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Sample records for activated adenovirus proteinases

  1. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  2. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  3. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  4. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  5. Manduca sexta hemolymph proteinase 21 activates prophenoloxidase-activating proteinase 3 in an insect innate immune response proteinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Maureen J; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo; Kanost, Michael R

    2007-04-20

    Melanization, an insect immune response, requires a set of hemolymph proteins including pathogen recognition proteins that initiate the response, a cascade of mostly unknown serine proteinases, and phenoloxidase. Until now, only initial and final proteinases in the pathways have been conclusively identified. Four such proteinases have been purified from the larval hemolymph of Manduca sexta: hemolymph proteinase 14 (HP14), which autoactivates in the presence of microbial surface components, and three prophenoloxidase-activating proteinases (PAP1-3). In this study, we have used two complementary approaches to identify a serine proteinase that activates proPAP3. Partial purification from hemolymph of an activator of proPAP3 resulted in an active fraction with two abundant polypeptides of approximately 32 and approximately 37 kDa. Labeling of these polypeptides with a serine proteinase inhibitor, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, indicated that they were active serine proteinases. N-terminal sequencing revealed that both were cleaved forms of the previously identified hemolymph serine proteinase, HP21. Surprisingly, cleavage of proHP21 had occurred not at the predicted activation site but more N-terminal to it. In vitro reactions carried out with purified HP14 (which activates proHP21), proHP21, proPAP3, and site-directed mutant forms of the latter two proteinases confirmed that HP21 activates proPAP3 by limited proteolysis. Like the HP21 products purified from hemolymph, HP21 that was activated by HP14 in the in vitro reactions was not cleaved at its predicted activation site.

  6. Proteinase activity in human and murine saliva as a biomarker for proteinase inhibitor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fingleton, Barbara; Menon, Ramkumar; Carter, Kathy J; Overstreet, P Dawn; Hachey, David L; Matrisian, Lynn M; McIntyre, J Oliver

    2004-12-01

    As molecularly targeted agents reach the clinic, there is a need for assays to detect their presence and effectiveness against target molecules in vivo. Proteinase inhibitors are one example of a class of therapeutic agent for which satisfactory methods of identifying successful target modulation in vivo are lacking. This is of particular importance while these drugs are in clinical trials because standard maximum-tolerated dose-finding studies often are not suitable due to lack of toxicity. Saliva represents a readily accessible bodily fluid that can be repeatedly sampled and used for assaying in vivo effects of systemic drugs. Here we show the development of a simple assay that can be used to measure proteinase activity in saliva and proteinase inhibition after systemic treatment with three different proteinase inhibitors. A variety of gelatinolytic activities present in human and murine saliva have been assayed with a fluorescent dye-labeled substrate and assigned to different proteinase categories by inclusion of specific classes of inhibitors. Treatment of mice with either matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or a urokinase inhibitor for a period as short as 48 hours results in levels of the drugs that can be detected in saliva by mass spectrometry and concomitant decreases in salivary proteinase activity, thus demonstrating that these inhibitors successfully modulate their targets in vivo.

  7. Silk gland-specific proteinase inhibitor serpin16 from the Bombyx mori shows cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-Chao; Dong, Zhaoming; Xiao, Li; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yan; He, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2015-01-30

    Serpins (serine proteinase inhibitors) are widely distributed in different species and are well known for their inhibitory activities towards serine proteinases. Here, we report the functional characterization of Bombyx mori serpin16. Expression analysis showed that serpin16 was specifically expressed at high levels in the silk gland at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that serpin16 had a canonical serpin fold, but it contained a unique reactive center loop, which was obviously shorter than that of typical serpins. Inhibitory activity analyses revealed that the target proteinase of serpin18 is a cysteine proteinase, rather than a serine proteinase. Furthermore, a Michaelis complex model of serpin16 with its target proteinase was constructed to explain the structural basis of how serpin16 recognizes the cysteine proteinase and its target specificity.

  8. A serine proteinase inhibitor from frog eggs with bacteriostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Yaoping; Yu, Haining; Yang, Xinbo; Rees, Huw H; Liu, Jingze; Lai, Ren

    2008-01-01

    By Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, Resource Q anionic exchange and C4 reversed phase liquid high performance liquid chromatography, a proteinase inhibitor protein (Ranaserpin) was identified and purified from the eggs of the odour frog, Rana grahami. The protein displayed a single band adjacent to the molecular weight marker of 14.4 kDa analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The inhibitor protein homogeneity and its molecular weight were confirmed again by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrum analysis gave this inhibitor protein an m/z of 14422.26 that was matched well with the result from SDS-PAGE. This protein is a serine proteinase inhibitor targeting multiple proteinases including trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. Ranaserpin inhibited the proteolytic activities of trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. It has an inhibitory constant (K(i)) of 6.2 x 10(-8) M, 2.7 x 10(-7) M and 2.2 x 10(-8) M for trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin, respectively. This serine proteinase inhibitor exhibited bacteriostatic effect on Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633). It was suggested that ranaserpin might act as a defensive role in resistance to invasion of pests or pathogens. This is the first report of serine proteinase inhibitor and its direct defensive role from amphibian eggs.

  9. Phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida isolates from denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Eraso, Elena; Madariaga, Lucila; Aguirre, Jose Manuel; Quindós, Guillermo

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise phospholipase and proteinase activities of oral Candida isolates from 100 denture wearers and to study the relationship of these activities with denture stomatitis. Of 100 patients studied, 44 suffered from denture stomatitis. Specimens were collected by swabbing the denture and underlying mucosa. Isolates were previously identified by conventional mycological and genotypic methods. The phospholipase and proteinase activities were evaluated by agar plate methods. A total of 152 isolates were recovered from denture and underlying mucosa, including 101 Candida albicans, 18 Candida tropicalis, 14 Candida glabrata, 11 Candida guilliermondii, four Candida parapsilosis, two Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one isolate each of Candida dubliniensis and Candida krusei. Most C. albicans (97%) showed phospholipase activity; furthermore, the unique C. dubliniensis isolate showed a moderate phospholipase activity. The isolation of C. albicans (chi-square test, P = 0.0016) and phospholipase production by Candida spp. (chi-square test, P = 0.0213) was found to be significantly associated with denture stomatitis. Proteinase production was observed in <30% of isolates, and it was not related to the presence of denture stomatitis (P = 0.7675). Candida albicans isolates may produce both virulence factors, although the proteinase production was only observed in <30% of the isolates. Phospholipase production was exclusive of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  10. Transcription activation by the adenovirus E1a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, James W.; Green, Michael R.

    1989-03-01

    The adenovirus Ela protein stimulates transcription of a wide variety of viral and cellular genes. It is shown here that Ela has the two functions characteristic of a typical cellular activator: one direct Ela to the promoter, perhaps by interacting with a DMA-bound protein, and the other, an activating region, enables the bound activator to stimulate transcription.

  11. [Suppression of activity of Candida albicans proteinases by cobalt chloride].

    PubMed

    Kutyreva, M P; Mukhametzianova, A R; Ulakhovich, N A

    2012-01-01

    Influence of cobalt (II) chloride on the system of Candida albicans proteinase (SAP C. alb.) (both in solution and immobilized on a surface of nitrocellulose membranes) has been investigated. In solution cobalt chloride inactivated inducible but not constitute enzyme. In the heterogenous sytem proteolitical effect of the cobalt ion on inductible proteinase was also observed.

  12. Activation of Proteinase 3 Contributes to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Erik JM; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine TN; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo AB

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive proinflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human α-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin-resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3-deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after being fed a high-fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high–fat–diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1–/– mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with α-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 d of a 16-wk high-fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27261776

  13. Activation of proteinase 3 contributes to Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Erik J M; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine T N; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-05-24

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human alpha-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after fed a high fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high fat diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1(-/-) mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with alpha-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 days of a 16 week high fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential.

  14. [Activity dynamics of proteinases and glycosidases of fish chymus with exposure in fresh and brackish water].

    PubMed

    Kuz'mina, V V; Shekhovtsova, N V; Bolobonina, V E

    2010-01-01

    Activity of proteinases of the content of intestines (chymus) of the benthos-eater Carassius carassius fed different diets during prolonged exposure to water is studied. In the process of exposure of the chymus to water, the activity of proteinases decreases. Activity of glycosidases may increase, maximally during the first three days of exposure. This phenomenon suggests the important role of enzymes of the enteral microflora in processes of destruction of proteinaceous and carbohydrate components of the suspension and especially of organic detritus.

  15. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-01-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG. PMID:1458677

  16. Pathway-selective antagonism of proteinase activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Suen, J Y; Cotterell, A; Lohman, R J; Lim, J; Han, A; Yau, M K; Liu, L; Cooper, M A; Vesey, D A; Fairlie, D P

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a GPCR associated with inflammation, metabolism and disease. Clues to understanding how to block PAR2 signalling associated with disease without inhibiting PAR2 activation in normal physiology could be provided by studies of biased signalling. Experimental Approach PAR2 ligand GB88 was profiled for PAR2 agonist and antagonist properties by several functional assays associated with intracellular G-protein-coupled signalling in vitro in three cell types and with PAR2-induced rat paw oedema in vivo. Key Results In HT29 cells, GB88 was a PAR2 antagonist in terms of Ca2+ mobilization and PKC phosphorylation, but a PAR2 agonist in attenuating forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation, increasing ERK1/2 phosphorylation, RhoA activation, myosin phosphatase phosphorylation and actin filament rearrangement. In CHO-hPAR2 cells, GB88 inhibited Ca2+ release, but activated Gi/o and increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In human kidney tubule cells, GB88 inhibited cytokine secretion (IL6, IL8, GM-CSF, TNF-α) mediated by PAR2. A rat paw oedema induced by PAR2 agonists was also inhibited by orally administered GB88 and compared with effects of locally administered inhibitors of G-protein coupled pathways. Conclusions and Implications GB88 is a biased antagonist of PAR2 that selectively inhibits PAR2/Gq/11/Ca2+/PKC signalling, leading to anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, while being an agonist in activating three other PAR2-activated pathways (cAMP, ERK, Rho) in human cells. These findings highlight opportunities to design drugs to block specific PAR2-linked signalling pathways in disease, without blocking beneficial PAR2 signalling in normal physiology, and to dissect PAR2-associated mechanisms of disease in vivo. PMID:24821440

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi: insights into naphthoquinone effects on growth and proteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Saulo C; Cavalcanti, Danielle F B; de Souza, Alessandra M T; Castro, Helena C; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Albuquerque, Magaly G; Santos, Dilvani O; da Silva, Gabriel Gomes; da Silva, Fernando C; Ferreira, Vitor F; de Pinho, Rosa T; Alves, Carlos R

    2011-01-01

    In this study we compared the effects of naphthoquinones (α-lapachone, β-lapachone, nor-β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap) on growth of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes forms, and on viability of VERO cells. In addition we also experimentally analyzed the most active compounds inhibitory profile against T. cruzi serine- and cysteine-proteinases activity and theoretically evaluated them against cruzain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase by using a molecular docking approach. Our results confirmed β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap with a high trypanocidal activity in contrast to α-lapachone and nor-β-lapachone whereas Epoxy-α-lap presented the safest toxicity profile against VERO cells. Interestingly the evaluation of the active compounds effects against T. cruzi cysteine- and serine-proteinases activities revealed different targets for these molecules. β-Lapachone is able to inhibit the cysteine-proteinase activity of T. cruzi proteic whole extract and of cruzain, similar to E-64, a classical cysteine-proteinase inhibitor. Differently, Epoxy-α-lap inhibited the T. cruzi serine-proteinase activity, similar to PMSF, a classical serine-proteinase inhibitor. In agreement to these biological profiles in the enzymatic assays, our theoretical analysis showed that E-64 and β-lapachone interact with the cruzain specific S2 pocket and active site whereas Epoxy-α-lap showed no important interactions. Overall, our results infer that β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap compounds may inhibit T. cruzi epimastigotes growth by affecting T. cruzi different proteinases. Thus the present data shows the potential of these compounds as prototype of protease inhibitors on drug design studies for developing new antichagasic compounds.

  18. Altered Expression of Brain Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2, Trypsin-2 and Serpin Proteinase Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael J; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Gentleman, Steve M; Walls, Andrew F; Dexter, David T

    2015-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is thought to contribute to cell death in neurodegenerative disorders, but the factors involved in the inflammatory process are not completely understood. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) expression in brain is increased in Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, but the status of PAR2 in Parkinson's disease is unknown. This study examined expression of PAR2 and endogenous proteinase activators (trypsin-2, mast cell tryptase) and proteinase inhibitors (serpin-A5, serpin-A13) in areas vulnerable and resistant to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease at different Braak α-synuclein stages of the disease in post-mortem brain. In normal aged brain, expression of PAR-2, trypsin-2, and serpin-A5 and serpin-A13 was found in neurons and microglia, and alterations in the amount of immunoreactivity for these proteins were found in some brain regions. Namely, there was a decrease in neurons positive for serpin-A5 in the dorsal motor nucleus, and serpin-A13 expression was reduced in the locus coeruleus and primary motor cortex, while expression of PAR2, trypsin-2 and both serpins was reduced in neurons within the substantia nigra. There was an increased number of microglia that expressed serpin-A5 in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and elevated numbers of microglia that expressed serpin-A13 in the substantia nigra of late Parkinson's disease cases. The number of microglia that expressed trypsin-2 increased in primary motor cortex of incidental Lewy body disease cases. Analysis of Parkinson's disease cases alone indicated that serpin-A5 and serpin-A13, and trypsin-2 expression in midbrain and cerebral cortex was different in cases with a high incidence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and psychosis compared to those with low levels of these treatment-induced side effects. This study showed that there was altered expression in brain of PAR2 and some proteins that can control its function in Parkinson's disease. Given the role of PAR2 in

  19. Activities of amylase, proteinase, and lipase enzymes from Lactococcus chungangensis and its application in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-07-01

    Several enzymes are involved in the process of converting milk to lactic acid and coagulated milk to curd and, therefore, are important in dairy fermented products. Amylase, proteinase, and lipase are enzymes that play an important role in degrading milk into monomeric molecules such as oligosaccharides, amino acids, and fatty acids, which are the main molecules responsible for flavors in cheese. In the current study, we determined the amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T), a bacterial strain of nondairy origin, and compared them with those of the reference strain, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), which is commonly used in the dairy industry. Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T) were both found to have amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities in broth culture, cream cheese, and yogurt. Notably, the proteinase and lipase activities of L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) were higher than those of L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), with proteinase activity of 10.50 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.64 U/mL in cream cheese, and lipase activity of 100 U/mL of tryptic soy broth, and 100 U/mL of cream cheese. In contrast, the amylase activity was low, with 5.28 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.86 U/mL in cream cheese. These enzyme activities in L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) suggest that this strain has potential to be used for manufacturing dairy fermented products, even though the strain is of nondairy origin.

  20. Changes in midgut endopeptidase activity of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are responsible for adaptation to soybean proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, L C; Lopes, A R; Cristofoletti, P T; Parra, J R; Terra, W R; Silva-Filho, M C

    2000-06-01

    The development of transgenic maize plants expressing soybean proteinase inhibitors could reduce the economic damage of one of the major maize pests in Brazil, the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797). We examined the influence of soybean proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzyme properties and development of S. frugiperda larvae. The inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin activities in vitro by soybean proteinase inhibitors suggested that either Kunitz (SBTI) or Bowman-Birk (SBBI) would have a potential antimetabolic effect when ingested by insect larvae. However, chronic ingestion of semipurified soybean inhibitors did not result in a significant reduction of growth and development of fall armyworm. Therefore, digestive serine proteinase activities (trypsin and chymotrypsin) of fall armyworm larvae were characterized. The results suggest that S. frugiperda was able to physiologically adapt to dietary proteinase inhibitors by altering the complement of proteolytic enzymes in the insect midguts.

  1. Nutritional Requirements and Nitrogen-Dependent Regulation of Proteinase Activity of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Elvira M.; Raya, Raul R.; De Giori, Graciela S.

    2000-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062 were determined with a simplified chemically defined medium (SCDM) and compared with those of L. helveticus CRL 974 (ATCC 15009). Both strains were found to be prototrophic for alanine, glycine, asparagine, glutamine, and cysteine. In addition, CRL 1062 also showed prototrophy for lysine and serine. The microorganisms also required riboflavin, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxal, nicotinic acid, and uracil for growth in liquid SCDM. The growth rate and the synthesis of their cell membrane-bound serine proteinases, but not of their intracellular leucyl-aminopeptidases, were influenced by the peptide content of the medium. The highest proteinase levels were found during cell growth in basal SCDM, while the synthesis of this enzyme was inhibited in SCDM supplemented with Casitone, Casamino Acids, or β-casein. Low-molecular-mass peptides (<3,000 Da), extracted from Casitone, and the dipeptide leucylproline (final concentration, 5 mM) play important roles in the medium-dependent regulation of proteinase activity. The addition of the dipeptide leucylproline (5 mM) to SCDM reduced proteinase activity by 25%. PMID:11097908

  2. A Kunitz proteinase inhibitor from corms of Xanthosoma blandum with bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thaís B; Silva, Osmar N; Migliolo, Ludovico; Souza-Filho, Carlos R; Gonçalves, Eduardo G; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José T A; Amaral, André C; Franco, Octávio L

    2011-05-27

    Bacterial infections directly affect the world's population, and this situation has been aggravated by indiscriminate use of antimicrobial agents, which can generate resistant microorganisms. In this report, an initial screening of proteins with antibacterial activity from corms of 15 species of the Xanthosoma genus was conducted. Since Xanthosoma blandum corms showed enhanced activity toward bacteria, a novel protein with bactericidal activity was isolated from this particular species. Edman degradation was used for protein N-termini determination; the primary structure showed similarities with Kunitz inhibitors, and this protein was named Xb-KTI. This protein was further challenged against serine proteinases from different sources, showing clear inhibitory activities. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity was observed for Xb-KTI. The results demonstrate the biotechnological potential of Xb-KTI, the first proteinase inhibitor with antimicrobial activity described in the Xanthosoma genus.

  3. [Expression of Chinese sturgeon cystatin in yeast Pichia pastoris and its proteinase inhibitory activity analysis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong-Mei; Bai, Jun-Jie; Jian, Qing; Lao, Hai-Hua; Ye, Xing; Luo, Jian-Ren

    2003-09-01

    Cystatin, which widely distributed in both tissues and body fluids of animal and plant, was a superfamily of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. It could form activity-inhibitor complexes with cysteine proteinases to inhibit the hydrolytic activity of proteinases. Cystatin played important roles not only in the inhibition of the proteolytic degradation of fish muscle, but also in biological defense systems against invaders. To explore the functions of fish cystatin and the potential values in fish disease prevention and cure, as well as seafood processing, the recombinant yeast strains which could express Chinese sturgeon cystatin were constructed. First, the cystatin cDNA of Chinese sturgeon, which had been PCR modified, was subcloned into yeast integrated vector pPICZaA. After extracted and purified, the recombinant plasmids were linearized by Sac I. The yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 strain was transformed by use of the Lithium Chloride transformation method, and the recombinant cystatin yeast strains got. After 0.5% methanol induction, SDS-PAGE analysis of the culture supernatant indicated that the yield of recombinant cystatin was about 215mg x L(-1) with the percentage about 73.6%. The recombinant cystatin was purified through Q-Sepharose anion-exchange chromatography, and the purity reached about 94.2%. The inhibitory activity of recombinant cystatin was measured by inhibiting the proteinase activity of papain. The results showed that about 1 microg recombinant cystatin could inhibit the activity of 15 microg papain. Heat stability assay results showed that there was a decrease in inhibitory activity of cystatin with the increasing of temperature. When solution of recombinant cystatin was kept at 70 degrees C for 5min, the inhibitory activity reduced fast. While the recombinant cystatin was heated to 90 degrees C for 5min, the inhibitory activity of recombinant cystatin was undetected. The inhibitory activity for recombinant Chinese sturgeon cystatin was higher

  4. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens.

    PubMed

    Varón, R; García-Moreno, M; Valera-Ruipérez, D; García-Molina, F; García-Cánovas, F; Ladrón-de Guevara, R G; Masiá-Pérez, J; Havsteen, B H

    2006-10-07

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving an uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous route, the time course equation of the concentration of the zymogen and of the activated enzyme have been derived. From these equations, an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the two routes has been carried out for the first time. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect of the initial zymogen and activating enzyme concentrations, on the relative weight. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed. Finally, we apply some of our results to experimental data obtained by other authors in experimental studies of the activation of some aspartic proteinase zymogens.

  5. Activation of intracellular serine proteinase in Bacillus subtilis cells during sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T J; Shankweiler, G W; Hageman, J H

    1986-01-01

    Cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 (trpC2) growing and sporulating in a single chemically defined medium carried out intracellular protein degradation and increased their levels of intracellular serine protease-1 in a manner very similar to what had previously been reported for cells sporulating in nutrient broth. The results were interpreted to mean that these processes are intrinsic to sporulation rather than medium dependent. To determine the cause of these increases in specific activity of proteinases, we purified the protease, prepared rabbit immunoglobulins directed against it, and monitored changes in protease antigen levels by performing rocket immunoelectrophoresis. In cells sporulating in nutrient broth, the protease antigen levels increased about 7-fold, whereas the specific activity increased about 150-fold, for an activation of about 20-fold. In cells sporulating in the single chemically defined sporulation medium, the protease antigen increased about 10-fold, whereas the specific activity increased at least 400-fold, for an activation of about 40-fold. These results were interpreted to mean that a posttranslational event activated the protease in vivo; a previously described endogenous proteinase inhibitor was confirmed to be present in the strain used. Chloramphenicol added to the cultures inhibited both the increases in antigen levels and in the specific activity of the proteinase. PMID:3079745

  6. Analysis of the autoproteolytic activity of the recombinant helper component proteinase from zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Boonrod, Kajohn; Füllgrabe, Marc W; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The multifunctional helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) of potyviruses contains an autoproteolytic function that, together with the protein 1 (P1) and NIa proteinase, processes the polyprotein into mature proteins. In this study, we analysed the autoproteolytic active domain of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) HC-Pro. Several Escherichia coli-expressed MBP:HC-Pro:GFP mutants containing deletions or point mutations at either the N- or C-terminus of the HC-Pro protein were examined. Our results showed that amino acids essential for the proteolytic activity of ZYMV HC-Pro are distinct from those of the tobacco etch virus HC-Pro, although the amino acid sequences in the proteolytic active domain are conserved among potyviruses.

  7. Structurally unique recombinant Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor retains activity when terminally extended and glycosylated.

    PubMed

    Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Kodrík, Dalibor; Grzelak, Krystyna; Nirmala, Xavier; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2005-10-01

    Recombinant derivatives of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor GmSPI2 (36 amino acid residues), which is a component of insect silk, were prepared in the expression vector Pichia pastoris. The rhSPI2 had a C-terminal hexahistidine tag attached to the GmSPI2 sequence, rtSPI2 was extended with GluAlaAla at the N-terminus, and rfSPI2 included this N-terminal extension and a C-terminal tail of 22 residues (myc epitope and hexahistidine). A portion of the secreted rfSI2 was O-glycosylated with a trimannosyl or hexamannosyl. The native inhibitor was active slightly on trypsin and highly on subtilisin and proteinase K. The extended C-terminus in rhSPI2 and rfSPI2 enhanced activity on the two latter enzymes and rendered rfSPI2 active on elastase and pronase, but abolished the inhibition of trypsin. The glycosylation of rfSPI2 reduced its inhibitory activity to a level comparable with the native inhibitor. The rtSPI2 with tripeptide extension at the N-terminus and no C-terminal modification was clearly less active than the native inhibitor. None of the tested compounds inhibited alpha-chymotrypsin and the non-serine proteinases.

  8. Fibronectin-Degrading Activity of Trypanosoma cruzi Cysteine Proteinase Plays a Role in Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Juliano, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, binds to diverse extracellular matrix proteins. Such an ability prevails in the parasite forms that circulate in the bloodstream and contributes to host cell invasion. Whether this also applies to the insect-stage metacyclic trypomastigotes, the developmental forms that initiate infection in the mammalian host, is not clear. Using T. cruzi CL strain metacyclic forms, we investigated whether fibronectin bound to the parasites and affected target cell invasion. Fibronectin present in cell culture medium bound to metacyclic forms and was digested by cruzipain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase. G strain, with negligible cruzipain activity, displayed a minimal fibronectin-degrading effect. Binding to fibronectin was mediated by gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface molecule implicated in parasite internalization. When exogenous fibronectin was present at concentrations higher than cruzipain can properly digest, or fibronectin expression was stimulated by treatment of epithelial HeLa cells with transforming growth factor beta, the parasite invasion was reduced. Treatment of HeLa cells with purified recombinant cruzipain increased parasite internalization, whereas the treatment of parasites with cysteine proteinase inhibitor had the opposite effect. Metacyclic trypomastigote entry into HeLa cells was not affected by anti-β1 integrin antibody but was inhibited by anti-fibronectin antibody. Overall, our results have indicated that the cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi metacyclic forms, through its fibronectin-degrading activity, is implicated in host cell invasion. PMID:25267835

  9. A snake-like serine proteinase (PmSnake) activates prophenoloxidase-activating system in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Monwan, Warunthorn; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2017-02-01

    Clip domain serine proteinases (ClipSPs) play critical roles in the activation of proteolytic cascade in invertebrate immune systems including the prophenoloxidase (proPO) activating system. In this study, we characterized a snake-like serine protease, namely PmSnake, from the shrimp Penaeus monodon which has previously been identified based on the subtractive cDNA library of proPO double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-treated hemocytes. An open reading frame of PmSnake contains 1068 bp encoding a predicted protein of 355 amino acid residues with a putative signal peptide of 22 amino acids and two conserved domains (N-terminal clip domain and C-terminal trypsin-like serine proteinase domain). Sequence analysis revealed that PmSnake was closest to the AeSnake from ant Acromyrmex echinatior (53% similarity), but was quite relatively distant from other shrimp PmclipSPs. PmSnake transcript was mainly expressed in shrimp hemocytes and up-regulated after systemic Vibrio harveyi infection indicating that it is an immune-responsive gene. Suppression of PmSnake expression by dsRNA interference reduced both transcript and protein levels leading to a reduction of the hemolymph phenoloxidase (PO) activity (36%), compared to the control, suggesting that the PmSnake functions as a clip-SP in shrimp proPO system. Western blot analysis using anti-PmSnake showed that the PmSnake was detected in hemocytes but not in cell-free plasma. In vitro PO activity and serine proteinase activity assays showed that adding rPmSnake into the shrimp hemolymph could increase PO activity as well as serine proteinase activity suggesting that the rPmSnake activates the proPO system via serine proteinase cascade.

  10. Proteolytic activity and fatal gram-negative sepsis in burned mice: effect of exogenous proteinase inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Neely, A N; Miller, R G; Holder, I A

    1994-01-01

    Circulating proteolytic activity (PA) increases following burn or surgical trauma. Challenging traumatized mice with the yeast Candida albicans further increases PA. Once a PA threshold has been passed, mortality increases as PA increases. The purposes of this study were to determine (i) if gram-negative bacterial challenge affects circulating PA and mortality as Candida challenge does and (ii) if proteinase inhibitor treatment with aprotinin, antithrombin III, and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor decreases circulating PA and increases the survival of burned mice infected with a bacterium. For all bacteria tested (Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae), burn plus challenge significantly elevated PA and mortality above levels in mice that were only burned or only challenged. Quantitative culture counts indicated that the mice died of sepsis. Proteinase inhibitor treatment of mice burned and challenged with K. pneumoniae significantly decreased circulating PA, decreased the hepatic microbial load, and increased survival. Hence, in traumatized mice challenged with either C. albicans or gram-negative bacteria, a relationship exists between proteolytic load and subsequent septic death. Parallels between these animal studies and human studies are discussed. PMID:8188336

  11. Preoviposition activation of cathepsin-like proteinases in degenerating ovarian follicles of the mosquito Culex pipiens pallens.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Ohmori, D; Ueno, T; Nishizuka, M; Eshita, Y; Fukunaga, A; Kominami, E

    2001-09-01

    Within developing ovaries of many insects, some developing follicles or oocytes usually degenerate (follicular atresia or oosorption), while the others may continue to grow to maturity, thus maintaining the balance between the number of eggs and reproductive circumstances such as available nutrients. To help clarify the phenomenon of follicular atresia during ovarian development, we examined cysteine proteinases stored in mosquito Culex pipiens pallens ovaries. First, analysis using synthesized substrates showed that cathepsin B- and L-like proteinases gradually accumulated in the developing ovaries after a blood meal, which required more than 10 min of preincubation under acidic conditions to reach their maximum activities. However, homogenates of degenerating follicles 3 days after feeding showed proteolytic activities without acid treatment, suggesting that the proteinases had already been activated, while the extract of normally developing follicles collected from the same ovaries required more than 10 min of acid preincubation to reach the optimum activities, suggesting that the enzymes remained as inactive forms. Chemical and immunohistochemical analyses showed that more proteinases are located in the cytoplasm, rather than being associated with yolk granules. Ovarian proteinases, which are believed to become activated at the onset of embryogenesis, should also be activated during oogenesis, presumably to enhance oosorption.

  12. [Activity of cytoplasmic proteinases from rat liver in Heren's carcinoma during tumor growth and treatment with medicinal herbs].

    PubMed

    Marchenko, M M; Kopyl'chuk, H P; Hrygor'ieva, O V

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of the acid and neutral proteinases general enzymes activity change in the hepatocytes postnuclear fraction in the rats suffering from the Heren's carcinoma was investigated. It was determined that in the tumor development of the enzyme activity level of both the acid and neutral proteinases increased 2,6-fold. The natural preparation of the herbs (Calendula officinalis L., Echinacea purpurea L., Scorzonera humilis L., Aconitum moldavicum Hacq.) normalizes both the activity of the investigated enzymes and coefficients of the liver weights of the sick animals. The chemical medicinal preparation 5,6-benzcumarine-5-uracil normalizes the activity of the neutral cytoplasmatic proteinases and reduces the level of the proteolytic activity of the acid enzymes in comparison with the control group of the animals as well as increases of the liver weight coefficients.

  13. Phospholipase and Aspartyl Proteinase Activities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bassyouni, Rasha H; Wegdan, Ahmed Ashraf; Abdelmoneim, Abdelsamie; Said, Wessam; AboElnaga, Fatma

    2015-10-01

    Few research had investigated the secretion of phospholipase and aspartyl proteinase from Candida spp. causing infection in females with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This research aimed to investigate the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in diabetic versus non-diabetic women and compare the ability of identified Candida isolates to secrete phospholipases and aspartyl proteinases with characterization of their genetic profile. The study included 80 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 100 non-diabetic females within the child-bearing period. Candida strains were isolated and identified by conventional microbiological methods and by API Candida. The isolates were screened for their extracellular phospholipase and proteinase activities by culturing them on egg yolk and bovine serum albumin media, respectively. Detection of aspartyl proteinase genes (SAP1 to SAP8) and phospholipase genes (PLB1, PLB2) were performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicated that vaginal candidiasis was significantly higher among the diabetic group versus nondiabetic group (50% versus 20%, respectively) (p = 0.004). C. albicans was the most prevalent species followed by C. glabrata in both groups. No significant association between diabetes mellitus and phospholipase activities was detected (p = 0.262), whereas high significant proteinase activities exhibited by Candida isolated from diabetic females were found (82.5%) (p = 0.000). Non-significant associations between any of the tested proteinase or phospholipase genes and diabetes mellitus were detected (p > 0.05). In conclusion, it is noticed that the incidence of C. glabrata causing VVC is increased. The higher prevalence of vaginal candidiasis among diabetics could be related to the increased aspartyl proteinase production in this group of patients.

  14. Proteinase and phospholipase activities and development at different temperatures of yeasts isolated from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Melville, Priscilla A; Benites, Nilson R; Ruz-Peres, Monica; Yokoya, Eugenio

    2011-11-01

    The presence of yeasts in milk may cause physical and chemical changes limiting the durability and compromising the quality of the product. Moreover, milk and dairy products contaminated by yeasts may be a potential means of transmission of these microorganisms to man and animals causing several kinds of infections. This study aimed to determine whether different species of yeasts isolated from bovine raw milk had the ability to develop at 37°C and/or under refrigeration temperature. Proteinase and phospholipase activities resulting from these yeasts were also monitored at different temperatures. Five genera of yeasts (Aureobasidium sp., Candida spp., Geotrichum spp., Trichosporon spp. and Rhodotorula spp.) isolated from bovine raw milk samples were evaluated. All strains showed one or a combination of characteristics: growth at 37°C (99·09% of the strains), psychrotrophic behaviour (50·9%), proteinase production (16·81% of the strains at 37°C and 4·09% under refrigeration) and phospholipase production (36·36% of the isolates at 37°C and 10·9% under refrigeration), and all these factors may compromise the quality of the product. Proteinase production was similar for strains incubated at 37°C (16·81% of the isolates) and room temperature (17·27%) but there was less amount of phospholipase-producing strains at room temperature (15·45% of the isolates were positive) when compared with incubation at 37°C (36·36%). Enzymes production at 37°C by yeasts isolated from milk confirmed their pathogenic potential. The refrigeration temperature was found to be most efficient to inhibit enzymes production and consequently ensure better quality of milk. The viability of yeasts and the activity of their enzymes at different temperatures are worrying because this can compromise the quality of dairy products at all stages of production and/or storage, and represent a risk to the consumer.

  15. Structure of the SARS coronavirus main proteinase as an active C{sub 2} crystallographic dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ting; Ooi, Amy; Lee, Hooi Chen; Wilmouth, Rupert; Liu, Ding Xiang; Lescar, Julien

    2005-11-01

    An orthorhombic crystal form of the SARS CoV main proteinase diffracting to a resolution of 1.9 Å is reported. The conformation of residues in the catalytic site indicates an active enzyme. The 34 kDa main proteinase (M{sup pro}) from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) plays an important role in the virus life cycle through the specific processing of viral polyproteins. As such, SARS-CoV M{sup pro} is a key target for the identification of specific inhibitors directed against the SARS virus. With a view to facilitating the development of such compounds, crystals were obtained of the enzyme at pH 6.5 in the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 that diffract to a resolution of 1.9 Å. These crystals contain one monomer per asymmetric unit and the biologically active dimer is generated via the crystallographic twofold axis. The conformation of the catalytic site indicates that the enzyme is active in the crystalline form and thus suitable for structure-based inhibition studies.

  16. Distortion of the catalytic domain of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 coincides with the formation of stable serpin-proteinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Perron, Michel J; Blouse, Grant E; Shore, Joseph D

    2003-11-28

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a typical member of the serpin family that kinetically traps its target proteinase as a covalent complex by distortion of the proteinase domain. Incorporation of the fluorescently silent 4-fluorotryptophan analog into PAI-1 permitted us to observe changes in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of two-chain tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and the proteinase domain of tPA during the inhibition reaction. We demonstrated three distinct conformational changes of the proteinase that occur during complex formation and distortion. A conformational change occurred during the initial formation of the non-covalent Michaelis complex followed by a large conformational change associated with the distortion of the proteinase catalytic domain that occurs concurrently with the formation of stable proteinase-inhibitor complexes. Following distortion, a very slow structural change occurs that may be involved in the stabilization or regulation of the trapped complex. Furthermore, by comparing the inhibition rates of two-chain tPA and the proteinase domain of tPA by PAI-1, we demonstrate that the accessory domains of tPA play a prominent role in the initial formation of the non-covalent Michaelis complex.

  17. Microplate fluorescence protease assays test the inhibition of select North American snake venoms' activities with an anti-proteinase library.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph A

    2015-09-01

    Snake envenomation is a relatively neglected significant world health problem, designated an orphan disease by the WHO. While often effective, antivenins are insufficient. Could another approach greatly aid inhibition of the venom toxins? New fluorescent substrates for measuring protease activity in microplate assays suitable for high throughput screening were tested and found reproducible with snake venom. Representative North American venoms showed relatively strong proteinase and collagenase, but weaker elastase activities. Caseinolytic activity is inhibited by the nonspecific proteinase inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline and by EDTA, as is collagenase activity, consistent with the action of metalloproteinases. Both general protease and collagenase assays CV average 3%, and Km measured were above normal working conditions. Using a library of anti -proteinase compounds with multiple venoms revealed high inhibitor activity by three agents with known multiple metalloproteinase inhibitor activity (Actinonin, GM6001, and NNGH), which incidentally supports the concept that much of the degradative activity of certain venoms is due to metalloproteinases with collagenase activity. These results together support the use of microplate proteinase assays, particularly this collagenase assay, in future drug repurposing studies leading to the development of new treatments for those envenomations that have a major proteolytic component in their pathophysiology.

  18. Candida tropicalis Biofilms: Biomass, Metabolic Activity and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Production.

    PubMed

    Negri, Melyssa; Silva, Sónia; Capoci, Isis Regina Grenier; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    According to epidemiological data, Candida tropicalis has been related to urinary tract infections and haematological malignancy. Several virulence factors seem to be responsible for C. tropicalis infections, for example: their ability to adhere and to form biofilms onto different indwelling medical devices; their capacity to adhere, invade and damage host human tissues due to enzymes production such as proteinases. The main aim of this work was to study the behaviour of C. tropicalis biofilms of different ages (24-120 h) formed in artificial urine (AU) and their ability to express aspartyl proteinase (SAPT) genes. The reference strain C. tropicalis ATCC 750 and two C. tropicalis isolates from urine were used. Biofilms were evaluated in terms of culturable cells by colony-forming units enumeration; total biofilm biomass was evaluated using the crystal violet staining method; metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT assay; and SAPT gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. All strains of C. tropicalis were able to form biofilms in AU, although with differences between strains. Candida tropicalis biofilms showed a decrease in terms of the number of culturable cells from 48 to 72 h. Generally, SAPT3 was highly expressed. C. tropicalis strains assayed were able to form biofilms in the presence of AU although in a strain- and time-dependent way, and SAPT genes are expressed during C. tropicalis biofilm formation.

  19. Application of Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia) serine proteinase for production of biologically active peptides from casein.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Pokora, Marta; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine potential application of a serine proteinase derived from Asian pumpkin for obtaining biologically active peptides from casein. The course of casein hydrolysis by three doses of the enzyme (50, 150, 300 U/mg of protein) was monitored for 24 hours by the determinations of: hydrolysis degree DH (%), free amino group content (μmole Gly/g), RP HPLC peptide profiles and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all hydrolyzates analyzed antioxidant activities were determined using three tests: the ability to reduce iron ions in FRAP test, the ability to scavenge free radicals in DPPH test, and Fe(2+) chelating activity. The antimicrobial activity of obtained peptide fractions was determined as the ability to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in a diffusion plate test. The deepest degradation, expressed as the DH [%] and the free amino group content (67% and 7528 µmole Gly/mg, respectively), was noted in samples hydrolyzed with 300 U/ml of enzyme for 24 hours, while in other samples the determined values were about three and two times lower. The results were in agreement with the peptide profiles obtained by RP HPLC. The highest antioxidative activities determined in all tests were seen for the casein hydrolysate obtained with 300 U/mg protein of serine proteinase after 24 h of reaction (2.15 µM Trolox/mg, 96.15 µg Fe(3+)/mg, 814.97 µg Fe(2+)/mg). Antimicrobial activity was presented in three preparations. In other samples no antimicrobial activity was detected.

  20. Targeting a Proteinase-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4) Carboxyl Terminal Motif to Regulate Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Thibeault, Pierre; Vanderboor, Christina M; Petri, Björn; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Bouvier, Michel; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2017-04-01

    Thrombin initiates human platelet aggregation by coordinately activating proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. However, targeting PAR1 with an orthosteric-tethered ligand binding-site antagonist results in bleeding, possibly owing to the important role of PAR1 activation on cells other than platelets. Because of its more restricted tissue expression profile, we have therefore turned to PAR4 as an antiplatelet target. We have identified an intracellular PAR4 C-terminal motif that regulates calcium signaling and β-arrestin interactions. By disrupting this PAR4 calcium/β-arrestin signaling process with a novel cell-penetrating peptide, we were able to inhibit both thrombin-triggered platelet aggregation in vitro and clot consolidation in vivo. We suggest that targeting PAR4 represents an attractive alternative to blocking PAR1 for antiplatelet therapy in humans.

  1. Itraconazole-resistant Candida auris with phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity from a case of vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Banerjee, Tuhina; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Tilak, Ragini

    2015-04-15

    Since the emergence of pathogenic non-albicans Candida species, a number of new isolates have been added to the list. One such unusual species is Candida auris (C. auris), recently isolated and studied in few reports. In this study, a case of vulvovaginitis caused by Candida auris incidentally identified by molecular methods using internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction (ITS PCR) is described. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed the isolate to be resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 2 µg/ml) and expressed important virulence factors including phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity. The patient was successfully treated with oral fluconazole and did not have any invasive fungemia. Very few cases of this emerging pathogen have been reported. However, its isolation from clinical specimens reveals the significance of non-albicans candida species over C. albicans and the diversity of Candida spp causing infections.

  2. Roles of platelets and proteinase-activated receptors in gastric ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Perini, Rafael; Wallace, John L; Ma, Li

    2005-10-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are expressed on the surface of many cells, but those on the platelet have been among the most thoroughly characterized. PARs act as key receptors mediating the proaggregatory and pro-secretory effects of thrombin. In addition to contributing to hemostasis, platelets are increasingly being viewed as important contributors to healing and to tumor growth. This is attributable to the many pro- and anti-angiogenic factors that are stored within platelets, which can be released at the sites of injury and new vessel growth. In this paper, we review the importance of the platelet in gastric ulcer healing, the contribution of platelet-contained angiogenic factors to the healing of gastric ulcers, and the role of PARs in regulating the release of angiogenic factors from platelets. Taken together, our results suggest that PARs, including those expressed on platelets, are a rational therapeutic target for modulating healing processes and tumor growth.

  3. Molecular orbital studies of enzyme activity: catalytic mechanism of serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Scheiner, S; Lipscomb, W N

    1976-01-01

    The catalytic activity of the serine proteinases is studied using molecular orbital methods on a model of the enzyme-substrate complex. A mechanism is employed in which Ser-195, upon donating a proton to the His-57-Asp-102 dyad, attacks the substrate to form the tetrahedral intermediate. As His-57 then donates a proton to the leaving group, the intermediate decomposes to the acyl enzyme. An analogous process takes place during deacylation, as a water molecule takes the place of Ser-195 as the nucleophile. The motility of the histidine is found to be an important factor in both steps. An attempt is made to include the effects of those atoms not explicitly included in the calculations and to compare the reaction rate of the proposed mechanism with that of the uncatalyzed hydrolysis. This mechanism is found to be in good agreement with structural and kinetic data. PMID:1061145

  4. Activation of chitin synthetase in permeabilized cells of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, M P; Correa, J U; Cabib, E

    1982-01-01

    Digitonin treatment at 30 degrees C of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B permeabilized the cells and caused rapid and extensive activation of chitin synthetase in situ. The same result was obtained with a mutant generally defective in vacuolar proteases. By lowering the temperature and using different permeabilization procedures, we showed that increases in permeability and activation are distinct processes. Activation was inhibited by the protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin, but by pepstatin or chymostatin. Metal chelators were also inhibitory, and their effect was reversed by the addition of Ca2+ but not by Mg2+. Antipain added together with Ca2+ after incubation of the cells in the presence of a chelating agent prevented reversal of inhibition, a result that was interpreted as indicating that antipain acts either on the same step affected by Ca2+ or on a subsequent step. Efforts to obtain activation in cell-free extracts were unsuccessful, but it was possible to extract the synthetase, once activated, by breaking permeabilized cells with glass beads. Treatment of the cell-free extracts with trypsin led not only to increased activity of chitin synthetase, but also to a change in the pH-activity curve and a diminished requirement by the enzyme for free N-acetylglucosamine. These observations suggest that the modification undergone by the synthetase during endogenous activation is different from that brought about by trypsin treatment. Images PMID:6216245

  5. Circulating ADAM17 Level Reflects Disease Activity in Proteinase-3 ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Anna; Lovric, Svjetlana; Engel, Alissa; Beese, Michaela; Wyss, Kristin; Hertel, Barbara; Park, Joon-Keun; Becker, Jan U; Kegel, Johanna; Haller, Hermann; Haubitz, Marion; Kirsch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitides are characterized by inflammatory destruction of small vessels accompanied by enhanced cleavage of membrane-bound proteins. One of the main proteases responsible for ectodomain shedding is disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17). Given its potential role in aggravating vascular dysfunction, we examined the role of ADAM17 in active proteinase-3 (PR3)-positive ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ADAM17 concentration was significantly increased in plasma samples from patients with active PR3-AAV compared with samples from patients in remission or from other controls with renal nonvascular diseases. Comparably, plasma levels of the ADAM17 substrate syndecan-1 were significantly enhanced in active AAV. We also observed that plasma-derived ADAM17 retained its specific proteolytic activity and was partly located on extracellular microparticles. Transcript levels of ADAM17 were increased in blood samples of patients with active AAV, but those of ADAM10 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3, which inhibits ADAMs, were not. We also performed a microRNA (miR) screen and identified miR-634 as significantly upregulated in blood samples from patients with active AAV. In vitro, miR-634 mimics induced a proinflammatory phenotype in monocyte-derived macrophages, with enhanced expression and release of ADAM17 and IL-6. These data suggest that ADAM17 has a prominent role in AAV and might account for the vascular complications associated with this disease.

  6. Circulating ADAM17 Level Reflects Disease Activity in Proteinase-3 ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Anna; Lovric, Svjetlana; Engel, Alissa; Beese, Michaela; Wyss, Kristin; Hertel, Barbara; Park, Joon-Keun; Becker, Jan U.; Kegel, Johanna; Haller, Hermann; Haubitz, Marion

    2015-01-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitides are characterized by inflammatory destruction of small vessels accompanied by enhanced cleavage of membrane-bound proteins. One of the main proteases responsible for ectodomain shedding is disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17). Given its potential role in aggravating vascular dysfunction, we examined the role of ADAM17 in active proteinase-3 (PR3)-positive ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ADAM17 concentration was significantly increased in plasma samples from patients with active PR3-AAV compared with samples from patients in remission or from other controls with renal nonvascular diseases. Comparably, plasma levels of the ADAM17 substrate syndecan-1 were significantly enhanced in active AAV. We also observed that plasma-derived ADAM17 retained its specific proteolytic activity and was partly located on extracellular microparticles. Transcript levels of ADAM17 were increased in blood samples of patients with active AAV, but those of ADAM10 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3, which inhibits ADAMs, were not. We also performed a microRNA (miR) screen and identified miR-634 as significantly upregulated in blood samples from patients with active AAV. In vitro, miR-634 mimics induced a proinflammatory phenotype in monocyte-derived macrophages, with enhanced expression and release of ADAM17 and IL-6. These data suggest that ADAM17 has a prominent role in AAV and might account for the vascular complications associated with this disease. PMID:25788529

  7. The product of the adenovirus intermediate gene IX is a transcriptional activator.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, P; Rosa-Calatrava, M; Kedinger, C

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the functional properties of the product of the adenovirus type 5 gene IX. This gene, which is expressed at intermediate times postinfection, encodes a small polypeptide (pIX) of 140 residues that has previously been shown to be incorporated into the viral capsid. Here, we show that pIX, in addition to its structural contribution, exhibits transcriptional properties. In transient transfection experiments, expression of pIX stimulated adenovirus major late promoter activity. The effect was independent of other viral proteins, but the level of promoter activation appeared strongly pIX dose dependent; similar levels of induction were observed with other cellular or viral TATA-containing (but not with TATA-less) promoters. This promoter specificity could be reproduced in a cell-free transcription system by the addition of purified recombinant pIX, further stressing the transcriptional nature of the phenomenon. A preliminary structural analysis of pIX indicated that the integrity of a putative leucine zipper at the carboxy-terminal end of the molecule, as well as elements within the amino-terminal half, was critical for pIX transcriptional activity. The relevance of these findings in adenovirus infection is discussed. PMID:9188576

  8. Agonist-Biased Signaling via Proteinase Activated Receptor-2: Differential Activation of Calcium and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Mathur, Maneesh; Rochdi, Moulay Driss; Bouvier, Michel; DeFea, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of different trypsin-revealed tethered ligand (TL) sequences of rat proteinase-activated receptor 2 (rPAR2) and the corresponding soluble TL-derived agonist peptides to trigger agonist-biased signaling. To do so, we mutated the proteolytically revealed TL sequence of rPAR2 and examined the impact on stimulating intracellular calcium transients and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The TL receptor mutants, rPAR2-Leu37Ser38, rPAR2-Ala37–38, and rPAR2-Ala39–42 were compared with the trypsin-revealed wild-type rPAR2 TL sequence, S37LIGRL42—. Upon trypsin activation, all constructs stimulated MAP kinase signaling, but only the wt-rPAR2 and rPAR2-Ala39–42 triggered calcium signaling. Furthermore, the TL-derived synthetic peptide SLAAAA-NH2 failed to cause PAR2-mediated calcium signaling but did activate MAP kinase, whereas SLIGRL-NH2 triggered both calcium and MAP kinase signaling by all receptors. The peptides AAIGRL-NH2 and LSIGRL-NH2 triggered neither calcium nor MAP kinase signals. Neither rPAR2-Ala37–38 nor rPAR2-Leu37Ser38 constructs recruited β-arrestins-1 or -2 in response to trypsin stimulation, whereas both β-arrestins were recruited to these mutants by SLIGRL-NH2. The lack of trypsin-triggered β-arrestin interactions correlated with impaired trypsin-activated TL-mutant receptor internalization. Trypsin-stimulated MAP kinase activation by the TL-mutated receptors was not blocked by inhibitors of Gαi (pertussis toxin), Gαq [N-cyclohexyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-6-methylindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide (GP2A)], Src kinase [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], or the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor [4-(3′-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline (AG1478)], but was inhibited by the Rho-kinase inhibitor (R)-(+)-trans-N-(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-aminoethyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide, 2HCl (Y27362). The data indicate that the proteolytically revealed TL sequence(s) and the mode

  9. Genetic delivery of an immunoRNase by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Hammer, Katharina; Arndt, Michaela A E; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Dorer, Dominik; Engelhardt, Sarah; Kontermann, Roland E; Hess, Jochen; Allgayer, Heike; Krauss, Jürgen; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2015-05-01

    Antibody therapy of solid cancers is well established, but suffers from unsatisfactory tumor penetration of large immunoglobulins or from low serum retention of antibody fragments. Oncolytic viruses are in advanced clinical development showing excellent safety, but suboptimal potency due to limited virus spread within tumors. Here, by developing an immunoRNase-encoding oncolytic adenovirus, we combine viral oncolysis with intratumoral genetic delivery of a small antibody-fusion protein for targeted bystander killing of tumor cells (viro-antibody therapy). Specifically, we explore genetic delivery of a small immunoRNase consisting of an EGFR-binding scFv antibody fragment fused to the RNase Onconase (ONC(EGFR)) that induces tumor cell death by RNA degradation after cellular internalization. Onconase is a frog RNase that combines lack of immunogenicity and excellent safety in patients with high tumor killing potency due to its resistance to the human cytosolic RNase inhibitor. We show that ONC(EGFR) expression by oncolytic adenoviruses is feasible with an optimized, replication-dependent gene expression strategy. Virus-encoded ONC(EGFR) induces potent and EGFR-dependent bystander killing of tumor cells. Importantly, the ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus showed dramatically increased cytotoxicity specifically to EGFR-positive tumor cells in vitro and significantly enhanced therapeutic activity in a mouse xenograft tumor model. The latter demonstrates that ONC(EGFR) is expressed at levels sufficient to trigger tumor cell killing in vivo. The established ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus represents a novel agent for treatment of EGFR-positive tumors. This viro-antibody therapy platform can be further developed for targeted/personalized cancer therapy by exploiting antibody diversity to target further established or emerging tumor markers or combinations thereof.

  10. Evaluation of the antiviral activity of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Sanekata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Morino, Hirofumi; Lee, Cheolsung; Maeda, Ken; Araki, Kazuko; Otake, Toru; Kawahata, Takuya; Shibata, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the antiviral activity of a chlorine dioxide gas solution (CD) and sodium hypochlorite (SH) against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus. CD at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ppm produced potent antiviral activity, inactivating >or= 99.9% of the viruses with a 15 sec treatment for sensitization. The antiviral activity of CD was approximately 10 times higher than that of SH.

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  12. Juvenile and adult metachromatic leukodystrophy: partial restoration of arylsulfatase A (cerebroside sulfatase) activity by inhibitors of thiol proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    von Figura, K; Steckel, F; Hasilik, A

    1983-01-01

    Arylsulfatase A polypeptides were examined in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with juvenile metachromatic leukodystrophy and three patients with the adult form of the disease, with the aid of metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation. The mutant cells were severely deficient in the arylsulfatase polypeptides. The apparent rate of synthesis, however, as estimated from the secretion of polypeptides or activity by cells incubated in the presence of 10 mM NH4Cl was 20-50% of control. In the absence of NH4Cl, the mutant enzyme was rapidly degraded upon transport into lysosomes. In the presence of inhibitors of thiol proteinases arylsulfatase A polypeptides were partially protected from degradation, and the catalytic activity of arylsulfatase A was increased. In addition, the treatment partially corrected the capacity of the cells to degrade cerebroside sulfates. Inhibitors of thiol proteinases may be of therapeutic value in variants of metachromatic leukodystrophy, in which an unstable arylsulfatase A is synthesized. Images PMID:6136972

  13. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. I. Kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Masia-Perez, J; Garcia-Molina, F; García-Moreno, M; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinases zymogens involving a uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous activation route and a reversible inhibition step, the time course equation of the zymogen, inhibitor and activated enzyme concentrations have been derived. Likewise, expressions for the time required for any reaction progress and the corresponding mean activation rates as well as the half-life of the global zymogen activation have been derived. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed.

  14. Polyethylene glycol modification of adenovirus reduces platelet activation, endothelial cell activation, and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hofherr, Sean E; Mok, Hoyin; Gushiken, Francisca C; Lopez, Jose A; Barry, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the complications for in vivo administration of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors after intravenous injection. In this paper, we investigated the mechanism of Ad5-induced thrombocytopenia and how these effects are attenuated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of Ad5 (Ad-PEG). After intravenous injection, accelerated platelet loss was observed in Ad-injected mice but not in their Ad-PEG-injected counterparts. This platelet loss induced by Ad5 corresponded with increases in coagulation D-dimer levels, splenomegaly, and, later, production of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. In contrast, these responses were blunted or ablated after injection of Ad-PEG. Ad5 activated both platelets and endothelial cells directly in vitro as evidenced by induction of P-selectin and the formation of von Willebrand factor-platelet strings and in vivo as evidenced by the induction of E-selectin messenger RNA. PEGylation blunted these observed activations. These data suggest that Ad5 may induce thrombocytopenia by direct activation of endothelial cells in addition to its direct effects on platelets. This link provides an important clue for the understanding of the mechanisms of thrombocytopenia associated with Ad5. Given that PEGylation blunted interactions of Ad with platelets and endothelial cells, reduced D-dimer formation, reduced thrombocytopenia, and reduced splenomegaly, these data suggest that this simple vector modification may have utility to improve the safety of Ad vectors for human gene therapy.

  15. MicroRNA-34a Mediates the Autocrine Signaling of PAR2-Activating Proteinase and Its Role in Colonic Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiming; Bao-Han, Wuyun; Lv, Xue; Su, Yuntao; Zhao, Xinhua; Yin, Yongmei; Zhang, Xingmao; Zhou, Zhixiang; MacNaughton, Wallace K.; Wang, Hongying

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is replete with proteinases. As a sensor of proteinases, proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis. We showed that PAR2 and its activating proteinase were coexpressed in different colon cancer cell lines, including HT29. Inactivating proteinase or knockdown of PAR2 significantly not only reduced cell proliferation in vitro but also inhibited tumorigenicity of HT29 in vivo. In addition, activation of PAR2 promoted DNA synthesis and upregulated Cyclin D1 activity at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Further studies showed that miRNA-34a mediated PAR2-induced Cyclin D1 upregulation. Inhibition of miR-34a partially abolished the suppression of Cyclin D1 induced by PAR2 deficiency. In addition, we showed that TGF-β contributed to the regulation of miR-34a by PAR2. Finally, in colorectal carcinoma samples, upregulation of PAR2 and downregulation of miR-34a were significantly correlated with grade and lymphomatic metastasis. Our findings provide the first evidence that miRNA mediates autocrine proteinase signaling-mediated cancer cell proliferation. PMID:23991105

  16. Molt cycle-associated changes in calcium-dependent proteinase activity that degrades actin and myosin in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The role of calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) in the proecdysial atrophy of crustacean claw muscle has been investigated. During atrophy the molar ratio of actin to myosin heavy chain decreased 31%, confirming earlier ultrastructural observations that the ratio of thin:thick myofilaments declined from 9:1 to 6:1 (D.L. Mykles and D.M. Skinner, 1981, J. Ultrastruct. Res. 75, 314 to 325). The release of TCA-soluble material in muscle homogenates at neutral pH was stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and completely inhibited by EGTA. The specific degradation of the major myofibrillar proteins (actin, myosin heavy and light chains, paramyosin, tropomyosin, troponin-T, and troponin-I) was demonstrated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteolytic activity was more than twofold greater in proecdysial muscle homogenates. Degradation of myofibrillar proteins was inhibited by EGTA, and the two inhibitors of crysteine proteinases, leupeptin, and antipain, but not pepstatin, an inhibitor of aspartic proteinases. Unlike CDPs from vertebrate muscle, the CDP(s) in crab claw muscle degrades actin and myosin in addition to other myofibrillar proteins.

  17. Membrane lipid peroxidation in neurodegeneration: Role of thrombin and proteinase-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Citron, Bruce A; Ameenuddin, Syed; Uchida, K; Suo, William Z; SantaCruz, Karen; Festoff, Barry W

    2016-07-15

    Thrombin and membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) have been implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders from CNS trauma to stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Because thrombin also induces MLP in platelets and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases we hypothesized that its deleterious effects might, in part, involve formation of MLP in neuronal cells. We previously showed that thrombin induced caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in motor neurons, via a proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1). We have now investigated thrombin's influence on the oxidative state of neurons leading to induction of MLP-protein adducts. Translational relevance of thrombin-induced MLP is supported by increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts (HNEPA) in AD and PD brains. We now report for the first time that thrombin dose-dependently induces formation of HNEPA in NSC34 mouse motor neuron cells using anti-HNE and anti-acrolein monoclonal antibodies. The most prominent immunoreactive band, in SDS-PAGE, was at ∼54kDa. Membrane fractions displayed higher amounts of the protein-adduct than cytosolic fractions. Thrombin induced MLP was mediated, at least in part, through PAR1 since a PAR1 active peptide, PAR1AP, also elevated HNEPA levels. Of interest, glutamate and Fe2SO4 also increased the ∼54kDa HNEPA band in these cells but to a lesser extent. Taken together our results implicate the involvement of thrombin and MLP in neuronal cell loss observed in various CNS degenerative and traumatic pathologies.

  18. Effects of antirheumatic drugs on the interleukin-1 alpha induced synthesis and activation of proteinases in articular cartilage explants in culture.

    PubMed

    Arsenis, C; McDonnell, J

    1989-06-01

    Three human cytokines (interleukin-1 alpha, interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha), added into the medium of bovine or rabbit articular cartilage explant cultures, stimulated the synthesis and activation of various proteinases. Proteoglycan degradation, measured by assaying for sulfated glycosaminoglycans released into the medium, was correlated with the proteinase stimulation. Several antirheumatic drugs were tested in a similar tissue culture system as potential inhibitors of the interleukin-1 alpha mediated stimulation of proteinase and PGE2 syntheses. Arteparon, Dexamethasone, Ibuprofen, Indomethacin, Levamisole, Naproxen, Phenylbutazone, Prednisolone, Piroxicam, Rumalon, Tamoxifen and Diclofenac were essentially ineffective in inhibiting the interleukin-1 alpha mediated induction of proteinase synthesis and sulfated glycosaminoglycan release, although some of them inhibited PGE2 synthesis. Two antimalarial drugs showed some inhibition, but only at higher concentrations.

  19. Ether lipid-ester prodrugs of acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: activity against adenovirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hartline, Caroll B; Gustin, Kortney M; Wan, William B; Ciesla, Stephanie L; Beadle, James R; Hostetler, Karl Y; Kern, Earl R

    2005-02-01

    The acyclic nucleoside phosphonate cidofovir (CDV) and its closely related analogue (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)-adenine ([S]-HPMPA) have been reported to have activity against many adenovirus (AdV) serotypes. A new series of orally active ether lipid-ester prodrugs of CDV and of (S)-HPMPA that have slight differences in the structure of their lipid esters were evaluated, in tissue-culture cells, for activity against 5 AdV serotypes. The results indicated that, against several AdV serotypes, the most active compounds were 15-2500-fold more active than the unmodified parent compounds and should be evaluated further for their potential to treat AdV infections in humans.

  20. Oncolytic adenovirus expressing interleukin-18 improves antitumor activity of dacarbazine for malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunhua; Cao, Hang; Liu, Ning; Xu, Kai; Ding, Meng; Mao, Li-jun

    2016-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses have emerged as novel therapeutic agents for cancer. This study aimed to evaluate synergistic antitumor activity of replication-competent adenovirus armed with interleukin (IL)-18 (ZD55-IL-18) and dacarbazine (DTIC) against melanoma. Melanoma A375 cells or nude mouse tumor xenografts were treated with ZD55-IL-18 alone or together with DTIC. The results showed that ZD55-IL-18 competently replicated in A375 cells and expressed IL-18, and these were not affected by DTIC. ZD55-IL-18 enhanced the cytotoxicity of DTIC accompanied by increased apoptosis. Moreover, ZD55-IL-18 and DTIC synergistically inhibited the growth but promoted the apoptosis of A375 xenografts and inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor expression and lung metastasis in xenografts of nude mice. In conclusion, this is the first study to show synergistic anticancer activity of ZD55-IL-18 and DTIC for malignant melanoma. Our results provide evidence that chemo-gene-viro therapeutic approach has greater potential for malignant cancers than conventional chemotherapy or gene therapy. PMID:27895465

  1. Oncolytic adenovirus expressing interleukin-18 improves antitumor activity of dacarbazine for malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunhua; Cao, Hang; Liu, Ning; Xu, Kai; Ding, Meng; Mao, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses have emerged as novel therapeutic agents for cancer. This study aimed to evaluate synergistic antitumor activity of replication-competent adenovirus armed with interleukin (IL)-18 (ZD55-IL-18) and dacarbazine (DTIC) against melanoma. Melanoma A375 cells or nude mouse tumor xenografts were treated with ZD55-IL-18 alone or together with DTIC. The results showed that ZD55-IL-18 competently replicated in A375 cells and expressed IL-18, and these were not affected by DTIC. ZD55-IL-18 enhanced the cytotoxicity of DTIC accompanied by increased apoptosis. Moreover, ZD55-IL-18 and DTIC synergistically inhibited the growth but promoted the apoptosis of A375 xenografts and inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor expression and lung metastasis in xenografts of nude mice. In conclusion, this is the first study to show synergistic anticancer activity of ZD55-IL-18 and DTIC for malignant melanoma. Our results provide evidence that chemo-gene-viro therapeutic approach has greater potential for malignant cancers than conventional chemotherapy or gene therapy.

  2. Proteinase-Activated Receptor 2 Is a Novel Regulator of TGF-β Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Witte, David; Zeeh, Franziska; Gädeken, Thomas; Gieseler, Frank; Rauch, Bernhard H.; Settmacher, Utz; Kaufmann, Roland; Lehnert, Hendrik; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β has a dual role in tumorigenesis, acting as a tumor suppressor in normal cells and in the early stages of tumor development while promoting carcinogenesis and metastasis in advanced tumor stages. The final outcome of the TGF-β response is determined by cell-autonomous mechanisms and genetic alterations such as genomic instability and somatic mutations, but also by a plethora of external signals derived from the tumor microenvironment, such as cell-to-cell interactions, growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins and proteolytic enzymes. Serine proteinases mediate their cellular effects via activation of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), a subclass of G protein-coupled receptors that are activated by proteolytic cleavage. We have recently identified PAR2 as a factor required for TGF-β1-dependent cell motility in ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. In this article, we review what is known on the TGF-β-PAR2 signaling crosstalk and its relevance for tumor growth and metastasis. Since PAR2 is activated through various serine proteinases, it may couple TGF-β signaling to a diverse range of other physiological processes, such as local inflammation, systemic coagulation or pathogen infection. Moreover, since PAR2 controls expression of the TGF-β type I receptor ALK5, PAR2 may also impact signaling by other TGF-β superfamily members that signal through ALK5, such as myostatin and GDF15/MIC-1. If so, PAR2 could represent a molecular linker between PDAC development and cancer-related cachexia. PMID:27916875

  3. Proteinase-Activated Receptor 2 Is a Novel Regulator of TGF-β Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Witte, David; Zeeh, Franziska; Gädeken, Thomas; Gieseler, Frank; Rauch, Bernhard H; Settmacher, Utz; Kaufmann, Roland; Lehnert, Hendrik; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2016-11-30

    TGF-β has a dual role in tumorigenesis, acting as a tumor suppressor in normal cells and in the early stages of tumor development while promoting carcinogenesis and metastasis in advanced tumor stages. The final outcome of the TGF-β response is determined by cell-autonomous mechanisms and genetic alterations such as genomic instability and somatic mutations, but also by a plethora of external signals derived from the tumor microenvironment, such as cell-to-cell interactions, growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins and proteolytic enzymes. Serine proteinases mediate their cellular effects via activation of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), a subclass of G protein-coupled receptors that are activated by proteolytic cleavage. We have recently identified PAR2 as a factor required for TGF-β1-dependent cell motility in ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. In this article, we review what is known on the TGF-β-PAR2 signaling crosstalk and its relevance for tumor growth and metastasis. Since PAR2 is activated through various serine proteinases, it may couple TGF-β signaling to a diverse range of other physiological processes, such as local inflammation, systemic coagulation or pathogen infection. Moreover, since PAR2 controls expression of the TGF-β type I receptor ALK5, PAR2 may also impact signaling by other TGF-β superfamily members that signal through ALK5, such as myostatin and GDF15/MIC-1. If so, PAR2 could represent a molecular linker between PDAC development and cancer-related cachexia.

  4. Chronic Activation of Innate Immunity Correlates With Poor Prognosis in Cancer Patients Treated With Oncolytic Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Kristian; Liikanen, Ilkka; Juhila, Juuso; Turkki, Riku; Tähtinen, Siri; Kankainen, Matti; Vassilev, Lotta; Ristimäki, Ari; Koski, Anniina; Kanerva, Anna; Diaconu, Iulia; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Oksanen, Minna; Linder, Nina; Joensuu, Timo; Lundin, Johan; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-02-01

    Despite many clinical trials conducted with oncolytic viruses, the exact tumor-level mechanisms affecting therapeutic efficacy have not been established. Currently there are no biomarkers available that would predict the clinical outcome to any oncolytic virus. To assess the baseline immunological phenotype and find potential prognostic biomarkers, we monitored mRNA expression levels in 31 tumor biopsy or fluid samples from 27 patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Additionally, protein expression was studied from 19 biopsies using immunohistochemical staining. We found highly significant changes in several signaling pathways and genes associated with immune responses, such as B-cell receptor signaling (P < 0.001), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling (P < 0.001), and leukocyte extravasation signaling (P < 0.001), in patients surviving a shorter time than their controls. In immunohistochemical analysis, markers CD4 and CD163 were significantly elevated (P = 0.020 and P = 0.016 respectively), in patients with shorter than expected survival. Interestingly, T-cell exhaustion marker TIM-3 was also found to be significantly upregulated (P = 0.006) in patients with poor prognosis. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of several functions of the innate immunity before treatment is associated with inferior survival in patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Conversely, lack of chronic innate inflammation at baseline may predict improved treatment outcome, as suggested by good overall prognosis.

  5. Bioactive proteinase 3 on the cell surface of human neutrophils: quantification, catalytic activity, and susceptibility to inhibition.

    PubMed

    Campbell, E J; Campbell, M A; Owen, C A

    2000-09-15

    Although proteinase 3 (PR3) is known to have the potential to promote inflammation and injure tissues, the biologic forms and function of PR3 in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from healthy donors have received little attention. In this paper, we show that PMN contain 3.24 +/- SD 0.24 pg of PR3 per cell, and that the mean concentration of PR3 in azurophil granules of PMN is 13.4 mM. Low levels of PR3 are detectable on the cell surface of unstimulated PMN. Exposure of PMN to cytokines or chemoattractants alone induces modest (1.5- to 2.5-fold) increases in cell surface-bound PR3. In contrast, brief priming of PMN with cytokines, followed by activation with a chemoattractant, induces rapid and persistent, 5- to 6-fold increases in cell surface expression of PR3, while causing minimal free release of PR3. Membrane-bound PR3 on PMN is catalytically active against Boc-Alanine-Alanine-Norvaline-thiobenzyl ester and fibronectin, but in marked contrast to soluble PR3, membrane-bound PR3 is resistant to inhibition by physiologic proteinase inhibitors. PR3 appears to bind to the cell surface of PMN via a charge-dependent mechanism because exposure of fixed, activated PMN to solutions having increasing ionic strength results in elution of PR3, HLE, and CG, and there is a direct relationship between their order of elution and their isoelectric points. These data indicate that rapidly inducible PR3 expressed on the cell surface of PMN is an important bioactive form of the proteinase. If PR3 expression on the cell surface of PMN is dysregulated, it is well equipped to amplify tissue injury directly, and also indirectly via the generation of autoantibodies.

  6. Systematic mutational analysis of the active-site threonine of HIV-1 proteinase: rethinking the "fireman's grip" hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Strisovsky, K.; Tessmer, U.; Langner, J.; Konvalinka, J.; Kräusslich, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinases share a conserved network of hydrogen bonds (termed "fireman's grip"), which involves the hydroxyl groups of two threonine residues in the active site Asp-Thr-Gly triplets (Thr26 in the case of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PR). In the case of retroviral proteinases (PRs), which are active as symmetrical homodimers, these interactions occur at the dimer interface. For a systematic analysis of the "fireman's grip," Thr26 of HIV-1 PR was changed to either Ser, Cys, or Ala. The variant enzymes were tested for cleavage of HIV-1 derived peptide and polyprotein substrates. PR(T26S) and PR(T26C) showed similar or slightly reduced activity compared to wild-type HIV-1 PR, indicating that the sulfhydryl group of cysteine can substitute for the hydroxyl of the conserved threonine in this position. PR(T26A), which lacks the "fireman's grip" interaction, was virtually inactive and was monomeric in solution at conditions where wild-type PR exhibited a monomer-dimer equilibrium. All three mutations had little effect when introduced into only one chain of a linked dimer of HIV-1 PR. In this case, even changing both Thr residues to Ala yielded residual activity suggesting that the "fireman's grip" is not essential for activity but contributes significantly to dimer formation. Taken together, these results indicate that the "fireman's grip" is crucial for stabilization of the retroviral PR dimer and for overall stability of the enzyme. PMID:11045610

  7. A Novel Trypsin Inhibitor-Like Cysteine-Rich Peptide from the Frog Lepidobatrachus laevis Containing Proteinase-Inhibiting Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tan, Ji-Min; Du, Can-Wei; Luan, Ning; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiu-Min

    2015-08-01

    Various bio-active substances in amphibian skins play important roles in survival of the amphibians. Many protease inhibitor peptides have been identified from amphibian skins, which are supposed to negatively modulate the activity of proteases to avoid premature degradation or release of skin peptides, or to inhibit extracellular proteases produced by invading bacteria. However, there is no information on the proteinase inhibitors from the frog Lepidobatrachus laevis which is unique in South America. In this work, a cDNA encoding a novel trypsin inhibitor-like (TIL) cysteine-rich peptide was identified from the skin cDNA library of L. laevis. The 240-bp coding region encodes an 80-amino acid residue precursor protein containing 10 half-cysteines. By sequence comparison and signal peptide prediction, the precursor was predicted to release a 55-amino acid mature peptide with amino acid sequence, IRCPKDKIYKFCGSPCPPSCKDLTPNCIAVCKKGCFCRDGTVDNNHGKCVKKENC. The mature peptide was named LL-TIL. LL-TIL shares significant domain similarity with the peptides from the TIL supper family. Antimicrobial and trypsin-inhibitory abilities of recombinant LL-TIL were tested. Recombinant LL-TIL showed no antimicrobial activity, while it had trypsin-inhibiting activity with a Ki of 16.5178 μM. These results suggested there was TIL peptide with proteinase-inhibiting activity in the skin of frog L. laevis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of TIL peptide from frog skin.

  8. Detergent-Stable Salt-Activated Proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 Isolated from Fish Sauce Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Montriwong, Aungkawipa; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-05-01

    The NaCl-activated and detergent-stable proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 isolated from fish sauce fermentation were purified and characterized. The enzymes with molecular masses of 20 and 36 kDa showed caseinolytic activity on a zymogram. Optimum azocaseinolytic activity was at 60 °C and pH 9. The proteolytic activity increased in the presence of 10 mM CaCl2 and 0.5 M NaCl and showed high stability at 0-2 M NaCl. The enzymes were stable at pH 4-10 and 10-50 °C. The enzymes preferably hydrolyzed Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and were completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), showing subtilisin-like characteristics. Activity and stability remained high in the presence of H2O2 and various surfactants. The enzymes exhibited high stability (>95%) in various organic solvents (DMSO, butanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile) at concentration of 50%. The V. halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 proteinases showed potential as a biocatalyst in aqueous-organic solvent systems and as an additive in laundry detergent.

  9. Waterborne adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with numerous disease outbreaks, particularly those involving d-cares, schools, children's camps, hospitals and other health care centers, and military settings. In addition, adenoviruses have been responsible for many recreational water outbreaks, including a great number of swimming pool outbreaks than any other waterborne virus (Gerba and Enriquez 1997). Two drinking water outbreaks have been documented for adenovirus (Divizia et al. 2004; Kukkula et al. 1997) but none for food. Of the 51 known adenovirus serotypes, one third are associated with human disease, while other infections are asymptomatic. Human disease associated with adenovirus infections include gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye infections, acute hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis (Table 2). Children and the immunocompromised are more severely impacted by adenovirus infections. Subsequently, adenovirus is included in the EPA's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), which is a list of unregulated contaminants found in public water systems that may pose a risk to public health (National Research Council 1999). Adenoviruses have been detected in various waters worldwide including wastewater, river water, oceans, and swimming pools (Hurst et al. 1988; Irving and Smith 1981; Pina et al. 1998). Adenoviruses typically outnumber the enteroviruses, when both are detected in surface waters. Chapron et al. (2000) found that 38% of 29 surface water samples were positive for infectious Ad40 and Ad41. Data are lacking regarding the occurrence of adenovirus in water in the US, particularly for groundwater and drinking water. Studies have shown, however, that adenoviruses survive longer in water than enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus (Enriquez et al. 1995), which may be due to their double-stranded DNA. Risk assessments have been conducted on waterborne adenovirus (Crabtree et al. 1997; van Heerden et al. 2005c). Using dose-response data for inhalation

  10. Manduca sexta proprophenoloxidase activating proteinase-3 (PAP3) stimulates melanization by activating proPAP3, proSPHs, and proPOs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Lu, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Haobo

    2014-01-01

    Melanization participates in various insect physiological processes including antimicrobial immune responses. Phenoloxidase (PO), a critical component of the enzyme system catalyzing melanin formation, is produced as an inactive precursor prophenoloxidase (proPO) and becomes active via specific proteolytic cleavage by proPO activating proteinase (PAP). In Manduca sexta, three PAPs can activate proPOs in the presence of two serine proteinase homologs (SPH1 and SPH2). While the hemolymph proteinases (HPs) that generate the active PAPs are known, it is unclear how the proSPHs (especially proSPH1) are activated. In this study, we isolated from plasma of bar-stage M. sexta larvae an Ile-Glu-Ala-Arg-p-nitroanilide hydrolyzing enzyme that cleaved the proSPHs. This proteinase, PAP3, generated active SPH1 and SPH2, which function as cofactors for PAP3 in proPO activation. Cleavage of the purified recombinant proSPHs by PAP3 yielded 38 kDa bands similar in mobility to the SPHs formed in vivo. Surprisingly, PAP3 also can activate proPAP3 to stimulate melanization in a direct positive feedback loop. The enhanced proPO activation concurred with the cleavage activation of proHP6, proHP8, proPAP1, proPAP3, proSPH1, proSPH2, proPOs, but not proHP14 or proHP21. These results indicate that PAP3, like PAP1, is a key factor of the self-reinforcing mechanism in the proPO activation system, which is linked to other immune responses in M. sexta. PMID:24768974

  11. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR(2)) in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells: effects on signaling and cellular level.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Roland; Hascher, Alexander; Mussbach, Franziska; Henklein, Petra; Katenkamp, Kathrin; Westermann, Martin; Settmacher, Utz

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrate functional expression of the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR(2)), a member of a G-protein receptor subfamily in primary cholangiocarcinoma (PCCA) cell cultures. Treatment of PCCA cells with the serine proteinase trypsin and the PAR(2)-selective activating peptide, furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2), increased migration across a collagen membrane barrier. This effect was inhibited by a PAR(2)-selective pepducin antagonist peptide (P2pal-18S) and it was also blocked with the Met receptor tyrosine kinase (Met) inhibitors SU 11274 and PHA 665752, the MAPKinase inhibitors PD 98059 and SL 327, and the Stat3 inhibitor Stattic. The involvement of Met, p42/p44 MAPKinases and Stat3 in PAR(2)-mediated PCCA cell signaling was further supported by the findings that trypsin and the PAR(2)-selective agonist peptide, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2), stimulated activating phosphorylation of these signaling molecules in cholangiocarcinoma cells. With our results, we provide a novel signal transduction module in cholangiocarcinoma cell migration involving PAR(2)-driven activation of Met, p42/p44 MAPKinases and Stat3.

  12. A five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor from black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon and its inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Somprasong, Nawarat; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2006-01-01

    A novel five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor, SPIPm2, identified from the hemocyte cDNA library of black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon was successfully expressed in the Escherichia coli expression system. The expressed recombinant SPIPm2 (rSPIPm2) as inclusion bodies was solubilized with a sodium carbonate buffer, pH10, and purified by gel filtration chromatography. The molecular mass of rSPIPm2 was determined using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to be 29.065 kDa. The inhibitory activities of rSPIPm2 were tested against trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin and elastase. The inhibitor exhibited potent inhibitory activities against subtilisin and elastase, weak inhibitory activity against trypsin, and did not inhibit chymotrypsin. Tight-binding inhibition assay suggested that the molar ratios of SPIPm2 to subtilisin and elastase were 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. The inhibition against subtilisin and elastase was a competitive type with inhibition constants (Ki) of 0.52 and 3.27 nM, respectively. The inhibitory activity of SPIPm2 against subtilisin implies that, in shrimp, it may function as a defense component against proteinases from pathogenic bacteria but the elastase inhibitory function is not known.

  13. Characterization of Peptides from Capsicum annuum Hybrid Seeds with Inhibitory Activity Against α-Amylase, Serine Proteinases and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Vieira Bard, Gabriela C; Nascimento, Viviane V; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Rodrigues, Rosana; Perales, Jonas; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, André O; Fernandes, Katia Valevski S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last several years, the activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), isolated from plant species, against different microorganisms has been demonstrated. More recently, some of these AMPs have been described as potent inhibitors of α-amylases and serine proteinases from insects and mammals. The aim of this work was to obtain AMPs from protein extracts of a hybrid Capsicum (Ikeda × UENF 1381) seeds and to evaluate their microbial and enzyme inhibitory activities. Initially, proteins were extracted from the Capsicum hybrid seeds in buffer (sodium phosphate pH 5.4,) and precipitated with ammonium sulfate (90% saturated). Extract of hybrid seeds was subjected to size exclusion chromatography, and three fractions were obtained: S1, S2 and S3. The amino acid sequence, obtained by mass spectrometry, of the 6 kDa peptide from the S3 fraction, named HyPep, showed 100% identity with PSI-1.2, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from C. annuum seeds, however the bifunctionality of this inhibitor against two enzymes is being shown for the first time in this work. The S3 fraction showed the highest antifungal activity, inhibiting all the yeast strains tested, and it also exhibited inhibitory activity against human salivary and Callosobruchus maculatus α-amylases as well as serine proteinases.

  14. Unabated Adenovirus Replication following Activation of the cGAS/STING-Dependent Antiviral Response in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cGAS/STING DNA sensing complex has recently been established as a predominant pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) for DNA-directed type I interferon (IFN) innate immune activation. Using replication-defective adenovirus vectors and replication-competent wild-type adenovirus, we have modeled the influence of the cGAS/STING cascade in permissive human cell lines (A549, HeLa, ARPE19, and THP1). Wild-type adenovirus induced efficient early activation of the cGAS/STING cascade in a cell-specific manner. In all responsive cell lines, cGAS/STING short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown resulted in a loss of TBK1 and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) activation, a lack of beta interferon transcript induction, loss of interferon-dependent STAT1 activation, and diminished induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Adenoviruses that infect through the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) (Ad2 and Ad5) and the CD46 (Ad35) and desmoglein-2 (Ad7) viral receptors all induce the cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade. The magnitude of the IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response was strongly influenced by serotype, with Ad35>Ad7>Ad2. For each serotype, no enhancement of viral DNA replication or virus production occurred in cGAS or STING shRNA-targeted cell line pools. We found no replication advantage in permissive cell lines that do not trigger the cGAS/STING cascade following infection. The cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade was not a direct target of viral antihost strategies, and we found no evidence that Ad stimulation of the cGAS/STING DNA response had an impact on viral replication efficiency. IMPORTANCE This study shows for the first time that the cGAS DNA sensor directs a dominant IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response to adenovirus in human cell lines. Activation of cGAS occurs with viruses that infect through different high-affinity receptors (CAR, CD46, and desmoglein-2), and the magnitude of the cGAS/STING DNA response cascade is influenced by serotype-specific functions

  15. Binding properties of the regulatory domains in Manduca sexta hemolymph proteinase-14, an initiation enzyme of the prophenoloxidase activation system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo

    2010-03-01

    Pathogen recognition and rapid initiation of defense responses are essential for the survival of host insects. In Manduca sexta, hemolymph proteinase-14 precursor (proHP14) senses non-self presence and triggers a branched serine proteinase pathway which leads to prophenoloxidase activation and melanin formation around the invading organisms. To understand functions of individual domains in HP14, we have produced a series of HP14 domains and truncation mutants and studied their interactions with microbial polysaccharides and beta-1,3-glucan recognition protein-1 (betaGRP1)-a biosensor for fungal and bacterial infection. These include: the low-density lipoprotein receptor class A repeats 1-5 (LDL(1-5)), Sushi domain, Wonton domain, and proteinase catalytic domain of HP14, as well as proHP14 missing 1-4 LDL repeats (DeltaLDL(1), DeltaLDL(12), DeltaLDL(1-3) and DeltaLDL(1-4)). LDL(1-5), Sushi, and Wonton domains specifically recognized Lys-type PG, whereas the latter two also bound betaGRP1. Wonton in addition bound to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and meso-diaminopimelic acid (DAP)-type peptidoglycan (PG). The four N-terminally truncated proHP14 (DeltaL(x)) further confirmed specific interactions with LPS, LTA, DAP-PG, Lys-PG, laminarin, and betaGRP1. These binding data suggest a broad specificity of proHP14 in pattern recognition. Its role in mediating immune responses is anticipated to be influenced by other plasma factors and surface structures of invading pathogens.

  16. A rapid method for detecting extracellular proteinase activity in Cryptococcus neoformans and a survey of 63 isolates.

    PubMed

    Ruma-Haynes, P; Brownlee, A G; Sorrell, T C

    2000-08-01

    A rapid method to detect extracellular proteolytic activity around colonies of Cryptococcus neoformans was developed with tannic acid used to complex with residual protein in a solid medium. A survey was conducted with 32 isolates of C. neoformans var. gattii and 31 isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans which were cultured on medium containing gelatin as the sole nitrogen source. The annulus of clearing around fungal colonies was > 1.2 mm in 24 (77%) isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans compared with only 7 (22%) isolates of C. neoformans var. gattii. There was no difference in proteolytic activity between environmental and human clinical isolates of C. neoformans. However, there was a difference between the size of the annulus around animal isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans and isolates of the same variety from other sources. The annuli around the 14 animal isolates were all >1.2 mm, while 7 (70%) of 10 human clinical isolates and only 3 (43%) of 7 environmental isolates were scored in the high proteinase range. A difference between the genetic types (as characterised by RAPD typing) of C. neoformans var. gattii was also evident with 17 (77%) of 22 VG-I isolates having a small annulus compared with only 1 (17%) of 6 VG-II and VG-III isolates with annuli of similar size. Relatively low proteinase production by C. neoformans var. gattii may reduce local and systemic spread of infection in mammalian hosts.

  17. In vitro activation of the rhesus macaque myeloid alpha-defensin precursor proRMAD-4 by neutrophil serine proteinases.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Karishma; Maemoto, Atsuo; Qu, Xiaoqing; Young, Steven K; Ouellette, André J

    2008-11-21

    Alpha-defensins are mammalian antimicrobial peptides expressed mainly by cells of myeloid lineage or small intestinal Paneth cells. The peptides are converted from inactive 8.5-kDa precursors to membrane-disruptive forms by post-translational proteolytic events. Because rhesus myeloid pro-alpha-defensin-4 (proRMAD-4((20-94))) lacks bactericidal peptide activity in vitro, we tested whether neutrophil azurophil granule serine proteinases, human neutrophil elastase (NE), cathepsin G (CG), and proteinase-3 (P3) have in vitro convertase activity. Only NE cleaved proRMAD-4((20-94)) at the native RMAD-4 N terminus to produce fully processed, bactericidal RMAD-4((62-94)). The final CG cleavage product was RMAD-4((55-94)), and P3 produced both RMAD-4((55-94)) and RMAD-4(57-94). Nevertheless, NE, CG, and P3 digests of proRMAD4 and purified RMAD-4((62-94)), RMAD-4((55-94)), and RMAD-4(57-94) peptides had equivalent in vitro bactericidal activities. Bactericidal peptide activity assays of proRMAD-4((20-94)) variants containing complete charge-neutralizing D/E to N/Q or D/E to A substitutions showed that (DE/NQ)-proRMAD-4((20-94)) and (DE/A)-proRMAD-4((20-94)) were as active as mature RMAD-4((62-94)). Therefore, proregion Asp and Glu side chains inhibit the RMAD-4 component of full-length proRMAD-4((20-94)), perhaps by a combination of charge-neutralizing and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Although native RMAD-4((62-94)) resists NE, CG, and P3 proteolysis completely, RMAD-4((62-94)) variants with disulfide pairing disruptions or lacking disulfide bonds were degraded extensively, evidence that the disulfide array protects the alpha-defensin moiety from degradation by the myeloid converting enzymes. These in vitro analyses support the conclusion that rhesus macaque myeloid pro-alpha-defensins are converted to active forms by serine proteinases that co-localize in azurophil granules.

  18. Strong cooperativity and loose geometry between CUB domains are the basis for procollagen c-proteinase enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Daniel; Vadon-Le Goff, Sandrine; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Font, Bernard; Eichenberger, Denise; Hulmes, David J S; Moali, Catherine

    2009-11-27

    Procollagen C-proteinase enhancers (PCPE-1 and -2) specifically activate bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1) and other members of the tolloid proteinase family during C-terminal processing of fibrillar collagen precursors. PCPEs consist of two CUB domains (CUB1 and CUB2) and one NTR domain separated by one short and one long linker. It was previously shown that PCPEs can strongly interact with procollagen molecules, but the exact mechanism by which they enhance BMP-1 activity remains largely unknown. Here, we used a series of deletion mutants of PCPE-1 and two chimeric constructs with repetitions of the same CUB domain to study the role of each domain and linker. Out of all the forms tested, only those containing both CUB1 and CUB2 were capable of enhancing BMP-1 activity and binding to a mini-procollagen substrate with nanomolar affinity. Both these properties were lost by individual CUB domains, which had dissociation constants at least three orders of magnitude higher. In addition, none of the constructs tested could inhibit PCPE activity, although CUB2CUB2NTR was found to modulate BMP-1 activity through direct complex formation with the enzyme, resulting in a decreased rate of substrate processing. Finally, increasing the length of the short linker between CUB1 and CUB2 was without detrimental effect on both activity and substrate binding. These data support the conclusion that CUB1 and CUB2 bind to the procollagen substrate in a cooperative manner, involving the short linker that provides a flexible tether linking the two binding regions.

  19. [Modulation of Ca(2+)-dependent proteinase activity in invertebrates and fish under the action of weak low-frequency magnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Kantserova, N P; Ushakova, N V; Krylov, V V; Lysenko, L A; Nemova, N N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of weak low-frequency magnetic field on intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent proteinases (calpains) of fish and invertebrates was studied in in vivo and in vitro experiments. It has been found that intravital effect of weak low-frequency magnetic field tuned to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ ions led to a significant decrease in calpain activity in examined animals. It was shown that preparations of Ca(2+)-dependent proteinases from invertebrates and fish have been also substantially inactivated at the effect of indicated factor. Observed phenomenon is in the correspondence with an interference model of the impact of weak low-frequency magnetic field on the biological objects.

  20. Domain 2 of a Kazal serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 from Penaeus monodon possesses antiviral activity against WSSV.

    PubMed

    Visetnan, Suwattana; Donpudsa, Suchao; Supungul, Premruethai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien

    2014-12-01

    A 5-domain Kazal type serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 from Penaeus monodon is involved in innate immune defense against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). To test which domains were involved, the 5 domains of SPIPm2 were over-expressed and tested against WSSV infection. By using hemocyte primary cell culture treated with each recombinant SPIPm2 domain along with WSSV, the expression of WSSV early genes ie1, WSV477 and late gene VP28 were substantially reduced as compared to other domains when the recombinant domain 2, rSPIPm2D2, was used. Injecting the WSSV along with rSPIPm2D2 but not with other domains caused delay in mortality rate of the infected shrimp. The results indicate that the SPIPm2D2 possesses strong antiviral activity and, hence, contributes predominantly to the antiviral activity of SPIPm2.

  1. Recombinant proteinase 3 (Wegener's antigen) expressed in Pichia pastoris is functionally active and is recognized by patient sera.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, M C; Heeringa, P; van der Geld, Y M; Huitema, M G; Klimp, A; Tiran, A; Kallenberg, C G

    1997-11-01

    The open reading frame of human proteinase 3 (PR3) without the prepro-peptide was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (rcPR3) and in Pichia pastoris (rpPR3). The 6-histidine tagged rpPR3 was efficiently secreted into culture supernatant from which it could be purified by immobilized metal chelate chromatography. Purified rpPR3 migrated as a single 32-kD band on SDS-PAGE and harboured protease activity that could be inhibited with inhibitors specific for serine-proteases. By indirect antigen-capture ELISA using rpPR3, 60% of sera from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis bound to the recombinant product, although it was not recognized in ELISA with directly coated rpPR3.

  2. Adenovirus E1A specifically blocks SWI/SNF-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M E; Cairns, B R; Levinson, R S; Yamamoto, K R; Engel, D A; Smith, M M

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A243 oncoprotein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces a slow-growth phenotype with accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This effect is due to the N-terminal and CR1 domains of E1A243, which in rodent cells are involved in triggering cellular transformation and also in binding to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. A genetic screen was undertaken to identify genes required for the function of E1A243 in S. cerevisiae. This screen identified SNF12, a gene encoding the 73-kDa subunit of the SWI/SNF transcriptional regulatory complex. Mutation of genes encoding known members of the SWI/SNF complex also led to loss of E1A function, suggesting that the SWI/SNF complex is a target of E1A243. Moreover, expression of E1A in wild-type cells specifically blocked transcriptional activation of the INO1 and SUC2 genes, whose activation pathways are distinct but have a common requirement for the SWI/SNF complex. These data demonstrate a specific functional interaction between E1A and the SWI/SNF complex and suggest that a similar interaction takes place in rodent and human cells. PMID:8816487

  3. Engineered adenovirus fiber shaft fusion homotrimer of soluble TRAIL with enhanced stability and antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, J; Wang, L; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, B; Zhu, R; Bi, J; Wu, J; Zhang, H; Wu, H; Yu, B; Kong, W; Yu, X

    2016-01-01

    Successful cancer therapies aim to induce selective apoptosis in neoplastic cells. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered an attractive anticancer agent due to its tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity. However, earlier studies with recombinant TRAIL revealed many shortcomings, including a short half-life, off-target toxicity and existence of TRAIL-resistant tumor cells. In this study, we developed a novel engineering strategy for recombinant soluble TRAIL by redesigning its structure with the adenovirus knobless fiber motif to form a stable homotrimer with improved antitumor activity. The result is a highly stable fiber-TRAIL fusion protein that could form homotrimers similar to natural TRAIL. The recombinant fusion TRAIL developed here displayed high specific activity in both cell-based assays in vitro and animal tests in vivo. This construct will serve as a foundation for a new generation of recombinant proteins suitable for use in preclinical and clinical studies and for effective combination therapies to overcome tumor resistance to TRAIL. PMID:27336718

  4. A novel strategy to modify adenovirus tropism and enhance transgene delivery to activated vascular endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Rots, Marianne G; Kok, Robbert J; Moorlag, Henk E; Van Loenen, Anne-Miek; Meijer, Dirk K F; Haisma, Hidde J; Molema, Grietje

    2004-05-01

    To assess the possibilities of retargeting adenovirus to activated endothelial cells, we conjugated bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) onto the adenoviral capsid to inhibit the interaction between viral knob and coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR). Subsequently, we introduced an alphav integrin-specific RGD peptide or E-selectin-specific antibody to the other functional group of the PEG molecule for the retargeting of the adenovirus to activated endothelial cells. In vitro studies showed that this approach resulted in the elimination of transgene transfer into CAR-positive cells, while at the same time specific transgene transfer to activated endothelial cells was achieved. PEGylated, retargeted adenovirus showed longer persistence in the blood circulation with area under plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) values increasing 12-fold compared to unmodified virus. Anti-E-selectin antibody-PEG-adenovirus selectively homed to inflamed skin in mice with a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) inflammation, resulting in local expression of the reporter transgene luciferase. This is the first study showing the benefits of PEGylation on adenovirus behavior upon systemic administration. The approach described here can form the basis for further development of adenoviral gene therapy vectors with improved pharmacokinetics and increased efficiency and specificity of therapeutic gene transfer into endothelial cells in disease.

  5. The Use of Adenovirus Dodecahedron in the Delivery of an Enzymatic Activity in the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Sumarheni; Gallet, Benoit; Fender, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Penton-dodecahedron (Pt-Dd) derived from adenovirus type 3 is a symmetric complex of pentameric penton base plus fiber which can be produced in the baculovirus system at a high concentration. The size of Pt-Dd is smaller than the virus, but this virus-like particle (VLP) has the major proteins recognized by specific receptors on the surface of almost all types of cell. In this study, by direct observation with fluorescence microscopy on a fixed and living cell, the intracellular trafficking and localization of Pt-Dd labeled with fluorescence dyes in the cytoplasm of HeLa Tub-GFP showed a rapid internalization characteristic. Subsequently, the linkage of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with Pt-Dd as the vector demonstrated an efficient system to deliver this enzyme into the cell without interfering its enzymatic activity as shown by biochemical and cellular experiments. These results were supported by additional studies using Bs-Dd or free form of the HRP used as the control. Overall, this study strengthens the potential role of Pt-Dd as an alternative vector for delivering therapeutic agents. PMID:27242929

  6. The Use of Adenovirus Dodecahedron in the Delivery of an Enzymatic Activity in the Cell.

    PubMed

    Sumarheni; Gallet, Benoit; Fender, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Penton-dodecahedron (Pt-Dd) derived from adenovirus type 3 is a symmetric complex of pentameric penton base plus fiber which can be produced in the baculovirus system at a high concentration. The size of Pt-Dd is smaller than the virus, but this virus-like particle (VLP) has the major proteins recognized by specific receptors on the surface of almost all types of cell. In this study, by direct observation with fluorescence microscopy on a fixed and living cell, the intracellular trafficking and localization of Pt-Dd labeled with fluorescence dyes in the cytoplasm of HeLa Tub-GFP showed a rapid internalization characteristic. Subsequently, the linkage of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with Pt-Dd as the vector demonstrated an efficient system to deliver this enzyme into the cell without interfering its enzymatic activity as shown by biochemical and cellular experiments. These results were supported by additional studies using Bs-Dd or free form of the HRP used as the control. Overall, this study strengthens the potential role of Pt-Dd as an alternative vector for delivering therapeutic agents.

  7. The helper component-proteinase of the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus inhibits the Hua Enhancer 1 methyltransferase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Rana M; Boonrod, Kajohn; Fuellgrabe, Marc W; Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2011-09-01

    The helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) is a multifunctional protein found among potyviruses. With respect to its silencing suppressor function, small RNA binding appears to be the major activity of HC-Pro. HC-Pro could also exhibit other suppressor activities. HC-Pro may inhibit the Hua Enhancer 1 (HEN1) activity. There is indirect evidence showing that either transient or stable expression of HC-Pro in plants results in an increase of non-methylated small RNAs. Here, we demonstrated that recombinant Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) HC-Pro inhibited the methyltransferase activity of HEN1 in vitro. Moreover, we found that the HC-Pro(FINK) mutant, which has lost small RNA-binding activity, inhibited HEN1 activity, while the truncated proteins and total soluble bacterial proteins did not. Using the ELISA-binding assay, we provided evidence that the HC-Pro(FRNK) wild-type and HC-Pro(FINK) both bound to HEN1, with HC-Pro(FRNK) binding stronger than HC-Pro(FINK). Motif mapping analysis revealed that the amino acids located between positions 139 and 320 of ZYMV HC-Pro were associated with HEN1 interaction.

  8. Investigations on the activation of recombinant microbial pro-transglutaminase: in contrast to proteinase K, dispase removes the histidine-tag.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Christian; Hertel, Thomas C; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Pietzsch, Markus

    2012-02-01

    In order to produce recombinant microbial transglutaminase (rMTG) which is free of the activating protease, dispase was used to activate the pro-rMTG followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). As shown by MALDI-MS, the dispase does not only cleave the pro-sequence, but unfortunately also cleaves within the C-terminal histidine-tag. Hence, the active rMTG cannot properly bind to the IMAC material. As an alternative, proteinase K was investigated. This protease was successfully applied for the activation of purified pro-rMTG either as free or immobilized enzyme and the free enzyme was also applicable directly in the crude cell extract of E. coli. Thus, it enables a simple two-step activation/purification procedure resulting in protease-free and almost pure transglutaminase preparations. The protocol has been successfully applied to both, wild-type transglutaminase of Streptomyces mobaraensis as well as to the highly active variant S2P. Proteinase K activates the pro-rMTG without unwanted degradation of the histidine-tag. It turned out to be very important to inhibit proteinase K activity, e.g., by PMSF, prior to protein separation by SDS-PAGE.

  9. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct.

  10. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  11. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents.

  12. Anti-adenovirus activity, antioxidant potential, and phenolic content of black tea (Camellia sinensis Kuntze) extract.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali; Moradi, Mohammad-Taghi; Alidadi, Somayeh; Hashemi, Leila

    2016-12-01

    BackgroundAdenovirus (ADV) causes a number of diseases in human, and to date, no specific antiviral therapy is approved against this virus. Thus, searching for effective anti-ADV agents seems to be an urgent requirement. Many studies have shown that components derived from medicinal plants have antiviral activity. Therefore, the present study was aimed to evaluate in vitro anti-ADV activity and also antioxidant potential and total phenolic compounds of black tea (Camellia sinensis) crude extract. MethodsIn this study, the hydroalchoholic extract of black tea was prepared and its anti-ADV activity was evaluated on HEp2 cell line using MTT [3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay. The 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50) and 50 % cytotoxicity concentration (CC50) of the extract were determined using regression analysis. Its inhibitory effect on adsorption and/or post-adsorption stages of the virus replication cycle was evaluated. To determine antioxidant activity, total phenol content, and flavonoids content of the extract, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, Folin-Ciocalteu method, and aluminum chloride colorimetric method were used, respectively. ResultsThe CC50 and the IC50 of the extract were 165.95±12.7 and 6.62±1.4 µg/mL, respectively, with the selectivity index (SI) of 25.06. This extract inhibited ADV replication in post-adsorption stage. The IC50 of DPPH radical was 8±1.41 μg/mL, compared with butylated hydroxytoluene, with IC50 of 25.41±1.89 μg/mL. The total phenol and flavonoid contents of the extract were 341.8±4.41 mg gallic acid equivalent per gram and 21.1±2.11 mg/g, respectively. ConclusionsHaving SI value of 25.06 with inhibitory effect on ADV replication, particularly during the post-adsorption period, black tea extract could be considered as a potential anti-ADV agent. The antiviral activity of this extract could be attributed to its phenolic compounds.

  13. Mapping transmembrane residues of proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2) that influence ligand-modulated calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Suen, J Y; Adams, M N; Lim, J; Madala, P K; Xu, W; Cotterell, A J; He, Y; Yau, M K; Hooper, J D; Fairlie, D P

    2017-03-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor involved in metabolism, inflammation, and cancers. It is activated by proteolysis, which exposes a nascent N-terminal sequence that becomes a tethered agonist. Short synthetic peptides corresponding to this sequence also activate PAR2, while small organic molecules show promising PAR2 antagonism. Developing PAR2 ligands into pharmaceuticals is hindered by a lack of knowledge of how synthetic ligands interact with and differentially modulate PAR2. Guided by PAR2 homology modeling and ligand docking based on bovine rhodopsin, followed by cross-checking with newer PAR2 models based on ORL-1 and PAR1, site-directed mutagenesis of PAR2 was used to investigate the pharmacology of three agonists (two synthetic agonists and trypsin-exposed tethered ligand) and one antagonist for modulation of PAR2 signaling. Effects of 28 PAR2 mutations were examined for PAR2-mediated calcium mobilization and key mutants were selected for measuring ligand binding. Nineteen of twenty-eight PAR2 mutations reduced the potency of at least one ligand by >10-fold. Key residues mapped predominantly to a cluster in the transmembrane (TM) domains of PAR2, differentially influence intracellular Ca(2+) induced by synthetic agonists versus a native agonist, and highlight subtly different TM residues involved in receptor activation. This is the first evidence highlighting the importance of the PAR2 TM regions for receptor activation by synthetic PAR2 agonists and antagonists. The trypsin-cleaved N-terminus that activates PAR2 was unaffected by residues that affected synthetic peptides, challenging the widespread practice of substituting peptides for proteases to characterize PAR2 physiology.

  14. Leukocyte cell surface proteinases: regulation of expression, functions, and mechanisms of surface localization.

    PubMed

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: (1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinases by cells; (2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or (3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: (1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; (2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; (3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; (4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and (5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes.

  15. Molecular orbital studies of enzyme activity: I: Charge relay system and tetrahedral intermediate in acylation of serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Scheiner, S; Kleier, D A; Lipscomb, W N

    1975-01-01

    The charge relay ststem and its role in the acylation of serine proteinases is studied using the partial retention of diatomic differential overlap (PRDDO) technique to perform approximate ab initio molecular orbital calculations on a model of the enzyme-substrate complex. The aspartate in the charge relay system is seen to act as the ultimate proton acceptor during the charging of the serine nucleophile. A projection of the potential energy surface is obtained in a subspace corresponding to this charge transfer and to the coupled motions of active site residues and the substrate. These results together with extended basis set results for cruder models suggest that a concerted transfer of protons from Ser-195 to His-57 and from His-57 to Asp-102 occurs with an energy barrier of 20-25 kcal/mole (84-105 kJ/mole). The subsequent nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide linkage by the charged serine is then seen to proceed energetically downhill to the tetrahedral intermediate. The formation of the tetrahedral intermediate from the Michaelis complex is calculated to be nearly thermoneutral. PMID:1058476

  16. Inhibitory activity of a heterochromatin-associated serpin (MENT) against papain-like cysteine proteinases affects chromatin structure and blocks cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Irving, James A; Shushanov, Sain S; Pike, Robert N; Popova, Evgenya Y; Brömme, Dieter; Coetzer, Theresa H T; Bottomley, Stephen P; Boulynko, Iaroslava A; Grigoryev, Sergei A; Whisstock, James C

    2002-04-12

    MENT (Myeloid and Erythroid Nuclear Termination stage-specific protein) is a developmentally regulated chromosomal serpin that condenses chromatin in terminally differentiated avian blood cells. We show that MENT is an effective inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteinases cathepsins L and V. In addition, ectopic expression of MENT in mammalian cells is apparently sufficient to inhibit a nuclear papain-like cysteine proteinase and prevent degradation of the retinoblastoma protein, a major regulator of cell proliferation. MENT also accumulates in the nucleus, causes a strong block in proliferation, and promotes condensation of chromatin. Variants of MENT with mutations or deletions within the M-loop, which contains a nuclear localization signal and an AT-hook motif, reveal that this region mediates nuclear transport and morphological changes associated with chromatin condensation. Non-inhibitory mutants of MENT were constructed to determine whether its inhibitory activity has a role in blocking proliferation. These mutations changed the mode of association with chromatin and relieved the block in proliferation, without preventing transport to the nucleus. We conclude that the repressive effect of MENT on chromatin is mediated by its direct interaction with a nuclear protein that has a papain-like cysteine proteinase active site.

  17. A three-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor exhibiting domain inhibitory and bacteriostatic activities from freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Cang; Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Zong-Heng; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2009-12-01

    In crustaceans, Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in hemolymph are believed to function as regulators of the host-defense reactions or inhibitors against proteinases from microorganisms. In this study, we report a Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor, named hcPcSPI1, from freshwater crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). We found that hcPcSPI1 is composed of a putative signal peptide, an RGD motif, and three tandem Kazal-type domains with the domain P1 residues L, L and E, respectively. Mainly, hcPcSPI1 was detected in hemocytes as well as in the heart, gills, and intestine at both the mRNA and protein levels. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that hcPcSPI1 in hemocytes was upregulated by the stimulation of Esherichia coli (8099) or became decreased after a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. In addition, hcPcSPI1 and its three independent domains were overexpressed and purified to explore their potential functions. All four proteins inhibited subtilisin A and proteinase K, but not alpha-chymotypsin or trypsin. Recombinant hcPcSPI1 could firmly attach to Gram-negative bacteria E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae; Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Staphylococcus aureus; fungi Candida albicans and Saccharomyce cerevisiae, and only domain 1 was responsible for the binding to E. coli and S. aureus. In addition, recombinant hcPcSPI1 was also found to possess bacteriostatic activity against the B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. Domains 2 and 3 contributed mainly to these bacteriostatic activities. All results suggested that hcPcSPI1 might play important roles in the innate immunity of crayfish.

  18. Inhibition of a Plasmodium vinckei cysteine proteinase cures murine malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, P J; Lee, G K; Smith, R E

    1993-01-01

    Intraerythrocytic malaria parasites degrade hemoglobin as a principal source of amino acids for parasite protein synthesis. We have previously identified a Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite cysteine proteinase as a putative hemoglobinase and shown that specific inhibitors of this proteinase block the hydrolysis of globin and the development of cultured parasites. We now show that the murine malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei has an analogous cysteine proteinase with similar biochemical properties to the P. falciparum proteinase, including an acid pH optimum, a preference for the peptide proteolytic substrate benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Phe-Arg-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, and nonomolar inhibition by seven peptide fluoromethyl ketone proteinase inhibitors. Thus, P. vinckei offers a model system for the in vivo testing of the antimalarial properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. One of the proteinase inhibitors studied, morpholine urea (Mu)-Phe-Homophenylalanine (HPhe)-CH2F strongly inhibited the P. vinckei cysteine proteinase in vitro and rapidly blocked parasite cysteine proteinase activity in vivo. When administered four times a day for 4 d to P. vinckei-infected mice, Mu-Phe-HPhe-CH2F elicited long-term cures in 80% of the treated animals. These results show that peptide proteinase inhibitors can be effective antimalarial compounds in vivo and suggest that the P. falciparum cysteine proteinase is a promising target for chemotherapy. Images PMID:8450035

  19. Evolutionary mechanisms acting on proteinase inhibitor variability.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T

    2005-11-01

    The interaction of proteinase inhibitors produced, in most cases, by host organisms and the invasive proteinases of pathogens or parasites or the dietary proteinases of predators, results in an evolutionary 'arms race' of rapid and ongoing change in both interacting proteins. The importance of these interactions in pathogenicity and predation is indicated by the high level and diversity of observable evolutionary activity that has been found. At the initial level of evolutionary change, recruitment of other functional protein-folding families has occurred, with the more recent evolution of one class of proteinase inhibitor from another, using the same mechanism and proteinase contact residues. The combination of different inhibitor domains into a single molecule is also observed. The basis from which variation is possible is shown by the high rate of retention of gene duplication events and by the associated process of inhibitory domain multiplication. At this level of reorganization, mutually exclusive splicing is also observed. Finally, the major mechanism by which variation is achieved rapidly is hypervariation of contact residues, an almost ubiquitous feature of proteinase inhibitors. The diversity of evolutionary mechanisms in a single class of proteins is unlikely to be common, because few systems are under similar pressure to create variation. Proteinase inhibitors are therefore a potential model system in which to study basic evolutionary process such as functional diversification.

  20. Potent antitumor activity of oncolytic adenovirus expressing Beclin-1 via induction of autophagic cell death in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Li, Lu; Meng, Haitao; Qian, Qijun

    2013-01-01

    An attractive strategy among adenovirus-based oncolytic systems is to design adenoviral vectors to express pro-apoptotic genes, in which this gene-virotherapy approach significantly enhances tumor cell death by activating apoptotic pathways. However, the existence of cancer cells with apoptotic defects is one of the major obstacles in gene-virotherapy. Here, we investigated whether a strategy that combines the oncolytic effects of an adenoviral vector with simultaneous expression of Beclin-1, an autophagy gene, offers a therapeutic advantage for leukemia. A Beclin-1 cDNA was cloned in an oncolytic adenovirus with chimeric Ad5/11 fiber (SG511-BECN). SG511-BECN treatment induced significant autophagic cell death, and resulted in enhanced cell killing in a variety of leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic blasts. SG511-BECN effects were seen in chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia with resistance to imatinib or chemotherapy, but exhibited much less cytotoxicity on normal cells. The SG511-BECN-induced autophagic cell death could be partially reversed by RNA interference knockdown of UVRAG, ATG5, and ATG7. We also showed that SG511-BECN strongly inhibited the growth of leukemic progenitors in vitro. In murine leukemia models, SG511-BECN prolonged the survival and decreased the xenograft tumor size by inducing autophagic cell death. Our results suggest that infection of leukemia cells with an oncolytic adenovirus overexpressing Beclin-1 can induce significant autophagic cell death and provide a new strategy for the elimination of leukemic cells via a unique mechanism of action distinct from apoptosis. PMID:23765161

  1. Adenovirus structure.

    PubMed

    Rux, John J; Burnett, Roger M

    2004-12-01

    Structural studies continue to play an essential role as the focus of adenovirus research shifts in emphasis from basic biology to adenovirus-based vector technologies. A crucial step in developing novel therapeutics for gene replacement, cancer, and vaccines is often to modify the virion. Such engineered changes are designed to retarget the virus, or to reduce the immunological responses to infection. These efforts are far more effective when they are based on detailed structural knowledge. This minireview provides a brief summary of the wealth of information that has been obtained from the combined application of X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. This knowledge now includes a good working model for the architectural organization of the virion, and atomic resolution molecular structures for all the major capsid proteins, hexon, penton, and fiber. We highlight new developments, which include the structure of the penton base and the discovery that adenovirus has several relatives. We sketch how the structural information can be used to engineer novel virions and conclude with the prospects for future progress.

  2. Redundant signaling mechanisms contribute to the vasodilatory response of the afferent arteriole to proteinase-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Hollenberg, Morley D; Loutzenhiser, Rodger

    2005-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that stimulation of proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) by SLIGRL-NH(2) elicits afferent arteriolar vasodilation, in part, by elaborating nitric oxide (NO), suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism (Trottier G, Hollenberg M, Wang X, Gui Y, Loutzenhiser K, and Loutzenhiser R. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 282: F891-F897, 2002). In the present study, we characterized the NO-independent component of this response, using the in vitro perfused hydronephrotic rat kidney. SLIGRL-NH(2) (10 mumol/l) dilated afferent arterioles preconstricted with ANG II, and the initial transient component of this response was resistant to NO synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase inhibition. This NO-independent response was not prevented by treatment with 10 nmol/l charybdotoxin and 1 mumol/l apamin, a manipulation that prevents the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-like response of the afferent arteriole to acetylcholine, nor was it blocked by the addition of 1 mmol/l tetraethylammonium (TEA) or 50 mumol/l 17-octadecynoic acid, treatments that block the EDHF-like response to bradykinin. To determine whether the PAR-2 response additionally involves the electrogenic Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, responses were evaluated in the presence of 3 mmol/l ouabain. In this setting, SLIGRL-NH(2) induced a biphasic dilation in control and a transient response after NOS inhibition. The latter was not prevented by charybdotoxin plus apamin or by TEA alone but was abolished by combined treatment with charybdotoxin, apamin, and TEA. This treatment did not prevent the NO-dependent dilation evoked in the absence of NOS inhibition. Our findings indicate a remarkable redundancy in the signaling cascade mediating PAR-2 -induced afferent arteriolar vasodilation, suggesting an importance in settings such as inflamation or ischemia, in which vascular mechanisms might be impaired and the PAR system is thought to be activated.

  3. Extracellular alkaline proteinase of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Dunaevsky, Ya E; Matveeva, A R; Beliakova, G A; Domash, V I; Belozersky, M A

    2007-03-01

    The main proteinase of the filamentous fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing anthracnoses and serious problems for production and storage of agricultural products has molecular mass of 57 kD and was purified more than 200-fold to homogeneity with the yield of 5%. Maximal activity of the proteinase is at pH 9.0-10.0, and the enzyme is stable at pH 6.0-11.5 (residual activity not less than 70%). The studied enzyme completely kept its activity to 55 degrees C, with a temperature optimum of 45 degrees C. The purified C. gloeosporioides proteinase is stable at alkaline pH values, but rapidly loses its activity at pH values lower than 5.0. Addition of bovine serum albumin stabilizes the enzyme under acidic conditions. Data on inhibitor analysis and substrate specificity of the enzyme allow its classification as a serine proteinase of subtilisin family. It is demonstrated that the extracellular proteinase of C. gloeosporioides specifically effects plant cell wall proteins. It is proposed that the studied proteinase--via hydrolysis of cell wall--provides for penetration of the fungus into the tissues of the host plant.

  4. Characterization of a protein from Rice tungro spherical virus with serine proteinase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Thole, Vera; Hull, Roger

    2002-12-01

    The RNA genome of Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) is predicted to be expressed as a large polyprotein precursor (Shen et al., Virology 193, 621-630, 1993 ). The polyprotein is processed by at least one virus-encoded protease located adjacent to the C-terminal putative RNA polymerase which shows sequence similarity to viral serine-like proteases. The catalytic activity of this protease was explored using in vitro transcription/translation systems. Besides acting in cis, the protease had activity in trans on precursors containing regions of the 3' half of the polyprotein but did not process a substrate consisting of a precursor of the coat proteins. The substitution mutation of Asp(2735) of the RTSV polyprotein had no effect on proteolysis; however, His(2680), Glu(2717), Cys(2811) and His(2830) proved to be essential for catalytic activity and could constitute the catalytic centre and/or substrate-binding pocket of the RTSV 3C-like protease.

  5. Validation of a mutant of the pore-forming toxin sticholysin-I for the construction of proteinase-activated immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pentón, David; Pérez-Barzaga, Victor; Díaz, Iscel; Reytor, Mey L; Campos, Javier; Fando, Rafael; Calvo, Loany; Cilli, Eduardo M; Morera, Vivian; Castellanos-Serra, Lila R; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Alvarez, Carlos; Pons, Tirso; Tejuca, Mayra

    2011-06-01

    The use of pore-forming toxins from sea anemones (actinoporins) in the construction of immunotoxins (ITs) against tumour cells is an alternative for cancer therapy. However, the main disadvantage of actinoporin-based ITs obtained so far has been the poor cellular specificity associated with the toxin's ability to bind and exert its activity in almost any cell membrane. Our final goal is the construction of tumour proteinase-activated ITs using a cysteine mutant at the membrane binding region of sticholysin-I (StI), a cytolysin isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. The mutant and the ligand moiety would be linked by proteinase-sensitive peptides through the StI cysteine residue blocking the toxin binding region and hence the IT non-specific killing activity. To accomplish this objective the first step was to obtain the mutant StI W111C, and to evaluate the impact of mutating tryptophan 111 by cysteine on the toxin pore-forming capacity. After proteolysis of the cleavage sequence, a short peptide would remain attached to the toxin. The next step was to evaluate whether this mutant is able to form pores even with a residual peptide linked to cysteine 111. In this work we demonstrated that (i) StI W111C shows pore-forming capacity in a nanomolar range, although it is 8-fold less active than the wild-type recombinant StI, corroborating the previously reported importance of residue 111 for the binding of StI to membranes, and (ii) the mutant is able to form pores even with a residual seven-residue peptide linked to cysteine 111. In addition, it was demonstrated that binding of a large molecule to cysteine 111 renders an inactive toxin that is no longer able to bind to the membrane. These results validate the mutant StI W111C for its use in the construction of tumour proteinase-activated ITs.

  6. Increasing in cysteine proteinase B expression and enzymatic activity during in vitro differentiation of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis: First evidence of modulation during morphological transition.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cinthia Bernardes; -Silva, Franklin Souza; Charret, Karen Dos Santos; Pereira, Bernardo Acácio Santini; Finkelstein, Léa Cysne; Santos-de-Souza, Raquel; de Castro Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro; Pereira, Mirian Claudia Souza; Rodrigues de Oliveira, Francisco Odêncio; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis presents adaptive protease-dependent mechanisms, as cysteine proteinases B (CPB). This study investigates the expression of three cpb gene isoforms and CPB enzymatic activity during the parasite differentiation. Relative expression levels of LbrM.08.0810 gene were assessed, exhibiting a higher quantity of transcripts in the logarithmic promastigotes phase than in the stationary promastigotes phase (>1.5 times). The cbp gene tends to decrease during acid pH shock and increases when the temperature rises (>1.3 times). LbrM.08.0820 and LbrM.08.0830 genes exhibited similar expression profiles to LbrM.08.0810 gene, with lower levels being observed overall. The proteolytic activity exhibits a gradual increase during the parasite's differentiation with low levels in samples of logarithmic promastigotes phase (3.2 ± 0.08 mmol min(-1) mg protein(-1)) to a peak of activity after 72 h of incubation at 32 °C (4.2 ± 0.026 mmol min(-1) mg protein(-1)) followed by a subsequent decrease of 68 % of peak activity levels after 96 h of incubation at 32 °C (2.8 ± 0.37 mmol min(-1) mg protein(-1)). These activities were also measured in the presence of selective inhibitors for cysteine proteinases, such as Z-Phe-Phe-fluoromethyl ketone and trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane, demonstrating their source as cathepsin-like proteinases. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of a modulation of cathepsin L-like expression during the L. (V.) braziliensis in vitro differentiation induced by acid pH and high temperature.

  7. Specificity of binding of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein to different conformational states of the clade E serpins plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and proteinase nexin-1.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-07-03

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is the principal clearance receptor for serpins and serpin-proteinase complexes. The ligand binding regions of LRP consist of clusters of cysteine-rich approximately 40-residue complement-like repeats (CR), with cluster II being the principal ligand-binding region. To better understand the specificity of binding at different sites within the cluster and the ability of LRP to discriminate in vivo between uncomplexed and proteinase-complexed serpins, we have systematically examined the affinities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and proteinase nexin-1 (PN-1) in their native, cleaved, and proteinase-complexed states to (CR)(2) and (CR)(3) fragments of LRP cluster II. A consistent blue shift of the CR domain tryptophan fluorescence suggested a common mode of serpin binding, involving lysines on the serpin engaging the acidic region around the calcium binding site of the CR domain. High affinity binding of non-proteinase-complexed PAI-1 and PN-1 occurred to all fragments containing three CR domains (3-59 nm) and most that contain only two CR domains, although binding energies to different (CR)(3) fragments differed by up to 18% for PAI-1 and 9% for PN-1. No detectable difference in affinity was seen between native and cleaved serpin. However, the presence of proteinase in complex with the serpin enhanced affinity modestly and presumably nonspecifically. This may be sufficient to give preferential binding of such complexes in vivo at the relevant physiological concentrations.

  8. Extensive beta-glucuronidase activity in murine central nervous system after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to brain.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, A; Stein, C; Derksen, T; Yang, G; Anderson, R D; Davidson, B L

    1998-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), caused by beta-glucuronidase deficiency, is a classic lysosomal storage disease. In the central nervous system (CNS), there is widespread pathology with distention of vacuoles in neurons and glia. An approach to therapy for MPS VII would require extensive delivery of enzyme to the CNS and subsequent uptake by the affected cells. In this study we show that intrastriatal injection of recombinant adenovirus encoding beta-glucuronidase (Ad betagluc) to MPS VII or wild-type mice results in focal, intense beta-glucuronidase mRNA expression near the injection site. Further, histochemical staining for enzyme activity showed that beta-glucuronidase activity extended well beyond transduced cells. Activity was detected throughout the ipsilateral striatum as well as in the corpus callosum, ventricles, and bilateral neocortex. Similarly, after injection into the right lateral ventricle or cisterna magna, enzyme activity was present in the ependymal cells of the ventricles, in the subarachnoid spaces, and also in the underlying cortex (150-500 microm from ependyma). The distribution of enzyme was most extensive 21 days after gene transfer to normal mouse brain, with more than 50% of the hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity. Eighty-four days after adenovirus injection a substantial level of enzyme expression remained (>40% of hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity). Histological sections from striatum of beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice injected with Ad betagluc showed a marked reduction in the number of distended vacuoles in both neurons and glia, as compared with uninjected striatum. Importantly, correction was noted in both hemispheres. Our finding that a relatively small number of transduced cells produce enzyme that reaches a large proportion of the CNS has favorable implications in developing direct gene transfer therapies for lysosomal storage disorders.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of the DNA and Protein Binding Activities of Adenovirus Core Protein V

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Vaughan, Robert C.; Houser, Carolyn; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Kao, C. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structure of adenovirus outer capsid was revealed recently at 3- to 4-Å resolution (V. Reddy, S. Natchiar, P. Stewart, and G. Nemerow, Science 329:1071–1075, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1187292); however, precise details on the function and biochemical and structural features for the inner core still are lacking. Protein V is one the most important components of the adenovirus core, as it links the outer capsid via association with protein VI with the inner DNA core. Protein V is a highly basic protein that strongly binds to DNA in a nonspecific manner. We report the expression of a soluble protein V that exists in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Using reversible cross-linking affinity purification in combination with mass spectrometry, we found that protein V contains multiple DNA binding sites. The binding sites from protein V mediate heat-stable nucleic acid associations, with some of the binding sites possibly masked in the virus by other core proteins. We also demonstrate direct interaction between soluble proteins V and VI, thereby revealing the bridging of the inner DNA core with the outer capsid proteins. These findings are consistent with a model of nucleosome-like structures proposed for the adenovirus core and encapsidated DNA. They also suggest an additional role for protein V in linking the inner nucleic acid core with protein VI on the inner capsid shell. IMPORTANCE Scant knowledge exists of how the inner core of adenovirus containing its double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome and associated proteins is organized. Here, we report a purification scheme for a recombinant form of protein V that allowed analysis of its interactions with the nucleic acid core region. We demonstrate that protein V exhibits stable associations with dsDNA due to the presence of multiple nucleic acid binding sites identified both in the isolated recombinant protein and in virus particles. As protein V also binds to the membrane lytic protein VI molecules

  10. Autolytic activation of calpain 3 proteinase is facilitated by calmodulin protein.

    PubMed

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J

    2015-01-09

    Calpains are broadly distributed, calcium-dependent enzymes that induce limited proteolysis in a wide range of substrates. Mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific family member calpain 3 (CAPN3) underlie limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. We have shown previously that CAPN3 knockout muscles exhibit attenuated calcium release, reduced calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling, and impaired muscle adaptation to exercise. However, neither the precise role of CAPN3 in these processes nor the mechanisms of CAPN3 activation in vivo have been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify calmodulin (CaM), a known transducer of the calcium signal, as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 autolytic activity. CaM was shown to bind CAPN3 at two sites located in the C2L domain. Biochemical studies using muscle extracts from transgenic mice overexpressing CAPN3 or its inactive mutant revealed that CaM binding enhanced CAPN3 autolytic activation. Furthermore, CaM facilitated CAPN3-mediated cleavage of its in vivo substrate titin in tissue extracts. Therefore, these studies reveal a novel interaction between CAPN3 and CaM and identify CaM as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 activity.

  11. Autolytic Activation of Calpain 3 Proteinase Is Facilitated by Calmodulin Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Calpains are broadly distributed, calcium-dependent enzymes that induce limited proteolysis in a wide range of substrates. Mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific family member calpain 3 (CAPN3) underlie limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. We have shown previously that CAPN3 knockout muscles exhibit attenuated calcium release, reduced calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling, and impaired muscle adaptation to exercise. However, neither the precise role of CAPN3 in these processes nor the mechanisms of CAPN3 activation in vivo have been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify calmodulin (CaM), a known transducer of the calcium signal, as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 autolytic activity. CaM was shown to bind CAPN3 at two sites located in the C2L domain. Biochemical studies using muscle extracts from transgenic mice overexpressing CAPN3 or its inactive mutant revealed that CaM binding enhanced CAPN3 autolytic activation. Furthermore, CaM facilitated CAPN3-mediated cleavage of its in vivo substrate titin in tissue extracts. Therefore, these studies reveal a novel interaction between CAPN3 and CaM and identify CaM as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 activity. PMID:25389288

  12. A monoclonal antibody that distinguishes latent and active forms of the proteasome (multicatalytic proteinase complex)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitman, D.; Etlinger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated to proteasome purified from human erythrocytes. Five of six proteasome-specific mAbs reacted with three subunits in the molecular mass range of 25-28 kDa, indicating a common epitope. The other mAb (AP5C10) exhibited a more restricted reactivity, recognizing a 32-kDa subunit of the proteasome purified in its latent state. However, when the proteasome is isolated in its active state, AP5C10 reacts with a 28-kDa subunit, evidence for processing of the proteasome subunits during purification. Purified proteasome preparations which exhibited partial latency have both AP5C10 reactive subunits. Although the 32-kDa subunit appears required for latency, loss of this component and generation of the 28-kDa component are not obligatory for activation. The 32- and 28-kDa subunits can each be further resolved into three components by isoelectric focusing. The apparent loss of 4 kDa during the conversion of the 32- to 28-kDa subunit is accompanied by a shift to a more basic pI for each polypeptide. Western blots of the early steps of proteasome purification reveal an AP5C10-reactive protein at 41 kDa. This protein was separated from proteasomes by sizing chromatography and may represent a pool of precursor subunits. Since the 32-kDa subunit appears necessary for latency, it is speculated to play a regulatory role in ATP-dependent proteolytic activity.

  13. Toxic activity of the CdtB component of Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin expressed from an adenovirus 5 vector.

    PubMed

    Wising, Catharina; Magnusson, Maria; Ahlman, Karin; Lindholm, Leif; Lagergård, Teresa

    2010-02-01

    The Haemophilus ducreyi cytolethal distending toxin (HdCDT) catalytic subunit CdtB has DNase-like activity and mediates DNA damage after its delivery into target cells. We constructed a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector expressing CdtB and investigated the toxic properties of this vector on HeLa cells. Ad5CdtB caused loss of cell viability, morphologic changes, and cell cycle arrest, findings similar to HdCDT intoxication. This confirmed that CdtB is responsible for the toxicity of the holotoxin when expressed in cells following transduction by an adenoviral vector, and indicated a possible potential of this novel strategy in studies of activity of intracellular products and in gene therapy of cancer.

  14. Effects of nanoparticle coatings on the activity of oncolytic adenovirus-magnetic nanoparticle complexes.

    PubMed

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Holm, Per Sonne; Schillinger, Ulrike; Plank, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Limitations to adenovirus infectivity can be overcome by association with magnetic nanoparticles and enforced infection by magnetic field influence. Here we examined three core-shell-type iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles differing in their surface coatings, particle sizes and magnetic properties for their ability to enhance the oncolytic potency of adenovirus Ad520 and to stabilize it against the inhibitory effects of serum or a neutralizing antibody. It was found that the physicochemical properties of magnetic nanoparticles are critical determinants of the properties which govern the oncolytic productivities of their complexes with Ad520. Although high serum concentration during infection or a neutralizing antibody had strong inhibitory influence on the uptake or oncolytic productivity of the naked virus, one particle type was identified which conferred high protection against both inhibitory factors while enhancing the oncolytic productivity of the internalized virus. This particle type equipped with a silica coating and adsorbed polyethylenimine, displaying a high magnetic moment and high saturation magnetization, mediated a 50% reduction of tumor growth rate versus control upon intratumoral injection of its complex with Ad520 and magnetic field influence, whereas Ad520 alone was inefficient. The correlations between physical properties of the magnetic particles or virus complexes and oncolytic potency are described herein.

  15. Anti-Tumor Activity of a miR-199-dependent Oncolytic Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Elisa; Elamin, Bahaeldin K.; D’Abundo, Lucilla; Falzoni, Simonetta; Donvito, Giovanna; Moshiri, Farzaneh; Milazzo, Maddalena; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Giacomelli, Luciano; Fornari, Francesca; Hemminki, Akseli; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Gramantieri, Laura; Negrini, Massimo; Sabbioni, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The down-regulation of miR-199 occurs in nearly all primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and HCC cell lines in comparison with normal liver. We exploited this miR-199 differential expression to develop a conditionally replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus, Ad-199T, and achieve tumor-specific viral expression and replication. To this aim, we introduced four copies of miR-199 target sites within the 3’ UTR of E1A gene, essential for viral replication. As consequence, E1A expression from Ad-199T virus was tightly regulated both at RNA and protein levels in HCC derived cell lines, and replication controlled by the level of miR-199 expression. Various approaches were used to asses in vivo properties of Ad-199T. Ad-199T replication was inhibited in normal, miR-199 positive, liver parenchyma, thus resulting in reduced hepatotoxicity. Conversely, the intrahepatic delivery of Ad-199T in newborn mice led to virus replication and fast removal of implanted HepG2 liver cancer cells. The ability of Ad-199T to control tumor growth was also shown in a subcutaneous xenograft model in nude mice and in HCCs arising in immune-competent mice. In summary, we developed a novel oncolytic adenovirus, Ad-199T, which could demonstrate a therapeutic potential against liver cancer without causing significant hepatotoxicity. PMID:24069256

  16. [The effect of synthetic derivatives of testosterone on the activity of acid proteinases, DNA-ase and RNA-ase in the liver and serum of female rats].

    PubMed

    Kisliakova, N D; Luntovskaia, V A

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of a 30-day administration of various doses of testosterone-propionate and methyltestosterone to intact female rats given a ration rich in protein on the activity of acid DNA-ase, RNA-ase and proteinases in the liver and the blood serum. The ration itself, rich in proteins, increased the activity of acid RNA in the liver of rats and gave a significant seasonal variations in the activity of RNA-ase and proteinases. Administration of the same doses (1 mg daily) of testosterone-propionate or methyltestosterone produced a different effect on the nuclease metabolism. In the first case there was observed a reduction of the RNA-ase activity, and in the second--of the DNA-ase. Possibly this partially explained a different extent of anabolic properties of these two androgens. An increase in the dose of methyltestosterone to 5 mg, on the contrary, produced activation of RNA-ase in the liver and the blood serum, which could promote the manifestation of catabolic properties.

  17. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new

  18. Inhibition of the 20S proteosome by a protein proteinase inhibitor: evidence that a natural serine proteinase inhibitor can inhibit a threonine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Kimihiko; Koide, Takehiko

    2009-02-01

    The 20S proteasome (20S) is an intracellular threonine proteinase (Mr 750,000) that plays important roles in many cellular regulations. Several synthetic peptide inhibitors and bacteria-derived inhibitors such as lactacystin and epoxomicin have been identified as potent proteasome inhibitors. However, essentially no protein proteinase inhibitor has been characterized. By examining several small size protein proteinase inhibitors, we found that a well-known serine proteinase inhibitor from bovine pancreas, basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), inhibits the 20S in vitro and ex vivo. Inhibition of the 20S by BPTI was time- and concentration-dependent, and stoichiometric. To inhibit the 20S activity, BPTI needs to enter into the interior of the 20S molecule. The molar ratio of BPTI to the 20S in the complex was estimated as approximately six BPTI to one 20S, thereby two sets of three peptidase activities (trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like) of the 20S were all inhibited. These results indicate that an entrance hole to the 20S formed by seven alpha-subunits is sufficiently large for BPTI to enter. This report is essentially the initial description of the inhibition of a threonine proteinase by a protein serine proteinase inhibitor, suggesting a common mechanism of inhibition between serine and threonine proteinases by a natural protein proteinase inhibitor.

  19. Purification, characterization, cDNA cloning and in vitro expression of a serine proteinase from the intestinal tract of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) with collagen degradation activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Long-Jie; Zhan, Chun-Lan; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Weng, Ling; Du, Cui-Hong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2014-05-21

    Sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) autolysis during transportation and processing is a major problem and the specific proteinases responsible for autolysis have not yet been identified. In the present study, a 34 kDa serine proteinase (SP) was isolated to high purity from sea cucumber intestinal tract by a series of column chromatographies. Peptide mass fingerprinting revealed that six peptide fragments were identical to a proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 preproprotein from sea cucumber A. japonicus. The enzyme hydrolyzed gelatin effectively at pH 6.0-9.0 and 35-40 °C, and the enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by SP inhibitors. Sea cucumber collagen was hydrolyzed significantly by purified SP at 37 °C and more gradually at 4 °C, suggesting that SP may be involved in autolysis. In addition, the SP gene that codes for 377 amino acid residues was cloned into an E. coli expression vector and expressed in vitro. A polyclonal antibody against rSP was prepared and found to react specifically against both rSP and endogenous SP, which may prove useful for future studies on the physiological functions of SP.

  20. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops.

  1. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K.; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus. PMID:27656149

  2. Some aspects of structural studies on aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, N S

    1992-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview over the differences and similarities in the structure of aspartic proteinases presently available. Comparison of the three-dimentional structure of different aspartic proteinases by a common intramolecular coordinate system have been performed. The intramolecular movable subdomains have been localized and the role of motion in substrate binding and zymogen activation is discussed.

  3. Proteinase activated receptor-2-mediated dual oxidase-2 up-regulation is involved in enhanced airway reactivity and inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Alharbi, Naif O; Vliagoftis, Harissios; Tyagi, Manoj; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M

    2015-07-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) express a variety of receptors, which sense danger signals from various aeroallergens/pathogens being inhaled constantly. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is one such receptor and is activated by cockroach allergens, which have intrinsic serine proteinase activity. Recently, dual oxidases (DUOX), especially DUOX-2, have been shown to be involved in airway inflammation in response to Toll-like receptor activation. However, the association between PAR-2 and DUOX-2 has not been explored in airways of allergic mice. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of DUOX-2/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling in airway reactivity and inflammation after PAR-2 activation. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with intact cockroach allergen extract (CE) in the presence of aluminium hydroxide followed by intranasal challenge with CE. Mice were then assessed for airway reactivity, inflammation, oxidative stress (DUOX-2, ROS, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitrite, nitrotyrosine and protein carbonyls) and apoptosis (Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3). Challenge with CE led to up-regulation of DUOX-2 and ROS in AECs with concomitant increases in airway reactivity/inflammation and parameters of oxidative stress, and apoptosis. All of these changes were significantly inhibited by intranasal administration of ENMD-1068, a small molecule antagonist of PAR-2 in allergic mice. Administration of diphenyliodonium to allergic mice also led to improvement of allergic airway responses via inhibition of the DUOX-2/ROS pathway; however, these effects were less pronounced than PAR-2 antagonism. The current study suggests that PAR-2 activation leads to up-regulation of the DUOX-2/ROS pathway in AECs, which is involved in regulation of airway reactivity and inflammation via oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  4. Functional Analysis of Adenovirus Protein IX Identifies Domains Involved in Capsid Stability, Transcriptional Activity, and Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Grave, Linda; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Chatton, Bruno; Kedinger, Claude

    2001-01-01

    The product of adenovirus (Ad) type 5 gene IX (pIX) is known to actively participate in the stability of the viral icosahedron, acting as a capsid cement. We have previously demonstrated that pIX is also a transcriptional activator of several viral and cellular TATA-containing promoters, likely contributing to the transactivation of the Ad expression program. By extensive mutagenesis, we have now delineated the functional domains involved in each of the pIX properties: residues 22 to 26 of the highly conserved N-terminal domain are crucial for incorporation of the protein into the virion; specific residues of the C-terminal leucine repeat are responsible for pIX interactions with itself and possibly other proteins, a property that is critical for pIX transcriptional activity. We also show that pIX takes part in the virus-induced nuclear reorganization of late infected cells: the protein induces, most likely through self-assembly, the formation of specific nuclear structures which appear as dispersed nuclear globules by immunofluorescence staining and as clear amorphous spherical inclusions by electron microscopy. The integrity of the leucine repeat appears to be essential for the formation and nuclear retention of these inclusions. Together, our results demonstrate the multifunctional nature of pIX and provide new insights into Ad biology. PMID:11435594

  5. A novel signaling pathway of tissue kallikrein in promoting keratinocyte migration: Activation of proteinase-activated receptor 1 and epidermal growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lin; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2010-02-01

    Biological functions of tissue kallikrein (TK, KLK1) are mainly mediated by kinin generation and subsequent kinin B2 receptor activation. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TK and its signaling pathways in cultured human keratinocyte migration and in a rat skin wound healing model. Herein, we show that TK promoted cell migration and proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Inactive TK or kinin had no significant effect on cell migration. Interestingly, cell migration induced by active TK was not blocked by icatibant or L-NAME, indicating an event independent of kinin B2 receptor and nitric oxide formation. TK's stimulatory effect on cell migration was inhibited by small interfering RNA for proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR{sub 1}), and by PAR{sub 1} inhibitor. TK-induced migration was associated with increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which was blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC), Src, EGFR and ERK. TK-induced cell migration and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked by metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, heparin, and antibodies against EGFR external domain, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and amphiregulin (AR). Local application of TK promoted skin wound healing in rats, whereas icatibant and EGFR inhibitor blocked TK's effect. Skin wound healing was further delayed by aprotinin and neutralizing TK antibody. This study demonstrates a novel role of TK in skin wound healing and uncovers new signaling pathways mediated by TK in promoting keratinocyte migration through activation of the PAR{sub 1}-PKC-Src-MMP pathway and HB-EGF/AR shedding-dependent EGFR transactivation.

  6. Enhancement of catalytic activity of enzymes by heating in anhydrous organic solvents: 3D structure of a modified serine proteinase at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Tyagi, R; Gupta, M N; Singh, T P

    2001-01-01

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that exposure of an enzyme to anhydrous organic solvents at optimized high temperature enhances its catalytic power through local changes at the binding region. Six enzymes, namely, proteinase K, wheat germ acid phosphatase, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase, chymotrypsin and trypsin were exposed to acetonitrile at 70 degrees C for three hr. The activities of these enzymes were found to be considerably enhanced. In order to understand the basis of this change in the activity of these enzymes, proteinase K was analyzed in detail using X-ray diffraction method. The overall structure of the enzyme was found to be similar to the native structure in aqueous environment. The hydrogen bonding system of the catalytic triad remained intact after the treatment. However, the water structure in the substrate binding site underwent some rearrangement as some of the water molecules were either displaced or completely absent. The most striking observation concerning the water structure was the complete deletion of the water molecule which occupied the position at the so-called oxyanion hole in the active site of the native enzyme. Three acetonitrile molecules were found in the present structure. All the acetonitrile molecules were located in the recognition site. Interlinked through water molecules, the sites occupied by acetonitrile molecules were independent of water molecules. The acetonitrile molecules are involved in extensive interactions with the protein atoms. The methyl group of one of the acetonitrile molecules (CCN1) interacts simultaneously with the hydrophobic side chains of Leu 96, Ile 107 and Leu 133. The development of such a hydrophobic environment at the recognition site introduced a striking conformation change in Ile 107 by rotating its side chain about C alpha-C beta bond by 180 degrees to bring about the delta-methyl group within the range of attractive van der Waals interactions with the methyl group of CCN1. A similar

  7. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  8. Combined Therapy with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells and Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing IL-12 Induce Enhanced Antitumor Activity in Liver Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Juanjuan; Shen, Junjie; Liu, Limei; Xu, Yanmin; Xia, Feng; Bie, Ping; Zhang, Xia; Cui, Youhong; Bian, Xiu-wu; Qian, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Both adoptive immunotherapy and gene therapy hold a great promise for treatment of malignancies. However, these strategies exhibit limited anti-tumor activity, when they are used alone. In this study, we explore whether combination of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) adoptive immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of human interleukin-12 (hIL-12) gene induce the enhanced antitumor potency. Our results showed that oncolytic adenovirus carrying hIL-12 (AdCN205-IL12) could produce high levels of hIL-12 in liver cancer cells, as compared with replication-defective adenovirus expressing hIL-12 (Ad-IL12). AdCN205-IL12 could specifically induce cytotoxocity to liver cancer cells. Combination of CIK cells with AdCN205-IL12 could induce higher antitumor activity to liver cancer cells in vitro than that induced by either CIK or AdCN205-IL12 alone, or combination of CIK and control vector AdCN205-GFP. Furthermore, treatment of the established liver tumors with the combined therapy of CIK cells and AdCN205-IL12 resulted in tumor regression and long-term survival. High level expression of hIL-12 in tumor tissues could increase traffic of CIK cells to tumor tissues and enhance their antitumor activities. Our study provides a novel strategy for the therapy of cancer by the combination of CIK adoptive immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of immune stimulatory molecule hIL-12. PMID:23028626

  9. An Osteoblast-Derived Proteinase Controls Tumor Cell Survival via TGF-beta Activation in the Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Thiolloy, Sophie; Edwards, James R.; Fingleton, Barbara; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Lynch, Conor C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast to bone metastases frequently induce a “vicious cycle” in which osteoclast mediated bone resorption and proteolysis results in the release of bone matrix sequestered factors that drive tumor growth. While osteoclasts express numerous proteinases, analysis of human breast to bone metastases unexpectedly revealed that bone forming osteoblasts were consistently positive for the proteinase, MMP-2. Given the role of MMP-2 in extracellular matrix degradation and growth factor/cytokine processing, we tested whether osteoblast derived MMP-2 contributed to the vicious cycle of tumor progression in the bone microenvironment. Methodology/Principal Findings To test our hypothesis, we utilized murine models of the osteolytic tumor-bone microenvironment in immunocompetent wild type and MMP-2 null mice. In longitudinal studies, we found that host MMP-2 significantly contributed to tumor progression in bone by protecting against apoptosis and promoting cancer cell survival (caspase-3; immunohistochemistry). Our data also indicate that host MMP-2 contributes to tumor induced osteolysis (μCT, histomorphometry). Further ex vivo/in vitro experiments with wild type and MMP-2 null osteoclast and osteoblast cultures identified that 1) the absence of MMP-2 did not have a deleterious effect on osteoclast function (cd11B isolation, osteoclast differentiation, transwell migration and dentin resorption assay); and 2) that osteoblast derived MMP-2 promoted tumor survival by regulating the bioavailability of TGFβ, a factor critical for cell-cell communication in the bone (ELISA, immunoblot assay, clonal and soft agar assays). Conclusion/Significance Collectively, these studies identify a novel “mini-vicious cycle” between the osteoblast and metastatic cancer cells that is key for initial tumor survival in the bone microenvironment. In conclusion, the findings of our study suggest that the targeted inhibition of MMP-2 and/or TGFβ would be beneficial for the treatment

  10. Adenovirus E1A protein activates transcription of the E1A gene subsequent to transcription complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaack, J; Logan, J; Vakalopoulou, E; Shenk, T

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of transcriptional activation of the adenovirus E1A and E3 genes by E1A protein during infection was examined by using transcription-competition assays. Infection of HeLa cells with one virus led to inhibition of mRNA accumulation from a superinfecting virus. Synthesis of the E1A 289R protein by the first virus to infect reduced inhibition of transcription of the superinfecting virus, indicating that the E1A 289R protein was limiting for E1A-activated transcription. Infection with an E1A- virus, followed 6 h later by superinfection with a wild-type virus, led to preferential transcriptional activation of the E1A gene of the first virus, suggesting that a host transcription component(s) stably associated with the E1A promoter in the absence of E1A protein and that this complex was the substrate for transcriptional activation by E1A protein. The limiting host transcription component(s) bound to the E1A promoter to form a complex with a half-life greater than 24 h in the absence of E1A 289R protein, as demonstrated in a challenge assay with a large excess of superinfecting virus. In the presence of the E1A 289R protein, the E1A gene of the superinfecting virus was gradually activated with a reduction in E1A mRNA accumulation from the first virus. The kinetics of the activation suggest that this was due to an indirect effect rather than to destabilization of stable transcription complexes by the 289R protein. Images PMID:1825853

  11. Adenoviruses in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C

    1992-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the many pathogens and opportunistic agents that cause serious infection in the congenitally immunocompromised, in patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment for organ and tissue transplants and for cancers, and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Adenovirus infections in these patients tend to become disseminated and severe, and the serotypes involved are clustered according to the age of the patient and the nature of the immunosuppression. Over 300 adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients, with an overall case fatality rate of 48%, are reviewed in this paper. Children with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and other primary immunodeficiencies are exposed to the serotypes of subgroups B and C that commonly infect young children, and thus their infections are due to types 1 to 7 and 31 of subgenus A. Children with bone marrow and liver transplants often have lung and liver adenovirus infections that are due to an expanded set of subgenus A, B, C, and E serotypes. Adults with kidney transplants have viruses of subgenus B, mostly types 11, 34, and 35, which cause cystitis. This review indicates that 11% of transplant recipients become infected with adenoviruses, with case fatality rates from 60% for bone marrow transplant patients to 18% for renal transplant patients. Patients with AIDS become infected with a diversity of serotypes of all subgenera because their adult age and life-style expose them to many adenoviruses, possibly resulting in antigenically intermediate strains that are not found elsewhere. Interestingly, isolates from the urine of AIDS patients are generally of subgenus B and comprise types 11, 21, 34, 35, and intermediate strains of these types, whereas isolates from stool are of subgenus D and comprise many rare, new, and intermediate strains that are untypeable for practical purposes. It has been estimated that adenoviruses cause active infection in 12% of AIDS patients and that 45% of

  12. Protein turnover and proliferation. Turnover kinetics associated with the elevation of 3T3-cell acid-proteinase activity and cessation of net protein gain.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, T D; Minassian, I A; Roux, L

    1982-01-01

    1. At least 95% of the total protein of A31-3T3 cell cultures undergoes turnover. 2. First-order exponential kinetics were used to provide a crude approximation of averaged protein synthesis, Ks, degradation, Kd, and net accumulation, Ka, as cells ceased growth at near-confluent density in unchanged Dulbecco's medium containing 10% serum. The values of the relationship Ka = Ks - Kd were : 5%/h = 6%/h - 1%/h in growing cells, and 0%/h = 3%/h - 3%/h in steady-state resting cells. 3. As determined by comparison of the progress of protein synthesis and net protein accumulation, the time course of increase in protein degradation coincided with the onset of an increase in lysosomal proteinase activity and decrease in thymidine incorporation after approx. 2 days of exponential growth. 4. After acute serum deprivation, rapid increases in protein degradation of less than 1%/h could be superimposed on the prevailing degradation rate in either growing or resting cells. The results indicate that two proteolytic mechanisms can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of their alterations. A slow mechanism changes in relation to proliferative status and lysosomal enzyme elevation. A prompt mechanism, previously described by others, changes before changes in cell-cycle distribution or lysosomal proteinase activity. 5. When the serum concentration of growing cultures was decreased to 1% or 0.25%, then cessation of growth was accompanied by a lower steady-state protein turnover rate of 2.0%/h or 1.5%/h respectively. When growth ceased under conditions of overcrowded cultures, or severe nutrient insufficiency, protein turnover did not attain a final steady state, but declined continually into the death of the culture. PMID:6756389

  13. Potent anti-tumour activity of a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus for melanoma via inhibition of migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, G; Yang, C-S; Xu, D; Sun, C; Zheng, J-N; Lei, T-C; Liu, Y-Q

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) represent a novel class of oncological therapeutic agents. One strategy to ensure tumour targeting is to place the essential viral genes under the control of tumour-specific promoters. Ki67 has been selected as a cancer gene therapy target, as it is expressed in most malignant cells but is barely detectable in most normal cells. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a Ki67 promoter-controlled CRAd (Ki67-ZD55-IL-24) on the proliferation and apoptosis of melanoma cells. Methods: Melanoma cells were independently treated with Ki67-ZD55-IL-24, ZD55-IL-24, Ki67-ZD55, and ZD55-EGFP. The cytotoxic potential of each treatment was assessed using cell viability measurements. Cell migration and invasion were assayed using cell migration and invasion assays. Apoptosis was assayed using the annexin V-FITC assay, western blotting, reverse transcriptase PCR (RT–PCR), haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and the TUNEL assay. Results: Our results showed that Ki67-ZD55-IL-24 had significantly enhanced anti-tumour activity as it more effectively induced apoptosis in melanoma cells than the other agents. Ki67-ZD55-IL-24 also caused the most significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion of melanoma cells. Furthermore, apoptosis was induced more effectively in melanoma xenografts in nude mice. Conclusions: This strategy holds promising potential for the further development of an effective approach to treat malignant melanoma. PMID:24714752

  14. Adenovirus sensing by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2016-12-01

    The host immune system developed multiple ways for recognition of viral pathogens. Upon disseminated adenovirus infection, the immune system senses adenovirus invasion from the moment it enters the bloodstream. The soluble blood factors, FX, antibodies, and complement, can bind and activate plethora of host-protective immune responses. Adenovirus binding to the cellular β3 integrin and endosomal membrane rupture trigger activation of IL-1α/IL-1R1 proinflammatory cascade leading to attraction of cytotoxic immune cells to the site of infection. Upon cell entry, adenovirus exposes its DNA genome in the cytoplasm and triggers DNA sensors signaling. Even when inside the nucleus, the specialized cellular machinery that recognizes the double-strand DNA breaks become activated and triggers viral DNA replication arrest. Thus, the host employs very diverse mechanisms to prevent viral dissemination.

  15. The effect of metal ions on the activity and thermostability of the extracellular proteinase from a thermophilic Bacillus, strain EA.1.

    PubMed Central

    Coolbear, T; Whittaker, J M; Daniel, R M

    1992-01-01

    The proteinase from the extremely thermophilic Bacillus strain EA.1 exhibits maximum stability at a pH of approx. 6.5. In the presence of calcium ions the half-life at 95 degrees C of the enzyme at this pH was 17 min, and loss of activity followed first-order decay kinetics. The role of metal ions in the activity and stability of the enzyme was studied using the holoenzyme, the metal-depleted apoenzyme, and a zinc-enriched apoenzyme preparation. Zinc and calcium ions were the preferred bivalent cations for the active site and stabilization site(s) respectively. Stabilization by metal ions was not in itself a highly stringent process, but ions other than calcium which stabilized the enzyme generally had a concomitant inhibitory effect on activity. Inhibition and stabilization of the enzyme by cations were concentration-dependent effects and certain ions activated the apoenzyme but not the holoenzyme. Manganese(II) ions conferred some stability and also activated the enzyme, but in the latter case were not as effective as zinc ions. The results are discussed with reference to the ionic radii, co-ordination number and preferred ligand donors of the ions. Mercury(II) ions severely compromised enzyme activity and stability, and the effects of thiol-reactive agents suggest that thiol groups also have a role in enzyme integrity. PMID:1445196

  16. Multiple forms of calcium-dependent proteinase in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) activities in lobster muscles have been resolved by high performance liquid chromatography. These activities differ in molecular weight and net charge. Though optimum activity occurred at high (5 and 10 mM) calcium at pH 6.8, the enzymes differ in activation at lower calcium concentrations. Only one of the CDPs is active at 100 ..mu..M calcium; none are active at 10 ..mu..M and below. Although all four CDPs are inhibited by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors leupeptin, E-64, and iodoacetamide, they show a differential response to the aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin and the serine proteinase inhibitor PMSF. In contrast to CDPs from vertebrate tissues, crustacean muscles contain multiple forms that require calcium at millimolar levels. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Identification of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from Pithecellobium dumosum seeds with insecticidal properties and double activity.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A S; Migliolo, L; Aquino, R O; Ribeiro, J K C; Macedo, L L P; Andrade, L B S; Bemquerer, M P; Santos, E A; Kiyota, S; Sales, M P

    2007-09-05

    A trypsin inhibitor, PdKI, was purified from Pithecellobium dumosum seeds by TCA precipitation, trypsin-sepharose chromatography, and reversed-phase-HPLC. PdKI was purified 217.6-fold and recovered 4.7%. SDS-PAGE showed that PdKI is a single polypeptide chain of 18.9 kDa and 19.7 kDa by MALDI-TOF. The inhibition on trypsin was stable in the pH range 2-10 and at a temperature of 50 degrees C. The Ki values were 3.56 x 10(-8)and 7.61 x 10(-7) M with competitive and noncompetitive inhibition mechanisms for trypsin and papain, respectively. The N-terminal sequence identified with members of Kunitz-type inhibitors from the Mimosoideae and Caesalpinoideae subfamilies. PdKI was effective against digestive proteinase from Zabrotes subfasciatus, Ceratitis capitata, Plodia interpunctella, Alabama argillaceae, and Callosobruchus maculatus, with 69, 66, 44, 38, and 29% inhibition, respectively. Results support that PdKI is a member of the Kunitz inhibitor family and its insecticidal properties indicate a potent insect antifeedant.

  18. Adenovirus 36 Attenuates Weight Loss from Exercise but Improves Glycemic Control by Increasing Mitochondrial Activity in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Michael B.; Park, Sooho; Kim, In-Beom; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 36 (Ad36) as an obesity agent induces adiposity by increasing glucose uptake and promoting chronic inflammation in fat tissues; in contrast, exercise reduces total body fat and inflammation. Our objective was to determine the association between Ad36 and the effects of exercise on inflammation and glycemic control. In the human trials (n = 54), Korean children (aged 12–14 years) exercised for 60 min on three occasions each week for 2 months. We compared the body mass index (BMI) Z-scores before and after exercise. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Ad36 and Ad2 as a control, and these mice exercised for 12 weeks postinfection. After the exercise period, we determined the serum parameters and assessed the presence of inflammation and the mitochondrial function in the organs. Ad36-seropositive children who were subjected to a supervised exercise regimen had high BMI Z-scores whereas Ad36-seronegative children had lower scores. Similarly, Ad36-infected mice were resistant to weight loss and exhibited chronic inflammation of their adipose tissues despite frequent exercise. However, Ad36 combined with exercise reduced the levels of serum glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, total cholesterol, and insulin in virus-infected mice. Interestingly, virus infection increased the mitochondrial function in the liver, as demonstrated by the numbers of mitochondria, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and transcription of key mitochondrial genes. Therefore Ad36 counteracts the weight-loss effect of exercise and maintains the chronic inflammatory state, but glycemic control is improved by exercise synergistically because of increased mitochondrial activity in the liver. PMID:25479564

  19. Neutrophil proteinase cathepsin G is proteolytically active on the human platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX receptor: characterization of the cleavage sites within the glycoprotein Ib alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Pidard, D; Renesto, P; Berndt, M C; Rabhi, S; Clemetson, K J; Chignard, M

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic activity of the neutrophil serine-proteinase cathepsin G (CG) on platelet adherence receptors, the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX complex and the integrin alpha IIb beta 3, has been investigated. In the range 50 to 200 nmol/l, CG is a potent platelet agonist which induces shape change, granule exocytosis and aggregation. Investigation of the proteolysis of the receptors' subunits during the course of platelet activation by CG was performed by immunoblot analysis of platelet proteins using a panel of specific antibodies. Exposure of platelets for 3 min at 37 degrees C to CG at a concentration that induces full cell activation resulted in an extensive cleavage of the N-terminal region of the extracellular domain of GPIb alpha, the largest (relative molecular mass, M(r), 143,000) of the three subunits constituting the GPIb-IX complex. In contrast, no detectable proteolytic modification of the two other subunits, GPIb beta and GPIX, was detected. Similarly, we observed that neither of the two subunits of the alpha IIb beta 3 receptor were proteolytically modified by CG. Cleavage of GPIb alpha by CG leaves a remnant of the polypeptide chain with M(r) approx. 106,000 in the plasma membrane, while releasing into the extracellular milieu the N-terminal domain with M(r) in the range 40,000 to 46,000. N-terminal sequencing of the CG-derived fragments of GPIb alpha indicated that the Leu275-Tyr276 peptide bond was the primary cleavage site for this proteinase. Proteolysis of GPIb alpha was already detectable at concentrations of CG as low as 25 nmol/l, while with 200 nmol/l the cleavage was detected as soon as 10 s after exposure of platelets to the proteinase. Comparison of the kinetics and concentration dependency for the proteolysis of GPIb alpha and for the activation of platelets by CG showed that cleavage of the GPIb-IX receptor is an early event that accompanies exocytosis and aggregation. Quantitative evaluation of the conversion of GPIb alpha into its

  20. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. )

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  1. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of hepatitis A virus 3C proteinase.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, B A; Lowe, C; Shechosky, S; McKay, R T; Yang, C C; Shah, V J; Simon, R J; Vederas, J C; Santi, D V

    1995-06-27

    Picornaviral 3C proteinases are a group of closely related thiol proteinases responsible for processing of the viral polyprotein into its component proteins. These proteinases adopt a chymotrypsin-like fold [Allaire et al. (1994) Nature 369, 72-77; Matthews et al. (1994) Cell 77, 761-771] and a display an active-site configuration like those of the serine proteinases. Peptide-aldehydes based on the preferred peptide substrates for hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C proteinase were synthesized by reduction of a thioester precursor. Acetyl-Leu-Ala-Ala-(N,N'-dimethylglutaminal) was found to be a reversible, slow-binding inhibitor for HAV 3C with a Ki* of (4.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(-8) M. This inhibitor showed 50-fold less activity against the highly homologous human rhinovirus (strain 14) 3C proteinase, whose peptide substrate specificity is slightly different, suggesting a high degree of selectivity. NMR spectrometry of the adduct of the 13C-labeled inhibitor with the HAV-3C proteinase indicate that a thiohemiacetal is formed between the enzyme and the aldehyde carbon as previously noted for peptide-aldehyde inhibitors of papain [Lewis & Wolfenden (1977) Biochemistry 16,4890-4894; Gamcsik et al. (1983) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 105, 6324-6325]. The adduct can also be observed by electrospray mass spectrometry.

  2. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo effects of semipurified proteinase inhibitors from Theobroma seeds on midgut protease activity of Lepidopteran pest insects.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, Luis Cesar Maffei Sartini; Sebbenn, Alexandre Magno; de Carvalho Derbyshire, Maria Tereza Vitral; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; de Paula Brotto, Marco Aurélio; Figueira, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    We have characterized in vitro and in vivo effects of trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma seeds on the activity of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteins from Lepidopteran pest insects. The action of semipurified trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma was evaluated by the inhibition of bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin activities determined by the hydrolysis of N-Benzoyl-DL-Arginine-p-Nitroanilide (BAPA) and N-Succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pho-Phe p-Nitroanilide (S-(Ala)2ProPhe-pNA). Proteinase inhibitor activities from Theobroma cacao and T. obovatum seeds were the most effective in inhibiting trypsin-like proteins, whereas those from T. obovatum and T. sylvestre were the most efficient against chymotrypsin-like proteins. All larvae midgut extracts showed trypsin-like proteolytic activities, and the putative trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma seeds significantly inhibited purified bovine trypsin. With respect to the influence of Theobroma trypsin inhibitors on intact insects, the inclusion of T. cacao extracts in artificial diets of velvet bean caterpillars (Anticarsia gemmatalis) and sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis) produced a significant increase in the percentage of adult deformation, which is directly related to both the survival rate of the insects and oviposition.

  3. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sampaio, Misako U

    2009-09-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.

  4. The effect of NaCl substitution with KCl on proteinase activities of cell-free extract and cell-free supernatant at different pH levels and salt concentrations: Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Ayyash, M M; Sherkat, F; Shah, N P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of substitution of NaCl with KCl at different pH levels and salt concentrations on proteinase activity of cell-free extract and cell-free supernatant of the probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei. de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe broth aliquots were mixed with 2 pure salts (NaCl and KCl) and 2 salt concentrations at 2 concentration levels (5 and 10%), inoculated with Lactobacillus acidophilus or Lactobacillus casei, and incubated aerobically at 37°C for 22 h. The cultures were then centrifuged at 4,000×g for 30 min, and the collected cell pellets were used to prepare cell-wall proteinases and the supernatants used as a source of supernatant (extracellular) proteinases. The proteolytic activity and protein content of both portions were determined. After incubation of both portions with 3 milk caseins (α-, β-, κ-casein), the supernatants were individually subjected to analysis of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity and proteolytic activity using the o-phthalaldehyde method. Significant differences were observed in ACE-inhibitory and proteolytic activities between salt substitution treatments of cell-free extract and cell-free supernatant from both probiotic strains at the same salt concentration and pH level.

  5. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  6. Human low-Mr kininogen contains three copies of a cystatin sequence that are divergent in structure and in inhibitory activity for cysteine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Salvesen, G; Parkes, C; Abrahamson, M; Grubb, A; Barrett, A J

    1986-01-01

    We point out that human low-Mr kininogen contains three cystatin-like sequences, rather than two, as had previously been thought. The protein was purified by affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl-papain-Sepharose, and subjected to limited proteolysis by trypsin and chymotrypsin. Fragments were isolated, and three corresponding to the individual cystatin-like domains were identified. By comparison with the known amino acid sequence of the protein they were numbered 1 to 3 from the N-terminus. Domain 1 was not found to have any inhibitory activity for cysteine proteinases, which is consistent with the absence of residues that are highly conserved in inhibitors of the cystatin superfamily, and have previously been suggested to be essential for activity. Domain 2 was a good inhibitor of chicken calpain, and also papain and cathepsin L. Domain 3 showed negligible inhibition of calpain, but inhibited papain and cathepsin L strongly. The probable arrangement of disulphide bonds in the heavy chain of low-Mr kininogen is deduced from the homology with the cystatins and other evidence contained in the present paper. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3521586

  7. Relevance of classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (C-ANCA)-mediated inhibition of proteinase 3-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexation to disease activity in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, K M; Stegeman, C A; van de Wiel, B A; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Kallenberg, C G; Goldschmeding, R

    1993-01-01

    In the sera of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), C-ANCA can be detected that are directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). We have previously observed that C-ANCA interfere with PR3 proteolytic activity and with complexation of PR3 with its major physiologic inhibitor, alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). In the present study we investigated whether this inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation correlates with clinical activity of WG. Serial serum samples of eight consecutive patients with histologically proven relapses of WG were tested. At the moment of relapse all sera revealed inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation (median 22%, range 10-59%). Disease activity score (r = 0.87, P < 0.02) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (r = 0.66, P < 0.1) correlated with C-ANCA inhibition of PR3-alpha 1AT complexation, while they did not correlate with the C-ANCA titre detected by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) nor with IgG anti-PR3 antibody level measured by ELISA. The inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation had risen significantly at the moment of relapse compared with values 3 months (P < 0.05) and 6 months (P < 0.01) before relapse. Eight patients with established WG and positive for C-ANCA but without clinical evidence of relapse served as controls. In this group no inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation was observed in 7/8 patients sera. Sera of one control patient contained moderate C-ANCA inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation, which remained at a constant level during the 6 months period of observation. Thus, disease activity in WG appears to be more closely related to C-ANCA inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation. PMID:8370167

  8. Isolation and characterization of recombinant Drosophila Copia aspartic proteinase

    PubMed Central

    Athauda, Senarath B. P.; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    The wild type Copia Gag precursor protein of Drosophila melanogaster expressed in Escherichia coli was shown to be processed autocatalytically to generate two daughter proteins with molecular masses of 33 and 23 kDa on SDS/PAGE. The active-site motif of aspartic proteinases, Asp-Ser-Gly, was present in the 23 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal half of the precursor protein. The coding region of this daughter protein (152 residues) in the copia gag gene was expressed in E. coli to produce the recombinant enzyme protein as inclusion bodies, which was then purified and refolded to create the active enzyme. Using the peptide substrate His-Gly-Ile-Ala-Phe-Met-Val-Lys-Glu-Val-Asn (cleavage site: Phe–Met) designed on the basis of the sequence of the cleavage-site region of the precursor protein, the enzymatic properties of the proteinase were investigated. The optimum pH and temperature of the proteinase toward the synthetic peptide were 4.0 and 70 °C respectively. The proteolytic activity was increased with increasing NaCl concentration in the reaction mixture, the optimum concentration being 2 M. Pepstatin A strongly inhibited the enzyme, with a Ki value of 15 nM at pH 4.0. On the other hand, the active-site residue mutant, in which the putative catalytic aspartic acid residue was mutated to an alanine residue, had no activity. These results show that the Copia proteinase belongs to the family of aspartic proteinases including HIV proteinase. The B-chain of oxidized bovine insulin was hydrolysed at the Leu15−–Tyr16 bond fairly selectively. Thus the recombinant Copia proteinase partially resembles HIV proteinase, but is significantly different from it in certain aspects. PMID:16813567

  9. The induction of proteinases in corn and soybean by anoxia

    SciTech Connect

    VanToai, T.; Hwang, Shihying )

    1989-04-01

    This study characterized the anaerobic changes in proteinase activities in corn and soybean roots and to investigate the possibility that these changes might contribute to the differential anaerobiosis tolerance of the two species. After 24 h of anoxia, crude protein extracts from H60 corn and Keller soybean root tips (10cm) were assayed for proteinase activities at pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. Turnover of aberrant proteins was studied in seedlings labelled with {sup 3}H-leucine for 12 h under: (a) puromycin (0.64 mM) in air, (b) ethanol (1%) in air, (c) nitrogen and (d) air. After the treatment, the labelled proteins remaining in roots were determined every 2 h for 6 h. In both corn and soybean, activities of alkali proteinases increased, and activities of acid proteinases declined under anoxia. Neutral proteinases increase in anoxic corn roots, but decline in anoxic soybean roots. The protein turnover rate in corn treated with puromycin, ethanol and nitrogen was much higher than in control roots. The protein turnover rate in soybean roots treated with puromycin, ethanol was similar to the rate of the control. The results indicated that: (a) anoxic corn can degrade aberrant proteins, but anoxic soybean cannot, (b) the degradation of aberrant proteins in anoxic corn is accomplished by neutral proteinases, and (c) the accumulation of aberrant proteins in soybean might contribute to the susceptibility of this species to anoxia.

  10. Expression of Proteinase-activated Receptor-2 in the Esophageal Mucosa of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Patients: A Histomorphologic and Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rehim, Dalia M; Fath El-Bab, Hanaa K; Kamal, Enas M

    2015-10-01

    Data are limited regarding the role of proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) in the esophageal mucosa in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. Our aim was to study PAR-2 expression and its relationship with different GERD-related clinical and pathologic parameters. Histomorphologic alterations in eosophageal mucosa in nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive reflux disease (ERD) were also, evaluated. Endoscopic biopsies of the esophageal mucosa were obtained from 94 GERD patients and 20 participants for histopathologic analysis and PAR-2 immunohistochemical staining. The present study demonstrated significantly higher PAR-2 expression in GERD patients compared with control, whereas no significant differences were seen between NERD and ERD groups. PAR-2 expression significantly correlated with histologic score (r=0.572, P<0.001) and severity of heartburn (r=0.541, P<0.001). PAR-2 expression was significantly associated with basal cell hyperplasia, and dilated intercellular spaces and inflammatory cell count (P<0.05). Histologic analysis revealed GERD-related histomorphologic alterations in the esophageal mucosa of GERD patients with significant differences (P<0.05) among groups. Total histologic score was significantly correlated with heartburn (r=0.299, P=0.025) and endoscopic severity (r=0.359, P=0.027) in NERD and ERD patients, respectively. Taken together, this study provides evidence for the major role of PAR-2 in the pathogenesis of GERD and GERD-associated mucosal alterations.

  11. The emergence of proteinase-activated receptor-2 as a novel target for the treatment of inflammation-related CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bushell, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    The signalling molecules that are involved in inflammatory pathways are now thought to play a part in many disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). In common with peripheral chronic inflammatory diseases such a rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis, evidence now exists for the involvement of inflammatory cytokines, for example tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukins (IL), in neurological disorders. A common factor observed with the up-regulation of these cytokines in peripheral inflammatory diseases, is the increased expression of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) subtype PAR-2. Indeed, recent evidence suggests that targeting PAR-2 helps reduce joint swelling observed in animal models of arthritis. So could targeting this receptor prove to be useful in treating those CNS disorders where inflammatory processes are thought to play an intrinsic role? The aim of this review is to summarize the emerging data regarding the role of PAR-2 in neuroinflammation and ischaemic injury and discuss its potential as an exciting new target for the prevention and/or treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:17347265

  12. Aspartic proteinases from Mucor spp. in cheese manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Yegin, Sirma; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo; Jose Gama Salgado, Antonio; Guvenc, Ulgar; Goksungur, Yekta; Tari, Canan

    2011-02-01

    Filamentous fungi belonging to the order of Mucorales are well known as producers of aspartic proteinases depicting milk-clotting activity. The biosynthesis level, the biochemical characteristics, and the technological properties of the resulting proteinases are affected by the producer strain and the mode of cultivation. While the milk-clotting enzymes produced by the Rhizomucor spp. have been extensively studied in the past, much less is known on the properties and potential applications of the aspartic proteinases obtained for Mucor spp. Indeed, several Mucor spp. strains have been reported as a potential source of milk-clotting enzymes having unique technological properties. Both submerged fermentation and solid substrate cultivation are proven alternatives for the production of Mucor spp. aspartic proteinases. This review provides an overview on the bioprocessing routes to obtain large amounts of these enzymes, on their structural characteristics as related to their functional properties, and on their industrial applications with focus on cheese manufacturing.

  13. Adenovirus infection stimulates the Raf/MAPK signaling pathway and induces interleukin-8 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, J T; Kovesdi, I

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that airway administration of adenovirus or adenovirus vectors results in a dose-dependent inflammatory response which limits the duration of transgene expression. We explored the possibility that adenovirus infection triggers signal transduction pathways that induce the synthesis of cytokines and thus contribute to the early inflammatory response. Since stimulation of the Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activates transcription factors that control the expression of inflammatory cytokines, we examined the activation of this pathway following adenovirus infection. Adenovirus infection induced the rapid activation of Raf-1 and a transient increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of p42mapk at early times postinfection. Activation of the Raf/MAPK pathway by adenovirus is likely triggered by the infection process, since it occurred rapidly and with various mutant adenoviruses and adenovirus vectors. Moreover, interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA accumulation was evident at 20 min postinfection and was induced even in the presence of cycloheximide. Both MAPK activation and IL-8 production were inhibited by forskolin, a potent inhibitor of Raf-1. These results suggest that adenovirus-induced Raf/MAPK activation contributes to IL-8 production. Adenovirus-induced activation of the Raf/MAPK signaling pathway and IL-8 production may play critical roles in the inflammation observed following in vivo administration of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy. PMID:8985363

  14. Immunodetection of thiol proteinase levels in various populations of Artemia cysts and during development.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Warner, A H

    1991-01-01

    An immunodetection assay on Western blots has been used to determine the thiol proteinase content and composition in cysts from 12 populations of the brine shrimp Artemia. Our results showed no differences in the subunit composition of the thiol proteinase among cysts from eight bisexual strains and four parthenogenic strains, and confirmed an earlier finding that the proteinase is composed of two subunits of 25.9 and 31.5 kilodaltons. In contrast, we found that Artemia cysts from parthenogenic strains contain 17.1 ng/cyst of the thiol proteinase, while cysts from bisexual strains contain 8.2 ng/cyst of the thiol proteinase. Also, there was a good linear correlation (r = 0.863; p less than 0.001) between the thiol proteinase content and cyst mass. Embryo fractionation experiments showed that 82% of the thiol proteinase was in the cytosol, while 14 and 4%, respectively, were in the nuclei/yolk platelets and mitochondria/lysosome fractions. Measurements of the thiol proteinase content of developing Artemia embryos showed that the proteinase content was relatively constant during early development, suggesting that the activity of the thiol proteinase gene(s) may be constitutive and not developmentally regulated in Artemia embryos.

  15. Proteinases of the cornea and preocular tear film.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, F J; Gilger, B C; Barrie, K P; Kallberg, M E; Plummer, C E; O'Reilly, S; Gelatt, K N; Brooks, D E

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance and repair of corneal stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) requires a tightly coordinated balance of ECM synthesis, degradation and remodeling in which proteolytic enzymes (proteinases) perform important functions. There are natural proteinase inhibitors present in preocular tear film (PTF) and cornea simultaneously with proteinases that prevent excessive degradation of normal healthy tissue. Disorders occur when there is an imbalance between proteinases and proteinase inhibitors in favor of the proteinases, causing pathologic degradation of stromal collagen and proteoglycans in the cornea. Two matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, are of major importance in terms of remodeling and degradation of the corneal stromal collagen. Immunohistochemical studies have shown different origins of MMP-2 and -9. MMP-2 is synthesized by corneal keratocytes and performs a surveillance function in the normal cornea, becoming locally activated to degrade collagen molecules that occasionally become damaged. Alternatively, MMP-9 may be produced by epithelial cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils following corneal wounding. Because the cornea is in close contact with the preocular tear film (PTF), proteinases have been evaluated in the PTF. In damaged corneas, total proteolytic activity in the tear fluid was found to be significantly increased compared to normal eyes and contralateral eyes. Studies analyzing the proteolytic activity in serial PTF samples during corneal healing led to the following conclusions: ulcerative keratitis in animals is associated with initially high levels of tear film proteolytic activity, which decrease as ulcers heal; proteinase levels in melting ulcers remain elevated leading to rapid progression of the ulcers. The success of medical and surgical treatment of the corneal ulcers is reflected by the proteolytic activity in tears. In animals, successful treatment leads to a rapid reduction in tear film proteolytic activity that

  16. Adenovirus (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common in late winter, spring, and early summer conjunctivitis (pinkeye) and pharyngoconjunctival fever caused by adenovirus tend to ... cystitis usually resolves on its own. Eye infections: Pinkeye (conjunctivitis) is a mild inflammation of the conjunctiva ( ...

  17. Expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris and characterization of its anti-coxsackievirus activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kebin; Yu, Hua; Xie, Wei; Xu, Zihui; Zhou, Shiwen; Huang, Chunji; Sheng, Halei; He, Xiaomei; Xiong, Junzhi; Qian, Guisheng

    2013-04-15

    Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors (CARs) are the common cellular receptors which mediate coxsackievirus or adenovirus infection. Receptor trap therapy, which uses soluble viral receptors to block the attachment and internalization of virus, has been developed for the inhibition of virus infection. In this study, we have constructed a pPIC3.5K/CAR-Fc expression plasmid for the economical and scale-up production of CAR-Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris. The coding sequence of the fusion protein was optimized according to the host codon usage bias. The amount of the CAR-Fc protein to total cell protein was up to 10% by 1% methanol induction for 96h and the purity was up to 96% after protein purification. Next, the virus pull-down assay demonstrated the binding activity of the CAR-Fc to coxsackievirus. The analyses of MTT assay, immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time PCR after virus neutralization assay revealed that CAR-Fc could significantly block coxsackievirus B3 infection in vitro. In coxsackievirus B3 infected mouse models, CAR-Fc treatment reduced mortality, myocardial edema, viral loads and inflammation, suggesting the significant virus blocking effect in vivo. Our results indicated that the P. pastoris expression system could be used to produce large quantities of bioactive CAR-Fc for further clinical purpose.

  18. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases.

  19. A low molecular weight proteinase inhibitor produced by T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, D; Teodorescu, M; Dray, S

    1986-01-01

    A low molecular weight (MW) proteinase inhibitor, between 6500 and 21,500 MW, appeared in the supernatant of rabbit spleen cells cultured at high density for 24 hr. The inhibitor inhibited the enzymatic activity of trypsin for both a high MW natural substrate, fibrinogen, and for a low MW artificial substrate, Chromozym TRY. The low MW proteinase inhibitor is protein in nature and is different, in terms of specificity for enzymes, MW and sensitivity to different physical or chemical treatments, from aprotinin, a low MW proteinase inhibitor (6500 MW) of bovine origin, and from the soybean trypsin inhibitor, a relatively high MW proteinase inhibitor (21,500 MW). The inhibitor was found in the supernatant of purified T cells but not B cells, and its production was increased in the presence of an optimal concentration of Con A. The possibility that this proteinase inhibitor has a role in the regulation of trypsin-like proteinases involved to the immune response remains to be investigated. Images Figure 4 PMID:2417942

  20. The reaction of serpins with proteinases involves important enthalpy changes.

    PubMed

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    2001-08-21

    When active serpins are proteolytically inactivated in a substrate-like reaction, they undergo an important structural transition with a resultant increase in their conformational stability. We have used microcalorimetry to show that this conformational alteration is accompanied by an important enthalpy change. For instance, the cleavage of alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, or papain and that of antithrombin by leukocyte elastase are characterized by large enthalpy changes (DeltaH = -53 to -63 kcal mol(-1)). The former reaction also has a large and negative heat capacity (DeltaC(p)() = -566 cal K(-1) mol(-1)). In contrast, serpins release significantly less heat when they act as proteinase inhibitors. For example, the inhibition of pancreatic elastase, leukocyte elastase, and pancreatic chymotrypsin by alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor and that of pancreatic trypsin and coagulation factor Xa by antithrombin are accompanied by a DeltaH of -20 to -31 kcal mol(-1). We observe no heat release upon proteolytic cleavage of inactive serpins or following inhibition of serine proteinases by canonical inhibitors or upon acylation of chymotrypsin by N-trans-cinnamoylimidazole. We suggest that part of the large enthalpy change that occurs during the structural transition of serpins is used to stabilize the proteinase in its inactive state.

  1. Picornaviral 3C cysteine proteinases have a fold similar to the chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire,M.; Chernaia, M.; Malcolm, B.; James, M.

    1994-01-01

    The picornavirus family includes several pathogens such as poliovirus, rhinovirus (the major cause of the common cold), hepatitis A virus and the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Picornaviral proteins are expressed by direct translation of the genomic RNA into a single, large polyprotein precursor. Proteolysis of the viral polyprotein into the mature proteins is assured by the viral 3C enzymes, which are cysteine proteinases. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the 3C proteinase from hepatitis A virus (HAV-3C). The overall architecture of HAV-3C reveals a fold resembling that of the chymotrypsin family of serine proteinases, which is consistent with earlier predictions. Catalytic residues include Cys 172 as nucleophile and His 44 as general base. The 3C cleavage specificity for glutamine residues is defined primarily by His 191. The overall structure suggests that an inter-molecular (trans) cleavage releases 3C and that there is an active proteinase in the polyprotein.

  2. Specificity of a wheat gluten aspartic proteinase.

    PubMed

    Bleukx, W; Brijs, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Delcour, J A

    1998-09-08

    The substrate and peptide bond specificities of a purified wheat gluten aspartic proteinase (GlAP) are studied. GlAP shows maximum gluten hydrolysing activity at pH 3.0. At this pH, especially the wheat high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) and to a lesser extent the low molecular weight glutenin subunits and gliadins are hydrolysed. GlAP has no obvious effect on albumins and globulins. In its action on oxidised insulin B-chain, GlAP forms eight peptides and has high specificity for peptide bonds located between amino acid residues with large hydrophobic side chains (Leu, Phe, Tyr) but the peptide bond Glu13-Ala14 is also hydrolysed. Although structurally quite similar to a barley aspartic proteinase, the peptide bond specificity of GlAP towards oxidised insulin B-chain resembles slightly more that of a cardoon aspartic proteinase, cardosin B. HMW-GS 7, purified from cultivar Galahad-77, is rapidly hydrolysed by GlAP. N-Terminal amino acid sequence data show that GlAP cleaves at least one Met-Ile peptide bond at the end of the N-terminal domain and two Val-Leu peptide bonds in the repetitive domain of HMW-GS 7.

  3. Silencing E1A mRNA by RNA interference inhibits adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-S; Kim, M-K; Lee, W-J; Kang, C

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus family contains 51 human serotypes, and most human adenoviruses cause widespread respiratory tract infections. Adenovirus infections can result in severe complications in some cases, such as in adenovirus type 11 infection in immunocompromised patients. However, effective treatment methods for adenovirus infections are currently unavailable. This prompted the search for antiviral agents effective against adenovirus infections. In the present study, adenovirus E1A was targeted by RNA interference (RNAi) using synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in an attempt to inhibit viral replication, since adenovirus E1A proteins are known to be involved in the transcriptional activation of the viral and cellular genes necessary for controlling the cell cycle and viral replication. The results indicated that the siRNAs effectively reduced the amount of adenovirus E1A mRNA and the levels of replicative intermediates. Additionally, siRNA-mediated gene silencing inhibited adenovirus replication by suppressing the E1A mRNA. These results suggest that the RNAi-mediated targeting of adenovirus E1A may have a potentially therapeutic effect in controlling adenovirus infections.

  4. EndoS from Streptococcus pyogenes is hydrolyzed by the cysteine proteinase SpeB and requires glutamic acid 235 and tryptophans for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity

    PubMed Central

    Allhorn, Maria; Olsén, Arne; Collin, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    Background The endoglycosidase EndoS and the cysteine proteinase SpeB from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes are functionally related in that they both hydrolyze IgG leading to impairment of opsonizing antibodies and thus enhance bacterial survival in human blood. In this study, we further investigated the relationship between EndoS and SpeB by examining their in vitro temporal production and stability and activity of EndoS. Furthermore, theoretical structure modeling of EndoS combined with site-directed mutagenesis and chemical blocking of amino acids was used to identify amino acids required for the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of EndoS. Results We could show that during growth in vitro S. pyogenes secretes the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing endoglycosidase EndoS prior to the cysteine proteinase SpeB. Upon maturation SpeB hydrolyzes EndoS that then loses its IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity. Sequence analysis and structural homology modeling of EndoS provided a basis for further analysis of the prerequisites for IgG glycan-hydrolysis. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification of amino acids revealed that glutamic acid 235 is an essential catalytic residue, and that tryptophan residues, but not the abundant lysine or the single cysteine residues, are important for EndoS activity. Conclusion We present novel information about the amino acid requirements for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of the immunomodulating enzyme EndoS. Furthermore, we show that the cysteine proteinase SpeB processes/degrades EndoS and thus emphasize the importance of the SpeB as a degrading/processing enzyme of proteins from the bacterium itself. PMID:18182097

  5. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction inhibits telomerase activity independent of its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, M; Ogawa, T; Mizumoto, K; Ueno, H; Niiyama, H; Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, M

    1999-08-01

    Evidence for a relationship between overexpression of wild-type p53 and telomerase activity remains controversial. We investigated whether p53 gene transduction could cause telomerase inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines, focusing on the relation of transduction to growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. The cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 or p21WAF1 at a multiplicity of infection of 100 or were continuously exposed to 10 microM VP-16, which is well known to induce apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction caused G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and resultant growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells; the cell number 2 days after infection was 50% of preinfection value, and 13% of the cells were dead. Moreover, the transduction resulted in complete depression of telomerase activity through down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression. In contrast, p21WAF1 gene transduction only arrested cell growth and cell cycle at G1 phase, and VP-16 treatment inhibited cell growth with G2-M arrest and apoptosis; after treatment, the cell number was 73% of pretreatment, and 12% of the cells were dead. Neither p21WAF1 gene transduction nor VP-16 treatment caused telomerase inhibition. Similar results were obtained in two other pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and AsPC-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that the p53 gene transduction directly inhibits telomerase activity, independent of its effects on cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis.

  6. Adenovirus infection targets the cellular protein kinase CK2 and RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) into viral inclusions of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Souquere-Besse, Sylvie; Pichard, Evelyne; Filhol, Odile; Legrand, Valerie; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Hovanessian, Ara G; Cochet, Claude; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine

    2002-03-15

    The effects of the adenovirus infection on the distribution of the cellular protein kinase CK2 and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) were examined at the ultrastructural level. Immunogold labeling revealed the redistribution of CK2 subunits and PKR to morphologically distinct structures of the cell nucleus. The electron-clear amorphous structures, designated pIX nuclear bodies in our previous work (Rosa-Calatrava et al., 2001), contained CK2 alpha and PKR. The protein crystals, which result from the regular assembly of hexon, penton base, and fiber proteins [Boulanger et al. (1970) J Gen Virol 6:329-332], contained CK2 beta and PKR. Both viral structures were devoid of viral RNA, including the PKR-inhibitor VA1 RNA generated by the RNA polymerase III. Instead, VA1 RNA accumulated in PKR-free viral compact rings in which the viral RNA generated by the RNA polymerase II was excluded.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase is rapidly and efficiently inactivated in human plasma by alpha 2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Kisselev, A F; von der Helm, K

    1994-10-01

    Human plasma impairs the activity of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) proteinase to cleave the HIV-1 gag-polyprotein precursor. The inhibition is due to the entrapment of the proteinase by plasma alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). In methylamine-treated plasma, where alpha 2M is inactivated, HIV proteinase is not blocked. The interaction of alpha 2M and HIV-1 proteinase resulting in covalent complexes of proteinase and alpha 2M was demonstrated by immunoblotting with antiserum either to alpha 2M or to the HIV proteinase. We suggest if HIV-1 proteinase would be released in vivo from infected patients' cells, alpha 2M entrapment may prevent or minimize a conceivable cleavage of extracellular matrix or plasma proteins by the HIV-1 enzyme.

  8. Characterization of a novel Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pariani, Sebastián; Contreras, Marisol; Rossi, Franco R; Sander, Valeria; Corigliano, Mariana G; Simón, Francisco; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Duschak, Vilma G; Clemente, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Many different types of serine proteinase inhibitors have been involved in several kinds of plant physiological processes, including defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which are included in the serine proteinase inhibitor family, are present in several organisms. These proteins play a regulatory role in processes that involve serine proteinases like trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, elastase and/or subtilisin. In the present work, we characterized two putative Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a single putative Kazal-type domain. The expression of these inhibitors is transiently induced in response to leaf infection by Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that they play some role in defense against pathogens. We also evaluated the inhibitory specificity of one of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which resulted to be induced during the local response to B. cinerea infection. The recombinant Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor displayed high specificity for elastase and subtilisin, but low specificity for trypsin, suggesting differences in its selectivity. In addition, this inhibitor exhibited a strong antifungal activity inhibiting the germination rate of B. cinerea conidia in vitro. Due to the important role of proteinase inhibitors in plant protection against pathogens and pests, the information about Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors described in the present work could contribute to improving current methods for plant protection against pathogens.

  9. 11R-P53 and GM-CSF Expressing Oncolytic Adenovirus Target Cancer Stem Cells with Enhanced Synergistic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Sai-qun; Ye, Zhen-long; Liu, Pin-yi; Huang, Yao; Li, Lin-fang; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Hai-li; Jin, Hua-jun; Qian, Qi-jun

    2017-01-01

    Targeting cancer stem cells with oncolytic virus (OV) holds great potential for thorough elimination of cancer cells. Based on our previous studies, we here established 11R-P53 and mGM-CSF carrying oncolytic adenovirus (OAV) SG655-mGMP and investigated its therapeutic effect on hepatocellular carcinoma stem cells Hep3B-C and teratoma stem cells ECCG5. Firstly, the augmenting effect of 11R in our construct was tested and confirmed by examining the expression of EGFP with Fluorescence and FCM assays after transfecting Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells with OVA SG7605-EGFP and SG7605-11R-EGFP. Secondly, the expressions of 11R-P53 and GM-CSF in Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells after transfection with OAV SG655-mGMP were detected by Western blot and Elisa assays, respectively. Thirdly, the enhanced growth inhibitory and augmented apoptosis inducing effects of OAV SG655-mGMP on Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells were tested with FCM assays by comparing with the control, wild type 5 adenovirus, 11R-P53 carrying OVA in vitro. Lastly, the in vivo therapeutic effect of OAV SG655-mGMP toward ECCG5 cell-formed xenografts was studied by measuring tumor volumes post different treatments with PBS, OAV SG655-11R-P53, OAV SG655-mGM-CSF and OAV SG655-mGMP. Treatment with OAV SG655-mGMP induced significant xenograft growth inhibition, inflammation factor AIF1 expression and immune cells infiltration. Therefore, our OAV SG655-mGMP provides a novel platform to arm OVs to target cancer stem cells. PMID:28243324

  10. Purification and characterization of an alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the mollusc Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Thøgersen, I B; Salvesen, G; Brucato, F H; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1992-01-01

    The cell-free haemolymph of the mollusc Octopus vulgaris inhibited the proteolytic activity of the thermolysin against the high-molecular-mass substrate hide powder azure. The purified inhibitor was a glycoprotein composed of two identical 180 kDa disulphide-linked subunits. In addition to the inhibition of the metalloproteinase thermolysin, the protein inhibited the serine proteinases human neutrophil elastase, pig pancreatic elastase, bovine chymotrypsin, bovine trypsin and the cysteine proteinase papain. A fraction of the proteinase-inhibitor complex resisted dissociation after denaturation indicating that some of the proteinase molecules became covalently bound. The nucleophile beta-aminopropionitrile decreased the covalent binding of proteinases to the Octopus vulgaris protein, suggesting that this interaction is mediated by an internal thiol ester; the reactivity and the amino acid sequence flanking the reactive residues of the putative thiol ester were consistent with this hypothesis. Bound trypsin remained active against the low-molecular-mass chromatogenic substrate H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg p-nitroanilide and was protected from inhibition by active-site-directed protein inhibitors of trypsin; however, the bound trypsin was readily inhibited by small synthetic inhibitors. This indicates that the inhibition of proteinases is accomplished by steric hindrance. The proteinase-inhibitory activity of this protein is characteristic of inhibition by mammalian alpha-macroglobulins and the presence of a putative thiol ester suggests that the Octopus vulgaris proteinase inhibitor is a homologue of human alpha 2-macroglobulin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:1379044

  11. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J.; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known, in vitro, animal, and human studies have implicated the proteinases in C. albicans virulence in one of the following seven ways: (i) correlation between Sap production in vitro and Candida virulence, (ii) degradation of human proteins and structural analysis in determining Sap substrate specificity, (iii) association of Sap production with other virulence processes of C. albicans, (iv) Sap protein production and Sap immune responses in animal and human infections, (v) SAP gene expression during Candida infections, (vi) modulation of C. albicans virulence by aspartyl proteinase inhibitors, and (vii) the use of SAP-disrupted mutants to analyze C. albicans virulence. Sap proteins fulfill a number of specialized functions during the infective process, which include the simple role of digesting molecules for nutrient acquisition, digesting or distorting host cell membranes to facilitate adhesion and tissue invasion, and digesting cells and molecules of the host immune system to avoid or resist antimicrobial attack by the host. We have critically discussed the data relevant to each of these seven criteria, with specific emphasis on how this proteinase family could contribute to Candida virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:12966142

  12. Effect of retroviral proteinase inhibitors on Mason-Pfizer monkey virus maturation and transmembrane glycoprotein cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, M A; Petteway, S R; Dreyer, G B; Hunter, E

    1992-01-01

    Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) is the prototype type D retrovirus which preassembles immature intracytoplasmic type A particles within the infected cell cytoplasm. Intracytoplasmic type A particles are composed of uncleaved polyprotein precursors which upon release are cleaved by the viral proteinase to their constituent mature proteins. This results in a morphological change in the virion described as maturation. We have investigated the role of the viral proteinase in virus maturation and infectivity by inhibiting the function of the enzyme through mutagenesis of the proteinase gene and by using peptide inhibitors originally designed to block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase activity. Mutation of the active-site aspartic acid, Asp-26, to asparagine abrogated the activity of the M-PMV proteinase but did not affect the assembly of noninfectious, immature virus particles. In mutant virions, the transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) of M-PMV, initially synthesized as a cell-associated gp22, is not cleaved to gp20, as is observed with wild-type virions. This demonstrates that the viral proteinase is responsible for this cleavage event. Hydroxyethylene isostere human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase inhibitors were shown to block M-PMV proteinase cleavage of the TM glycoprotein and Gag-containing precursors in a dose-dependent manner. The TM cleavage event was more sensitive than cleavage of the Gag precursors to inhibition. The infectivity of treated particles was reduced significantly, but experiments showed that inhibition of precursor and TM cleavage may be at least partially reversible. These results demonstrate that the M-PMV aspartyl proteinase is activated in released virions and that the hydroxyethylene isostere proteinase inhibitors used in this study exhibit a broad spectrum of antiretroviral activity. Images PMID:1602542

  13. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  14. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  15. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 promotes TGF-β-dependent cell motility in pancreatic cancer cells by sustaining expression of the TGF-β type I receptor ALK5.

    PubMed

    Zeeh, Franziska; Witte, David; Gädeken, Thomas; Rauch, Bernhard H; Grage-Griebenow, Evelin; Leinung, Nadja; Fromm, Sofie Joline; Stölting, Stephanie; Mihara, Koichiro; Kaufmann, Roland; Settmacher, Utz; Lehnert, Hendrik; Hollenberg, Morley D; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2016-07-05

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by high expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and the G protein-coupled receptor proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), the latter of which functions as a cell-surface sensor for serine proteinases asscociated with the tumour microenvironment. Since TGF-β and PAR2 affect tumourigenesis by regulating migration, invasion and metastasis, we hypothesized that there is signalling crosstalk between them. Depleting PDAC and non-PDAC cells of PAR2 by RNA interference strongly decreased TGF-β1-induced activation of Smad2/3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Smad dependent transcriptional activity, expression of invasion associated genes, and cell migration/invasion in vitro. Likewise, the plasminogen activator-inhibitor 1 gene in primary cultures of aortic smooth muscle cells from PAR2-/- mice displayed a greatly attenuated sensitivity to TGF-β1 stimulation. PAR2 depletion in PDAC cells resulted in reduced protein and mRNA levels of the TGF-β type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5). Forced expression of wild-type ALK5 or a kinase-active ALK5 mutant, but not a kinase-active but Smad-binding defective ALK5 mutant, was able to rescue TGF-β1-induced Smad3 activation, Smad dependent transcription, and cell migration in PAR2-depleted cells. Together, our data show that PAR2 is crucial for TGF-β1-induced cell motility by its ability to sustain expression of ALK5. Therapeutically targeting PAR2 may thus be a promising approach in preventing TGF-β-dependent driven metastatic dissemination in PDAC and possibly other stroma-rich tumour types.

  16. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 promotes TGF-β-dependent cell motility in pancreatic cancer cells by sustaining expression of the TGF-β type I receptor ALK5

    PubMed Central

    Gädeken, Thomas; Rauch, Bernhard H.; Grage-Griebenow, Evelin; Leinung, Nadja; Fromm, Sofie Joline; Stölting, Stephanie; Mihara, Koichiro; Kaufmann, Roland; Settmacher, Utz; Lehnert, Hendrik; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by high expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and the G protein-coupled receptor proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), the latter of which functions as a cell-surface sensor for serine proteinases asscociated with the tumour microenvironment. Since TGF-β and PAR2 affect tumourigenesis by regulating migration, invasion and metastasis, we hypothesized that there is signalling crosstalk between them. Depleting PDAC and non-PDAC cells of PAR2 by RNA interference strongly decreased TGF-β1-induced activation of Smad2/3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Smad dependent transcriptional activity, expression of invasion associated genes, and cell migration/invasion in vitro. Likewise, the plasminogen activator-inhibitor 1 gene in primary cultures of aortic smooth muscle cells from PAR2−/− mice displayed a greatly attenuated sensitivity to TGF-β1 stimulation. PAR2 depletion in PDAC cells resulted in reduced protein and mRNA levels of the TGF-β type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5). Forced expression of wild-type ALK5 or a kinase-active ALK5 mutant, but not a kinase-active but Smad-binding defective ALK5 mutant, was able to rescue TGF-β1-induced Smad3 activation, Smad dependent transcription, and cell migration in PAR2-depleted cells. Together, our data show that PAR2 is crucial for TGF-β1-induced cell motility by its ability to sustain expression of ALK5. Therapeutically targeting PAR2 may thus be a promising approach in preventing TGF-β-dependent driven metastatic dissemination in PDAC and possibly other stroma-rich tumour types. PMID:27248167

  17. Antibody in sera of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis is to trichomonad proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Newton, E; Dennis, C; Neale, K A

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A recent report demonstrated the immunogenic character of the cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis. It was of interest, therefore, to examine for the presence of serum anti-proteinase antibody among patients with trichomoniasis. METHODS--An immunoprecipitation assay was used involving protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus first coated with the IgG fraction of goat anti-human Ig and then mixed with individual sera of patients to bind human antibody. These antibody-coated bacteria were then added to detergent extracts of T vaginalis. Bound immune complexes on S aureus were washed and solubilised for electrophoretic analysis on acrylamide copolymerised with gelatin for detection of proteinase activity. RESULTS--Sera from patients (50/50), but none from sera of normal, uninfected women, possessed IgG to numerous trichomonad cysteine proteinases. The presence of this serum anti-proteinase antibody disappeared after drug treatment and cure of patients of the T vaginalis infection. CONCLUSIONS--The commonality of the anti-proteinase antibody in the sera of patients with trichomoniasis provided evidence for the expression of the same repertoire of parasite proteinases during infection. These observations have important implications for the in vivo relevance of the proteinases and indicate that strategies to use a specific serum antibody response for diagnosis of this infection may be possible. Images PMID:1916796

  18. Expression of virus-encoded proteinases: functional and structural similarities with cellular enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, W G; Semler, B L

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses express their genome, or part of their genome, initially as a polyprotein precursor that undergoes proteolytic processing. Molecular genetic analyses of viral gene expression have revealed that many of these processing events are mediated by virus-encoded proteinases. Biochemical activity studies and structural analyses of these viral enzymes reveal that they have remarkable similarities to cellular proteinases. However, the viral proteinases have evolved unique features that permit them to function in a cellular environment. In this article, the current status of plant and animal virus proteinases is described along with their role in the viral replication cycle. The reactions catalyzed by viral proteinases are not simple enzyme-substrate interactions; rather, the processing steps are highly regulated, are coordinated with other viral processes, and frequently involve the participation of other factors. Images PMID:8302216

  19. Thrombin-induced regulation of CD95(Fas) expression in the N9 microglial cell line: evidence for involvement of proteinase-activated receptor(1) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Jonathan R; Zhang, Matthew; Kutlubaev, Mansur; Lee, Richard; Bishop, Caroline; Andersen, Henrik; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Möller, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Microglia are the immune cells of the CNS. Brain injury triggers phenotypic changes in microglia including regulation of surface antigens. The serine proteinase alpha-thrombin can induce profound changes in neural cell physiology via cleavage of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). We recently demonstrated that pharmaceutical-grade recombinant human alpha-thrombin (rh-thr) induces a restricted set of proteolysis-dependent changes in microglia. CD95(Fas) is a cell-death receptor that is up-regulated in microglia by inflammatory stimuli. Here we characterized the effect of rh-thr on CD95(Fas) expression in the N9 microglial cell line. Dose-response and time course studies demonstrated maximal effects at 100 U/ml and 24 h, respectively. Regulation of expression was seen at both the surface protein and steady-state mRNA levels. The rh-thr-induced effects were mimicked by PAR(1) agonist peptides and blocked by pharmacologic inhibitors selective for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). Rh-thr also induced a rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. Thrombin-induced regulation of CD95(Fas) could modulate the neuroinflammatory response in a variety of neurological disorders.

  20. Purification and characterization of a subtilisin-like proteinases secreted in the stationary growth phase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H2.

    PubMed

    Balaban, N P; Malikova, L A; Mardanova, A M; Rudenskaya, G N; Sharipova, M R

    2007-04-01

    Proteinases secreted during the early and late stationary phases have been isolated from the culture liquid of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H2 using CM-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography with subsequent FPLC on a Mono S column. Considering the character of hydrolysis of specific chromogenic substrates and the type of inhibition, these enzymes were identified as subtilisin-like proteinases. The molecular weight of both proteinases is 29 kD. The proteolytic activity of the proteinases secreted during the early and late stationary phases towards the synthetic substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA was maximal at pH 8.5 and 9.0, respectively. The maximal activity of both proteinases was observed at 37 degrees C, and the proteins were stable within the pH range of 7.2-9.5. The subtilisin-like proteinases from B. amyloliquefaciens were shown to catalyze synthesis of peptide bonds.

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 2 retargeted adenovirus has redirected cellular tropism: evidence for reduced toxicity and enhanced antitumor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, D L; Gonzalez, A M; Printz, M A; Doukas, J; Ying, W; D'Andrea, M; Hoganson, D K; Curiel, D T; Douglas, J T; Sosnowski, B A; Baird, A; Aukerman, S L; Pierce, G F

    1999-06-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) have been used as vectors to deliver genes to a wide variety of tissues. Despite achieving high expression levels in vivo, Ad vectors display normal tissue toxicity, transient expression, and antivector immune responses that limit therapeutic potential. To circumvent these problems, several retargeting strategies to abrogate native tropism and redirect Ad uptake through defined receptors have been attempted. Despite success in cell culture, in vivo results have generally not shown sufficient selectivity for target tissues. We have previously identified (C. K. Goldman et al., Cancer Res., 57: 1447-1451, 1997) the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) ligand and receptor families as conferring sufficient specificity and binding affinity to be useful for targeting DNA in vivo. In the present studies, we retargeted Ad using basic FGF (FGF2) as a targeting ligand. Cellular uptake is redirected through high-affinity FGF receptors (FGFRs) and not the more ubiquitous lower-affinity Ad receptors. Initial in vitro experiments demonstrated a 10- to 100-fold increase in gene expression in numerous FGFR positive (FGFR+) cell lines using FGF2-Ad when compared with Ad. To determine whether increased selectivity could be detected in vivo, FGF2-Ad was administered i.v. to normal mice. FGF2-Ad demonstrates markedly decreased hepatic toxicity and liver transgene expression compared with Ad treatment. Importantly, FGF2-Ad encoding the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene transduces Ad-resistant FGFR+ tumor cells both ex vivo and in vivo, which results in substantially enhanced survival (180-260%) when the prodrug ganciclovir is administered. Because FGFRs are up-regulated on many types of malignant or injured cells, this broadly useful method to redirect native Ad tropism and to increase the potency of gene expression may offer significant therapeutic advantages.

  2. Ovarian steroids, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and/or aspartic proteinases cooperate to control endometrial remodeling by regulating gene expression in the stroma and glands.

    PubMed

    Gaide Chevronnay, Héloïse P; Lemoine, Pascale; Courtoy, Pierre J; Marbaix, Etienne; Henriet, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Explants from nonmenstrual endometria cultured in the absence of ovarian hormones undergo tissue breakdown. Addition of estradiol and progesterone (EP) prevents proteolysis. Explants include stromal and epithelial compartments which play different but complementary roles in endometrial physiology, including tissue remodeling and hormonal response. In order to characterize the cell type-specific contribution to regulation of tissue breakdown, we characterized the transcriptomes of microdissected stromal and glandular areas from endometrial explants cultured with or without EP. The datasets were also compared to other published endometrial transcriptomes. Finally, the contribution of proteolysis, hypoxia, and MAPKs to the regulation of selected genes was further investigated in explant culture. This analysis identified distinct gene expression profiles in stroma and glands, with differential response to EP, but functional clustering underlined convergence in biological processes, further indicating that endometrial remodeling requires cooperation between the two compartments through expression of cell type-specific genes. Only partial overlaps were observed between lists of genes involved in different occurrences of endometrial breakdown, pointing to a limited number of potentially crucial regulators but also to the requirement for additional mechanisms controlling tissue remodeling. We identified a group of genes differentially regulated by EP in stroma and glands among which some were sensitive to MAPKs and/or aspartic proteinases and were not induced by hypoxia. In conclusion, MAPKs and/or aspartic proteinases likely act in concert with EP to locally and specifically control differential expression of genes between degrading and preserved areas of the human endometrium.

  3. Suppression of Adenovirus Replication by Cardiotonic Steroids.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Filomena; Stoilov, Peter; Lingwood, Clifford; Brown, Martha; Cochrane, Alan

    2017-02-01

    The dependence of adenovirus on the host pre-RNA splicing machinery for expression of its complete genome potentially makes it vulnerable to modulators of RNA splicing, such as digoxin and digitoxin. Both drugs reduced the yields of four human adenoviruses (HAdV-A31, -B35, and -C5 and a species D conjunctivitis isolate) by at least 2 to 3 logs by affecting one or more steps needed for genome replication. Immediate early E1A protein levels are unaffected by the drugs, but synthesis of the delayed protein E4orf6 and the major late capsid protein hexon is compromised. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that both drugs altered E1A RNA splicing (favoring the production of 13S over 12S RNA) early in infection and partially blocked the transition from 12S and 13S to 9S RNA at late stages of virus replication. Expression of multiple late viral protein mRNAs was lost in the presence of either drug, consistent with the observed block in viral DNA replication. The antiviral effect was dependent on the continued presence of the drug and was rapidly reversible. RIDK34, a derivative of convallotoxin, although having more potent antiviral activity, did not show an improved selectivity index. All three drugs reduced metabolic activity to some degree without evidence of cell death. By blocking adenovirus replication at one or more steps beyond the onset of E1A expression and prior to genome replication, digoxin and digitoxin show potential as antiviral agents for treatment of serious adenovirus infections. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism(s) by which digoxin and digitoxin inhibit adenovirus replication will guide the development of novel antiviral therapies.

  4. [High molecular weight chitosan and sodium alginate effect on secretory acid proteinase of Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Calamari, Silvia; Bojanich, Alejandra; Barembaum, Silvina; Azcurra, Ana; Virga, Carolina; Dorronsoro, Susana

    2004-12-01

    The effect of high molecular weight chitosan (HMWCh) and sodium alginate (NaAL) on acid proteinase secretion of Candida albicans (one of culture collection and five isolates) was evaluated. The secretion of acid proteinase was induced in the presence and the absence of these polymers in different concentrations and their enzymatic activity was determined. HMWCh and NaAL significantly diminished the enzymatic activity (>76% for the collection strains and > 89% for the isolates, p < 0.05). HMWCh did not modify protein concentrations, but NaAL did. It can be concluded that both polymers can inhibit the proteinase activity of Candida albicans.

  5. Studies on Proteinases from Some Blood-Sucking Insects,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ovinus, and Pediculus humanus, but not in those of Cimex lectularius or Rhodnius prolixus. The trypsin and chymotrypsin have been partially... Cimex and Rhodnius appear to have a high molecular weight proteinase with optimal activity at pH 5 in their midguts. (Author)

  6. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  7. Truncated Active Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Delivered by a Chimeric Adenovirus-Hepatitis B Virus Vector Ameliorates Rat Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zihua; Li, Dong; Kang, Fubiao; Li, Haijun; Li, Baosheng; Cao, Zhichen; Nassal, Michael; Sun, Dianxing

    2013-01-01

    Background Liver cirrhosis is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by progressive displacement of functional hepatocytes by fibrous tissue. The underlying fibrosis is often driven by chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Matrix metalloproteinases including MMP-8 are crucial for excess collagen degradation. In a rat model of liver cirrhosis, MMP-8 delivery by an adenovirus (Ad) vector achieved significant amelioration of fibrosis but application of Ad vectors in humans is subject to various issues, including a lack of intrinsic liver specificity. Methods HBV is highly liver-specific and its principal suitability as liver-specific gene transfer vector is established. HBV vectors have a limited insertion capacity and are replication-defective. Conversely, in an HBV infected cell vector replication may be rescued in trans by the resident virus, allowing conditional vector amplification and spreading. Capitalizing on a resident pathogen to help in its elimination and/or in treating its pathogenic consequences would provide a novel strategy. However, resident HBV may also reduce susceptibility to HBV vector superinfection. Thus a size-compatible truncated MMP-8 (tMMP8) gene was cloned into an HBV vector which was then used to generate a chimeric Ad-HBV shuttle vector that is not subject to superinfection exclusion. Rats with thioacetamide-induced liver cirrhosis were injected with the chimera to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. Results Our data demonstrate that infectious HBV vector particles can be obtained via trans-complementation by wild-type virus, and that the tMMP8 HBV vector can efficiently be shuttled by an Ad vector into cirrhotic rat livers. There it exerted a comparable beneficial effect on fibrosis and hepatocyte proliferation markers as a conventional full-length MMP-8Ad vector. Conclusions Though the rat cirrhosis model does not allow assessing in vivo HBV vector amplification these results advocate the further development of Ad

  8. Leucine residues in conserved region of 33K protein of bovine adenovirus - 3 are important for binding to major late promoter and activation of late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Vikas; Islam, Azharul; Ayalew, Lisanework E; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2015-09-01

    The L6 region of bovine adenovirus 3 (BAdV-3) encode 33K (spliced) and 22K (unspliced) proteins. Earlier, anti-33K serum detected five major and three minor proteins in BAdV-3 infected cells. Here, we demonstrate that anti-sera raised against L6-22K protein detected two proteins of 42 and 37 kDa in BAdV-3 infected cells and one protein of 42 kDa in transfected cells expressing splice-site variant 22K protein (pC.22K containing substituted splice acceptor/donor sequence). Unlike 22K, 33K stimulated the transcription from the major late promoter (MLP) by binding to the downstream sequence elements (DE). Analysis of the variant proteins demonstrated that amino acids 201-240 of the conserved C-terminus of 33K containing the potential leucine zipper and RS repeat are required for the activation of MLP. Furthermore, amino acid substitution analysis demonstrated that unlike arginine residues of RS repeat, the leucine residues (217, 224, 232 and 240) of the conserved leucine zipper appear required for the binding of 33K to the MLP.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  10. Enhanced anti-tumor activity by the combination of a conditionally replicating adenovirus mediated interleukin-24 and dacarbazine against melanoma cells via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guan; Liu, Yan-Qun; Wei, Zhi-Ping; Pei, Dong-Sheng; Mao, Li-Jun; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2010-08-28

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most lethal and aggressive human malignancies. It is notoriously resistant to all of the current therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy. Suppressed apoptosis and extraordinary invasiveness are the distinctive features that contribute to the malignancy of melanoma. Dacarbazine (DTIC) has been considered as the gold standard for melanoma treatment with a response rate of 15-20%. Unfortunately, the resistance to this chemotherapeutic agent occurs frequently. ZD55-IL-24 is a selective conditionally replicating adenovirus that can mediate the expression of interleukin-24 (IL-24) gene, which has a strong anti-tumor effect. In this study, we hypothesized that a combination of ZD55-IL-24-mediated gene virotherapy and chemotherapy using DTIC would produce an increased cytotoxicity against human melanoma cells in comparison with these agents alone. Our results showed that the combination of ZD55-IL-24 and DTIC significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity by more effectively inducing apoptosis in melanoma cells than either agent used alone without any overlapping toxicity against normal cells. This additive or synergistic effect of ZD55-IL-24 in combination with DTIC in killing human malignant melanoma cells implies a promising novel approach for melanoma therapy.

  11. Basis for the specificity and activation of the serpin protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI) as an inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T; Gettins, Peter G W

    2010-06-25

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction approximately 2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca(2+). To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ(DeltaGD)) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing approximately 5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only approximately 2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional approximately 1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  12. Basis for the Specificity and Activation of the Serpin Protein Z-dependent Proteinase Inhibitor (ZPI) as an Inhibitor of Membrane-associated Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T.; Gettins, Peter G.W.

    2012-12-13

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction {approx}2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca{sup 2+}. To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ{sub {Delta}GD}) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing {approx}5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only {approx}2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional {approx}1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  13. Medial hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors regulate neuroendocrine responses to stress and exploratory locomotor activity: application of recombinant adenovirus containing 5-HT1A sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Holmes, Andrew; Ma, Li; Van de Kar, Louis D; Garcia, Francisca; Murphy, Dennis L

    2004-12-01

    Our previous studies found that serotonin transporter (SERT) knock-out mice showed increased sensitivity to minor stress and increased anxiety-like behavior but reduced locomotor activity. These mice also showed decreased density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A) receptors in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and dorsal raphe. To evaluate the contribution of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors to these phenotypes of SERT knock-out mice, two studies were conducted. Recombinant adenoviruses containing 5-HT1A sense and antisense sequences (Ad-1AP-sense and Ad-1AP-antisense) were used to manipulate 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus. The expression of the 5-HT1A genes is controlled by the 5-HT1A promoter, so that they are only expressed in 5-HT1A receptor-containing cells. (1) Injection of Ad-1AP-sense into the hypothalamus of SERT knock-out mice restored 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus; this effect was accompanied by elimination of the exaggerated adrenocorticotropin responses to a saline injection (minor stress) and reduced locomotor activity but not by a change in increased exploratory anxiety-like behavior. (2) To further confirm the observation in SERT-/- mice, Ad-1AP-antisense was injected into the hypothalamus of normal mice. The density and the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus were significantly reduced in Ad-1AP-antisense-treated mice. Compared with the control group (injected with Ad-track), Ad-1A-antisense-treated mice showed a significant reduction in locomotor activity, but again no changes in exploratory anxiety-like behaviors, tested by elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Thus, the present results demonstrate that medial hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors regulate stress responses and locomotor activity but may not regulate exploratory anxiety-like behaviors.

  14. Adenovirus type 5 early region 1B 55-kDa oncoprotein can promote cell transformation by a mechanism independent from blocking p53-activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Härtl, B; Zeller, T; Blanchette, P; Kremmer, E; Dobner, T

    2008-06-12

    Inhibition of p53-activated transcription is an integral part of the mechanism by which early region 1B 55K oncoprotein (E1B-55K) from adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) contributes to complete cell transformation in combination with Ad E1A. In addition, more recent data suggest that the mode of action of the Ad protein during transformation may involve additional functions and other protein interactions. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive mutational analysis to assign further transforming functions of Ad5 E1B-55K to distinct domains within the viral polypeptide. Results from these studies show that the functions required for transformation are encoded within several patches of the 55K primary sequence, including several clustered cysteine and histidine residues, some of which match the consensus for zinc fingers. In addition, two amino-acid substitutions (C454S/C456S) created a 55K mutant protein, which had substantially reduced transforming activity. Interestingly, the same mutations neither affected binding to p53 nor inhibition of p53-mediated transactivation. Therefore, an activity necessary for efficient transformation of primary rat cells can be separated from functions required for inhibition of p53-stimulated transcription. Our data indicate that this activity is linked to the ability of the Ad5 protein to bind to components of the Mre11/Rad50/NBS1 DNA double-strand break repair complex, and/or its ability to assemble multiprotein aggregates in the cytoplasm and nucleus of transformed rat cells. These results introduce a new function for Ad5 E1B-55K and suggest that the viral protein contributes to cell transformation through p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways.

  15. Activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB by the adenovirus E3/19K protein requires its ER retention

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have recently shown that the accumulation of diverse viral and cellular membrane proteins in the ER activates the higher eukaryotic transcription factor NF-kappaB. This defined a novel ER-nuclear signal transduction pathway, which is distinct from the previously described unfolded protein response (UPR). The well characterized UPR pathway is activated by the presence of un- or malfolded proteins in the ER. In contrast, the ER stress signal which activates the NF-kappaB pathway is not known. Here we used the adenovirus early region protein E3/19K as a model to investigate the nature of the NF-kappaB-activating signal emitted by the ER. E3/19K resides in the endoplasmic reticulum where it binds to MHC class I molecules, thereby preventing their transport to the cell surface. It is maintained in the ER by a retention signal sequence in its carboxy terminus, which causes the protein to be continuously retrieved to the ER from post-ER compartments. Mutation of this sequence allows E3/19K to reach the cell surface. We show here that expression of E3/19K potently activates a functional NF-kappaB transcription factor. The activated NF-kappaB complexes contained p50/p65 and p50/c-rel heterodimers. E3/19K interaction with MHC class I was not important for NF-kappaB activation since mutant proteins which no longer bind MHC molecules remained fully capable of inducing NF- kappaB. However, activation of both NF-kappaB DNA binding and kappaB- dependent transactivation relied on E3/19K ER retention: mutants, which were expressed on the cell surface, could no longer activate the transcription factor. This identifies the NF-kappaB-activating signal as the accumulation of proteins in the ER membrane, a condition we have termed "ER overload." We show that ER overload-mediated NF-kappaB activation but not TNF-stimulated NF-kappaB induction can be inhibited by the intracellular Ca2+ chelator TMB-8. Moreover, treatment of cells with two inhibitors of the ER-resident Ca(2+) -dependent

  16. Adenovirus Replaces Mitotic Checkpoint Controls

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Roberta L.; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with adenovirus triggers the cellular DNA damage response, elements of which include cell death and cell cycle arrest. Early adenoviral proteins, including the E1B-55K and E4orf3 proteins, inhibit signaling in response to DNA damage. A fraction of cells infected with an adenovirus mutant unable to express the E1B-55K and E4orf3 genes appeared to arrest in a mitotic-like state. Cells infected early in G1 of the cell cycle were predisposed to arrest in this state at late times of infection. This arrested state, which displays hallmarks of mitotic catastrophe, was prevented by expression of either the E1B-55K or the E4orf3 genes. However, E1B-55K mutant virus-infected cells became trapped in a mitotic-like state in the presence of the microtubule poison colcemid, suggesting that the two viral proteins restrict entry into mitosis or facilitate exit from mitosis in order to prevent infected cells from arresting in mitosis. The E1B-55K protein appeared to prevent inappropriate entry into mitosis through its interaction with the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53. The E4orf3 protein facilitated exit from mitosis by possibly mislocalizing and functionally inactivating cyclin B1. When expressed in noninfected cells, E4orf3 overcame the mitotic arrest caused by the degradation-resistant R42A cyclin B1 variant. IMPORTANCE Cells that are infected with adenovirus type 5 early in G1 of the cell cycle are predisposed to arrest in a mitotic-like state in a p53-dependent manner. The adenoviral E1B-55K protein prevents entry into mitosis. This newly described activity for the E1B-55K protein appears to depend on the interaction between the E1B-55K protein and the tumor suppressor p53. The adenoviral E4orf3 protein facilitates exit from mitosis, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of cyclin B1. By preventing entry into mitosis and by promoting exit from mitosis, these adenoviral proteins act to prevent the infected cell from arresting in a

  17. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2143540

  18. Adenovirus DNA polymerase is a phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, M; Nakano, R; Mohan, P M; Rawitch, A B; Padmanabhan, R

    1993-01-05

    Biological activities of many of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins are modulated by protein phosphorylation. Investigations of the phosphorylation of adenovirus DNA polymerase (AdPol) have been difficult mainly because of its low level of synthesis in adenovirus-infected HeLa cells. However, when AdPol was overproduced using the recombinant vaccinia virus (RV-AdPol) and the baculovirus expression systems, or by a large scale metabolic labeling of adenovirus 2-infected HeLa cells (native AdPol), in vivo phosphorylation of AdPol could be demonstrated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of [32P]AdPol indicated the presence of phosphoserine independent of the source of AdPol. Comparison of tryptic peptide maps of native AdPol and RV-AdPol revealed that the majority of phosphopeptides were common. Fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography and sequencing of one of the major phosphopeptides revealed serine 67 as a site of phosphorylation. Interestingly, this site is located close to the nuclear localization signal of AdPol and has a consensus substrate recognition sequence for histone H1 (cdc2-related) kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Dephosphorylation of AdPol with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase resulted in significant decrease in its activity in the in vitro DNA replication initiation assay, suggesting that phosphorylation is important for its biological activity.

  19. Class specific inhibition of house dust mite proteinases which cleave cell adhesion, induce cell death and which increase the permeability of lung epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Winton, Helen L; Wan, Hong; Cannell, Mark B; Thompson, Philip J; Garrod, David R; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Robinson, Clive

    1998-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens with cysteine and serine proteinase activity are risk factors for allergic sensitization and asthma. A simple method to fractionate proteinase activity from HDM faecal pellets into cysteine and serine class activity is described. Both proteinase fractions increased the permeability of epithelial cell monolayers. The effects of the serine proteinase fraction were inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) and soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). The effects of the cysteine proteinase fraction could be inhibited by E-64. No reciprocity of action was found. Treatment of epithelial monolayers with either proteinase fraction caused breakdown of tight junctions (TJs). AEBSF inhibited TJ breakdown caused by the serine proteinase fraction, whereas E-64 inhibited the cysteine proteinase fraction. Agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the proteinases induced DNA cleavage which was inhibited by the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-250. Compound E-64 inhibited DNA fragmentation caused by the cysteine proteinase fraction, but was without effect on the serine proteinase fraction. Staining of proteinase-treated cells with annexin V (AV) and propidium iodide (PI) revealed a diversity of cellular responses. Some cells stained only with AV indicating early apoptosis, whilst others were dead and stained with both AV and PI. HDM proteinases exert profound effects on epithelial cells which will promote allergic sensitization; namely disruption of intercellular adhesion, increased paracellular permeability and initiation of cell death. Attenuation of these actions by proteinase inhibitors leads to the conclusion that compounds designed to be selective for the HDM enzymes may represent a novel therapy for asthma. PMID:9720772

  20. Proteinase Inhibitor I Accumulation in Tomato Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Simmons, Mary; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1986-01-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of tomato accumulate proteinase Inhibitor I as the sucrose is depleted from 1% to less than 0.1% in the culture medium. Inhibitor I can be prematurely induced to accumulate in the cells by the addition to the medium of the proteinase inhibitor inducing factor, trigalacturonic acid, ethylene glycol chitin, or chitosan. In cultures grown in 0.6% initial sucrose with no inducers added, a uronic acid-rich extracellular polysaccharide appears in the medium during growth of the cells. This extracellular polysaccharide apparently contains an `endogenous inducer' of Inhibitor I synthesis. When the partially purified polysaccharide is added to the culture medium, Inhibitor I accumulation is induced. Proteinase inhibitors also accumulate in tobacco and alfalfa suspension-cultured cells as the cell cultures age. As with the tomato cultures, a uronic acid-rich component(s) appears in the media prior to inhibitor accumulation. These data suggest that an endogenous inducer may be activating proteinase inhibitor genes through a similar mechanism in all three types of cells. PMID:16664609

  1. Antiviral antibodies target adenovirus to phagolysosomes and amplify the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Anne K; Vilaysane, Akosua; Cotter, Matthew J; Clark, Sharon A; Meijndert, H Christopher; Colarusso, Pina; Yates, Robin M; Petrilli, Virginie; Tschopp, Jurg; Muruve, Daniel A

    2009-06-01

    Adenovirus is a nonenveloped dsDNA virus that activates intracellular innate immune pathways. In vivo, adenovirus-immunized mice displayed an enhanced innate immune response and diminished virus-mediated gene delivery following challenge with the adenovirus vector AdLacZ suggesting that antiviral Abs modulate viral interactions with innate immune cells. Under naive serum conditions in vitro, adenovirus binding and internalization in macrophages and the subsequent activation of innate immune mechanisms were inefficient. In contrast to the neutralizing effect observed in nonhematopoietic cells, adenovirus infection in the presence of antiviral Abs significantly increased FcR-dependent viral internalization in macrophages. In direct correlation with the increased viral internalization, antiviral Abs amplified the innate immune response to adenovirus as determined by the expression of NF-kappaB-dependent genes, type I IFNs, and caspase-dependent IL-1beta maturation. Immune serum amplified TLR9-independent type I IFN expression and enhanced NLRP3-dependent IL-1beta maturation in response to adenovirus, confirming that antiviral Abs specifically amplify intracellular innate pathways. In the presence of Abs, confocal microscopy demonstrated increased targeting of adenovirus to LAMP1-positive phagolysosomes in macrophages but not epithelial cells. These data show that antiviral Abs subvert natural viral tropism and target the adenovirus to phagolysosomes and the intracellular innate immune system in macrophages. Furthermore, these results illustrate a cross-talk where the adaptive immune system positively regulates the innate immune system and the antiviral state.

  2. Plasma interferon-gamma, interleukin-10 and soluble markers of immune activation in infants with primary adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection.

    PubMed

    Fernández, J Alonso; Tapia, Lorena; Palomino, M Angélica; Larrañaga, Carmen; Peña, Mónica; Jaramillo, Héctor

    2005-01-01

    Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are etiological agents of acute respiratory tract infection in infants. Long-term prognosis of ADV infection includes severe lung damage, bronchiectasis and hyperlucent lung, while RSV infection is associated with development of recurrent wheezing and subsequent asthma. These differences may be related to differences in the primary immune responses elicited by these viruses. In this paper, we investigated the type of cytokine responses and the magnitude of immune activation in ADV and RSV infections in infants. We examined plasma concentrations of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-10 (IL-10), soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sCD25) and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (sTNFR-II) in previously healthy infants during the acute phase of primary ADV infection (n = 21) and RSV infection (n = 68), and in uninfected controls (n = 44). In ADV-infected infants, IFN-gamma plasma levels were significantly higher than those observed in RSV cases and the control group (p < 0.05). RSV cases did not show any differences in IFN-gamma plasma levels compared to the other groups. sCD25 levels were significantly higher in ADV- and RSV-infected infants than in controls (p < 0.0001), and higher in ADV than in RSV cases (p < 0.05). sTNFR-II levels were significantly higher in RSV- and ADV-infected infants than in controls (p < 0.0001, p < 0.05, respectively), and higher in RSV than in ADV infection (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in IL-10 plasma concentrations between the three groups. These results indicate that ADV and RSV infections in infants differ significantly with regard to the magnitude of production of interferon-gamma and soluble immune activation markers sCD25 and sTNFR-II. These immunological differences may be involved in the different clinical outcomes associated with these viral infections.

  3. Limited proteolysis by macrophage elastase inactivities human. cap alpha. /sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Banda, M.J.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Ever since the initial description of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor (..cap alpha../sub 1/PI), the role of this plasma glycoprotein and its allelic polymorphism in disease and in healthy physiology has been the subject of much investigation, ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI inactivates a number of serine proteinases, including granulocyte elastase, and thus affords protection from the connective tissue degradation mediated by this class of proteinases. Because an imbalance in the ratio between ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI and proteinase may contribute to the development of destructive lung diseases, proteinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. Both macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes have been implicated in disruption of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance. In this report, a new mechanism for alteration of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance is demonstrated. It was found that the purified form of macrophage elastase catalytically degrades and inactivates ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI so that it no longer inhibits the elastinolytic activity of granulocyte elastase.

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoeae activates the proteinase cathepsin B to mediate the signaling activities of the NLRP3 and ASC-containing inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Joseph A; Gao, Xi; Huang, Max Tze-Han; O'Connor, Brian P; Thomas, Christopher E; Willingham, Stephen B; Bergstralh, Daniel T; Jarvis, Gary A; Sparling, P Frederick; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2009-05-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a common sexually transmitted pathogen that significantly impacts female fertility, neonatal health, and transmission of HIV worldwide. N. gonorrhoeae usually causes localized inflammation of the urethra and cervix by inducing production of IL-1beta and other inflammatory cytokines. Several NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) proteins are implicated in the formation of pro-IL-1beta-processing complexes called inflammasomes in response to pathogens. We demonstrate that NLRP3 (cryopyrin, NALP3) is the primary NLR required for IL-1beta/IL-18 secretion in response to N. gonorrhoeae in monocytes. We also show that N. gonorrhoeae infection promotes NLRP3-dependent monocytic cell death via pyronecrosis, a recently described pathway with morphological features of necrosis, including release of the strong inflammatory mediator HMBG1. Additionally, N. gonorrhoeae activates the cysteine protease cathepsin B as measured by the breakdown of a cathepsin B substrate. Inhibition of cathepsin B shows that this protease is an apical controlling step in the downstream activities of NLRP3 including IL-1beta production, pyronecrosis, and HMGB1 release. Nonpathogenic Neisseria strains (Neisseria cinerea and Neisseria flavescens) do not activate NLRP3 as robustly as N. gonorrhoeae. Conditioned medium from N. gonorrhoeae contains factors capable of initiating the NLRP3-mediated signaling events. Isolated N. gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide, a known virulence factor from this bacterium that is elaborated from the bacterium in the form of outer membrane blebs, activates both NLRP3-induced IL-1beta secretion and pyronecrosis. Our findings indicate that activation of NLRP3-mediated inflammatory response pathways is an important venue associated with host response and pathogenesis of N. gonorrhoeae.

  5. Neisseria gonorrhoeae activates the proteinase Cathepsin B to mediate the signaling activities of the NLRP3 and ASC - containing inflammasome1

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Joseph A.; Gao, Xi; Huang, Max; O’Connor, Brian P.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Willingham, Stephen B.; Bergstralh, Daniel T.; Jarvis, Gary A.; Sparling, P. Frederick; Ting, Jenny P-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a common sexually transmitted pathogen that significantly impacts female fertility, neonatal health, and transmission of HIV worldwide. N. gonorrhoeae usually causes localized inflammation of the urethra and cervix by inducing production of IL-1β and other inflammatory cytokines. Several NLR (Nucleotide binding domain, Leucine Rich Repeat) proteins are implicated in the formation of pro-IL-1β-processing complexes called inflammasomes in response to pathogens. We demonstrate that NLRP3 (cryopyrin,NALP3) is the primary NLR required for IL-1β/IL-18 secretion in response to N. gonorrhoeae in monocytes. We also show that N. gonorrhoeae infection promotes NLRP3-dependent monocytic cell death via pyronecrosis, a recently described pathway with morphological features of necrosis, including release of the strong inflammatory mediator HMBG1. Additionally, N. gonorrhoeae activates the cysteine protease Cathepsin-B as measured by the breakdown of a Cathepsin B substrate. Inhibition of Cathepsin B shows that this protease is an apical controlling step in the downstream activities of NLRP3 including IL-1β production, pyronecrosis, and HMGB1 release. Non-pathogenic Neisseria strains (N. cinerea and N. flavescens) do not activate NLRP3 as robustly as N. gonorrhoeae. Conditioned media from N. gonorrhoeae contains factors capable of initiating the NLRP3 mediated signaling events. Isolated N. gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide, a known virulence factor from this bacterium that is elaborated from the bacterium in the form of outer membrane blebs, activates both NLRP3-induced IL-1β secretion and pyronecrosis. Our findings indicate that activation of NLRP3-mediated inflammatory response pathways is an important venue associated with host response and pathogenesis of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:19414800

  6. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to adenovirus in serum. Additionally... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus...

  7. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. II. Contribution of the uni- and bimolecular activation routes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Escribano, J; Masia-Perez, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, J L; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    From the kinetic study carried out in part I of this series (preceding article) an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the uni- and bimolecular routes has been carried out. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect on this relative weight of the initial zymogen, inhibitor and activating enzyme concentrations.

  8. Bitter gourd proteinase inhibitors: potential growth inhibitors of Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Telang, Manasi; Srinivasan, Ajay; Patankar, Aparna; Harsulkar, Abhay; Joshi, Vijay; Damle, Archana; Deshpande, Vasanti; Sainani, Mohini; Ranjekar, Prabhakar; Gupta, Gorakh; Birah, Ajanta; Rani, Seema; Kachole, Manavendra; Giri, Ashok; Gupta, Vidya

    2003-07-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) from the seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) were identified as strong inhibitors of Helicoverpa armigera gut proteinases (HGP). Biochemical investigations showed that bitter gourd PIs (BGPIs) inhibited more than 80% HGP activity. Electrophoretic analysis revealed the presence of two major proteins (BGPI-1 and-2) and two minor proteins (BGPI-3 and-4) having inhibitory activity against both trypsin and HGP. The major isoforms BGPI-1 and BGPI-2 have molecular mass of 3.5 and 3.0 kDa, respectively. BGPIs inhibited HGP activity of larvae fed on different host plants, on artificial diet with or without added PIs and proteinases excreted in fecal matter. Degradation of BGPI-1 by HGP showed direct correlation with accumulation of BGPI-2-like peptide, which remained stable and active against high concentrations of HGP up to 3 h. Chemical inhibitors of serine proteinases offered partial protection to BGPI-1 from degradation by HGP, suggesting that trypsin and chymotrypsin like proteinases are involved in degradation of BGPI-1. In larval feeding studies, BGPIs were found to retard growth and development of two lepidopteran pests namely Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura. This is the first report showing that BGPIs mediated inhibition of insect gut proteinases directly affects fertility and fecundity of both H. armigera and S. litura. The results advocate use of BGPIs to introduce insect resistance in otherwise susceptible plants.

  9. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  10. Exploiting features of adenovirus replication to support mammalian kinase production

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, Matt; Stegmueller, Kerstin; Eickhoff, Jan; Hanke, Miriam; Herzberger, Katrin; Herget, Thomas; Choidas, Axel; Daub, Henrik; Godl, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Faced with the current wealth of genomic data, it is essential to have robust and reliable methods of converting DNA sequences into their functional gene products. We demonstrate here that when conditions are established that take advantage of the replication-associated virus amplification, the virus-induced shutdown of host protein synthesis as well as the activation of signalling pathways that normally occur during virus replication, adenovirus biology can be exploited to generate a potent kinase expression system. Residual virus in the protein production has always been a limitation for adenovirus systems and we describe a DNA intercalator/ultraviolet light treatment that eliminates residual adenovirus in protein preparations that has no deleterious effect on enzyme activity. The use of mammalian cells in combination with adenovirus generated a variety of active enzymes which could not be produced in Escherichia coli or baculovirus-infected insect cells. Thus, the utility of adenovirus-mediated enzyme expression as a versatile alternative to established protein production technologies is demonstrated. PMID:14576328

  11. Exploiting features of adenovirus replication to support mammalian kinase production.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Matt; Stegmueller, Kerstin; Eickhoff, Jan; Hanke, Miriam; Herzberger, Katrin; Herget, Thomas; Choidas, Axel; Daub, Henrik; Godl, Klaus

    2003-11-01

    Faced with the current wealth of genomic data, it is essential to have robust and reliable methods of converting DNA sequences into their functional gene products. We demonstrate here that when conditions are established that take advantage of the replication-associated virus amplification, the virus-induced shutdown of host protein synthesis as well as the activation of signalling pathways that normally occur during virus replication, adenovirus biology can be exploited to generate a potent kinase expression system. Residual virus in the protein production has always been a limitation for adenovirus systems and we describe a DNA intercalator/ultraviolet light treatment that eliminates residual adenovirus in protein preparations that has no deleterious effect on enzyme activity. The use of mammalian cells in combination with adenovirus generated a variety of active enzymes which could not be produced in Escherichia coli or baculovirus-infected insect cells. Thus, the utility of adenovirus-mediated enzyme expression as a versatile alternative to established protein production technologies is demonstrated.

  12. Involement of an acrosinlike proteinase in the sulfhydryl-induced degradation of rabbit sperm nuclear protamine

    PubMed Central

    Zirkin, BR; Chang, TSK; Heaps, J

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that proteolytic activity is associated with isolated rabbit sperm nuclei and is responsible for the degradation of nuclear protamine that occurs during thiol-induced in vitro decondensation of the nuclei (Zirkin and Chang, 1977; Chang and Zirkin, 1978). In this study, we present the results of experiments designed to characterize this proteolytic activity. Basic protein isolated from rabbit sperm nuclei incubated with 5 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) and 1 percent Triton X-100 for increasing periods of time exhibited progressively faster migrating bands on acid-urea polyacrylamide gels, reflection the progressive degradation of protamine. Ultimately, a specific and characteristic peptide banding pattern resulted. When sperm nuclei were treated with the esterase inhibitor nitrophenyl-p-guanidino benzoate (NPGB) to inhibit the nuclear-associated proteolytic activity and then incubated with one of several exogenous proteinases in addition to DTT and Triton X-100, characteristic peptide banding patterns were seen for each exogenous proteinase employed. For trypsin, chymotrypsin, pronase, and papain, the peptide banding patterns differed from one another and from the pattern characteristic of protamine degradation by the nuclear-associated proteinase. By contrast, when rabbit acrosin served as the exogenous proteinase, the peptide banding pattern seen was identical to the pattern characteristic of the nuclear-associated proteinase. These results demonstrate directly that the proteinase associated with rabbit sperm nuclei and involved in sperm nuclear decondensation in vitro is acrosinlike. PMID:6988441

  13. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  14. Ozone inactivation of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.

    1980-06-01

    Ozone decreased the trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activities of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor both in plasma and in solutions of the pure inhibitor. The total loss of porcine elastase inhibitory activity required 18 mol of ozone/mol of pure alpha 1-PI and approximately 850 mol of ozone/mol of alpha 1-PI in plasma. A corresponding loss of the ability to inhibit human leukocyte elastase was observed. Inactivated alpha 1-PI contains four residues of methionine sulfoxide, in addition to oxidized tryosine and tryptophan. Electrophoretic analysis demonstrated that the ozone-inactivated alpha 1-PI did not form normal complexes with serine proteinases. These findings suggest that the inhalation of ozone could inactivate alpha 1-PI on the airspace side of the lung to create a localized alpha 1-PI deficiency, which might contribute to the development of emphysema.

  15. [Extracellular proteinases of filamentous fungi as potential markers of phytopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Gruban', T N; Beliakova, G A; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of proteins in the culture liquid of filamentous fungi under study was found to induce the secretion of proteinases. The inhibitory analysis of the major extracellular proteinases of the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata showed that they both belong to the group of serine proteinases. The substrate specificity of these proteinases and their sensitivity to inhibitors suggest that the enzyme of T. harzianum is a subtilisin-like proteinase and the enzyme of A. alternata is a trypsin-like proteinase. This difference between the proteinases may reflect the physiological difference between their producers (saprotroph and phytopathogen).

  16. Molecular investigation on the interaction of spermine with proteinase K by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Koupaei, Mansoore; Shareghi, Behzad; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Davar, Fateme

    2017-01-01

    The alteration in structure, function and stability of proteinase K in the presence of spermine was investigated using spectroscopic methods and simulation techniques. The stability and enzyme activity of proteinase K-spermine complex were significantly enhanced as compared to that of the pure enzyme. The increase in the value of Vmax and the catalytic efficiency of Proteinase K in presence of spermine confirmed that the polyamine could bring the enzyme hyperactivation. UV-vis spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism methods demonstrated that the binding of spermine changed the microenvironment and structure of proteinase K. The fluorescence studies, showing that spermine quenched the intensity of proteinase K with static mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters analysis suggested that hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces play a key role in complex stability which is in agreement with modeling studies. The CD spectra represented the secondary structure alteration of proteinase K with an increase in α-helicity and a decrease in β-sheet of proteinase K upon spermine conjugation. The molecular simulation results proposed that spermine could interact with proteinase K spontaneously at single binding site, which is in agreement with spectroscopic results. This agreement between experimental and theoretical results may be a worth method for protein-ligand complex studies.

  17. The characterization of SaPIN2b, a plant trichome-localized proteinase inhibitor from Solanum americanum.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Ding, Ling-Wen; Ge, Zhi-Juan; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Bo-Lun; Yang, Xiao-Bei; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2012-11-16

    Proteinase inhibitors play an important role in plant resistance of insects and pathogens. In this study, we characterized the serine proteinase inhibitor SaPIN2b, which is constitutively expressed in Solanum americanum trichomes and contains two conserved motifs of the proteinase inhibitor II (PIN2) family. The recombinant SaPIN2b (rSaPIN2b), which was expressed in Escherichia coli, was demonstrated to be a potent proteinase inhibitor against a panel of serine proteinases, including subtilisin A, chymotrypsin and trypsin. Moreover, rSaPIN2b also effectively inhibited the proteinase activities of midgut trypsin-like proteinases that were extracted from the devastating pest Helicoverpa armigera. Furthermore, the overexpression of SaPIN2b in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in enhanced resistance against H. armigera. Taken together, our results demonstrated that SaPIN2b is a potent serine proteinase inhibitor that may act as a protective protein in plant defense against insect attacks.

  18. Regulation of alpha 1 proteinase inhibitor function by rabbit alveolar macrophages. Evidence for proteolytic rather than oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Banda, M J; Clark, E J; Werb, Z

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were cultured in an environment conducive to the secretion of both reactive oxygen and proteinases, so that the relative importance of proteolytic and oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar macrophages could be evaluated. The inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was proportional to its proteolysis, and there was no detectable inactivation in the absence of proteolysis. Although the live macrophages were capable of secreting reactive oxygen, they did not inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by oxidation. The inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by proteolysis was proportional to the secretion of elastinolytic activity by the alveolar macrophages. The inability of the alveolar macrophages to oxidize alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was attributed to the methionine in the macrophages, in secreted proteins, and in the culture medium competing for oxidants. The data suggest that proteolytic inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may be important in vivo and that the methionine concentration in vivo may protect alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor from significant oxidative inactivation. Images PMID:2989330

  19. The Evaluation of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB) as a Disinfectant for Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; O’Connor, Katherine E.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. The current study determined whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. Methods The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating nine human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with 50 and 0 PPM (µg/ml) of PHMB for 24 hours at room temperature, to simulate swimming pool temperatures, or 40°C, to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays determined adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were Log10 converted and mean ± standard deviation Log10 reductions from controls were calculated. Virucidal (greater than 99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. Results At room temperature, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for two adenovirus types and greater than 1 Log10, but less than 3 Log10, for seven of nine adenovirus types. Conclusions 50 PPM of PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Clinical Relevance Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB has the potential to serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections. PMID:23450376

  20. CP30, a Cysteine Proteinase Involved in Trichomonas vaginalis Cytoadherence

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-López, M. Remedios; Becerril-Garcia, Cecilia; Fattel-Facenda, Loriz V.; Avila-Gonzalez, Leticia; Ruíz-Tachiquín, Martha E.; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana

    2000-01-01

    We describe here the participation of a Trichomonas vaginalis 30-kDa proteinase (CP30) with affinity to the HeLa cell surface in attachment of this parasite to host epithelial cells. The CP30 band is a cysteine proteinase because its activity was inhibited by E-64, a thiol proteinase inhibitor. In two-dimensional substrate gel electrophoresis of total extracts of the trichomonad isolate CNCD 147, three spots with proteolytic activity were detected in the 30-kDa region, in the pI range from 4.5 to 5.5. Two of the spots (pI 4.5 and 5.0) bound to the surfaces of fixed HeLa cells corresponding to the CP30 band. The immunoglobulin G fraction of the rabbit anti-CP30 antiserum that recognized a 30-kDa band by Western blotting and immunoprecipitated CP30 specifically inhibited trichomonal cytoadherence to HeLa cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner and reacted with CP30 at the parasite surface. CP30 degraded proteins found on the female urogenital tract, including fibronectin, collagen IV, and hemoglobin. Interestingly, CP30 digested fibronectin and collagen IV only at pH levels between 4.5 and 5.0. Moreover, trichomonosis patients whose diagnosis was confirmed by in vitro culture possessed antibody to CP30 in both sera and vaginal washes, and CP30 activity was found in vaginal washes. Our results suggest that surface CP30 is a cysteine proteinase necessary for trichomonal adherence to human epithelial cells. PMID:10948104

  1. Oncolytic virotherapy for osteosarcoma using midkine promoter-regulated adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Takagi-Kimura, M; Yamano, T; Tagawa, M; Kubo, S

    2014-03-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy using adenoviruses has potential therapeutic benefits for a variety of cancers. We recently developed MOA5, a tumor-specific midkine promoter-regulated oncolytic vector based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5). We modified the binding tropism of MOA5 by replacing the cell-binding domain of the Ad5 fiber knob with that from another adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35); the resulting vector was designated MOA35. Here we evaluated the therapeutic efficacies of MOA5 and MOA35 for human osteosarcoma. Midkine mRNA expression and its promoter activity was significantly high in five human osteosarcoma cell lines, but was restricted in normal cells. Very low levels of adenovirus cellular receptor coxsackievirus/adenovirus receptor (CAR) (Ad5 receptor) expression were observed in MNNG-HOS and MG-63 cells, whereas high levels of CAR expression were seen in the other osteosarcoma cell lines. By contrast, CD46 (Ad35 receptor) was highly expressed in all osteosarcoma cell lines. Infectivity and in vitro cytocidal effect of MOA35 was significantly enhanced in MNNG-HOS and MG-63 cells compared with MOA5, although the cytocidal effects of MOA5 were sometimes higher in high CAR-expressing cell lines. In MG-63 xenograft models, MOA35 significantly enhanced antitumor effects compared with MOA5. Our findings indicate that MOA5 and MOA35 allow tailored virotherapy and facilitate more effective treatments for osteosarcoma.

  2. Induction of a heparin-stimulated serine proteinase in sex accessory gland tumors of the Lobund-Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael J; Lind, Jeremy; Sinha, Akhouri A

    2015-08-01

    Induction of new proteinase activities that may process growth factors, modify cell surface receptors, cleave extracellular matrix proteins, etc. is considered fundamental in carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to characterize a novel proteinase activity induced in sex accessory gland cancers (about 70% in seminal vesicles) of adult male Lobund-Wistar rats by a single injection of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU; 25mg/kg) followed by implanted testosterone propionate (45mg in silastic tubing every 2months) treatment for 10-14months. A 28kDa proteinase activity was detected in tumor extracts using SDS-gelatin gel zymography with incubations done without CaCl2. Its activity was stimulated 15 fold by heparin (optimal activity 1.5-3.0μg/lane) added to the tissue extract-SDS sample buffer prior to electrophoresis. No 28kDa heparin-stimulated proteinase (H-SP) was found in the dorsal, lateral and anterior (coagulating gland) prostate lobes or seminal vesicles of untreated adult rats, but there was a 26-30kDa Ca(2+)-independent proteinase activity in the ventral prostate that showed limited heparin stimulation. The 28kDa H-SP was completely inhibited by 1.0mM 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonylfluoride (AESBF) indicating that it was a serine-type proteinase. Other types of proteinase inhibitors were without effect, including serine proteinase inhibitors benzamidine, tranexamic acid and ε-aminocaproic acid. Proteinase activities of about 28kDa were found with casein, fibrinogen or carboxymethylated transferrin as substrate, however, these activities were not stimulated by heparin. Similar levels of activities of the 28kDa H-SP were found in primary tumors and their metastases, but little/no activity was detected in serum, even from rats with large tumor volume and metastases. These data demonstrate overexpression of a heparin-stimulated 28kDa serine proteinase in the primary tumors of sex accessory gland cancers and their metastases. This proteinase either does not

  3. The house dust mite allergen Der p 1, unlike Der p 3, stimulates the expression of interleukin-8 in human airway epithelial cells via a proteinase-activated receptor-2-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adam, Emmanuelle; Hansen, Kristina K; Astudillo Fernandez, Olaya; Astudillo, Olaya Fernandez; Coulon, Ludivine; Bex, Françoise; Duhant, Xavier; Jaumotte, Erika; Hollenberg, Morley D; Jacquet, Alain

    2006-03-17

    We investigated and compared the mechanisms by which two dust mite proteolytic allergens, Der p 1 and Der p 3, and a peptide agonist of proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR(2)AP) trigger interleukin (IL)-8 release from human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549). Although all three stimuli tested induced the up-regulation of IL-8 (mRNA and protein), the Der p 1-mediated signaling events did not exactly match those induced by PAR(2)AP and Der p 3. First, Der p 1 was less effective in stimulating IL-8 gene transcriptional activity than PAR(2)AP and Der p 3. Second, Der p 1-mediated IL-8 expression was mainly dependent on NF-kappaB, whereas Der p 3 and PAR(2)AP regulated IL-8 expression through the activation of both NF-kappaB and AP-1. Third, although all three MAP kinases, ERK1/2, p38, and JNK, were activated, Der p 1 induced IL-8 release exclusively via the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, whereas PAR(2)AP and Der p 3 also involved the other kinases. Fourth, in HeLa cells, Der p 1 was able to up-regulate IL-8 secretion independent of PAR(2) expression, and in contrast with PAR(2)AP and Der p 3, Der p 1 was unable to affect calcium signaling via PAR(2) in PAR(2)-expressing KNRK cells. Finally, cleavage by Der p 1 of a synthetic peptide representing the N-terminal activation-cleavage site of PAR(2) did not release a high potency activator of PAR(2) as does Der p 3. We conclude that Der p 1 (but not Der p 3)-induced IL-8 production in A549 epithelial cells is independent of PAR(2) activation.

  4. A serine proteinase of an archaebacterium, Halobacterium mediterranei. A homologue of eubacterial subtilisins.

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, V M; Rudenskaya, G N; Revina, L P; Gryaznova, Y B; Lysogorskaya, E N; Filippova IYu; Ivanova, I I

    1992-01-01

    A homogeneous serine proteinase secreted by the extreme halophilic bacterium Halobacterium mediterranei 1538 was isolated by affinity chromatography on bacitracin-Sepharose with a yield of 48% (260-fold purification). The enzyme reveals an optimum for pyroglutamyl-Ala-Ala-Leu p-nitroanilide hydrolysis at pH 8.0-8.5 (Km 0.14 mM; k(cat). 36.9 s-1). Its activity increases linearly with NaCl concentration over the range 2-5 M. The substrate specificity of the enzyme is comparable with that of secretory subtilisins, the extent of protein degradation approaching that attained with proteinase K. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 41 kDa and a pI of 7.5. The N-terminal sequence of H. mediterranei serine proteinase reveals a 50% identity with that of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris serine proteinases, indicating that the enzyme belongs to the subtilisin family. Hence the serine proteinase secreted by the halophilic bacterium should be considered as a functional analogue, and a structural homologue, of eubacterial serine proteinases (subtilisins). Images Fig. 3. PMID:1637313

  5. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control.

  6. Identification of a novel proteinase (ameloprotease-I) responsible for the complete degradation of amelogenin during enamel maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, J; Leung, W; Simmer, J P; Zeichner-David, M; Fincham, A G

    1996-01-01

    During enamel formation the proteins of the extracellular matrix, particularly amelogenins, are removed prior to maturation. In order to investigate this process and to improve our understanding of the function of proteinases during enamel maturation, proteinase fractions were isolated from developing pig enamel and assayed for proteolytic activity in vitro. A recombinant murine amelogenin, M179, was used as a substrate. Two major groups of enamel proteinases were defined as high-molecular-mass ['high-molecular-weight' in Moradian-Oldak, Simmer, Sarte, Zeichner-David and Fincham (1994) Arch. Oral Biol.39, 647-656] and low-molecular-mass proteinases. Here we report the characterization of one of the proteinases present in the low-molecular-mass group. We demonstrate that this proteinase is a serine proteinase capable of degradation of M179 following cleavage of the tyrosine-rich amelogenin polypeptide from the N-terminal region. A partial N-terminal sequence of the proteinase was obtained (LPHVPHRIPPGYGRPXTXNEEGXNPYFXFFXXHG). An anti-peptide antibody directed against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the first 14 amino acids of the above sequence was produced. The presence of the proteinase in the acetic acid extract was confirmed by Western blotting. Searching using the amino acid sequence determined in this study showed it to be also present in the 32 kDa and 89 kDa enamelin proteins reported by Fukae, Tanabe, Murakami and Tohi [(1996) Adv. Dent. Res., in the press]. We therefore identify the 32 kDa enamelin as an enamel proteinase ('ameloprotease-I') which is responsible for amelogenin degradation in maturing enamel. We propose that the 89 kDa enamelin is a precursor of ameloprotease-I, the first enamel protein for which a function has been defined. PMID:8836151

  7. Enzymatic response of the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) to a bis-benzamidine proteinase Inhibitor. i.

    PubMed

    Marinho-Prado, Jeanne Scardini; Lourenção, A L; Guedes, R N C; Pallini, A; Oliveira, J A; Oliveira, M G A

    2012-10-01

    Ingestion of proteinase inhibitors leads to hyperproduction of digestive proteinases, limiting the bioavailability of essential amino acids for protein synthesis, which affects insect growth and development. However, the effects of proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzymes can lead to an adaptive response by the insect. In here, we assessed the biochemical response of midgut proteinases from the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) to different concentrations of berenil, a bis-benzamidine proteinase inhibitor, on eucalyptus. Eucalyptus leaves were immersed in berenil solutions at different concentrations and fed to larvae of T. arnobia. Mortality was assessed daily. The proteolytic activity in the midgut of T. arnobia was assessed after feeding on plants sprayed with aqueous solutions of berenil, fed to fifth instars of T. arnobia for 48 h before midgut removal for enzymatic assays. Larvae of T. arnobia were able to overcome the effects of the lowest berenil concentrations by increasing their trypsin-like activity, but not as berenil concentration increased, despite the fact that the highest berenil concentration resulted in overproduction of trypsin-like proteinases. Berenil also prevented the increase of the cysteine proteinases activity in response to trypsin inhibition.

  8. Characterization of the Proteinase that Initiates the Degradation of the Trypsin Inhibitor in Germinating Mung Beans (Vigna radiata).

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A; Tan-Wilson, A L

    1987-05-01

    The proteinase (proteinase F) responsible for the initial proteolysis of the mung bean (Vigna radiata) trypsin inhibitor (MBTI) during germination has been purified 1400-fold from dry beans. The enzyme acts as an endopeptidase, cleaving the native inhibitor, MBTI-F, to produce the first modified inhibitor form, MBTI-E. The cleavage of the Asp76-Lys77 peptide bond of MBTI-F occurs at a pH optimum of 4.5, with the tetrapeptide Lys-Asp-Asp-Asp being released. Proteinase F exhibited no activity against the modified inhibitor forms MBTI-E and MBTI-C. Vicilin, the major storage protein of the mung bean, does not serve as a substrate for proteinase F between pH 4 and 7. Proteinase F is inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, chymostatin, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, and p-chlorophenylsulfonate, but not by iodoacetate and CuCl(2). It is not activated by dithiothreitol, and is stable for extended periods of time (10 months, 4 degrees C, pH 4.0) in the absence of reducing agents. An apparent molecular weight of 65,000 was found for proteinase F by gel filtration. Subcellular fractionation in glycerol suggests that greater than 85% of the proteinase F activity is found in the protein bodies of the ungerminated mung bean. The same studies indicate that at least 56% of the MBTI of the seed is also localized in the protein bodies.

  9. Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, John D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent discoveries and delves in detail about what is known about each of the proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) and proteinases (matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-related peptidase-4) that are secreted into the enamel matrix. After an overview of enamel development, this review focuses on these enamel proteins by describing their nomenclature, tissue expression, functions, proteinase activation, and proteinase substrate specificity. These proteins and their respective null mice and human mutations are also evaluated to shed light on the mechanisms that cause nonsyndromic enamel malformations termed amelogenesis imperfecta. Pertinent controversies are addressed. For example, do any of these proteins have a critical function in addition to their role in enamel development? Does amelogenin initiate crystallite growth, does it inhibit crystallite growth in width and thickness, or does it do neither? Detailed examination of the null mouse literature provides unmistakable clues and/or answers to these questions, and this data is thoroughly analyzed. Striking conclusions from this analysis reveal that widely held paradigms of enamel formation are inadequate. The final section of this review weaves the recent data into a plausible new mechanism by which these enamel matrix proteins support and promote enamel development. PMID:24159389

  10. The influence of cis-acting P1 protein and translational elements on the expression of Potato virus Y helper-component proteinase (HCPro) in heterologous systems and its suppression of silencing activity.

    PubMed

    Tena Fernández, Fátima; González, Inmaculada; Doblas, Paula; Rodríguez, César; Sahana, Nandita; Kaur, Harpreet; Tenllado, Francisco; Praveen, Shelly; Canto, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    In the Potyvirus genus, the P1 protein is the first N-terminal product processed from the viral polyprotein, followed by the helper-component proteinase (HCPro). In silencing suppression patch assays, we found that Potato virus Y (PVY) HCPro expressed from a P1-HCPro sequence increased the accumulation of a reporter gene, whereas protein expressed from an HCPro sequence did not, even with P1 supplied in trans. This enhancing effect of P1 has been noted in other potyviruses, but has remained unexplained. We analysed the accumulation of PVY HCPro in infiltrated tissues and found that it was higher when expressed from P1-HCPro than from HCPro sequences. Co-expression of heterologous suppressors increased the steady-state level of mRNA expressed from the HCPro sequence, but not that of protein. This suggests that, in the absence of P1 upstream, either HCPro acquires a conformation that affects negatively its activity or stability, or that its translation is reduced. To test these options, we purified HCPro expressed in the presence or absence of upstream P1, and found no difference in purification pattern and final soluble state. By contrast, alteration of the Kozak context in the HCPro mRNA sequence to favour translation increased partially suppressor accumulation and activity. Furthermore, protein activity was not lower than in protein expressed from P1-HCPro sequences. Thus, a direct role for P1 on HCPro suppressor activity or stability, by influencing its conformation during translation, can be excluded. However, P1 could still have an indirect effect favouring HCPro accumulation. Our data highlight the relevance of cis-acting translational elements in the heterologous expression of HCPro.

  11. High-molecular-mass multicatalytic proteinase complexes produced by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia strain BR.

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, P; Müller, A; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1992-01-01

    A major-high-molecular mass proteinase and seven latent minor proteinases were found in cell extracts and in concentrates of culture medium from Frankia sp. strain BR after nondenaturing electrophoresis in mixed gelatin-polyacrylamide gels. All of these complexes showed multicatalytic properties. Their molecular masses and their sedimentation coefficients varied from 1,300 kDa (28S) to 270 kDa (12S). The electroeluted 1,300-kDa proteinase complex dissociated into 11 low-molecular-mass proteinases (40 to 19 kDa) after sodium dodecyl sulfate activation at 30 degrees C and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. All of these electroeluted proteinases hydrolyzed N-carbobenzoxy-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-4-methoxy-beta- naphthylamide, D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-beta-naphthylamide, and Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide, whereas Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide was cleaved only by the six lower-molecular-mass proteinases (27.5 to 19 kDa). Examination by electron microscopy of uranyl acetate-stained, electroeluted 1,300- and 650-kDa intracellular and extracellular proteinase complexes showed ring-shaped and cylindrical particles (10 to 11 nm in diameter, 15 to 16 nm long) similar to those of eukaryotic prosomes and proteasomes. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat skeletal muscle proteasomes cross-reacted with all of the high-molecular-mass proteinase complexes and, after denaturation of the electroeluted 1,300-kDa band, with polypeptides of 35 to 38, 65, and 90 kDa. Electrophoresis of the activated cell extracts under denaturing conditions revealed 11 to 17 gelatinases from 40 to 19 kDa, including the 11 proteinases of the 1,300-kDa proteinase complex. The inhibition pattern of these proteinases is complex. Thiol-reactive compounds and 1-10-phenanthroline strongly inhibited all of the proteinases, but inhibitors against serine-type proteinases were also effective for most of them. Images PMID:1537794

  12. The picornaviral 3C proteinases: cysteine nucleophiles in serine proteinase folds.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, B A

    1995-08-01

    The 3C proteinases are a novel group of cysteine proteinases with a serine proteinase-like fold that are responsible for the bulk of polyprotein processing in the Picornaviridae. Because members of this viral family are to blame for several ongoing global pandemic problems (rhinovirus, hepatitis A virus) as well as sporadic outbreaks of more serious pathologies (poliovirus), there has been continuing interest over the last two decades in the development of antiviral therapies. The recent determination of the structure of two of the 3C proteinases by X-ray crystallography opens the door for the application of the latest advances in computer-assisted identification and design of anti-proteinase therapeutic/chemoprophylactic agents.

  13. Antiviral cytokines induce hepatic expression of the granzyme B inhibitors, proteinase inhibitor 9 and serine proteinase inhibitor 6.

    PubMed

    Barrie, Mahmoud B; Stout, Heather W; Abougergi, Marwan S; Miller, Bonnie C; Thiele, Dwain L

    2004-05-15

    Expression of the granzyme B inhibitors, human proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9), or the murine orthologue, serine proteinase inhibitor 6 (SPI-6), confers resistance to CTL or NK killing by perforin- and granzyme-dependent effector mechanisms. In light of prior studies indicating that virally infected hepatocytes are selectively resistant to this CTL effector mechanism, the present studies investigated PI-9 and SPI-6 expression in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells in response to adenoviral infection and to cytokines produced during antiviral immune responses. Neither PI-9 nor SPI-6 expression was detected by immunoblotting in uninfected murine or human hepatocytes. Similarly, human Huh-7 hepatoma cells were found to express only very low levels of PI-9 relative to levels detected in perforin- and granzyme-resistant CTL or lymphokine-activated killer cells. Following in vivo adenoviral infection or in vitro culture with IFN-alphabeta or IFN-gamma, SPI-6 expression was induced in murine hepatocytes. Similarly, after culture with IFN-alpha, induction of PI-9 mRNA and protein expression was observed in human hepatocytes and Huh-7 cells. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha also induced 4- to 10-fold higher levels of PI-9 mRNA expression in Huh-7 cells, whereas levels of mRNA encoding a related serine proteinase inhibitor, proteinase inhibitor 8, were unaffected by culture of Huh-7 cells with IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha. These findings indicate that cytokines that promote antiviral cytopathic responses also regulate expression of the cytoprotective molecules, PI-9 and SPI-6, in hepatocytes that are potential targets of CTL and NK effector mechanisms.

  14. Proteinase A, a storage-globulin-degrading endopeptidase of vetch (Vicia sativa L.) seeds, is not involved in early steps of storage-protein mobilization.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Senyuk, V I; Shutov, A D; Nong, V H; Fischer, J; Horstmann, C; Müntz, K

    1997-09-01

    Proteinase A is a papain-like cysteine endopeptidase of vetch (Vicia sativa L.) which was assumed to initiate storage-globulin breakdown just after the onset of seed germination. This enzyme was purified from cotyledons of vetch seedlings. On gelatin-containg SDS gels, active proteinase A migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 21 kDa, whereas after heat denaturation its molecular size on SDS/PAGE was 29 kDa. Although proteinase A is capable of hydrolyzing storage globulins in vitro it could not be localized in the protein-body fraction of cotyledons from germinating seeds. cDNA clones encoding proteinase A precursor have been obtained by PCR. The precursor is composed of an N-terminal signal sequence followed by a propeptide, the region encoding mature proteinase A, and a C-terminal KDEL sequence. Mature proteinase A with a derived molecular mass of 25,244 Da does not have the KDEL sequence. The derived amino acid sequence of the proteinase A precursor is 78.2% identical to sulfhydryl-endopeptidase (SH-EP), a cysteine endopeptidase from germinating Vigna mungo seedlings. Northern blot analysis indicated that proteinase A mRNA appears de novo in cotyledons of 1-day-germinated vetch seeds, where its amount increases up to day 6. No proteinase A mRNA was detected in other vetch organs, not even in the embryo axis, which contains stored globulins. By means of antibodies raised against the purified and against recombinantly produced proteinase A, the 29-kDa bands of mature proteinase A were detected in cotyledon extracts of 6-day-germinated seeds when globulin degradation has already far proceeded. The reported data do not agree with the proposed triggering role of proteinase A in storage-globulin breakdown during germination.

  15. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  16. [Progresses in the structure and function of Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Liang; Sheng, Qing; Zhang, Yao-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are widely distributed in many living organisms and play crucial roles in many biological processes, particularly in regulating the proteinase activity spatially and temporally. However, The Kazal family of serine protease inhibitors is one of the most important and extensively studied protease inhibitor families. This type of protease inhibitor normally consists of one or several domains. Every domain has a highly conserved sequence structure and molecular conformation. It is found that contact residues are hyper variable, which are responsible for the interaction of inhibitors and proteinases. Most of them are in the solvent exposed loop. But P1 residue is the key active site of the interaction between inhibitor and enzyme. The types of the amino acid at P1 site likely play an important role in causing different inhibitory activity. The substitutions at the contact residues cause significant effects on the association constant. By using the Laskowski algorithm, the Ki values of a Kazal domain against six serine proteinases can be predicted from the domain' s sequence alone. At present there are many Kazal proteinase inhibitors found in the organisms, which show important biological functions. This article gives a comprehensive review of the newer developments in the characters and the interaction of the Kazal-type inhibitors.

  17. Characteristics of a Proteinase of a Trichosporon Species Isolated from Dungeness Crab Meat

    PubMed Central

    Groninger, Herman S.; Eklund, M. W.

    1966-01-01

    The proteinase of a Trichosporon species was partially purified by dialysis, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. A 170-fold purification of the enzyme with a 1.4% recovery of the activity was achieved. The proteinase was separated into a major component and possibly two minor components by starch gel electrophoresis. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.8 to 6.2. It was active against casein, hemoglobin, and crab protein substrates, but inactive against bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, and benzoylarginine ethyl ester. It was slightly activated by 10 mm cysteine, 0.1 mm ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 0.1 mm Co++. There was slight inhibition by 10 mm Co++ and 0.1 mm phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, and total inhibition by 1 mmp-chloromercuribenzoate. The proteinase was completely inactivated by heating at 60 C for 10 min. PMID:5914489

  18. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis: influence of successive in vitro cultivation on the expression of promastigote proteinases.

    PubMed

    Rebello, Karina Mastropasqua; Britto, Constança; Pereira, Bernardo Acácio Santini; Pita-Pereira, Daniela de; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Ferreira, Anna Beatriz Robottom; Cysne-Finkelstein, Léa; Otto, Thomas Dan; Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro de Castro; da-Silva, Gabriel Gomes; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Cysteine proteinases are an important virulence factor in Leishmania parasites. In this study we analyzed the cysteine proteinase expression of infective Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis promastigotes, examining the expression induced by successive in vitro passages in culture. We observed that this parasite presents a decrease in its virulence over BALB/c macrophages, after successive passages in culture, but still they present proteinase activity, being capable of hydrolyzing the substrate pGlu-Phe-Leu-p Nitroanilide at pH 7.0. This proteinase activity also decreases in the course of the successive passages. Additionally, the decrease in the amount of CPB proteins following successive passages of promastigotes was verified by immunoblotting assays, using an anti-CPB antiserum. Real-time PCR assays were performed to assess the relative cpb expression when compared to a housekeeping gene in promastigote cDNA preparations from the first, fourth and seventh passages. Interestingly, the data indicate a relative increase in cpb gene transcripts as the promastigotes were maintained under in vitro culture: 2.2 times higher for fourth and 2.7 times higher for seventh passages when compared to the first passage. Thus, the information gathered here shows that the expression of cysteine proteinases is modified during in vitro cultivation of L. (V.) braziliensis promastigotes.

  19. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  20. Potential Use of Proteinase Inhibitors, Avidin, and Other Bio-reagents for Synergizing Bt Performance and Delaying Resistance Development to Bt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After being ingested by target insects, the insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) need to go through a proteolytic process by insect midgut proteinases to become activated. At the same time, Bt can be hydrolyzed and degraded by midgut proteinases to become non-toxic to target insect...

  1. Increased expression of Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor, in isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; Wende, C; Görlich, M; McMullan-Vogel, C G; Borg-von Zepelin, M; Vogel, C W; Korting, H C

    1995-01-01

    The increased prevalence and the severity of oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients are attributed exclusively to the virus-induced immune deficiency of the host. The present study was aimed at answering the question of whether Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor of the opportunistic C. albicans yeast, has any potential influence on the clinical manifestation of oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-positive patients. We measured the secretory proteinase activities of clinical C. albicans isolates from the oropharynges of either HIV-positive individuals (n = 100) or a control group (n = 122). The mean secretory proteinase activity of C. albicans isolates from the HIV-positive group (4,255 +/- 2,372 U/liter) was significantly higher compared with that of isolates from the control group (2,324 +/- 1,487 U/liter) (P < 0.05). The higher level of secretory proteinase activity in the culture supernatants of individual C. albicans isolates correlated with the increased level of proteinase expression on the cell surface, as revealed by cytofluorometry, and with higher levels of secretion of the immunodetectable protein, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Proteinase activity within the population of C. albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals was independent of the patient's clinical disease stage and the CD4+/CD8+ cell numbers. Furthermore, no correlation of the proteinase activities with the C. albicans serotype was found, although C. albicans serotype B was significantly more frequent in the HIV-positive group (40%) compared with that in the control group (12%). However, a positive correlation of proteinase activity to antifungal susceptibility was evident.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567880

  2. Immobilization of a proteinase from the extremely thermophilic organism Thermus Rt41A.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S A; Peek, K; Daniel, R M

    1994-02-05

    An extracellular proteinase from Thermus strain Rt41A was immobilized to controlled pore glass (CPG) beads. The properties of the free and CPG-immobilized enzymes were compared using both a large (azocasein) and a small (peptidase) substrate. The specific activity of the immobilized proteinase was 5284 azoU/mg with azocasein and 144 sucU/mg for SucAAPFpNA. The percentage recovery of enzyme activity was unaffected by pore size when it was immobilized at a fixed level of activity/g of beads, whereas it increased with increasing pore size when added at a fixed level/m(2) of support. Saturation of the CPG beads was observed at 540 azoU/m(2) of 105-nm beads. Lower levels (50 azoU/m(2) of 50-nm beads) were used in characterization experiments. The pH optimum of the immobilized Rt41A proteinase was 8.0 for azocasein and 9.5 for SucAAPFpNA, compared with the free proteinase which was 10.5 for both substrates. The immobilized enzyme retained 65% of its maximum activity against azocasein at pH 12, whereas the free proteinase retained less than 10% under the same conditions. Stability at 80 degrees C increased on immobilization at all pH values between 5 and 11, the greatest increase in half-life being approximately 12-fold at pH 7.0. Temperature-activity profiles for both the free and immobilized enzymes were similar for both substrates. The stability of the immobilized proteinase, however, was higher than that of the free enzyme in the absence and presence of CaCl(2). Overall, the results show that low levels of calcium (10 muM) protect against thermal denaturation, but that high calcium or immobilization are required to protect against autolysis. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Purification and partial characterization of proteinase inhibitors of equine seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, André Belico; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa; Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; Lagares, Monique de Albuquerque; Santoro, Marcelo Matos

    2009-07-01

    The aims of the study were: 1/ to isolate and identify equine seminal plasma proteinase inhibitors, 2/ to evaluate their inhibitory potential, and 3/ to test a correlation between protein concentration in seminal plasma supernatant (obtained after precipitation with 36% ammonium sulfate) and stallion sexual maturity. Seminal plasma proteins obtained from six stallions were chromatographed in a Superose 12 (FPLC system) column followed by C(18) HPLC reverse-phase. Inhibition of trypsin amidase activity was evaluated in the collected fractions. Active proteins with a molecular mass of 6.3-7.0 KDa were identified using mass spectrometry. The older stallions showed a reduction in total seminal plasma protein concentration, but had similar concentrations of proteinase inhibitors (0.28+/-0.10 mg/ml) in seminal plasma supernatant. Different proteinase inhibitor isoforms were found in semen of all stallions which suggests that the isoforms may be used as biomarkers of individual animals.

  4. Toll-like receptors recognize distinct proteinase-resistant glycoconjugates in Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh; Hara, Hiromitsu; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2015-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and autoimmune neuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome. The mechanism by which C. jejuni infection results in such the hyperimmunity is not completely understood. Host immunity plays an important role in the disease pathogenesis; however, little is known how immune system recognizes this human pathogen. In this study, we report that Toll-like receptors recognize distinct proteinase K-resistant glycoconjugates in C. jejuni and Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide is solely proteinase-resistant glycoconjugate in E. coli. In contrast, C. jejuni possesses at least five different components that are resistant to proteinase digestion and are capable of inducing NF-κB activation through TLR2 and TLR4. Possession of multiple activators of Toll-like receptors may be the unique strategy of C. jejuni to trigger hyperimmunity.

  5. Consequences of manganese replacement of copper for prion protein function and proteinase resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David R.; Hafiz, Farida; Glasssmith, Leslie L.; Wong, Boon-Seng; Jones, Ian M.; Clive, Christine; Haswell, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds copper and has antioxidant activity enhancing the survival of neurones in culture. The ability of the PrP to bind other cations was tested and it was found that only manganese could substitute for copper. Although initially manganese-loaded PrP exhibited similar structure and activity to copper-loaded PrP, after aging, manganese-loaded PrP became proteinase resistant and lost function. It was also found that manganese could be incorporated into PrP expressed by astrocytes and that this PrP was partially proteinase resistant. These results show that it is possible to generate proteinase-resistant PrP from cells and suggest a possible mechanism for the formation of the scrapie isoform of the PrP as generated in sporadic prion disease. PMID:10716918

  6. The role of fungal proteinases in pathophysiology of Stachybotrys chartarum.

    PubMed

    Yike, Iwona; Rand, Thomas; Dearborn, Dorr G

    2007-10-01

    The adverse health effects of Stachybotrys chartarum have often been linked to exposure to the trichothecene mycotoxins. Recent studies have shown that in addition to mycotoxins this fungus is capable of producing and secreting in vivo proteins such as hemolysins and proteinases. Spore extracts obtained from a high trichothecene producing isolate JS 58-17 exhibited a significantly lower proteolytic activity compared to the low trichothecene producer, JS 58-06. Growing isolates on rice or potato dextrose agar results in higher proteolytic activity of the spores compared to those grown on drywall. Proteinases in the spore extracts can hydrolyze gelatin and collagen I and IV. Analysis of zymograms shows the presence of several proteins with proteolytic activity in the spores of S. chartarum. Human tracheal epithelial cells exposed to spore extracts produced significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha than control cells. This stimulation of cytokine production was completely abolished by Pefabloc, a serine protease inhibitor. Neutrophil numbers and proinflammatory cytokine (IL1-beta and TNF-alpha) concentrations were highly elevated in the lungs of 7 day old rat pups exposed intratracheally to 4 x 10(4) spores/gm body weight compared to control. No significant differences in those inflammatory indices in vivo were noted between the treatments with the high trichothecene producer, isolate JS 58-17 and JS 58-06, which does not produce macrocyclic trichothecenes. Immunohistochemistry revealed reduced collagen IV labeling in spore-induced lung granulomas in rat pups exposed to both isolates. These results suggest that proteinases from S. chartarum spores significantly contribute to lung inflammation and injury.

  7. Regulation of proteinases during mouse peri-implantation development: urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression and cross talk with matrix metalloproteinase 9.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hernández, M G; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Castillo-Trápala, A; Armant, D Randall

    2011-02-01

    Trophoblast cells express urokinase-type plasminogen activator (PLAU) and may depend on its activity for endometrial invasion and tissue remodeling during peri-implantation development. However, the developmental regulation, tissue distribution, and function of PLAU are not completely understood. In this study, the expression of PLAU and its regulation by extracellular matrix proteins was examined by RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and plasminogen-casein zymography in cultured mouse embryos. There was a progressive increase in Plau mRNA expression in blastocysts cultured on gestation days 4-8. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (55 kDa) and PLAU (a triplet of 40, 37, and 31 kDa) were present in conditioned medium and embryo lysates, and were adsorbed to the culture plate surface. The temporal expression pattern of PLAU, according to semi-quantitative gel zymography, was similar in non-adhering embryos and embryos cultured on fibronectin, laminin, or type IV collagen, although type IV collagen and laminin upregulated Plau mRNA expression. Immunofluorescence revealed PLAU on the surface of the mural trophectoderm and in non-spreading giant trophoblast cells. Exogenous human plasminogen was transformed to plasmin by cultured embryos and activated endogenous matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). Indeed, the developmental expression profile of MMP9 was similar to that of PLAU. Our data suggest that the intrinsic developmental program predominantly regulates PLAU expression during implantation, and that PLAU could be responsible for activation of MMP9, leading to localized matrix proteolysis as trophoblast invasion commences.

  8. Taraxalisin -- a serine proteinase from dandelion Taraxacum officinale Webb s.l.

    PubMed

    Rudenskaya, G N; Bogacheva, A M; Preusser, A; Kuznetsova, A V; Dunaevsky YaE; Golovkin, B N; Stepanov, V M

    1998-10-23

    Latex of dandelion roots contains a serine proteinase that hydrolyzes a chromogenic peptide substrate Glp-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA optimally at pH 8.0. Maximal activity of the proteinase in the roots is attained in April, at the beginning of plant development after the winter period. The protease was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation of the root extract followed by affinity chromatography on a Sepharose-Ala-Ala-Leu-mrp and gel filtration on Superose 6R performed in FPLC regime. Pure serine proteinase named taraxalisin was inactivated by specific inhibitors of serine proteinases, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF). Its molecular mass is 67 kDa and pI 4.5. pH stability range is 6-9 in the presence of 2 mM Ca2+, temperature optimum is at 40 degrees C; Km=0.37+/-0.06 mM. The substrate specificity of taraxalisin towards synthetic peptides and insulin B-chain is comparable with that of two other subtilisin-like serine proteinases, cucumisin and macluralisin. The taraxalisin N-terminal sequence traced for 15 residues revealed 40% coinciding residues when aligned with that of subtilisin Carlsberg.

  9. Purification and characterization of serine proteinase 2 from Bacillus intermedius 3-19.

    PubMed

    Balaban, N P; Mardanova, A M; Sharipova, M R; Gabdrakhmanova, L A; Sokolova, E A; Rudenskaya, G N; Leshchinskaya, I B

    2004-04-01

    A proteinase secreted in the late stationary phase was isolated from the culture fluid of Bacillus intermedius 3-19 by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose followed by FPLC on a Mono S column. The enzyme was completely inhibited by the serine proteinase inhibitors diisopropyl fluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. The maximum proteolytic activity against the synthetic chromogenic substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA was observed at pH 9.0. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 28 kD and its isoelectric point is 9.2. We have also determined pH- and thermostability and Km and kcat of this proteinase. The enzyme has been classified as a thiol-dependent serine proteinase. N-Terminal amino acid sequence (10 residues) and amino acid composition of the protein were also determined. By the mode of hydrolysis of peptide bonds in the oxidized B-chain of insulin, this enzyme is similar to the thiol-dependent serine proteinase 1 from B. intermedius 3-19 secreted during vegetative growth.

  10. Pacifastin, a novel 155-kDa heterodimeric proteinase inhibitor containing a unique transferrin chain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zicai; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Aspán, Anna; Hall, Martin; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    1997-01-01

    A 155-kDa proteinase inhibitor, pacifastin, from plasma of the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, was found to be composed of two covalently linked subunits. The two subunits are encoded by two different mRNAs, which were cloned and sequenced. The heavy chain of pacifastin (105 kDa) is related to transferrins, containing three transferrin lobes, two of which seem to be active for iron binding. The light chain of pacifastin (44 kDa) is the inhibitory subunit, and has nine cysteine-rich inhibitory domains that are homologous to each other and to low molecular weight proteinase inhibitors isolated from the grasshopper, Locusta migratoria. The nine light chain domains and the Locusta inhibitors share a characteristic cysteine array (Cys-Xaa9–12-Cys-Xaa2-Cys-Xaa-Cys-Xaa6–8-Cys-Xaa4-Cys) distinct from any described proteinase inhibitor family, suggesting that they constitute a new family of proteinase inhibitors. Pacifastin is the first known protein that has combined properties of a transferrin-like molecule and a proteinase inhibitor. PMID:9192625

  11. Differential antibiosis against Helicoverpa armigera exerted by distinct inhibitory repeat domains of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-05-01

    Plant defensive serine proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are known to have negative impact on digestive physiology of herbivore insects and thus have a crucial role in plant protection. Here, we have assessed the efficacy and specificity of three previously characterized inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) variants from Capsicum annuum PIs viz., IRD-7, -9 and -12 against gut proteinases from Helicoverpa armigera. Comparative study of in silico binding energy revealed that IRD-9 possesses higher affinity towards H. armigera serine proteinases as compared to IRD-7 and -12. H. armigera fed on artificial diet containing 5 TIU/g of recombinant IRD proteins exhibited differential effects on larval growth, survival rate and other nutritional parameters. Major digestive gut trypsin and chymotrypsin genes were down regulated in the IRD fed larvae, while few of them were up-regulated, this indicate alterations in insect digestive physiology. The results corroborated with proteinase activity assays and zymography. These findings suggest that the sequence variations among PIs reflect in their efficacy against proteinases in vitro and in vivo, which also could be used for developing tailor-made multi-domain inhibitor gene(s).

  12. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Roger B.; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B.; Soliman, Mayra C.; Souza, Fernanda G.; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V.; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S.; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D.; Spilki, Fernando R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  14. Effects of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid, A23187 and calmodulin, calcium activated neutral proteinase antagonists on melatonin secretion in perifused chick pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Agapito, M T; Pablos, M; Reiter, R J; Recio, J M; Gutierrez-Baraja, R

    1998-04-10

    We have recently described, using perifused pineal glands, that calcium influx participates in the activation of chick pineal gland. This study shows that the loss of perifused chick pineal gland activity is a complex process which seems to involve the release of calcium from intracellular stores, calmodulin and calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP). Pineal glands were perifused with Krebs medium (controls) or with Krebs medium plus the drugs ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA; calcium chelator), A23187 (calcium ionophore), EGTA plus A23187 (extra-intra cellular calcium chelation), trifluoperazine and CGS9343B (calmodulin inhibitors), and E-64 (CANP inhibitor) at the time of the natural peak of melatonin release. When EGTA or A23187 were added to the perifusion medium, no effects were observed. On the other hand, when the calcium chelator EGTA plus A23187 (free extra and intracellular calcium levels were dramatically decreased), trifluoperazine, CGS 9343B or E-64 were added to the perifusion medium melatonin synthesis increased significantly and was sustained for 8 h. We propose a prominent role for calcium output from intracellular stores in regulating melatonin production primarily by acting on Ca-calmodulin and calcium-activated neutral protease.

  15. Most proteinase3- and myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays perform less well in treated small-vessel vasculitis than in active disease.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Trevisin, Michelle; Hayman, Matthew; Pollock, Wendy

    2009-06-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) levels have been thought to follow disease activity, with levels being high at presentation, declining with treatment and increasing just before relapse. However, we have shown that ANCA often persist for many years in patients with clinically inactive Wegener's granulomatosis. ANCA assays are less sensitive for treated disease than for active disease, and the levels in treated patients produce different results in different assay systems. ANCA often persist for years without relapse, and the risk of relapse probably depend on levels that are critical for any individual patient. The capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays may be more sensitive in detecting early relapse. Relapse is more common when ANCA levels are high but, although elevated, ANCA levels are lower in relapse than at presentation. Standardized ANCA levels for the definitions of remission and relapse may not be possible, and the optimal ANCA testing protocol for treated disease remains unclear.

  16. Interactions outside the proteinase-binding loop contribute significantly to the inhibition of activated coagulation factor XII by its canonical inhibitor from corn.

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Vera A; Trubetskov, Mikhail M; Korshunova, Alena V; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Kolyadko, Vladimir N; Sergienko, Olga V; Lunin, Vladimir G; Panteleev, Mikhail A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I

    2014-05-16

    Activated factor XII (FXIIa) is selectively inhibited by corn Hageman factor inhibitor (CHFI) among other plasma proteases. CHFI is considered a canonical serine protease inhibitor that interacts with FXIIa through its protease-binding loop. Here we examined whether the protease-binding loop alone is sufficient for the selective inhibition of serine proteases or whether other regions of a canonical inhibitor are involved. Six CHFI mutants lacking different N- and C-terminal portions were generated. CHFI-234, which lacks the first and fifth disulfide bonds and 11 and 19 amino acid residues at the N and C termini, respectively, exhibited no significant changes in FXIIa inhibition (Ki = 3.2 ± 0.4 nm). CHFI-123, which lacks 34 amino acid residues at the C terminus and the fourth and fifth disulfide bridges, inhibited FXIIa with a Ki of 116 ± 16 nm. To exclude interactions outside the FXIIa active site, a synthetic cyclic peptide was tested. The peptide contained residues 20-45 (Protein Data Bank code 1BEA), and a C29D substitution was included to avoid unwanted disulfide bond formation between unpaired cysteines. Surprisingly, the isolated protease-binding loop failed to inhibit FXIIa but retained partial inhibition of trypsin (Ki = 11.7 ± 1.2 μm) and activated factor XI (Ki = 94 ± 11 μm). Full-length CHFI inhibited trypsin with a Ki of 1.3 ± 0.2 nm and activated factor XI with a Ki of 5.4 ± 0.2 μm. Our results suggest that the protease-binding loop is not sufficient for the interaction between FXIIa and CHFI; other regions of the inhibitor also contribute to specific inhibition.

  17. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  18. A pepstatin-insensitive aspartic proteinase from a thermophilic Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Toogood, H S; Prescott, M; Daniel, R M

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain Wp22.A1 produced a cell-associated aspartic proteinase which was purified to homogeneity using phenyl-Sepharose (hydrophobic and affinity chromatography) and Mono Q. The proteinase has a molecular mass of 45 kDa by SDS/PAGE and a pI of 3.8. It is insensitive to pepstatin, but is sensitive to the other aspartic proteinase-specific inhibitors diazoacetyl-DL-norleucine methyl ester (DAN) and 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane. Inactivation by DAN was only partial, suggesting that it had non-specifically modified an aspartate residue at a site other than the active site. The enzyme was not inhibited by any of the serine or cysteine proteinase inhibitors tested. Maximum proteolytic activity was observed at pH 3.5. The proteinase had a higher activity with haemoglobin, but was more specific (Vmax./Km) for cytochrome c. Substrate inhibition was observed with both these substrates. The cleavage of oxidized insulin B chain tended to occur at sites where the P1 amino acid was bulky and non-polar, and the P1' amino acid was bulky and polar, such as its primary cleavage site of Val2-Asn3. The proteinase was stable in the pH range 2.5-5.5. Thermostability was increased in the presence of Ca2+, although to a lesser extent at higher temperatures. The thermostabilities at 60, 70, 80 and 90 degrees C were 45 h, 102, 21 and 3 min respectively in the presence of Ca2+. Images Figure 1 PMID:7741709

  19. Analysis of human immunoglobulin-degrading cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, D; Alderete, J F

    1995-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that causes a widely distributed sexually transmitted disease (STD). Since immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to specific trichomonad immunogens are found in serum and vaginal washes (VWs) from patients with trichomoniasis, a potential mechanism of immune evasion by this parasite might be the ability of T. vaginalis proteinases to degrade human immunoglobulins (Igs). Incubation of human IgG with lysates of T. vaginalis organisms resulted in time- and concentration-dependent degradation of the heavy chain. Secretory IgA was degraded similarly. Inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, when added to trichomonal lysates, abolished IgG and IgA degradation, while EDTA, a metalloproteinase inhibitor, did not. Substrate-gel electrophoresis with human IgG, IgM, or IgA copolymerized with acrylamide revealed several distinct cysteine proteinases in both lysates and culture supernatants from logarithmically growing parasites that degraded all classes of human antibodies. Trichomonal lysates and supernatants of numerous isolates tested all had Ig-degrading activity. Finally, proteolytic activity against IgG was detected in most (26 of 33; 78%) VWs from patients with trichomoniasis. In contrast, 18 of 28 (65%) VWs from women without trichomoniasis or from patients infected with other STDs had no detectable proteinases when tested in an identical manner. The other 10 of these 28 VWs (35%) had smaller amounts of detectable Ig-degrading proteinases. These differences in Ig-degrading proteinase activity between patients with and without trichomoniasis, regardless of coinfecting STDs, were statistically significant (P = 0.001). These results illustrate that T. vaginalis is capable of degrading human Igs. PMID:7642267

  20. Cloning and rational mutagenesis of kexstatin I, a potent proteinaceous inhibitor of Kex2 proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, K; Oyama, H; Ito, S; Fukiharu, M; Miyagawa, Y; Takahashi, S; Hirose, M; Kikuchi, N; Nakayama, T; Shibano, Y

    2001-01-01

    Kexstatin I is a potent proteinaceous inhibitor of Kex2 proteinase (EC 3.4.21.61). In the present study we show the molecular cloning, primary structure determination and expression of the gene encoding kexstatin I. We also demonstrate its enhanced activity and specificity for Kex2 proteinase inhibition by rational mutagenesis. The cloned kexstatin I gene encoded a protein of 145 amino acid residues, including the 35-residue signal sequence for secretion. The amino acid sequence showed 52% identity with those of the Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitors (SSIs). Thus kexstatin I is the first SSI-family member that can inhibit Kex2 proteinase. The reactive site of the inhibitor was determined to be -Thr(69)-Lys(70) downward arrowGlu(71)-, where downward arrow indicates the reactive site. Because Kex2 proteinase generally shows the highest affinity for substrates with basic amino acid residues at the P(1) and P(2) sites, conversion of the Thr(69)-Lys(70) segment of the inhibitor into dibasic motifs was expected to result in enhanced inhibitory activities. Thus we constructed kexstatin I mutants, in which the Thr(69)-Lys(70) sequence was replaced by the Thr(69)-Arg(70), Lys(69)-Lys(70) and Lys(69)-Arg(70) sequences using PCR-based mutagenesis, and analysed them kinetically. Among these mutants, the Lys(69)-Arg(70) mutant was the most potent inhibitor. The K(i) for Kex2 proteinase was 3.2x10(-10) M, which was 140-fold lower than that of the inhibitor with the Thr(69)-Lys(70) sequence. Although kexstatin I could also inhibit subtilisin, the enhancement of inhibitory activity upon such mutations was specific for Kex2 proteinase inhibition. PMID:11284720

  1. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  2. Combination therapy with conditionally replicating adenovirus and replication defective adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon-Taek; Park, Kyung-Ho; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yasushi; Ohm, Joyce E; Nadaf, Sorena; Dikov, Mikhail M; Curiel, David T; Carbone, David P

    2004-09-15

    Low gene transfer rate is the most substantial hurdle in the practical application of gene therapy. One strategy to improve transfer efficiency is the use of a conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD) that can selectively replicate in tumor cells. We hypothesized that conventional E1-deleted adenoviruses (ad) can become replication-competent when cotransduced with a CRAD to selectively supply E1 in trans in tumors. The resulting selective production of large numbers of the E1-deleted ad within the tumor mass will increase the transduction efficiency. We used a CRAD (Delta24RGD) that produces a mutant E1 without the ability to bind retinoblastoma but retaining viral replication competence in cancer cells with a defective pRb/p16. Ad-lacZ, adenovirus-luciferase (ad-luc), and adenovirus insulin-like growth factor-1R/dominant-negative (ad-IGF-1R/dn; 482, 950) are E1-deleted replication-defective adenoviruses. The combination of CRAD and ad-lacZ increased the transduction efficiency of lacZ to 100% from 15% observed with ad-lacZ alone. Transfer of media of CRAD and ad-lacZ cotransduced cells induced the transfer of lacZ (media transferable bystander effect). Combination of CRAD and ad-IGF-1R/dn increased the production of truncated IGF-1R or soluble IGF-1R > 10 times compared with transduction with ad-IGF-1R/dn alone. Combined intratumoral injection of CRAD and ad-luc increased the luciferase expression about 70 times compared with ad-luc alone without substantial systemic spread. Combined intratumoral injection of CRAD and ad-IGF-1R/482 induced stronger growth suppression of established lung cancer xenografts than single injections. The combination of CRAD and E1-deleted ad induced tumor-specific replication of CRAD and E1-deleted ad and increased the transduction rate and therapeutic efficacy of these viruses in model tumors.

  3. Transformation Potentials of the Noninfectious (Defective) Component in Pools of Adenoviruses Type 12 and Simian Adenovirus 7

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, J. P.; Yohn, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Pools of adenovirus 12 and simian adenovirus 7 were separated into four or five fractions by density gradient centrifugation in cesium chloride. Each fraction was analyzed for total in vitro infectivity units, total transformation activity, and for total virus particle (VP) content. Two major subpopulations were separated with mean densities of 1.30 ± 0.02 and 1.34 ± 0.02 g/ml, respectively. Virions in the 1.34 g/ml range were highly infectious (102 to 103 VP per infectivity unit) in contrast to virions at 1.30 g/ml density (104 to 105 VP per infectivity units). Transformation capacity was evenly distributed throughout fractions of both viruses, indicating that genetically incomplete or defective virus particles were not deficient in their ability to induce transformation. The average VP per transformation unit for adenovirus 12 (2.85 × 106) and for simian adenovirus 7 (4.00 × 106) did not vary significantly from fraction to fraction. These values were obtained with optimal input multiplicities of 16 to 64 VP per cell. At higher multiplicities the apparent increase in VP per transformation unit was attributable to the viral cytocidal effect on hamster cells. These studies revealed that quantitation of in vitro transformation based on VP multiplicities was more reliable than on the basis of infectious units. These estimates were independent of method of virus production, extraction, and purification. Images PMID:4211167

  4. Several properties of the partially purified proteinase inhibitor in eggplant exocarp.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, M; Ibuki, F; Yamada, M; Tashiro, M; Miyoshi, M

    1975-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor was isolated and partially purified from the exocarp of eggplant, Solanum melongena L., by means of acetate buffer extraction, heat treatment, salting-out and column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. This preparation showed inhibitory activities on various proteinases; trypsin [EC 3.4.4.4] and Pronase were strongly inhibited while alpha-chymotrypsin [EC 3.4.4.5] and Nagarse were weakly inhibited. The inhibitor was a protein substance, and, therefore, it was gradually inactivated by the long-time incubation with Pronase. The inhibition mode was non-competitive on trypsin and competitive on Pronase on the basis of Lineweaver-Burk plots. The investigations on the inhibition behavior in the co-existence of two kinds of proteinases suggested that the inhibitor was not of multi-headed type.

  5. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, F. P.; Bockelmann, W.; Fox, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8.5 and 50(deg)C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 126 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that the native enzyme exists as a dimer. Mg(sup2+) and Ca(sup2+) activated the proteinase, as did NaCl; however, Hg(sup2+), Fe(sup2+), and Zn(sup2+) caused strong inhibition. The sequence of the first 20 N-terminal amino acids was NH(inf2)-Ala-Lys-Asn-Asp-Ala-Val-Gly-Gly-Met-Gly-Tyr-Leu-Ser-Met-Ile-Pro-Se r-Gln-Pro-Gly. PMID:16535130

  6. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174.

    PubMed

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P F

    1995-09-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8.5 and 50(deg)C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 126 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that the native enzyme exists as a dimer. Mg(sup2+) and Ca(sup2+) activated the proteinase, as did NaCl; however, Hg(sup2+), Fe(sup2+), and Zn(sup2+) caused strong inhibition. The sequence of the first 20 N-terminal amino acids was NH(inf2)-Ala-Lys-Asn-Asp-Ala-Val-Gly-Gly-Met-Gly-Tyr-Leu-Ser-Met-Ile-Pro-Se r-Gln-Pro-Gly.

  7. Biochemical properties of Bacillus intermedius subtilisin-like proteinase secreted by a Bacillus subtilis recombinant strain in its stationary phase of growth.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, E O; Mardanova, A M; Balaban, N P; Rudenskaya, G N; Ilyinskaya, O N; Sharipova, M R

    2009-03-01

    Biochemical properties of Bacillus intermedius subtilisin-like proteinase (AprBi) secreted by a B. subtilis recombinant strain in the early and late stationary phases of growth have been determined. Protein structure was analyzed and its stability estimated. It was noted that the enzyme corresponding to different phases of bacterial growth retains activity in the presence of reducing and oxidizing agents (C2H5OH and H2O2). Different effects of bivalent metal ions on activity of two proteinase fractions were found. Calcium ions more efficiently activate proteinase secreted in the late stationary phase. Unlike the first enzyme fraction, the second forms catalytically active dimers.

  8. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments.

    PubMed

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner.

  9. Use of recombinant Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 to identify a potent inhibitor of amebic invasion in a human colonic model.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Herdman, Scott; Hirata, Ken; Choi, Min-Ho; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles; Caffrey, Conor R; Hansell, Elisabeth; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Chen, Yen Ting; Roush, William R; McKerrow, James; Eckmann, Lars; Guo, Jianhua; Stanley, Samuel L; Reed, Sharon L

    2007-07-01

    Cysteine proteinases are key virulence factors of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that cysteine proteinases play a central role in tissue invasion and disruption of host defenses by digesting components of the extracellular matrix, immunoglobulins, complement, and cytokines. Analysis of the E. histolytica genome project has revealed more than 40 genes encoding cysteine proteinases. We have focused on E. histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 (EhCP1) because it is one of two cysteine proteinases unique to invasive E. histolytica and is highly expressed and released. Recombinant EhCP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded to an active enzyme with a pH optimum of 6.0. We used positional-scanning synthetic tetrapeptide combinatorial libraries to map the specificity of the P1 to P4 subsites of the active site cleft. Arginine was strongly preferred at P2, an unusual specificity among clan CA proteinases. A new vinyl sulfone inhibitor, WRR483, was synthesized based on this specificity to target EhCP1. Recombinant EhCP1 cleaved key components of the host immune system, C3, immunoglobulin G, and pro-interleukin-18, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. EhCP1 localized to large cytoplasmic vesicles, distinct from the sites of other proteinases. To gain insight into the role of secreted cysteine proteinases in amebic invasion, we tested the effect of the vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors K11777 and WRR483 on invasion of human colonic xenografts. The resultant dramatic inhibition of invasion by both inhibitors in this human colonic model of amebiasis strongly suggests a significant role of secreted amebic proteinases, such as EhCP1, in the pathogenesis of amebiasis.

  10. Serine proteinases of mast cell and leukocyte granules. A league of their own.

    PubMed

    Caughey, G H

    1994-12-01

    Serine proteinases are hydrolases that use serine's side chain hydroxyl group to attack and cleave internal peptide bonds in peptides and proteins. They reside in all mammalian tissues, including the lung and airway. As a group, they vary tremendously in form and target specificity and have a vast repertoire of functions, many of which are critical for life. A subset of these proteinases is expressed primarily in the cytosolic granules of leukocytes from bone marrow, including mast cells. Examples are elastase-related proteinases and cathepsin G of monocytes and neutrophils, the many "granzymes" of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, and the tryptases and chymases of mast cells. The pace of discovery and characterization of these granule-associated serine proteinases, fueled by technical advances in molecular biology, has accelerated rapidly in the past few years. Progress has been made in assigning possible functions to individual proteinases. However, the burgeoning numbers of these enzymes; their cell, tissue and species-dependent differences in expression; and their variety of action in vitro (despite, in many cases, shared modes of activation and recent divergence in protein evolution) have vexed and challenged those of us who are anxious to establish their roles in mammalian biology. Certainly, much remains to be discovered and clarified. The purpose of this overview is to capture the state of the art in this field, stressing the similarities as well as the differences among individual granule-associated proteinases and focusing particularly on those enzymes likely to be important in the human lung and airways.

  11. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Conidiobolus coronatus and its inhibition by an inhibitor from insect hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Bania, Jacek; Samborski, Jaroslaw; Bogus, Mieczyslawa; Polanowski, Antoni

    2006-08-01

    The relatively little-investigated entomopathogen Conidiobolus coronatus secretes several proteinases into culture broth. Using a combination of ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography, we purified to homogeneity a serine proteinase of Mr 30,000-32,000, as ascertained by SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme showed subtilisin-like activity. It very effectively hydrolyzed N-Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Phe-pNa with a Km-1.36 x 10(-4) M and Kcat-24 s(-1), and N-Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Leu-pNa with Km-6.65 x 10(-4) M and Kcat-11 s(-1). The specificity index k(cat)/K(m) for the tested substrates was calculated to be 176,340 s(-1) M(-1) and 17,030 s(-1) M(-1), respectively. Using oxidized insulin B chain as a substrate, the purified proteinase exhibited specificity to aromatic and hydrophobic amino-acid residues, such as Phe, Leu, and Gly at the P1 position, splitting primarily the peptide bonds: Phe(1)-Val(2), Leu(15)-Tyr(16), and Gly(23)-Phe(24). The proteinase appeared to be sensitive to the specific synthetic inhibitors of the serine proteinases DFP (diisopropyl flourophosphate) and PMSF (phenyl-methylsulfonyl fluoride) as well as to some naturally occurring protein inhibitors of chymotrypsin. It is worth noting that the enzyme exhibited the highest sensitivity to inhibition by AMCI-1 (with an association constant of 3 x 10(10) M(-1)), an inhibitor of cathepsin G/chymotrypsin from the larval hemolymph of Apis mellifera, reinforcing the possibility of involvement of inhibitors from hemolymph in insect innate immunity. The substrate specificity and proteinase inhibitor effects indicate that the purified proteinase from the fermentation broth of Conidiobolus coronatus is a subtilisin-like serine proteinase.

  12. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  13. Bovine adenovirus 3 core protein precursor pVII localizes to mitochondria, and modulates ATP synthesis, mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sanjeev K; Gaba, Amit; Singh, Jaswant; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2014-02-01

    Viruses modulate the functions of mitochondria by translocating viral proteins to the mitochondria. Subcellular fractionation and sensitivity to proteinase K/Triton X-100 treatment of mitochondrial fractions of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3-infected/transfected cells suggested that core protein pVII localizes to the mitochondria and contains a functional mitochondrial localization signal. Moreover, mitochondrial localization of BAdV-3 pVII appears to help in the retention of mitochondrial Ca(2+), inducing a significant increase in the levels of ATP and maintaining the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in transfected cells. In contrast, mitochondrial localization of BAdV-3 pVII has no significant effect on the levels of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production in the transfected cells. Consistent with these results, expression of pVII in transfected cells treated with staurosporine decreased significantly the activation of caspase-3. Our results suggested that BAdV-3 pVII localizes to mitochondria, and interferes with apoptosis by inhibiting loss of the MMP and by increasing mitochondrial Ca(2+) and ATP production.

  14. Replication of adenovirus type 4 DNA by a purified fraction from infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Temperley, S M; Hay, R T

    1991-01-01

    An extract from Adenovirus type 4 infected HeLa cells was fractionated by ion-exchange and DNA affinity chromatography. One fraction, which bound tightly to single stranded DNA, contained predominantly a protein of apparent molecular weight 65,000 and three less abundant proteins. Immunological cross-reactivity with adenovirus type 2 proteins confirmed the presence of preterminal protein and indicated that the abundant species was the virus coded DNA binding protein. This fraction contained an aphidicolin resistant DNA polymerase activity and in the presence of a linearised plasmid containing the adenovirus type 4 origin of DNA replication efficient transfer of dCMP onto preterminal protein, indicative of initiation, was observed. Furthermore, addition of all four deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and an ATP regenerating system resulted in the elongation of initiated molecules to generate plasmid molecules covalently attached to preterminal protein. Adenovirus type 4 DNA binding protein was extensively purified from crude adenovirus-4 infected HeLa extract by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody raised against adenovirus type 2 DNA binding protein. A low level of initiation of DNA replication was detected in the fraction depleted of DNA binding protein but activity was restored by addition of purified DNA binding protein. DNA binding protein therefore plays an important role in the initiation of Ad4 DNA replication. Images PMID:1829516

  15. Human cytomegalovirus maturational proteinase: expression in Escherichia coli, purification, and enzymatic characterization by using peptide substrate mimics of natural cleavage sites.

    PubMed Central

    Burck, P J; Berg, D H; Luk, T P; Sassmannshausen, L M; Wakulchik, M; Smith, D P; Hsiung, H M; Becker, G W; Gibson, W; Villarreal, E C

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) assembly protein, resulting in truncation of its C terminus, is an essential step in virion maturation. The proteinase responsible for this cleavage is the amino-terminal half of the protein encoded by the UL80a open reading fame. We have obtained high expression levels of this 256-amino-acid HCMV proteinase, assemblin, in Escherichia coli. In addition to the 28-kDa proteinase, a 15-kDa protein comprising the first 143 amino acids and a 13-kDa protein comprising the last 113 amino acids of the 28-kDa HCMV proteinase were present. Both the 28-kDa proteinase and the 15-kDa protein were purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure utilizing anion exchange in urea and dithiothreitol and size exclusion in NaSCN and dithiothreitol. Activation of the purified 28-kDa proteinase required denaturation in urea as well as complete reduction of all five cysteine residues in the molecule. Removal of the urea by dialysis with retention of the reducing agent yielded an active proteinase. Addition of glycerol to 50% enhanced the activity. The HCMV proteinase cleaved the peptides RGVVNASSRLAK and SYVKASVSPE, which are mimics of the maturational (M)- and release (R)-site sequences, respectively, in the UL80a-encoded protein. The cleavage site in the peptides was at the same Ala-Ser scissile bond as observed in the UL80a protein. The Km value for the cleavage of RGVVNASSRLAK (M-site mimic) by the proteinase was similar to that for SYVKASVSPE (R-site mimic), but the turnover (kcat) of the M-site peptide mimic substrate by the proteinase was six to eight times faster. The peptide homologs of the herpes simplex virus type 1 M- and R-site sequences in the UL26-encoded protein were also cleaved by the HCMV proteinase, although at rates slower than those for the HCMV substrates. The HCMV proteinase was inhibited by Zn2+ and by alkylating agents, but only at very high inhibitor concentrations. The purified 15-kDa protein

  16. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  17. Inactivation of key factors of the plasma proteinase cascade systems by Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, T; Carlsson, J; Sundqvist, G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Bacteroides gingivalis W83 on various key components of the human plasma proteinase cascade systems was studied. When purified C1-inhibitor was incubated with the bacterium, the inhibitor was rapidly inactivated by limited proteolytic cleavage. In citrated whole plasma, C1-inhibitor, antithrombin, plasminogen, prekallikrein, prothrombinase complex, the clotting factor X, and most of the alpha 2-antiplasmin were functionally eliminated after 30 min of incubation with the bacterium. Fibrinogen disappeared from the plasma almost immediately upon mixing with the bacterial suspension. In contrast, there was no appreciable decrease in the bulk of other plasma proteins, such as various transport proteins (albumin, prealbumin, transferrin) and immunoglobulins, during 4 h of incubation with the bacterium. Most of the observed effects can be assigned to the proteolytic activity of the bacterium itself, since there was little evidence for generation of intrinsic plasma proteinase activity, despite the loss of proteinase inhibitory activities. B. gingivalis W83 thus seems to be equipped with proteolytic enzyme systems which selectively recognize and rapidly inactivate the most important proteinase inhibitors and proenzymes present in human plasma. This bacterium therefore seems to be able to efficiently paralyze the host's various defenses against invading microorganisms. Images PMID:3902645

  18. Proteinase from germinating bean cotyledons. Evidence for involvement of a thiol group in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Csoma, C; Polgár, L

    1984-09-15

    To degrade storage proteins germinating seeds synthesize proteinases de novo that can be inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents [Baumgartner & Chrispeels (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 77, 223-233]. We have elaborated a procedure for isolation of such a proteinase from the cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris. The purification procedure involved fractionation of the cotyledon homogenate with acetone and with (NH4)2SO4 and successive chromatographies on DEAE-cellulose, activated thiol-Sepharose Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 23,400, proved to be highly specific for the asparagine side chain and blocking of its thiol group resulted in loss of the catalytic activity. The chemical properties of the thiol group of the bean enzyme were investigated by acylation with t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-asparagine p-nitro-phenyl ester and by alkylations with iodoacetamide and iodoacetate. Deviations from normal pH-rate profile were observed, which indicated that the thiol group is not a simple functional group, but constitutes a part of an interactive system at the active site. The pKa value for acylation and the magnitude of the rate constant for alkylation with iodoacetate revealed that the bean proteinase possesses some properties not shared by papain and the other cysteine proteinases studied to date.

  19. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic proteinase from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    PubMed

    Llorente, Berta E; Brutti, Cristina B; Caffini, Néstor O

    2004-12-29

    The study of proteinase expression in crude extracts from different organs of the globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) disclosed that enzymes with proteolytic and milk-clotting activity are mainly located in mature flowers. Maximum proteolytic activity was recorded at pH 5.0, and inhibition studies showed that only pepstatin, specific for aspartic proteinases, presented a significant inhibitory effect. Such properties, in addition to easy enzyme inactivation by moderate heating, make this crude protease extract potentially useful for cheese production. Adsorption with activated carbon, together with anion exchange and affinity chromatography, led to the isolation of a heterodimeric milk-clotting proteinase consisting of 30- and 15-kDa subunits. MALDI-TOF MS of the 15-kDa chain determined a 15.358-Da mass, and the terminal amino sequence presented 96% homology with the smaller cardosin A subunit. The amino terminal sequence of the 30-kDa chain proved to be identical to the larger cardosin A subunit. Electrophoresis evidenced proteinase self-processing that was confirmed by immunoblots presenting 62-, 30-, and 15-kDa bands.

  20. Applicability of Yeast Extracellular Proteinases in Brewing: Physiological and Biochemical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bilinski, Carl A.; Russell, Inge; Stewart, Graham G.

    1987-01-01

    A general screening survey for expression of extracellular acid proteinase production was performed on over 100 cultures belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. Although two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed positive extracellular proteinase phenotypes in plate tests, it was not possible to demonstrate proteolytic activities in cell-free culture supernatants in assays performed at beer pH values. Of several yeasts from other genera examined, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and Torulopsis magnoliae produced extracellular proteinases with desirable properties. Proteolytic activities were detected in assays performed at beer pH values and at lower temperature. Brewer's wort served as a highly inducing medium for extracellular proteinase production, with T. magnoliae yielding enzyme of highest specific activity. In fact, commencement of enzyme production was detected shortly after the onset of exponential growth in brewer's wort. Inclusion of crude enzyme preparations in brewer's wort inoculated simultaneously with brewer's yeast reduced final ethanol yields slightly and was found to be effective in reducing chill haze formation in bottled beer. PMID:16347298

  1. Predicting proteinase specificities from free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Seble Merid; Olufsen, Magne; Smalås, Arne O; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2006-10-01

    The role of the primary binding residue (P1) in complexes between three different subtilases (subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and proteinase K) and their canonical protein inhibitor eglin c have been studied by free energy calculations. Based on the crystal structures of eglin c in complex with subtilisin Carlsberg and thermitase, and a homology model of the eglin c-proteinase K complex, a total of 57 mutants have been constructed and docked into their host proteins. The binding free energy was then calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method for all complexes differing only in the nature of the amino acid at the P1 position. LIE calculations for 19 different complexes for each subtilase were thus carried out excluding proline. The effects of substitutions at the P1 position on the binding free energies are found to be very large, and positively charged residues (Arg, Lys and His) are particularly deleterious for all three enzymes. The charged variants of the acidic side chains are found to bind more favorably as compared to their protonated states in all three subtilases. Furthermore, hydrophobic amino acids are accommodated most favorably at the S1-site in all three enzymes. Comparison of the three series of binding free energies shows only minor differences in the 19 computed relative binding free energies among these subtilases. This is further reflected in the correlation coefficient between the 23 relative binding free energies obtained, including the possible protonation states of ionizable side chains, but excluding the P1 Pro, for subtilisin Carlsberg versus thermitase (0.95), subtilisin versus proteinase K (0.94) and thermitase versus proteinase K (0.96).

  2. Ganciclovir Inhibits Human Adenovirus Replication and Pathogenicity in Permissive Immunosuppressed Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E.; Spencer, Jacqueline F.; Balakrishnan, Lata; Dewhurst, Stephen; Capella, Cristina; Buller, R. Mark L.; Wold, William S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment. PMID:25224011

  3. Ganciclovir inhibits human adenovirus replication and pathogenicity in permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Balakrishnan, Lata; Dewhurst, Stephen; Capella, Cristina; Buller, R Mark L; Toth, Karoly; Wold, William S M

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment.

  4. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm.

  5. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGES

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; ...

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  6. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  7. Purification and characterization of a 39,000-Da serine proteinase from the hemolymph of a solitary ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi.

    PubMed

    Shishikura, F; Abe, T; Ohtake, S; Tanaka, K

    1997-09-01

    A new endogenous serine proteinase from the cell-free hemolymph of a solitary ascidian, Halocythia roretzi, was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, hydrophobic interaction chromatography on TSKgel Toyopearl HW 65 F, ion exchange chromatography on TSKgel DEAE-Toyopearl 650 M, affinity chromatography on Arginine-Sepharose 4B, gel filtration on TSKgel Toyopearl HW 65F and hydroxyapatite chromatography on Bio-Gel HT. The serine proteinase is a single polypeptide chain whose molecular weight and isoelectric point are 39 kDa and about 7.6 pI, respectively. The most susceptible substrate was Boc-Leu-Gly-Arg-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide (MCA), and activity was optimal at pH 8. The enzyme was relatively stable at high temperatures; about 50% activity was retained even at 60 degrees C for 30 min in 50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, containing 0.5 M NaCl, and 0.05% Brij-35. The enzyme was characterized by the inhibitory effects of synthetic or natural inhibitors, substrate specificity toward 26 peptidyl-MCAs, proteinase activity toward natural proteins and complex formation with a serine proteinase inhibitor (58 kDa) previously found in H. roretzi hemolymph, indicating that the enzyme was a member of serine proteinases and strongly inhibited by the 58 kDa serine proteinase inhibitor as well as human antithrombin III. We also demonstrated the clotting enzyme activity of the purified serine proteinase toward bovine fibrinogen and Limulus coagulogen, a fibrinogen-like clottable protein of horseshoe crabs.

  8. A role for trigger factor and an rgg-like regulator in the transcription, secretion and processing of the cysteine proteinase of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, W R; Gibson, C M; Caparon, M G

    1998-01-01

    The ability of numerous microorganisms to cause disease relies upon the highly regulated expression of secreted proteinases. In this study, mutagenesis with a novel derivative of Tn4001 was used to identify genes required for the expression of the secreted cysteine proteinase (SCP) of the pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. Designated as Rop loci (regulation of proteinase), ropB is a rgg-like transcriptional activator required for transcription of the gene which encodes the proteinase. In contrast, ropA contributes post-transcriptionally to the secretion and processing of SCP and encodes a homologue of Trigger Factor, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and putative chaparone which is highly conserved in most bacterial species, but of unknown function. Analysis of additional ropA mutants demonstrated that RopA acts both to assist in targeting SCP to the secretory pathway and to promote the ability of the proprotein to establish an active conformation upon secretion. This latter function was dependent upon the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase domain of RopA and mutants that lacked this domain exhibited a bipartite deficiency manifested as a kinetic defect in autologous processing of the proprotein to the mature proteinase, and as a catalytic defect in the mature proteinase. These results provide insight into the function of Trigger Factor, the regulation of proteinase activity and the mechanism of secretion in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:9799235

  9. Adenovirus infection elevates levels of cellular topoisomerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, K C; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a specific, sensitive, and quantitative assay for topoisomerase I, which is based on the formation of a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate. Our assay measures the quantitative transfer of 32P radioactivity from 32P-labeled DNA to topoisomerase I. Since 32P-labeled topoisomerase molecules are resolved by NaDodSO4/PAGE, HeLa topoisomerase I (100 kDa) and calf thymus topoisomerase I (82 kDa) can be quantitatively assayed in the same reaction mixture. The assay can detect at least 0.3 ng (3 fmol) of topoisomerase I. We have used our assay to measure the levels of topoisomerase I activity in crude extracts of nuclei prepared from uninfected, adenovirus-infected, and adenovirus-transformed human cells. The evidence suggests that an adenovirus early gene product, presumably a protein encoded in early region 1A (E1A), increases cellular topoisomerase I activity at least 10-fold. Immunoblotting analysis with antiserum against calf thymus topoisomerase I shows that the increase in activity is due to an increase in the amount of enzyme. Images PMID:2986107

  10. Subunit structure of karatasin, the proteinase isolated from Bromelia plumieri (karatas).

    PubMed

    Montes, C; Amador, M; Cuevas, D; Cordoba, F

    1990-01-01

    Close to 15% of the karatasin proteinase activity in the fruit juice of Bromelia plumieri (karatas) is present outside dialysis Visking tubing in 7 days in 0.2 M acetate buffer (pH) 3.5 or 6.5) containing phenyl mercuric acetate. The small proteinase(s), distinct from the 85% activity in juice due to nondialysable karatasin with a reported Mr of 24,868, separates across Spectrapore (13 kDa) membranes but not across Spectrapore with 3.5 kDa average pore diameter. The dialyzed proteinase is named karatasin-D (K-D). Purified non-Dialysable karatasin can be dissociated to what seems to be K-D by incubation in a buffer solution, containing SDS and 2-mercaptoethanol with phenyl mercuric acetate, in dialysis experiments for 8 days at room temperature using Spectrapore 13 kDa tubing. Thus, native karatasin in B. plumieri fruit juice seem to be the result of association of 2 small molecular mass K-D subunits, linked together by disulfide bonds and electrostatic forces, in equilibrium with small amounts of free K-D molecules. The amino acid composition and partial sequence of karatasin up to the 14th position from the amino terminus have discrete analogies with papain and with stem bromelain.

  11. A new subtilisin-like proteinase from roots of the dandelion Taraxacum officinale Webb S. L.

    PubMed

    Bogacheva, A M; Rudenskaya, G N; Preusser, A; Tchikileva, I O; Dunaevsky, Y E; Golovkin, B N; Stepanov, V M

    1999-09-01

    A serine proteinase from roots of Taraxacum officinale Webb S. L. was isolated by affinity chromatography and gel-filtration on Superose 6R using FPLC. The enzyme is a 67-kD glycoprotein containing 54% carbohydrate which we have named taraxalisin. The substrate specificity of taraxalisin toward synthetic peptides and oxidized insulin B-chain is comparable with that of cucumisin from Cucumis melo and the subtilisin-like serine proteinase macluralisin from Maclura pomifera. The proteinase is inactivated by DFP and PMSF. Taraxalisin exhibits maximal activity at pH 8.0. The pH range for stability of the enzyme is narrow--6.0-9.0. The temperature optimum for the subtilisin-like activity is 40 degrees C. The N-terminal sequence of taraxalisin has 40% of its residues identical to those of subtilisin Carlsberg. Thus, the serine proteinase from dandelion roots is a member of the subtilisin family, which is evidently widespread in the plant kingdom.

  12. A chymotrypsin-like proteinase from the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B

    2005-08-01

    A chymotrypsin-like proteinase was isolated from the posterior midgut of larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme, TmC1, was purified to homogeneity as determined by SDS-PAGE and postelectrophoretic activity detection. TmC1 had a molecular mass of 23.0 kDa, pI of 8.4, a pH optimum of 9.5, and the optimal temperature for activity was 51 degrees C. The proteinase displayed high stability at temperatures below 43 degrees C and in the pH range 6.5-11.2, which is inclusive of the pH of the posterior and middle midgut. The enzyme hydrolyzed long chymotrypsin peptide substrates SucAAPFpNA, SucAAPLpNA and GlpAALpNA and did not hydrolyze short chymotrypsin substrates. Kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction demonstrated that the best substrate was SucAAPFpNA, with k(cat app) 36.5 s(-1) and K(m) 1.59 mM. However, the enzyme had a lower K(m) for SucAAPLpNA, 0.5 mM. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) was an effective inhibitor of TmC1, and the proteinase was not inhibited by either tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) or N(alpha)-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK). However, the activity of TmC1 was reduced with sulfhydryl reagents. Several plant and insect proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors were active against the purified enzyme, the most effective being Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI). The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme was IISGSAASKGQFPWQ, which was up to 67% similar to other insect chymotrypsin-like proteinases and 47% similar to mammalian chymotrypsin A. The amino acid composition of TmC1 differed significantly from previously isolated T. molitor enzymes.

  13. Proteinases in Naegleria Fowleri (strain NF3), a pathogenic amoeba: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Mat Amin, Nakisah

    2004-12-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba, known as a causative agent for a fatal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in man such as Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Factors contributing to its pathogenicity and its distribution in the environment have been investigated by previous researchers. In case of its pathogenicity, several enzymes such as phospolipase A and sphingomyelinase, have been proposed to probably act as aggressors in promoting PAM but no study so far have been conducted to investigate the presence of proteinase enzyme in this amoeba although a 56kDa cystein proteinase enzyme has been identified in Entamoeba histolytica as an important contributing factor in the amoeba's virulence. In this preliminary study, a pathogenic amoeba, Naegleria fowleri (strain NF3) was examined for the presence of proteinases. Samples of enzymes in this amoeba were analysed by electrophoresis using SDS-PAGE-gelatin gels. The results showed that this amoeba possesses at least two high molecular weight proteinases on gelatin gels; their apparent molecular weights are approximately 128 kDa and approximately 170 kDa. Band of approximately 128 kDa enzyme is membrane-associated and its activity is higher at alkaline pH compared with lower pH; at lower pH, its activity is greatly stimulated by DTT. The approximately 170 kDa band enzyme appears to be inactivated at pH 8.0, at lower ph its activity is higher and DTT-dependance. The activity of this enzyme is partially inhibited by inhibitor E-64 but markedly inhibited to antipain suggesting it belongs to the cysteine proteinase group.

  14. Adenovirus vector delivery stimulates natural killer cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Tomasec, Peter; Wang, Eddie C. Y.; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; McSharry, Brian P.; Aicheler, Rebecca J.; Stanton, Richard J.; Wilkinson, Gavin W. G.

    2007-01-01

    We report that delivery of first-generation replication-deficient adenovirus (RDAd) vectors into primary human fibroblasts is associated with the induction of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytolysis in vitro. RDAd vector delivery induced cytolysis by a range of NK cell populations including the NK cell clone NKL, primary polyclonal NK lines and a proportion of NK clones (36 %) in autologous HLA-matched assays. Adenovirus-induced cytolysis was inhibited by antibody blocking of the NK-activating receptor NKG2D, implicating this receptor in this function. NKG2D is ubiquitously expressed on NK cells and CD8+ T cells. Significantly, γ-irradiation of the vector eliminated the effect, suggesting that breakthrough expression from the vector induces at least some of the pro-inflammatory responses of unknown aetiology following the application of RDAd vectors during in vivo gene delivery. PMID:17374753

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided.

  16. Identification of monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, and purification and characterization of a monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, D S; Thøgersen, I B; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1993-01-01

    characterized by steric protection of the proteinase active site and by sensitivity to small primary amines. The frog monomeric alpha-macroglobulin is structurally and functionally similar to the well-characterized monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor rat alpha 1-inhibitor-3. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:7679897

  17. Identification of the aspartic proteinases from human erythrocyte membranes and gastric mucosa (slow-moving proteinase) as catalytically equivalent to cathepsin E.

    PubMed Central

    Jupp, R A; Richards, A D; Kay, J; Dunn, B M; Wyckoff, J B; Samloff, I M; Yamamoto, K

    1988-01-01

    Three aspartic proteinases with similar Mr values (approx. 80,000) but from distinct sources (human gastric mucosa, human erythrocyte membranes and rat spleen) were shown to have immunological cross-reactivity and comparable mobilities when subjected to polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. Kinetic parameters (kcat, Km and Ki) were determined for the interactions of the three enzymes with two synthetic chromogenic substrates and five inhibitors (naturally occurring and synthetic). On this basis it would appear that all of the enzymes should be considered equivalent to cathepsin E. pH-activity measurements indicated that the aspartic proteinase that originated from the erythrocyte membranes retained activity at a higher pH value than either of its readily soluble counterparts. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3058118

  18. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  19. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  20. Assessment of the Incidence of Enteric Adenovirus Species and Serotypes in Surface Waters in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa: Tyume River as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Sibanda, Timothy; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2012-01-01

    TaqMan real-time PCR was used for the detection and quantitation of adenoviruses in Tyume River water samples over a 12-month period. A total of 72 samples were analysed, and 22 samples were positive for adenovirus. Of the positive samples, 18 were collected from downstream sampling points. Among the downstream sampling points, adenovirus detection rate increased with distance downstream, being 28%, 33%, and 39% for Alice, Drayini, and Manqulweni, respectively. The Alice sampling site had the highest concentrations of adenovirus ranging between 6.54 × 103 genome copies/L and 8.49 × 104 genome copies/L. The observed trend could have been expected considering the level of anthropogenic activities in areas along the lower stretch of Tyume River, with the major one being the effluent of treated and semi treated sewage from wastewater treatment facilities. Adenovirus detection was sporadic at most sampling sites. Multiplex conventional PCR was used for the detection of clinically important adenovirus species B, C, and F and their serotypes. Species C and F adenoviruses were detected in 77% and 18% of the samples, respectively. Most adenovirus positive samples were obtained from areas of increased population densities. The presence of adenoviruses may confirm the risk of its transmission to the human population. PMID:23226986

  1. Prevalence, susceptibility profile and proteinase production of yeasts causing vulvovaginitis in Turkish women.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Sema Keceli; Budak, Fatma; Yucesoy, Gulseren; Susever, Serdar; Willke, Ayse

    2006-02-01

    In this study the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), antifungal susceptibility and proteinase production of isolated Candida species were investigated. Vaginal swabs were collected from symptomatic women with vulvovaginitis attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic of Kocaeli University, Turkey. The relation between risk factors, such as pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, antibiotic and corticosteroid use, history of sexually transmitted diseases and contraceptive methods, was recorded. Candida spp. were identified by conventional methods, then evaluated for proteinase secretion in a medium containing casein. Antifungal susceptibility was determined according to the NCCLS microdilution method. The prevalence of women with vulvovaginitis was 35.7% (170/6080) and 16% (28/170) of them were diagnosed as VVC. Candida albicans was the dominant species: 21 (75%), followed by 4 C. glabrata (14%), 2 C. tropicalis (7%), and one C. krusei (3.5%). All isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B, except one C. krusei, one C. glabrata and one C. albicans that were resistant to fluconazole. Proteinase production was determined in 19 (90.5%) C. albicans and in all C. tropicalis isolates. Proteinase activity was not associated with antifungal resistance. No association was found between risk factors and VVC.

  2. Protein digestion in cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) as a target for plant defence by endogenous proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Prashant; Bandani, Ali R; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2011-07-01

    Gut extracts from cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) showed significant levels of proteolytic activity, which was inhibited by reagents specific for cysteine proteases and chymotrypsin-like proteases. Gut tissue contained cDNAs encoding cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinases, similar to those identified in the closely related pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). Analysis of honeydew (liquid excreta) from cereal aphids fed on diet containing ovalbumin showed that digestion of ingested proteins occurred in vivo. Protein could partially substitute for free amino acids in diet, although it could not support complete development. Recombinant wheat proteinase inhibitors (PIs) fed in diet were antimetabolic to cereal aphids, even when normal levels of free amino acids were present. PIs inhibited proteolysis by aphid gut extracts in vitro, and digestion of protein fed to aphids in vivo. Wheat subtilisin/chymotrypsin inhibitor, which was found to inhibit serine and cysteine proteinases, was more effective in both inhibitory and antimetabolic activity than wheat cystatin, which inhibited cysteine proteases only. Digestion of ingested protein is unlikely to contribute significantly to nutritional requirements when aphids are feeding on phloem, and the antimetabolic activity of dietary proteinase inhibitors is suggested to result from effects on proteinases involved in degradation of endogenous proteins.

  3. Proteinase inhibitors in severe inflammatory processes (septic shock and experimental endotoxaemia): biochemical, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Fritz, H

    1979-01-01

    Plasma levels of antithrombin III, alpha 2-macroglobulin and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor, as well as those of various clotting, complement and other plasma factors, were significantly decreased in 18 patients suffering from hyperdynamic septic shock. A similar statistically significant reduction of the concentrations of several plasma factors (prothrombin and antithrombin III, plasminogen and alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor, complement factor C3 and clotting factor XIII) was observed in experimental endotoxaemia. In this model the reduction in the plasma levels of these factors was considerably diminished by the intravenous injection of a granulocytic elastase--cathepsin G inhibitor of lower molecular weight from soybeans. The results of both studies indicate that consumption of plasma factors in the course of Gram-negative sepsis proceeds not only via the classical routes (by activation of the clotting, fibrinolytic and complement cascades by system-specific proteinases such as thrombokinase or the plasminogen activator) but also to an appreciable degree of unspecific degradation of plasma factors by neutral proteinases such as elastase and cathepsin G. The endotoxin-induced release of both sorts of proteinases, the system-specific ones and the unspecific lysosomal proteinases from leucocytes and other cells, is likely to be mainly responsible for the consumption of antithrombin III and alpha-2-macroglobulin via complex formation (followed by elimination of the complexes) and the increased turnover of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor as observed in the clinical study. The therapeutic use of an exogenous elastase--cathepsin G inhibitor in the experimental model was stimulated by the observation that human mucous secretions contain and acid-stable inhibitor of the neutral granulocytic proteinases, called HUSI-I or antileucoproteinase. This inhibitor protects mucous membranes and soluble proteins against proteolytic attack by leucocytic proteinases released in the

  4. Effect of a Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor from Phaseolus coccineus on Hypothenemus hampei gut proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo Pereira, Railene; Valencia-Jiménez, Arnubio; Magalhães, Cláudio Picanço; Prates, Maura Vianna; Melo, Jorge Alex Taquita; de Lima, Liziane Maria; de Sales, Maurício Pereira; Tempel Nakasu, Erich Yukio; da Silva, Maria Cristina Mattar; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima

    2007-12-26

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari), is an important devastating coffee pest worldwide. Both trypsin and chymotrypsin enzyme activities from H. hampei larval midgut can be inactivated by proteinaceous enzyme-inhibitors. A serine proteinase inhibitor belonging to the Bowman-Birk class was purified from a wild accession of Phaseolus coccineus L. seeds. The inhibitor (PcBBI1) is a cysteine-rich protein that is heat-stable at alkaline pH. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis showed that PcBBI1 occurs in seeds as a monomer (8689 Da) or dimer (17,378 Da). Using in vitro inhibition assays, it was found that PcBBI1 has a high inhibitory activity against H. hampei trypsin-like enzymes, bovine pancreatic chymotrypsin, and trypsin. According to this, PcBBI1 could be a promising tool to make genetically modified coffee with resistance to coffee berry borer.

  5. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  6. [Adenovirus vectors and their clinical application in gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Adám, E; Nász, I

    2001-09-23

    The potential therapeutic application of the gene transfer technology with adenovirus vectors seems to be enormous. Adenovirus vectors offer several advantages over other vectors, but several important limitations of adenovirus mediated gene transfer are also known. Great number of studies in inherited diseases and in different cancer therapy clinical trials have provided information of critical importance for design of efficient clinical protocols. Clinical trials have been extended to the treatment of many other diseases, too. There are about thirty currently active gene therapy protocols for the treatment only of HIV-1 infection in the USA. These programs aim to confer protective immunity against HIV-1 transmission to individuals who are in risk of infection, to develop preventive or therapeutic vaccines for patients with AIDS and other infectious diseases. Gene therapy represents one of the most important developments in oncology, however, before this can be realised as standard treatment the technical problems of gene delivery and higher safety must be overcome. The early--first and second generation--adenovirus vectors are now likely to be phased out for most diseases, and further experiments seem to be necessary. It might be change to the third generation or other, more modern vector application in clinical trials, as the helper dependent vectors. Almost all transcriptional unit is removed from the DNA of these vectors ("gutless vectors"), therefore they cannot reproduce, give higher gene expression and far less inflammatory. Despite the latest achievement reported in vector design it is not possible to predict yet to what extent and when gene therapy will be effective.

  7. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

  8. Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional response upon immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. Proteinase inhibitors play a key role in regulating the activity of the respective proteinases. Among serine proteinase inhibitors, kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) are widely found in mammals, avians, and a variety of invertebrates. In this study, we describe the identification of a kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor (Ab-KPI) from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, which is presumably involved in innate immunity. The full-length cDNA of Ab-KPI includes 600 bp nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 143 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ab-KPI contains a putative 17-amino acid signal peptide and two tandem kazal domains with high similarity to other kazal-type SPIs. Each kazal domain consists of reactive site (P1) residue containing a leucine (L), and a threonine (T) located in the second amino acid position after the second conserved cysteine of each domain. Temporal expression of Ab-KPI was assessed by real time quantitative PCR in hemocytes and mantle tissue following bacterial and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) challenge, and tissue injury. At 6 h post-bacterial and -VHSV challenge, Ab-KPI expression in hemocytes was increased 14-fold and 4-fold, respectively, compared to control samples. The highest up-regulations upon tissue injury were shown at 9 h and 12 h in hemocytes and mantle, respectively. The transcriptional modulation of Ab-KPI following bacterial and viral challenges and tissue injury indicates that it might be involved in immune defense as well as wound healing process in abalone.

  9. In vitro and ex vivo inhibition of hepatitis A virus 3C proteinase by a peptidyl monofluoromethyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Morris, T S; Frormann, S; Shechosky, S; Lowe, C; Lall, M S; Gauss-Müller, V; Purcell, R H; Emerson, S U; Vederas, J C; Malcolm, B A

    1997-05-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C proteinase is the enzyme responsible for the processing of the viral polyprotein. Although a cysteine proteinase, it displays an active site configuration like those of the mammalian serine proteinases (Malcolm, B. A. Protein Science 1995, 4, 1439). A peptidyl monofluoromethyl ketone (peptidyl-FMK) based on the preferred peptide substrates for HAV 3C proteinase was generated by first coupling the precursor, N,N-dimethylglutamine fluoromethylalcohol, to the tripeptide, Ac-Leu-Ala-Ala-OH, and then oxidizing the product to the corresponding peptidyl-FMK (Ac-LAAQ'-FMK). This molecule was found to be an irreversible inactivator of HAV 3C with a second-order rate constant of 3.3 x 10(2) M-1 s-1. 19F NMR spectroscopy indicates the displacement of fluoride on inactivation of the enzyme by the fluoromethyl ketone. NMR spectroscopy of the complex between the 13C-labeled inhibitor and the HAV 3C proteinase indicates that an (alkylthio)methyl ketone is formed. Studies of polyprotein processing, using various substrates generated by in vitro transcription/translation, demonstrated efficient blocking of even the most rapid proteolytic events such as cleavage of the 2A-2B and 2C-3A junctions. Subsequent ex vivo studies, to test for antiviral activity, show a 25-fold reduction in progeny virus production as the result of treatment with 5 microM inhibitor 24 h post-infection.

  10. In vitro molecular genetics as a tool for determining the differential cleavage specificities of the poliovirus 3C proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ypma-Wong, M F; Semler, B L

    1987-01-01

    We describe a completely in vitro system for generating defined poliovirus proteinase mutations and subsequently assaying the phenotypic expression of such mutations. A complete cDNA copy of the entire poliovirus genome has been inserted into a bacteriophage T7 transcription vector. We have introduced proteinase and/or cleavage site mutations into this cDNA. Mutant RNA is transcribed from the altered cDNA template and is subsequently translated in vitro. Employing such a system, we provide direct evidence for the bimolecular cleavage events carried out by the 3C proteinase. We show that specific genetically-altered precursor polypeptides containing authentic Q-G cleavage sites will not act as substrates for 3C either in cis or in trans. We also provide evidence that almost the entire P3 region is required to generate 3C proteinase activity capable of cleaving the P1 precursor to capsid proteins. However, only the 3C portion of P3 is required to generate 3C proteinase activity capable of cleaving P2 and its processing products. Images PMID:3031587

  11. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  12. Pest protection conferred by a Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene.

    PubMed

    Smigocki, Ann C; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases.

  13. Adenovirus vector-mediated Gli1 siRNA induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer with Smo-dependent or Smo-independent Hh pathway activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiefang; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Gong, Yanfang; Man, Xiaohua; Jin, Jing; Wu, Hongyu

    2013-10-10

    Activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a core molecular mechanism in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, the inhibition of upstream Hh signals does not inhibit the growth of a subset of pancreatic cancer (PC). This study was to examine the effect of siRNA targeting Gli1, the downstream component of Hh pathway, on PC cells and to provide some insight into the underlying mechanisms. A Gli1siRNA-expressing adenovirus (Ad-U6-Gli1siRNA) was constructed, and its effect on PC cells was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Gli1 was expressed in 83.3% (20/24) PC tissues, whereas no expression was found in normal pancreatic ductal epithelium. Gli1 was expressed in SW1990 and CFPAC cells in which Smo was completely absent, as well as in PaTu8988, Panc-1 and BxPC-3 cells in which Smo was concomitantly present. Ad-U6-Gli1siRNA induced cell growth inhibition, strong G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in all five human PC cell lines. Meanwhile, Ad-U6-Gli1siRNA significantly suppressed the expression of Gli1, Ptch1 and two target genes, Cyclin D2 and Bcl-2, in all five lines. Furthermore, two tumor xenograft nude mice models were established by subcutaneously injecting Smo-positive Panc-1 cells or Smo-negative SW1990 cells. The in vivo experimental results demonstrated that Ad-U6-Gli1siRNA inhibited the growth of both Panc1-derived and SW1990-derived tumors and induced cell apoptosis. Our study indicates that Gli1-targeting siRNA could induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in PC through knockdown of Gli1 and its target genes; and this method may represent a more effective therapeutic strategy for PC with Smo-dependent or Smo-independent Hh pathway activation.

  14. The proteolytic system of Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1: purification and characterization of a proteinase, a dipeptidase, and an aminopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Gobbetti, M; Smacchi, E; Corsetti, A

    1996-01-01

    A cell envelope 57-kDa proteinase, a cytoplasmic 65-kDa dipeptidase, and a 75-kDa aminopeptidase were purified from Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1 sourdough lactic acid bacterium by sequential fast protein liquid chromatography steps. All of the enzymes are monomers. The proteinase was most active at pH 7.0 and 40 degrees C, while aminopeptidase and dipeptidase had optima at pH 7.5 and 30 to 35 degrees C. Relatively high activities were observed at the pH and temperature of the sourdough fermentation. The proteinase is a serine enzyme. Urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of digest of alpha s1- and beta-caseins showed differences in the pattern of peptides released by the purified proteinase and those produced by crude preparations of the cell envelope proteinases of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus B397 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis SK11. Reversed-phase fast protein liquid chromatography of gliadin digests showed a more-complex peptide pattern produced by the proteinase of Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1. The dipeptidase is a metalloenzyme with high affinity for dipeptides containing hydrophobic amino acids but had no activity on tripeptides or larger peptides. The aminopeptidase was also inhibited by metal-chelating agents, and showed a broad N-terminal hydrolytic activity including di- and tripeptides. Km values of 0.70 and 0.44 mM were determined for the dipeptidase on Leu-Leu and the aminopeptidase on Leu-p-nitroanilide, respectively. PMID:8795211

  15. Effect of acute ozone exposure on the proteinase-antiproteinase balance in the rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, J.A.; Gregory, R.E.; Cole, D.J.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.

    1987-04-01

    Lung disease may result from a persisting proteinase excess or a depletion of antiproteinase in pulmonary parenchyma. We investigated the in vivo effect of a 48-hr exposure to ozone at 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 ppm on proteinase and antiproteinase activity of rat lungs. Elastase inhibitory capacities of serum, lung tissue, and airway washings were measured as indicators of antielastase activity. Trypsin inhibitory capacity was measured using an esterolytic procedure. Proteinase was measured as radioactive release from a /sup 14/C-globin substrate. The 48-hr exposures to O/sub 3/ at levels up to 1 ppm produced concentration-dependent decreases of 35-80% of antiproteinase activities in serum and in lung tissue. However, exposure to 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/ resulted in no decrease in antiproteinase activities. Acid proteinase activities (pH 4.2) were increased 65-120% by exposure to 1 or 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/, which correlated with inflammatory cells noted histologically. At 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/, pulmonary edema and hemorrhage were noted in histologic sections. These changes led to a flooding of the alveoli with up to 40 times normal protein levels and a greater than fivefold increase in airway antiproteinase. These data suggest that serum and soluble lung tissue antiproteinase activity decreased upon exposure to low levels of ozone. However, if O/sub 3/ exposure is high enough to produce pulmonary hemorrhage, antiproteinase may increase following serum exudation. These changes may be important in the development of ozone-induced lung diseases, especially emphysema.

  16. Molecular Analysis of Adenovirus Isolates from Previously Vaccinated Young Adults

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF ADENOVIRUS ISOLATES FROM PREVIOUSLY VACCINATED YOUNG ADULTS D. A. Blasiole...Molecular Analysis of Adenovirus Isolates From Previously Vaccinated Young Adults . 6. AUTHORS Daniel A Blasiole, David Metzgar, Luke T Daum, Margaret AK

  17. Correction of a deletion mutant by gene targeting with an adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Taylor, M W

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of adenovirus type 5 as a vector for homologous recombination was examined in CHO cells by using the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene. Infection of a hemizygous CHO APRT- cell line containing a 3-bp deletion in exon 5 of the aprt gene with a recombinant adenovirus containing the wild-type gene resulted in restoration of the APRT+ phenotype at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-6) per infected cell. A relatively high frequency (approximately 6 to 20%) of the transductants appears to result from a homologous recombination event. The mutation on the chromosomal aprt gene is corrected in the homologous recombinants, and APRT expression is restored to a normal hemizygous level. Neither adenovirus nor exogenous promoter sequences are detected in the homologous recombinants. The remaining transductants result from random integration of the aprt gene with the adenovirus sequence. A number of adenovirus vectors containing different promoter sequences linked to the hamster aprt gene were constructed. A possible role for the promoter region in the homologous recombination event was indicated by the lack of homologous recombination in constructs lacking an active promoter. Images PMID:8423811

  18. Innate Functions of Immunoglobulin M Lessen Liver Gene Transfer with Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Unzu, Carmen; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors. PMID:24465560

  19. Adenovirus Core Protein pVII Is Translocated into the Nucleus by Multiple Import Receptor Pathways†

    PubMed Central

    Wodrich, Harald; Cassany, Aurelia; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Guan, Tinglu; Nemerow, Glen; Gerace, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses are nonenveloped viruses with an ∼36-kb double-stranded DNA genome that replicate in the nucleus. Protein VII, an abundant structural component of the adenovirus core that is strongly associated with adenovirus DNA, is imported into the nucleus contemporaneously with the adenovirus genome shortly after virus infection and may promote DNA import. In this study, we evaluated whether protein VII uses specific receptor-mediated mechanisms for import into the nucleus. We found that it contains potent nuclear localization signal (NLS) activity by transfection of cultured cells with protein VII fusion constructs and by microinjection of cells with recombinant protein VII fusions. We identified three NLS-containing regions in protein VII by deletion mapping and determined important NLS residues by site-specific mutagenesis. We found that recombinant protein VII and its NLS-containing domains strongly and specifically bind to importin α, importin β, importin 7, and transportin, which are among the most abundant cellular nuclear import receptors. Moreover, these receptors can mediate the nuclear import of protein VII fusions in vitro in permeabilized cells. Considered together, these data support the hypothesis that protein VII is a major NLS-containing adaptor for receptor-mediated import of adenovirus DNA and that multiple import pathways are utilized to promote efficient nuclear entry of the viral genome. PMID:16973564

  20. Adenovirus core protein pVII is translocated into the nucleus by multiple import receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Wodrich, Harald; Cassany, Aurelia; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A; Guan, Tinglu; Nemerow, Glen; Gerace, Larry

    2006-10-01

    Adenoviruses are nonenveloped viruses with an approximately 36-kb double-stranded DNA genome that replicate in the nucleus. Protein VII, an abundant structural component of the adenovirus core that is strongly associated with adenovirus DNA, is imported into the nucleus contemporaneously with the adenovirus genome shortly after virus infection and may promote DNA import. In this study, we evaluated whether protein VII uses specific receptor-mediated mechanisms for import into the nucleus. We found that it contains potent nuclear localization signal (NLS) activity by transfection of cultured cells with protein VII fusion constructs and by microinjection of cells with recombinant protein VII fusions. We identified three NLS-containing regions in protein VII by deletion mapping and determined important NLS residues by site-specific mutagenesis. We found that recombinant protein VII and its NLS-containing domains strongly and specifically bind to importin alpha, importin beta, importin 7, and transportin, which are among the most abundant cellular nuclear import receptors. Moreover, these receptors can mediate the nuclear import of protein VII fusions in vitro in permeabilized cells. Considered together, these data support the hypothesis that protein VII is a major NLS-containing adaptor for receptor-mediated import of adenovirus DNA and that multiple import pathways are utilized to promote efficient nuclear entry of the viral genome.

  1. Innate functions of immunoglobulin M lessen liver gene transfer with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Unzu, Carmen; Melero, Ignacio; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors.

  2. [Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA sequences encoding serine proteinase and Kunitz type inhibitor in venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper].

    PubMed

    Ramazanova, A S; Fil'kin, S Iu; Starkov, V G; Utkin, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteinases and Kunitz type inhibitors are widely represented in venoms of snakes from different genera. During the study of the venoms from snakes inhabiting Russia we have cloned cDNAs encoding new proteins belonging to these protein families. Thus, a new serine proteinase called nikobin was identified in the venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper. By amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence, nikobin differs from serine proteinases identified in other snake species. Nikobin amino acid sequence contains 15 unique substitutions. This is the first serine proteinase of viper from Vipera genus for which a complete amino acid sequence established. The cDNA encoding Kunitz type inhibitor was also cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of inhibitor is homologous to those of other proteins from that snakes of Vipera genus. However there are several unusual amino acid substitutions that might result in the change of biological activity of inhibitor.

  3. Purification and Characterization of a Keratinolytic Serine Proteinase from Streptomyces albidoflavus

    PubMed Central

    Bressollier, Philippe; Letourneau, François; Urdaci, Maria; Verneuil, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Streptomyces strain K1-02, which was identified as a strain of Streptomyces albidoflavus, secreted at least six extracellular proteases when it was cultured on feather meal-based medium. The major keratinolytic serine proteinase was purified to homogeneity by a two-step procedure. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 18,000 and was optimally active at pH values ranging from 6 to 9.5 and at temperatures ranging from 40 to 70°C. Its sensitivity to protease inhibitors, its specificity on synthetic substrates, and its remarkably high level of NH2-terminal sequence homology with Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) showed that the new enzyme, designated SAKase, was homologous to SGPB. We tested the activity of SAKase with soluble and fibrous substrates (elastin, keratin, and type I collagen) and found that it was very specific for keratinous substrates compared to SGPB and proteinase K. PMID:10347045

  4. Purification and characterization of a keratinolytic serine proteinase from Streptomyces albidoflavus.

    PubMed

    Bressollier, P; Letourneau, F; Urdaci, M; Verneuil, B

    1999-06-01

    Streptomyces strain K1-02, which was identified as a strain of Streptomyces albidoflavus, secreted at least six extracellular proteases when it was cultured on feather meal-based medium. The major keratinolytic serine proteinase was purified to homogeneity by a two-step procedure. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 18,000 and was optimally active at pH values ranging from 6 to 9.5 and at temperatures ranging from 40 to 70 degrees C. Its sensitivity to protease inhibitors, its specificity on synthetic substrates, and its remarkably high level of NH2-terminal sequence homology with Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) showed that the new enzyme, designated SAKase, was homologous to SGPB. We tested the activity of SAKase with soluble and fibrous substrates (elastin, keratin, and type I collagen) and found that it was very specific for keratinous substrates compared to SGPB and proteinase K.

  5. On the modeling of snake venom serine proteinase interactions with benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Elsa S.; Fonseca, Nelson; Ramos, Maria João

    2004-01-01

    Pit viper venoms contain a number of serine proteinases that exhibit one or more thrombin-like activities on fibrinogen and platelets, this being the case for the kinin-releasing and fibrinogen-clotting KN-BJ from the venom of Bothrops jararaca. A three-dimensional structural model of the KN-BJ2 serine proteinase was built by homology modeling using the snake venom plasminogen activator TSV-PA as a major template and porcine kallikrein as additional structural support. A set of intrinsic buried waters was included in the model and its behavior under dynamic conditions was molecular dynamics simulated, revealing a most interesting similarity pattern to kallikrein. The benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitors α-NAPAP, 3-TAPAP, and 4-TAPAP were docked into the refined model, allowing for a more insightful functional characterization of the enzyme and a better understanding of the reported comparatively low affinity of KN-BJ2 toward those inhibitors. PMID:15322279

  6. Inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by Cu(II) and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kwon, N S; Chan, P C; Kesner, L

    1990-03-01

    When alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was treated with 1-5 microM CuSO4 in the presence of H2O2 (250-1000 microM), its elastase inhibitory capacity was markedly decreased. Several other metal ions tested had either very little or no effect. The Cu(II)-catalyzed decreased in the inhibition of elastase activity can also be demonstrated in dialyzed plasma. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that in several pathological conditions in which extracellular copper levels are elevated, Cu(II)-catalyzed peroxidation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may occur at sites of inflammation where H2O2 is secreted as a major product by activated phagocytes.

  7. Proteinases as virulence factors in Leishmania spp. infection in mammals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites cause human tegumentary and visceral infections that are commonly referred to as leishmaniasis. Despite the high incidence and prevalence of cases, leishmaniasis has been a neglected disease because it mainly affects developing countries. The data obtained from the analysis of patients’ biological samples and from assays with animal models confirm the involvement of an array of the parasite’s components in its survival inside the mammalian host. These components are classified as virulence factors. In this review, we focus on studies that have explored the role of proteinases as virulence factors that promote parasite survival and immune modulation in the mammalian host. Additionally, the direct involvement of proteinases from the host in lesion evolution is analyzed. The gathered data shows that both parasite and host proteinases are involved in the clinical manifestation of leishmaniasis. It is interesting to note that although the majority of the classes of proteinases are present in Leishmania spp., only cysteine-proteinases, metalloproteinases and, to a lesser scale, serine-proteinases have been adequately studied. Members from these classes have been implicated in tissue invasion, survival in macrophages and immune modulation by parasites. This review reinforces the importance of the parasite proteinases, which are interesting candidates for new chemo or immunotherapies, in the clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis. PMID:22871236

  8. Characterization and pathogenetic role of proteinase from Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Na, B K; Kim, J C; Song, C Y

    2001-01-01

    A secreted proteinase was purified from the culture supernatant of Acanthamoeba castellanii with several chromatographic steps. The purified proteinase was a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase. Its molecular weight was approximately 12 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and its native molecular weight was 12 kDa when determined by molecular sieve chromatography. It showed a broad temperature optimum ranging 30-55 degrees C with an optimal at 55 degrees C and an optimal pH of 8.5. It could degrade various protein substrates, such as collagen, fibronectin, laminin, secretory immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, plasminogen, fibrinogen, haemoglobin and rabbit corneal proteins. It showed strong cytopathic effects in cultured cells, including HEp2 and HEK cells. The corneal lesions, induced by both the purified proteinase and A. castellanii, displayed similar clinical results for both cases, in which the stromal infiltration and opacity with the epithelial defect were revealed. These results suggest that the enzyme was highly associated with the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. The fact that cytopathic effects and development of corneal lesions caused by the proteinase of Acanthamoeba were inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor suggest that the proteinase inhibitor might be useful as a therapeutic agent.

  9. Neutrophil Elastase, Proteinase 3, and Cathepsin G as Therapeutic Targets in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.; Jenne, Dieter E.; Gauthier, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the first cells recruited to inflammatory sites and form the earliest line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are three hematopoietic serine proteases stored in large quantities in neutrophil cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They act in combination with reactive oxygen species to help degrade engulfed microorganisms inside phagolysosomes. These proteases are also externalized in an active form during neutrophil activation at inflammatory sites, thus contributing to the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. As multifunctional proteases, they also play a regulatory role in noninfectious inflammatory diseases. Mutations in the ELA2/ELANE gene, encoding neutrophil elastase, are the cause of human congenital neutropenia. Neutrophil membrane-bound proteinase 3 serves as an autoantigen in Wegener granulomatosis, a systemic autoimmune vasculitis. All three proteases are affected by mutations of the gene (CTSC) encoding dipeptidyl peptidase I, a protease required for activation of their proform before storage in cytoplasmic granules. Mutations of CTSC cause Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. Because of their roles in host defense and disease, elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are of interest as potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we describe the physicochemical functions of these proteases, toward a goal of better delineating their role in human diseases and identifying new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of their bioavailability and activity. We also describe how nonhuman primate experimental models could assist with testing the efficacy of proposed therapeutic strategies. PMID:21079042

  10. Studies on the Interaction of Tumor-Derived HD5 Alpha Defensins with Adenoviruses and Implications for Oncolytic Adenovirus Therapy.

    PubMed

    Vragniau, Charles; Hübner, Jens-Martin; Beidler, Peter; Gil, Sucheol; Saydaminova, Kamola; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Yumul, Roma; Wang, Hongjie; Richter, Maximilian; Sova, Pavel; Drescher, Charles; Fender, Pascal; Lieber, André

    2017-03-15

    Defensins are small antimicrobial peptides capable of neutralizing human adenovirus (HAdV) in vitro by binding capsid proteins and blocking endosomal escape of virus. In humans, the alpha defensin HD5 is produced by specialized epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal and genito-urinary tracts. Here, we demonstrate, using patient biopsy specimens, that HD5 is also expressed as an active, secreted peptide by epithelial ovarian and lung cancer cells in situ This finding prompted us to study the role of HD5 in infection and spread of replication-competent, oncolytic HAdV type 3 (HAdV3). HAdV3 produces large amounts of penton-dodecahedra (PtDd), virus-like particles, during replication. We have previously shown that PtDd are involved in opening epithelial junctions, thus facilitating lateral spread of de novo-produced virions. Here, we describe a second function of PtDd, namely, the blocking of HD5. A central tool to prove that viral PtDd neutralize HD5 and support spread of progeny virus was an HAdV3 mutant virus in which formation of PtDd was disabled (mut-Ad3GFP, where GFP is green fluorescent protein). We demonstrated that viral spread of mut-Ad3GFP was blocked by synthetic HD5 whereas that of the wild-type (wt) form (wt-Ad3GFP) was only minimally impacted. In human colon cancer Caco-2 cells, induction of cellular HD5 expression by fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) significantly inhibited viral spread and progeny virus production of mut-Ad3GFP but not of wt-Ad3GFP. Finally, the ectopic expression of HD5 in tumor cells diminished the in vivo oncolytic activity of mut-Ad3GFP but not of wt-Ad3GFP. These data suggest a new mechanism of HAdV3 to overcome innate antiviral host responses. Our study has implications for oncolytic adenovirus therapy.IMPORTANCE Previously, it has been reported that human defensin HD5 inactivates specific human adenoviruses by binding to capsid proteins and blocking endosomal escape of virus. The central new findings described in our

  11. Novel Aggregation Properties of Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Sap6 Mediate Virulence in Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohitashw; Saraswat, Darpan; Tati, Swetha; Edgerton, Mira

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans, a commensal fungus of the oral microbiome, causes oral candidiasis in humans with localized or systemic immune deficiencies. Secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps) are a family of 10 related proteases and are virulence factors due to their proteolytic activity, as well as their roles in adherence and colonization of host tissues. We found that mice infected sublingually with C. albicans cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and a Δsap8 strain) had thicker fungal plaques and more severe oral infection, while infection with the Δsap6 strain was attenuated. These hypervirulent strains had highly aggregative colony structure in vitro and higher secreted proteinase activity; however, the levels of proteinase activity of C. albicans Saps did not uniformly match their abilities to damage cultured oral epithelial cells (SCC-15 cells). Hyphal induction in cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and Δsap8 cells) resulted in formation of large cell-cell aggregates. These aggregates could be produced in germinated wild-type cells by addition of native or heat-inactivated Sap6. Sap6 bound only to germinated cells and increased C. albicans adhesion to oral epithelial cells. The adhesion properties of Sap6 were lost upon deletion of its integrin-binding motif (RGD) and could be inhibited by addition of RGD peptide or anti-integrin antibodies. Thus, Sap6 (but not Sap5) has an alternative novel function in cell-cell aggregation, independent of its proteinase activity, to promote infection and virulence in oral candidiasis.

  12. Novel Aggregation Properties of Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Sap6 Mediate Virulence in Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohitashw; Saraswat, Darpan; Tati, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, a commensal fungus of the oral microbiome, causes oral candidiasis in humans with localized or systemic immune deficiencies. Secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps) are a family of 10 related proteases and are virulence factors due to their proteolytic activity, as well as their roles in adherence and colonization of host tissues. We found that mice infected sublingually with C. albicans cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and a Δsap8 strain) had thicker fungal plaques and more severe oral infection, while infection with the Δsap6 strain was attenuated. These hypervirulent strains had highly aggregative colony structure in vitro and higher secreted proteinase activity; however, the levels of proteinase activity of C. albicans Saps did not uniformly match their abilities to damage cultured oral epithelial cells (SCC-15 cells). Hyphal induction in cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and Δsap8 cells) resulted in formation of large cell-cell aggregates. These aggregates could be produced in germinated wild-type cells by addition of native or heat-inactivated Sap6. Sap6 bound only to germinated cells and increased C. albicans adhesion to oral epithelial cells. The adhesion properties of Sap6 were lost upon deletion of its integrin-binding motif (RGD) and could be inhibited by addition of RGD peptide or anti-integrin antibodies. Thus, Sap6 (but not Sap5) has an alternative novel function in cell-cell aggregation, independent of its proteinase activity, to promote infection and virulence in oral candidiasis. PMID:25870228

  13. Adenovirus Serotype 14 Infection, New Brunswick, Canada, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Garceau, Richard; Thibault, Louise; Oussedik, Youcef; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    We describe 3 culture-proven cases of adenovirus serotype 14 infection in New Brunswick, Canada, during the summer of 2011. Strains isolated from severely ill patients were closely related to strains of a genomic variant, adenovirus 14p1, circulating in the United States and Ireland. Physicians in Canada should be aware of this emerging adenovirus. PMID:23260201

  14. Asynchronous reformation of individual kallikrein-related secretory proteinases in rat submandibular glands following degranulation by cyclocytidine.

    PubMed

    Proctor, G B; Shori, D K; Chan, K M; Garrett, J R

    1993-10-01

    Time scales for the reformation of the secretory granules in granular tubules and their constituent proteinases were assessed after inducing a massive degranulation by intraperitoneal injection of cyclocytidine in conscious animals. The minimum working dose of cyclocytidine to produce the maximum degranulation and depletion of proteinase activity, at 3 h after injection, was 75 mg/kg. Histologically, although most granular tubule cells then appeared to be extensively degranulated, isolated individual cells showing little or no degranulation always persisted. Acinar cells also showed some depletion of secretory material. At 15 h after injecting cyclocytidine the formation of new granules had begun in the granular tubule cells, but it was not extensive or uniform in adjacent cells; however, the acinar cells already appeared to be regranulated. The pattern of granule reformation in granular tubule cells progressed gradually, so that 7-10 days after cyclocytidine-induced degranulation the cells were mostly packed with granules and showed similar appearances to those of normal resting control glands. Individual proteinases in extracts of the glands were assayed specifically using fluorogenic oligopeptide amidase substrates, with and without appropriate inhibitors. This revealed a 95% reduction in total proteinase activity 3 h after cyclocytidine (75 mg/kg). In the same extracts, acinar peroxidase was reduced by 28%. Peroxidase levels recovered to control values within 15 h after cyclocytidine but recovery of proteinases progressed more gradually and did not occur uniformly for the different constituent proteinases. Tissue kallikrein (rK1) showed the most rapid recovery and had reached levels approaching normal within 3 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Elasticity and Binding of Adenovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Garrett; Negishi, Atsuko; Seeger, Adam; McCarty, Doug; Taylor, Russell; Samulshi, Jude; Superfine, Richard

    1999-11-01

    Adenovirus was the first human virus found to cause the transformation of cells and is one of the more common vectors being used for the development of gene therapy. As such, much is known about the viral structure and genome; however, the events of the early infection cycle, such as binding of the virus to the cell membrane and the release of genetic material from the capsid, for this and other nonenveloped viruses, are not fully understood. With the atomic force microscope (AFM) we are able to image the virus in both air and liquids, allowing us to change the surrounding environment, varying such physiologically relevant parameters as osmolality or pH. We additionally have the ability to do manipulations on single virus particles in these environments using the nanoManipulator. The nanoManipulator is an advanced interface for AFM that allows real time three dimensional rendering of the topographical data, allows the sample surface to be non-destructively felt using a hand held stylus that responds to the information being sensed at the tip, and allows controlled modification of the surface. Using this tool we have translated single virions over various surfaces, allowing us to measure the adhesion between the capsid and these surfaces. Additionally, we are able to place the tip directly atop individual viruses and measure their elasticity under a compressive load being supplied by that tip. We can explore how this property changes as a function of the properties of the surrounding liquid.

  16. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  17. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of class I major histocompatibility complex genes following transformation with human adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, J; Rotem-Yehudar, R; Ehrlich, R

    1991-01-01

    Transformation of rodent cells by human adenoviruses is a well-established model system for studying the expression, regulation, and function of class I antigens. In this report, we demonstrate that the highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 operates at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels in regulating the activity of major histocompatibility complex class I genes and products in transformed cells. Adenovirus type 12 suppresses the cell surface expression of class I antigens in most cell lines. Nevertheless, in a number of cell lines suppression is the result of reduction in the amount of stable specific mRNA, while in another group of cell lines suppression involves interference with processing of a posttranscriptional product. The two mechanisms operate both for the endogenous H-2 genes and for a miniature swine class I transgene that is expressed in the cells. Images PMID:1895404

  18. Three low molecular weight cysteine proteinase inhibitors of human seminal fluid: purification and enzyme kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Chhikara, Nirmal; Gill, Kamaldeep; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2013-08-01

    The cystatins form a superfamily of structurally related proteins with highly conserved structural folds. They are all potent, reversible, competitive inhibitors of cysteine proteinases (CPs). Proteins from this group present differences in proteinase inhibition despite their high level of structural similarities. In this study, three cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs) of low molecular weight were isolated from human seminal fluid (HSF) by affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-papain-Sepharose column, purified using various chromatographic procedures and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified these proteins as cystatin 9, cystatin SN, and SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S). All three CPIs suppressed the activity of papain potentially and showed remarkable heat stability. Interestingly SAP-1 also inhibits the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and PSA (prostate specific antigen) and acts as a cross-class protease inhibitor in in vitro studies. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we have also observed that SAP-1 shows a significant binding with all these proteases. These studies suggest that SAP-1 is a cross-class inhibitor that may regulate activity of various classes of proteases within the reproductive systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report about purification of CPIs from HSF; the identification of such proteins could provide better insights into the physiological processes and offer intimation for further research.

  19. Crystal structure of 2A proteinase from hand, foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhixia; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Gao, Xiaopan; Qin, Bo; Zhao, Zhendong; Cui, Sheng

    2013-11-15

    EV71 is responsible for several epidemics worldwide; however, the effective antiviral drug is unavailable to date. The 2A proteinase (2A(pro)) of EV71 presents a promising drug target due to its multiple roles in virus replication, inhibition of host protein synthesis and evasion of innate immunity. We determined the crystal structure of EV71 2A(pro) at 1.85Å resolution, revealing that the proteinase maintains a chymotrypsin-like fold. The active site is composed of the catalytic triads C110A, H21 and D39 with the geometry similar to that in other picornaviral 2A(pro), 3C(pro) and serine proteinases. The cI-to-eI2 loop at the N-terminal domain of EV71 2A(pro) adopts a highly stable conformation and contributes to the hydrophilic surface property, which are strikingly different in HRV2 2A(pro) but are similar in CVB4 2A(pro). We identified a hydrophobic motif "LLWL" followed by an acidic motif "DEE" at the C-terminus of EV71 2A(pro). The "LLWL" motif is folded into the β-turn structure that is essential for the positioning of the acidic motif. Our structural and mutagenesis study demonstrated that both the negative charging and the correct positioning of the C-terminus are essential for EV71 replication. Deletion of the "LLWL" motif abrogated the proteolytic activity, indicating that the motif is critical for maintaining the active proteinase conformation. Our findings provide the structural and functional insights into EV71 2A(pro) and establish a framework for structure-based inhibitor design.

  20. The Role of Cysteine Proteinases and their Inhibitors in the Host-Pathogen Cross Talk

    PubMed Central

    Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases and their inhibitors play essential functional roles in basic biological processes in both hosts and pathogens. Endo/lysosomal cathepsins participate in immune response in pathogen recognition and elimination. They are essential for both antigen processing and presentation (host adaptive immune response) and activation of endosomal Toll like receptors (innate immune response). Pathogens can produce proteases and also natural inhibitors to subvert the host immune response. Several pathogens are sensed through the intracellular pathogen recognition receptors, but only some of them use the host proteolytic system to escape into the cytosol. In this review, I provide an update on the most recent developments regarding the role of proteinases and their inhibitors in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. PMID:23305363

  1. Degradation of immunoglobulins, protease inhibitors, and interleukin-1 by a secretory proteinase of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Na, Byoung-Kuk; Cho, Jong-Hwa; Song, Chul-Yong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a secretory proteinase from the pathogenic amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii on host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins such as immunoglobulins, interleukin-1, and protease inhibitors was investigated. The enzyme was found to degrade secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), IgG, and IgM. It also degraded interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and IL-1β. Its activity was not inhibited by endogenous protease inhibitors, such as α2-macroglobulin, α1-trypsin inhibitor, and α2-antiplasmin. Furthermore, the enzyme rapidly degraded those endogenous protease inhibitors as well. The degradation of host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins by the Acanthamoeba proteinase suggested that the enzyme might be an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:12073735

  2. cDNA cloning of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase from crucian carp (Carassius carassius) and expression of the active region as myofibril-bound serine proteinase inhibitor in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Han, Long; Cao, Min-Jie; Shi, Chao-lan; Wei, Xiao-Nan; Li, Huan; Du, Cui-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) (EC 5.3.1.9) can act as a myofibril-bound serine proteinase (MBSP) inhibitor (MBSPI) in fish. In order to better understand the biological information of the GPI and its functional domain for inhibiting MBSP, the cDNA of GPI was cloned from crucian carp (Carassius carassius) with RT-PCR, nested-PCR and 3'-RACE. The result of sequencing showed that the GPI cDNA had an open reading frame of 1662bp encoding 553 amino acid residues. After constructing and comparing the three-dimensional structures of GPI and MBSP, the middle fragment of crucian carp GPI (GPI-M) was predicted as a functional domain for inhibiting MBSP. Then the crucian carp GPI-M gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the recombinant GPI-M (rGPI-M) with molecular mass of approximately 21kDa in the form of inclusion bodies. The rGPI-M was obtained at an electrophoresis level purity of approximately 95% after denaturation and dialysis renaturation.

  3. SARS CoV main proteinase: The monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Yang, Lin; Mangel, Walter F

    2006-12-12

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, have varied more than 65,0000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 microM. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded KD values of 5.8 +/- 0.8 microM (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 +/- 2.2 microM (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 +/- 1.5 microM (obtained from the forward scattering). The KD from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 +/- 1.1 microM, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 +/- 0.4 microM. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar KD values.

  4. A heat-stable serine proteinase from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Magnani, P; Villa, A; Macchi, F; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1992-08-21

    A proteinase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from crude extracts of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. Molecular mass values assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration were 54 and 118 kDa, respectively, which points to a dimeric structure of the molecule. An isoelectric point of 5.6 was also determined. The enzyme behaved as a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase, as shown by the inhibitory effects exerted by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethyl ketone and chymostatin. Consistently with the inhibition pattern, the enzyme cleaved chromogenic substrates at the carboxyl side of aromatic or bulky aliphatic amino acids; however, it effectively attacked only a small number of such substrates, thus, displaying a specificity much narrower than and clearly different from that of chymotrypsin. This was confirmed by its inability to digest a set of natural substrate proteins, as well as insulin chains A and B; only after alkylation casein was degraded to some extent. Proteinase activity was significantly stimulated by Mn2+ which acted as a mixed-type nonessential activator. The enzyme also displayed a broad pH optimum in the range 6.5-8.0. Furthermore, it was completely stable up to 90 degrees C; above this temperature it underwent first-order thermal inactivation with half-lives ranging from 342 min (92 degrees C) to 7 min (101 degrees C). At 50 degrees C it could withstand 6 M urea and, to some extent, different organic solvents; however, at 95 degrees C it was extensively inactivated by all of these compounds. None of the chemical physical properties of the enzyme, including amino-acid analysis, provided evidence of a possible relation to other well-known microbial serine proteinases.

  5. SARS CoV Main Proteinase: The Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium Dissociation Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano,V.; McGrath, W.; Yang, L.; Mangel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, K{sub D}, have varied more than 650000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 {mu}M. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded K{sub D} values of 5.8 {+-} 0.8 {mu}M (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 {+-} 2.2 {mu}M (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 {+-} 1.5 {mu}M (obtained from the forward scattering). The K{sub D} from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 {+-} 1.1 {mu}M, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 {+-} 0.4 {mu}M. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar K{sub D} values.

  6. Purification and characterization of native and recombinant SaPIN2a, a plant sieve element-localized proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Ding, Ling-Wen; Ge, Zhi-Juan; Wang, Zhaoyu; Wang, Fanghai; Li, Ning; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2007-01-01

    SaPIN2a encodes a proteinase inhibitor in nightshade (Solanum americanum), which is specifically localized to the enucleate sieve elements. It has been proposed to play an important role in phloem development by regulating proteolysis in sieve elements. In this study, we purified and characterized native SaPIN2a from nightshade stems and recombinant SaPIN2a expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified native SaPIN2a was found as a charge isomer family of homodimers, and was weakly glycosylated. Native SaPIN2a significantly inhibited serine proteinases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, and subtilisin, with the most potent inhibitory activity on subtilisin. It did not inhibit cysteine proteinase papain and aspartic proteinase cathepsin D. Recombinant SaPIN2a had a strong inhibitory effect on chymotrypsin, but its inhibitory activities toward trypsin and especially toward subtilisin were greatly reduced. In addition, native SaPIN2a can effectively inhibit midgut trypsin-like activities from Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera litura larvae, suggesting a potential for the production of insect-resistant transgenic plants.

  7. Directed adenovirus evolution using engineered mutator viral polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Uil, Taco G.; Vellinga, Jort; de Vrij, Jeroen; van den Hengel, Sanne K.; Rabelink, Martijn J. W. E.; Cramer, Steve J.; Eekels, Julia J. M.; Ariyurek, Yavuz; van Galen, Michiel; Hoeben, Rob C.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are the most frequently used viruses for oncolytic and gene therapy purposes. Most Ad-based vectors have been generated through rational design. Although this led to significant vector improvements, it is often hampered by an insufficient understanding of Ad’s intricate functions and interactions. Here, to evade this issue, we adopted a novel, mutator Ad polymerase-based, ‘accelerated-evolution’ approach that can serve as general method to generate or optimize adenoviral vectors. First, we site specifically substituted Ad polymerase residues located in either the nucleotide binding pocket or the exonuclease domain. This yielded several polymerase mutants that, while fully supportive of viral replication, increased Ad’s intrinsic mutation rate. Mutator activities of these mutants were revealed by performing deep sequencing on pools of replicated viruses. The strongest identified mutators carried replacements of residues implicated in ssDNA binding at the exonuclease active site. Next, we exploited these mutators to generate the genetic diversity required for directed Ad evolution. Using this new forward genetics approach, we isolated viral mutants with improved cytolytic activity. These mutants revealed a common mutation in a splice acceptor site preceding the gene for the adenovirus death protein (ADP). Accordingly, the isolated viruses showed high and untimely expression of ADP, correlating with a severe deregulation of E3 transcript splicing. PMID:21138963

  8. Immunologic and Genetic Selection of Adenovirus Vaccine Strains: Synthesis and Characterization of Adenovirus Antigens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    exhibited strikingly different chromatographic characteristics. 2. Effect of proflavine on the synthesis of adenovirus, type 5, and associated soluble...antigens. The synthesis of type 5 adenovirus in HeLa cells was suppressed to a considerable extent by low concentrations of proflavine , an acridine dye...chemical. Addition of proflavine to infected cells at different times during the virus growth cycle revealed that the processes leading to the synthesis

  9. Coordinate expression of the Porphyromonas gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain proteinase, Kgp, arginine-specific gingipain proteinase, RgpA, and the heme/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2004-11-01

    Heme utilization in Porphyromonas gingivalis requires the participation of an outer membrane hemin/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR, the lysine-specific gingipain proteinase (Kgp) and arginine-specific gingipain proteinase (Rgp). In this study, the expression of hmuR , kgp and rgpA genes in response to growth with different heme sources was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoassay. Coordinate regulation of hmuR , kgp and rgpA gene expression was evaluated through utilization of P. gingivalis hmuR and kgp mutants or by selective inactivation of proteinases with Kgp- and Rgp-specific inhibitors. We observed that expression of the kgp and rgpA genes was not tightly regulated by heme, but rather by the growth phase. In contrast, expression of the hmuR gene was negatively regulated by heme, while growth of P. gingivalis with human serum resulted in increased hmuR expression. A P. gingivalis kgp isogenic mutant demonstrated significantly increased hmuR gene expression, and inactivation of Kgp and Rgp activity by specific inhibitors up-regulated hmuR gene transcription. Moreover, inactivation of Kgp up-regulated rgpA transcription. Finally, a P. gingivalis hmuR mutant exhibited repressed kgp gene expression and lysine-specific proteinase activity. Collectively, these results indicate that kgp , rgpA and hmuR gene transcription is coordinately regulated and may facilitate greater efficiency of heme utilization in P. gingivalis .

  10. Isolation and characterization of two forms of an acidic bromelain stem proteinase.

    PubMed

    Harrach, T; Eckert, K; Maurer, H R; Machleidt, I; Machleidt, W; Nuck, R

    1998-05-01

    Two forms of an acidic bromelain proteinase isolated from crude bromelain, an extract from pineapple stem, were found by a two-step FPLC purification procedure. The basic main components were removed by cation exchange chromatography and the breakthrough fraction was further resolved by anion exchange chromatography into 15 protein fractions, only two of which, called SBA/a and SBA/b, were proteolytically active. These components were characterized by electrospray mass spectroscopy (ESMS), isoelectric focusing, N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, monosaccharide analysis, and enzymatic parameters. The molecular masses of SBA/a and SBA/b were determined by ESMS to be 23,550 and 23,560, respectively. The isoelectric points (pI) of the two bands of SBA/a were 4.8 and 4.9; SBA/b focused as a single band at pI = 4.8. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequences (11 residues) were identical to SBA/a and SBA/b and identical with those of stem bromelain, the basic main proteinase of the pineapple stem, and fruit bromelain, the acidic main proteinase of the pineapple fruit. Both components are highly glycosylated; hydrolysis of SBA/a yielded about twofold more monosaccharide per protein than SBA/b. The comparison of the catalytic properties of SBA/a with those of SBA/b revealed no relevant differences in the hydrolysis of three peptidyl-NH-Mec substrates and in the inhibition profiles using chicken cystatin and E-64, indicating that these components can be considered as two forms of a single enzyme. Both forms are scarcely inhibited by chicken cystatin and slowly inactivated by E-64, hence are nontypical cysteine proteinases of the papain superfamily.

  11. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-01-01

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized. PMID:26999188

  12. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-03-17

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3C(pro)s) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3C(pro) plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3C(pro) are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3C(pro) can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3C(pro) and these essential factors, 3C(pro) is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3C(pro) are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3C(pro) may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3C(pro) is summarized.

  13. Characterization of the mature cell surface proteinase of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Josefina M; Brown, Lucía; Savoy de Giori, Graciela; Hebert, Elvira M

    2015-05-01

    The cell envelope-associated proteinase (CEP) of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 (PrtL) has an essential role in bacterial growth, contributes to the flavor and texture development of fermented products, and can release bioactive health-beneficial peptides during milk fermentation. The genome of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 possesses only one gene that encodes PrtL, which consists of 1924 amino acids and is a multidomain protein anchored to the cell via its W domain. PrtL was extracted from the cell under high ionic strength conditions using NaCl, suggesting an electrostatic interaction between the proteinase and the cell envelope. The released PrtL was purified and biochemically characterized; its activity was maximal at temperatures between 37 and 40 °C and at pH between 7 and 8. Under optimal conditions, PrtL exhibited higher affinity for succinyl-alanyl-alanyl-prolyl-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide than for succinyl-alanyl-glutamyl-prolyl-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide, while methoxy-succinyl-arginyl-prolyl-tyrosyl-p-nitroanilide was not degraded. A similar α- and β-casein degradation pattern was observed with the purified and the cell envelope-bound proteinase. Finally, on the basis of its specificity towards caseins and the unique combination of amino acids at residues thought to be involved in substrate specificity, PrtL can be classified as a representative of a new group of CEP.

  14. [Conditions of the biosynthesis of an extracellular subtilisin-like proteinase by Bacillus pumilus KMM 62].

    PubMed

    Malikova, L A; Mardanova, A M; Sokolova, O V; Balaban, N P; Rudenskaia, G N; Sharipova, M R

    2007-01-01

    The influence of the cultivation conditions on Bacillus pumilus KMM 62 growth and effectiveness of the production of a subtilisin-like serine proteinase were investigated. Enzyme accumulation in the culture fluid reached the maximum value after 32 and 46-48 h of growth; it depends on the composition of the nutrient medium. The ratio of the concentrations of two main components of the medium, peptone and inorganic phosphate, which was optimal for enzyme biosynthesis was determined by multifactor experiments. Ammonium salts, when introduced as an additional nitrogen source, had different effects on the proteinase biosynthesis at different growth stages: they suppress enzyme production at the early stationary growth phase and stimulate the biosynthesis of the enzyme after 46-48 h of growth. Complex organic substrates (albumin, casein, hemoglobin, and gelatin) have a repressive effect on the biosynthesis of the enzyme. The effect of amino acids on culture growth and enzyme biosynthesis during the early and late stationary growth phase is different. Hydrophilic amino acids, glutamine, and glutamic acid exhibit the most pronounced repressive action on biosynthesis. The activity of different regulatory mechanisms for the synthesis of this proteinase is assumed at the early and late stationary stages of growth.

  15. Proteinases in the joint: clinical relevance of proteinases in joint destruction

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, Yvonne; Ospelt, Caroline; Gay, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Proteinases are involved in essential steps in cartilage and bone homeostasis. Consequently, efforts have been made to establish their potential role in the pathology of rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and spondyloarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are sensitive markers of disease severity and response to treatment, and therefore they have potential in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Despite disappointing early results with synthetic inhibitors of MMPs, there is still much scope for developing effective and safe MMPs inhibitors, and consequently to deliver new options to inhibit joint destruction. PMID:18001502

  16. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  17. Proteinases inhibit H(+)-ATPase and Na+/H+ exchange but not water transport in apical and endosomal membranes from rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Sabolić, I; Shi, L B; Brown, D; Ausiello, D A; Verkman, A S

    1992-01-10

    A marked increase in water permeability can be induced in Xenopus oocytes by injection of mRNA from tissues that express water channels, suggesting that the water channel is a protein. In view of this and previous reports which showed that proteinases may interfere with mercurial inhibition of water transport in red blood cells (RBC), we examined the influence of trypsin, chymotrypsin, papain, pronase, subtilisin and thermolysin on water permeability as well as on ATPase activity, H(+)-pump, passive H+ conductance, and Na+/H+ exchange in apical brush-border vesicles (BBMV) and endosomal (EV) vesicles from rat renal cortex. H+ transport was measured by Acridine orange fluorescence quenching and water transport by stopped-flow light scattering. As measured by potential-driven H+ accumulation in BBMV and EV, proteinase treatment had little effect on vesicle integrity. In BBMV, ecto-ATPase activity was inhibited by 15-30%, Na+/H+ exchange by 20-55%, and H+ conductance was unchanged. Osmotic water permeability (Pf) was 570 microns/s and was inhibited 85-90% by 0.6 mM HgCl2; proteinase treatment did not affect Pf or the HgCl2 inhibition. In EV, NEM-sensitive H+ accumulation and ATPase activity were inhibited by greater than 95%. Pf (140 microns/s) and HgCl2 inhibition (75-85%) were not influenced by proteinase treatment. SDS-PAGE showed selective digestion of multiple polypeptides by proteinases. These results confirm the presence of water channels in BBMV and EV and demonstrate selective inhibition of ATPase function and Na+/H+ exchange by proteinase digestion. The lack of effect of proteinases on water transport by mercurials. We conclude that the water channel may be a small integral membrane protein which, unlike the H(+)-ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger, has no functionally important membrane domains that are sensitive to proteolysis.

  18. Gene Transcript Abundance Profiles Distinguish Kawasaki Disease from Adenovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Stephen J.; Watson, Virginia E.; Shimizu, Chisato; Kanegaye, John T.; Burns, Jane C.; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute Kawasaki disease (KD) is difficult to distinguish from other illnesses that involve acute rash or fever, in part because the etiologic agent(s) and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. As a result, diagnosis and critical therapies may be delayed. Methods We used DNA microarrays to identify possible diagnostic features of KD. We compared gene expression patterns in the blood of 23 children with acute KD and 18 age-matched febrile children with 3 illnesses that resemble KD. Results Genes associated with platelet and neutrophil activation were expressed at higher levels in patients with KD than in patients with acute adenovirus infections or systemic adverse drug reactions, but levels in patients with KD were not higher than those in patients with scarlet fever. Genes associated with B cell activation were also expressed at higher levels in patients with KD than in control subjects. A striking absence of interferon-stimulated gene expression in patients with KD was confirmed in an independent cohort of patients with KD. Using a set of 38 gene transcripts, we successfully predicted the diagnosis for 21 of 23 patients with KD and 7 of 8 patients with adenovirus infection. Conclusions These findings provide insight into the molecular features that distinguish KD from other febrile illnesses and support the feasibility of developing novel diagnostic reagents for KD based on the host response. PMID:19583510

  19. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vector Ebola Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, Julie E; DeZure, Adam D; Stanley, Daphne A; Coates, Emily E; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E; Berkowitz, Nina M; Hu, Zonghui; Joshi, Gyan; Ploquin, Aurélie; Sitar, Sandra; Gordon, Ingelise J; Plummer, Sarah A; Holman, LaSonji A; Hendel, Cynthia S; Yamshchikov, Galina; Roman, Francois; Nicosia, Alfredo; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Bailer, Robert T; Schwartz, Richard M; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Sullivan, Nancy J; Graham, Barney S

    2017-03-09

    Background The unprecedented 2014 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) prompted an international response to accelerate the availability of a preventive vaccine. A replication-defective recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 3-vectored ebolavirus vaccine (cAd3-EBO), encoding the glycoprotein from Zaire and Sudan species, that offers protection in the nonhuman primate model, was rapidly advanced into phase 1 clinical evaluation. Methods We conducted a phase 1, dose-escalation, open-label trial of cAd3-EBO. Twenty healthy adults, in sequentially enrolled groups of 10 each, received vaccination intramuscularly in doses of 2×10(10) particle units or 2×10(11) particle units. Primary and secondary end points related to safety and immunogenicity were assessed throughout the first 8 weeks after vaccination; in addition, longer-term vaccine durability was assessed at 48 weeks after vaccination. Results In this small study, no safety concerns were identified; however, transient fever developed within 1 day after vaccination in two participants who had received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Glycoprotein-specific antibodies were induced in all 20 participants; the titers were of greater magnitude in the group that received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than in the group that received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose (geometric mean titer against the Zaire antigen at week 4, 2037 vs. 331; P=0.001). Glycoprotein-specific T-cell responses were more frequent among those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than among those who received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose, with a CD4 response in 10 of 10 participants versus 3 of 10 participants (P=0.004) and a CD8 response in 7 of 10 participants versus 2 of 10 participants (P=0.07) at week 4. Assessment of the durability of the antibody response showed that titers remained high at week 48, with the highest titers in those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Conclusions Reactogenicity and immune responses

  20. Platelet-adenovirus vs. inert particles interaction: effect on aggregation and the role of platelet membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Gupalo, Elena; Kuk, Cynthia; Qadura, Mohammad; Buriachkovskaia, Liudmila; Othman, Maha

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are involved in host defense via clearance of bacteria from the circulation, interaction with virus particles, and uptake of various size particulates. There is a growing interest in micro- and nanoparticles for drug delivery and there is evidence that the properties of these particles critically influence their interaction and uptake by various tissues and cells including platelets. Virus mediated gene therapy applications are still challenged by the resultant thrombocytopenia and the mechanism(s) of platelet-foreign particles interaction remains unclear. We studied the specifics of platelet interaction with an active biological agent (adenovirus) and inert latex microspheres (MS) and investigated the role of platelet proteins in this interaction. We show that activated and not resting platelets internalize MS, without influencing platelet aggregation. In contrast, adenovirus induces and potentiates ADP-induced platelet aggregation and results in rapid expression of P-selectin. Platelets then internalize adenovirus and viral particles appear inside the open canalicular system. Inhibition of platelet αIIbβ3, GPIbα, and P-selectin decreases both platelet aggregation and internalization of MS. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 and αVβ3 does not abolish adenovirus platelet internalization and adenovirus-induced platelet activation is maintained. Our study demonstrates that platelets react differentially with foreign particles and that αIIbβ3 is a key player in platelet engulfing of foreign particles but not in mediating adenovirus internalization. Other platelet candidate molecules remain to be investigated as potential targets for management of adenovirus-induced thrombocytopenia.

  1. Developing novel anthelmintics from plant cysteine proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Jerzy M; Buttle, David J; Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann; Duce, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections of livestock and humans are predominantly controlled by treatment with three classes of synthetic drugs, but some livestock nematodes have now developed resistance to all three classes and there are signs that human hookworms are becoming less responsive to the two classes (benzimidazoles and the nicotinic acetylcholine agonists) that are licensed for treatment of humans. New anthelmintics are urgently needed, and whilst development of new synthetic drugs is ongoing, it is slow and there are no signs yet that novel compounds operating through different modes of action, will be available on the market in the current decade. The development of naturally-occurring compounds as medicines for human use and for treatment of animals is fraught with problems. In this paper we review the current status of cysteine proteinases from fruits and protective plant latices as novel anthelmintics, we consider some of the problems inherent in taking laboratory findings and those derived from folk-medicine to the market and we suggest that there is a wealth of new compounds still to be discovered that could be harvested to benefit humans and livestock. PMID:18761736

  2. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  3. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5-FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad-FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy.

  4. Comparative Study of Action of Cell Wall Proteinases from Various Strains of Streptococcus cremoris on Bovine αs1-, β-, and κ-Casein

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Servaas; Exterkate, Fred A.; Slangen, Charles J.; de Veer, Gerrie J. C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Partially purified cell wall proteinases of eight strains of Streptococcus cremoris were compared in their action on bovine αs1-, β-, and κ-casein, as visualized by starch gel electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and thin-layer chromatography. Characteristic degradation profiles could be distinguished, from which the occurrence of two proteinases, represented by strain HP and strain AM1, was concluded. The action of the HP-type proteinase P1 (also detectable in strains Wg2, C13, and TR) was established by electrophoretic methods to be directed preferentially towards β-casein. The AM1-type proteinase PIII (also detectable in strain SK11) was also able to degrade β-casein, but at the same time split αs1- and κ-casein more extensively than did PI. Strain FD27 exhibited mainly PI activity but also detectable PIII degradation characteristics. The cell wall proteinase preparation of strain E8 showed low PI as well as low PIII activity. All proteinase preparations produced from κ-casein positively charged degradation products with electrophoretic mobilities similar to those of degradation products released by the action of the milk-clotting enzyme chymosin. The differences between PI and PIII in mode of action, as detected by gel electrophoresis and thin-layer chromatography, were reflected by the courses of the initial degradation of methyl-14C-labeled β-casein and by the effect of αs1- plus κ-casein on these degradations. The results are discussed in the light of previous comparative studies of cell wall proteinases in strains of S. cremoris and with respect to the growth of this organism in milk. Images PMID:16347215

  5. The organotypic multicellular spheroid is a relevant three-dimensional model to study adenovirus replication and penetration in human tumors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Dirven, Clemens M; Pherai, D Shareen; Kater, Mathijs; Van der Valk, Paul; Vogels, Ronald; Vandertop, W Peter; Pinedo, Herbert M; Curiel, David T; Gerritsen, Winald R

    2002-11-01

    The use of adenoviruses for gene transfer and as oncolytic agents is currently receiving widespread attention. As specific constraints to adenovirus distribution and spread cannot be studied in cell cultures, there is a need for an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) model mimicking the in vivo biology of tumors. We studied the interactions between tumor and adenoviruses using multicellular spheroids grown from primary brain tumor material. Using beta-galactosidase and luciferase reporter genes expressed by replication-defective adenoviruses, we showed that infection was restricted to the first layer of cells. Using a replication-competent adenovirus expressing the luciferase gene, we showed that transgene expression in the spheroid was considerably enhanced and that viral spreading deep into the 3D structure took place. In addition, a tetrazolium salt-based metabolic assay could be used to compare the oncolytic activity of different concentrations of replication-competent adenoviruses. We can conclude that organotypic spheroids offer a versatile in vitro system for studying distribution, spread, and oncolysis by adenoviruses in a clinically relevant model.

  6. Granzyme M is a regulatory protease that inactivates proteinase inhibitor 9, an endogenous inhibitor of granzyme B.

    PubMed

    Mahrus, Sami; Kisiel, Walter; Craik, Charles S

    2004-12-24

    Granzyme M is a trypsin-fold serine protease that is specifically found in the granules of natural killer cells. This enzyme has been implicated recently in the induction of target cell death by cytotoxic lymphocytes, but unlike granzymes A and B, the molecular mechanism of action of granzyme M is unknown. We have characterized the extended substrate specificity of human granzyme M by using purified recombinant enzyme, several positional scanning libraries of coumarin substrates, and a panel of individual p-nitroanilide and coumarin substrates. In contrast to previous studies conducted using thiobenzyl ester substrates (Smyth, M. J., O'Connor, M. D., Trapani, J. A., Kershaw, M. H., and Brinkworth, R. I. (1996) J. Immunol. 156, 4174-4181), a strong preference for leucine at P1 over methionine was demonstrated. The extended substrate specificity was determined to be lysine = norleucine at P4, broad at P3, proline > alanine at P2, and leucine > norleucine > methionine at P1. The enzyme activity was found to be highly dependent on the length and sequence of substrates, indicative of a regulatory function for human granzyme M. Finally, the interaction between granzyme M and the serpins alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor, and proteinase inhibitor 9 was characterized by using a candidate-based approach to identify potential endogenous inhibitors. Proteinase inhibitor 9 was effectively hydrolyzed and inactivated by human granzyme M, raising the possibility that this orphan granzyme bypasses proteinase inhibitor 9 inhibition of granzyme B.

  7. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-12-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis.

  8. Role of saliva proteinase 3 in dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Teng-Yu; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Du, Yue; Wu, Song-Tao; Yuan, Wen-Wen; Yu, Yu; Su, Lin; Luo, Yang; Zhang, Jie-Hua; Lu, Wan-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Jiao; Feng, Yun; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Salivary analysis can be used to assess the severity of caries. Of the known salivary proteins, a paucity of information exists concerning the role of proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease of the chymotrypsin family, in dental caries. Whole, unstimulated saliva was collected from children with varying degrees of active caries and tested using a Human Protease Array Kit and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A significantly decreased concentration of salivary PR3 was noted with increasing severity of dental caries (P<0.01); a positive correlation (r=0.87; P<0.01; Pearson's correlation analysis) was also observed between salivary pH and PR3 concentration. In an antibacterial test, a PR3 concentration of 250 ng·mL−1 or higher significantly inhibited Streptococcus mutans UA159 growth after 12 h of incubation (P<0.05). These studies indicate that PR3 is a salivary factor associated with the severity of dental caries, as suggested by the negative relationship between salivary PR3 concentration and the severity of caries as well as the susceptibility of S. mutans to PR3. PMID:26756046

  9. Substrate and inhibitor studies with human gastric aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, A; Campbell, C J; Grinham, C J; Keane, R M; Lawton, B C; Pendlebury, J E

    1990-01-01

    The separation of pepsin isoenzymes 1, 2, 3 and 5 (gastricsin) in human gastric juice was effected by chromatography on Mono Q ion-exchanger, and slow-moving proteinase was purified to homogeneity by using a modified procedure incorporating a novel affinity-chromatography step. The pH-activity profiles of these enzymes with mucus glycoprotein and basement-membrane substrates were determined; the profiles for pepsin 2 were noticeably different, and, in general, the pH optima for the hydrolysis of basement membrane were more acidic. Pepsin 1 expressed larger specificity constants (kcat./Km) than pepsin 3 with a series of synthetic peptide substrates, reflecting greater binding (smaller Km) by pepsin 1. Inhibitor studies at pH 1.7 and 4.5 with a series of P2-substituted lactoyl-pepstatins implied that valine at position P2 was optimal for inhibiting pepsins 1, 2 and 3 but detrimental for pepsin 5, whereas lysine at position P2 was tolerated well by pepsin 5 but not by pepsins 1, 2 and 3. The potency of lactoyl-pepstatin with lysine at position P2 did not increase as a function of pH. P2-substituted lactoyl-pepstatins failed to show any inhibitory selectivity among pepsins 1, 2 and 3. PMID:2111133

  10. Inactivation kinetics of adenovirus serotype 2 with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee; Shisler, Joanna L; Mariñas, Benito J

    2008-03-01

    The effect of pH (6-10), temperature (10-30 degrees C), disinfectant concentration (1-11mg/l as Cl(2)), and ammonia nitrogen-to-chlorine molar ratio (1.3-52) on the inactivation kinetics of adenovirus serotype 2 with monochloramine was investigated by performing batch-reactor experiments with synthetic 0.01M buffer (phosphate or borate) solutions. The inactivation kinetics was independent of monochloramine concentration and ammonia nitrogen-to-chlorine molar ratio but had strong pH dependence, with the rate of inactivation decreasing with increasing pH. The kinetics at pH 6 and 8 were consistent with pseudo-first-order kinetics, while curves at pH 10 were characterized by a lag phase followed by a pseudo-first-order phase. The rate of inactivation increased with increasing temperature-activation energies of 56.5kJ/mole (pH 8) and 72.6kJ/mole (pH 10). The results obtained in this study revealed that monochloramine disinfection might not generally provide adequate control of adenoviruses in drinking water at high pH and low temperature.

  11. Enzymes active in the areas undergoing cartilage resorption during the development of the secondary ossification center in the tibiae of rats ages 0-21 days: I. Two groups of proteinases cleave the core protein of aggrecan.

    PubMed

    Lee, E R; Lamplugh, L; Davoli, M A; Beauchemin, A; Chan, K; Mort, J S; Leblond, C P

    2001-09-01

    The formation of a secondary ossification center in the cartilaginous epiphysis of long bones requires the excavation of canals and marrow space and, therefore, the resorption of cartilage. On the assumption that its resorption requires the lysis of the major cartilage component aggrecan, it was noted that the core protein may be cleaved in vitro by proteinases from two subfamilies: matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases. Such cleavage results in aggrecan being replaced by a fragment of itself referred to as a "G1-fragment." To find out if this cleavage occurs in the developing epiphysis of the rat tibia, the approach has been to localize the G1 fragments. For this purpose two neoepitope antisera were applied, one capable of recognizing the MMP-generated G1-fragment that bears the C-terminus ...FVDIPEN341 and the other capable of recognizing the aggrecanase-generated G1-fragment that carries the C-terminus ...NITEGE373. With the aid of these antisera, we report here that aggrecan cleavage is localized to newly developed sites of erosion. Thus, at 6 days of age, canals allowing the entry of capillaries are dug out from the surface of the epiphysis in a radial direction (stage I), whereas immunostaining indicative of aggrecan cleavage by MMPs appears at the blind end of each canal. The next day, the canal blind ends fuse to create a marrow space in the epiphysis (stage II), whereas immunostaining produced by MMPs occurs along the walls of this space. By 9 days, clusters of hypertrophic chondrocytes are scattered along the marrow space wall to initiate the formation of the secondary ossification center (stage III), where the resorption sites are unreactive to either antiserum. From the 9th to the 21st day, the center keeps on enlarging and, as the distal wall of the marrow space recedes, it is intensely immunostained with both antisera indicating that both MMPs and aggrecanases are involved in this resorption. We conclude, that both enzyme subfamilies

  12. A second hepatitis C virus-encoded proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, A; McCourt, D W; Wychowski, C; Feinstone, S M; Rice, C M

    1993-01-01

    Host and viral proteinases are believed to be required for the production of at least nine hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific polyprotein cleavage products. Although several cleavages appear to be catalyzed by host signal peptidase or the HCV NS3 serine proteinase, the enzyme responsible for cleavage at the 2/3 site has not been identified. In this report, we have defined the 2/3 cleavage site and obtained evidence which suggests that this cleavage is mediated by a second HCV-encoded proteinase, located between aa 827 and 1207. This region encompasses the C-terminal portion of the 23-kDa NS2 protein, the 2/3 cleavage site, and the serine proteinase domain of NS3. Efficient processing at the 2/3 site was observed in mammalian cells, Escherichia coli, and in plant or animal cell-free translation systems in the absence of microsomal membranes. Cleavage at the 2/3 site was abolished by alanine substitutions for NS2 residues His-952 or Cys-993 but was unaffected by several other substitution mutations, including those that inactivate NS3 serine proteinase function. Mutations abolishing cleavage at the 2/3 site did not block cleavage at other sites in the HCV polyprotein. Cotransfection experiments indicate that the 2/3 site can be cleaved in trans, which should facilitate purification and further characterization of this enzyme. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8248148

  13. Molecular characterization of adenoviruses among finnish military conscripts.

    PubMed

    Mölsä, Markos; Hemmilä, Heidi; Rönkkö, Esa; Virkki, Maria; Nikkari, Simo; Ziegler, Thedi

    2016-04-01

    Although adenoviruses were identified as important respiratory pathogens many years ago, little information is available concerning the prevalence of different adenovirus serotypes, which are circulating and causing epidemics in Finnish military training centers. Over a period of five years from 2008 to 2012, 3577 respiratory specimens were collected from military conscripts presenting with symptoms compatible with acute respiratory tract infection. Upon initial testing for certain respiratory viruses by real-time PCR, 837 of these specimens were identified as adenovirus-positive. For 672 of these specimens, the serotype of the adenovirus responsible was successfully determined by DNA sequencing. Serotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 were detected in 1, 3, 181, and 487 samples, respectively. Adenovirus epidemics were observed during each year of this study. Based on these findings, adenovirus vaccination should be considered for military conscripts in the Finnish Defence Forces.

  14. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farzad, Lisa; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Yagyu, Shigeki; Bertin, Terry; Hemminki, Akseli; Rooney, Cliona; Lee, Brendan; Suzuki, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads) produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD) Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy. PMID:27119096

  15. (13) C-metabolic flux analysis of human adenovirus infection: Implications for viral vector production.

    PubMed

    Carinhas, Nuno; Koshkin, Alexey; Pais, Daniel A M; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2017-01-01

    Adenoviruses are human pathogens increasingly used as gene therapy and vaccination vectors. However, their impact on cell metabolism is poorly characterized. We performed carbon labeling experiments with [1,2-(13) C]glucose or [U-(13) C]glutamine to evaluate metabolic alterations in the amniocyte-derived, E1-transformed 1G3 cell line during production of a human adenovirus type 5 vector (AdV5). Nonstationary (13) C-metabolic flux analysis revealed increased fluxes of glycolysis (17%) and markedly PPP (over fourfold) and cytosolic AcCoA formation (nearly twofold) following infection of growing cells. Interestingly, infection of growth-arrested cells increased overall carbon flow even more, including glutamine anaplerosis and TCA cycle activity (both over 1.5-fold), but was unable to stimulate the PPP and was associated with a steep drop in AdV5 replication (almost 80%). Our results underscore the importance of nucleic and fatty acid biosynthesis for adenovirus replication. Overall, we portray a metabolic blueprint of human adenovirus infection, highlighting similarities with other viruses and cancer, and suggest strategies to improve AdV5 production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 195-207. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-10-16

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  17. Analysis of the adenovirus type 5 terminal protein precursor and DNA polymerase by linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Roovers, D J; van der Lee, F M; van der Wees, J; Sussenbach, J S

    1993-01-01

    A series of adenovirus type 5 precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (Ad pol) genes with linker insertion mutations were separately introduced into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a late vaccinia virus promoter. The recombinant viruses were used for overexpression of the mutant genes in HeLa cells. In total, 22 different mutant pTP and 10 different Ad pol vaccinia virus recombinants were constructed, including some that expressed carboxyl-terminus-truncated forms of both proteins and one that produced the mutant H5ts149 Ad pol. To investigate the structure-function relationships of both proteins, extracts from cells infected with the recombinant viruses were tested for in vitro complementation of the initiation and elongation steps in adenovirus DNA replication. The results were in accordance with those of earlier in vivo experiments with these insertion mutants and indicate that multiple regions of both proteins are essential for adenovirus DNA replication. The carboxyl termini of both pTP and Ad pol were shown to be essential for proper functioning of these proteins during initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Three different DNA replication-negative pTP mutants were shown to have residual activity in the initiation assay, suggesting not only that pTP is required for initiation but also that it may play a role in DNA replication after the deoxycytidylation step. Images PMID:8416372

  18. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-02

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  19. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Jutta; Kontaxis, Georg; Rancan, Chiara; Skern, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb(pro)) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb(pro) L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. (15)N-HSQC measurements of Lb(pro) L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb(pro), lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb(pro), stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb(pro) and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb(pro).

  20. Isolation and characterization of βA3-crystallin associated proteinase from α-crystallin fraction of human lenses

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to characterize the properties of a proteinase activity associated with βA3-crystallin, which was isolated from the α-crystallin fraction of human lenses. Methods An inactive, Arg-bond hydrolyzing proteinase in the α-crystallin fraction, which was isolated from the water soluble (WS) protein fraction of 60- to 70-year-old human lenses, was activated by sodium deoxycholate treatment. The activated enzyme was purified by a three-step procedure that included a size-exclusion Agarose A1.5 m chromatography, non-denaturing preparative gel-electrophoresis, and size-exclusion HPLC. The purified proteinase was characterized for the proteinase type, proteolysis of bovine recombinant γB-, γC-, and γD-crystallins, and its presence in three different protein fractions of human lenses (i.e., α-crystallin, βH-crystallin, and membrane fractions). Results An inactive, Arg-bond hydrolyzing proteinase present in the α-crystallin fraction showed activity on treatment with detergents such as sodium deoxycholate, Triton X-100, octyl β-D-glucopyranoside, and CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamido propyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate). The sodium deoxycholate-activated enzyme was released from the α-crystallin fraction since it eluted at a lower molecular weight species than α-crystallin during size-exclusion Agarose A1.5 m chromatography. Following a three-step purification procedure, the enzyme showed three species between 22 kDa and 25 kDa during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE) analysis. The three protein bands were identified as βA3-, βB1-, and βB2-crystallin by the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and tandem mass spectrometric (ES-MS/MS) methods. Inhibitor studies revealed that the enzyme was a serine-type proteinase. Among the recombinant βA3-, βB1-, or βB2-crystallins, only the βA3-crystallin exhibited the proteinase activity following detergent treatment and size

  1. Effects of leupeptin on proteinase and germination of castor beans

    SciTech Connect

    Alpi, A.; Beevers, H.

    1981-10-01

    Leupeptin, tripeptide inhibitor of some proteinases, was shown previously to maintain the stability of several enzymes (isocitrate lyase, fumarase, and catalase) in crude extracts of castor bean endosperm. This reagent is now shown to inhibit the breakdown of water-soluble and crystalloid-storage proteins of the protein bodies isolated from castor beans by the SH-proteinase and it also inhibits the endopeptidase from mung beans. When suitably introduced into the endosperm of dry castor beans it strongly inhibits germination and seedling development. Application of leupeptin to endosperm halves removed from the seed prevents the normal development of enzymes concerned with gluconeogenesis from fat and drastically curtails sugar production. The results suggest that the SH-proteinase is intimately involved in the mobilization of storage proteins.

  2. Production of proteinase on noncarbohydrate carbon sources by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Morihara, K

    1965-09-01

    Proteinase production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in medium containing noncarbohydrate materials, especially various hydrocarbons, as the sole carbon source. On heavy oil, kerosene, n-paraffinic hydrocarbon of C(12), C(14), or C(16), and propylene glycol, the bacteria grew well and high protinase production was observed. However, production on paraffinic hydrocarbon differed remarkably with strains of varied origins. The elastase-positive strain, IFO 3455, showed abundant growth and high proteinase production on medium containing a paraffin of C(12), C(14), or C(16), whereas the elastase-negative strain, IFO 3080, showed little growth on the same medium. Neither elastase-positive nor elastase-negative strains, however, utilized n-paraffins of C(5) to C(10), or various aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. The proteinases produced on the noncarbohydrate medium were identical with those produced in glucose medium.

  3. Adenovirus dodecahedron, a new vector for human gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Ruigrok, R W; Gout, E; Buffet, S; Chroboczek, J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus is one of most efficient delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, the initial enthusiasm for the use of recombinant adenovirus for gene therapy has been tempered by strong immune responses that develop to the virus and virus-infected cells. Even though recombinant adenoviruses are replication-defective, they introduce into the recipient cell, together with the gene of interest, viral genetes that might lead to fortuitous recombination if the recipient is infected by wild-type adenovirus. We propose the use of a dodecahedron made of adenovirus pentons or penton bases as an alternative vector for human gene therapy. The penton is a complex of two oligomeric proteins, a penton base and fiber, involved in the cell attachment, internalization, and liberation of virus into the cytoplasm. The dodecahedron retains many of the advantages of adenovirus for gene transfer such as efficiency of entry, efficient release of DNA from endosomes, and wide range of cell and tissue targets. Because it consists of only one or two adenovirus proteins instead of the 11 contained in an adenovirus virion and it does not contain the viral genome, it is potentially a safer alternative to recombinant adenovirus.

  4. A Compact Viral Processing Proteinase/Ubiquitin Hydrolase from the OTU Family

    PubMed Central

    Chenon, Mélanie; Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphaël; Jupin, Isabelle; Bressanelli, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) - a member of the alphavirus-like supergroup of viruses - serves as a model system for positive-stranded RNA virus membrane-bound replication. TYMV encodes a precursor replication polyprotein that is processed by the endoproteolytic activity of its internal cysteine proteinase domain (PRO). We recently reported that PRO is actually a multifunctional enzyme with a specific ubiquitin hydrolase (DUB) activity that contributes to viral infectivity. Here, we report the crystal structure of the 150-residue PRO. Strikingly, PRO displays no homology to other processing proteinases from positive-stranded RNA viruses, including that of alphaviruses. Instead, the closest structural homologs of PRO are DUBs from the Ovarian tumor (OTU) family. In the crystal, one molecule's C-terminus inserts into the catalytic cleft of the next, providing a view of the N-terminal product complex in replication polyprotein processing. This allows us to locate the specificity determinants of PRO for its proteinase substrates. In addition to the catalytic cleft, at the exit of which the active site is unusually pared down and solvent-exposed, a key element in molecular recognition by PRO is a lobe N-terminal to the catalytic domain. Docking models and the activities of PRO and PRO mutants in a deubiquitylating assay suggest that this N-terminal lobe is also likely involved in PRO's DUB function. Our data thus establish that DUBs can evolve to specifically hydrolyze both iso- and endopeptide bonds with different sequences. This is achieved by the use of multiple specificity determinants, as recognition of substrate patches distant from the cleavage sites allows a relaxed specificity of PRO at the sites themselves. Our results thus shed light on how such a compact protein achieves a diversity of key functions in viral genome replication and host-pathogen interaction. PMID:23966860

  5. A compact viral processing proteinase/ubiquitin hydrolase from the OTU family.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Charlotte; Ayach, Maya; Beaurepaire, Lionel; Chenon, Mélanie; Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphaël; Jupin, Isabelle; Bressanelli, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV)--a member of the alphavirus-like supergroup of viruses--serves as a model system for positive-stranded RNA virus membrane-bound replication. TYMV encodes a precursor replication polyprotein that is processed by the endoproteolytic activity of its internal cysteine proteinase domain (PRO). We recently reported that PRO is actually a multifunctional enzyme with a specific ubiquitin hydrolase (DUB) activity that contributes to viral infectivity. Here, we report the crystal structure of the 150-residue PRO. Strikingly, PRO displays no homology to other processing proteinases from positive-stranded RNA viruses, including that of alphaviruses. Instead, the closest structural homologs of PRO are DUBs from the Ovarian tumor (OTU) family. In the crystal, one molecule's C-terminus inserts into the catalytic cleft of the next, providing a view of the N-terminal product complex in replication polyprotein processing. This allows us to locate the specificity determinants of PRO for its proteinase substrates. In addition to the catalytic cleft, at the exit of which the active site is unusually pared down and solvent-exposed, a key element in molecular recognition by PRO is a lobe N-terminal to the catalytic domain. Docking models and the activities of PRO and PRO mutants in a deubiquitylating assay suggest that this N-terminal lobe is also likely involved in PRO's DUB function. Our data thus establish that DUBs can evolve to specifically hydrolyze both iso- and endopeptide bonds with different sequences. This is achieved by the use of multiple specificity determinants, as recognition of substrate patches distant from the cleavage sites allows a relaxed specificity of PRO at the sites themselves. Our results thus shed light on how such a compact protein achieves a diversity of key functions in viral genome replication and host-pathogen interaction.

  6. [Isolation of a specific inhibitor of microbial serine proteinase from kidney bean seeds].

    PubMed

    Mosolov, V V; Malova, E L; Cheban, A N

    1983-10-01

    A protein acting as a specific inhibitor of microbial serine proteinases was isolated from kidney bean seeds. The purification procedure included complex formation between the inhibitor and Aspergillus oryzae proteinase. The protein with a Mr approximately 10 000 inhibits subtilisin and Asp. oryzae proteinase but does not affect trypsin and chymotrypsin. The inhibitor molecule contains no half-cystine residues.

  7. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation.

    PubMed

    Mangel, Walter F; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a "molecular sled" to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  8. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGES

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  9. Structure and uncoating of immature adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Marabini, Roberto; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Mangel, Walter F.; Flint, S. Jane; Martín, Carmen San

    2009-01-01

    Summary Maturation via proteolytical processing is a common trait in the viral world, and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins, but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion; and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytical processing are not infectious. We present the 3D structure of immature adenovirus particles, as represented by the thermosensitive mutant Ad2 ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions, and compare it with the mature capsid. Our 3DEM maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the location of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help to define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged. PMID:19563809

  10. Structure, Function and Dynamics in Adenovirus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed. PMID:25421887

  11. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  12. A Novel Psittacine Adenovirus Identified During an Outbreak of Avian Chlamydiosis and Human Psittacosis: Zoonosis Associated with Virus-Bacterium Coinfection in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K. Y.; Zhang, Anna J. X.; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C. Y.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Chan, Andy S. F.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lo, Janice Y. C.; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3′ end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3–54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6–70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1–74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should

  13. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Tse, Herman; Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K Y; Zhang, Anna J X; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Chan, Andy S F; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lo, Janice Y C; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should be

  14. Phase diagram of crystallization of Aspergillus niger acid proteinase A, a non-pepsin-type acid proteinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Norio; Ataka, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Tomonari; Katsura, Tatsuo; Tanokura, Masaru

    1996-10-01

    Proteinase A from Aspergillus niger var. macrosporus is a non-pepsin-type acid proteinase with an extremely low isoelectric point (pI 3.3). The protein is crystallized from ammonium sulfate solutions of pH lower than 4. The crystallization is affected by the presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). We have studied the phase diagram of the crystallization of proteinase A in the absence and presence of DMSO, to clarify crystallization at such an extremely low pH and to study the effects of DMSO. The results indicate that the logarithm of protein solubility is a rectilinear function of ammonium sulfate concentration in both the absence and presence of DMSO. DMSO definitely lowers the solubility at relatively low concentrations of ammonium sulfate, but had little effect on protein solubility at higher concentrations of ammonium sulfate.

  15. Experimental Cross-Species Infection of Common Marmosets by Titi Monkey Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eunice C.; Liu, Maria; Brasky, Kathleen M.; Lanford, Robert E.; Kelly, Kristi R.; Bales, Karen L.; Schnurr, David P.; Canfield, Don R.; Patterson, Jean L.; Chiu, Charles Y.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV), as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses. PMID:23894316

  16. Use of macrophages to target therapeutic adenovirus to human prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Muthana, Munitta; Giannoudis, Athina; Scott, Simon D; Fang, Hsin-Yu; Coffelt, Seth B; Morrow, Fiona J; Murdoch, Craig; Burton, Julian; Cross, Neil; Burke, Bernard; Mistry, Roshna; Hamdy, Freddie; Brown, Nicola J; Georgopoulos, Lindsay; Hoskin, Peter; Essand, Magnus; Lewis, Claire E; Maitland, Norman J

    2011-03-01

    New therapies are required to target hypoxic areas of tumors as these sites are highly resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Monocytes continuously extravasate from the bloodstream into tumors where they differentiate into macrophages and accumulate in hypoxic areas, thereby opening up the possibility of using these cells as vehicles to deliver gene therapy to these otherwise inaccessible sites. We describe a new cell-based method that selectively targets an oncolytic adenovirus to hypoxic areas of prostate tumors. In this approach, macrophages were cotransduced with a hypoxia-regulated E1A/B construct and an E1A-dependent oncolytic adenovirus, whose proliferation is restricted to prostate tumor cells using prostate-specific promoter elements from the TARP, PSA, and PMSA genes. When such cotransduced cells reach an area of extreme hypoxia, the E1A/B proteins are expressed, thereby activating replication of the adenovirus. The virus is subsequently released by the host macrophage and infects neighboring tumor cells. Following systemic injection into mice bearing subcutaneous or orthotopic prostate tumors, cotransduced macrophages migrated into hypoxic tumor areas, upregulated E1A protein, and released multiple copies of adenovirus. The virus then infected neighboring cells but only proliferated and was cytotoxic in prostate tumor cells, resulting in the marked inhibition of tumor growth and reduction of pulmonary metastases. This novel delivery system employs 3 levels of tumor specificity: the natural "homing" of macrophages to hypoxic tumor areas, hypoxia-induced proliferation of the therapeutic adenovirus in host macrophages, and targeted replication of oncolytic virus in prostate tumor cells.

  17. Purification, cDNA cloning and characterization of proteinase B, an asparagine-specific endopeptidase from germinating vetch (Vicia sativa L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Shutov, A D; Nong, V H; Senyuk, V I; Jung, R; Horstmann, C; Fischer, J; Nielsen, N C; Müntz, K

    1995-03-01

    Proteinase B, an asparagine-specific endopeptidase, has been purified from germinating vetch (Vicia sativa L.) seeds. The final preparation consists of two enzymically active proteins with molecular masses of approximately 39 kDa and 37 kDa. Synthetic substrates were used to confirm cleavage specificity of the proteinase B preparation. As expected, the enzyme cleaves the substrates at the C-terminal side of Asn residues. The octapeptide ETRNGVEE was digested most efficiently. When Gly was replaced by Ile or Glu, cleavage took place with lower efficiency. Polyclonal antibodies displayed both proteins in cotyledon extracts of germinated vetch seeds. In addition, a strong cross-reacting protein band was found in cotyledon extracts of developing seeds, indicating the presence of a very similar enzyme during seed development. cDNA clones encoding proteinase B precursor have been obtained on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequence DDDFEGTRWAILLAGS, by means of the polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA clones contain an open reading frame of 1479 bp encoding a polypeptide of 493 amino acids. The precursor displayed 59% sequence identity to the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of a vacuolar Asn-specific enzyme from the developing castor beam endosperm which is thought to catalyze the post-translational processing of pro-proteins into the mature forms. Proteinase B is synthesized de novo during seed germination. The results of Southern-blot analyses suggested that there are at least two genes for proteinase B.

  18. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:23455436

  19. Incorporation of adenovirus in calcium phosphate precipitates enhances gene transfer to airway epithelia in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Fasbender, A; Lee, J H; Walters, R W; Moninger, T O; Zabner, J; Welsh, M J

    1998-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia is inefficient because the apical membrane lacks the receptor activity to bind adenovirus fiber protein. Calcium phosphate (CaPi) precipitates have been used to deliver plasmid DNA to cultured cell lines. However, such precipitates are not effective in many primary cultures or in vivo. Here we show that incorporating recombinant adenovirus into a CaPi coprecipitate markedly enhances transgene expression in cells that are resistant to adenovirus infection. Enhancement requires that the virus be contained in the precipitate and viral proteins are required to increase expression. Ad: CaPi coprecipitates increase gene transfer by increasing fiber-independent binding of virus to cells. With differentiated cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia in vitro, a 20-min application of Ad:CaPi coprecipitates that encode CF transmembrane conductance regulator produced as much CF transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- current as a 24-h application of adenovirus alone. We found that Ad:CaPi coprecipitates also increased transgene expression in mouse lung in vivo; importantly, expression was particularly prominent in airway epithelia. These results suggest a new mechanism for gene transfer that may be applicable to a number of different gene transfer applications and could be of value in gene transfer to CF airway epithelia in vivo. PMID:9649572

  20. Exposure to tobacco-derived materials induces overproduction of secreted proteinases in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Small-Howard, Andrea; Turner, Helen . E-mail: hturner@queens.org

    2005-04-15

    Mast cells reside at interfaces with the environment, including the mucosa of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This localization exposes mast cells to inhaled, or ingested, environmental challenges. In the airways of smokers, resident immune cells will be in contact with the condensed components of cigarette smoke. Mast cells are of particular interest due to their ability to promote airway remodeling and mucus hypersecretion. Clinical data show increased levels of mast cell-secreted tryptase and increased numbers of degranulated mast cells in the lavage and bronchial tissue of smokers. Since mast cell-secreted proteinases (MCPTs), including tryptases, contribute to pathological airway remodeling, we investigated the relationship between mast cell proteinases and smoke exposure. We exposed a mast cell line to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). We show that CSC exposure increases MCPT levels in mast cells using an assay for tryptase-type MCPT activity. We hypothesized that this increase in MCPT activity reflects a CSC-induced increase in the cytosolic pool of proteinase molecules, via stimulation of MCPT transcription. Transcript array data suggested that mRNA changes in response to CSC were limited in number and peaked after 3 h of CSC exposure. However, we noted marked transcriptional regulation of several MCPT genes. CSC-induced changes in the mRNA levels for MCPTs were confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke up-regulates MCPT levels in mast cells at both the protein and the mRNA level. We suggest that the pathological airway remodeling that has been described in clinical studies of smoke inhalation may be attributable to MCPT overproduction in vivo.

  1. Serine proteinases from barley malt may degrade beta-amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley seed proteinases are critically important to seed germination and malting in that they generate amino acids from seed N reserves, supporting embryo growth during germination and yeast fermentation during brewing. However, relatively little is known regarding the endogenous protein substrate ...

  2. Proteinases involved in the degradation of trypsin inhibitor in germinating mung beans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A; Tan-Wilson, A L

    1983-01-01

    The mung bean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) trypsin inhibitor (MBTI) is rapidly modified by limited proteolysis during the early stages of seedling growth. Using an electrophoretic assay that separates the unmodified inhibitor (MBTI-F) and the first two modified species (MBTI-E and -C), a pH optimum of approximately 4 was found for the modification reaction. The inhibitor modifying activity is initially low in ungerminated seeds, with the reaction F leads to E being the primary reaction catalyzed. Activity catalyzing the production of MBTI-C appears on the first day of germination. This activity (F leads to E leads to C) increases up to 6 days after inhibition, at which time the cotyledons begin to abscise. The activity converting MBTI-F and -E to MBTI-C was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (3.3 mM) but only weakly by iodoacetate (9 mM) and not at all by pepstatin A (9 microM), leupeptin (18 microM), or EDTA (5 mM). These results suggest the involvement of proteinases other than the major endopeptidase of the germinating seed, vicilin peptidohydrolase. This conclusion is further supported by gel filtration of the extracts of cotyledons on Sephacryl S-200. At least three proteinases are present in germinated cotyledons capable of modifying MBTI-F to MBTI-C and/or -E. All are distinguishable from vicilin peptidohydrolase on the basis of their molecular weight and inhibition by low molecular weight organic reagents.

  3. Enhanced inactivation of adenovirus under polychromatic UV lamps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adenovirus is recognized as the most UV-resistant waterborne pathogen of concern to public health microbiologists. The US EPA has stipulated that a UV fluence (dose) of 186 mJ cm-2 is required for 4-log inactivation credit in water treatment. However, all adenovirus inactivation data to date publi...

  4. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  5. The search for adenovirus 14 in children in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Laham, Federico R; Jewell, Alan M; Schoonover, Shauna L; Demmler, Gail J; Piedra, Pedro A

    2008-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)14 has recently emerged in the United States causing outbreaks of severe respiratory disease. To determine if Ad14 circulated in Houston, Texas, during the same time as an outbreak in military recruits in nearby San Antonio, 215 pediatric adenovirus isolates were serotyped using microneutralization. None were Ad14; Ad1, Ad2, and Ad3 were the most common identified serotypes.

  6. A novel adenovirus in Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-05-07

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins.

  7. Adenovirus dodecahedron allows large multimeric protein transduction in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Schoehn, G; Foucaud-Gamen, J; Gout, E; Garcel, A; Drouet, E; Chroboczek, J

    2003-04-01

    Adenovirus dodecahedron is a virus-like particle composed of only two viral proteins of human adenovirus serotype 3 that are responsible for virus attachment and internalization. We show here that this dodecameric particle, devoid of genetic information, efficiently penetrates human cells and can deliver large multimeric proteins such as immunoglobulins.

  8. E1B and E4 oncoproteins of adenovirus antagonize the effect of apoptosis inducing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Roberta L.; Wilkinson, John C.; Ornelles, David A.

    2014-05-15

    Adenovirus inundates the productively infected cell with linear, double-stranded DNA and an abundance of single-stranded DNA. The cellular response to this stimulus is antagonized by the adenoviral E1B and E4 early genes. A mutant group C adenovirus that fails to express the E1B-55K and E4ORF3 genes is unable to suppress the DNA-damage response. Cells infected with this double-mutant virus display significant morphological heterogeneity at late times of infection and frequently contain fragmented nuclei. Nuclear fragmentation was due to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria into the nucleus. The release of AIF was dependent on active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which appeared to be activated by viral DNA replication. Nuclear fragmentation did not occur in AIF-deficient cells or in cells treated with a PARP-1 inhibitor. The E1B-55K or E4ORF3 proteins independently prevented nuclear fragmentation subsequent to PARP-1 activation, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of PAR-modified proteins. - Highlights: • E1B-55K or E4orf3 prevents nuclear fragmentation. • Nuclear fragmentation requires AIF and PARP-1 activity. • Adenovirus DNA replication activates PARP-1. • E1B-55K or E4orf3 proteins alter the distribution of PAR.

  9. Purification and N-terminal sequence of a serine proteinase-like protein (BMK-CBP) from the venom of the Chinese scorpion (Buthus martensii Karsch).

    PubMed

    Gao, Rong; Zhang, Yong; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam

    2008-08-01

    A serine proteinase-like protein was isolated from the venom of Chinese red scorpion (Buthus martensii Karsch) by combination of gel filtration, ion-exchange and reveres-phase chromatography and named BMK-CBP. The apparent molecular weight of BMK-CBP was identified as 33 kDa by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing condition. The sequence of N-terminal 40 amino acids was obtained by Edman degradation. The sequence shows highest similarity to proteinase from insect source. When tested with commonly used substrates of proteinase, no significant hydrolytic activity was observed for BMK-CBP. The purified BMK-CBP was found to bind to the cancer cell line MCF-7 and the cell binding ability was dose-dependent.

  10. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  11. Digestive proteinases of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) larvae: purification and characterization of a trypsin-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B; Elpidina, E N

    2005-03-01

    A new trypsin-like proteinase was purified to homogeneity from the posterior midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and gel filtration on Superdex-75. The isolated enzyme had molecular mass of 25.5 kD and pI 7.4. The enzyme was also characterized by temperature optimum at 55 degrees C, pH optimum at 8.5, and K(m) value of 0.04 mM (for hydrolysis of Bz-Arg-pNA). According to inhibitor analysis the enzyme is a trypsin-like serine proteinase stable within the pH range of 5.0-9.5. The enzyme hydrolyzes peptide bonds formed by Arg or Lys residues in the P1 position with a preference for relatively long peptide substrates. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, IVGGSSISISSVPXQIXLQY, shares 50-72% identity with other insect trypsin-like proteinases, and 44-50% identity to mammalian trypsins. The isolated enzyme is sensitive to inhibition by plant proteinase inhibitors and it can serve as a suitable target for control of digestion in this stored product pest.

  12. Regulation of transcription of the adenovirus EII promoter by gene products: Absence of sequence specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, R.E.; Kaufman, R.J.; Sharp, P.A.

    1984-10-01

    During adenovirus infection, the EII promoter is positively regulated by products of the EIa region. The authors have studied this regulation by fusing a DNA segment containing the adenovirus EII promoter to a dihydrofolate reductase cDNA segment. Expression of this hybrid gene is stimulated in trans when cell lines containing an integrated copy are either transfected with plasmids carrying the EIa region or infected with adenovirus. This suggests that EIa activity regulates transcription of the EII promoter in the absence of other viral proteins and that this stimulation can occur when the EII promoter is organized in cellular chromatin. Transcription from the EII promoter is initiated at two sites in cell lines lacking EIa activity. Introduction of the EIa region preferentially stimulated transcription from one of these two sites. A sensitive, stable cotransfection assay was used to test for specific EII sequences required for stimulation. EIa activity stimulates all mutaant promoters; the most extensive deletion retained only 18 base pairs of sequences upstream of the initiation site. They suggest that regulation of a promoter by the EIa region does not depend on the presence of a set of specific sequences, but instead reflects a characteristic of promoters that have been exogenously introduced into cells. Insertion of the 72-base-pair repeat of simian-virus 40 in cis enhances transcription from the EII promoter. The stimulatory effects of EIa activity and of the simian virus 40 sequence are additive and appear to differ mechanistically.

  13. Nepenthesin, a unique member of a novel subfamily of aspartic proteinases: enzymatic and structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Athauda, Senarath B P; Matsumoto, Koji; Rajapakshe, Sanath; Kuribayashi, Masayuki; Kojima, Masaki; Kubomura-Yoshida, Nobuko; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shibata, Chiaki; Inoue, Hideshi

    2005-12-01

    Carnivorous plants are known to secrete acid proteinases to digest prey, mainly insects, for nitrogen uptake. In our recent study, we have purified, for the first time, to homogeneity two acid proteinases, nepenthesin I (Nep I) and nepenthesin II (Nep II) from the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes distillatoria and investigated their enzymatic and structural characteristics. Both enzymes were optimally active at pH approx. 2.6 toward acid-denatured hemoglobin; the specificity of Nep I toward oxidized insulin B chain appears to be similar, but slightly wider than those of other aspartic proteinases (APs). At or below 50 degrees C both enzymes were remarkably stable; especially Nep I was extremely stable over a wide range of pH from 3 to 10 for over 30 days. This suggests an evolutionary adaptation of the enzymes to their specific habitat. We have also cloned the cDNAs and deduced the complete amino acid sequences of the precursors of Nep I and Nep II from the pitcher tissue of Nepenthes gracilis. Although the corresponding mature enzymes are homologous with ordinary pepsin-type APs, both enzymes had a high content of cysteine residues (12 residues per molecule), which are assumed to form six unique disulfide bonds as suggested by computer modeling and are thought to contribute toward the remarkable stability of Neps. Moreover, the amino acid sequence identity of Neps with ordinary APs, including plant vacuolar APs, are remarkably low (approx. 20%), and phylogenetic comparison shows that Neps are distantly related to them to form a novel subfamily of APs with a high content of cysteine residues and a characteristic insertion, named 'the Nep-type AP (NAP)-specific insertion', including a large number of novel, orthologous plant APs emerging in the gene/protein databases.

  14. Enzymic and structural characterization of nepenthesin, a unique member of a novel subfamily of aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed

    Athauda, Senarath B P; Matsumoto, Koji; Rajapakshe, Sanath; Kuribayashi, Masayuki; Kojima, Masaki; Kubomura-Yoshida, Nobuko; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shibata, Chiaki; Inoue, Hideshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2004-07-01

    Carnivorous plants are known to secrete acid proteinases to digest prey, mainly insects, for nitrogen uptake. In the present study, we have purified, for the first time, to homogeneity two acid proteinases (nepenthesins I and II) from the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes distillatoria (a pitcher-plant known locally as badura) and investigated their enzymic and structural characteristics. Both enzymes were optimally active at pH approx. 2.6 towards acid-denatured haemoglobin; the specificity of nepenthesin I towards oxidized insulin B chain appears to be similar, but slightly wider than those of other APs (aspartic proteinases). Among the enzymic properties, however, the most notable is their unusual stability: both enzymes were remarkably stable at or below 50 degrees C, especially nepenthesin I was extremely stable over a wide range of pH from 3 to 10 for over 30 days. This suggests an evolutionary adaptation of the enzymes to their specific habitat. We have also cloned the cDNAs and deduced the complete amino acid sequences of the precursors of nepenthesins I and II (437 and 438 residues respectively) from the pitcher tissue of N. gracilis. Although the corresponding mature enzymes (each 359 residues) are homologous with ordinary pepsin-type APs, both enzymes had a high content of cysteine residues (12 residues/molecule), which are assumed to form six unique disulphide bonds as suggested by computer modelling and are supposed to contribute towards the remarkable stability of nepenthesins. Moreover, the amino acid sequence identity of nepenthesins with ordinary APs, including plant vacuolar APs, is remarkably low (approx. 20%), and phylogenetic comparison shows that nepenthesins are distantly related to them to form a novel subfamily of APs with a high content of cysteine residues and a characteristic insertion, named 'the nepenthesin-type AP-specific insertion', that includes a large number of novel, orthologous plant APs emerging in the gene/protein databases.

  15. An in-built proteinase inhibitor system for the protection of recombinant proteins recovered from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Daniel; Anguenot, Raphaël; Brunelle, France; Le, Van Quy; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Trépanier, Sonia; Michaud, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Proteolytic degradation represents a significant barrier to the efficient production of several recombinant proteins in plants, both in vivo during their expression and in vitro during their recovery from source tissues. Here, we describe a strategy to protect recombinant proteins during the recovery process, based on the coexpression of a heterologous proteinase inhibitor acting as a 'mouse trap' against the host proteases during extraction. After confirming the importance of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities in crude protein extracts of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) leaves, transgenic lines of potato expressing either tomato cathepsin D inhibitor (CDI) or bovine aprotinin, both active against trypsin and chymotrypsin, were generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation. Leaf crude protein extracts from CDI-expressing lines, showing decreased levels of cathepsin D-like and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase hydrolysing activities in vitro, conducted decreased turnover rates of the selection marker protein neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) relative to the turnover rates measured for transgenic lines expressing only the marker protein. A similar stabilizing effect on NPTII was observed in leaf protein extracts from plant lines coexpressing bovine aprotinin, confirming the ability of ectopically expressed broad-spectrum serine proteinase inhibitors to reproduce the protein-stabilizing effect of low-molecular-weight proteinase inhibitors generally added to protein extraction media.

  16. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  17. “Hit-and-Run” Transformation by Adenovirus Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nevels, Michael; Täuber, Birgitt; Spruss, Thilo; Wolf, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    According to classical concepts of viral oncogenesis, the persistence of virus-specific oncogenes is required to maintain the transformed cellular phenotype. In contrast, the “hit-and-run” hypothesis claims that viruses can mediate cellular transformation through an initial “hit,” while maintenance of the transformed state is compatible with the loss (“run”) of viral molecules. It is well established that the adenovirus E1A and E1B gene products can cooperatively transform primary human and rodent cells to a tumorigenic phenotype and that these cells permanently express the viral oncogenes. Additionally, recent studies have shown that the adenovirus E4 region encodes two novel oncoproteins, the products of E4orf6 and E4orf3, which cooperate with the viral E1A proteins to transform primary rat cells in an E1B-like fashion. Unexpectedly, however, cells transformed by E1A and either E4orf6 or E4orf3 fail to express the viral E4 gene products, and only a subset contain E1A proteins. In fact, the majority of these cells lack E4- and E1A-specific DNA sequences, indicating that transformation occurred through a hit-and-run mechanism. We provide evidence that the unusual transforming activities of the adenoviral oncoproteins may be due to their mutagenic potential. Our results strongly support the possibility that even tumors that lack any detectable virus-specific molecules can be of viral origin, which could have a significant impact on the use of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:11238835

  18. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Rui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Lin; Jin, Haifeng; Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-06-29

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma.

  19. Bio-physical evaluation and in vivo delivery of plant proteinase inhibitor immobilized on silica nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Neha; Doke, Dhananjay S; Khandare, Jayant J; Jawale, Priyanka V; Biradar, Ankush V; Giri, Ashok P

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant expression of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors (CanPI-13) and its application via synthetic carrier for the crop protection is the prime objective of our study. Herein, we explored proteinase inhibitor peptide immobilization on silica based nanospheres and rods followed by its pH mediated release in vitro and in vivo. Initial studies suggested silica nanospheres to be a suitable candidate for peptide immobilization. Furthermore, the interactions were characterized biophysically to ascertain their conformational stability and biological activity. Interestingly, bioactive peptide loading at acidic pH on nanospheres was found to be 62% and showed 56% of peptide release at pH 10, simulating gut milieu of the target pest Helicoverpa armigera. Additionally, in vivo study demonstrated significant reduction in insect body mass (158 mg) as compared to the control insects (265 mg) on 8th day after feeding with CanPI-13 based silica nanospheres. The study confirms that peptide immobilized silica nanosphere is capable of affecting overall growth and development of the feeding insects, which is known to hamper fecundity and fertility of the insects. Our study illustrates the utility and development of peptide-nanocarrier based platform in delivering diverse biologically active complexes specific to gut pH of H. armigera.

  20. Mutational analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease suggests functional homology with aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, D D; Hutchison, C A; Edgell, M H; Farmerie, W G; Swanstrom, R

    1989-01-01

    Processing of the retroviral gag and pol gene products is mediated by a viral protease. Bacterial expression systems have been developed which permit genetic analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease as measured by cleavage of the pol protein precursor. Deletion analysis of the pol reading frame locates the sequences required to encode a protein with appropriate proteolytic activity near the left end of the pol reading frame but largely outside the gag-pol overlap region, which is at the extreme left end of pol. Most missense mutations within an 11-amino-acid domain highly conserved among retroviral proteases and with sequence similarity to the active site of aspartic proteinases abolish appropriate processing, suggesting that the retrovirus proteases share a catalytic mechanism with aspartic proteinases. Substitution of the amino acids flanking the scissile bond at three of the processing sites encoded by pol demonstrates distinct sequence requirements for cleavage at these different sites. The inclusion of a charged amino acid at the processing site blocks cleavage. A subset of these substitutions also inhibits processing at the nonmutated sites. Images PMID:2642305

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of CMS1MS2: a cysteine proteinase from Carica candamarcensis latex

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Marco Túlio Ribeiro; Teixeira, Raphael Dias; Ribeiro, Henrique de Assis Lopes; Turchetti, Andréia Pereira; Junqueira, Caroline Furtado; Lopes, Míriam Tereza Paz; Salas, Carlos Edmundo; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases from the latex of plants of the family Caricaceae are widely used industrially as well as in pharmaceutical preparations. In the present work, a 23 kDa cysteine proteinase from Carica candamarcensis latex (designated CMS1MS2) was purified for crystallization using three chromatography steps. The enzyme shows about fourfold higher activity than papain with BAPNA as substrate. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction experiments were obtained by the hanging-drop method in the presence of PEG and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals are monoclinic (space group P21), with unit-cell parameters a = 53.26, b = 75.71, c = 53.23 Å, β = 96.81°, and diffract X-rays to 1.8 Å resolution. PMID:18540057

  2. Modification of L-triiodothyronine binding sites from rat erythrocyte membrane by heating and by proteinase treatments.

    PubMed

    Angel, R C; Botta, J A; Farías, R N

    1987-03-12

    The number of binding sites for L-triiodothyronine in rat erythrocyte membranes was increased 2-fold by incubation at 37 degrees C for 60 min. An increase of approximately 3-fold was found when the incubation was carried out at 50 degrees C. The proteinase inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride abolished the effect. Similar increments in the number of binding sites were obtained by treatment of the membranes with proteinases. The Kd values (0.09 X 10(-10) M and 3.6 X 10(-10) M for the high-affinity and the low-affinity binding sites, respectively) remained unchanged after the treatment, as did the free-SH group requirements, storage stability and stereospecificity. Our results suggest that endogenous proteolytic activity could be involved in the increase of the number of membrane latent sites for L-triiodothyronine.

  3. Characterisation of functional and insecticidal properties of a cathepsin L-like proteinase from flesh fly (Sacrophaga peregrina) involved in differentiation of imaginal discs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase from Sacrophaga peregrina (flesh fly), which is involved in differentiation of imaginal discs. The protein has a potential insecticidal activity, since recombinant baculoviruses engineered to express ScathL have an enhanced ability to kill lepidoptera...

  4. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human beta-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, T; Watabe, K; Uehara, K; Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Eto, Y

    1997-02-18

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human beta-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The beta-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the beta-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the beta-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of beta-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology.

  5. Secreted Frizzled Related Protein 2 is a procollagen C proteinase enhancer with a role in myocardial infarction-associated fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Luo, Min; Zhang, Yue; Wilkes, David C.; Ge, Gaoxiang; Grieskamp, Thomas; Yamada, Chikaomi; Liu, Ting-Chun; Huang, Guorui; Basson, Craig T.; Kispert, Andreas; Greenspan, Daniel S.; Sato, Thomas N.

    2009-01-01

    Secreted frizzled related proteins (sFRPs) have emerged as key regulators of a wide range of developmental and disease processes, with virtually all known functions of mammalian sFRPs attributed to their ability to antagonize Wnt signaling. Recently however, the Xenopus and zebrafish sFRP, Sizzled, was shown to function as an antagonist of Chordin processing by Tolloid-like metalloproteinases, leading to the proposal that sFRPs may function as evolutionarily-conserved antagonists of the chordinase activities of this class of proteinases. Herein, in contrast to this proposal, we show that the mammalian sFRP, sFRP2, does not affect Chordin processing, but instead can serve as a direct enhancer of the procollagen C-proteinase activity of Tolloid-like metalloproteinases. We further show that the level of fibrosis, in which procollagen processing by Tolloid-like proteinases plays a rate-limiting role, is markedly reduced in sFRP2-null mice subjected to myocardial infarction. Importantly, this reduced level of fibrosis is accompanied by significantly improved cardiac function. This study thus uncovers a novel function for sFRP2 and a potential therapeutic application for sFRP2 antagonism in controlling fibrosis in the infarcted heart. PMID:19079247

  6. Biochemical and immunological characterization of a recombinantly-produced antifungal cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa).

    PubMed

    Popovic, Milica; Andjelkovic, Uros; Burazer, Lidija; Lindner, Buko; Petersen, Arnd; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2013-10-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors are considered important defense molecules against insect and pathogen attack. The cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) belongs to the cystatin family and shows potent antifungal activity (in vitro and in vivo). However, the low abundance of this molecule in fruit (6μg/g of fresh fruit) seems to limit further investigations on the interaction between phytocystatin and photopathogenic fungi. In this paper the cDNA of the kiwi CPI was expressed in Escherichia coli. Fifteen N-terminal amino acids were identified by Edman degradation, and 77% of the rCPI primary structure was confirmed by mass fingerprint. The structural homology of recombinant CPI (rCPI) to its natural counterpart has been clearly demonstrated in immunological assays (immunoblot and ELISA inhibition). Biological activity of rCPI was demonstrated in inhibition assay with cysteine proteinase papain (EC50 2.78nM). In addition, rCPI reveals antifungal properties toward pathogenic fungi (Alternaria radicina and Botrytis cinerea), which designates it as an interesting model protein for the exploration of plant phytocystatins - pathogen interactions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of natural plant resistance could lead to the development of ecologically safe fungicides for controlling post-harvest diseases and maintaining food quality.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a mammalian cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase from Acanthamoeba healyi

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yeon-Chul; Hwang, Mi-Yul; Yun, Ho-Cheol; Yu, Hak-Sun; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2002-01-01

    We have cloned a cDNA encoding a cysteine proteinase of the Acanthamoeba healyi OC-3A strain isolated from the brain of a granulomatous amoebic encephalitis patient. A DNA probe for an A. healyi cDNA library screening was amplified by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designed on the basis of conserved amino acids franking the active sites of cysteine and asparagine residues that are conserved in the eukaryotic cysteine proteinases. Cysteine proteinase gene of A. healyi (AhCP1) was composed of 330 amino acids with signal sequence, a proposed pro-domain and a predicted active site made up of the catalytic residues, Cys25, His159, and Asn175. Deduced amino acid sequence analysis indicates that AhCP1 belong to ERFNIN subfamily of C1 peptidases. By Northern blot analysis, no direct correlation was observed between AhCP1 mRNA expression and virulence of Acanthamoeba, but the gene was expressed at higher level in amoebae isolated from soil than amoeba from clinical samples. These findings raise the possibility that Ahcp1 protein may play a role in protein metabolism and digestion of phagocytosed bacteria or host tissue debris rather than in invasion of amoebae into host tissue. PMID:11949209

  8. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  9. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of an adenovirus-PEI-bile-acid complex in tumors with low coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cho-Hee; Kasala, Dayananda; Na, Youjin; Lee, Min Sang; Kim, Sung Wan; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2014-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) is a potential vehicle for cancer gene therapy. However, cells that express low levels of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) demonstrate poor Ad infection efficiency. We developed a bile acid-conjugated poly(ethyleneimine) (DA3)-coated Ad complex (Ad/DA3) to enhance Ad transduction efficiency. The size distribution and zeta potential of Ad/DA3 increased to 324 ± 3.08 nm and 10.13 ± 0.21 mV, respectively, compared with those of naked Ad (108 ± 2.26 nm and -17.7 ± 1.5 mV). The transduction efficiency of Ad/DA3 increased in a DA3 polymer concentration-dependent manner. Enhanced gene transfer by Ad/DA3 was more evident in CAR-moderate and CAR-negative cancer cells. Competition assays with a CAR-specific antibody revealed that internalization of Ad/DA3 was not mediated primarily by CAR but involved clathrin-, caveolae-, and macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis. Cancer cell death was significantly increased when oncolytic Ad and DA3 were complexed (RdB-KOX/DA3) compared to that of naked oncolytic Ad and was inversely proportional to CAR levels. Importantly, RdB-KOX/DA3 significantly enhanced apoptosis, reduced angiogenesis, reduced proliferation, and increased active viral replication in human tumor xenografts compared to that of naked Ad. These results demonstrate that a hybrid vector system can increase the efficacy of oncolytic Ad virotherapy, particularly in CAR-limited tumors.

  10. Influenza recombinant vaccine: matrix protein M1 on the platform of the adenovirus dodecahedron.

    PubMed

    Naskalska, A; Szolajska, E; Chaperot, L; Angel, J; Plumas, J; Chroboczek, J

    2009-12-09

    We propose a novel influenza vaccine composed of the adenovirus dodecahedron (Dd) as delivery platform carrying an internal influenza matrix protein M1. To attach the antigen to the vector we used WW domains interacting with Dd. Successful internalization of the Dd-M1WW complex was observed using biochemical and cell biology techniques. We show here that the complex of Dd with antigen is a potent activator of human myeloid dendritic cells (MDC), and that it is efficiently presented by MDC to M1-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes. These results show that proposed vaccine model is feasible and that adenovirus dodecahedron is a potent delivery platform for foreign antigens to human cells.

  11. Adenovirus DNA template for late transcription is not a replicative intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Brison, O; Kédinger, C; Chambon, P

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between adenovirus replication and late transcription has been investigated using viral replication and transcription complexes isolated from infected HeLa cell nuclei. These two types of complexes extracted from adenovirus type 2-infected cell nuclei did not sediment at the same rate on sucrose gradients. Viral replicative intermediates were quantitatively precipitated by immunoglobulins raised against purified 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein, whereas viral transcription complexes remained in the supernatant. These results show that late transcription does not occur on active replication complexes or on 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein-containing replicative intermediates inactive in DNA synthesis. Additional evidence is presented indicating that it is very unlikely that replicative intermediates lacking the 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein could be the template for late transcription. PMID:232191

  12. Mechanisms of pathogenesis of emerging adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cook, James; Radke, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of human adenovirus infections can cause severe illness in people with no known predisposing conditions. The reasons for this increased viral pathogenicity are uncertain. Adenoviruses are constantly undergoing mutation during circulation in the human population, but related phenotypic changes of the viruses are rarely detected because of the infrequency of such outbreaks and the limited biological studies of the emergent strains. Mutations and genetic recombinations have been identified in these new strains. However, the linkage between these genetic changes and increased pathogenicity is poorly understood. It has been observed recently that differences in virus-induced immunopathogenesis can be associated with altered expression of non-mutant viral genes associated with changes in viral modulation of the host innate immune response. Initial small animal studies indicate that these changes in viral gene expression can be associated with enhanced immunopathogenesis in vivo. Available evidence suggests the hypothesis that there is a critical threshold of expression of certain viral genes that determines both the sustainability of viral transmission in the human population and the enhancement of immunopathogenesis. Studies of this possibility will require extension of the analysis of outbreak viral strains from a sequencing-based focus to biological studies of relationships between viral gene expression and pathogenic responses. Advances in this area will require increased coordination among public health organizations, diagnostic microbiology laboratories, and research laboratories to identify, catalog, and systematically study differences between prototype and emergent viral strains that explain the increased pathogenicity that can occur during clinical outbreaks. PMID:28184296

  13. Isolation and Epidemiology of Falcon Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Rideout, Bruce; Sandfort, Cal

    2005-01-01

    An adenovirus was detected by electron microscopy in tissues from falcons that died during an outbreak of inclusion body hepatitis and enteritis that affected neonatal Northern aplomado (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) and peregrine (Falco peregrinus anatum) falcons. Molecular characterization has identified the falcon virus as a new member of the aviadenovirus group (M. Schrenzel, J. L. Oaks, D. Rotstein, G. Maalouf, E. Snook, C. Sandfort, and B. Rideout, J. Clin. Microbiol. 43:3402-3413, 2005). In this study, the virus was successfully isolated and propagated in peregrine falcon embryo fibroblasts, in which it caused visible and reproducible cytopathology. Testing for serum neutralizing antibodies found that infection with this virus was limited almost exclusively to falcons. Serology also found that wild and captive peregrine falcons had high seropositivity rates of 80% and 100%, respectively, although clinical disease was rarely reported in this species. These data implicate peregrine falcons as the natural host and primary reservoir for the virus. Other species of North American falcons, including aplomado falcons, had lower seropositivity rates of 43 to 57%. Falcon species of tropical and/or island origin were uniformly seronegative, although deaths among adults of these species have been described, suggesting they are highly susceptible. Chickens and quail were uniformly seronegative and not susceptible to infection, indicating that fowl were not the source of infection. Based on the information from this study, the primary control of falcon adenovirus infections should be based on segregation of carrier and susceptible falcon species. PMID:16000467

  14. Proinflammatory Effects of Interferon Gamma in Mouse Adenovirus 1 Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mary K.; Procario, Megan C.; Twisselmann, Nele; Wilkinson, J. Erby; Archambeau, Ashley J.; Michele, Daniel E.; Day, Sharlene M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviruses are frequent causes of pediatric myocarditis. Little is known about the pathogenesis of adenovirus myocarditis, and the species specificity of human adenoviruses has limited the development of animal models, which is a significant barrier to strategies for prevention or treatment. We have developed a mouse model of myocarditis following mouse adenovirus 1 (MAV-1) infection to study the pathogenic mechanisms of this important cause of pediatric myocarditis. Following intranasal infection of neonatal C57BL/6 mice, we detected viral replication and induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in the hearts of infected mice. MAV-1 caused myocyte necrosis and induced substantial cellular inflammation that was composed predominantly of CD3+ T lymphocytes. Depletion of IFN-γ during acute infection reduced cardiac inflammation in MAV-1-infected mice without affecting viral replication. We observed decreased contractility during acute infection of neonatal mice, and persistent viral infection in the heart was associated with cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy in adulthood. IFN-γ is a proinflammatory mediator during adenovirus-induced myocarditis, and persistent adenovirus infection may contribute to ongoing cardiac dysfunction. IMPORTANCE Studying the pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by different viruses is essential in order to characterize both virus-specific and generalized factors that contribute to disease. Very little is known about the pathogenesis of adenovirus myocarditis, which is a significant impediment to the development of treatment or prevention strategies. We used MAV-1 to establish a mouse model of human adenovirus myocarditis, providing the means to study host and pathogen factors contributing to adenovirus-induced cardiac disease during acute and persistent infection. The MAV-1 model will enable fundamental studies of viral myocarditis, including IFN-γ modulation as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:25320326

  15. High expression of functional adenovirus DNA polymerase and precursor terminal protein using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stunnenberg, H G; Lange, H; Philipson, L; van Miltenburg, R T; van der Vliet, P C

    1988-01-01

    Initiation of Adenovirus (Ad) DNA replication occurs by a protein-priming mechanism in which the viral precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (pol) as well as two nuclear DNA-binding proteins from uninfected HeLa cells are required. Biochemical studies on the pTP and DNA polymerase proteins separately have been hampered due to their low abundance and their presence as a pTP-pol complex in Ad infected cells. We have constructed a genomic sequence containing the large open reading frame from the Ad5 pol gene to which 9 basepairs from a putative exon were ligated. When inserted behind a modified late promoter of vaccinia virus the resulting recombinant virus produced enzymatically active 140 kDa Ad DNA polymerase. The same strategy was applied to express the 80 kDa pTP gene in a functional form. Both proteins were overexpressed at least 30-fold compared to extracts from Adenovirus infected cells and, when combined, were fully active for initiation in an in vitro Adenovirus DNA replication system. Images PMID:3362670

  16. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberger, Jutta; Rancan, Chiara; Skern, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb{sup pro}) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb{sup pro} L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. {sup 15}N-HSQC measurements of Lb{sup pro} L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb{sup pro}, lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb{sup pro}, stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb{sup pro} and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb{sup pro}. - Highlights: • We examine self-processing of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus. • NMR analysis strongly supports intramolecular self-processing. • Self-processing is a dynamic process with no stable complex. • Structural comparison with nsp1α of PRRSV which forms stable intramolecular complex. • Subdomain orientation explains differences in stability of intramolecular complexes.

  17. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of ubiquitin-like poxvirus proteinase I7L using homology modeling and covalent docking approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Byrd, Chelsea M.; Tseitin, Vladimir; Dai, Dongcheng; Raush, Eugene; Totrov, Maxim; Abagyan, Ruben; Jordan, Robert; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2007-10-01

    Essential for viral replication and highly conserved among poxviridae, the vaccinia virus I7L ubiquitin-like proteinase (ULP) is an attractive target for development of smallpox antiviral drugs. At the same time, the I7L proteinase exemplifies several interesting challenges from the rational drug design perspective. In the absence of a published I7L X-ray structure, we have built a detailed 3D model of the I7L ligand binding site (S2-S2' pocket) based on exceptionally high structural conservation of this site in proteases of the ULP family. The accuracy and limitations of this model were assessed through comparative analysis of available X-ray structures of ULPs, as well as energy based conformational modeling. The 3D model of the I7L ligand binding site was used to perform covalent docking and VLS of a comprehensive library of about 230,000 available ketone and aldehyde compounds. Out of 456 predicted ligands, 97 inhibitors of I7L proteinase activity were confirmed in biochemical assays (˜20% overall hit rate). These experimental results both validate our I7L ligand binding model and provide initial leads for rational optimization of poxvirus I7L proteinase inhibitors. Thus, fragments predicted to bind in the prime portion of the active site can be combined with fragments on non-prime side to yield compounds with improved activity and specificity.

  18. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  19. 13C- and 1H-NMR studies of oxyanion and tetrahedral intermediate stabilization by the serine proteinases: optimizing inhibitor warhead specificity and potency by studying the inhibition of the serine proteinases by peptide-derived chloromethane and glyoxal inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Malthouse, J P G

    2007-06-01

    Catalysis by the serine proteinases proceeds via a tetrahedral intermediate whose oxyanion is stabilized by hydrogen-bonding in the oxyanion hole. There have been extensive (13)C-NMR studies of oxyanion and tetrahedral intermediate stabilization in trypsin, subtilisin and chymotrypsin using substrate-derived chloromethane inhibitors. One of the limitations of these inhibitors is that they irreversibly alkylate the active-site histidine residue which results in the oxyanion not being in the optimal position in the oxyanion hole. Substrate-derived glyoxal inhibitors are reversible inhibitors which, if they form tetrahedral adducts in the same way as substrates form tetrahedral intermediates, will overcome this limitation. Therefore we have synthesized (13)C-enriched substrate-derived glyoxal inhibitors which have allowed us to use (13)C-NMR and (1)H-NMR to determine how they interact with proteinases. It is hoped that these studies will help in the design of specific and highly potent warheads for serine proteinase inhibitors.

  20. A recombinant cysteine proteinase from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi suitable for serodiagnosis of American visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    de Souza Dias, Suzana; da Costa Pinheiro, Paulo Henrique; Katz, Simone; dos Santos, Márcia Regina Machado; Barbiéri, Clara Lúcia

    2005-02-01

    A recombinant protein, rLdccys1, which was produced by expression of the gene encoding a 30 kDa cysteine proteinase from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi, was used for detection of antibodies in sera from patients with active visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of rLdccys1 showed that it contains all the characteristics of a cysteine proteinase. The ability of the protein to react with sera from humans with VL was also shown by Western blotting. The sensitivity for detection of specific antibodies to L. (L.) chagasi bodies using rLdccys1, L. (L.) chagasi promastigote lysates, and amastigote lysates was 80%, 98%, and 99%, respectively. No cross-reactivity between rLdccys1 and Chagas disease was observed, and there was little positive reactivity with sera from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis and tuberculosis, compared with promastigote and amastigote extracts. Our findings indicate that rLdccys1 from L. (L.) chagasi constitutes a potential tool for the diagnosis of American VL.

  1. Primary structure and reactive site of a novel wheat proteinase inhibitor of subtilisin and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Poerio, Elia; Di Gennaro, Simone; Di Maro, Antimo; Farisei, Francesca; Ferranti, Pasquale; Parente, Augusto

    2003-02-01

    The proteinase inhibitor WSCI, active in inhibiting bacterial subtilisin and a number of animal chymotrypsins, was purified from endosperm of exaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, c.v. San Pastore) by ion exchange chromatography and its complete amino acid sequence was established by automated Edman degradation. WSCI consists of a single polypeptide chain of 72 amino acid residues, has a molecular mass of 8126.3 Da and a pl of 5.8. The inhibition constants (Ki) for Bacillus licheniformis subtilisin and bovine pancreatic alpha-chymotrypsin are 3.92 x 10(-9) M and 7.24 x 10(-9) M, respectively. The inhibitor contains one methionine and of tryptophan residue and has a high content of essential amino acids (41 over a total of 72 residues), but no cysteines. The primary structure of WSCI shows high similarity with barley subtilisin-chymotrypsin isoinhibitors of the Cl-2 type and with maize subtilisinchymotrypsin inhibitor MPI. Significant degrees of similarity were also found between sequences of WSCI and of other members of the potato inhibitor I family of the serine proteinase inhibitors. The wheat inhibitor WSCI has a single reactive site (the peptide bond between methionyl-48 and glutamyl-49 residues) as identified by affinity chromatography and sequence analysis.

  2. Functional Characterization of Cucumis metuliferus Proteinase Inhibitor Gene (CmSPI) in Potyviruses Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Su, Mei-Hsiu; Lin, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Chien-Hung; Ku, Hsin-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are ubiquitous proteins that block the active center or interact allosterically with proteinases and are involved in plant physiological processes and defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The CmSPI gene identified from Cucumis metuliferus encodes a serine type PI (8 kDa) that belongs to potato I type family. To evaluate the effect of silencing CmSPI gene on Papaya ringspot virus resistance, RNA interference (RNAi) with an inter-space hairpin RNA (ihpRNA) construct was introduced into a PRSV-resistant C. metuliferus line. CmSPI was down-regulated in CmSPI RNAi transgenic lines in which synchronously PRSV symptoms were evident at 21 day post inoculation. Alternatively, heterogeneous expression of CmSPI in Nicotiana benthamiana was also conducted and showed that CmSPI can provide resistance to Potato virus Y, another member of Potyvirus, in transgenic N. benthamiana lines. This study demonstrated that CmSPI plays an important role in resistant function against potyviruses in C. metuliferus and N. benthamiana. PMID:26184285

  3. Biochemical characterization of Acacia schweinfurthii serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Odei-Addo, Frank; Frost, Carminita; Smith, Nanette; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Gráf, László; Naude, Ryno

    2014-10-01

    One of the many control mechanisms of serine proteinases is their specific inhibition by protein proteinase inhibitors. An extract of Acacia schweinfurthii was screened for potential serine proteinase inhibition. It was successfully purified to homogeneity by precipitating with 80% (v/v) acetone and sequential chromatographic steps, including ion-exchange, affinity purification and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions revealed an inhibitor (ASTI) consisting of two polypeptide chains A and B of approximate molecular weights of 16 and 10 kDa, respectively, and under non-reducing conditions, 26 kDa was observed. The inhibitor was shown to inhibit bovine trypsin (Ki of 3.45 nM) at an approximate molar ratio of inhibitor:trypsin (1:1). The A- and B-chains revealed complete sequences of 140 and 40 amino acid residues, respectively. Sequence similarity (70%) was reported between ASTI A-chain and ACTI A-chain (Acacia confusa) using ClustalW. The B-chain produced a 76% sequence similarity between ASTI and Leucaena leucocephala trypsin inhibitor.

  4. IMMUNOFLUORESCENT STUDIES OF THE POTENTIATION OF AN ADENOVIRUS-ASSOCIATED VIRUS BY ADENOVIRUS 7

    PubMed Central

    Blacklow, Neil R.; Hoggan, M. David; Rowe, Wallace P.

    1967-01-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescent procedure for detection of viral antigen was used to study the potentiation of AAV-1 by Ad.7. AAV viral antigen formed only when the cells were also infected with adenovirus, and only in cell culture systems in which the adenovirus infection proceeded to completion. Ad. 7 infection of AGMK. cell cultures did not potentiate AAV unless the Ad. 7 infection was itself potentiated by SV40. Dose-response studies indicated that a single AAV particle and a single infectious Ad. 7 particle sufficed to initiate AAV antigen synthesis. Sequential inoculation studies showed that AAV antigen formed simultaneously with Ad. 7 viral antigen when the AAV was inoculated any time between 15 hr before to 10 hr after the Ad. 7, both antigens appearing about 15 hr after inoculation of Ad. 7. The AAV-1 antigen formation had a minimum latent period of 5 hr, as seen with Ad. 7 preinfection of 10 hr or more. When UV-irradiated Ad. 7 was used as helper, the AAV antigen still appeared simultaneously with the Ad. 7 viral antigen, even though the latter was delayed by 23 hr compared to nonirradiated virus. When the early replicative events of both viruses were allowed to proceed in FUDR-inhibited cells, and then the FUDR inhibition was reversed, AAV antigen formed within 2 hr, which was 3 hr before the Ad. 7 viral antigen appeared. It was inferred that the event in the adenovirus cycle that renders a cell competent to synthesize AAV occurs after the 10th hr and may be temporally associated with replication of the adenovirus DNA. PMID:4225814

  5. N-terminal extension of the yeast IA3 aspartic proteinase inhibitor relaxes the strict intrinsic selectivity.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Phylip, Lowri H; Bur, Daniel; Wyatt, David M; Berry, Colin; Kay, John

    2007-07-01

    Yeast IA(3) aspartic proteinase inhibitor operates through an unprecedented mechanism and exhibits a remarkable specificity for one target enzyme, saccharopepsin. Even aspartic proteinases that are very closely similar to saccharopepsin (e.g. the vacuolar enzyme from Pichia pastoris) are not susceptible to significant inhibition. The Pichia proteinase was selected as the target for initial attempts to engineer IA(3) to re-design the specificity. The IA(3) polypeptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces castellii differ considerably in sequence. Alterations made by deletion or exchange of the residues in the C-terminal segment of these polypeptides had only minor effects. By contrast, extension of each of these wild-type and chimaeric polypeptides at its N-terminus by an MK(H)(7)MQ sequence generated inhibitors that displayed subnanomolar potency towards the Pichia enzyme. This gain-in-function was completely reversed upon removal of the extension sequence by exopeptidase trimming. Capture of the potentially positively charged aromatic histidine residues of the extension by remote, negatively charged side-chains, which were identified in the Pichia enzyme by modelling, may increase the local IA(3) concentration and create an anchor that enables the N-terminal segment residues to be harboured in closer proximity to the enzyme active site, thus promoting their interaction. In saccharopepsin, some of the counterpart residues are different and, consistent with this, the N-terminal extension of each IA(3) polypeptide was without major effect on the potency of interaction with saccharopepsin. In this way, it is possible to convert IA(3) polypeptides that display little affinity for the Pichia enzyme into potent inhibitors of this proteinase and thus broaden the target selectivity of this remarkable small protein.

  6. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins). A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora. PMID:20663211

  7. The N-terminal octapeptide acts as a dimerization inhibitor of SARS coronavirus 3C-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ping; Fan, Keqiang; Chen, Hao; Ma, Liang; Huang, Changkang; Tan, Lei; Xi, Dong; Li, Chunmei; Liu, Ying; Cao, Aoneng; Lai, Luhua

    2006-01-20

    The 3C-like proteinase of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has been proposed to be a key target for structural-based drug design against SARS. Accurate determination of the dimer dissociation constant and the role of the N-finger (residues 1-7) will provide more insights into the enzyme catalytic mechanism of SARS 3CL proteinase. The dimer dissociation constant of the wild-type protein was determined to be 14.0microM by analytical ultracentrifugation method. The N-finger fragment of the enzyme plays an important role in enzyme dimerization as shown in the crystal structure. Key residues in the N-finger have been studied by site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme assay, and analytical ultracentrifugation. A single mutation of M6A was found to be critical to maintain the dimer structure of the enzyme. The N-terminal octapeptide N8 and its mutants were also synthesized and tested for their potency as dimerization inhibitors. Peptide cleavage assay confirms that peptide N8 is a dimerization inhibitor with a K(i) of 2.20mM. The comparison of the inhibitory activities of N8 and its mutants indicates that the hydrophobic interaction of Met-6 and the electrostatic interaction of Arg-4 contribute most for inhibitor binding. This study describes the first example of inhibitors targeting the dimeric interface of SARS 3CL proteinase, providing a novel strategy for drug design against SARS and other coronaviruses.

  8. Cloning and molecular characterization of a cubilin-related serine proteinase from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Takeharu; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Islam, M Khyrul; Kamio, Tsugihiko; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2004-08-01

    Serine proteinases are one of the largest proteolytic families of enzymes, and have diverse cellular activities in mammalian tissues. We report here the cloning and molecular characterization of a cDNA encoding the serine proteinase of the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlSP). The HlSP cDNA is 1570 bp long and the deduced precursor protein consists of 464 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 50.4 kDa and a pI of 8.2. The preprotein, consisting of 443 amino acids, was predicted to include a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, and bone morphogenic protein-1 domain, a low-density lipoprotein receptor class A domain, and a catalytic domain. HlSP sequence analysis showed high similarity to serine proteinases reported from arthropods and vertebrate animal species. Two-dimensional immunoblot analysis revealed endogenous HlSP in adult tick extracts at 50 kDa. Endogenous HlSP was also expressed in all lifecycle stages of H. longicornis. Immunohistochemical studies detected the endogenous enzyme in the midgut epithelial cells of an adult tick. The Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant HlSP was demonstrated to degrade bovine serum albumin and hydrolyze the substrate Bz-L-Arg-pNA at the rate of 30.2 micromol/min/mg protein. Further, HlSP expression was up-regulated during a blood-feeding process, indicating its involvement in the digestion of host blood components.

  9. The insect immune protein scolexin is a novel serine proteinase homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, C. M.; Karplus, P. A.; Granados, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Scolexin is a coagulation-provoking plasma protein induced in response to bacterial or viral infection of larval Manduca sexta, a large lepidopterous insect. Here we report the isolation and sequencing of two cDNA clones that code for scolexin isoforms sharing 80% sequence identity. The scolexin sequences have low but recognizable sequence similarity to members of the chymotrypsin family and represent a new subfamily of chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases. Comparison with known structures reveals the conservation of key catalytic residues and a possible specificity for small nonpolar residues. Most remarkable is the absence of a canonical activation peptide cleavage site. This suggests that the regulation of scolexin activity will involve a novel activation mechanism. PMID:10210202

  10. High cell density cultivation of Brevibacterium linens and formation of proteinases and lipase.

    PubMed

    Adamitsch, Bernhard F; Karner, Ferdinand; Hampel, Werner A

    2003-05-01

    Brevibacterium linens forms hydrolytic enzymes which can be used to accelerate the ripening of cheese without causing bitterness. B. linens ATCC 9172 was grown to a high cell density (50 g dry wt l-1 after 60 h) in a mineral medium containing lactic acid, soy-peptone and ammonium sulphate by applying a continuous feed of nutrients. The maximal activities of L-leucine aminopeptidase and cell-associated proteinase were 286 U l-1 and 202 U l-1, respectively. The cell-associated lipolytic activity exhibited a strong and sudden increase at 46 h, resulting in a maximum of 9.5 U g-1 dry wt; thus the volumetric productivity of proteolytic and lipolytic activity was 4220 U l-1 h-1 and 7.3 U l-1 h-1, respectively.

  11. The adenovirus L4-22K protein is multifunctional and is an integral component of crucial aspects of infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Orozco, Diana; Hearing, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    A variety of cellular and viral processes are coordinately regulated during adenovirus (Ad) infection to achieve optimal virus production. The Ad late gene product L4-22K has been associated with disparate activities during infection, including the regulation of late gene expression, viral DNA packaging, and infectious virus production. We generated and characterized two L4-22K mutant viruses to further explore L4-22K functions during viral infection. Our results show that L4-22K is indeed important for temporal control of viral gene expression not only because it