressing PKC. However, staurosporine's enhancing effect on chondrogenesis is not related to PKC activity.

  12. Activation of protein kinase C by the lipid moieties of lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Wightman, P.D.; Raetz, C.R.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) was partially purified from the RAW264.7 macrophage-like cell and characterized by its activation by phosphatidylserine (PS) in the presence of calcium and its insensitivity to cyclic nucleotides or calmodulin. This PKC can also be activated by the acidic lipid moieties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS lipids activate PKC in the absence of PS and, like PS, synergize with diacylglycerol (DAG). Intact RAW264.7 cells were prelabelled with /sup 32/Pi and treated with the well characterized PKC ligands, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or DAG. The phosphoproteins thereby induced were separated in 2-D gels and visualized by autoradiography. These phosphoproteins were used as standards to identify the PKC-associated phosphoproteins induced in these cells using other stimulators. The authors demonstrate that the LPS lipids as well as LPS itself induce the formation of phosphoproteins common to those induced by PMA or DAG. PMA, DAG, the LPS lipids, and LPS itself activate the RAW264.7 cell and stimulate the release of prostaglandin D/sub 2/ at the same concentration that stimulate new protein phosphorylation. These results suggest that the activation of PKC is an early event in the activation of the RAW264.7 macrophage by LPS.

  13. A Cell-Autonomous Molecular Cascade Initiated by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Represses Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Houssein S.; Bergeron, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate essential physiological processes, and inadequate levels are associated with various pathological conditions. In testosterone-producing Leydig cells, steroidogenesis is strongly stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) via its receptor leading to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, which is essential for the initiation of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis then passively decreases with the degradation of cAMP into AMP by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated following cAMP-to-AMP breakdown in MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells. Activated AMPK then actively inhibits cAMP-induced steroidogenesis by repressing the expression of key regulators of steroidogenesis, including Star and Nr4a1. Similar results were obtained in Y-1 adrenal cells and in the constitutively steroidogenic R2C cells. We have also determined that maximum AMPK activation following stimulation of steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells occurs when steroid hormone production has reached a plateau. Our data identify AMPK as a molecular rheostat that actively represses steroid hormone biosynthesis to preserve cellular energy homeostasis and prevent excess steroid production. PMID:25225331

  14. Activation of protein kinase Ceta triggers cortical granule exocytosis in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Cameron B; Kohan, Sirus A; Chen, Qian; Iagnemma, Joseph; Umbach, Joy A

    2002-03-15

    Previous work has shown that phorbol esters or diacylglycerol trigger cortical granule exocytosis in Xenopus oocytes. We sought to identify the isoform(s) of protein kinase C (PKC) that mediate(s) this regulated secretory event. Because this process is initiated by lipid activators of PKC but is independent of calcium ions, we focused on the family of novel (calcium-independent) PKCs. Pharmacological investigations using Gö6976 and Gö6983 tended to exclude PKCdelta, epsilon and mu as secretory triggers. Subcellular fractionation and immunoblot data revealed that these oocytes expressed all five members of the novel PKC family, but it was only PKCeta that colocalized with cortical granules. Finally, expression of wild type or constitutively active forms of PKCdelta and eta strongly supported the conclusion that it is PKCeta that initiates cortical granule exocytosis in these cells. These observations represent an important step in identifying the mechanism of secretory triggering in this system.

  15. Pharmacological Targeting of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Opportunities for Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Miglianico, Marie; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-14

    As a central regulator of metabolism, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an established therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. Beyond the metabolic area, the number of medical fields that involve AMPK grows continuously, expanding the potential applications for AMPK modulators. Even though indirect AMPK activators are used in the clinics for their beneficial metabolic outcome, the few described direct agonists all failed to reach the market to date, which leaves options open for novel targeting methods. As AMPK is not actually a single molecule and has different roles depending on its isoform composition, the opportunity for isoform-specific targeting has notably come forward, but the currently available modulators fall short of expectations. In this review, we argue that with the amount of available structural and ligand data, computer-based drug design offers a number of opportunities to undertake novel and isoform-specific targeting of AMPK.

  16. Roles of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mammalian glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, Guy A; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Leclerc, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    AMPK (5'-AMP-activated protein kinase) is emerging as a metabolic master switch, by which cells in both mammals and lower organisms sense and decode changes in energy status. Changes in AMPK activity have been shown to regulate glucose transport in muscle and glucose production by the liver. Moreover, AMPK appears to be a key regulator of at least one transcription factor linked to a monogenic form of diabetes mellitus. As a result, considerable efforts are now under way to explore the usefulness of AMPK as a therapeutic target for other forms of this disease. Here we review this topic, and discuss new findings which suggest that AMPK may play roles in regulating insulin release and the survival of pancreatic islet beta-cells, and nutrient sensing by the brain. PMID:12839490

  17. Metabolic syndrome: adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and malonyl coenzyme A.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2006-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome can be defined as a state of metabolic dysregulation characterized by insulin resistance, central obesity, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, premature atherosclerosis, and other diseases. An increasing body of evidence has linked the metabolic syndrome to abnormalities in lipid metabolism that ultimately lead to cellular dysfunction. We review here the hypothesis that, in many instances, the cause of these lipid abnormalities could be a dysregulation of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/malonyl coenzyme A (CoA) fuel-sensing and signaling mechanism. Such dysregulation could be reflected by isolated increases in malonyl CoA or by concurrent changes in malonyl CoA and AMPK, both of which would alter intracellular fatty acid partitioning. The possibility is also raised that pharmacological agents and other factors that activate AMPK and/or decrease malonyl CoA could be therapeutic targets.

  18. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-07-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  19. Abelson murine leukemia virus transformation-defective mutants with impaired P120-associated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, F H; Van de Ven, W J; Stephenson, J R

    1980-01-01

    Several transformation-defective (td) mutants of Abelson murine leukemia virus (AbLV) are described. Cells nonproductively infected with such mutants exhibited a high degree of growth contact inhibition, failed to form colonies in soft agar, lacked rescuable transforming virus, and were as susceptible as uninfected control cells to transformation by wild-type (wt) AbLV pseudotype virus. In addition, each of several td AbLV nonproductively infected cell clones analyzed was found to be nontumorigenic in vivo. Biochemical analysis of td mutant AbLV-infected clones revealed levels of expression of the major AbLV translational product, P120, and a highly related 80,000-Mr AbLV-encoded protein, P80, at concentrations analogous to those in wt AbLV-transformed cells. Although the AbLV-specific 120,000-Mr polyproteins expressed in td mutant AbLV-infected clones were indistinguishable from those in wt AbLV-transformed lines with respect to molecular weight and [35S]methionine tryptic peptide composition, they each differed from wt AbLV P120 in their patterns of post-translational phosphorylation. A previously described AbLV-associated protein kinase activity is shown to recognize as substrate a major tyrosine-specific acceptor site(s) contained within a single well-resolved tryptic peptide common to both AbLV P120 and P80. In vitro [gamma-32P]ATP-mediated labeling of this phosphorylation site was reduced to below detectable levels in td mutant nonproductively infected cell clones. These findings establish that the AbLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity are involved in AbLV tumorigenesis. Images PMID:6253663

  20. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase plays a key role in regulating MAPKAPK2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Tatsuhiko . E-mail: sudo@riken.jp; Kawai, Kayoko; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2005-11-18

    One of three major families of the mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK), p38 as well as JNK, has been shown to transduce extracellular stress stimuli into cellular responses by phospho-relay cascades. Among p38 families, p38{alpha} is a widely characterized isoform and the biological phenomena are explained by its kinase activity regulating functions of its downstream substrates. However, its specific contributions to each phenomenon are yet not fully elucidated. For better understanding of the role of MAPKs, especially p38{alpha}, we utilized newly established mouse fibroblast cell lines originated from a p38{alpha} null mouse, namely, a parental cell line without p38{alpha} gene locus, knockout of p38{alpha} (KOP), Zeosin-resistant (ZKOP), revertant of p38{alpha} (RKOP), and Exip revertant (EKOP). EKOP is smaller in size but grows faster than the others. Although comparable amounts of ERK and JNK are expressed in each cell line, ERK is highly phosphorylated in EKOP even in normal culture conditions. Serum stimulation after serum starvation led to ERK phosphorylation in RKOP and ZKOP, but not in EKOP as much. On the contrary, relative phosphorylation level of JNK to total JNK in response to UV was low in RKOP. And its phosphorylation as well as total JNK is slightly lower in EKOP. RKOP is less sensitive to UV irradiation as judged by the survival rate. Stress response upon UV or sorbitol stimuli, leading to mitogen activate protein kinase activated kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) phosphorylation, was only observed in RKOP. Further experiments reveal that MAPKAPK2 expression is largely suppressed in ZKOP and EKOP. Its expression was recovered by re-introduction of p38{alpha}. The loss of MAPKAPK2 expression accompanied by the defect of p38{alpha} is confirmed in an embryonic extract prepared from p38{alpha} null mice. These data demonstrate that p38 signal pathway is regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by modulation of the expression of its component. Together, we have

  1. Pathway illuminated: visualizing protein kinase C signaling.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Newton, Alexandra C

    2003-12-01

    Protein kinase C has been at the center of cell signaling since the discovery 25 years ago that it transduces signals that promote phospholipid hydrolysis. In recent years, the use of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters has enabled studies of the regulation of protein kinase C signaling in living cells. Advances in imaging techniques have unveiled unprecedented detail of the signal processing mechanics of protein kinase C, from the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol that regulate protein kinase C activity, to the locations and kinetics of different protein kinase C isozymes, to the spatial and temporal dynamics of substrate phosphorylation by this key enzyme. This review discusses how fluorescence imaging studies have illuminated the fidelity with which protein kinase C transduces rapidly changing extracellular information into intracellular phosphorylation signals.

  2. Collagen-induced platelet activation mainly involves the protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Karniguian, A; Grelac, F; Levy-Toledano, S; Legrand, Y J; Rendu, F

    1990-01-01

    This study analyses early biochemical events in collagen-induced platelet activation. An early metabolic event occurring during the lag phase was the activation of PtdIns(4,5)P2-specific phospholipase C. Phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) formation, phosphorylation of P43 and P20, thromboxane B2 (TXB2) synthesis and platelet secretion began after the lag phase, and were similarly time-dependent, except for TXB2 synthesis, which was delayed. Collagen induced extensive P43 phosphorylation, whereas P20 phosphorylation was weak and always lower than with thrombin. The dose-response curves of P43 phosphorylation and granule secretion were similar, and both reached a peak at 7.5 micrograms of collagen/ml, a dose which induced half-maximal PtdOH and TXB2 formation. Sphingosine, assumed to inhibit protein kinase C, inhibited P43 phosphorylation and secretion in parallel. However, sphingosine was not specific for protein kinase C, since a 15 microM concentration, which did not inhibit P43 phosphorylation, blocked TXB2 synthesis by 50%. Sphingosine did not affect PtdOH formation at all, even at 100 microM, suggesting that collagen itself induced this PtdOH formation, independently of TXB2 generation. The absence of external Ca2+ allowed the cleavage of polyphosphoinositides and the accumulation of InsP3 to occur, but impaired P43 phosphorylation, PtdOH and TXB2 formation, and secretion; these were only restored by adding 0.11 microM-Ca2+. In conclusion, stimulation of platelet membrane receptors for collagen initiates a PtdInsP2-specific phospholipase C activation, which is independent of external Ca2+, and might be the immediate receptor-linked response. A Ca2+ influx is indispensable to the triggering of subsequent platelet responses. This stimulation predominantly involves the protein kinase C pathway associated with secretion, and appears not to be mediated by TXB2, at least during its initial stage. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2163606

  3. Alteration of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase activity in rabbit ciliary processes by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Delamere, N.A.; Socci, R.R.; King, K.L. )

    1990-10-01

    The response of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase (Na,K-ATPase) to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase was examined in membranes obtained from rabbit iris-ciliary body. In the presence of the protein kinase together with 10(-5) M cAMP, Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced. No change in Na,K-ATPase activity was detected in response to the protein kinase without added cAMP. Likewise cAMP alone did not alter Na,K-ATPase activity. Reduction of Na,K-ATPase activity was also observed in the presence of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. The response of the enzyme to the kinase catalytic subunit was also examined in membranes obtained from rabbit ciliary processes. In the presence of 8 micrograms/ml of the catalytic subunit, ciliary process Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced by more than 50%. To examine whether other ATPases were suppressed by the protein kinase, calcium-stimulated ATPase activity was examined; its activity was stimulated by the catalytic subunit. To test whether the response of the ciliary process Na,K-ATPase is unique, experiments were also performed using membrane preparations from rabbit lens epithelium or rabbit kidney; the catalytic subunit significantly reduced the activity of Na,K-ATPase from the kidney but not the lens. These Na,K-ATPase studies suggest that in the iris-ciliary body, cAMP may alter sodium pump activity. In parallel 86Rb uptake studies, we observed that ouabain-inhibitable potassium uptake by intact pieces of iris-ciliary body was reduced by exogenous dibutryl cAMP or by forskolin.

  4. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Andrusiak, Matthew G.; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans was developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics of C. elegans in combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components in C. elegans. PMID:26907690

  5. Activation of protein kinase C by lysophosphatidic acid: dependence on composition of phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sando, J J; Chertihin, O I

    1996-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has attracted recent attention as a major serum-derived regulator implicated in responses to vascular injury and inflammation, in tumour invasiveness and in neuronal signalling and remodelling. Although the possibility of a specific G-protein-coupled LPA receptor protein has been suggested, characterization of such a receptor is lacking. Since LPA can activate protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in many cells and PKC activators mimic many LPA effects, the possibility of more direct LPA effects on PKC was investigated. Phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylserine (PS)/diacylglycerol (DAG) lipid vesicles of defined acyl chain composition were used to activate the enzyme. At total concentrations of saturated PC/PS + DAG vesicles (2-3 mM) that provided maximal PKC activation, 1-10 mol % [18:1]-LPA led to a further approx. 2-fold activation of PKC alpha. At lower lipid concentrations, a greater increase was observed with LPA concentrations up to 16-20 mol %. Higher concentrations of LPA were inhibitory. The LPA activation of PKC was dependent on the presence of DAG, PS and Ca2+. [18:1]-Lysophosphatidylcholine produced similar PKC activation in PC/PS/DAG vesicles. [14:0]-LPA was less effective, and longer-chain saturated lysolipids were ineffective. In unsaturated PC/PS vesicles, very little to no effect of LPA was discernable. These results suggest that physiologically or pathologically relevant concentrations of LPA can contribute to PKC activation depending on the composition of the lipid membrane. We hypothesize that LPA may affect the formation of lipid domains that are recognized by the enzyme. PMID:8713089

  6. A rice membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinase is activated in response to low temperature.

    PubMed

    Martín, M L; Busconi, L

    2001-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are found in various subcellular localizations, which suggests that this family of serine/threonine kinases may be involved in multiple signal transduction pathways. CDPKs are believed to be involved in the response of plants to low temperatures, but the precise role in the signal transduction pathway is largely unknown. Previous reports described changes in CDPKs' mRNA levels in response to cold treatment, but whether these changes are accompanied by increases in protein level and/or kinase activities is unknown. In the present study, we identify in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Don Juan) plants a 56-kD membrane-bound CDPK that is activated in response to cold treatment. Immunoblot analysis of the enzyme preparations from control and cold-treated plants showed that the kinase level was similar in both preparations. However, both kinase and autophosphorylating activities of the enzyme prepared from cold-treated plants were significantly higher than that obtained from control plants. The activation of the CDPK is detected after 12 to 18 h of cold treatment, which indicates that the kinase does not participate in the initial response to low temperature but in the adaptative process to adverse conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a CDPK that is posttranscriptionally activated in response to low temperature.

  7. Targeting AMP-activated protein kinase as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Viollet, B; Mounier, R; Leclerc, J; Yazigi, A; Foretz, M; Andreelli, F

    2007-12-01

    In the light of recent studies in humans and rodents, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, has been described as an integrator of regulatory signals monitoring systemic and cellular energy status. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been proposed to function as a 'fuel gauge' to monitor cellular energy status in response to nutritional environmental variations. Recently, it has been proposed that AMPK could provide a link in metabolic defects underlying progression to the metabolic syndrome. AMPK is a heterotrimeric enzyme complex consisting of a catalytic subunit alpha and two regulatory subunits beta and gamma. AMPK is activated by rising AMP and falling ATP. AMP activates the system by binding to the gamma subunit that triggers phosphorylation of the catalytic alpha subunit by the upstream kinases LKB1 and CaMKKbeta (calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase). AMPK system is a regulator of energy balance that, once activated by low energy status, switches on ATP-producing catabolic pathways (such as fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis), and switches off ATP-consuming anabolic pathways (such as lipogenesis), both by short-term effect on phosphorylation of regulatory proteins and by long-term effect on gene expression. As well as acting at the level of the individual cell, the system also regulates food intake and energy expenditure at the whole body level, in particular by mediating the effects of insulin sensitizing adipokines leptin and adiponectin. AMPK is robustly activated during skeletal muscle contraction and myocardial ischaemia playing a role in glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. In liver, activation of AMPK results in enhanced fatty acid oxidation as well as decreased glucose production. Moreover, the AMPK system is one of the probable targets for the anti-diabetic drugs biguanides and thiazolidinediones. Thus, the relationship between AMPK activation and beneficial metabolic

  8. Regulated exocytosis contributes to protein kinase C potentiation of vanilloid receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Morenilla-Palao, Cruz; Planells-Cases, Rosa; García-Sanz, Nuria; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2004-06-11

    The vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) plays a key role in the perception of peripheral thermal and inflammatory pain. TRPV1 expression and channel activity are notably up-regulated by proalgesic agents. The transduction pathways involved in TRPV1 sensitization are still elusive. We have used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that associate with the N terminus of TRPV1. We report that two vesicular proteins, Snapin and synaptotagmin IX (Syt IX), strongly interact in vitro and in vivo with the TRPV1 N-terminal domain. In primary dorsal root ganglion neurons, TRPV1 co-distributes in vesicles with Syt IX and the vesicular protein synaptobrevin. Neither Snapin nor Syt IX affected channel function, but they notably inhibited protein kinase C (PKC)-induced potentiation of TRPV1 channel activity with a potency that rivaled the blockade evoked by botulinum neurotoxin A, a potent blocker of neuronal exocytosis. Noteworthily, we found that PKC activation induced a rapid delivery of functional TRPV1 channels to the plasma membrane. Botulinum neurotoxin A blocked the TRPV1 membrane translocation induced by PKC that was activated with a phorbol ester or the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR5. Therefore, our results indicate that PKC signaling promotes at least in part the SNARE-dependent exocytosis of TRPV1 to the cell surface. Taken together, these findings imply that activity-dependent delivery of channels to the neuronal surface may contribute to the buildup and maintenance of thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia in peripheral nociceptor terminals.

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase enhances the phagocytic ability of macrophages and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hong-Beom; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W.; Deshane, Jessy S.; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Chaplin, David D.; Takashima, Seiji; Abraham, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Although AMPK plays well-established roles in the modulation of energy balance, recent studies have shown that AMPK activation has potent anti-inflammatory effects. In the present experiments, we examined the role of AMPK in phagocytosis. We found that ingestion of Escherichia coli or apoptotic cells by macrophages increased AMPK activity. AMPK activation increased the ability of neutrophils or macrophages to ingest bacteria (by 46±7.8 or 85±26%, respectively, compared to control, P<0.05) and the ability of macrophages to ingest apoptotic cells (by 21±1.4%, P<0.05 compared to control). AMPK activation resulted in cytoskeletal reorganization, including enhanced formation of actin and microtubule networks. Activation of PAK1/2 and WAVE2, which are downstream effectors of Rac1, accompanied AMPK activation. AMPK activation also induced phosphorylation of CLIP-170, a protein that participates in microtubule synthesis. The increase in phagocytosis was reversible by the specific AMPK inhibitor compound C, siRNA to AMPKα1, Rac1 inhibitors, or agents that disrupt actin or microtubule networks. In vivo, AMPK activation resulted in enhanced phagocytosis of bacteria in the lungs by 75 ± 5% vs. control (P<0.05). These results demonstrate a novel function for AMPK in enhancing the phagocytic activity of neutrophils and macrophages.—Bae, H. -B., Zmijewski, J. W., Deshane, J. S., Tadie, J. -M., Chaplin, D. D., Takashima, S., Abraham, E. AMP-activated protein kinase enhances the phagocytic ability of macrophages and neutrophils. PMID:21885655

  10. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  11. Effects of dipalmitoylglycerol and fatty acids on membrane structure and protein kinase C activity.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, E M; Zidovetzki, R

    1997-01-01

    The individual and combined effects of the saturated diacylglycerol (DAG) dipalmitin (DP) and saturated or polyunsaturated unesterified fatty acids (PUFAs) on both the structure of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS; 4:1 mol/mol) bilayers and on protein kinase C (PKC) activity were studied using 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and enzyme activity assays. In the absence of DP, PUFAs only slightly activated PKC whereas palmitic acid had no effect. In the absence of fatty acids, DP induced lateral phase separation of the bilayer into liquid-crystalline and gel phases. Under these conditions virtually all DP was sequestered into the gel phase and no activation of PKC was observed. The addition of polyunsaturated arachidonic or docosahexaenoic acids to the DP-containing bilayers significantly increased the relative amounts of DP and other lipid components in the liquid-crystalline phase, correlating with a dramatic increase in PKC activity. Furthermore, the effect was greater with PS, resulting in an enrichment of PS in the liquid-crystalline domains. In the presence of DP, palmitic acid did not decrease the amount of gel phase lipid and had no effect on PKC activity. The results explain the observed lack of PKC-activating capacity of long-chain saturated DAGs as due to the sequestration of DAG into gel domains wherein it is complexed with phospholipids and thus not available for the required interaction with the enzyme. PMID:9370455

  12. Modulation of Brahma expression by the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway is associated with changes in melanoma proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Aanchal; Saladi, Srinivas Vinod; Trivedi, Archit R; Aras, Shweta; Qi, Huiling; Jayanthy, Ashika; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi; de la Serna, Ivana L

    2014-12-01

    Brahma (BRM) and Brahma-related gene 1(BRG1) are catalytic subunits of SWItch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complexes. BRM is epigenetically silenced in a wide-range of tumors. Mutations in the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) gene occur frequently in melanoma and lead to constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) pathway. We tested the hypothesis that BRM expression is modulated by oncogenic BRAF and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in melanocytes and melanoma cells. Expression of oncogenic BRAF in melanocytes and melanoma cells that are wild-type for BRAF decreased BRM expression and increased BRG1 expression. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) or selective inhibition of BRAF in melanoma cells that harbor oncogenic BRAF increased BRM expression and decreased BRG1 expression. Increased BRM expression was associated with increased histone acetylation on the BRM promoter. Over-expression of BRM in melanoma cells that harbor oncogenic BRAF promoted changes in cell cycle progression and apoptosis consistent with a tumor suppressive role. Upon inhibition of BRAF(V600E) with PLX4032, BRM promoted survival. PLX4032 induced changes in BRM function were correlated with increased acetylation of the BRM protein. This study provides insights into the epigenetic consequences of inhibiting oncogenic BRAF in melanoma through modulation of SWI/SNF subunit expression and function.

  13. Vitamin E protected cultured cortical neurons from oxidative stress-induced cell death through the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Numakawa, Yumiko; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Yagasaki, Yuki; Kumamaru, Emi; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Takahisa; Niki, Etsuo

    2006-05-01

    The role of vitamin E in the CNS has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we found that pre-treatment with vitamin E analogs including alphaT (alpha-tocopherol), alphaT3 (alpha -tocotrienol), gammaT, and gammaT3 for 24 h prevented the cultured cortical neurons from cell death in oxidative stress stimulated by H2O2, while Trolox, a cell-permeable analog of alphaT, did not. The preventive effect of alphaT was dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Furthermore, we found that alphaT exposure induced the activation of both the MAP kinase (MAPK) and PI3 kinase (PI3K) pathways and that the alphaT-dependent survival effect was blocked by the inhibitors, U0126 (an MAPK pathway inhibitor) or LY294002 (a PI3K pathway inhibitor). Interestingly, the up-regulation of Bcl-2 (survival promoting molecule) was induced by alphaT application. The up-regulation of Bcl-2 did not occur in the presence of U0126 or LY294002, suggesting that alphaT-up-regulated Bcl-2 is mediated by these kinase pathways. These observations suggest that vitamin E analogs play an essential role in neuronal maintenance and survival in the CNS.

  14. Roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3'-kinase in ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor-mediated heregulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Vijapurkar, Ulka; Kim, Myong-Soo; Koland, John G

    2003-04-01

    ErbB2/HER2 and ErbB3/HER3, two members of the ErbB/HER family, together constitute a heregulin coreceptor complex that elicits a potent mitogenic and transforming signal. Among known intracellular effectors of the ErbB2/ErbB3 heregulin coreceptor are mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase. Activation of the distinct MAPK and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways by the ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor in response to heregulin and their relative contributions to the mitogenic and transformation potentials of the activated coreceptor were investigated here. To this end, cDNAs encoding the wild-type ErbB3 protein (ErbB3-WT) and ErbB3 proteins with amino acid substitutions in either the Shc-binding site (ErbB3-Y1325F), the six putative PI 3-kinase-binding sites (ErbB3-6F), or both (ErbB3-7F) were generated and expressed in NIH-3T3 cells to form functional ErbB2/ErbB3 heregulin coreceptors. While the coreceptor incorporating ErbB3-WT activated both the MAPK and the PI 3-kinase signaling pathways, those incorporating ErbB3-Y1325F or ErbB3-6F activated either PI 3-kinase or MAPK, respectively. The ErbB2/ErbB3-7F coreceptor activated neither. Elimination of either signaling pathway lowered basal and eliminated heregulin-dependent expression of cyclin D1, which was in each case accompanied by an attenuated mitogenic response. Selective elimination of the PI 3-kinase pathway severely impaired the ability of heregulin to transform cells expressing the coreceptor, whereas attenuation of the MAPK pathway had a lesser effect. Thus, while both pathways contributed in a roughly additive manner to the mitogenic response elicited by the activated ErbB2/ErbB3 coreceptor, the PI 3-kinase pathway predominated in the induction of cellular transformation.

  15. Inca: a novel p21-activated kinase-associated protein required for cranial neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Xu, Yanhua; Hoffman, Trevor L; Zhang, Tailin; Schilling, Thomas; Sargent, Thomas D

    2007-04-01

    Inca (induced in neural crest by AP2) is a novel protein discovered in a microarray screen for genes that are upregulated in Xenopus embryos by the transcriptional activator protein Tfap2a. It has no significant similarity to any known protein, but is conserved among vertebrates. In Xenopus, zebrafish and mouse embryos, Inca is expressed predominantly in the premigratory and migrating neural crest (NC). Knockdown experiments in frog and fish using antisense morpholinos reveal essential functions for Inca in a subset of NC cells that form craniofacial cartilage. Cells lacking Inca migrate successfully but fail to condense into skeletal primordia. Overexpression of Inca disrupts cortical actin and prevents formation of actin "purse strings", which are required for wound healing in Xenopus embryos. We show that Inca physically interacts with p21-activated kinase 5 (PAK5), a known regulator of the actin cytoskeleton that is co-expressed with Inca in embryonic ectoderm, including in the NC. These results suggest that Inca and PAK5 cooperate in restructuring cytoskeletal organization and in the regulation of cell adhesion in the early embryo and in NC cells during craniofacial development.

  16. Impact of 5'-amp-activated Protein Kinase on Male Gonad and Spermatozoa Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep

    2017-01-01

    As we already know, the male reproductive system requires less energetic investment than the female one. Nevertheless, energy balance is an important feature for spermatozoa production in the testis and for spermatozoa properties after ejaculation. The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK, is a sensor of cell energy, that regulates many metabolic pathways and that has been recently shown to control spermatozoa quality and functions. It is indeed involved in the regulation of spermatozoa quality through its action on the proliferation of testicular somatic cells (Sertoli and Leydig), on spermatozoa motility and acrosome reaction. It also favors spermatozoa quality through the management of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes. I review here the most recent data available on the roles of AMPK in vertebrate spermatozoa functions. PMID:28386541

  17. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates sidestream cigarette smoke-induced endothelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Low, Brad; Liang, Mei; Fu, Jian

    2007-07-01

    Second-hand smoke is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. So far, little is known about the signaling mechanisms of second-hand smoke-induced vascular dysfunction. Endothelial junctions are fundamental structures important for maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our study showed that sidestream cigarette smoke (SCS), a major component of second-hand smoke, was able to disrupt endothelial junctions and increase endothelial permeability. Sidestream cigarette smoke stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and myosin light chain (MLC). A selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK (SB203580) prevented SCS-induced loss of endothelial barrier integrity as evidenced by transendothelial resistance measurements. Resveratrol, an antioxidant that was able to inhibit SCS-induced p38 MAPK and MLC phosphorylation, also protected endothelial cells from the damage. Thus, p38 MAPK mediates SCS-induced endothelial permeability. Inhibition of p38 MAPK may have therapeutic potential for second-hand smoke-induced vascular injury.

  18. Cellular progesterone receptor phosphorylation in response to ligands activating protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.V.; Peralta, W.D.; Greene, G.L.; Fox, C.F.

    1987-08-14

    Progesterone receptors were immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies KD68 from lysates of human breast carcinoma T47D cells labelled to steady state specific activity with /sup 32/Pi. The 120 kDa /sup 32/P-labelled progesterone receptor band was resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by autoradiography. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed serine phosphorylation, but no threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation. Treatment of the /sup 32/Pi-labelled cells with EGF, TPA or dibutyryl cAMP had no significant quantitative effect on progesterone receptor phosphorylation, though the EGF receptor and the cAMP-dependent protein kinases have been reported to catalyze phosphorylation of purified avian progesterone receptor preparations in cell free systems. Progesterone receptor phosphorylation on serine residues was increased by 2-fold in cells treated with 10 nM progesterone; EGF had no effect on progesterone-mediated progesterone receptor phosphorylation.

  19. Complexes between STE5 and components of the pheromone-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase module.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, S; Polverino, A; Barr, M; Wigler, M

    1994-01-01

    We present genetic evidence for complex formation of STE5 and the STE11, STE7, and FUS3 protein kinases, the pheromone-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase module of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interaction between STE5 and STE11 is not dependent on STE7, and interaction between STE5 and STE7 does not require STE11. The N-terminal regulatory domain of STE11 is both necessary and sufficient for interaction with STE5. Interaction between STE7 and STE11 is bridged by STE5, suggesting the formation of a multiprotein complex. We also demonstrate biochemical interaction between STE5 and STE11 by using a combination of bacterially expressed fusion proteins and extracts prepared from yeast. Our results suggest that STE5 is a scaffolding protein that facilitates interactions between components of the pheromone-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase module. We further propose that such scaffolding proteins serve to inhibit cross-talk between functionally unrelated mitogen-activated protein kinase modules within the same cell. Images PMID:8052657

  20. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling.

  1. Glabridin induces glucose uptake via the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Keisuke; Yamashita, Yoko; Zhang, Tianshun; Nakagawa, Kaku; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2014-08-05

    The present study demonstrates that glabridin, a prenylated isoflavone in licorice, stimulates glucose uptake through the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in L6 myotubes. Treatment with glabridin for 4h induced glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner accompanied by the translocation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane. Glabridin needed at least 4h to increase glucose uptake, while it significantly decreased glycogen and increased lactic acid within 15 min. Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK by Compound C suppressed the glabridin-induced glucose uptake, whereas phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt inhibition by LY294002 and Akt1/2 inhibitor, respectively, did not. Furthermore, glabridin induced AMPK phosphorylation, and siRNA for AMPK completely abolished glabridin-induced glucose uptake. We confirmed that glabridin-rich licorice extract prevent glucose intolerance accompanied by the AMPK-dependent GLUT4 translocation in the plasma membrane of mice skeletal muscle. These results indicate that glabridin may possess a therapeutic effect on metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and hyperglycemia, by modulating glucose metabolism through AMPK in skeletal muscle cells.

  2. Protein kinaseactivates NF-κB in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-κB in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-κB regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKCη) regulates NF-κB upstream signaling by activating the IκB kinase (IKK) and the degradation of IκB. Furthermore, PKCη enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-κB under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKCη confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKCη is involved in NF-κB signaling leading to drug resistance.

  3. Cell cycle regulation of breast cancer cells through estrogen-induced activities of ERK and Akt protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, Nancy; Guédin, Aurore; Dacquet, Catherine; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2005-06-15

    The proliferative effect of estrogens on breast cancer cell (BCC) is mainly mediated through estrogen receptors (ER). Non-transcriptional effects of estrogens, exerted through activation of several protein kinases, may also contribute to BCC proliferation. However, the relative contribution of these two responses to BCC proliferation is not known. We characterized a novel estrogenic receptor ligand which possess Akt and ERK activating properties distinct from that of 17beta-estradiol. Early and delayed waves of activation of these kinases were detected upon estrogenic challenge of BCC, but only molecules able to promote a significant, delayed activation of ERK-induced BCC proliferation. Estrogen-induced cell cycle progression was not sensitive to the inhibition of ERK-regulating kinases MEK1 and 2. ERalpha was found to be necessary, but not sufficient for kinases activation. Thus, estrogens elicit a distinct pattern of early and delayed activation of ERK and Akt, and early protein kinase activation is probably not involved in BCC proliferation. Structural variations in the estrogen molecule may confer novel biological properties unrelated to estrogen-dependent transcriptional activation.

  4. Mechanism of protein kinase C activation by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myungho; Bell, R.M. )

    1991-01-29

    The mechanism of protein kinase C (PKC) activation by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol (PI) was investigated by using Triton X-100 mixed micellar methods. The activation of PKC by PIP{sub 2}, for which maximal activity was 60% of that elicited by sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG), was similar to activation by DAG in several respects: (1) activation by PIP{sub 2} and DAG required phosphatidylserine (PS) as a phospholipid cofactor, (2) PIP{sub 2} and DAG reduced the concentration of Ca{sup 2+} and PS required for activation, (3) the concentration dependences of activation by PIP{sub 2} and DAG depended on the concentration of PS, and (4) PIP{sub 2} and DAG complemented one another to achieve maximal activation. On the other hand, PIP{sub 2} activation of the PKC differed from activation by DAG in several respects. With increasing concentrations of PIP{sub 2}, (1) the optimal concentration of PS required was constant at 12 mol%, (2) the maximal activity at 12 mol% PS increased, and (3) the cooperativity for PS decreased. PIP{sub 2} did not inhibit ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binding of PKC at saturating levels of PS; however, at subsaturating levels of PS, PIP{sub 2} enhanced ({sup 3}H)PDBu binding by acting as a phospholipid cofactor. PIP did not function as an activator but served as a phospholipid cofactor in the presence of PS. These data establish that PIP{sub 2}, PIP, and PI can function to spare, in part, the PS phospholipid cofactor requirement of PKC, and they demonstrate that PIP{sub 2} but not PIP and PI can function as a lipid activator of PKC by mechanisms distinct from those of DAG and phorbol esters.

  5. Areca (betel) nut extract activates mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-kappaB in oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Chun; Lu, Suu-Yi; Lee, Szu-Ying; Lin, Chi-Yen; Chen, Chun-Hsien; Chang, Kuo-Wei

    2005-09-10

    Areca (betel) was recently proved a carcinogenic substance by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, the signaling impact of areca in oral keratinocyte is still obscure. Mitogen-activated protein kinase superfamilies, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, together with transcription factor NF-kappaB, are important signaling elements. We examined the activation of these signaling pathways in OECM-1 and SAS oral keratinocytes, treated with ripe areca nut extract (ANE). In both cells, a rapid increase in JNK1 activity at 0.5 hr was noted following treatment of ANE. ERK was profoundly activated during 0.5-2 hr in OECM-1 cells. Contrasting p38 activity was noted in these 2 cells. In both cells, ANE also activated NF-kappaB pathway in a biphasic manner, particularly for SAS cells. NF-kappaB was activated by approximately 2- to 4-fold at 0.5-1 hr and a plateau or slight decrease of activity existed between 1 and 6 hr. Later, another higher episode of NF-kappaB activity was raised. This was accompanied with the rapid degradation in cytosolic IkappaBalpha as well as an increase of nuclear NF-kappaB in both cells. ANE treatment did not activate epidermal growth factor receptor signaling system, but blockage of NF-kappaB activation rendered the suppression of ANE-modulated COX-2 upregulation in OECM-1. This study identified that ANE affected interactive signaling systems in oral keratonocytes that could be the pathogenetic basis for areca.

  6. Local activation of protein kinase A inhibits morphogenetic movements during Xenopus gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Byung-Ho; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2003-05-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has various biological roles in many organisms. However, little is known about its role in the developmental processes of vertebrates. In this study, we describe the functional analysis of PKA during gastrulation movements in Xenopus laevis. Overexpression of constitutively active PKA (cPKA) in the dorsal equatorial region of the embryo affects morphogenetic movement during gastrulation. We also show that intrinsic differences of PKA activities along the dorsoventral axis are set up and the level of PKA activity on the dorsal region is lower than that on the ventral region from late blastula to gastrula stages. In addition, PKA activation in animal explants inhibits activin-induced elongation. In cPKA-injected embryos, there were no changes in the expressions of markers involved in mesoderm specification, although the correct expression domains of these genes were altered. The effects of PKA activation can be restored by coexpression of PKI, a pseudosubstrate of PKA. We further analyzed the effects of PKA activation on the behavior of migratory gastrulating cells in vitro. Expression of cPKA in head mesoderm cells causes less polarized and/or randomized migration as demonstrated by a directional cell migration assay. Finally, we show that RhoA GTPase lies downstream of PKA, affecting activin-induced convergent extension movements. Taken together, these results suggest that overexpressed PKA can modulate a pathway responsible for morphogenetic movements during Xenopus gastrulation.

  7. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  8. Protein kinase C activity and the relations between blood lead and neurobehavioral function in lead workers.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kyu-Yoon; Lee, Byung-Kook; Bressler, Joseph P; Bolla, Karen I; Stewart, Walter F; Schwartz, Brian S

    2002-01-01

    At picomolar concentrations, lead activates protein kinase C (PKC). This activation has been implicated in the neurotoxicity of lead. No prior study has evaluated the association of PKC activity with neurobehavioral function in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PKC activity is associated with neurobehavioral function or modifies the relationship between blood lead levels and neurobehavioral test scores. In this cross-sectional study of 212 current lead workers in the Republic of Korea, we assessed blood lead levels, neurobehavioral test scores, and PKC activity. PKC activity was determined by measuring the levels of phosphorylation of three erythrocyte membrane proteins (spectrin and the 52-kDa and 48-kDa subunits of band 4.9), using an in vitro back-phosphorylation assay. When linear regression was used to control for confounding variables, blood lead was a significant predictor of decrements in performance on tests of psychomotor function, manual dexterity, and executive ability. In linear regression models, back-phosphorylation levels were not associated with neurobehavioral test scores, but when dichotomized at the median, back-phosphorylation levels modified the relationship between blood lead and test scores. For spectrin and the 52-kDa and 48-kDa subunits of band 4.9, 5, 2, and 5 of 14 interaction terms, respectively, had associated p-values less than 0.10, all with positive signs, indicating that blood lead was associated with worse test scores only in subjects with lower back-phosphorylation levels. These data indicate that blood lead levels are associated with decrements in neurobehavioral test scores, mainly in the domains of manual dexterity and psychomotor function, but only in subjects with lower in vitro back-phosphorylation levels, which is equivalent to higher in vivo PKC activity. We hypothesize that subjects with higher PKC activity in the presence of lead may be more susceptible to the health effects of lead. PMID

  9. Protein kinase C activity and the relations between blood lead and neurobehavioral function in lead workers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyu-Yoon; Lee, Byung-Kook; Bressler, Joseph P; Bolla, Karen I; Stewart, Walter F; Schwartz, Brian S

    2002-02-01

    At picomolar concentrations, lead activates protein kinase C (PKC). This activation has been implicated in the neurotoxicity of lead. No prior study has evaluated the association of PKC activity with neurobehavioral function in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PKC activity is associated with neurobehavioral function or modifies the relationship between blood lead levels and neurobehavioral test scores. In this cross-sectional study of 212 current lead workers in the Republic of Korea, we assessed blood lead levels, neurobehavioral test scores, and PKC activity. PKC activity was determined by measuring the levels of phosphorylation of three erythrocyte membrane proteins (spectrin and the 52-kDa and 48-kDa subunits of band 4.9), using an in vitro back-phosphorylation assay. When linear regression was used to control for confounding variables, blood lead was a significant predictor of decrements in performance on tests of psychomotor function, manual dexterity, and executive ability. In linear regression models, back-phosphorylation levels were not associated with neurobehavioral test scores, but when dichotomized at the median, back-phosphorylation levels modified the relationship between blood lead and test scores. For spectrin and the 52-kDa and 48-kDa subunits of band 4.9, 5, 2, and 5 of 14 interaction terms, respectively, had associated p-values less than 0.10, all with positive signs, indicating that blood lead was associated with worse test scores only in subjects with lower back-phosphorylation levels. These data indicate that blood lead levels are associated with decrements in neurobehavioral test scores, mainly in the domains of manual dexterity and psychomotor function, but only in subjects with lower in vitro back-phosphorylation levels, which is equivalent to higher in vivo PKC activity. We hypothesize that subjects with higher PKC activity in the presence of lead may be more susceptible to the health effects of lead.

  10. Novel epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) analogs activate AMP-activated protein kinase pathway and target cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Pamu, Sreedhar; Cui, Qiuzhi; Chan, Tak Hang; Dou, Q. Ping

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical monitor of cellular energy status and also controls processes related to tumor development, including cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, cell growth and survival. Therefore AMPK as an anti-cancer target has received intensive attention recently. It has been reported that the anti-diabetic drug metformin and some natural compounds, such as quercetin, genistein, capsaicin and green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can activate AMPK and inhibit cancer cell growth. Indeed, natural products have been the most productive source of leads for the development of anti-cancer drugs but perceived disadvantages, such as low bioavailability and week potency, have limited their development and use in the clinic. In this study we demonstrated that synthetic EGCG analogs 4 and 6 were more potent AMPK activators than metformin and EGCG. Activation of AMPK by these EGCG analogs resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation, up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, down-regulation of mTOR pathway, and suppression of stem cell population in human breast cancer cells. Our findings suggest that novel potent and specific AMPK activators can be discovered from natural and synthetic sources that have potential to be used for anti-cancer therapy in the clinic. PMID:22459208

  11. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) controls diacylglycerol kinase activity in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabet, Ricardos; Moutin, Enora; Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Heintz, Dimitri; Fouillen, Laetitia; Flatter, Eric; Krężel, Wojciech; Alunni, Violaine; Koebel, Pascale; Dembélé, Doulaye; Tassone, Flora; Bardoni, Barbara; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Vitale, Nicolas; Muller, Dominique; Le Merrer, Julie; Moine, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the absence of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) in neurons. In the mouse, the lack of FMRP is associated with an excessive translation of hundreds of neuronal proteins, notably including postsynaptic proteins. This local protein synthesis deregulation is proposed to underlie the observed defects of glutamatergic synapse maturation and function and to affect preferentially the hundreds of mRNA species that were reported to bind to FMRP. How FMRP impacts synaptic protein translation and which mRNAs are most important for the pathology remain unclear. Here we show by cross-linking immunoprecipitation in cortical neurons that FMRP is mostly associated with one unique mRNA: diacylglycerol kinase kappa (Dgkκ), a master regulator that controls the switch between diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways. The absence of FMRP in neurons abolishes group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent DGK activity combined with a loss of Dgkκ expression. The reduction of Dgkκ in neurons is sufficient to cause dendritic spine abnormalities, synaptic plasticity alterations, and behavior disorders similar to those observed in the FXS mouse model. Overexpression of Dgkκ in neurons is able to rescue the dendritic spine defects of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene KO neurons. Together, these data suggest that Dgkκ deregulation contributes to FXS pathology and support a model where FMRP, by controlling the translation of Dgkκ, indirectly controls synaptic proteins translation and membrane properties by impacting lipid signaling in dendritic spine. PMID:27233938

  12. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) controls diacylglycerol kinase activity in neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabet, Ricardos; Moutin, Enora; Becker, Jérôme A J; Heintz, Dimitri; Fouillen, Laetitia; Flatter, Eric; Krężel, Wojciech; Alunni, Violaine; Koebel, Pascale; Dembélé, Doulaye; Tassone, Flora; Bardoni, Barbara; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Vitale, Nicolas; Muller, Dominique; Le Merrer, Julie; Moine, Hervé

    2016-06-28

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the absence of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) in neurons. In the mouse, the lack of FMRP is associated with an excessive translation of hundreds of neuronal proteins, notably including postsynaptic proteins. This local protein synthesis deregulation is proposed to underlie the observed defects of glutamatergic synapse maturation and function and to affect preferentially the hundreds of mRNA species that were reported to bind to FMRP. How FMRP impacts synaptic protein translation and which mRNAs are most important for the pathology remain unclear. Here we show by cross-linking immunoprecipitation in cortical neurons that FMRP is mostly associated with one unique mRNA: diacylglycerol kinase kappa (Dgkκ), a master regulator that controls the switch between diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways. The absence of FMRP in neurons abolishes group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent DGK activity combined with a loss of Dgkκ expression. The reduction of Dgkκ in neurons is sufficient to cause dendritic spine abnormalities, synaptic plasticity alterations, and behavior disorders similar to those observed in the FXS mouse model. Overexpression of Dgkκ in neurons is able to rescue the dendritic spine defects of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene KO neurons. Together, these data suggest that Dgkκ deregulation contributes to FXS pathology and support a model where FMRP, by controlling the translation of Dgkκ, indirectly controls synaptic proteins translation and membrane properties by impacting lipid signaling in dendritic spine.

  13. AJUBA LIM Proteins Limit Hippo Activity in Proliferating Cells by Sequestering the Hippo Core Kinase Complex in the Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Radhika; Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Zhang, Kun; Loza, Andrew J.; Yabuta, Norikazu; Nojima, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway controls organ growth and is implicated in cancer development. Whether and how Hippo pathway activity is limited to sustain or initiate cell growth when needed is not understood. The members of the AJUBA family of LIM proteins are negative regulators of the Hippo pathway. In mammalian epithelial cells, we found that AJUBA LIM proteins limit Hippo regulation of YAP, in proliferating cells only, by sequestering a cytosolic Hippo kinase complex in which LATS kinase is inhibited. At the plasma membranes of growth-arrested cells, AJUBA LIM proteins do not inhibit or associate with the Hippo kinase complex. The ability of AJUBA LIM proteins to inhibit YAP regulation by Hippo and to associate with the kinase complex directly correlate with their capacity to limit Hippo signaling during Drosophila wing development. AJUBA LIM proteins did not influence YAP activity in response to cell-extrinsic or cell-intrinsic mechanical signals. Thus, AJUBA LIM proteins limit Hippo pathway activity in contexts where cell proliferation is needed. PMID:27457617

  14. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-based classification of diabetes pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, D; Kalra, S; Sharma, M

    2016-09-21

    The current classification of both diabetes and antidiabetes medication is complex, preventing a treating physician from choosing the most appropriate treatment for an individual patient, sometimes resulting in patient-drug mismatch. We propose a novel, simple systematic classification of drugs, based on their effect on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the master regular of energy metabolism, an energy sensor, activated when cellular energy levels are low, resulting in activation of catabolic process, and inactivation of anabolic process, having a beneficial effect on glycemia in diabetes. This listing of drugs makes it easier for students and practitioners to analyze drug profiles and match them with patient requirements. It also facilitates choice of rational combinations, with complementary modes of action. Drugs are classified as stimulators, inhibitors, mixed action, possible action, and no action on AMPK activity. Metformin and glitazones are pure stimulators of AMPK. Incretin-based therapies have a mixed action on AMPK. Sulfonylureas either inhibit AMPK or have no effect on AMPK. Glycemic efficacy of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor, colesevelam, and bromocriptine may also involve AMPK activation, which warrants further evaluation. Berberine, salicylates, and resveratrol are newer promising agents in the management of diabetes, having well-documented evidence of AMPK stimulation medicated glycemic efficacy. Hence, AMPK-based classification of antidiabetes medications provides a holistic unifying understanding of pharmacotherapy in diabetes. This classification is flexible with a scope for inclusion of promising agents of future.

  15. Antifibrotic effects of noscapine through activation of prostaglandin E2 receptors and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kach, Jacob; Sandbo, Nathan; La, Jennifer; Denner, Darcy; Reed, Eleanor B; Akimova, Olga; Koltsova, Svetlana; Orlov, Sergei N; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2014-03-14

    Myofibroblast differentiation is a key process in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disease. We have shown previously that differentiation of myofibroblasts is regulated by microtubule polymerization state. In this work, we examined the potential antifibrotic effects of the antitussive drug, noscapine, recently found to bind microtubules and affect microtubule dynamics. Noscapine inhibited TGF-β-induced differentiation of cultured human lung fibroblasts (HLFs). Therapeutic noscapine treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin model of the disease. Noscapine did not affect gross microtubule content in HLFs, but inhibited TGF-β-induced stress fiber formation and activation of serum response factor without affecting Smad signaling. Furthermore, noscapine stimulated a rapid and profound activation of protein kinase A (PKA), which mediated the antifibrotic effect of noscapine in HLFs, as assessed with the PKA inhibitor, PKI. In contrast, noscapine did not activate PKA in human bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells. Finally, activation of PKA and the antifibrotic effect of noscapine in HLFs were blocked by the EP2 prostaglandin E2 receptor antagonist, PF-04418948, but not by the antagonists of EP4, prostaglandin D2, or prostacyclin receptors. Together, we demonstrate for the first time the antifibrotic effect of noscapine in vitro and in vivo, and we describe a novel mechanism of noscapine action through EP2 prostaglandin E2 receptor-mediated activation of PKA in pulmonary fibroblasts.

  16. Aplotaxene blocks T cell activation by modulation of protein kinase C-θ-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Na, Bo-Ra; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Hyun-Su; Piragyte, Indre; Choi, Eun-Ju; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Han, Weon-Cheol; Lee, Seung-Ho; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2013-12-01

    Aplotaxene, (8Z, 11Z, 14Z)-heptadeca-1, 8, 11, 14-tetraene, is one of the major components of essential oil obtained from Inula helenium root, which is used in Oriental medicine. However, the effects of aplotaxene on immunity have not been investigated. Here, we show that aplotaxene inhibits T cell activation in terms of IL-2 and CD69 expression. Aplotaxene, at a concentration that optimally inhibits IL-2 production, has little effect on apoptotic or necrotic cell death, suggesting that apoptosis is not a mechanism for aplotaxene-mediated inhibition of T cell activation. Aplotaxene affects neither superantigeninduced conjugate formation between Jurkat T cells and Raji B cells nor clustering of CD3 and LFA-1 at the immunological synapse. Aplotaxene significantly inhibits PKC-θ phosphorylation and translocation to the immunological synapse, and blocks PMA-induced T-cell receptor internalization. Furthermore, aplotaxene leads to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK, ERK and p38) phosphorylation and NF-κB, NF-AT, and AP-1 promoter activities in Jurkat T cells. Taken together, our findings provide evidence for the immunosuppressive effect of aplotaxene on activated T cells through the modulation of the PKC-θ and MAPK pathways, suggesting that aplotaxene may be a novel immunotherapeutic agent for immunological diseases related to the overactivation of T cells.

  17. The c-mos proto-oncogene protein kinase turns on and maintains the activity of MAP kinase, but not MPF, in cell-free extracts of Xenopus oocytes and eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Nebreda, A R; Hunt, T

    1993-01-01

    During studies of the activation and inactivation of the cyclin B-p34cdc2 protein kinase (MPF) in cell-free extracts of Xenopus oocytes and eggs, we found that a bacterially expressed fusion protein between the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein and the Xenopus c-mos protein kinase (malE-mos) activated a 42 kDa MAP kinase. The activation of MAP kinase on addition of malE-mos was consistent, whereas the activation of MPF was variable and failed to occur in some oocyte extracts in which cyclin A or okadaic acid activated both MPF and MAP kinase. In cases when MPF activation was transient, MAP kinase activity declined after MPF activity was lost, and MAP kinase, but not MPF, could be maintained at a high level by the presence of malE-mos. When intact oocytes were treated with progesterone, however, the activation of MPF and MAP kinase occurred simultaneously, in contrast to the behaviour of extracts. These observations suggest that one role of c-mos may be to maintain high MAP kinase activity in meiosis. They also imply that the activation of MPF and MAP kinase in vivo are synchronous events that normally rely on an agent that has still to be identified. Images PMID:8387916

  18. Thrombopoietin potentiates agonist-stimulated activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Ezumi, Y; Nishida, E; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    1999-07-22

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) plays a crucial role in megakaryocyte differentiation and platelet production. c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO, is also expressed in terminally differentiated platelets. We investigated the effects of TPO on activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in human platelets. Thrombin, a thrombin receptor agonist peptide, a thromboxane A(2) analogue, collagen, crosslinking the glycoprotein VI, ADP, and epinephrine, but not phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate activated p38. TPO did not activate p38 by itself, whereas TPO pretreatment potentiated the agonist-induced activation of p38. TPO did not promote phosphorylation of Hsp27 and cytosolic phospholipase A(2) by itself, but enhanced thrombin-induced phosphorylation of them. The specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 strongly inhibited such phosphorylation. Thus, TPO possesses the priming effect on p38 activation in human platelets and could affect platelet functions through the p38 pathway.

  19. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators for the prevention, treatment and potential reversal of pathological pain

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J.; Das, Vaskar; Dussor, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Pathological pain is an enormous medical problem that places a significant burden on patients and can result from an injury that has long since healed or be due to an unidentifiable cause. Although treatments exist, they often either lack efficacy or have intolerable side effects. More importantly, they do not reverse the changes in the nervous system mediating pathological pain, and thus symptoms often return when therapies are discontinued. Consequently, novel therapies are urgently needed that have both improved efficacy and disease-modifying properties. Here we highlight an emerging target for novel pain therapies, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is capable of regulating a variety of cellular processes including protein translation, activity of other kinases, and mitochondrial metabolism, many of which are thought to contribute to pathological pain. Consistent with these properties, preclinical studies show positive, and in some cases disease-modifying effects of either pharmacological activation or genetic regulation of AMPK in models of nerve injury, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), postsurgical pain, inflammatory pain, and diabetic neuropathy. Given the AMPK-activating ability of metformin, a widely prescribed and well-tolerated drug, these preclinical studies provide a strong rationale for both retrospective and prospective human pain trials with this drug. They also argue for the development of novel AMPK activators, whether orthosteric, allosteric, or modulators of events upstream of the kinase. Together, this review will present the case for AMPK as a novel therapeutic target for pain and will discuss future challenges in the path toward development of AMPK-based pain therapeutics. PMID:26521775

  20. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Activation of Protein Kinase C Isoforms & Its Impact on Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Geraldes, Pedro; King, George L

    2010-01-01

    Both cardio- and microvascular complications adversely affect the life quality of patients with diabetes and have been the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in this population. Cardiovascular pathologies of diabetes have an effect on microvenules, arteries, and myocardium. It is believed that hyperglycemia is one of the most important metabolic factors in the development of both micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. Several prominent hypotheses exist to explain the adverse effect of hyperglycemia. One of them is the chronic activation by hyperglycemia of protein kinase C (PKC), a family of enzymes that are involved in controlling the function of other proteins. PKC has been associated with vascular alterations such as increases in permeability, contractility, extracellular matrix synthesis, cell growth and apoptosis, angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, and cytokine activation and inhibition. These perturbations in vascular cell homeostasis caused by different PKC isoforms (PKC-α, -β1/2, and PKC-δ) are linked to the development of pathologies affecting large vessel (atherosclerosis, cardiomyopathy) and small vessel (retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) complications. Clinical trials using a PKC-β isoform inhibitor have been conducted, with some positive results for diabetic nonproliferative retinopathy, nephropathy and endothelial dysfunction. This paper reviews current understanding of how PKC isoforms cause vascular dysfunctions and pathologies in diabetes. PMID:20431074

  2. c-Kit-kinase induces a cascade of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in normal human melanocytes in response to mast cell growth factor and stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase but is down-regulated in melanomas.

    PubMed Central

    Funasaka, Y; Boulton, T; Cobb, M; Yarden, Y; Fan, B; Lyman, S D; Williams, D E; Anderson, D M; Zakut, R; Mishima, Y

    1992-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Kit, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is an important regulator of cell growth whose constitutively active oncogenic counterpart, v-kit, induces sarcomas in cats. Mutations in murine c-kit that reduce the receptor tyrosine kinase activity cause deficiencies in the migration and proliferation of melanoblasts, hematopoietic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. We therefore investigated whether c-Kit regulates normal human melanocyte proliferation and plays a role in melanomas. We show that normal human melanocytes respond to mast cell growth factor (MGF), the Kit-ligand that stimulates phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in c-Kit and induces sequential phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in several other proteins. One of the phosphorylated intermediates in the signal transduction pathway was identified as an early response kinase (mitogen-activated protein [MAP] kinase). Dephosphorylation of a prominent 180-kDa protein suggests that MGF also activates a phosphotyrosine phosphatase. In contrast, MGF did not induce proliferation, the cascade of protein phosphorylations, or MAP kinase activation in the majority of cells cultured from primary nodular and metastatic melanomas that grow independently of exogenous factors. In the five out of eight human melanoma lines expressing c-kit mRNAs, c-Kit was not constitutively activated. Therefore, although c-Kit-kinase is a potent growth regulator of normal human melanocytes, its activity is not positively associated with malignant transformation. Images PMID:1372524

  3. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Tao, Hua; Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  4. cAMP Signaling Prevents Podocyte Apoptosis via Activation of Protein Kinase A and Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y.; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP. PMID:24642777

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-independent activation of unfolded protein response kinases by a small molecule ATP-mimic

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Aaron S; Alfaro, Jennifer; Morales-Soto, Marisol A; Dar, Arvin C; McCullagh, Emma; Gotthardt, Katja; Li, Han; Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Sidrauski, Carmela; Korennykh, Alexei V; Bernales, Sebastian; Shokat, Kevan M; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two ER membrane-resident transmembrane kinases, IRE1 and PERK, function as stress sensors in the unfolded protein response. IRE1 also has an endoribonuclease activity, which initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, while PERK phosphorylates eIF2α. We engineered a potent small molecule, IPA, that binds to IRE1's ATP-binding pocket and predisposes the kinase domain to oligomerization, activating its RNase. IPA also inhibits PERK but, paradoxically, activates it at low concentrations, resulting in a bell-shaped activation profile. We reconstituted IPA-activation of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation from purified components. We estimate that under conditions of maximal activation less than 15% of PERK molecules in the reaction are occupied by IPA. We propose that IPA binding biases the PERK kinase towards its active conformation, which trans-activates apo-PERK molecules. The mechanism by which partial occupancy with an inhibitor can activate kinases may be wide-spread and carries major implications for design and therapeutic application of kinase inhibitors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05434.001 PMID:25986605

  6. p-HPEA-EDA, a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, activates AMP-activated protein kinase to inhibit carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Yun, Hyo Jeong; Namgoong, Gwang Mo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kwon, Seong-Min; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2011-04-01

    Phenolic constituents of virgin olive oil are reported to have antitumor activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and specific target proteins of virgin olive oil remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycone (p-HPEA-EDA), a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, inhibits tumor promoter-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumorigenicity by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HT-29 cells. p-HPEA-EDA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p90RSK in JB6 Cl41 cells, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, activator protein-1 transactivation and cell transformation promoted by TPA. Moreover, p-HPEA-EDA strongly inhibited the cell viability and COX-2 expression by activation of AMPK activity in HT-29 cells, resulted from depletion of intracellular adenosine triphosphate. p-HPEA-EDA-induced activation of caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells, leading to apoptosis. Importantly, p-HPEA-EDA suppressed the colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In contrast, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor, blocked the p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited colony formation in HT-29 cells. In vivo chorioallantoic membrane assay also showed that p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited tumorigenicity of HT-29 cells. These findings revealed that targeted activation of AMPK and inhibition of COX-2 expression by p-HPEA-EDA contribute to the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of virgin olive oil against colon cancer cells.

  7. Concerted transcriptional activation of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene by insulin and luteinizing hormone in cultured porcine granulosa-luteal cells: possible convergence of protein kinase a, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sekar, N; Veldhuis, J D

    2001-07-01

    -repressive region in this gene. Non-LH receptor-dependent agonists of protein kinase A (PKA), 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM), and forskolin (10 microM) with or without insulin/IGF-I costimulation likewise augmented LDL receptor promoter expression with similar strong dependency on the -255 to -139 bp 5'-upstream region. To assess more specific PKA-dependent mediation of LH's contribution to combined hormonal drive, the LDL receptor (-1076 to +11 bp) reporter plasmid was cotransfected with a full-sequence rabbit muscle protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) minigene driven constitutively by a Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Expression of the latter PKA antagonist blocked transcriptional stimulation by LH alone as well as that by LH combined with insulin (or IGF-I) by 70-85% without reducing basal transcriptional activity. Transfection of a mutant inactive (Arg to Gly) Rous sarcoma virus/PKI gene confirmed the specificity of the PKI effect. To investigate the convergent role of the insulin/IGF-I effector pathway mediating bihormonal stimulation of LDL receptor promoter expression, transfected granulosa-luteal cells were pretreated for 30 min with two specific inhibitors of phophatidylinositol 3-kinase, wortmannin (100 nM) and LY 294002 (10 microM), or of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, PD 98059 (50 microM), U0126 (10 microM), or the latter's inactive derivative, U0124 (10 microM). Both classes of antagonists impeded the ability of insulin or IGF-I to enhance LH-stimulated LDL receptor promoter expression by 60-80%. In conclusion, the present analyses indicate that LH and insulin (or IGF-I) can up-regulate LDL receptor transcriptional activity supraadditively in porcine granulosa-luteal cells 1) via one or more agonistic cis-acting DNA regions located between -255 and -139 bp 5'- upstream of the transcriptional start site, 2) without abrogating sterol-sensitive repressive of this promoter, and 3) by way of intracellular mechanisms that include the PKA, phophatidylinositol 3-kinase, and mitogen-activated

  8. Protein kinase C-beta contributes to NADPH oxidase activation in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, L V; Leitges, M; Altschuler, G; Mistry, N; McDermott, A; Roes, J; Segal, A W

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed the involvement of the beta isotype of the protein kinase C (PKC) family in the activation of NADPH oxidase in primary neutrophils. Using immunofluorescence and cell fractionation, PKC-beta is shown to be recruited to the plasma membrane upon stimulation with phorbol ester and to the phagosomal membrane upon phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles (Fcgamma-receptor stimulus). The time course of recruitment is similar to that of NADPH oxidase activation by these stimuli. The PKC-beta specific inhibitor 379196 inhibits the response to PMA as well as to IgG-coated bacteria. Partial inhibition occurs between 10 and 100 nM of inhibitor, the concentration at which PKC-beta, but not other PKC isotypes, is targeted. Neutrophils isolated from a mouse that lacks PKC-beta also showed an inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by PMA and IgG-coated particles. The level of inhibition is comparable to that achieved with 379196 in human neutrophils. Thus the PKC-beta isotype mediates activation of NADPH oxidase by PMA and by stimulation of Fcgamma receptors in neutrophils. PMID:10727429

  9. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schett, G; Zwerina, J; Firestein, G

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory processes are based on a sustained and tightly regulated communication network among different cells types. This network comprises extracellular mediators such as cytokines, chemokines and matrix-degrading proteases, which orchestrate the participation of cells in the chronic inflammatory process. The mirrors of this outside communication world are intracellular transcription factor pathways, which shuttle information about inflammatory stimuli to the cell nucleus. This review examines the function of one key signal transduction pathway of inflammation—the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK). The signalling pathway is considered as crucial for the induction and maintenance of chronic inflammation, and its components thus emerge as interesting molecular targets of small molecule inhibitors for controlling inflammation. This review not only summarises the current knowledge of activation, regulation and function of the p38MAPK pathway but also examines the role of this pathway in clinical disease. It gives an overview of current evidence of p38MAPK activation in inflammatory arthritis and elaborates the key molecular determinants which contribute to p38MAPK activation in joint disease. PMID:17827184

  10. 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mor, Vijay; Unnikrishnan, M K

    2011-09-01

    Lifestyle changes such as physical inactivity combined with calorie-rich, low-fibre diets have triggered an explosive surge in metabolic syndrome, outlined as a cluster of heart attack risk factors such as insulin resistance, raised fasting plasma glucose, abdominal obesity, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. By acting as a master-switch of energy homeostasis and associated pathophysiological phenomena, 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) appears to orchestrate the adaptive physiology of energy deficit, suggesting that the sedentary modern human could be suffering from chronic suboptimal AMPK activation. Addressing individual targets with potent ligands with high specificity may be inappropriate (it has not yielded any molecule superior to the sixty year old metformin) because this strategy cannot address a cluster of interrelated pathologies. However, spices, dietary supplements and nutraceuticals attenuate the multiple symptoms of metabolic syndrome in a collective and perhaps more holistic fashion with fewer adverse events. Natural selection could have favoured races that developed a taste for spices and dietary supplements, most of which are not only antioxidants but also activators of AMPK. The review will outline the various biochemical mechanisms and pathophysiological consequences of AMPK activation involving the cluster of symptoms that embrace metabolic syndrome and beyond. Recent advances that integrate energy homeostasis with a number of overarching metabolic pathways and physiological phenomena, including inflammatory conditions, cell growth and development, malignancy, life span, and even extending into environmental millieu, as in obesity mediated by gut microflora and others will also be outlined.

  11. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase.

  12. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets. PMID:23822503

  13. Angiotensin II-Activated Protein Kinase D Mediates Acute Aldosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Brian A.; Olala, Lawrence; Arun, Senthil Nathan; Parker, Peter M.; George, Mariya V.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin II (AngII)-aldosterone system can contribute to cardiovascular disease, such that an understanding of this system is critical. Diacylglycerol-sensitive serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) is activated by AngII in several systems, including the human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line NCI H295R, where this enzyme enhances chronic (24 hours) AngII-evoked aldosterone secretion. However, the role of PKD in acute AngII-elicited aldosterone secretion has not been previously examined. In primary cultures of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells, which secrete detectable quantities of aldosterone in response to secretagogues within minutes, PKD was activated in response to AngII, but not an elevated potassium concentration or adrenocorticotrophic hormone. This activation was time- and dose-dependent and occurred through the AT1, but not the AT2, receptor. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of constitutively-active PKD resulted in enhanced AngII-induced aldosterone secretion; whereas overexpression of a dominant-negative PKD construct decreased AngII-stimulated aldosterone secretion. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that PKD mediates acute AngII-induced aldosterone secretion. PMID:19961896

  14. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-06-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets.

  15. Ceramides modulate protein kinase C activity and perturb the structure of Phosphatidylcholine/Phosphatidylserine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H W; Goldberg, E M; Zidovetzki, R

    1999-01-01

    We studied the effects of natural ceramide and a series of ceramide analogs with different acyl chain lengths on the activity of rat brain protein kinase C (PKC) and on the structure of bovine liver phosphatidylcholine (BLPC)/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) (3:1:1 molar ratio) bilayers using (2)H-NMR and specific enzymatic assays in the absence or presence of 7.5 mol % diolein (DO). Only a slight activation of PKC was observed upon addition of the short-chain ceramide analogs (C(2)-, C(6)-, or C(8)-ceramide); natural ceramide or C(16)-ceramide had no effect. In the presence of 7.5 mol % DO, natural ceramide and C(16)-ceramide analog slightly attenuated DO-enhanced PKC activity. (2)H-NMR results demonstrated that natural ceramide and C(16)-ceramide induced lateral phase separation of gel-like and liquid crystalline domains in the bilayers; however, this type of membrane perturbation has no direct effect on PKC activity. The addition of both short-chain ceramide analogs and DO had a synergistic effect in activating PKC, with maximum activity observed with 20 mol % C(6)-ceramide and 15 mol % DO. Further increases in C(6)-ceramide and/or DO concentrations led to decreased PKC activity. A detailed (2)H-NMR investigation of the combined effects of C(6)-ceramide and DO on lipid bilayer structure showed a synergistic effect of these two reagents to increase membrane tendency to adopt nonbilayer structures, resulting in the actual presence of such structures in samples exceeding 20 mol % ceramide and 15 mol % DO. Thus, the increased tendency to form nonbilayer lipid phases correlates with increased PKC activity, whereas the actual presence of such phases reduced the activity of the enzyme. Moreover, the results show that short-chain ceramide analogs, widely used to study cellular effects of ceramide, have biological effects that are not exhibited by natural ceramide. PMID:10465759

  16. Presenilin-2 regulates the degradation of RBP-Jk protein through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Man; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Ann, Eun-Jung; Mo, Jung-Soon; Yoon, Ji-Hye; Park, Hee-Sae

    2012-03-01

    Transcriptional regulation performs a central role in Notch1 signaling by recombining binding protein Suppressor of Hairless (RBP-Jk)--a signaling pathway that is widely involved in determination of cell fate. Our earlier work demonstrated the possible regulation of the Notch1-RBP-Jk pathway through protein degradation of RBP-Jk; however, the potential regulator for the degradation of RBP-Jk remains to be determined. Here, we report that the expression of endogenous and exogenous RBP-Jk was increased significantly in cells treated with proteasome- and lysosome-specific inhibitors. The effects of these inhibitors on RBP-Jk occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The level of RBP-Jk protein was higher in presenilin-2 (PS2)-knockout cells than in presenilin-1 (PS1)-knockout cells. Furthermore, the level of RBP-Jk was decreased by expression of PS2 in PS1 and PS2 double-knockout cells. We also found that PS1-knockout cells treated with a specific inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase ∂ (MAPK) had significantly increased levels of RBP-Jk. p38 MAPK phosphorylates RBP-Jk at Thr339 by physical binding, which subsequently induces the degradation and ubiquitylation of the RBP-Jk protein. Collectively, our results indicate that PS2 modulates the degradation of RBP-Jk through phosphorylation by p38 MAPK.

  17. P21 activated kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Chetan K; Minden, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The p21 activated kinases (Paks) are well known effector proteins for the Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac. The Paks contain 6 members, which fall into 2 families of proteins. The first family consists of Paks 1, 2, and 3, and the second consists of Paks 4, 5, and 6. While some of the Paks are ubiquitously expressed, others have more restrictive tissue specificity. All of them are found in the nervous system. Studies using cell culture, transgenic mice, and knockout mice, have revealed important roles for the Paks in cytoskeletal organization and in many aspects of cell growth and development. This review discusses the basic structures of the Paks, and their roles in cell growth, development, and in cancer. PMID:24658305

  18. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified.

  19. Stimulation of Brain AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mulchandani, Nikhil; Yang, Weng-Lang; Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Zhang, Fangming; Marambaud, Philippe; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are enormous public health problems with astronomical financial repercussions on health systems worldwide. The central nervous system (CNS) is closely intertwined in the septic process but the underlying mechanism is still obscure. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitous energy sensor enzyme and plays a key role in regulation of energy homeostasis and cell survival. In this study, we hypothesized that activation of AMPK in the brain would attenuate inflammatory responses in sepsis, particularly in the lungs. Adult C57BL/6 male mice were treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR, 20 ng), an AMPK activator, or vehicle (normal saline) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection, followed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) at 30 min post-ICV. The septic mice treated with AICAR exhibited elevated phosphorylation of AMPKα in the brain along with reduced serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), compared with the vehicle. Similarly, the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β, keratinocyte-derived chemokine and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 as well as myeloperoxidase activity in the lungs of AICAR-treated mice were significantly reduced. Moreover, histological findings in the lungs showed improvement of morphologic features and reduction of apoptosis with AICAR treatment. We further found that the beneficial effects of AICAR on septic mice were diminished in AMPKα2 deficient mice, showing that AMPK mediates these effects. In conclusion, our findings reveal a new functional role of activating AMPK in the CNS to attenuate inflammatory responses and acute lung injury in sepsis. PMID:26252187

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression in macrophages is controlled by lymphocytes during macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chong; Yang, Xiqiang; Yao, Lan; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Wei; Li, Xin; Wang, Lijia

    2012-01-01

    The viewpoints on the control of innate immune cells by the adaptive immune system during sepsis remain controversial. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is essential to the negative control of innate immunity and suppresses the activation of macrophages by inhibiting activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The purpose of the current study was to observe inflammatory response and macrophage activation in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with endotoxemia and to determine the role of MKP-1 in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system. Endotoxemia was induced in wild-type and SCID mice by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and all of the SCID mice died. SCID mice produced more inflammatory cytokines than BALB/c mice systemically and locally. TNF-α mRNA expression was higher and MKP-1 mRNA expression was lower in peritoneal macrophages (PMa) from SCID mice compared to PMa from wild-type mice after and even before LPS injection. Thioglycollate-stimulated PMa from wild-type mice were stimulated with LPS in vitro in the presence or absence of pan-T cells. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were higher in the supernatants from PMa cultured alone compared to PMa co-cultured with pan-T cells, and PMa MKP-1 mRNA and protein expression were higher when PMa were co-cultured with pan-T cells. Therefore, pan-T cells can up-regulate MKP-1 expression in macrophages and inhibit the secretion of inflammatory cytokines secretion by macrophages. In SCID mice, lymphocyte deficiency, especially T cell deficiency, causes insufficient MKP-1 expression in macrophages, which can be responsible for the severe inflammation and bad prognosis of septic SCID mice. MKP-1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system.

  1. Type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase inhibits Rac1 activation in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YING; CHEN, YONGCHANG; WU, MIN; LAN, TING; WU, YAN; LI, YUEYING; QIAN, HAI

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced motility of cancer cells is a critical step in promoting tumor metastasis, which remains the major cause of gastric cancer-associated mortality. The small GTPase Rac1 is a key signaling component in the regulation of cell migration. Previous studies have demonstrated that Rac1 activity may be regulated by protein kinase G (PKG); however, the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) on Rac1 activity. The human gastric cancer cell line AGS was infected with adenoviral constructs encoding PKG II to increase the expression of this enzyme, and treated with a cGMP analog (8-pCPT-cGMP) to induce its activation. A Transwell assay was employed to measure cell migration, and the activity of Rac1 was assessed using a pull-down assay. Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the Rac1 protein. Phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate 3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream effecter protein kinase B (Akt) are associated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced motility/migration of cancer cells. Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) is the major signaling molecule of the Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) mediated signaling pathway. ERK and its upstream activator MAPK kinase (MEK) are also involved in LPA-induced motility/migration of cancer cells. Phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt, MEK/ERK and enriched Rac1 were detected by western blotting. The results revealed that blocking the activation of Rac1 by ectopically expressing an inactive Rac1 mutant (T17N) impeded LPA-induced cell migration. Increased PKG II activity inhibited LPA-induced migration and LPA-induced activation of Rac1; however, it had no effect on the phosphorylation of Rac1. PKG II also inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK mediated signaling, which is important for LPA-induced Rac1 activation. These results suggest that PKG II affects LPA

  2. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2 subunit mediates glycolysis in postmortem skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liang, Junfang; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Jin, Ye; Du, Min

    2013-11-01

    Postmortem glycolysis is directly linked to the incidences of PSE (pale, soft and exudative) and DFD (dark, firm and dry) meats which cause significant loss to meat industry. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major regulator of postmortem glycolysis. However, there are two isoforms of the AMPKα catalytic subunit, and their roles in glycolysis of postmortem muscle remain unclear. The objective was to identify the isoform specific roles of AMPK in postmortem glycolysis. Wild type, AMPKα1, and AMPKα2 knockout (KO) mice were used in the current study. AMPK in Longissimus muscle was activated shortly after death. AMPKα2 but not AMPKα1 KO abolished the activity of AMPK in postmortem muscle. In addition, AMPKα2 KO reduced postmortem pH decline and the generation of lactate, while AMPKα1 KO had no significant effect. Finally, the glycogen content of skeletal muscle was reduced in AMPKα2 KO but not AMPKα1 KO mice. Data clearly demonstrate that AMPKα2 catalytic subunit mainly regulates postmortem glycolysis in muscle.

  3. Neuroprotective Effects of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase on Scopolamine Induced Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jun-Ho; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Song, Joo-Hyun; Ha, Joohun

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of energy metabolism, is activated in response to cellular stress when intracellular levels of AMP increase. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of AMPK against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in vivo and glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. An adenovirus expressing AMPK wild type alpha subunit (WT) or a dominant negative form (DN) was injected into the hippocampus of rats using a stereotaxic apparatus. The AMPK WT-injected rats showed significant reversal of the scopolamine induced cognitive deficit as evaluated by escape latency in the Morris water maze. In addition, they showed enhanced acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-reactive neurons in the hippocampus, implying increased cholinergic activity in response to AMPK. We also studied the cellular mechanism by which AMPK protects against glutamate-induced cell death in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We further demonstrated that AMPK WT-infected cells increased cell viability and reduced Annexin V positive hippocampal neurons. Western blot analysis indicated that AMPK WT-infected cells reduced the expression of Bax and had no effects on Bcl-2, which resulted in a decreased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These data suggest that AMPK is a useful cognitive impairment treatment target, and that its beneficial effects are mediated via the protective capacity of hippocampal neurons. PMID:23946693

  4. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-15

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells.

  5. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  6. Suppressed expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases in hyperthermia induced defective neural tube.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianliang; Leng, Zhaoting; Liu, Wenjing; Wang, Xia; Yan, Xue; Yu, Li

    2015-05-06

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common congenital malformations. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is involved in many physiological processes. HMGB1 has been showed closely associated with neurulation and NTDs induced by hyperthermia and could activate MAPKs pathway. Since hyperthermia caused increased activation of MAPKs in many systems, the present study aims to investigate whether HMGB1 contributes to hyperthermia induced NTDs through MAPKs pathway. The mRNA levels of MAPKs and HMGB1 between embryonic day 8.5 and 10 (E8.5-10) in hyperthermia induced defective neural tube were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). By immunofluorescence and western blotting, the expressions of HMGB1 and phosphorylated MAPKs (ERK1/2, JNK and p38) in neural tubes after hyperthermia were studied. The mRNA levels of MAPKs and HMGB1, as well as the expressions of HMGB1 along with phosphorylated JNK, p38 and ERK, were downregulated in NTDs groups induced by hyperthermia compared with control. The findings suggested that HMGB1 may contribute to hyperthermia induced NTDs formation through decreased cell proliferation due to inhibited phosphorylated ERK1/2 MAPK.

  7. Modulation of influenza virus replication by alteration of sodium ion transport and protein kinase C activity

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, H.-Heinrich; Palese, Peter; Shaw, Megan L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, increasing levels of resistance to the four FDA-approved anti-influenza virus drugs have been described and vaccine manufacturers have experienced demands that exceed their capacity. This situation underlines the urgent need for novel antivirals as well as innovations in vaccine production in preparation for the next influenza epidemic. Here we report the development of a cell-based high-throughput screen which we have used for the identification of compounds that modulate influenza virus growth either negatively or positively. We screened a library of compounds with known biological activity and identified distinct groups of inhibitors and enhancers that target sodium channels or protein kinase C (PKC). We confirmed these results in viral growth assays and find that treatment with a sodium channel opener or PKC inhibitor significantly reduces viral replication. In contrast, inhibition of sodium channels or activation of PKC leads to enhanced virus production in tissue culture. These diametrically opposing effects strongly support a role for PKC activity and the regulation of Na+ currents in influenza virus replication and both may serve as targets for antiviral drugs. Furthermore, we raise the possibility that compounds that result in increased viral titers may be beneficial for boosting the production of tissue culture-grown influenza vaccines. PMID:18585796

  8. Functional characterization of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ji; Zhang, Tao; Ji, Hongbin; Tao, Kaixiong; Guo, Jianping; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitously expressed metabolic sensor among various species. Specifically, cellular AMPK is phosphorylated and activated under certain stressful conditions, such as energy deprivation, in turn to activate diversified downstream substrates to modulate the adaptive changes and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Recently, emerging evidences have implicated the potential roles of AMPK signaling in tumor initiation and progression. Nevertheless, a comprehensive description on such topic is still in scarcity, especially in combination of its biochemical features with mouse modeling results to elucidate the physiological role of AMPK signaling in tumorigenesis. Hence, we performed this thorough review by summarizing the tumorigenic role of each component along the AMPK signaling, comprising of both its upstream and downstream effectors. Moreover, their functional interplay with the AMPK heterotrimer and exclusive efficacies in carcinogenesis were chiefly explained among genetically altered mice models. Importantly, the pharmaceutical investigations of AMPK relevant medications have also been highlighted. In summary, in this review, we not only elucidate the potential functions of AMPK signaling pathway in governing tumorigenesis, but also potentiate the future targeted strategy aiming for better treatment of aberrant metabolism-associated diseases, including cancer.

  9. The absence of myristic acid decreases membrane binding of p60src but does not affect tyrosine protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Buss, J E; Kamps, M P; Gould, K; Sefton, B M

    1986-01-01

    We have constructed two point mutants of Rous sarcoma virus in which the amino-terminal glycine residue of the transforming protein, p60src, was changed to an alanine or a glutamic acid residue. Both mutant proteins failed to become myristylated and, more importantly, no longer transformed cells. The lack of transformation could not be attributed to defects in the catalytic activity of the mutant p60src proteins. In vitro phosphorylation of the peptide angiotensin or of the cellular substrate proteins enolase and p36 revealed no significant differences in the Km or specific activity of the mutant and wild-type p60src proteins. However, when cellular fractions were prepared, less than 12% of the nonmyristylated p60src proteins was bound to membranes. In contrast, more than 82% of the wild-type protein was associated with membranes. Wild-type p60src was phosphorylated by protein kinase C, a protein kinase which associates with membranes when activated. The mutant proteins were not. This finding supports the idea that within the intact cell the nonmyristylated p60src proteins are cytoplasmic and suggests that this apparent solubility is not an artifact of the cell fractionation procedure. The myristyl groups of p60src apparently encourages a tight association between protein and membranes and, by determining the cellular location of the enzyme, allows transformation to occur. Images PMID:3009860

  10. Protein kinase activity associated with the large subunit of herpes simplex virus type 2 ribonucleotide reductase (ICP10).

    PubMed Central

    Chung, T D; Wymer, J P; Smith, C C; Kulka, M; Aurelian, L

    1989-01-01

    The large subunit of the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) ribonucleotide reductase (RR1) is demonstrated to possess serine/threonine-specific kinase activity. Computer-assisted sequence analysis identified regions within the amino terminus of ICP10 that are homologous to the catalytic domain of known protein kinases (PKs). An in vitro kinase assay confirmed the ability of ICP10, immunoprecipitated from either HSV-2-infected cells or from cells transfected with an ICP10 expression vector, to autophosphorylate and transphosphorylate exogenous substrates in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. The HSV-1 RR1 was shown to be negative for PK activity under these conditions. PK activity was localized to a 57-kDa amino-terminal region within ICP10 that lacked RR activity. Images PMID:2545912

  11. Death-associated protein kinase controls STAT3 activity in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chakilam, Saritha; Gandesiri, Muktheshwar; Rau, Tilman T; Agaimy, Abbas; Vijayalakshmi, Mahadevan; Ivanovska, Jelena; Wirtz, Ralph M; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Benderska, Natalya; Wittkopf, Nadine; Chellappan, Ajithavalli; Ruemmele, Petra; Vieth, Michael; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Christiansen, Hans; Hartmann, Arndt; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Raja; Becker, Christoph; Steinberg, Pablo; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2013-03-01

    The TNF-IL-6-STAT3 pathway plays a crucial role in promoting ulcerative colitis-associated carcinoma (UCC). To date, the negative regulation of STAT3 is poorly understood. Interestingly, intestinal epithelial cells of UCC in comparison to ulcerative colitis show high expression levels of anti-inflammatory death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) and low levels of pSTAT3. Accordingly, epithelial DAPK expression was enhanced in STAT3(IEC-KO) mice. To unravel a possible regulatory mechanism, we used an in vitro TNF-treated intestinal epithelial cell model. We identified a new function of DAPK in suppressing TNF-induced STAT3 activation as DAPK siRNA knockdown and treatment with a DAPK inhibitor potentiated STAT3 activation, IL-6 mRNA expression, and secretion. DAPK attenuated STAT3 activity directly by physical interaction shown in three-dimensional structural modeling. This model suggests that DAPK-induced conformational changes in the STAT3 dimer masked its nuclear localization signal. Alternatively, pharmacological inactivation of STAT3 led to an increase in DAPK mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that STAT3 restricted DAPK expression by promoter binding, thereby reinforcing its own activation by inducing IL-6. This novel negative regulation principle might balance TNF-induced inflammation and seems to play an important role in the inflammation-associated transformation process as confirmed in an AOM+DSS colon carcinogenesis mouse model. DAPK as a negative regulator of STAT3 emerges as therapeutic option in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and UCC.

  12. Expression and activation of platelet-derived growth factor β receptor, mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Gennaro; Uberti, Barbara Degli; Galiero, Giorgio; Martano, Manuela; Pirro, Antonella; Russo, Marco; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    Canine mammary tumours are frequent neoplasms mostly affecting intact female dogs, for which no 100% efficient therapy is available. Platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) with a potential role in human