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Sample records for activated adenovirus proteinases

  1. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  2. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  3. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  4. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  5. Silk gland-specific proteinase inhibitor serpin16 from the Bombyx mori shows cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-Chao; Dong, Zhaoming; Xiao, Li; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yan; He, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2015-01-30

    Serpins (serine proteinase inhibitors) are widely distributed in different species and are well known for their inhibitory activities towards serine proteinases. Here, we report the functional characterization of Bombyx mori serpin16. Expression analysis showed that serpin16 was specifically expressed at high levels in the silk gland at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that serpin16 had a canonical serpin fold, but it contained a unique reactive center loop, which was obviously shorter than that of typical serpins. Inhibitory activity analyses revealed that the target proteinase of serpin18 is a cysteine proteinase, rather than a serine proteinase. Furthermore, a Michaelis complex model of serpin16 with its target proteinase was constructed to explain the structural basis of how serpin16 recognizes the cysteine proteinase and its target specificity.

  6. Adult Schistosoma mansoni express cathepsin L proteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M; Dalton, J P; Clough, K A; Kilbane, C L; Harrop, S A; Hole, N; Brindley, P J

    1994-09-01

    This report presents the deduced amino acid sequence of a novel cathepsin L proteinase from Schistosoma mansoni, and describes cathepsin L-like activity in extracts of adult schistosomes. Using consensus primers specific for cysteine proteinases, gene fragments were amplified from adult S. mansoni cDNA by PCR and cloned. One of these fragments showed marked identity to Sm31, the cathepsin B cysteine proteinase of adult S. mansoni, whereas another differed from Sm31 and was employed as a probe to isolate two cDNAs from an adult S. mansoni gene library. Together these cDNAs encoded a novel preprocathepsin L of 319 amino acids; this zymogen is predicted to be processed in vivo into a mature, active cathepsin L proteinase of 215 amino acids. Closest homologies were with cathepsins L from rat, mouse, and chicken (46-47% identity). Southern hybridization analysis suggested that only one or a few copies of the gene was present per genome, demonstrated that its locus was distinct from that of Sm31, and that a homologous sequence was present in Schistosoma japonicum. Because these results indicated that schistosomes expressed a cathepsin L proteinase, extracts of adult S. mansoni were examined for acidic, cysteine proteinase activity. Based on rates of cleavage of peptidyl substrates employed to discriminate between classes of cysteine proteinases, namely cathepsin L (Z-phe-arg-AMC), cathepsin B (Z-arg-arg-AMC) and cathepsin H (Bz-arg-AMC), the extracts were found to contain vigorous cathepsin L-like activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Neutrophil Elastase and Proteinase-3 Trigger G Protein-biased Signaling through Proteinase-activated Receptor-1 (PAR1)*

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Renaux, Bernard; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil proteinases released at sites of inflammation can affect tissue function by either activating or disarming signal transduction mediated by proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). Because PAR1 is expressed at sites where abundant neutrophil infiltration occurs, we hypothesized that neutrophil-derived enzymes might also regulate PAR1 signaling. We report here that both neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3 cleave the human PAR1 N terminus at sites distinct from the thrombin cleavage site. This cleavage results in a disarming of thrombin-activated calcium signaling through PAR1. However, the distinct non-canonical tethered ligands unmasked by neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3, as well as synthetic peptides with sequences derived from these novel exposed tethered ligands, selectively stimulated PAR1-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. This signaling was blocked by pertussis toxin, implicating a Gαi-triggered signal pathway. We conclude that neutrophil proteinases trigger biased PAR1 signaling and we describe a novel set of tethered ligands that are distinct from the classical tethered ligand revealed by thrombin. We further demonstrate the function of this biased signaling in regulating endothelial cell barrier integrity. PMID:24052258

  8. Hormonal control of proteinase activity in squash cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Penner, D; Ashton, F M

    1967-06-01

    A crude proteolytic enzyme preparation which hydrolyzes casein was isolated from the cotyledons of squash seedlings. The presence of ethylene diamine tetraacetate or cysteine did not appreciably affect the activity of the preparation. During the course of germination, the level of proteolytic activity increased in the cotyledons of intact embryos through the third day and then decreased. The presence of the embryonic axis during the first 32 hours of germination was a prerequisite for the development of maximum proteolytic activity.The presence of a cytokinin, such as benzyladenine, kinetin, BTP [6-(benzylamino)-9-(2-tetrahydropyranyl)-9H-purine], or phenyladenine, in the culture solution could reproduce the effect of the embryonic axis. Other growth regulators did not produce this stimulation. High concentrations (1 mm) of all growth regulators examined were inhibitory. Various combinations of growth regulators failed to produce any synergistic effects. 6-Methylpurine inhibited the development of proteinase activity, and this inhibition was only partially restored by benzyladenine.A proteinase was partially purified from the cotyledons of 2-day-old squash seedlings and its synthesis was shown to be under the control of the embryonic axis.

  9. [Phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolates obtained from clinical specimens].

    PubMed

    Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Bulut, Yunus; Tunçoglu, Ebru

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans strains isolated from clinical specimens. A total of 147 C. albicans strains isolated from blood (n = 29), respiratory specimens (n = 44), urine (n = 52), pus (n = 17) and stool (n = 5) were included in the study. Proteinase and phospholipase activities were determined in 81% and 76% of C. albicans isolates, respectively. All C. albicans isolates revealed beta-hemolytic activity on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 7% fresh sheep blood and 3% glucose. Phospholipase and proteinase positivity were highest among the respiratory isolates. Proteinase activity of respiratory (93%) and blood (83%) isolates were statistically significantly higher than that of urine (77%; p = 0.032), pus (65%; p = 0.007) and stool isolates (60%; p = 0.026). While phospholipase activity showed statistically significant difference between respiratory (84%) and pus (53%) isolates (p = 0.014), no statistically significant difference was determined for blood (79%), urine (75%) and stool (80%) isolates (p > 0.05). Two blood isolates with 4+ proteinase activity and 3 urine isolates with 3+ proteinase activity were phospholipase negative. One urine isolate with 4+ phospholipase activity and 4 with 3+ phospholipase activity were proteinase negative. Phospholipase and proteinase negative 1 isolate from stool and 1 isolate from pus were found to have 4+ hemolytic activity. In conclusion, besides proteinase and phospholipase enzyme activities, hemolytic activity may play an important role for the C.albicans infections. The pathogenetic role of these virulence factors should be evaluated by further clinical studies.

  10. Activation of Proteinase 3 Contributes to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Erik JM; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine TN; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo AB

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive proinflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human α-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin-resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3-deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after being fed a high-fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high–fat–diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1–/– mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with α-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 d of a 16-wk high-fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27261776

  11. Cofactoring and Dimerization of Proteinase-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huilan; Liu, Allen P.; Smith, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein–coupled receptors that transmit cellular responses to extracellular proteases and have important functions in vascular physiology, development, inflammation, and cancer progression. The established paradigm for PAR activation involves proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular N terminus, which reveals a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand by binding intramolecularly to the receptor to trigger transmembrane signaling. Most cells express more than one PAR, which can influence the mode of PAR activation and signaling. Clear examples include murine PAR3 cofactoring of PAR4 and transactivation of PAR2 by PAR1. Thrombin binds to and cleaves murine PAR3, which facilitates PAR4 cleavage and activation. This process is essential for thrombin signaling and platelet activation, since murine PAR3 cannot signal alone. Although PAR1 and PAR4 are both competent to signal, PAR1 is able to act as a cofactor for PAR4, facilitating more rapid cleavage and activation by thrombin. PAR1 can also facilitate PAR2 activation through a different mechanism. Cleavage of the PAR1 N terminus by thrombin generates a tethered ligand domain that can bind intermolecularly to PAR2 to activate signaling. Thus, PARs can regulate each other’s activity by localizing thrombin when in complex with PAR3 and PAR4 or by cleaved PAR1, providing its tethered ligand domain for PAR2 activation. The ability of PARs to cofactor or transactivate other PARs would necessitate that the two receptors be in close proximity, likely in the form of a heterodimer. Here, we discuss the cofactoring and dimerization of PARs and the functional consequences on signaling. PMID:24064459

  12. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-12-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG.

  13. Implantation serine proteinase 2 is a monomeric enzyme with mixed serine proteolytic activity and can silence signalling via proteinase activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Navneet; Fahr, Jochen; Renaux, Bernard; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Kumar, Rajeev; Nishikawa, Sandra; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Hollenberg, Morley D; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2013-12-01

    Implantation serine proteinase 2 (ISP2), a S1 family serine proteinase, is known for its role in the critical processes of embryo hatching and implantation in the mouse uterus. Native implantation serine proteinases (ISPs) are co-expressed and co-exist as heterodimers in uterine and blastocyst tissues. The ISP1-ISP2 enzyme complex shows trypsin-like substrate specificity. In contrast, we found that ISP2, isolated as a 34 kDa monomer from a Pichia pastoris expression system, exhibited a mixed serine proteolytic substrate specificity, as determined by a phage display peptide cleavage approach and verified by the in vitro cleavage of synthetic peptides. Based upon the peptide sequence substrate selectivity, a database search identified many potential ISP2 targets of physiological relevance, including the proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2). The in vitro cleavage studies with PAR2-derived peptides confirmed the mixed substrate specificity of ISP2. Treatment of cell lines expressing proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1, 2, and 4 with ISP2 prevented receptor activation by either thrombin (PARs 1 and 4) or trypsin (PAR2). The disarming and silencing of PARs by ISP2 may play a role in successful embryo implantation.

  14. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) as targets for antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Margaret; McIntosh, Kathryn; Bushell, Trevor; Sloan, Graeme; Plevin, Robin

    2016-04-15

    Since the identification of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) family as mediators of serine protease activity in the 1990s, there has been tremendous progress in the elucidation of their pathophysiological roles. The development of drugs that target PARs has been the focus of many laboratories for the potential treatment of thrombosis, cancer and other inflammatory diseases. Understanding the mechanisms of PAR activation and G protein signalling pathways evoked in response to the growing list of endogenous proteases has yielded great insight into receptor regulation at the molecular level. This has led to the development of new selective modulators of PAR activity, particularly PAR1. The mixed success of targeting PARs has been best exemplified in the context of inhibiting PAR1 as a new antiplatelet therapy. The development of the competitive PAR1 antagonist, vorapaxar (Zontivity), has clearly shown the value in targeting PAR1 in acute coronary syndrome (ACS); however the severity of associated bleeding with this drug has limited its use in the clinic. Due to the efficacy of thrombin acting via PAR1, strategies to selectively inhibit specific PAR1-mediated G protein signalling pathways or to target the second thrombin platelet receptor, PAR4, are being devised. The rationale behind these alternative approaches is to bias downstream thrombin activity via PARs to allow for inhibition of pro-thrombotic pathways but maintain other pathways that may preserve haemostatic balance and improve bleeding profiles for widespread clinical use. This review summarizes the structural determinants that regulate PARs and the modulators of PAR activity developed to date.

  15. Proinflammatory genes expression in granulocytes activated by native proteinase-binding fragments of anti-proteinase 3 IgG.

    PubMed

    Surmiak, M; Kaczor, M; Sanak, M

    2015-08-01

    The classical pathway of neutrophils activation due to cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA) involves specific antigen binding to proteinase-3 and activation of the immunoglobulin G receptors by the constant fragment of the antibody. A requirement for this double signaling was suggested also because proteinase-3 is presented within a complex of NB-1 glycoprotein lacking transmembrane domain. An integrin Mac-1 receptor was postulated to cooperate in neutrophil stimulation by anti-proteinase 3 (anti-PR3). A characteristic profile of transcriptional activation of neutrophils by c-ANCA was described by us previously. We ascertained mRNA expression of neutrophils following stimulation with antigen-binding fragments of native anti-PR3 IgG. Expression of targeted transcripts was compared with our previous results, in which intact anti-PR3 IgG was used. Human neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers negative for ANCAs. Antigen-binding fragments of human anti-PR3 were prepared from sera of patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis. We analyzed reactive oxygen species production and abundance of mRNA of 151 genes by quantitative real time-PCR in neutrophils stimulated with anti-PR3 IgG F(ab)(2). We observed a consistent upregulation of 17 genes (CYSLTR1, HPGD, IL1R1, IL1RL1, MAPK1, MAPK8, NR3C1, PLA2G7, PTGDR, CD302, DNAJB1, F2R, F2RL1, IER3, RAC1, RPL41, PTGER3), whereas other 9 genes were up-regulated only in some donors. No reactive oxygen species production was observed in neutrophils stimulated with anti-PR3 F(ab)(2). Stimulation of neutrophils with F(ab)(2) of anti-PR3 autoantibodies activated cells to a lesser extent than intact IgG. However, several cellular pathways were up-regulated, involving calcium and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase AKT, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Interestingly, binding of F(ab)(2) to the PR-3 present on the surface of neutrophil is sufficient for lipid

  16. Cis and trans activation of adenovirus IVa2 gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, V; Salzman, N P

    1985-01-01

    The transcriptional control region of the adenovirus IVa2 promoter was analyzed by cloning this promoter in front of a gene coding for bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CATase) and estimating levels of CATase and IVa2 promoter specific RNA synthesized after transfection. To produce detectable amounts of CATase with the IVa2 promoter, an enhancer has to be present in cis. In the absence of enhancer sequences, the adenovirus E1A gene can not stimulate CATase synthesis. When cells were transfected with plasmids containing enhancer sequences and various IVa2 mutant promoters upstream of the CAT gene, we observed that CATase activity was not reduced significantly even after deletion of all sequences upstream of the RNA initiation site. Synthesis of IVa2 specific RNA was dependent on plasmids containing an enhancer (SV40 72 bp repeat) that was present in cis. In the absence of enhancer sequences, co-transfection to provide the adenovirus E1A gene in trans also stimulated IVa2 RNA synthesis. When HeLa cells were transfected with various deletion mutants with an enhancer in cis it was seen that sequences -38 to -64 base pairs upstream of the RNA initiation site are necessary for efficient transcription. The E1A gene in trans and an enhancer in cis have an additive effect on RNA synthesis from both IVa2 and major late promoters. The basis for the conflicting results between transcription and CATase synthesis is discussed. Images PMID:2989786

  17. Expression of human recombinant granzyme A zymogen and its activation by the cysteine proteinase cathepsin C.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J A; Kamp, A M; Citarella, F; Horrevoets, A J; Hack, C E

    1996-04-19

    Human granzyme A is one of the serine proteinases present in the granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Granzymes are synthesized as inactive proenzymes with an amino-terminal prodipeptide, which is processed during transport of granzymes to the cytotoxic granules, where they are stored as active proteinases. In this study, we explored the possibility of producing recombinant granzymes. Recombinant human granzyme A zymogen was expressed in several eukaryotic cell lines (HepG2, Jurkat, and COS-1) after infection with a recombinant vaccinia virus containing full-length granzyme A cDNA. Immunoblot analysis of cell lysates showed that all infected cells produced a disulfide-linked homodimer of identical molecular weight as natural granzyme A. Infected HepG2 cells produced the largest amount of this protease (approximately 160 times more than lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells). The recombinant protein only had high mannose type oligosaccharides as did the natural protein. Although infected HepG2 and COS cells contained high granzyme A antigen levels, lysates from these cells did not show any granzyme A proteolytic activity. However, the inactive proenzyme could be converted into active granzyme A by incubation with the thiol proteinase cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase I). This study is the first to demonstrate expression of an active recombinant human cytotoxic lymphocyte proteinase and conversion of inactive progranzyme A into an active enzyme by cathepsin C. We suggest that a similar approach can be used for the production of other granzymes and related proteinases.

  18. NaCl-activated extracellular proteinase from Virgibacillus sp. SK37 isolated from fish sauce fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sinsuwan, S; Rodtong, S; Yongsawatdigul, J

    2007-06-01

    Virgibacillus sp. SK37 exhibited high extracellular proteolytic activity in skim milk broth containing 10% NaCl. Optimum conditions of the crude proteinase were at pH 8.0 and 65 degrees C. The proteinase was strongly inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and preferably hydrolyzed Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-AMC, suggesting the serine proteinase with a subtilisin-like characteristic. Proteolytic activity increased with NaCl concentration up to 20%. Ca(2+) activated the enzyme activity but reduced enzyme stability at 65 degrees C. Several proteinases with dominant molecular mass (MW) of 81, 67, 63, 50, 38, and 18 kDa were detected on native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (native-PAGE) activity staining in the absence and presence of 25% NaCl. These results demonstrated that Virgibacillus sp. SK37 produced salt-activated extracellular proteinases. Virgibacillus sp. SK37 could be a promising strain for starter culture development used in fish sauce fermentation. PMID:17995713

  19. Metalloproteinase activity secreted by fibrogenic cells in the processing of prolysyl oxidase. Potential role of procollagen C-proteinase.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, M V; Stetler-Stevenson, W G; Trubetskoy, O V; Gacheru, S N; Kagan, H M

    1996-03-22

    Lysyl oxidase is secreted from fibrogenic cells as a 50-kDa proenzyme that is proteolytically processed to the mature enzyme in the extracellular space. To characterize the secreted proteinase activity, a truncated, recombinant form of lysyl oxidase was prepared as a proteinase substrate containing the sequence of the propeptide cleavage region. The processing proteinase activity secreted by cultured fibrogenic cells resists inhibitors of serine or aspartyl proteinases as well as tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) but is completely inhibited by metal ion chelators. Known metalloproteinases were tested for their activity toward this substrate. Carboxyl-terminal procollagen proteinase (C-proteinase), MMP-2, and conditioned fibrogenic cell culture medium cleave the lysyl oxidase substrate to the size of the mature enzyme. The NH2-terminal sequence generated by arterial smooth muscle conditioned medium and the C-proteinase but not by MMP-2, i.e. Asp-Asp-Pro-Tyr, was identical to that previously identified in mature lysyl oxidase isolated from connective tissue. The C-proteinase activity against the model substrate was inhibited by a synthetic oligopeptide mimic of the cleavage sequence (Ac-Met-Val-Gly-Asp-Asp-Pro-Tyr-Asn-amide), whereas this peptide also inhibited the generation of lysyl oxidase activity in the medium of fetal rat lung fibroblasts in culture. In toto, these results identify a secreted metalloproteinase activity participating in the activation of prolysyl oxidase, identify inhibitors of the processing activity, and implicate procollagen C-proteinase in this role.

  20. Fluorometric determination of acid proteinase activity in Candida albicans strains from diabetic patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Zuhal; Kilic, Nedret; Kalkanci, Ayse

    2011-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is one of the most frequent disorders in obstetrics and gynaecology. Approximately three-quarters of all adult women experience at least one episode of vulvovaginal candidiasis during their life span. Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the rate of vaginal colonisation and infection with Candida species. The secreted acid proteinase might be especially relevant in the pathogenesis of vulvovaginal candidiasis. The aim of this study was to determine the acid proteinase activity in the samples of Candida albicans from diabetic patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis by a fluorometric method. Vaginal swabs were taken from 33 women (aged between 22 and 57 years) having symptoms of vaginitis. Patients were divided into three groups: control group, controlled diabetic group and uncontrolled diabetic group. The proteinase activity in the culture supernatants was determined by a modified fluorometric method. Acid proteinase activities were significantly increased in the uncontrolled diabetic group in comparison with both the control group and the controlled diabetic group (P < 0.05). Acid proteinase may play an important role in C. albicans pathogenesis in diabetic patients. Improving glucose control may reduce the risk of Candida colonisation and potentially symptomatic infection, among women with diabetes and hence may be useful even for weaker enzyme activity measurements.

  1. Characterization of the binding activities of proteinase-adhesin complexes from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, R N; Potempa, J; McGraw, W; Coetzer, T H; Travis, J

    1996-01-01

    Adhesins from oral bacteria perform an important function in colonizing target tissues within the dentogingival cavity. In Porphyromonas gingivalis certain of these adhesion proteins exist as a complex with either of two major proteinases referred to as gingipain R (arginine-specific gingipain) and gingipain K (lysine-specific gingipain) (R. N. Pike, W. T. McGraw, J. Potempa, and J. Travis, J. Biol. Chem. 269:406-411, 1994). With specific proteinase inhibitors, it was shown that hemagglutination by either proteinase-adhesin complex could occur independently of proteinase activity. Significantly, low concentrations of fibrinogen, fibronectin, and laminin inhibited hemagglutination, indicating that adherence to these proteins and not the hemagglutination activity was a primary property of the adhesin activity component of complexes. Binding studies with gingipain K and gingipain R suggest that interaction with fibrinogen is a major function of the adhesin domain, with dissociation constants for binding to fibrinogen being 4 and 8.5 nM, respectively. Specific association with fibronectin and laminin was also found. All bound proteins were degraded by the functional proteinase domain, with gingipain R being more active on laminin and fibronectin and gingipain K being more effective in the digestion of fibrinogen. Cumulatively, these data suggest that gingipain R and gingipain K, acting as proteinase-adhesin complexes, progressively attach to, degrade, and detach from target proteins. Since such complexes appear to be present on the surfaces of both vesicles and membranes of P. gingivalis, they may play an important role in the attachment of this bacterium to host cell surfaces. PMID:8631676

  2. Biased signalling and proteinase-activated receptors (PARs): targeting inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, M D; Mihara, K; Polley, D; Suen, J Y; Han, A; Fairlie, D P; Ramachandran, R

    2014-03-01

    Although it has been known since the 1960s that trypsin and chymotrypsin can mimic hormone action in tissues, it took until the 1990s to discover that serine proteinases can regulate cells by cleaving and activating a unique four-member family of GPCRs known as proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). PAR activation involves the proteolytic exposure of its N-terminal receptor sequence that folds back to function as a 'tethered' receptor-activating ligand (TL). A key N-terminal arginine in each of PARs 1 to 4 has been singled out as a target for cleavage by thrombin (PARs 1, 3 and 4), trypsin (PARs 2 and 4) or other proteases to unmask the TL that activates signalling via Gq , Gi or G12 /13 . Similarly, synthetic receptor-activating peptides, corresponding to the exposed 'TL sequences' (e.g. SFLLRN-, for PAR1 or SLIGRL- for PAR2) can, like proteinase activation, also drive signalling via Gq , Gi and G12 /13 , without requiring receptor cleavage. Recent data show, however, that distinct proteinase-revealed 'non-canonical' PAR tethered-ligand sequences and PAR-activating agonist and antagonist peptide analogues can induce 'biased' PAR signalling, for example, via G12 /13 -MAPKinase instead of Gq -calcium. This overview summarizes implications of this 'biased' signalling by PAR agonists and antagonists for the recognized roles the PARs play in inflammatory settings. PMID:24354792

  3. Activities of amylase, proteinase, and lipase enzymes from Lactococcus chungangensis and its application in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-07-01

    Several enzymes are involved in the process of converting milk to lactic acid and coagulated milk to curd and, therefore, are important in dairy fermented products. Amylase, proteinase, and lipase are enzymes that play an important role in degrading milk into monomeric molecules such as oligosaccharides, amino acids, and fatty acids, which are the main molecules responsible for flavors in cheese. In the current study, we determined the amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T), a bacterial strain of nondairy origin, and compared them with those of the reference strain, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), which is commonly used in the dairy industry. Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T) were both found to have amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities in broth culture, cream cheese, and yogurt. Notably, the proteinase and lipase activities of L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) were higher than those of L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), with proteinase activity of 10.50 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.64 U/mL in cream cheese, and lipase activity of 100 U/mL of tryptic soy broth, and 100 U/mL of cream cheese. In contrast, the amylase activity was low, with 5.28 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.86 U/mL in cream cheese. These enzyme activities in L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) suggest that this strain has potential to be used for manufacturing dairy fermented products, even though the strain is of nondairy origin. PMID:27108177

  4. Inhibition of proteolytic activity of poliovirus and rhinovirus 2A proteinases by elastase-specific inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Molla, A; Hellen, C U; Wimmer, E

    1993-01-01

    A polyprotein cleavage assay has been developed to assay the proteolytic activities in vitro of the 2A proteinases encoded by poliovirus and human rhinovirus 14, which are representative members of the Enterovirus and Rhinovirus genera of picornaviruses, respectively. The elastase-specific substrate-based inhibitors elastatinal and methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone (MPCMK) inhibited both 2A proteinases in vitro. The electrophoretic mobilities of both 2A proteinases were reduced upon incubation with elastatinal, whereas the mobility of a Cys-109-->Ala poliovirus 2Apro mutant was unchanged, an observation suggesting that this inhibitor may have formed a covalent bond with the active-site Cys-109 nucleophile. Iodoacetamide, calpain inhibitor 1, and antipain inhibited poliovirus 2Apro. MPCMK caused a reduction in the yields of the enteroviruses poliovirus type 1 and coxsackievirus A21 and of human rhinovirus 2 in infected HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of encephalomyocarditis virus, a picornavirus of the Cardiovirus genus. MPCMK abrogated the shutoff of host cell protein synthesis that is induced by enterovirus and rhinovirus infection and reduced the synthesis of virus-encoded polypeptides in infected cells. These results indicate that the determinants of substrate recognition by 2A proteinases resemble those of pancreatic and leukocyte elastases. These results may be relevant to the development of broad-range chemotherapeutic agents against entero- and rhinoviruses. Images PMID:8392608

  5. Nutritional requirements and nitrogen-dependent regulation of proteinase activity of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062.

    PubMed

    Hebert, E M; Raya, R R; De Giori, G S

    2000-12-01

    The nutritional requirements of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062 were determined with a simplified chemically defined medium (SCDM) and compared with those of L. helveticus CRL 974 (ATCC 15009). Both strains were found to be prototrophic for alanine, glycine, asparagine, glutamine, and cysteine. In addition, CRL 1062 also showed prototrophy for lysine and serine. The microorganisms also required riboflavin, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxal, nicotinic acid, and uracil for growth in liquid SCDM. The growth rate and the synthesis of their cell membrane-bound serine proteinases, but not of their intracellular leucyl-aminopeptidases, were influenced by the peptide content of the medium. The highest proteinase levels were found during cell growth in basal SCDM, while the synthesis of this enzyme was inhibited in SCDM supplemented with Casitone, Casamino Acids, or beta-casein. Low-molecular-mass peptides (<3,000 Da), extracted from Casitone, and the dipeptide leucylproline (final concentration, 5 mM) play important roles in the medium-dependent regulation of proteinase activity. The addition of the dipeptide leucylproline (5 mM) to SCDM reduced proteinase activity by 25%. PMID:11097908

  6. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens.

    PubMed

    Varón, R; García-Moreno, M; Valera-Ruipérez, D; García-Molina, F; García-Cánovas, F; Ladrón-de Guevara, R G; Masiá-Pérez, J; Havsteen, B H

    2006-10-01

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving an uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous route, the time course equation of the concentration of the zymogen and of the activated enzyme have been derived. From these equations, an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the two routes has been carried out for the first time. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect of the initial zymogen and activating enzyme concentrations, on the relative weight. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed. Finally, we apply some of our results to experimental data obtained by other authors in experimental studies of the activation of some aspartic proteinase zymogens.

  7. Hydrolytic activity of Virgibacillus sp. SK37, a starter culture of fish sauce fermentation, and its cell-bound proteinases.

    PubMed

    Sinsuwan, Sornchai; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2012-08-01

    Fish sauce production relies on a natural fermentation process requiring 12-18 months for process completion. Virgibacillus sp. SK37 has been shown to be a potential strain for fish sauce acceleration. However, hydrolytic activity of proteinases bound at cell surface of this strain has not been well elucidated. Addition of 0.2 % CaCl(2) (w/w) in conjunction with starter cultures of Virgibacillus sp. SK 37 increased protein hydrolysis as measured by α-amino group content throughout fermentation (P < 0.05). Cell-bound proteinases from Virgibacillus sp. SK 37 were extracted into a free form by incubating the washed cells in Ca(2+)-free buffer at 37 °C for 2 h. Cell-bound proteinases revealed molecular mass of 19, 20, 22, 32, 34, and 44 kDa based on a synthetic peptide zymogram. The proteinases showed subtilisin-like serine characteristics with the highest activity at 50 °C and pH 8 and 11. Activity of the extracted proteinases increased ~4 times at ≥100 mM CaCl(2). In addition, CaCl(2) enhanced thermal stability of the extracted proteinases. Enzymes showed proteolytic activity in either the absence or presence of 10 and 25 % NaCl toward fish muscle, soy protein isolate, and casein substrates. Cell-bound proteinases were likely to play an important role in protein hydrolysis during fish sauce fermentation. PMID:22806191

  8. Activation of intracellular serine proteinase in Bacillus subtilis cells during sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T J; Shankweiler, G W; Hageman, J H

    1986-01-01

    Cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 (trpC2) growing and sporulating in a single chemically defined medium carried out intracellular protein degradation and increased their levels of intracellular serine protease-1 in a manner very similar to what had previously been reported for cells sporulating in nutrient broth. The results were interpreted to mean that these processes are intrinsic to sporulation rather than medium dependent. To determine the cause of these increases in specific activity of proteinases, we purified the protease, prepared rabbit immunoglobulins directed against it, and monitored changes in protease antigen levels by performing rocket immunoelectrophoresis. In cells sporulating in nutrient broth, the protease antigen levels increased about 7-fold, whereas the specific activity increased about 150-fold, for an activation of about 20-fold. In cells sporulating in the single chemically defined sporulation medium, the protease antigen increased about 10-fold, whereas the specific activity increased at least 400-fold, for an activation of about 40-fold. These results were interpreted to mean that a posttranslational event activated the protease in vivo; a previously described endogenous proteinase inhibitor was confirmed to be present in the strain used. Chloramphenicol added to the cultures inhibited both the increases in antigen levels and in the specific activity of the proteinase. PMID:3079745

  9. Proteinase-activated receptors induce nonoxidative, antimicrobial peptides and increased antimicrobial activity in human mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Lippuner, Nadine; Morell, Bernhard; Schaffner, Andreas; Schaer, Dominik J

    2007-02-01

    As thrombin and SFLLRNPNDKYEPF (SFLLRN-14), a synthetic ligand, mainly of the proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), induce in monocytes the synthesis and secretion of chemokines, the PAR pathway can be viewed as a mononuclear phagocyte-activating principle. Classically, antimicrobial activity of mononuclear phagocytes is the measure for activation. Here, we investigated whether thrombin or SFLLRN-14 increases the antimicrobial activity of human monocytes and compared these effects to those of IFN-gamma. Furthermore, we measured the effects of these agents on the secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates and the antimicrobial activity of acid peptide extracts from monocytes. Human monocytes were exposed to maximally active concentrations of thrombin, SFLLRN-14, and IFN-gamma. Human monocytes treated with thrombin or SFLLRN-14 and then challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium, including its attenuated mutant phoP, or Listeria monocytogenes killed, within 3 h, significantly more bacteria than control cells, an effect comparable with or surpassing the effect of IFN-gamma. This finding establishes the proteinase-PAR pathway as a potent, alternate activation pathway of mononuclear phagocytes. Thrombin and SFLLRN-14 had no significant effects on the amount of H(2)O(2) secreted by monocytes. This was in contrast to IFN-gamma, which as expected, increased the secretion of H(2)O(2) by approximately fourfold. Thrombin and SFLLRN-14, but not IFN-gamma, however, significantly increased the antimicrobial activity of acid peptide extracts of monocytes in a radial diffusion assay. Taken together, these findings suggest that IFN-gamma and thrombin differentially regulate oxidative and nonoxidative killing systems of human monocytes. PMID:17095611

  10. Biased signalling and proteinase-activated receptors (PARs): targeting inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, M D; Mihara, K; Polley, D; Suen, J Y; Han, A; Fairlie, D P; Ramachandran, R

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been known since the 1960s that trypsin and chymotrypsin can mimic hormone action in tissues, it took until the 1990s to discover that serine proteinases can regulate cells by cleaving and activating a unique four-member family of GPCRs known as proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). PAR activation involves the proteolytic exposure of its N-terminal receptor sequence that folds back to function as a ‘tethered’ receptor-activating ligand (TL). A key N-terminal arginine in each of PARs 1 to 4 has been singled out as a target for cleavage by thrombin (PARs 1, 3 and 4), trypsin (PARs 2 and 4) or other proteases to unmask the TL that activates signalling via Gq, Gi or G12/13. Similarly, synthetic receptor-activating peptides, corresponding to the exposed ‘TL sequences’ (e.g. SFLLRN—, for PAR1 or SLIGRL— for PAR2) can, like proteinase activation, also drive signalling via Gq, Gi and G12/13, without requiring receptor cleavage. Recent data show, however, that distinct proteinase-revealed ‘non-canonical’ PAR tethered-ligand sequences and PAR-activating agonist and antagonist peptide analogues can induce ‘biased’ PAR signalling, for example, via G12/13-MAPKinase instead of Gq-calcium. This overview summarizes implications of this ‘biased’ signalling by PAR agonists and antagonists for the recognized roles the PARs play in inflammatory settings. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24354792

  11. A sycamore cell wall polysaccharide and a chemically related tomato leaf polysaccharide possess similar proteinase inhibitor-inducing activities.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C A; Bishop, P; Pearce, G

    1981-09-01

    A large pectic polysaccharide, called rhamnogalacturonan I, that is solubilized by a fungal endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase from the purified walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells possesses proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity similar to that of the proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor, a pectic-like oligosaccharide fraction isolated from tomato leaves. This suggests that the proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity resides in particular polysaccharide fragments which can be released when plant cell walls are exposed to appropriate enzyme degradation as a result of either wounding or pest attack.

  12. Analysis of the autoproteolytic activity of the recombinant helper component proteinase from zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Boonrod, Kajohn; Füllgrabe, Marc W; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The multifunctional helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) of potyviruses contains an autoproteolytic function that, together with the protein 1 (P1) and NIa proteinase, processes the polyprotein into mature proteins. In this study, we analysed the autoproteolytic active domain of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) HC-Pro. Several Escherichia coli-expressed MBP:HC-Pro:GFP mutants containing deletions or point mutations at either the N- or C-terminus of the HC-Pro protein were examined. Our results showed that amino acids essential for the proteolytic activity of ZYMV HC-Pro are distinct from those of the tobacco etch virus HC-Pro, although the amino acid sequences in the proteolytic active domain are conserved among potyviruses.

  13. Norovirus Proteinase-Polymerase and Polymerase Are Both Active Forms of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Green, Kim Y.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro−Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro−Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis. PMID:15681440

  14. Modification of cystatin C activity by bacterial proteinases and neutrophil elastase in periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, M; Wikström, M; Potempa, J; Renvert, S; Hall, A

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study the interaction between the human cysteine proteinase inhibitor, cystatin C, and proteinases of periodontitis associated bacteria. METHODS: Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from discrete periodontitis sites and their cystatin C content was estimated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The interaction between cystatin C and proteolytic enzymes from cultured strains of the gingival bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was studied by measuring inhibition of enzyme activity against peptidyl substrates, by detection of break down patterns of solid phase coupled and soluble cystatin C, and by N-terminal sequence analysis of cystatin C products resulting from the interactions. RESULTS: Gingival crevicular fluid contained cystatin C at a concentration of approximately 15 nM. Cystatin C did not inhibit the principal thiol stimulated proteinase activity of P gingivalis. Instead, strains of P gingivalis and P intermedia, but not A actinomycetemcomitans, released cystatin C modifying proteinases. Extracts of five P gingivalis and five P intermedia strains all hydrolysed bonds in the N-terminal region of cystatin C at physiological pH values. The modified cystatin C resulting from incubation with one P gingivalis strain was isolated and found to lack the eight most N-terminal residues. The affinity of the modified inhibitor for cathepsin B was 20-fold lower (Ki 5 nM) than that of full length cystatin C. A 50 kDa thiol stimulated proteinase, gingipain R, was isolated from P gingivalis and shown to be responsible for the Arg8-bond hydrolysis in cystatin C. The cathepsin B inhibitory activity of cystatin C incubated with gingival crevicular fluid was rapidly abolished after Val10-bond cleavage by elastase from exudate neutrophils, but cleavage at the gingipain specific Arg8-bond was also demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: The physiological control of cathepsin B activity is impeded in

  15. Adenovirus type 3 induces platelet activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying-Yu; Yu, Xiu-Nan; Qu, Zhang-Yi; Zhang, Ai-Ai; Xing, Yu-Ling; Jiang, Li-Xin; Shang, Lei; Wang, Ying-Chen

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate platelet activation induced by adenovirus type 3 (HAdV3) in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or whole blood was incubated with or without HAdV at various concentrations. Platelet aggregation, platelet counting, fibrinogen and expression of platelet membrane antigens (CD41a and CD62P) were determined following incubation with HAdV for different periods of time. The results demonstrated that HAdV at the concentrations of 109-1011 vp/ml enhanced adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation, however did not alter the platelet count. Infection with HAdVs also reduced fibrinogen level. P-selectin and CD41a appeared rapidly on the surface after platelets were incubated with HAdVs in vitro for 30 min. In conclusion, HAdVs may induce activation of platelets and lead to a pre-thrombotic state of peripheral blood. This finding may aid in the development of measures to prevent severe HAdV infection.

  16. Monomeric 55-kDa guanidinobenzoatase switches to a serine proteinase activity upon tetramerization. Tetrameric proteinase SP 220 K appears as the native form.

    PubMed

    Poustis-Delpont, C; Thaon, S; Auberger, P; Gerardi-Laffin, C; Sudaka, P; Rossi, B

    1994-05-20

    Guanidinobenzoatases are cell surface enzymes present in cells capable of migration or remodeling. The guanidinobenzoatase purified to homogeneity from human renal carcinoma did not display gelatinase activity under the 55-kDa form (Poustis-Delpont, C., Descomps, R., Auberger, P., Delque-Bayer, P., Sudaka, P., and Rossi, B. (1992) Cancer Res. 52, 3622-3628). We bring new insights into the structure-activity relationships of this enzyme using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, [3H]diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling, gelatin zymography, and immunodetection using a polyclonal antibody raised against the 55-kDa entity. Upon aggregation into a 220-kDa form, the enzyme exhibited [3H]diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling and diisopropyl fluorophosphate-inhibitable gelatinase activity whereas its capability to cleave p-nitrophenyl p'-guanidinobenzoate as a substrate was abolished. Thus, the guanidinobenzoatase property appears as a feature of a 55-kDa inactive form of a serine proteinase subunit. After boiling in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (3% w/v), the 220-kDa entity subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis could be dissociated into a 55-kDa protein as shown by silver staining. The resulting 55-kDa band remained [3H]diisopropyl fluorophosphate-labeled and reacted with anti-55-kDa guanidinobenzoatase antibodies, strongly suggesting that the 220-kDa proteinase was a noncovalently associated tetramer. Interestingly, Triton X-100 extracts of renal carcinoma plasma membranes exhibited a 220-kDa serine proteinase activity, as expressed in gelatin zymography, which was barely detectable in the non-tumoral counterpart. It is noteworthy that an anti-55-kDa guanidinobenzoatase reactive 220-kDa species was also observed in renal carcinoma plasma membranes extracts as assessed by Western blot, whereas it was hardly visible in the non-tumoral counterpart. No signal was immunodetected at M(r) 55,000 in renal carcinoma and kidney cortex

  17. Fibronectin-Degrading Activity of Trypanosoma cruzi Cysteine Proteinase Plays a Role in Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Juliano, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, binds to diverse extracellular matrix proteins. Such an ability prevails in the parasite forms that circulate in the bloodstream and contributes to host cell invasion. Whether this also applies to the insect-stage metacyclic trypomastigotes, the developmental forms that initiate infection in the mammalian host, is not clear. Using T. cruzi CL strain metacyclic forms, we investigated whether fibronectin bound to the parasites and affected target cell invasion. Fibronectin present in cell culture medium bound to metacyclic forms and was digested by cruzipain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase. G strain, with negligible cruzipain activity, displayed a minimal fibronectin-degrading effect. Binding to fibronectin was mediated by gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface molecule implicated in parasite internalization. When exogenous fibronectin was present at concentrations higher than cruzipain can properly digest, or fibronectin expression was stimulated by treatment of epithelial HeLa cells with transforming growth factor beta, the parasite invasion was reduced. Treatment of HeLa cells with purified recombinant cruzipain increased parasite internalization, whereas the treatment of parasites with cysteine proteinase inhibitor had the opposite effect. Metacyclic trypomastigote entry into HeLa cells was not affected by anti-β1 integrin antibody but was inhibited by anti-fibronectin antibody. Overall, our results have indicated that the cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi metacyclic forms, through its fibronectin-degrading activity, is implicated in host cell invasion. PMID:25267835

  18. [Properties of extracellular proteinase--an activator of protein C in blood plasma formed by Aspergillus ochraceus].

    PubMed

    Osmolovskiĭ, A A; Kreĭer, V G; Baranova, N A; Kurakov, A V; Egorov, N S

    2015-01-01

    The properties of an extracellular proteinase activating plasma protein C isolated from the culture supernatant of A. ochraceus VKM F-4104D have been studied. This enzyme demonstrated a substrate specificity absent of hydrolyzing activity toward chromogenic proteinase substrates. On the basis of inhibitory analysis, the protein C-activating proteinase from A. ochraceus VKM F-4104D appeared to be a serine proteinase, together with that isolated from the venom of Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix. The isolated enzyme was a nonglycosylated protein with a molecular weight of about 33 kDa, pI 6.0 with an observed optimal activity under a pH of 8.0-9.0 and 37°C. A comparison of the properties of the protein C-activating proteinase formed by A. ochraceus and the enzyme derived from the venom of Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix demonstrated a similarity in their properties; however, proteinase from the micromycete appeared to be in the nonglycosylated state and possessed the ability to hydrolyze the chromogenic plasmin substrate H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA. PMID:25842908

  19. Cystatin F regulates proteinase activity in IL-2-activated natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Maher, Katarina; Konjar, Spela; Watts, Colin; Turk, Boris; Kopitar-Jerala, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Cystatin F is a unique member of the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, which is synthesized as an inactive dimer and it is activated by N-terminal cleavage in the endolysosomes. It is expressed in the cells of the immune system: myeloid cells and the cells involved in target cell killing: natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Upon activation of the NK cells with interleukin 2 (IL-2), cystatin F was found upregulated and co-localized in cytotoxic granules with cathepsin C (CatC) and CatV. However, cystatin F inhibits the CatC in cells only when its N-terminal part is processed. Although cystatin F could inhibit both CatV and CatC, the IL-2 stimulation of the YT cells resulted in an increased CatV activity, while the CatC activity was unchanged. The incubation of IL-2 activated NK cells with a cysteine proteinase inhibitor E-64d increased the cystatin F dimer formation. Our results suggest that cystatin F not only inhibits CatV, but it is processed by the CatV in order to inhibit the CatC activity in cytotoxic granules. The regulation of the CatC activity in the cytotoxic granules of the NK cells by the cystatin F could be important for the processing and activation of granule-associated serine proteases - granzymes.

  20. [Anti-adenovirus activity of a substance and medical form of ribamydil in cell culture].

    PubMed

    Nosach, L N; Diachenko, N S; Zhovnovataia, V L

    2009-01-01

    The inhibiting effect of ribamydil on adenovirus reproduction was studied under the determination of the number of cells with virus- induced DNA-containing intranucleus inclusion bodies and hexone antigen, the synthesis of adenovirus proteins and the infection virus by t he investigation. EC50 of ribamydil substance is 4-8 microg/ml, but complete suppression of adenovirus genome expression was found when adding ribamydil after the virus adsorption, in concentrations of 125-500 microg/ml. The original effect of ribamydil on the expression of adenovirus genome was found under its effect in concentration of 31 microg/ml. Intranucleus virus-induced inclusion bodies of the early type only were found under these conditions. Synthesis of the structural virus polypeptides, including hexone polypeptide (II) and non-structural polypeptide 100K, taking part in hexone trimerization, proceed intensively but without formation of immunologically active hexone. The inhibiting effect of officinal form of ribamydil was less expressed as compared with the substance (EC50: 62 microg/ml). The work results prove that the therapeutic effect of ribamydil (ribavirin) under treatment of adenovirus infections may be achieved in case when it is used in a dose excluding the expression of the adenovirus genome.

  1. Isolation of a proteinase with plasminogen-activating activity from Lachesis muta muta (bushmaster) snake venom.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, E F; Santos, C I; Magalhaes, A; Diniz, C R; Figueiredo, S; Gilroy, J; Richardson, M

    2000-06-01

    A plasminogen activator enzyme (LV-PA) from Lachesis muta muta venom was purified to homogeneity using gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions showed a single protein band with an Mr of 33,000 Da. It is an acidic glycoprotein which activates plasminogen to plasmin indirectly, functioning via prior formation of a molecular complex, known as plasminogen activator. The purified preparation catalyzes the hydrolysis of several p-nitroanilide peptide substrates containing Lys at the scissile bond. In contrast, no hydrolysis was detected on the synthetic substrates TAME and BAPNA, which contain arginine. By the use of the plasmin-specific chromogenic substrate Tos-Gly-Pro-Lys-pNA, the preparation had a plasmin-like activity of 0.68 U/mg, which was 35.8-fold higher than that of the crude venom from which it was prepared. In vitro, fibrin hydrolysis using LV-PA as plasminogen activator displayed more similarity with the effect produced by streptokinase (SK). SDS-PAGE (10%) analysis showed a 115-kDa complex formation after incubation of plasminogen with either LV-PA or SK. At a molar ratio of 50:1 (fibrinogen:enzyme), the preparation exhibited weakly fibrinogenolytic activity. However, LV-PA is distinguished from thrombin in that it does not clot fibrinogen. After incubation of LV-PA with platelet-rich plasma, the enzyme (2 microM) showed no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP, epinephrine, or collagen. Comparison of the N-terminal sequence of LV-PA with other snake venom plasminogen activators revealed that LV-PA exhibits a high degree of sequence identity with the TsVPA from Trimeresurus stejnegeri (90%) and with the Haly-PA from Agkistrodon halys (85%). LV-PA also has homology with other snake venom serine proteinases such as the thrombin-like/gyroxin analogue (38%) from bushmaster venom and with other coagulation serine proteases. The proteinase was readily inhibited by treatment with p-nitrophenyl p

  2. Thrombin-Mediated Direct Activation of Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2: Another Target for Thrombin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hansen, Kristina K; Renaux, Bernard; Polley, Danny; Gibson, Stacy; Vanderboor, Christina; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2016-05-01

    Thrombin is known to signal to cells by cleaving/activating a G-protein-coupled family of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). The signaling mechanism involves the proteolytic unmasking of an N-terminal receptor sequence that acts as a tethered receptor-activating ligand. To date, the recognized targets of thrombin cleavage and activation for signaling are PAR1 and PAR4, in which thrombin cleaves at a conserved target arginine to reveal a tethered ligand. PAR2, which like PAR1 is also cleaved at an N-terminal arginine to unmask its tethered ligand, is generally regarded as a target for trypsin but not for thrombin signaling. We now show that thrombin, at concentrations that can be achieved at sites of acute injury or in a tumor microenvironment, can directly activate PAR2 vasorelaxation and signaling, stimulating calcium and mitogen-activated protein kinase responses along with triggeringβ-arrestin recruitment. Thus, PAR2 can be added alongside PAR1 and PAR4 to the targets, whereby thrombin can affect tissue function.

  3. Characterization of an exocellular serine-thiol proteinase activity in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Carmona, A K; Puccia, R; Oliveira, M C; Rodrigues, E G; Juliano, L; Travassos, L R

    1995-07-01

    An exocellular proteinase activity has been characterized in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis culture filtrates. Chromatographic analysis showed that the activity was eluted from an anion-exchange Resource Q column at 0.08-0.1 M NaCl, and by gel filtration near ovalbumin elution, in a single peak. Purification of the proteinase, however, was hampered by the low protein yield, in contrast to the high peptidase activity. Numerous chromogenic peptidyl p-nitroanilide derivatives and internally quenched fluorescent peptides, flanked by Abz (O-aminobenzoyl) and EDDnp (ethylenediaminedinitrophenyl), were tested as substrates. Cleavage was observed with Abz-MKRLTL-EDDnp, Abz-FRLVR-EDDnp, and Abz-PLGLLGR-EDDnp at Leu-Thr, Leu-Val and Leu-Leu/Leu-Gly bonds respectively as determined by isolation of the corresponding fragments by HPLC. Leucine at P1 seemed to be restrictive for the activity of the exocellular enzyme, but threonine (P'1) and leucine (P'2) in Abz-MKRLTL-EDDnp apparently were not essential. Also, a pair of alanines could substitute for lysine (P3) and arginine (P2) in this substrate, with a decrease in the Km values. The exocellular peptidase activity of P. brasiliensis had an optimum pH of > 9.0 and was irreversibly inhibited by PMSF, mercuric acetate and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Inhibition of the mercuriate compounds could be partially reversed by Cys/EDTA. E-64 [trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanido)butene] was a weak and reversible inhibitor, whereas EDTA and pepstatin were not inhibitory. These results suggest that P. brasiliensis exocellular enzyme belongs to the subfamily of SH-containing serine proteinases.

  4. [Characteristics of the Effect of Cestodes Parasitizing the Fish Intestine on the Activity of the Host Proteinases].

    PubMed

    Izvekova, G I; Solovyev, M M

    2016-01-01

    The activity and spectrum of proteinases in the intestines of host fishes change upon infestation with cestodes. Serine proteinases are found to make a greater contribution to the total proteolytic activity. The reduction of proteolytic activity is associated with adsorption of the enzymes of the host on the surface of cestodes, and the increase in the activity is caused by the injury of the intestinal mucosa by the attachment apparatuses of cestodes. The inhibition of proteainase activity indicates the possible participation of microbiota enzymes in protein hydrolyses.

  5. Phospholipase and Aspartyl Proteinase Activities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bassyouni, Rasha H; Wegdan, Ahmed Ashraf; Abdelmoneim, Abdelsamie; Said, Wessam; AboElnaga, Fatma

    2015-10-01

    Few research had investigated the secretion of phospholipase and aspartyl proteinase from Candida spp. causing infection in females with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This research aimed to investigate the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in diabetic versus non-diabetic women and compare the ability of identified Candida isolates to secrete phospholipases and aspartyl proteinases with characterization of their genetic profile. The study included 80 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 100 non-diabetic females within the child-bearing period. Candida strains were isolated and identified by conventional microbiological methods and by API Candida. The isolates were screened for their extracellular phospholipase and proteinase activities by culturing them on egg yolk and bovine serum albumin media, respectively. Detection of aspartyl proteinase genes (SAP1 to SAP8) and phospholipase genes (PLB1, PLB2) were performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicated that vaginal candidiasis was significantly higher among the diabetic group versus nondiabetic group (50% versus 20%, respectively) (p = 0.004). C. albicans was the most prevalent species followed by C. glabrata in both groups. No significant association between diabetes mellitus and phospholipase activities was detected (p = 0.262), whereas high significant proteinase activities exhibited by Candida isolated from diabetic females were found (82.5%) (p = 0.000). Non-significant associations between any of the tested proteinase or phospholipase genes and diabetes mellitus were detected (p > 0.05). In conclusion, it is noticed that the incidence of C. glabrata causing VVC is increased. The higher prevalence of vaginal candidiasis among diabetics could be related to the increased aspartyl proteinase production in this group of patients.

  6. A genetic fiber modification to achieve matrix-metalloprotease-activated infectivity of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Rovira-Rigau, Maria; Luna, Jeroni; Giménez-Alejandre, Marta; Vaquero, Eva; García de la Torre, Beatriz; Andreu, David; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2014-10-28

    Selective tumor targeting of oncolytic adenovirus at the level of cell entry remains a major challenge to improve efficacy and safety. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are overexpressed in a variety of tumors and in particular in pancreatic cancer. In the current work, we have exploited the expression of MMPs together with the penetration capabilities of a TAT-like peptide to engineer tumor selective adenoviruses. We have generated adenoviruses containing CAR-binding ablated fibers further modified with a C-terminus TAT-like peptide linked to a blocking domain by an MMP-cleavable sequence. This linker resulted in a MMP-dependent cell transduction of the reporter MMP-activatable virus AdTATMMP and in efficient transduction of neoplastic cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Intravenous and intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice showed very low AdTATMMP activity in the normal pancreas, whereas increased transduction was observed in pancreatic tumors of transgenic Ela-myc mice. Intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice bearing orthotopic tumors led to a 25-fold increase in tumor targeting compared to the wild type fiber control. A replication competent adenovirus, Ad(RC)MMP, with the MMP-activatable fiber showed oncolytic efficacy and increased antitumor activity compared to Adwt in a pancreatic orthotopic model. Reduced local and distant metastases were observed in Ad(RC)MMP treated-mice. Moreover, no signs of pancreatic toxicity were detected. We conclude that MMP-activatable adenovirus may be beneficial for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  7. Isolation, characterization and antifungal activity of proteinase inhibitors from Capsicum chinense Jacq. Seeds.

    PubMed

    Dias, Germana Bueno; Gomes, Valdirene Moreira; Pereira, Umberto Zottich; Ribeiro, Suzanna F Ferreira; Carvalho, André O; Rodrigues, Rosana; Machado, Olga L Tavares; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales; Ferreira, André Teixeira S; Perales, Jonas; Da Cunha, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species belong to the Solanaceae family and have great social, economic and agronomical significance. The present research presents data on the isolation and characterization of Capsicum chinense Jacq. peptides which were scrutinized in relation to their toxicity towards a diverse set of yeast species. The protein extract was separated with C18 reverse-phase chromatography in high performance liquid chromatography, resulting in three different peptide enriched fractions (PEFs) termed PEF1, PEF2 and PEF3. Tricine-SDS-PAGE of the PEF2 revealed peptides with molecular masses of approximately 5.0 and 8.5 kDa. These PEFs also exhibited strong antifungal activity against different yeasts. In the presence of the PEF2, Candida tropicalis exhibited morphological changes, including cellular agglomeration and formation of pseudohyphae. Determined N-terminal sequences of PEF2 and PEF3 were proven to be highly homologous to serine proteinase inhibitors, when analysed by comparative database sequence tools. For this reason were performed protease inhibitory activity assay. The PEFs displayed high inhibitory activity against trypsin and low inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin. PEF2 and PEF3 were considerably unsusceptible to a broad interval of pH and temperatures. Due to the myriad of application of Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) in fields ranging from plant protection against pathogens and pests to medicine such as in cancer and virus replication inhibition, the discovery of new PIs with new properties are of great interest.

  8. Age-dependent changes in extracellular proteins, aminopeptidase and proteinase activities in Frankia isolate BR.

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Benoist, P; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1991-12-01

    To investigate protein secretion by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia isolate BR, we designed a rapid DEAE adsorption, salt elution and Biogel P6DG desalination method to concentrate protein from the growth medium. Secreted proteins reached a maximum concentration (5.6 gm l-1) in the medium at growth arrest. Analysis by SDS-PAGE detected up to 63 extracellular polypeptides when Frankia cells were grown under stirred conditions in BAP medium supplemented with phosphatidylcholine and MES buffer and 65 proteins in stirred BAP media alone. The pattern of extracellular polypeptides changed during growth. Several extracellular proteolytic activities were detected and compared with intracellular ones. The substrate specificity of the extracellular and intracellular aminopeptidase activities were the same. Also, the electrophoretic migration patterns of secreted and intracellular aminopeptidases could not be distinguished. Secretion of the proline-specific aminopeptidase FAP proteinase (PF) were secreted: 10 had the same electrophoretic mobility as their intracellular counterparts after SDS-gelatine-PAGE while five (PF - 39.5, PF - 38.5, PF - 36.5, PF - 25.5 and PF - 20.5 kDa) had a different electrophoretic mobility and, therefore, appeared to be exclusively extracellular. At least seven extracellular proteinases appeared to increase coordinately in activity shortly before growth arrest.

  9. CCL21/IL21-armed oncolytic adenovirus enhances antitumor activity against TERT-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Yi-Fei; Si, Chong-Zhan; Zhu, Yu-Hui; Jin, Yan; Zhu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Guang-Yao

    2016-07-15

    Multigene-armed oncolytic adenoviruses are capable of efficiently generating a productive antitumor immune response. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21) binds to CCR7 on naïve T cells and dendritic cells (DCs) to promote their chemoattraction to the tumor and resultant antitumor activity. Interleukin 21 (IL21) promotes survival of naïve T cells while maintaining their CCR7 surface expression, which increases their capacity to transmigrate in response to CCL21 chemoattraction. IL21 is also involved in NK cell differentiation and B cell activation and proliferation. The generation of effective antitumor immune responses is a complex process dependent upon coordinated interactions of various subsets of effector cells. Using the AdEasy system, we aimed to construct an oncolytic adenovirus co-expressing CCL21 and IL21 that could selectively replicate in TERTp-positive tumor cells (Ad-CCL21-IL21 virus). The E1A promoter of these oncolytic adenoviruses was replaced by telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (TERTp). Ad-CCL21-IL21 was constructed from three plasmids, pGTE-IL21, pShuttle-CMV-CCL21 and AdEasy-1 and was homologously recombined and propagated in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183 and the packaging cell line HEK-293, respectively. Our results showed that our targeted and armed oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-CCL21-IL21 can induce apoptosis in TERTp-positive tumor cells to give rise to viral propagation, in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, we confirm that these modified oncolytic adenoviruses do not replicate efficiently in normal cells even under high viral loads. Additionally, we investigate the role of Ad-CCL21-IL21 in inducing antitumor activity and tumor specific cytotoxicity of CTLs in vitro. This study suggests that Ad-CCL21-IL21 is a promising targeted tumor-specific oncolytic adenovirus. PMID:27157859

  10. Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 mediate contraction of human oesophageal muscularis mucosae.

    PubMed

    Chang, B-S; Chang, J-C; Huang, S-C

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 mediate contraction of the human gallbladder. In the present study, we investigated effects mediated by proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) in the human oesophagus by measuring contraction of muscularis mucosae strips isolated from the human oesophagus. Both PAR(1) agonists (thrombin, SFLLRN-NH(2) and TFLLR-NH(2)) and PAR(2) agonists (trypsin, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2) and SLIGKV-NH(2)) caused concentration-dependent contraction. In contrast, PAR(1) and PAR(2) control peptides did not cause contraction. The existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) in the human oesophageal muscularis mucosae was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. On the other hand, PAR(4) agonists, GYPGKF-NH(2), GYPGQV-NH(2) and AYPGKF-NH(2), did not cause contraction or relaxation in resting or carbachol-contracted muscularis mucosae strips, suggesting that PAR(4) is not involved in human oesophageal motility. The contractile responses to SFLLRN-NH(2) and trypsin in the human oesophagus were insensitive to atropine and tetrodotoxin, indicating that the contractile response was not neurally mediated. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PAR(1) and PAR(2) but not PAR(4) mediate contraction in human oesophageal muscularis mucosae. PAR(1) and PAR(2) may influence human oesophageal motility. PMID:19694963

  11. Application of Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia) serine proteinase for production of biologically active peptides from casein.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Pokora, Marta; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine potential application of a serine proteinase derived from Asian pumpkin for obtaining biologically active peptides from casein. The course of casein hydrolysis by three doses of the enzyme (50, 150, 300 U/mg of protein) was monitored for 24 hours by the determinations of: hydrolysis degree DH (%), free amino group content (μmole Gly/g), RP HPLC peptide profiles and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all hydrolyzates analyzed antioxidant activities were determined using three tests: the ability to reduce iron ions in FRAP test, the ability to scavenge free radicals in DPPH test, and Fe(2+) chelating activity. The antimicrobial activity of obtained peptide fractions was determined as the ability to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in a diffusion plate test. The deepest degradation, expressed as the DH [%] and the free amino group content (67% and 7528 µmole Gly/mg, respectively), was noted in samples hydrolyzed with 300 U/ml of enzyme for 24 hours, while in other samples the determined values were about three and two times lower. The results were in agreement with the peptide profiles obtained by RP HPLC. The highest antioxidative activities determined in all tests were seen for the casein hydrolysate obtained with 300 U/mg protein of serine proteinase after 24 h of reaction (2.15 µM Trolox/mg, 96.15 µg Fe(3+)/mg, 814.97 µg Fe(2+)/mg). Antimicrobial activity was presented in three preparations. In other samples no antimicrobial activity was detected.

  12. Phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolated from oral cavities of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tsang, C S P; Chu, F C S; Leung, W K; Jin, L J; Samaranayake, L P; Siu, S C

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to biotype and characterize phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities of oral Candida albicans isolates from 210 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and 210 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Seventy-six and 50 C. albicans isolates were obtained from type 2 DM patients and controls, respectively, using the oral rinse technique. The isolates were characterized with a biotyping system based on enzyme profiles, carbohydrate assimilation patterns and boric acid resistance of the yeasts, and the isolates were further tested for in vitro phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities. The major biotypes of C. albicans isolates from the type 2 DM and control groups were A1R (42.1 %) and J1R (36.0 %), respectively. Significantly higher proteinase and haemolytic activities were found in the isolates from the type 2 DM group (P<0.05). Proteinase activity was higher in isolates from patients with > or =10 years of DM history than those with <10 years (P<0.05). Haemolytic activity was significantly higher in isolates from female DM patients than in those from male counterparts (P<0.05). These data provide evidence of increased extracellular enzyme activity in Candida isolates taken from DM patients.

  13. Effects of trypsin, thrombin and proteinase-activated receptors on guinea pig common bile duct motility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2012-11-10

    Trypsin and thrombin activate proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), which modulate gastrointestinal motility. The common bile duct is exposed to many proteinases that can activate PARs, especially during infection and stone obstruction. We investigated PAR effects on common bile duct motility in vitro. Contraction and relaxation of isolated guinea pig common bile duct strips caused by PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) agonists were measured using isometric transducers. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the expression of PAR(1) and PAR(2). Thrombin and two PAR(1) peptide agonists, TFLLR-NH(2) and SFLLRN-NH(2), evoked moderate relaxation of the carbachol-contracted common bile duct in a concentration-dependent manner. Trypsin and three PAR(2) peptide agonists, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2), SLIGKV-NH(2) and SLIGRL-NH(2), generated moderate to marked relaxation as well. The existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) mRNA in the common bile duct was identified by RT-PCR. Moreover, two PAR(4)-selective agonists, AYPGKF-NH(2) and GYPGQV-NH(2), produced relaxation of the common bile duct. In contrast, all PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) inactive control peptides did not elicit relaxation. This indicates that PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) mediate common bile duct relaxation. The thrombin, TFLLR-NH(2), trypsin, and AYPGKF-NH(2)-induced responses were not affected by tetrodotoxin, implying that the PAR effects are not neurally mediated. Our findings provide the first evidence that PAR(1) and PAR(2) mediate whereas agonists of PAR(4) elicit relaxation of the guinea pig common bile duct. Trypsin and thrombin relax the common bile duct. PARs may play an important role in the control of common bile duct motility. PMID:22960409

  14. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 is involved in the behavioural changes associated with sickness behaviour.

    PubMed

    Abulkassim, Roua; Brett, Ros; MacKenzie, Scott M; Bushell, Trevor J

    2016-06-15

    Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is widely expressed in the CNS but whether it plays a key role in inflammation-related behavioural changes remains unknown. Hence, in the present study we have examined whether PAR2 contributes to behaviour associated with systemic inflammation using PAR2 transgenic mice. The onset of sickness behaviour was delayed and the recovery accelerated in PAR2(-/-) mice in the LPS-induced model of sickness behaviour. In contrast, PAR2 does not contribute to behaviour under normal conditions. In conclusion, these data suggest that PAR2 does not contribute to behaviour in the normal healthy brain but it plays a role in inflammation-related behavioural changes.

  15. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes. PMID:26090464

  16. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Rossana; Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes.

  17. Itraconazole-resistant Candida auris with phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity from a case of vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Banerjee, Tuhina; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Tilak, Ragini

    2015-04-15

    Since the emergence of pathogenic non-albicans Candida species, a number of new isolates have been added to the list. One such unusual species is Candida auris (C. auris), recently isolated and studied in few reports. In this study, a case of vulvovaginitis caused by Candida auris incidentally identified by molecular methods using internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction (ITS PCR) is described. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed the isolate to be resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 2 µg/ml) and expressed important virulence factors including phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity. The patient was successfully treated with oral fluconazole and did not have any invasive fungemia. Very few cases of this emerging pathogen have been reported. However, its isolation from clinical specimens reveals the significance of non-albicans candida species over C. albicans and the diversity of Candida spp causing infections.

  18. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Rossana; Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes. PMID:26090464

  19. Measurement of neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G activities using intramolecularly quenched fluorogenic substrates.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Brice; Attucci, Sylvie; Epinette, Christophe; Pitois, Elodie; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Juliano, Luiz; Gauthier, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are three hematopoietic serine proteases, large quantities of which are stored in neutrophil cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They act in combination with reactive oxygen species to degrade engulfed microorganisms inside phagolysosomes. Active forms of these proteases are also externalized during neutrophil activation at inflammatory sites, thus helping to regulate inflammatory and immune responses. A fraction of secreted neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) remains bound to the external plasma membrane, where they remain enzymatically active. This protocol describes the spectrofluorometric measurement of NSP activities using sensitive ortho-aminobenzoyl-peptidyl-N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) ethylenediamine fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) substrates that fully discriminate between the three human NSPs. These are used to measure subnanomolar concentrations of free or membrane-bound NSPs in low-binding microplates and to quantify the activities of individual proteases in biological fluids. We describe the synthesis of FRET substrate, neutrophil purification, and kinetic experiments on activated neutrophils. The protocol for measuring NSP activity on the surface of activated neutrophils can be adapted to measure NSP activities in whole biological fluids. Such data clarify the contributions of individual NSPs to the development of inflammatory diseases. Ultimately, these proteases may be shown to be targets for therapeutic inhibitors.

  20. Activation of chitin synthetase in permeabilized cells of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, M P; Correa, J U; Cabib, E

    1982-01-01

    Digitonin treatment at 30 degrees C of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B permeabilized the cells and caused rapid and extensive activation of chitin synthetase in situ. The same result was obtained with a mutant generally defective in vacuolar proteases. By lowering the temperature and using different permeabilization procedures, we showed that increases in permeability and activation are distinct processes. Activation was inhibited by the protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin, but by pepstatin or chymostatin. Metal chelators were also inhibitory, and their effect was reversed by the addition of Ca2+ but not by Mg2+. Antipain added together with Ca2+ after incubation of the cells in the presence of a chelating agent prevented reversal of inhibition, a result that was interpreted as indicating that antipain acts either on the same step affected by Ca2+ or on a subsequent step. Efforts to obtain activation in cell-free extracts were unsuccessful, but it was possible to extract the synthetase, once activated, by breaking permeabilized cells with glass beads. Treatment of the cell-free extracts with trypsin led not only to increased activity of chitin synthetase, but also to a change in the pH-activity curve and a diminished requirement by the enzyme for free N-acetylglucosamine. These observations suggest that the modification undergone by the synthetase during endogenous activation is different from that brought about by trypsin treatment. Images PMID:6216245

  1. VaSP1, catalytically active serine proteinase from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom with unconventional active site triad.

    PubMed

    Kurtović, Tihana; Brgles, Marija; Leonardi, Adrijana; Lang Balija, Maja; Sajevic, Tamara; Križaj, Igor; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Halassy, Beata

    2014-01-01

    VaSP1, a serine proteinase from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom, is a glycosylated monomer of 31.5 kDa, as determined by MALDI mass spectrometry, showing multiple isoelectric points between pH 6.5 and pH 8.5. Partial amino acid sequencing of VaSP1 by Edman degradation and MS/MS analysis identified sequences which allowed its classification among the so-called snake venom serine proteinase homologues, members of the peptidase S1 family, however being devoid of the canonical catalytic triad. Only few representatives of this group have been identified so far with just two of them characterised in detail at the protein level. Despite substitution of His57 with Arg, VaSP1 possesses proteolytic activity which can be inhibited by Pefabloc, benzamidine, Zn²⁺ ions, DTT and trypsin inhibitor II, a Kunitz/BPTI group member. It hydrolyses N(α)-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-NA, exhibiting Michaelis-Menten behaviour with K(m) = 48.2 μM and V(m) = 0.019 nM s⁻¹. The pH for optimal activity on tested substrate is around 9.0. VaSP1 also cleaves insulin B-chain, digesting it at positions His¹⁰-Leu¹¹, Ala¹⁴-Leu¹⁵ and Tyr¹⁶-Leu¹⁷. Furthermore, the novel serine proteinase is active towards wide array of proteins involved in haemostasis where its degradation of fibrinogen, fibrin, prothrombin, factor X and plasminogen in vivo probably results in depletion of coagulation factors in blood circulation. The possibility that VaSP1 possesses anticoagulant properties has been further indicated by its ability to prolong prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time.

  2. Adenovirus type 2 activates cell cycle-dependent genes that are a subset of those activated by serum.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H T; Baserga, R; Mercer, W E

    1985-01-01

    We have studied a panel of 10 genes and cDNA sequences that are expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner in different types of cells from different species and that are inducible by different mitogens. These include five sequences (c-myc, 4F1, 2F1, 2A9, and KC-1) that are preferentially expressed in the early part of the G1 phase, three genes (ornithine decarboxylase, p53, and c-rasHa) preferentially expressed in middle or late G1, and two genes (thymidine kinase and histone H3) preferentially expressed in the S phase of the cell cycle. We have studied the expression of these genes in nonpermissive (tsAF8) and semipermissive (Swiss 3T3) cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Under the conditions of these experiments, adenovirus type 2 infection stimulates cellular DNA synthesis in both tsAF8 and 3T3 cells. However, four of the five early G1 genes (c-myc, 4F1, KC-1, and 2A9) and one of the late G1 genes (c-ras) are not induced by adenovirus infection, although they are strongly induced by serum. The other sequences (2F1, ornithine decarboxylase, p53, thymidine kinase, and histone H3) are activated by both adenovirus and serum. We conclude that the cell cycle-dependent genes activated by adenovirus 2 are a subset of the cell cycle-dependent genes activated by serum. The data suggest that the mechanisms by which serum and adenovirus induce cellular DNA synthesis are not identical. Images PMID:2427924

  3. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into normal rabbit arteries results in prolonged vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, K D; Dunn, P F; Owens, J W; Schulick, A H; Virmani, R; Sukhova, G; Libby, P; Dichek, D A

    1995-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are capable of high efficiency in vivo arterial gene transfer, and are currently in use as therapeutic agents in animal models of vascular disease. However, despite substantial data on the ability of viruses to cause vascular inflammation and proliferation, and the presence in current adenovirus vectors of viral open reading frames that are translated in vivo, no study has examined the effect of adenovirus vectors alone on the arterial phenotype. In a rabbit model of gene transfer into a normal artery, we examined potential vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal proliferation resulting from exposure to replication-defective adenovirus. Exposure of normal arteries to adenovirus vectors resulted in: (a) pronounced infiltration of T cells throughout the artery wall; (b) upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in arterial smooth muscle cells; (c) neointimal hyperplasia. These findings were present both 10 and 30 d after gene transfer, with no evidence of a decline in severity over time. Adenovirus vectors have pleiotropic effects on the arterial wall and cause significant pathology. Interpretation of experimental protocols that use adenovirus vectors to address either biological or therapeutic issues should take these observations into account. These observations should also prompt the design of more inert gene transfer vectors. Images PMID:8675667

  4. Proteinase K activity determination with β-galactosidase as sensitive macromolecular substrate.

    PubMed

    Ghéczy, Nicolas; Küchler, Andreas; Walde, Peter

    2016-11-15

    Proteinase K from Engyodontium album (proK) is a relatively unspecific serine endopeptidase which is known to attack proteins yet in their native states. If the attacked protein is an enzyme, even a partial hydrolysis by proK may lead to an inactivation of the enzyme, which can be monitored by measuring the loss of catalytic activity of the attacked enzyme. E. coli β-galactosidase (β-Gal) was used in this work as such enzyme. It was found to be a convenient and sensitive macromolecular model substrate for comparing the "native protein-attacking ability" of free and immobilized proK at pH = 7.0 and 23 °C. The β-Gal activity was measured spectrophotometrically with o-nitrophenyl-β-galactopyranoside. Reproducible proK determinations were possible for as little as 4.3 ng proK by using a proK analyte solution of 10 nM. Compared to free proK, immobilized proK was much less efficient in inactivating β-Gal, most likely due to a decreased mobility of immobilized proK and a restricted accessibility of β-Gal to the active site of proK. Worth noting is, that under conditions at which β-Gal was completely inactivated by proK, the activity of hen egg lysozyme, horseradish peroxidase, or Aspergillus sp. glucose oxidase remained unaltered. PMID:27594349

  5. Proteinase activated-receptors-associated signaling in the control of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sedda, Silvia; Marafini, Irene; Caruso, Roberta; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world and the second cause of cancer-related death. Gastric carcinogenesis is a multifactorial process, in which environmental and genetic factors interact to activate multiple intracellular signals thus leading to uncontrolled growth and survival of GC cells. One such a pathway is regulated by proteinase activated-receptors (PARs), seven transmembrane-spanning domain G protein-coupled receptors, which comprise four receptors (i.e., PAR-1, PAR-2, PAR-3, and PAR-4) activated by various proteases. Both PAR-1 and PAR-2 are over-expressed on GC cells and their activation triggers and/or amplifies intracellular pathways, which sustain gastric carcinogenesis. There is also evidence that expression of either PAR-1 or PAR-2 correlates with depth of wall invasion and metastatic dissemination and inversely with the overall survival of patients. Consistently, data emerging from experimental models of GC suggest that both these receptors can be important targets for therapeutic interventions in GC patients. In contrast, PAR-4 levels are down-regulated in GC and correlate inversely with the aggressiveness of GC, thus suggesting a negative role of this receptor in the control of GC. In this article we review the available data on the expression and role of PARs in GC and discuss whether manipulation of PAR-driven signals may be useful for interfering with GC cell behavior. PMID:25232234

  6. Proteinase K activity determination with β-galactosidase as sensitive macromolecular substrate.

    PubMed

    Ghéczy, Nicolas; Küchler, Andreas; Walde, Peter

    2016-11-15

    Proteinase K from Engyodontium album (proK) is a relatively unspecific serine endopeptidase which is known to attack proteins yet in their native states. If the attacked protein is an enzyme, even a partial hydrolysis by proK may lead to an inactivation of the enzyme, which can be monitored by measuring the loss of catalytic activity of the attacked enzyme. E. coli β-galactosidase (β-Gal) was used in this work as such enzyme. It was found to be a convenient and sensitive macromolecular model substrate for comparing the "native protein-attacking ability" of free and immobilized proK at pH = 7.0 and 23 °C. The β-Gal activity was measured spectrophotometrically with o-nitrophenyl-β-galactopyranoside. Reproducible proK determinations were possible for as little as 4.3 ng proK by using a proK analyte solution of 10 nM. Compared to free proK, immobilized proK was much less efficient in inactivating β-Gal, most likely due to a decreased mobility of immobilized proK and a restricted accessibility of β-Gal to the active site of proK. Worth noting is, that under conditions at which β-Gal was completely inactivated by proK, the activity of hen egg lysozyme, horseradish peroxidase, or Aspergillus sp. glucose oxidase remained unaltered.

  7. Comparison of specific activity and cytopathic effects of purified 33 kDa serine proteinase from Acanthamoeba strains with different degree of virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Tae; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Ha, Young-Ran; Hong, Yeon-Chul; Jeong, Hae Jin; Yu, Hak Sun

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) and amebic keratitis (AK) by Acanthamoeba has yet to be clarified. Protease has been recognized to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GAE and AK. In the present study, we have compared specific activity and cytopathic effects (CPE) of purified 33 kDa serine proteinases from Acanthamoeba strains with different degree of virulence (A. healyi OC-3A, A. lugdunensis KA/E2, and A. castellanii Neff). Trophozoites of the 3 strains revealed different degrees of CPE on human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. The effect was remarkably reduced by adding phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF), a serine proteinase inhibitor. This result indicated that PMSF-susceptible proteinase is the main component causing cytopathy to HCE cells by Acanthamoeba. The purified 33 kDa serine proteinase showed strong activity toward HCE cells and extracellular matrix proteins. The purified proteinase from OC-3A, the most virulent strain, demonstrated the highest enzyme activity compared to KA/E2, an ocular isolate, and Neff, a soil isolate. Polyclonal antibodies against the purified 33 kDa serine proteinase inhibit almost completely the proteolytic activity of culture supernatant of Acanthamoeba. In line with these results, the 33 kDa serine proteinase is suggested to play an important role in pathogenesis and to be the main component of virulence factor of Acanthamoeba. PMID:17170574

  8. A masquerade-like serine proteinase homologue is necessary for phenoloxidase activity in the coleopteran insect, Holotrichia diomphalia larvae.

    PubMed

    Kwon, T H; Kim, M S; Choi, H W; Joo, C H; Cho, M Y; Lee, B L

    2000-10-01

    Previously, we reported the molecular cloning of cDNA for the prophenoloxidase activating factor-I (PPAF-I) that encoded a member of the serine proteinase group with a disulfide-knotted motif at the N-terminus and a trypsin-like catalytic domain at the C-terminus [Lee, S.Y., Cho, M.Y., Hyun, J.H., Lee, K.M., Homma, K.I., Natori, S. , Kawabata, S.I., Iwanaga, S. & Lee, B.L. (1998) Eur. J. Biochem. 257, 615-621]. PPAF-I is directly involved in the activation of pro-phenoloxidase (pro-PO) by limited proteolysis and the overall structure is highly similar to that of Drosophila easter serine protease, an essential serine protease zymogen for pattern formation in normal embryonic development. Here, we report purification and molecular cloning of cDNA for another 45-kDa novel PPAF from the hemocyte lysate of Holotrichia diomphalia larvae. The gene encodes a serine proteinase homologue consisting of 415 amino-acid residues with a molecular mass of 45 256 Da. The overall structure of the 45-kDa protein is similar to that of masquerade, a serine proteinase homologue expressed during embryogenesis, larval, and pupal development in Drosophila melanogaster. The 45-kDa protein contained a trypsin-like serine proteinase domain at the C-terminus, except for the substitution of Ser of the active site triad to Gly and had a disulfide-knotted domain at the N-terminus. A highly similar 45-kDa serine proteinase homologue was also cloned from the larval cDNA library of another coleopteran, Tenebrio molitor. By in vitro reconstitution experiments, we found that the purified 45-kDa serine proteinase homologue, the purified active PPAF-I and the purified pro-PO were necessary for expressing phenoloxidase activity in the Holotrichia pro-PO system. However, incubation of pro-PO with either PPAF-I or 45-kDa protein, no phenoloxidase activity was observed. Interestingly, when the 45-kDa protein was incubated with PPAF-I and pro-PO in the absence, but not in the presence of Ca2+, the 45-k

  9. Purification and some physico-chemical and enzymic properties of a calcium ion-activated neutral proteinase from rabbit skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Azanza, Jean-Louis; Raymond, Jacques; Robin, Jean-Michel; Cottin, Patrick; Ducastaing, André

    1979-01-01

    Ca2+-activated neutral proteinase was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle by a method involving DEAE-Sephacel chromatography, affinity chromatography on organomercurial–Sepharose and gel filtration on Sephacryl S-200 and Sephadex G-150. The SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate)/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis data show that the purified enzyme contains only one polypeptide chain of mol.wt. 73000. The purification procedure used allowed us to eliminate a contaminant containing two components of mol.wt. about 30000 each. Whole casein or α1-casein were hydrolysed with a maximum rate at 30°C, pH7.5, and with 5mm-CaCl2, but myofibrils were found to be a very susceptible substrate for this proteinase. This activity is associated with the destruction of the Z-discs, which is caused by the solubilization of the Z-line proteins. The activity of the proteinase in vitro is not limited to the removal of Z-line. SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis on larger plates showed the ability of the proteinase to degrade myofibrils more extensively than previously supposed. This proteolysis resulted in the production of a 30000-dalton component as well as in various other higher- and lower-molecular-weight peptide fragments. Troponin T, troponin I, α-tropomyosin, some high-molecular-weight proteins (M protein, heavy chain of myosin) and three unidentified proteins are degraded. Thus the number of proteinase-sensitive regions in the myofibrils is greater than as previously reported by Dayton, Goll, Zeece, Robson & Reville [(1976) Biochemistry 15, 2150–2158]. The Ca2+-activated neutral proteinase is not a chymotrypsin- or trypsin-like enzyme, but it reacted with all the classic thiol-proteinase inhibitors for cathepsin B, papain, bromelain and ficin. Thus the proteinase was proved to have an essential thiol group. Antipain and leupeptin are also inhibitors of the Ca2+-activated neutral proteinase. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:534501

  10. A theoretical study of the active sites of papain and S195C rat trypsin: implications for the low reactivity of mutant serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    The serine and cysteine proteinases represent two important classes of enzymes that use a catalytic triad to hydrolyze peptides and esters. The active site of the serine proteinases consists of three key residues, Asp...His...Ser. The hydroxyl group of serine functions as a nucleophile and the imidazole ring of histidine functions as a general acid/general base during catalysis. Similarly, the active site of the cysteine proteinases also involves three key residues: Asn, His, and Cys. The active site of the cysteine proteinases is generally believed to exist as a zwitterion (Asn...His+...Cys-) with the thiolate anion of the cysteine functioning as a nucleophile during the initial stages of catalysis. Curiously, the mutant serine proteinases, thiol subtilisin and thiol trypsin, which have the hybrid Asp...His...Cys triad, are almost catalytically inert. In this study, ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations have been performed on the active sites of papain and the mutant serine proteinase S195C rat trypsin. These calculations predict that the active site of papain exists predominately as a zwitterion (Cys-...His+...Asn). However, similar calculations on S195C rat trypsin demonstrate that the thiol mutant is unable to form a reactive thiolate anion prior to catalysis. Furthermore, structural comparisons between native papain and S195C rat trypsin have demonstrated that the spatial juxtapositions of the triad residues have been inverted in the serine and cysteine proteinases and, on this basis, I argue that it is impossible to convert a serine proteinase to a cysteine proteinase by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:8819168

  11. Acute pancreatitis: proteinase-activated receptor-2 as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

    PubMed

    Matej, R; Housa, D; Olejár, T

    2006-01-01

    "Proteinase-activated" receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a G protein-coupled transmembrane receptor with seven transmembrane domains activated by trypsin. It has been shown in the pancreatic tissue that PAR-2 is involved in duct/acinary cells secretion, arterial tonus regulation and capillary liquid content turnover under physiological conditions. These above mentioned structures play an important role during the development of acute pancreatitis and are profoundly influenced by a high concentration of trypsin enzyme after its secretion into the interstitial tissue from the basolateral aspect of acinar cells. Among the other factors, it is the increase of interstitial trypsin concentration followed rapidly by PAR-2 action on pancreatic vascular smooth muscle cells that initiates ischemic changes in pancreatic parenchyma and that finally leads to necrosis of the pancreas. Consequent reperfusion perpetuates changes leading to the acute pancreatitis development. On the contrary, PAR-2 action on both exocrine and duct structures seems to play locally a protective role during acute pancreatitis development. Moreover, PAR-2 action is not confined to the pancreas but it contributes to the systemic vascular endothelium and immune cell activation that triggers the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) contributing to an early high mortality rate in severe disease. PMID:16343048

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  13. In vitro Candida albicans biofilm induced proteinase activity and SAP8 expression correlates with in vivo denture stomatitis severity.

    PubMed

    Ramage, Gordon; Coco, Brent; Sherry, Leighann; Bagg, Jeremy; Lappin, David F

    2012-07-01

    Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory disorder of the palatal mucosa amongst denture wearers. The pathological changes are induced by Candida albicans biofilm on the fitting surface of the upper denture, and different individuals experience different levels of disease. C. albicans is known to produce secreted aspartyl proteinases (SAPs) to aid adhesion, invasion and tissue destruction. We hypothesised that differential expression and activity of SAPs from denture stomatitis isolates results in different levels of disease amongst denture wearers. We selected C. albicans isolates from asymptomatic controls and three different severities of disease [Newton’s type (NT) 0, I, II and III]. We assessed biofilm formation and proteinase activity for each biofilm and investigated the transcriptional profile of SAPs 1, 2, 5, 6 and 8 from early (12 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms. There were no significant differences between isolates with respect to biofilm formation, whereas proteinase activity normalised to biofilm growth was significantly increased in the diseased groups (p < 0.0001). Proteinase activity correlated strongly with SAP expression (p < 0.0001). SAP8 expression was the greatest, followed by SAP5, 6, 2 and 1. The diseased groups showed the greatest levels of SAP expression, with significant differences also observed between the groups (p < 0.005). All SAPs except SAP5 were expressed in greater amounts in the mature biofilms compared to early biofilms. Overall, this study suggests that SAP activity in biofilms determined in vitro may help to explain differences in disease severity. SAP8 has been shown for the first time to play a prominent role in biofilms.

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteinase activity is necessary for parasite adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, R; Alderete, J F

    1989-01-01

    The role of cysteine proteinases in adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to HeLa and human vaginal epithelial cells was evaluated. Only pretreatment of trichomonads, but not epithelial cells, with N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), an inhibitor of trichomonad cysteine proteinases, greatly diminished the ability of T. vaginalis to recognize and bind to epithelial cells. Leupeptin and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, other cysteine proteinase inhibitors, also decreased T. vaginalis cytadherence. Parasites incubated with TLCK and washed extensively still did not adhere to cells at levels equal to those seen for control trichomonads treated with phosphate-buffered saline or culture medium alone. Exposure of TLCK-treated organisms with other cysteine proteinases restored cytadherence levels, indicating that proteinase action on the parasite surface is prerequisite for host cell attachment. Concentrations of TLCK which inhibited cytadherence did not alter the metabolism of T. vaginalis, as determined by metabolic labeling of trichomonad proteins; the protein patterns of T. vaginalis in the presence and absence of TLCK were identical. Kinetics of TLCK-mediated inhibition of cytadherence of other T. vaginalis isolates with different levels of epithelial-cell parasitism were similar to the concentration-dependent inhibition seen for isolate NYH 286. Incubation of TLCK-treated, washed organisms in growth medium resulted in regeneration of adherence. Finally, treatment of T. vaginalis organisms with proteinase inhibitors for abrogation of cytadherence effectively rendered the trichomonads unable to kill host cells, which is consistent with the contact-dependent nature of host cytotoxicity. These data show for the first time the involvement of T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases in parasite attachment to human epithelial cells. These results have implications for future pharmacologic intervention at a key step in infection. PMID:2789190

  15. Genetic delivery of an immunoRNase by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Hammer, Katharina; Arndt, Michaela A E; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Dorer, Dominik; Engelhardt, Sarah; Kontermann, Roland E; Hess, Jochen; Allgayer, Heike; Krauss, Jürgen; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2015-05-01

    Antibody therapy of solid cancers is well established, but suffers from unsatisfactory tumor penetration of large immunoglobulins or from low serum retention of antibody fragments. Oncolytic viruses are in advanced clinical development showing excellent safety, but suboptimal potency due to limited virus spread within tumors. Here, by developing an immunoRNase-encoding oncolytic adenovirus, we combine viral oncolysis with intratumoral genetic delivery of a small antibody-fusion protein for targeted bystander killing of tumor cells (viro-antibody therapy). Specifically, we explore genetic delivery of a small immunoRNase consisting of an EGFR-binding scFv antibody fragment fused to the RNase Onconase (ONC(EGFR)) that induces tumor cell death by RNA degradation after cellular internalization. Onconase is a frog RNase that combines lack of immunogenicity and excellent safety in patients with high tumor killing potency due to its resistance to the human cytosolic RNase inhibitor. We show that ONC(EGFR) expression by oncolytic adenoviruses is feasible with an optimized, replication-dependent gene expression strategy. Virus-encoded ONC(EGFR) induces potent and EGFR-dependent bystander killing of tumor cells. Importantly, the ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus showed dramatically increased cytotoxicity specifically to EGFR-positive tumor cells in vitro and significantly enhanced therapeutic activity in a mouse xenograft tumor model. The latter demonstrates that ONC(EGFR) is expressed at levels sufficient to trigger tumor cell killing in vivo. The established ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus represents a novel agent for treatment of EGFR-positive tumors. This viro-antibody therapy platform can be further developed for targeted/personalized cancer therapy by exploiting antibody diversity to target further established or emerging tumor markers or combinations thereof.

  16. RAD51 and BRCA2 enhance oncolytic adenovirus type 5 activity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tookman, Laura A.; Browne, Ashley K.; Connell, Claire M.; Bridge, Gemma; Ingemarsdotter, Carin K.; Dowson, Suzanne; Shibata, Atsushi; Lockley, Michelle; Martin, Sarah A.; McNeish, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) function is critically important in High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer (HGSOC). HGSOC with intact HR has a worse prognosis and is less likely to respond to platinum chemotherapy and PARP inhibitors. Oncolytic adenovirus, a novel therapy for human malignancies, stimulates a potent DNA damage response that influences overall anti-tumor activity. Here, the importance of HR was investigated by determining the efficacy of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vectors in ovarian cancer. Using matched BRCA2 mutant and wild-type HGSOC cells, it was demonstrated that intact HR function promotes viral DNA replication and augments overall efficacy, without influencing viral DNA processing. These data were confirmed in a wider panel of HR competent and defective ovarian cancer lines. Mechanistically, both BRCA2 and RAD51 localize to viral replication centers within the infected cell nucleus and that RAD51 localization occurs independently of BRCA2. In addition, a direct interaction was identified between RAD51 and adenovirus E2 DNA binding protein. Finally, using functional assays of HR competence, despite inducing degradation of MRE11, Ad5 infection does not alter cellular ability to repair DNA double strand break damage via HR. These data reveal that Ad5 redistributes critical HR components to viral replication centers and enhances cytotoxicity. Implications Oncolytic adenoviral therapy may be most clinically relevant in tumors with intact HR function. PMID:26452665

  17. Developing a rapid throughput screen for detection of nematicidal activity of plant cysteine proteinases: the role of Caenorhabditis elegans cystatins.

    PubMed

    Phiri, A M; De Pomerai, D; Buttle, D J; Behnke, J M B

    2014-02-01

    Plant cysteine proteinases (CPs) from papaya (Carica papaya) are capable of killing parasitic nematode worms in vitro and have been shown to possess anthelmintic effects in vivo. The acute damage reported in gastrointestinal parasites has not been found in free-living nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans nor among the free-living stages of parasitic nematodes. This apparent difference in susceptibility might be the result of active production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (such as cystatins) by the free-living stages or species. To test this possibility, a supernatant extract of refined papaya latex (PLS) with known active enzyme content was used. The effect on wild-type (Bristol N2) and cystatin null mutant (cpi-1(-/-) and cpi-2(-/-)) C. elegans was concentration-, temperature- and time-dependent. Cysteine proteinases digested the worm cuticle leading to release of internal structures and consequent death. Both cystatin null mutant strains were highly susceptible to PLS attack irrespective of the temperature and concentration of exposure, whereas wild-type N2 worms were generally resistant but far more susceptible to attack at low temperatures. PLS was able to induce elevated cpi-1 and cpi-2 cystatin expression. We conclude that wild-type C. elegans deploy cystatins CPI-1 and CPI-2 to resist CP attack. The results suggest that the cpi-1 or cpi-2 null mutants (or a double mutant combination of the two) could provide a cheap and effective rapid throughput C. elegans-based assay for screening plant CP extracts for anthelmintic activity.

  18. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. I. Kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Masia-Perez, J; Garcia-Molina, F; García-Moreno, M; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinases zymogens involving a uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous activation route and a reversible inhibition step, the time course equation of the zymogen, inhibitor and activated enzyme concentrations have been derived. Likewise, expressions for the time required for any reaction progress and the corresponding mean activation rates as well as the half-life of the global zymogen activation have been derived. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed.

  19. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 activation presynaptically enhances spontaneous glutamatergic excitatory transmission in adult rat substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Liu, T; Nakatsuka, T; Kumamoto, E

    2009-07-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) have a unique activation mechanism in that a proteolytically exposed N-terminal region acts as a tethered ligand. A potential impact of PAR on sensory processing has not been fully examined yet. Here we report that synthetic peptides with sequences corresponding to PAR ligands enhance glutamatergic excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. The frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) was increased by PAR-1 agonist SFLLRN-NH2 (by 47% at 1 microM) with small increases by PAR-2 and -4 agonists (SLIGKV-NH2 and GYPGQV-OH, respectively; at >3 microM); there was no change in its amplitude or in holding current at -70 mV. The PAR-1 peptide action was inhibited by PAR-1 antagonist YFLLRNP-OH. TFLLR-NH2, an agonist which is more selective to PAR-1 than SFLLRN-NH2, dose-dependently increased spontaneous EPSC frequency (EC50=0.32 microM). A similar presynaptic effect was produced by PAR-1 activating proteinase thrombin in a manner sensitive to YFLLRNP-OH. The PAR-1 peptide action was resistant to tetrodotoxin and inhibited in Ca2+-free solution. Primary-afferent monosynaptically evoked EPSC amplitudes were unaffected by PAR-1 agonist. These results indicate that PAR-1 activation increases the spontaneous release of L-glutamate onto SG neurons from nerve terminals in a manner dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Considering that sensory processing within the SG plays a pivotal role in regulating nociceptive transmission to the spinal dorsal horn, the PAR-1-mediated glutamatergic transmission enhancement could be involved in a positive modulation of nociceptive transmission. PMID:19420120

  20. Etoposide enhances antitumor efficacy of MDR1-driven oncolytic adenovirus through autoupregulation of the MDR1 promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yau-Lin; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds), or oncolytic adenoviruses, such as E1B55K-deleted adenovirus, are attractive anticancer agents. However, the therapeutic efficacy of E1B55K-deleted adenovirus for refractory solid tumors has been limited. Environmental stress conditions may induce nuclear accumulation of YB-1, which occurs in multidrug-resistant and adenovirus-infected cancer cells. Overexpression and nuclear localization of YB-1 are associated with poor prognosis and tumor recurrence in various cancers. Nuclear YB-1 transactivates the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) genes through the Y-box. Here, we developed a novel E1B55K-deleted adenovirus driven by the MDR1 promoter, designed Ad5GS3. We tested the feasibility of using YB-1 to transcriptionally regulate Ad5GS3 replication in cancer cells and thereby to enhance antitumor efficacy. We evaluated synergistic antitumor effects of oncolytic virotherapy in combination with chemotherapy. Our results show that adenovirus E1A induced E2F-1 activity to augment YB-1 expression, which shut down host protein synthesis in cancer cells during adenovirus replication. In cancer cells infected with Ad5WS1, an E1B55K-deleted adenovirus driven by the E1 promoter, E1A enhanced YB-1 expression, and then further phosphorylated Akt, which, in turn, triggered nuclear translocation of YB-1. Ad5GS3 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents facilitated nuclear localization of YB-1 and, in turn, upregulated the MDR1 promoter activity and enhanced Ad5GS3 replication in cancer cells. Thus, E1A, YB-1, and the MDR1 promoter form a positive feedback loop to promote Ad5GS3 replication in cancer cells, and this regulation can be further augmented when chemotherapeutic agents are added. In the in vivo study, Ad5GS3 in combination with etoposide synergistically suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival in NOD/SCID mice bearing human lung tumor xenografts. More importantly, Ad5GS3 exerted potent oncolytic activity against clinical

  1. Molt cycle-associated changes in calcium-dependent proteinase activity that degrades actin and myosin in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The role of calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) in the proecdysial atrophy of crustacean claw muscle has been investigated. During atrophy the molar ratio of actin to myosin heavy chain decreased 31%, confirming earlier ultrastructural observations that the ratio of thin:thick myofilaments declined from 9:1 to 6:1 (D.L. Mykles and D.M. Skinner, 1981, J. Ultrastruct. Res. 75, 314 to 325). The release of TCA-soluble material in muscle homogenates at neutral pH was stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and completely inhibited by EGTA. The specific degradation of the major myofibrillar proteins (actin, myosin heavy and light chains, paramyosin, tropomyosin, troponin-T, and troponin-I) was demonstrated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteolytic activity was more than twofold greater in proecdysial muscle homogenates. Degradation of myofibrillar proteins was inhibited by EGTA, and the two inhibitors of crysteine proteinases, leupeptin, and antipain, but not pepstatin, an inhibitor of aspartic proteinases. Unlike CDPs from vertebrate muscle, the CDP(s) in crab claw muscle degrades actin and myosin in addition to other myofibrillar proteins.

  2. Membrane lipid peroxidation in neurodegeneration: Role of thrombin and proteinase-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Citron, Bruce A; Ameenuddin, Syed; Uchida, K; Suo, William Z; SantaCruz, Karen; Festoff, Barry W

    2016-07-15

    Thrombin and membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) have been implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders from CNS trauma to stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Because thrombin also induces MLP in platelets and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases we hypothesized that its deleterious effects might, in part, involve formation of MLP in neuronal cells. We previously showed that thrombin induced caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in motor neurons, via a proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1). We have now investigated thrombin's influence on the oxidative state of neurons leading to induction of MLP-protein adducts. Translational relevance of thrombin-induced MLP is supported by increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts (HNEPA) in AD and PD brains. We now report for the first time that thrombin dose-dependently induces formation of HNEPA in NSC34 mouse motor neuron cells using anti-HNE and anti-acrolein monoclonal antibodies. The most prominent immunoreactive band, in SDS-PAGE, was at ∼54kDa. Membrane fractions displayed higher amounts of the protein-adduct than cytosolic fractions. Thrombin induced MLP was mediated, at least in part, through PAR1 since a PAR1 active peptide, PAR1AP, also elevated HNEPA levels. Of interest, glutamate and Fe2SO4 also increased the ∼54kDa HNEPA band in these cells but to a lesser extent. Taken together our results implicate the involvement of thrombin and MLP in neuronal cell loss observed in various CNS degenerative and traumatic pathologies. PMID:27138068

  3. [Activity of elastase-like proteinases and their inhibitors in indigent nearly healthy residents in various biogeochemical conditions of the Chuvash ASSR].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, R V; Platonova, L V; Suslikov, V L; Paskhina, T S

    1991-01-01

    A proteinase-inhibitory balance of blood (elastase-like activity, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 2-macroglobulin activities) was studied in practically healthy inhabitants of the Chuvash ASSR two subregions--Sura river basin and Cubninocivil region, which are distinctly dissimilar in all the biogeochemical parameters involving macro- and microtrace compositions. The higher activity of elastase-like proteinases and decreased content of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor were detected in practically healthy inhabitants of the river Sura basin, where high incidence of myocardial infarction was found, as compared with those of the Cubninocivil people. The similar alterations in the proteinase-inhibitory balance were observed in blood of experimental animals maintained on a diet containing fresh water from these subregions. The data obtained suggest that there exists causative relationship between biogeochemical parameters and development of imbalance in the proteinase-inhibitor system in practically healthy inhabitants of the river Sura basin. This imbalance is considered as a pathogenetic factor responsible for development of atherosclerosis.

  4. The two-component NS2B-NS3 proteinase represses DNA unwinding activity of the West Nile virus NS3 helicase.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Andrei V; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Aleshin, Alexander E; Ratnikov, Boris I; Smith, Jeffrey W; Liddington, Robert C; Strongin, Alex Y

    2008-06-20

    Similar to many flavivirus types including Dengue and yellow fever viruses, the nonstructural NS3 multifunctional protein of West Nile virus (WNV) with an N-terminal serine proteinase domain and an RNA triphosphatase, an NTPase domain, and an RNA helicase in the C-terminal domain is implicated in both polyprotein processing and RNA replication and is therefore a promising drug target. To exhibit its proteolytic activity, NS3 proteinase requires the presence of the cofactor encoded by the upstream NS2B sequence. During our detailed investigation of the biology of the WNV helicase, we characterized the ATPase and RNA/DNA unwinding activities of the full-length NS2B-NS3 proteinase-helicase protein as well as the individual NS3 helicase domain lacking both the NS2B cofactor and the NS3 proteinase sequence and the individual NS3 proteinase-helicase lacking only the NS2B cofactor. We determined that both the NS3 helicase and NS3 proteinase-helicase constructs are capable of unwinding both the DNA and the RNA templates. In contrast, the full-length NS2B-NS3 proteinase-helicase unwinds only the RNA templates, whereas its DNA unwinding activity is severely repressed. Our data suggest that the productive, catalytically competent fold of the NS2B-NS3 proteinase moiety represents an essential component of the RNA-DNA substrate selectivity mechanism in WNV and, possibly, in other flaviviruses. Based on our data, we hypothesize that the mechanism we have identified plays a role yet to be determined in WNV replication occurring both within the virus-induced membrane-bound replication complexes in the host cytoplasm and in the nuclei of infected cells.

  5. A Monoclonal Antibody (MCPR3-7) Interfering with the Activity of Proteinase 3 by an Allosteric Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Hinkofer, Lisa C.; Seidel, Susanne A. I.; Korkmaz, Brice; Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M.; Braun, Dieter; Jenne, Dieter E.; Specks, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is an abundant serine protease of neutrophil granules and a major target of autoantibodies (PR3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Some of the PR3 synthesized by promyelocytes in the bone marrow escapes the targeting to granules and occurs on the plasma membrane of naive and primed neutrophils. This membrane-associated PR3 antigen may represent pro-PR3, mature PR3, or both forms. To discriminate between mature PR3 and its inactive zymogen, which have different conformations, we generated and identified a monoclonal antibody called MCPR3-7. It bound much better to pro-PR3 than to mature PR3. This monoclonal antibody greatly reduced the catalytic activity of mature PR3 toward extended peptide substrates. Using diverse techniques and multiple recombinant PR3 variants, we characterized its binding properties and found that MCPR3-7 preferentially bound to the so-called activation domain of the zymogen and changed the conformation of mature PR3, resulting in impaired catalysis and inactivation by α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-antitrypsin). Noncovalent as well as covalent complexation between PR3 and α1-proteinase inhibitor was delayed in the presence of MCPR3-7, but cleavage of certain thioester and paranitroanilide substrates with small residues in the P1 position was not inhibited. We conclude that MCPR3-7 reduces PR3 activity by an allosteric mechanism affecting the S1′ pocket and further prime side interactions with substrates. In addition, MCPR3-7 prevents binding of PR3 to cellular membranes. Inhibitory antibodies targeting the activation domain of PR3 could be exploited as highly selective inhibitors of PR3, scavengers, and clearers of the PR3 autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23902773

  6. Detergent-Stable Salt-Activated Proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 Isolated from Fish Sauce Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Montriwong, Aungkawipa; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-05-01

    The NaCl-activated and detergent-stable proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 isolated from fish sauce fermentation were purified and characterized. The enzymes with molecular masses of 20 and 36 kDa showed caseinolytic activity on a zymogram. Optimum azocaseinolytic activity was at 60 °C and pH 9. The proteolytic activity increased in the presence of 10 mM CaCl2 and 0.5 M NaCl and showed high stability at 0-2 M NaCl. The enzymes were stable at pH 4-10 and 10-50 °C. The enzymes preferably hydrolyzed Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and were completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), showing subtilisin-like characteristics. Activity and stability remained high in the presence of H2O2 and various surfactants. The enzymes exhibited high stability (>95%) in various organic solvents (DMSO, butanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile) at concentration of 50%. The V. halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 proteinases showed potential as a biocatalyst in aqueous-organic solvent systems and as an additive in laundry detergent.

  7. Detergent-Stable Salt-Activated Proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 Isolated from Fish Sauce Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Montriwong, Aungkawipa; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-05-01

    The NaCl-activated and detergent-stable proteinases from Virgibacillus halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 isolated from fish sauce fermentation were purified and characterized. The enzymes with molecular masses of 20 and 36 kDa showed caseinolytic activity on a zymogram. Optimum azocaseinolytic activity was at 60 °C and pH 9. The proteolytic activity increased in the presence of 10 mM CaCl2 and 0.5 M NaCl and showed high stability at 0-2 M NaCl. The enzymes were stable at pH 4-10 and 10-50 °C. The enzymes preferably hydrolyzed Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and were completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), showing subtilisin-like characteristics. Activity and stability remained high in the presence of H2O2 and various surfactants. The enzymes exhibited high stability (>95%) in various organic solvents (DMSO, butanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile) at concentration of 50%. The V. halodenitrificans SK1-3-7 proteinases showed potential as a biocatalyst in aqueous-organic solvent systems and as an additive in laundry detergent. PMID:25820449

  8. Proteinase PrtP impairs lactococcin LcnB activity in Lactococcus lactis BGMN1-501: new insights into bacteriocin regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vukotic, Goran; Mirkovic, Nemanja; Jovcic, Branko; Miljkovic, Marija; Strahinic, Ivana; Fira, Djordje; Radulovic, Zorica; Kojic, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Proteinases and bacteriocins are of great importance to the dairy industry, but their interactions have not been studied so far. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis BGMN1-5 is a natural isolate from homemade semi-hard cheese which produces two bacteriocins (Lactococcin B and LsbB), as well as proteinase PrtP. A medium-dependent increase in the bacteriocin LcnB activity of L. lactis BGMN1-501, a derivate of L. lactis subsp. lactis BGMN1-5, was shown to be accompanied by a decrease in its promoter activity. A similar effect of media components on gene expression was reported for proteinase PrtP, whose gene is co-localized on the same plasmid as the lcnB gene. Thus, the PrtP-LcnB interplay was investigated. Single gene knockout mutants were constructed with disrupted prtP or lcnB genes. PrtP- mutants showed higher bacteriocin activity that had lost its growth medium dependence, which was in contrast to the original strain. When LcnB from this mutant was combined with proteinase from the LcnB- mutant in vitro, its activity was rendered to the original level, suggesting that proteinase reduces bacteriocin activity. We propose a new model of medium dependent expression of these genes with regard to the effects of their interaction in vivo. PMID:25713574

  9. Purification and characterization of a salt-activated and organic solvent-stable heterotrimer proteinase from Virgibacillus sp. SK33 isolated from Thai fish sauce.

    PubMed

    Sinsuwan, Sornchai; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2010-01-13

    A NaCl-activated proteinase produced by Virgibacillus sp. SK33 was purified to homogeneity using phenyl-Sepharose and Sephadex G-75 with a yield of 12% and purification of 2.6-fold. A single protein was detected at approximately 32 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. However, three subunits with molecular weights of 27,858, 33,918, and 35,368 Da were obtained from MALDI-TOF mass spectra, implying that the enzyme was a heterotrimer. The isoelectric point of the proteinase was 5.4. Optimum catalytic activity was at 55 degrees C and pH 7.5. The enzyme showed serine characteristics as it was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. The purified proteinase showed broad specificity toward oxidized insulin B including Gln4, Cys7, Glu13, Ala14, Leu15,17, Tyr16,26, Arg22, Phe24,25, and Lys29. Dominant cleavage sites of the enzyme were Tyr16-Leu17 and Phe25-Tyr26, indicating that it preferably hydrolyzed aromatic amino acids located on the P1 site. Among various substrates studied, the enzyme hydrolyzed anchovy protein to the greatest extent at 4 M NaCl. Activity increased with either CaCl2 or NaCl concentration with the maximum 2-fold increase at either 50 mM CaCl2 or 4 M NaCl. The enzyme was also highly stable up to 500 mM CaCl2 or 4 M NaCl. The proteinase showed high stability in various organic solvents (25%, v/v) including dimethylsulfoxide, methanol, acetonitrile, and ethanol. Results of peptide mass fingerprint and de novo peptide sequencing showed that the purified proteinase is a novel proteinase. The proteinase from Virgibacillus sp. SK33 could have a potential application in high ionic strength environments and aqueous-organic solvent systems. PMID:19938835

  10. Adenovirus preterminal protein synthesized in COS cells from cloned DNA is active in DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, S C; Horwitz, M S; Engler, J A

    1988-01-01

    Replication of the DNA genome of human adenovirus serotype 2 requires three virus-encoded proteins. Two of these proteins, the preterminal protein (pTP) and the adenovirus DNA polymerase, are transcribed from a single promoter at early times after virus infection. The mRNAs for these proteins share several exons, including one encoded near adenovirus genome coordinate 39. By using plasmids containing DNA fragments postulated to encode the various exons of pTP mRNA, the contributions of each exon to the synthesis of an active pTP have been measured. Only plasmids that contain both the open reading frame for pTP (genome coordinates 29.4 to 23.9) and the HindIII J fragment that contains the exon at genome coordinate 39 can express functional pTP. Images PMID:3336069

  11. Expression of serine proteinase P186 of Arthrobotrys oligospora and analysis of its nematode-degrading activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailong; Qiao, Jun; Meng, Qingling; Gong, Shasha; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Tianli; Tian, Lulu; Cai, Xuepeng; Luo, Jianxun; Chen, Chuangfu

    2015-12-01

    The nematode-trapping fungi possess a unique capability of predating and invading nematodes. As a representative nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora has been widely used to study the interactions between nematode-trapping fungi and their hosts. Serine proteinase is one of the important virulence factors during process of invasion of the nematode-trapping fungi into nematodes. In this study, using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we amplified the gene sequence of serine proteinase 186 from A. oligospora, cloned it into pPIC9K vector and expressed it in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The expressed recombinant serine proteinase186 (reP186) was purified via Ni-affinity chromatography. The in vitro nematode-degrading activity of reP186 was analyzed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis revealed that reP186 with molecular weight of 33 kDa was successfully obtained. ReP186 was capable of degrading a series of protein substrates including casein, gelatin, bovine serum albumin, denatured collagen and nematode cortical layer. The reP186 exhibited the maximal activity at pH 8.0 and 55 °C and was highly sensitive to the inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride. Treatment of Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus with reP186 for 12, 24 and 36 h, respectively, resulted in 62, 88 and 100 % of killing rates for C. elegans, and 52, 65 and 84 % of killing rates for H. contortus, respectively, indicating a relatively strong nematode-degrading bioactivity of reP186. PMID:26419902

  12. Proteinase-treated photoreceptor discs. Photoelectric activity of the partially-digested rhodopsin and membrane orientation.

    PubMed

    Bayramashvili, D I; Drachev, A L; Drachev, L A; Kaulen, A D; Kudelin, A B; Martynov, V I; Skulachev, V P

    1984-08-01

    Photoreceptor discs from rod outer segments of cattle retina were treated with (a) papain, (b) thermolysin or (c) trypsin, the procedures resulting in the cleavage of the rhodopsin polypeptide chain between (a) 323 and 324, 236 and 237, 241 and 242, (b) 327 and 328, 240 and 241, or (c) 339 and 340 amino acid residues, respectively. In all the cases, partially digested rhodopsins proved to be competent in generating photoelectric potential and increasing membrane conductance of the discs adsorbed onto phospholipid-impregnated collodion film. The kinetics of generation and dissipation of photopotential as well as of formation of metarhodopsin II and of the light-induced rhodopsin protonation were found to be the same in the partially digested preparations and in the intact one. Incubation of papain-treated or thermolysin-treated discs at pH 6.0 induced formation of inside-out vesicles which, when incorporated into the collodion film, generated an oppositely directed photopotential. Treatment of such vesicles with papain gave rise to further cleavages of the polypeptide localized between 30 and 31, 186 and 187 amino acid residues. One more proteinase-sensitive site, localized between 104 and 105 residues, has been discovered in the inside-out vesicles treated with thermolysin. This fact consistent with the scheme of the 'seven column' arrangement of the visual rhodopsin [Ovchinnikov, Yu. A. (1982) FEBS Lett. 148, 179-191]. Rhodopsin, when treated with papain on both sides, was deprived of sixty amino acid residues being split in two sites in the middle part of the polypeptide, but was still active as a photoelectric energy transducer. The main specific feature inherent in the photoelectric response of the papain-treated or thermolysin-treated rhodopsin and absent from the native protein is that the former survives addition of long trains of saturating flashes when the response of the intact preparation becomes negligible. This effect was shown to be due to conversion

  13. Activation of progelatinase A (MMP-2) by neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3: a role for inflammatory cells in tumor invasion and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shamamian, P; Schwartz, J D; Pocock, B J; Monea, S; Whiting, D; Marcus, S G; Mignatti, P

    2001-11-01

    Gelatinase A (MMP-2), a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) involved in tumor invasion and angiogenesis, is secreted as an inactive zymogen (proMMP-2) and activated by proteolytic cleavage. Here we report that polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-derived elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 activate proMMP-2 through a mechanism that requires membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) expression. Immunoprecipitation of human PMN-conditioned medium with a mixture of antibodies to elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 abolished proMMP-2 activation, whereas individual antibodies were ineffective. Incubation of HT1080 cells with either purified PMN elastase or cathepsin G or proteinase-3 resulted in dose-and time-dependent proMMP-2 activation. Addition of PMN-conditioned medium to MT1-MMP expressing cells resulted in increased proMMP-2 activation and in vitro invasion of extracellular matrix (ECM), but had no effect with cells that express no MT1-MMP. MMP-2 activation by PMN-conditioned medium or purified elastase was blocked by the elastase inhibitor alpha(1)-antitrypsin but not by Batimastat, an MMP inhibitor, showing that elastase activation of MMP-2 is not mediated by MMP activities. The PMN-conditioned medium-induced increase in cell invasion was blocked by Batimastat as well as by alpha(1)-antitrypsin, showing that PMN serine proteinases trigger a proteinase cascade that entails proMMP-2 activation: this gelatinase is the downstream effector of the proinvasive activity of PMN proteinases. These findings indicate a novel role for PMN-mediated inflammation in a variety of tissue remodeling processes including tumor invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:11598905

  14. The simultaneous release by bone explants in culture and the parallel activation of procollagenase and of a latent neutral proteinase that degrades cartilage proteoglycans and denatured collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Vaes, G; Eeckhout, Y; Lenaers-Claeys, G; François-Gillet, C; Druetz, J E

    1978-01-01

    1. A latent neutral proteinase was found in culture media of mouse bone explants. Its accumulation during the cultures is closely parallel to that of procollagenase; both require the presence of heparin in the media. 2. Latent neutral proteinase was activated by several treatments of the media known to activate procollagenase, such as limited proteolysis by trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin or kallikrein, dialysis against 3 M-NaSCN at 4 degrees C and prolonged preincubation at 25 degrees C. Its activation often followed that of the procollagenase present in the same media. 3. Activation of neutral proteinase (as does that of procollagenase) by trypsin or plasmin involved two successive steps: the activation of a latent endogenous activator present in the media followed by the activation of neutral proteinase itself by that activator. 4. The proteinase degrades cartilage proteoglycans, denatured collagen (Azocoll) and casein at neutral pH; it is inhibited by EDTA, cysteine or serum. Collagenase is not inhibited by casein or Azocoll and is less resistant to heat or to trypsin than is the proteinase. Partial separation of the two enzymes was achieved by gel filtration of the media but not by fractional (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, by ion exchange or by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-collagen. These fractionations did not activate latent enzymes. 5. Trypsin activation decreases the molecular weight of both latent enzymes (60 000-70 000) by 20 000-30 000, as determined by gel filtration of media after removal of heparin. 6. The latency of both enzymes could be due either to a zymogen or to an enzyme-inhibitor complex. A thermostable inhibitor of both enzymes was found in some media. However, combinations of either enzyme with that inhibitor were not reactivated by trypsin, indicating that this inhibitor is unlikely to be the cause of the latency. PMID:208518

  15. Characterization of Peptides from Capsicum annuum Hybrid Seeds with Inhibitory Activity Against α-Amylase, Serine Proteinases and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Vieira Bard, Gabriela C; Nascimento, Viviane V; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Rodrigues, Rosana; Perales, Jonas; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, André O; Fernandes, Katia Valevski S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last several years, the activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), isolated from plant species, against different microorganisms has been demonstrated. More recently, some of these AMPs have been described as potent inhibitors of α-amylases and serine proteinases from insects and mammals. The aim of this work was to obtain AMPs from protein extracts of a hybrid Capsicum (Ikeda × UENF 1381) seeds and to evaluate their microbial and enzyme inhibitory activities. Initially, proteins were extracted from the Capsicum hybrid seeds in buffer (sodium phosphate pH 5.4,) and precipitated with ammonium sulfate (90% saturated). Extract of hybrid seeds was subjected to size exclusion chromatography, and three fractions were obtained: S1, S2 and S3. The amino acid sequence, obtained by mass spectrometry, of the 6 kDa peptide from the S3 fraction, named HyPep, showed 100% identity with PSI-1.2, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from C. annuum seeds, however the bifunctionality of this inhibitor against two enzymes is being shown for the first time in this work. The S3 fraction showed the highest antifungal activity, inhibiting all the yeast strains tested, and it also exhibited inhibitory activity against human salivary and Callosobruchus maculatus α-amylases as well as serine proteinases.

  16. Negative regulation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) activation by a clip-domain serine proteinase homolog (SPH) from endoparasitoid venom.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangmei; Lu, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Haobo; Asgari, Sassan

    2004-05-01

    Most parasitic wasps inject maternal factors into the host hemocoel to suppress the host immune system and ensure successful development of their progeny. Melanization is one of the insect defence mechanisms against intruding pathogens or parasites. We previously isolated from the venom of Cotesia rubecula a 50 kDa protein that blocked melanization in the hemolymph of its host, Pieris rapae [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 33 (2003) 1017]. This protein, designated Vn50, is a serine proteinase homolog (SPH) containing an amino-terminal clip domain. In this work, we demonstrated that recombinant Vn50 bound P. rapae hemolymph components that were recognized by antisera to Tenebrio molitor prophenoloxidase (proPO) and Manduca sexta proPO-activating proteinase (PAP). Vn50 is stable in the host hemolymph-it remained intact for at least 72 h after parasitization. Using M. sexta as a model system, we found that Vn50 efficiently down-regulated proPO activation mediated by M. sexta PAP-1, SPH-1, and SPH-2. Vn50 did not inhibit active phenoloxidase (PO) or PAP-1, but it significantly reduced the proteolysis of proPO. If recombinant Vn50 binds P. rapae proPO and PAP (as suggested by the antibody reactions), it is likely that the molecular interactions among M. sexta proPO, PAP-1, and SPHs were impaired by this venom protein. A similar strategy might be employed by C. rubecula to negatively impact the proPO activation reaction in its natural host.

  17. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  18. Manduca sexta proprophenoloxidase activating proteinase-3 (PAP3) stimulates melanization by activating proPAP3, proSPHs, and proPOs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Lu, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Haobo

    2014-01-01

    Melanization participates in various insect physiological processes including antimicrobial immune responses. Phenoloxidase (PO), a critical component of the enzyme system catalyzing melanin formation, is produced as an inactive precursor prophenoloxidase (proPO) and becomes active via specific proteolytic cleavage by proPO activating proteinase (PAP). In Manduca sexta, three PAPs can activate proPOs in the presence of two serine proteinase homologs (SPH1 and SPH2). While the hemolymph proteinases (HPs) that generate the active PAPs are known, it is unclear how the proSPHs (especially proSPH1) are activated. In this study, we isolated from plasma of bar-stage M. sexta larvae an Ile-Glu-Ala-Arg-p-nitroanilide hydrolyzing enzyme that cleaved the proSPHs. This proteinase, PAP3, generated active SPH1 and SPH2, which function as cofactors for PAP3 in proPO activation. Cleavage of the purified recombinant proSPHs by PAP3 yielded 38 kDa bands similar in mobility to the SPHs formed in vivo. Surprisingly, PAP3 also can activate proPAP3 to stimulate melanization in a direct positive feedback loop. The enhanced proPO activation concurred with the cleavage activation of proHP6, proHP8, proPAP1, proPAP3, proSPH1, proSPH2, proPOs, but not proHP14 or proHP21. These results indicate that PAP3, like PAP1, is a key factor of the self-reinforcing mechanism in the proPO activation system, which is linked to other immune responses in M. sexta. PMID:24768974

  19. Waterborne adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with numerous disease outbreaks, particularly those involving d-cares, schools, children's camps, hospitals and other health care centers, and military settings. In addition, adenoviruses have been responsible for many recreational water outbreaks, including a great number of swimming pool outbreaks than any other waterborne virus (Gerba and Enriquez 1997). Two drinking water outbreaks have been documented for adenovirus (Divizia et al. 2004; Kukkula et al. 1997) but none for food. Of the 51 known adenovirus serotypes, one third are associated with human disease, while other infections are asymptomatic. Human disease associated with adenovirus infections include gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye infections, acute hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis (Table 2). Children and the immunocompromised are more severely impacted by adenovirus infections. Subsequently, adenovirus is included in the EPA's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), which is a list of unregulated contaminants found in public water systems that may pose a risk to public health (National Research Council 1999). Adenoviruses have been detected in various waters worldwide including wastewater, river water, oceans, and swimming pools (Hurst et al. 1988; Irving and Smith 1981; Pina et al. 1998). Adenoviruses typically outnumber the enteroviruses, when both are detected in surface waters. Chapron et al. (2000) found that 38% of 29 surface water samples were positive for infectious Ad40 and Ad41. Data are lacking regarding the occurrence of adenovirus in water in the US, particularly for groundwater and drinking water. Studies have shown, however, that adenoviruses survive longer in water than enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus (Enriquez et al. 1995), which may be due to their double-stranded DNA. Risk assessments have been conducted on waterborne adenovirus (Crabtree et al. 1997; van Heerden et al. 2005c). Using dose-response data for inhalation

  20. [Abscisic acid level, activities of proteinases and trypsin inhibitory proteins in the germinating seeds of common beans under conditions of water stress].

    PubMed

    Domash, V I; Protsko, R F; Vasiuk, V A; Shumikhin, S V; Ermolitskaia, L V; Sharpio, T P

    2006-01-01

    Specific features of changes in the contents of free and bound abscisic acid (ABA) and activities of neutral and alkaline proteinases and trypsin inhibitory proteins were determined in the embryonic axis and cotyledons of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) after drying. The changes in ABA content, observed following the loss of 5% seed weight, were regarded as an adaptive reaction to stress, whereas the corresponding changes after the loss of 10% seed weight, as a result of pathological disturbance of ABA metabolism. Both drying modes had a negative effect on the state of the proteinase-inhibitory system, as was apparent from the disruption of the regular inverse correlation between the activities of proteinases and serine proteinase inhibitory proteins. Comparison of the dynamics of these characteristics with the buildup of water stress demonstrated an inverse correlation between the content of free ABA and the activity of the proteinases studied. This suggests a potential inhibitory effect of this hormone on the function of the hydrolases in question in the germinating seed.

  1. Coagulation factor X activates innate immunity to human species C adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Konstantin; Flatt, Justin W; Di Paolo, Nelson C; Khare, Reeti; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Acchione, Mauro; Sumida, John P; Ohto, Umeharu; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke; MacDonald, James W; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Frederico M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2012-11-01

    Although coagulation factors play a role in host defense for "living fossils" such as horseshoe crabs, the role of the coagulation system in immunity in higher organisms remains unclear. We modeled the interface of human species C adenovirus (HAdv) interaction with coagulation factor X (FX) and introduced a mutation that abrogated formation of the HAdv-FX complex. In vivo genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that FX-binding-ablated virus failed to activate a distinct network of nuclear factor κB-dependent early-response genes that are activated by HAdv-FX complex downstream of TLR4/MyD88/TRIF/TRAF6 signaling. Our study implicates host factor "decoration" of the virus as a mechanism to trigger an innate immune sensor that responds to a misplacement of coagulation FX from the blood into intracellular macrophage compartments upon virus entry into the cell. PMID:23019612

  2. [Modulation of Ca(2+)-dependent proteinase activity in invertebrates and fish under the action of weak low-frequency magnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Kantserova, N P; Ushakova, N V; Krylov, V V; Lysenko, L A; Nemova, N N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of weak low-frequency magnetic field on intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent proteinases (calpains) of fish and invertebrates was studied in in vivo and in vitro experiments. It has been found that intravital effect of weak low-frequency magnetic field tuned to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ ions led to a significant decrease in calpain activity in examined animals. It was shown that preparations of Ca(2+)-dependent proteinases from invertebrates and fish have been also substantially inactivated at the effect of indicated factor. Observed phenomenon is in the correspondence with an interference model of the impact of weak low-frequency magnetic field on the biological objects.

  3. Bicalutamide Activated Oncolytic Adenovirus for the Adjuvant Therapy of High Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara Jane; Hoti, Naser Uddin; Liu, Chunyan; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yonggang; Lupold, Shawn E.; DeWeese, Theodore; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A & AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and non-steroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR responsive genes and E1A responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens, and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of high-risk prostate cancers. PMID:23764901

  4. Proteinase-activated receptors induce interleukin-8 expression by intestinal epithelial cells through ERK/RSK90 activation and histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongying; Moreau, France; Hirota, Christina L; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2010-06-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in both inflammation and tumorigenesis in epithelial cells. Interleukin (IL)-8 is a potent chemoattractant and is also involved in angiogenesis. The molecular mechanism whereby PARs induce epithelial IL-8 expression is not known. In HT-29 colonic epithelial cells, PAR(1) or PAR(2) agonists stimulated the expression of IL-8 through a NF-kappaB-dependent pathway without inducing IkappaB degradation and disassociation of IkappaB from NF-kappaB. Further studies revealed that PAR activation induced the phosphorylation of p65 at Ser-276 in the nucleus, which increased the recruitment of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 to p50. Inhibition of ERK activation completely blocked PAR-induced IL-8 expression, phosphorylation of p65 and HAT activity. We also demonstrated that RSK p90 was the downstream kinase that mediated ERK-induced nuclear p65 phosphorylation. In conclusion, activation of either PAR(1) or PAR(2) stimulated the transcriptional up-regulation of IL-8 in HT-29 colonic epithelial cells through a pathway that involved ERK/RSK p90, NF-kappaB phosphorylation, and HAT activity. These studies provide evidence of a new role for serine proteinases and PARs in the regulation of gene expression in colonic inflammation and tumorigenesis.

  5. Investigations on the activation of recombinant microbial pro-transglutaminase: in contrast to proteinase K, dispase removes the histidine-tag.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Christian; Hertel, Thomas C; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Pietzsch, Markus

    2012-02-01

    In order to produce recombinant microbial transglutaminase (rMTG) which is free of the activating protease, dispase was used to activate the pro-rMTG followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). As shown by MALDI-MS, the dispase does not only cleave the pro-sequence, but unfortunately also cleaves within the C-terminal histidine-tag. Hence, the active rMTG cannot properly bind to the IMAC material. As an alternative, proteinase K was investigated. This protease was successfully applied for the activation of purified pro-rMTG either as free or immobilized enzyme and the free enzyme was also applicable directly in the crude cell extract of E. coli. Thus, it enables a simple two-step activation/purification procedure resulting in protease-free and almost pure transglutaminase preparations. The protocol has been successfully applied to both, wild-type transglutaminase of Streptomyces mobaraensis as well as to the highly active variant S2P. Proteinase K activates the pro-rMTG without unwanted degradation of the histidine-tag. It turned out to be very important to inhibit proteinase K activity, e.g., by PMSF, prior to protein separation by SDS-PAGE.

  6. Epoxy-α-lapachone has in vitro and in vivo anti-leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis effects and inhibits serine proteinase activity in this parasite.

    PubMed

    Souza-Silva, Franklin; Bourguignon, Saulo Cabral; Pereira, Bernardo Acácio Santini; Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro de Castro; de Oliveira, Luiz Filipe Gonçalves; Henriques-Pons, Andrea; Finkelstein, Lea Cysne; Ferreira, Vitor Francisco; Carneiro, Paula Fernandes; de Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Caffarena, Ernesto Raul; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis is a protozoan that causes infections with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The currently available chemotherapeutic treatments present many problems, such as several adverse side effects and the development of resistant strains. Natural compounds have been investigated as potential antileishmanial agents, and the effects of epoxy-α-lapachone on L. (L.) amazonensis were analyzed in the present study. This compound was able to cause measurable effects on promastigote and amastigote forms of the parasite, affecting plasma membrane organization and leading to death after 3 h of exposure. This compound also had an effect in experimentally infected BALB/c mice, causing reductions in paw lesions 6 weeks after treatment with 0.44 mM epoxy-α-lapachone (mean lesion area, 24.9 ± 2.0 mm(2)), compared to untreated animals (mean lesion area, 30.8 ± 2.6 mm(2)) or animals treated with Glucantime (mean lesion area, 28.3 ± 1.5 mm(2)). In addition, the effects of this compound on the serine proteinase activities of the parasite were evaluated. Serine proteinase-enriched fractions were extracted from both promastigotes and amastigotes and were shown to act on specific serine proteinase substrates and to be sensitive to classic serine proteinase inhibitors (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, aprotinin, and antipain). These fractions were also affected by epoxy-α-lapachone. Furthermore, in silico simulations indicated that epoxy-α-lapachone can bind to oligopeptidase B (OPB) of L. (L.) amazonensis, a serine proteinase, in a manner similar to that of antipain, interacting with an S1 binding site. This evidence suggests that OPB may be a potential target for epoxy-α-lapachone and, as such, may be related to the compound's effects on the parasite.

  7. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  8. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct.

  9. [Ulysses retrotransposon aspartate proteinase (Drosophila virilis)].

    PubMed

    Volkov, D A; Savvateeva, L V; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2002-01-01

    Retrotransposones are mobile genetic elements occurring in genomes of bacteria, plants or animals. Retrotransposones were found to contain nucleotide sequences encoding proteins which are homological to retroviral aspartic proteinases. Our research has been focused on Ulysses which is mobile genetic element found in Drosophila virilis. We suggested a primary structure of Ulysses proteinase using comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of retroviral proteinases and proteinases from retrotransposones. The appropriate cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purification of recombinant protein (12 kD) has been carried out by affinity chromatography using pepstatine-agarose. The obtained protein has proteolytic activity at optimum pH 5.5 like the majority of aspartic proteinases.

  10. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents.

  11. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  12. Mechanisms of liver fibrosis associated with experimental Fasciola hepatica infection: roles of Fas2 proteinase and hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis A; Terashima, Angélica; Yi, Pedro; Andrade, Roy; Cubero, Francisco J; Albanis, Efsevia; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Espinoza, Jose R; Friedman, Scott L

    2011-02-01

    We have evaluated the possible mechanisms of liver fibrosis caused by Fasciola hepatica in an animal model and in culture using immortalized human stellate cells. Liver biopsies of F. hepatica-infected rats were performed at wk 8 and 16. Serum-starved LX-2 cells, a human stellate cell line, were exposed to increasing concentrations of Fas2 antigen. The expression of key fibrosis-related genes was evaluated by qRT-PCR. There was a significant correlation between fibrogenic gene expression and both intensity and duration of infection. LX-2 cells exposed to Fas2 showed progressively increased expression of mRNAs for Collagen I, alpha-smooth muscle-actin, platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase II; inhibition of Fas2 cysteine proteinase activity by E-64 abrogated these increases, suggesting that the protease activity of Fas2 is involved in fibrogenic stimulation. In summary, F. hepatica infection is associated with up-regulation of mRNAs associated with hepatic fibrogenesis in vivo and in activated hepatic stellate cells.

  13. Modulation of the catalytic activity of cruzipain, the major cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi, by temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Salvati, L; Mattu, M; Polticelli, F; Tiberi, F; Gradoni, L; Venturini, G; Bolognesi, M; Ascenzi, P

    2001-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases are relevant to several aspects of the parasite life cycle and of parasite-host relationships. Here, a quantitative investigation of the effect of temperature and pH on the total substrate inhibition of cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi, is reported. Values of the apparent catalytic and inhibition parameters Km, Vmax, Vmax/Km, and K(i) for the cruzipain-catalysed hydrolysis of N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-(7-amino-4-methylcoumarin) (Z-Phe-Arg-AMC) and azocasein were determined between 10.0 degrees C and 40.0 degrees C and between pH 4.5 and 8.5. Values of Km were independent of temperature and pH, whereas values of Vmax, Vmax/Km, and K(i) were temperature-dependent and pH-dependent. Over the whole pH range explored, values of logVmax, log(Vmax/Km), and logK(i) increased linearly with respect to T(-1). Values of Vmax and Vmax/Km were affected by the acid-base equilibrium of one temperature-independent ionizing group (i.e. pK(unl)' = pK(lig)' = 5.7 +/- 0.1, at 25.0 degrees C). Moreover, values of K(i) were affected by the alkaline pK shift of one ionizing group of active cruzipain (from pK(unl)" = 5.7 +/- 0.1 to pK(lig)" = 6.1 +/- 0.1, at 25.0 degrees C) upon Z-Phe-Arg-AMC binding. Values of logK(unl)', logK(lig)', and logK(lig)" were temperature-independent. Conversely, values of logK(unl)" were linearly dependent on T(-1). As a whole, total substrate inhibition of cruzipain decreased with increasing temperature and pH. These data suggest that both synthetic and protein substrates can bind to the unique active centre of cruzipain either productively or following a binding mode which results in enzyme inhibition. However, allosteric effect(s) cannot be excluded.

  14. Disruption of prosomes by some bivalent metal ions results in the loss of their multicatalytic proteinase activity and cancels the nuclease resistance of prosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nothwang, H G; Coux, O; Bey, F; Scherrer, K

    1992-01-01

    Prosomes are ribonucleoprotein particles constituted by a variable set of about 20 proteins found associated with untranslated mRNA. In addition, they contain a small RNA, the presence of which has been an issue of controversy for a long time. The intact particles have a multicatalytic proteinase (MCP) activity and are very stable; we have never observed autodigestion of the particle by its intrinsic proteinase activity. Surprisingly it was found that Zn2+ and Cu2+ ions at concentrations of 0.1-1 mM disrupt the prosome particles isolated from HeLa cells and duck erythroblasts and abolish instantaneously its MCP activity, without altering the two-dimensional electrophoretic pattern of the constituent proteins. Fe2+, however, seems to induce autodegradation rather than dissociation of the prosome constituents. Most interestingly, protein or oligopeptide substrates protect the particle and its proteinase activity from disruption by Zn2+ or Cu2+. Nuclease-digestion assays reveal that the prosomal RNA, which is largely resistant in the intact particle, becomes digestible after dissociation of prosomes by Zn2+. These data give, for the first time, unambiguous proof of the presence of an RNA in the particle. Furthermore, they demonstrate a structure-function relationship between the complex and its enzyme activity, which seems to be based on the particle as an entity and not on the single constituent proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:1445237

  15. Proteinase Activated Receptor 1 Mediated Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Liver Injury: A Role for Bone Marrow Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kallis, Yiannis N.; Scotton, Christopher J.; MacKinnon, Alison C.; Goldin, Robert D.; Wright, Nicholas A.; Iredale, John P.; Chambers, Rachel C.; Forbes, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from the co-ordinated actions of myofibroblasts and macrophages, a proportion of which are of bone marrow origin. The functional effect of such bone marrow-derived cells on liver fibrosis is unclear. We examine whether changing bone marrow genotype can down-regulate the liver's fibrotic response to injury and investigate mechanisms involved. Proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is up-regulated in fibrotic liver disease in humans, and deficiency of PAR1 is associated with reduced liver fibrosis in rodent models. In this study, recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation from PAR1-deficient or wild-type donors prior to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Bone marrow transplantation alone from PAR1-deficient mice was able to confer significant reductions in hepatic collagen content and activated myofibroblast expansion on wild-type recipients. This effect was associated with a decrease in hepatic scar-associated macrophages and a reduction in macrophage recruitment from the bone marrow. In vitro, PAR1 signalling on bone marrow-derived macrophages directly induced their chemotaxis but did not stimulate proliferation. These data suggest that the bone marrow can modulate the fibrotic response of the liver to recurrent injury. PAR1 signalling can contribute to this response by mechanisms that include the regulation of macrophage recruitment. PMID:24475094

  16. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a series of penicillin-derived HIV proteinase inhibitors containing a stereochemically unique peptide isostere.

    PubMed

    Holmes, D S; Bethell, R C; Cammack, N; Clemens, I R; Kitchin, J; McMeekin, P; Mo, C L; Orr, D C; Patel, B; Paternoster, I L

    1993-10-15

    A series of HIV-1 proteinase inhibitors was synthesized based upon a single penicillin derived thiazolidine moiety. Reaction of the C-4 carboxyl group with (R)-phenylalaninol gave amide 10 which was a moderately potent inhibitor of HIV-1 proteinase (IC50 = 0.15 microM). Further modifications based on molecular modeling studies led to compound 48 which contained a stereochemically unique statine-based isostere. This was a potent competitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.25 nM) with antiviral activity against HIV-1 in vitro (5 microM). Neither modification to the benzyl group in an attempt to improve interaction with the S2' pocket, nor introduction of a hydrogen bond donating group to interact with residue Gly48' resulted in improved inhibitory or antiviral activity. PMID:8230099

  17. [Extracellular proteinases from the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium culmorum].

    PubMed

    Ievleva, E V; Revina, T A; Kudriavtseva, N N; Sof'in, A V; Valueva, T A

    2006-01-01

    The growth of Fusarium culmorum fungus on a medium containing thermostable proteins from potato tubers was accompanied by the production of proteinases, exhibiting activity over a broad pH range (from 6.0-10.0). When studied by SDS-PAGE in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol, extracellular proteinases were represented by at least five species with a molecular weight of 30-60 kDa. Inhibitor analysis and studies of enzyme activities with synthetic substrates demonstrated that the culture liquid of Fusarium culmorum contained serine proteinases of various classes. The amount of subtilisin-like proteinases was the highest. A near-complete inhibition of the enzymes was caused by proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors from potato tubers. These data suggest that proteinases of the phytopathogen Fusarium culmorum serve as a metabolic target for natural inhibitors of potato proteinases.

  18. A Double WAP Domain-Containing Protein Es-DWD1 from Eriocheir sinensis Exhibits Antimicrobial and Proteinase Inhibitory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-Nv; Yu, Ai-Qing; Wu, Min-Hao; Tan, Shang-Jian; Zhu, You-Ting; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Qun

    2013-01-01

    Whey acidic proteins (WAP) belong to a large gene family of antibacterial peptides, which are critical in the host immune response against microbial invasion. The common feature of these proteins is a single WAP domain maintained by at least one four-disulfide core (4-DSC) structure rich in cysteine residues. In this study, a double WAP domain (DWD)-containing protein, Es-DWD1, was first cloned from the Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheirsinensis). The full-length Es-DWD1cDNA was 1193 bp, including a 411 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 136 amino acids with a signal peptide of 22 amino acids in the N-terminus. A comparison with other reported invertebrate and vertebrate sequences revealed the presence of WAP domains characteristic of WAP superfamilies. As determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, Es-DWD1 transcripts were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues, but it was up-regulated in hemocytes post-challenge with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The mature recombinant Es-DWD1 (rEs-DWD1) protein exhibited different binding activities to bacteria and fungus. Moreover, rEs-DWD1 could exert agglutination activities against Bacillus subtilis and Pichiapastoris and demonstrated inhibitory activities against the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila and P. pastoris. Furthermore, rEs-DWD1 showed a specific protease inhibitory activity in B. subtilis. Coating of rEs-DWD1 onto agarose beads enhanced encapsulation of the beads by crab hemocytes. Collectively, the results suggest that Es-DWD1 is a double WAP domain containing protein with antimicrobial and proteinase inhibitory activities, which play significant roles in the immunity of crustaceans. PMID:23967346

  19. Studies on prekallikrein of bovine plasma. II. Activation of prekallikrein with proteinases and properties of kallikrein activated by bovine Hageman factor.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Nagasawa, S; Suzuki, T

    1980-01-01

    Activation of bovine plasma prekallikrein was investigated with several proteinases. Highly purified bovine plasma prekallikrein was rapidly activated to kallikrein [EC 3.4.21.8] by bovine activated Hageman factor, trypsin [EC 3.4.21.4] and Pronase P (proteinases from Streptomyces griseus) and more gradually by papain [EC 3.4.22.2] and ficin [EC 3.4.22.3]. Activation of prekallikrein was also observed with bovine plasmin [EC 3.4.21.7], but not with bovine clotting factors Xa (Stuart factor) [EC 3.4.21.6] and IXa (Christmas factor) or thrombin [EC 3.4.21.5]. Urokinase [EC 3.4.99.26], Reptilase, collagenase [EC 3.4.24.3], elastase [EC 3.4.21.11], alpha-chymotrypsin [EC 3.4.21.1], Nagarse [EC 3.4.21.14], and stem bromelain [EC 3.4.22 4] did not convert prekallikrein to kallikrein. Plasma kallikrein activated to Hageman factor released kinin rapidly from bovine high molecular weight (HMW) kininogen. However, from bovine low molecular weight (LMW) kininogen, liberation of kinin was extremely slow. The kallikrein activity was inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), Trasylol, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), and N-alpha-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethylketone (TLCK), but not by egg-white trypsin inhibitor (EWTI), lima bean trypsin inhibitor (LBTI), heparin or hexadimethrine bromide (Polybrene). The kallikrein formed an enzyme-inhibitor complex with SBTI and Trasylol, but not with LBTI. Prekallikrein did not react with SBTI. Prekallikrein consists of a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight about 90,000, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Activation of prekallikrein by Hageman factor was found to involve cleavage of the single peptide bond on the disulfide-bridged polypeptide chain, and no change of molecular weight was observed during the activation. The peptide bond cleaved in prekallikrein by the activation was an Arg-X peptide bond on a disulfide-bridged polypeptide chain.

  20. Diversity of digestive proteinases in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, K S; Elpidina, E N; Oppert, B; Prabhakar, S; Zhuzhikov, D P; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A

    2006-10-01

    The spectrum of Tenebrio molitor larval digestive proteinases was studied in the context of the spatial organization of protein digestion in the midgut. The pH of midgut contents increased from 5.2-5.6 to 7.8-8.2 from the anterior to the posterior. This pH gradient was reflected in the pH optima of the total proteolytic activity, 5.2 in the anterior and 9.0 in the posterior midgut. When measured at the pH and reducing conditions characteristic of each midgut section, 64% of the total proteolytic activity was in the anterior and 36% in the posterior midgut. In the anterior midgut, two-thirds of the total activity was due to cysteine proteinases, whereas the rest was from serine proteinases. In contrast, most (76%) of the proteolytic activity in the posterior midgut was from serine proteinases. Cysteine proteinases from the anterior were represented by a group of anionic fractions with similar electrophoretic mobility. Trypsin-like activity was predominant in the posterior midgut and was due to one cationic and three anionic proteinases. Chymotrypsin-like proteinases also were prominent in the posterior midgut and consisted of one cationic and four anionic proteinases, four with an extended binding site. Latent proteinase activity was detected in each midgut section. These data support a complex system of protein digestion, and the correlation of proteinase activity and pH indicates a physiological mechanism of enzyme regulation in the gut.

  1. Regulation of a viral proteinase by a peptide and DNA in one-dimensional space: I. binding to DNA AND to hexon of the precursor to protein VI, pVI, of human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Suomalainen, Maarit; Greber, Urs F; Freimuth, Paul; Blainey, Paul C; Luo, Guobin; Xie, X Sunney; Mangel, Walter F

    2013-01-18

    The precursor to adenovirus protein VI, pVI, is a multifunctional protein with different roles early and late in virus infection. Here, we focus on two roles late in infection, binding of pVI to DNA and to the major capsid protein hexon. pVI bound to DNA as a monomer independent of DNA sequence with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, K(d)((app)), of 46 nm. Bound to double-stranded DNA, one molecule of pVI occluded 8 bp. Upon the binding of pVI to DNA, three sodium ions were displaced from the DNA. A ΔG(0)(0) of -4.54 kcal/mol for the nonelectrostatic free energy of binding indicated that a substantial component of the binding free energy resulted from nonspecific interactions between pVI and DNA. The proteolytically processed, mature form of pVI, protein VI, also bound to DNA; its K(d)((app)) was much higher, 307 nm. The binding assays were performed in 1 mm MgCl(2) because in the absence of magnesium, the binding to pVI or protein VI to DNA was too tight to determine a K(d)((app)). Three molecules of pVI bound to one molecule of the hexon trimer with an equilibrium dissociation constant K(d)((app)) of 1.1 nm.

  2. Serine proteinase inhibition by the active site titrant N alpha-(N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-azaornithine p-nitrophenyl ester. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, P; Balliano, G; Gallina, C; Polticelli, F; Bolognesi, M

    2000-02-01

    Kinetics for the hydrolysis of the chromogenic active-site titrant N alpha-(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-azaornithine p-nitrophenyl ester (Dmc-azaOrn-ONp) catalysed by bovine beta-trypsin, bovine alpha-thrombin, bovine Factor Xa, human alpha-thrombin, human Factor Xa, human Lys77-plasmin, human urinary kallikrein, Mr 33 000 and Mr 54 000 species of human urokinase, porcine pancreatic beta-kallikrein-A and -B and Ancrod (the coagulating serine proteinase from the Malayan pit viper Agkistrodon rhodostoma venom) have been obtained between pH 6.0 and 8.0, at 21.0 degrees C, and analysed in parallel with those for the enzymatic cleavage of N alpha-(N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-alpha-azalysine p-nitrophenyl ester (Dmc-azaLys-ONp). The enzyme kinetics are consistent with the minimum three-step catalytic mechanism of serine proteinases, the rate-limiting step being represented by the deacylation process. Bovine beta-trypsin kinetics are modulated by the acid-base equilibrium of the His57 catalytic residue (pKa approximately 6.9). Dmc-azaOrn-ONp and Dmc-azaLys-ONp bind stoichiometrically to the serine proteinase active site, and allow the reliable determination of the active enzyme concentration between 1.0 x 10-6 M and 3.0 x 10-4 M. The affinity and the reactivity for Dmc-azaOrn-ONp (expressed by Ks and k+2/Ks, respectively) of the serine proteinases considered are much lower than those for Dmc-azaLys-ONp. The very different affinity and reactivity properties for Dmc-azaOrn-ONp and Dmc-azaLys-ONp have been related to the different size of the ornithine/lysine side chains, and to the ensuing different positioning of the active-site titrants upon binding to the enzyme catalytic centre (i.e. to P1-S1 recognition). These data represent the first detailed comparative investigation on the catalytic properties of serine proteinases towards an ornithine derivative (i. e. Dmc-azaOrn-ONp).

  3. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 mediate relaxation of guinea pig internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2014-02-10

    Activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 stimulates contraction of the rat but relaxation of the guinea pig colon. The aim of the present study was to investigate PAR effects on internal anal sphincter (IAS) motility. We measured relaxation of isolated muscle strips from the guinea pig IAS caused by PAR agonists using isometric transducers. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the existence of PAR. In the IAS, thrombin and PAR1 peptide agonists TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2 evoked moderate to marked relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, trypsin and PAR2 peptide agonists 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, SLIGRL-NH2 and SLIGKV-NH2 produced relaxation. In contrast, both PAR1 and PAR2 inactive control peptides did not elicit relaxation. Furthermore, the selective PAR1 antagonist vorapaxar and PAR2 antagonist GB 83 specifically inhibited thrombin and trypsin-induced relaxations, respectively. RT-PCR revealed the presence of PAR1 and PAR2 in the IAS. This indicates that PAR1 and PAR2 mediate the IAS relaxation. The relaxant responses of TFLLR-NH2 and trypsin were attenuated by N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), indicating involvement of NO. These responses were not affected by tetrodotoxin, implying that the PAR effects are not neurally mediated. On the other hand, PAR4 agonists GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2 did not cause relaxation or contraction, suggesting that PAR4 is not involved in the sphincter motility. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both PAR1 and PAR2 mediate relaxation of the guinea pig IAS through the NO pathway. PAR1 and PAR2 may regulate IAS tone and might be potential therapeutic targets for anal motility disorders. PMID:24631471

  4. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 mediates allogeneic CD8(+) T cell-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Jian, Zhang; Ping, Zou; Weiming, Li

    2009-12-01

    Vascular endothelial-cells injury plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and transplant-associated endothelial injury syndrome. Vascular endothelial cells are an exposed target tissue for immune-mediated injury during GVHD. Early endothelial injury syndromes share common features with acute GVHD. Chronic GVHD leads to a rarefaction of microvessels caused by the infiltration of alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this context, allogeneic reactive cytotoxic T cell may contribute to apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. The involvement of proteinase-activated receptor (PAR-1) in regulation of apoptosis has been recently recognized in many cell types. We hypothesized that apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells induced by allogeneic cytotoxic T cell are mediated via the PAR-1. Allogeneic CD8(+) T cell, PAR-1 agonist peptide (SFLLRN) induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) as assessed by AnnexinV-FITC labeling. To ascertain the mechanism of endothelial apoptosis, we determined that allogeneic CD8(+) T cell, SFLLRN enhanced cleavage of caspase-3 and led to p38MAPK activation as assessed by Western blot. The effects of allogeneic CD8(+) T cell and SFLLRN on apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells were largely prevented by a cleavage-blocking anti-human PAR-1-antibody (ATAP2) and a specific inhibitor of p38MAPK. In concert, these observations provide strong evidence that allogeneic CD8(+) T cell induces apoptosis of human vascular endothelial cells through PAR-1-dependent modulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway via alterations of p38MAPK and caspase-3. PMID:19082770

  5. Potent antitumor activity of oncolytic adenovirus expressing Beclin-1 via induction of autophagic cell death in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Li, Lu; Meng, Haitao; Qian, Qijun

    2013-01-01

    An attractive strategy among adenovirus-based oncolytic systems is to design adenoviral vectors to express pro-apoptotic genes, in which this gene-virotherapy approach significantly enhances tumor cell death by activating apoptotic pathways. However, the existence of cancer cells with apoptotic defects is one of the major obstacles in gene-virotherapy. Here, we investigated whether a strategy that combines the oncolytic effects of an adenoviral vector with simultaneous expression of Beclin-1, an autophagy gene, offers a therapeutic advantage for leukemia. A Beclin-1 cDNA was cloned in an oncolytic adenovirus with chimeric Ad5/11 fiber (SG511-BECN). SG511-BECN treatment induced significant autophagic cell death, and resulted in enhanced cell killing in a variety of leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic blasts. SG511-BECN effects were seen in chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia with resistance to imatinib or chemotherapy, but exhibited much less cytotoxicity on normal cells. The SG511-BECN-induced autophagic cell death could be partially reversed by RNA interference knockdown of UVRAG, ATG5, and ATG7. We also showed that SG511-BECN strongly inhibited the growth of leukemic progenitors in vitro. In murine leukemia models, SG511-BECN prolonged the survival and decreased the xenograft tumor size by inducing autophagic cell death. Our results suggest that infection of leukemia cells with an oncolytic adenovirus overexpressing Beclin-1 can induce significant autophagic cell death and provide a new strategy for the elimination of leukemic cells via a unique mechanism of action distinct from apoptosis. PMID:23765161

  6. Diversity between mammalian tolloid proteinases: Oligomerisation and non-catalytic domains influence activity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, Christopher P.; Ruiz Nivia, Hilda D.; Dajani, Rana; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Collins, Richard F.; Rada, Heather; Bird, Louise E.; Baldock, Clair

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian tolloid family of metalloproteinases is essential for tissue patterning and extracellular matrix assembly. The four members of the family: bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1), mammalian tolloid (mTLD), tolloid-like (TLL)-1 and TLL-2 differ in their substrate specificity and activity levels, despite sharing similar domain organization. We have previously described a model of substrate exclusion by dimerisation to explain differences in the activities of monomeric BMP-1 and dimers of mTLD and TLL-1. Here we show that TLL-2, the least active member of the tolloid family, is predominantly monomeric in solution, therefore it appears unlikely that substrate exclusion via dimerisation is a mechanism for regulating TLL-2 activity. X-ray scattering and electron microscopy structural and biophysical analyses reveal an elongated shape for the monomer and flexibility in the absence of calcium. Furthermore, we show that TLL-2 can cleave chordin in vitro, similar to other mammalian tolloids, but truncated forms of TLL-2 mimicking BMP-1 are unable to cleave chordin. However, both the N- and C-terminal non-catalytic domains from all mammalian tolloids bind chordin with high affinity. The mechanisms underlying substrate specificity and activity in the tolloid family are complex with variation between family members and depend on both multimerisation and substrate interaction. PMID:26902455

  7. Granzyme activity in the inflamed lung is not controlled by endogenous serine proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, G M; Wolbink, A M; Cormier, Y; Hack, C E

    2000-10-01

    Numerous lung diseases, such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), are characterized by the presence of activated alveolar CTL and NK cells. Since these cells produce granzymes, granzyme A and B levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from 14 normal subjects and 12 patients with HP were measured by ELISA. Median (range) BAL granzyme A and B levels were 4 (0-37) and 0 (0-6) pg/ml in normal subjects. BAL granzyme levels were significantly higher in HP patients, being at 74 (0-1,889) and 10 (0-78) pg/ml for granzymes A and B, respectively. In vitro, neither of the three main serine protease inhibitors of the lung, namely alpha1-antitrypsin, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, and elafin, showed any effect on granzyme A or B activity. In addition, granzyme A was shown to be fully active in BAL fluids. Hence, these data show that granzyme activity may be poorly controlled by protease inhibitors in inflamed tissues. Thus, granzymes could contribute to tissue remodeling and inflammation characterizing HP.

  8. Interactions of human lacrimal and salivary cystatins with adenovirus endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Ruzindana-Umunyana, A; Weber, J M

    2001-09-01

    Over 100 serotypes of adenoviruses have been implicated in a variety of human and domesticated animal pathologies and some serotypes are widely used as gene transfer vectors. Aside from the limited use of vaccines for specific serotypes, little effort has been expended in the development of antivirals. The objective here was to study the effect of cystatins from human saliva (CS) and tears (CT), two points of viral entry, on adenain, the adenovirus type 2 encoded proteinase, which is absolutely required for infectivity. Two molecular weight species (13 and 14.5 kDa) were purified from both fluids at a yield of 5 mg/l. In vitro adenain activity was inhibited to 50% at a molar ratio of 5 CS:1 adenain and 3 CT:1 adenain. By comparison, papain was inhibited to 50% at a molar ratio of 2 CS:1 papain and 1.5 CT:1 papain. Adenain differed from papain in response to CS and chicken egg white (CEW) cystatin in being stimulated at low concentrations, and in being inhibited only at very high concentrations of cystatins. The presence of cleavage consensus sites specific to adenain in the human cystatins could drive the adenain-cystatin interaction predominantly in the substrate pathway direction. However, we found that the cystatins could only be digested after denaturation and by highly active fresh enzyme preparations. Our experiments designed to test the nature of the interaction between adenain and cystatins suggest a docking model for the adenain-human cystatin interaction, similar to that proposed for papain and CEW. At equilibrium the dissociation constant, K(d), between adenain and CT was 1.2 nM. The kinetic parameters determined here suggest a simple reversible mechanism for the inhibition of adenain by human cystatins. We conclude that the cystatins present in tears and saliva are unlikely to play a significant role in inhibiting adenovirus infections.

  9. Effects of the terminal sire type and sex on pork muscle cathepsins (B, B+L and H), cysteine proteinase inhibitors and lipolytic enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Armero, E; Barbosa, J A; Toldra, F; Baselga, M; Pla, M

    1999-02-01

    Pork muscle cathepsins (B, B+L, and H), cysteine proteinase inhibitors and lipolytic enzyme activities were measured in the offspring of five different genetic sire types: Danish Duroc (DU), Dutch Large White (LW(D)), English Large White (LW(E)), Belgian Landrace × Landrace (BL×LR) and Belgian Landrace (BL). Cathepsin B and B+L activities were higher for LW(E) and LW(D) sires than for BL×LR and BL. Cathepsin H activity showed an opposite evolution, being higher for BL and BL×LR sires than for DU, LW(D) and LW(E). Cysteine proteinase inhibitor activity was higher for LW(E) sires than for DU and BL. In lipolytic enzymes, BL sires had a lower acid lipase activity than DU and LW(E) sires and also a lower neutral esterase activity than LW(E) and LW(D) sires. Significant differences between sexes were found for cathepsin H activity only, being higher for females. PMID:22061703

  10. A monoclonal antibody that distinguishes latent and active forms of the proteasome (multicatalytic proteinase complex)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitman, D.; Etlinger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated to proteasome purified from human erythrocytes. Five of six proteasome-specific mAbs reacted with three subunits in the molecular mass range of 25-28 kDa, indicating a common epitope. The other mAb (AP5C10) exhibited a more restricted reactivity, recognizing a 32-kDa subunit of the proteasome purified in its latent state. However, when the proteasome is isolated in its active state, AP5C10 reacts with a 28-kDa subunit, evidence for processing of the proteasome subunits during purification. Purified proteasome preparations which exhibited partial latency have both AP5C10 reactive subunits. Although the 32-kDa subunit appears required for latency, loss of this component and generation of the 28-kDa component are not obligatory for activation. The 32- and 28-kDa subunits can each be further resolved into three components by isoelectric focusing. The apparent loss of 4 kDa during the conversion of the 32- to 28-kDa subunit is accompanied by a shift to a more basic pI for each polypeptide. Western blots of the early steps of proteasome purification reveal an AP5C10-reactive protein at 41 kDa. This protein was separated from proteasomes by sizing chromatography and may represent a pool of precursor subunits. Since the 32-kDa subunit appears necessary for latency, it is speculated to play a regulatory role in ATP-dependent proteolytic activity.

  11. Phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus of the 55-kilodalton adenovirus type 5 E1B protein regulates transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, J G; Halliday, T; Whalen, S G; Takayesu, D; Graham, F L; Branton, P E

    1994-01-01

    The 55-kDa product of early region 1B (E1B) of human adenoviruses is required for viral replication and participates in cell transformation through complex formation with and inactivation of the cellular tumor suppressor p53. We have used both biochemical and genetic approaches to show that this 496-residue (496R) protein of adenovirus type 5 is phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues near the carboxy terminus within sequences characteristic of substrates of casein kinase II. Mutations which converted serines 490 and 491 to alanine residues decreased viral replication and greatly reduced the efficiency of transformation of primary baby rat kidney cells. Such mutant 496R proteins interacted with p53 at efficiencies similar to those of wild-type 496R but only partially inhibited p53 transactivation activity. These results indicated that phosphorylation at these carboxy-terminal sites either regulates the inhibition of p53 or regulates some other 496R function required for cell transformation. Images PMID:8289381

  12. Enzymatic regulation of pattern: BMP4 binds CUB domains of Tolloids and inhibits proteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojoon X.; Mendes, Fabio A.; Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    In Xenopus embryos, a dorsal–ventral patterning gradient is generated by diffusing Chordin/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) complexes cleaved by BMP1/Tolloid metalloproteinases in the ventral side. We developed a new BMP1/Tolloid assay using a fluorogenic Chordin peptide substrate and identified an unexpected negative feedback loop for BMP4, in which BMP4 inhibits Tolloid enzyme activity noncompetitively. BMP4 binds directly to the CUB (Complement 1r/s, Uegf [a sea urchin embryonic protein] and BMP1) domains of BMP1 and Drosophila Tolloid with high affinity. Binding to CUB domains inhibits BMP4 signaling. These findings provide a molecular explanation for a long-standing genetical puzzle in which antimorphic Drosophila tolloid mutant alleles displayed anti-BMP effects. The extensive Drosophila genetics available supports the relevance of the interaction described here at endogenous physiological levels. Many extracellular proteins contain CUB domains; the binding of CUB domains to BMP4 suggests a possible general function in binding transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members. Mathematical modeling indicates that feedback inhibition by BMP ligands acts on the ventral side, while on the dorsal side the main regulator of BMP1/Tolloid enzymatic activity is the binding to its substrate, Chordin. PMID:19884260

  13. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 3C-like proteinase N terminus is indispensable for proteolytic activity but not for enzyme dimerization. Biochemical and thermodynamic investigation in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Chen, Lili; Tan, Jinzhi; Chen, Jing; Du, Li; Sun, Tao; Shen, Jianhua; Chen, Kaixian; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus is a novel human coronavirus and is responsible for SARS infection. SARS coronavirus 3C-like proteinase (SARS 3CL(pro)) plays key roles in viral replication and transcription and is an attractive target for anti-SARS drug discovery. In this report, we quantitatively characterized the dimerization features of the full-length and N-terminal residues 1-7 deleted SARS 3CL(pro)s by using glutaraldehyde cross-linking SDS-PAGE, size-exclusion chromatography, and isothermal titration calorimeter techniques. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking SDS-PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography results show that, similar to the full-length SARS 3CL(pro), the N-terminal deleted SARS 3CL(pro) still remains a dimer/monomer mixture within a wide range of protein concentrations. Isothermal titration calorimeter determinations indicate that the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of the N-terminal deleted proteinase dimer (262 microm) is very similar to that of the full-length proteinase dimer (227 microm). Enzymatic activity assay using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer method reveals that N-terminal deletion results in almost complete loss of enzymatic activity for SARS 3CL(pro). Molecular dynamics and docking simulations demonstrate the N-terminal deleted proteinase dimer adopts a state different from that of the full-length proteinase dimer, which increases the angle between the two protomers and reduces the binding pocket that is not beneficial to the substrate binding. This conclusion is verified by the surface plasmon resonance biosensor determination, indicating that the model substrate cannot bind to the N-terminal deleted proteinase. These results suggest the N terminus is not indispensable for the proteinase dimerization but may fix the dimer at the active state and is therefore vital to enzymatic activity.

  14. Shrimp single WAP domain (SWD)-containing protein exhibits proteinase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Amparyup, Piti; Donpudsa, Suchao; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2008-01-01

    Single WAP domain (SWD)-containing proteins are small proteins with a C-terminal region containing a single whey acidic protein (WAP) domain. In the present study, the cDNAs representing three isoforms of SWD proteins (SWDPm1, SWDPm2 and SWDPm3) were identified from hemocytes of the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. The deduced peptides revealed that they contain a putative signal peptide of 24 amino acids and encode for a mature peptide of 69, 68 and 56 amino acids, respectively, which contain typical characters similar to those of the shrimp SWD proteins (type III crustin) with a Pro-Arg region and a WAP domain towards the C-terminus. Tissue distribution analysis by RT-PCR showed that all three SWDPm transcripts were primarily found in hemocytes. Transcript expression of SWDPm1 was down-regulated upon injection with Staphylococcus aureus whilst there was no change of SWDPm2 and SWDPm3 expression. In contrast, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) injection resulted in a biphasic response with up-regulation of SWDPm1 and SWDPm2 transcripts at 6h followed by significant down-regulation by 24h after infection. Genomic organization of the SWDPm2 gene revealed the presence of three exons interrupted by two introns. To characterize the biological functions of the SWD protein, the mature SWDPm2 protein encoding cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant (r)SWDPm2 exhibits antibacterial activity against several Gram-positive, but not Gram-negative, bacteria and is a competitive inhibitor of subtilisin A with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 1.98nM. Thus, rSWDPm2 may contribute to the inhibitory regulation of subtilisin A from bacterial infection and P. monodon SWD protein likely function as immune effectors in defense against invasion of shrimp pathogens. PMID:18602420

  15. A zymogen form of masquerade-like serine proteinase homologue is cleaved during pro-phenoloxidase activation by Ca2+ in coleopteran and Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kum Young; Zhang, Rong; Kim, Moon Suk; Park, Ji Won; Park, Ho Young; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Lee, Bok Luel

    2002-09-01

    To elucidate the biochemical activation mechanism of the insect pro-phenoloxidase (pro-PO) system, we purified a 45-kDa protein to homogeneity from the hemolymph of Tenebrio molitor (mealworm) larvae, and cloned its cDNA. The overall structure of the 45-kDa protein is similar to Drosophila masquerade serine proteinase homologue, which is an essential component in Drosophila muscle development. This Tenebrio masquerade-like serine proteinase homologue (Tm-mas) contains a trypsin-like serine proteinase domain in the C-terminal region, except for the substitution of Ser to Gly at the active site triad, and a disulfide-knotted domain at the amino-terminal region. When the purified 45-kDa Tm-mas was incubated with CM-Toyopearl eluate solution containing pro-PO and other pro-PO activating factors, the resulting phenoloxidase (PO) activity was shown to be independent of Ca2+. This suggests that the purified 45-kDa Tm-mas is an activated form of pro-PO activating factor. The55-kDa zymogen form of Tm-mas was detected in the hemolymph when PO activity was not evident. However, when Tenebrio hemolymph was incubated with Ca2+, a 79-kDa Tenebrio pro-PO and the 55-kDa zymogen Tm-mas converted to 76-kDa PO and 45-kDa Tm-mas, respectively, with detectable PO activity. Furthermore, when Tenebrio hemolymph was incubated with Ca2+ and beta-1,3-glucan, the conversion of pro-PO to PO and the 55-kDa zymogen Tm-mas to the 45-kDa protein, was faster than in the presence of Ca2+ only. These results suggest that the cleavage of the 55-kDa zymogen of Tm-mas by a limited proteolysis is necessary for PO activity, and the Tm-mas is a pro-PO activating cofactor.

  16. A serpin-induced extensive proteolytic susceptibility of urokinase-type plasminogen activator implicates distortion of the proteinase substrate-binding pocket and oxyanion hole in the serpin inhibitory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Egelund, R; Petersen, T E; Andreasen, P A

    2001-02-01

    The formation of stable complexes between serpins and their target serine proteinases indicates formation of an ester bond between the proteinase active-site serine and the serpin P1 residue [Egelund, R., Rodenburg, K.W., Andreasen, P.A., Rasmussen, M.S., Guldberg, R.E. & Petersen, T.E. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 6375-6379]. An important question concerning serpin inhibition is the contrast between the stability of the ester bond in the complex and the rapid hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme intermediate in general serine proteinase-catalysed peptide bond hydrolysis. To answer this question, we used limited proteolysis to detect conformational differences between free urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPA in complex with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Whereas the catalytic domain of free uPA, pro-uPA, uPA in complex with non-serpin inhibitors and anhydro-uPA in a non-covalent complex with PAI-1 was resistant to proteolysis, the catalytic domain of PAI-1-complexed uPA was susceptible to proteolysis. The cleavage sites for four different proteinases were localized in specific areas of the C-terminal beta-barrel of the catalytic domain of uPA, providing evidence that the serpin inhibitory mechanism involves a serpin-induced massive rearrangement of the proteinase active site, including the specificity pocket, the oxyanion hole, and main-chain binding area, rendering the proteinase unable to complete the normal hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. The distorted region includes the so-called activation domain, also known to change conformation on zymogen activation.

  17. Properties of a subtilisin-like proteinase from a psychrotrophic Vibrio species comparison with proteinase K and aqualysin I.

    PubMed

    Kristjánsson, M M; Magnússon, O T; Gudmundsson, H M; Alfredsson, G A; Matsuzawa, H

    1999-03-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase purified from cultures of a psychrotrophic Vibrio species (strain PA-44) belongs to the proteinase K family of the superfamily of subtilisin-like proteinases. The enzyme is secreted as a 47-kDa protein, but under mild heat treatment (30 min at 40 degrees C) undergoes autoproteolytic cleavage on the carboxyl-side of the molecule to give a proteinase with a molecular mass of about 36 kDa that apparently shares most of the enzymatic characteristics and the stability of the 47-kDa protein. In this study, selected enzymatic properties of the Vibrio proteinase were compared with those of the related proteinases, proteinase K and aqualysin I, as representative mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for the amidase activity of the cold-adapted enzyme against succinyl-AAPF-p-nitroanilide was significantly higher than that of its mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, especially when compared with aqualysin I. The stability of the Vibrio proteinase, both towards heat and denaturants, was found to be significantly lower than of either proteinase K or aqualysin I. One or more disulfide bonds in the psychrotrophic proteinase are important for the integrity of the active enzyme structure, as disulfide cleavage, either by reduction with dithiothreitol or by sulfitolysis, led to a loss in its activity. Under the same conditions, aqualysin I was also partially inactivated by dithiothreitol, but the activity of proteinase K was unaffected. The disulfides of either proteinase K or aqualysin I were not reactive towards sulfitolysis, except under denaturing conditions, while all disulfides of the Vibrio proteinase reacted in absence of a denaturant. The reactivity of the disulfides of the proteins as a function of denaturant concentration followed the order: Vibrio proteinase > proteinase K > aqualysin I. The same order of reactivity was also observed for the inactivation of the enzymes by H2O2

  18. Human plasma alpha-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. Purification by affinity chromatography, characterization and isolation of an active fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Gounaris, A D; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1984-01-01

    Human plasma alpha-cysteine proteinase inhibitor (alpha CPI) was purified by a two-stage method: affinity chromatography on S-carboxymethyl-papain-Sepharose, and high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography. The protein was obtained as a form of Mr about 64 000 and material of higher Mr (about 100 000). In sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with reduction, both forms showed a major component of Mr 64 000. An antiserum was raised against alpha CPI, and 'rocket' immunoassays showed the mean concentration in sera from 19 individuals to be 35.9 mg/dl. Both low-Mr and high-Mr forms of alpha CPI were confirmed to be sialoglycoproteins by the decrease in electrophoretic mobility after treatment with neuraminidase. alpha CPI was shown immunologically to be distinct from antithrombin III and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, two serine proteinase inhibitors from plasma with somewhat similar Mr values. alpha CPI was also distinct from cystatins A and B, the two intracellular low-Mr cysteine proteinase inhibitors from human liver. Complexes of alpha CPI with papain were detectable in immunoelectrophoresis, but dissociated to free enzyme and intact inhibitor in sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The stoichiometry of binding of papain was close to 1:1 for both low-Mr and high-Mr forms. alpha CPI was found to be a tight-binding inhibitor of papain and human cathepsins H and L (Ki 34 pM, 1.1 nM and 62 pM respectively). By contrast, inhibition of cathepsin B was much weaker, Ki being about 35 microM. Dipeptidyl peptidase I also was weakly inhibited. Digestion of alpha CPI with bromelain gave rise to an inhibitory fragment of Mr about 22 000, which was isolated. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6548132

  19. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E; Blanchette, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for

  20. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops.

  1. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K.; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus. PMID:27656149

  2. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K.; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus.

  3. Shrimp Serine Proteinase Homologues PmMasSPH-1 and -2 Play a Role in the Activation of the Prophenoloxidase System

    PubMed Central

    Jearaphunt, Miti; Amparyup, Piti; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2015-01-01

    Melanization mediated by the prophenoloxidase (proPO) activating system is a rapid immune response used by invertebrates against intruding pathogens. Several masquerade-like and serine proteinase homologues (SPHs) have been demonstrated to play an essential role in proPO activation in insects and crustaceans. In a previous study, we characterized the masquerade-like SPH, PmMasSPH1, in the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon as a multifunctional immune protein based on its recognition and antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio harveyi. In the present study, we identify a novel SPH, known as PmMasSPH2, composed of an N-terminal clip domain and a C-terminal SP-like domain that share high similarity to those of other insect and crustacean SPHs. We demonstrate that gene silencing of PmMasSPH1 and PmMasSPH2 significantly reduces PO activity, resulting in a high number of V. harveyi in the hemolymph. Interestingly, knockdown of PmMasSPH1 suppressed not only its gene transcript but also other immune-related genes in the proPO system (e.g., PmPPAE2) and antimicrobial peptides (e.g., PenmonPEN3, PenmonPEN5, crustinPm1 and Crus-likePm). The PmMasSPH1 and PmMasSPH2 also show binding activity to peptidoglycan (PGN) of Gram-positive bacteria. Using a yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that PmMasSPH1 specifically interacted with the final proteinase of the proPO cascade, PmPPAE2. Furthermore, the presence of both PmMasSPH1 and PmPPAE2 enhances PGN-induced PO activity in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest the importance of PmMasSPHs in the activation of the shrimp proPO system. PMID:25803442

  4. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus. PMID:27656149

  5. An electroblotting, two-step procedure for the detection of proteinases and the study of proteinase/inhibitor complexes in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Visal-Shah, S; Vrain, T C; Yelle, T C; Nguyen-Quoc, B; Michaud, D

    2001-08-01

    A two-step gelatin/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (gelatin/PAGE) procedure was devised for the detection of proteinases and the study of proteinase/inhibitor interactions in complex biological extracts. The proteins are first resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE under reducing or nonreducing conditions, and electrotransferred into a 0.75 mm-thick accompanying polyacrylamide slab gel containing 0.1% w/v porcine gelatin. The active proteinase bands are developed by a gelatin proteolysis step in the accompanying gel in the presence or absence of diagnostic proteinase inhibitors, allowing the assessment of proteinase classes and the visual discrimination of inhibitor-'sensitive' and -'insensitive' proteinases in complex extracts. Alternatively, protein extracts are preincubated with specific reversible inhibitors before electrophoresis, allowing a rapid discrimination of strong and weak interactions implicating proteinases and reversible inhibitors. In comparison with the standard gelatin/PAGE procedure, that involves copolymerization of gelatin with acrylamide in the resolving gel, this new procedure simplifies proteinase patterns, avoids overestimation of proteinase numbers in complex extracts, and allows in certain conditions the estimation of proteinase molecular weights. Stem bromelain (EC 3.4.22.32), bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4), papain (EC 3.4.22.2), and the extracellular (digestive) cysteine proteinases of five herbivorous pests are used as model enzymes to illustrate the usefulness of this approach in detecting proteinases and in studying their interactions with specific proteinaceous inhibitors potentially useful in biotechnology.

  6. The dual effect of adenovirus type 5 E1A 13S protein on NF-kappaB activation is antagonized by E1B 19K.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, M L; Indorf, A; Limbourg, F P; Städtler, H; Traenckner, E B; Baeuerle, P A

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of human adenoviruses encode several regulatory proteins, including the two differentially spliced gene products E1A and E1B. Here, we show that the 13S but not the 12S splice variant of E1A of adenovirus type 5 can activate the human transcription factor NF-kappaB in a bimodal fashion. One mode is the activation of NF-kappaB containing the p65 subunit from the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB-IkappaB complex. This activation required reactive oxygen intermediates and the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha at serines 32 and 36, followed by IkappaBalpha degradation and the nuclear uptake of NF-kappaB. In addition, 13S E1A stimulated the transcriptional activity of the C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 at a core promoter with either a TATA box or an initiator (INR) element. The C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 were found to associate with E1A in vitro. The activation of NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene transcription by E1A was potently suppressed upon coexpression of the E1B 19-kDa protein (19K). E1B 19K prevented both the activation of NF-kappaB and the E1A-mediated transcriptional enhancement of p65. These inhibitory effects were not found for the 55-kDa splice variant of the E1B protein. We suggest that the inductive effect of E1A 13S on the host factor NF-kappaB, whose activation is important for the transcription of various adenovirus genes, must be counteracted by the suppressive effect of E1B 19K so that the adenovirus-infected cell can escape the immune-stimulatory and apoptotic effects of NF-kappaB. PMID:8754803

  7. A novel signaling pathway of tissue kallikrein in promoting keratinocyte migration: Activation of proteinase-activated receptor 1 and epidermal growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lin; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2010-02-01

    Biological functions of tissue kallikrein (TK, KLK1) are mainly mediated by kinin generation and subsequent kinin B2 receptor activation. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TK and its signaling pathways in cultured human keratinocyte migration and in a rat skin wound healing model. Herein, we show that TK promoted cell migration and proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Inactive TK or kinin had no significant effect on cell migration. Interestingly, cell migration induced by active TK was not blocked by icatibant or L-NAME, indicating an event independent of kinin B2 receptor and nitric oxide formation. TK's stimulatory effect on cell migration was inhibited by small interfering RNA for proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR{sub 1}), and by PAR{sub 1} inhibitor. TK-induced migration was associated with increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which was blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC), Src, EGFR and ERK. TK-induced cell migration and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked by metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, heparin, and antibodies against EGFR external domain, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and amphiregulin (AR). Local application of TK promoted skin wound healing in rats, whereas icatibant and EGFR inhibitor blocked TK's effect. Skin wound healing was further delayed by aprotinin and neutralizing TK antibody. This study demonstrates a novel role of TK in skin wound healing and uncovers new signaling pathways mediated by TK in promoting keratinocyte migration through activation of the PAR{sub 1}-PKC-Src-MMP pathway and HB-EGF/AR shedding-dependent EGFR transactivation.

  8. New aspartic proteinase of Ulysses retrotransposon from Drosophila virilis.

    PubMed

    Volkov, D A; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2004-06-01

    This work is focused on the investigation of a proteinase of Ulysses mobile genetic element from Drosophila virilis. The primary structure of this proteinase is suggested based on comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of aspartic proteinases from retroviruses and retrotransposons. The corresponding cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein accumulated in inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein (12 kD) was subjected to refolding and purified by affinity chromatography on pepstatin-agarose. Proteolytic activity of the protein was determined using oligopeptide substrates melittin and insulin B-chain. It was found that the maximum of the proteolytic activity is displayed at pH 5.5 as for the majority of aspartic proteinases. We observed that hydrolysis of B-chain of insulin was totally inhibited by pepstatin A in the micromolar concentration range. The molecular weight of the monomer of the Ulysses proteinase was determined by MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry.

  9. Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 and the regulation of porcine coronary artery contractility: a role for distinct tyrosine kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    El-Daly, Mahmoud; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Triggle, Christopher R; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Because angiotensin-II-mediated porcine coronary artery (PCA) vasoconstriction is blocked by protein tyrosine kinase (PYK) inhibitors, we hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), known to regulate vascular tension, like angiotensin-II, would also cause PCA contractions via PYK-dependent signalling pathways. Experimental Approach Contractions of intact and endothelium-free isolated PCA rings, stimulated by PAR1/PAR2-activating peptides, angiotensin-II, PGF2α, EGF, PDGF and KCl, were monitored with/without multiple signalling pathway inhibitors, including AG-tyrphostins AG18 (non-specific PYKs), AG1478 (EGF-receptor kinase), AG1296 (PDGF receptor kinase), PP1 (Src kinase), U0126 and PD98059 (MEK/MAPKinase kinase), indomethacin/SC-560/NS-398 (COX-1/2) and L-NAME (NOS). Key Results AG18 inhibited the contractions induced by all the agonists except KCl, whereas U0126 attenuated contractions induced by PAR1/PAR2 agonists, EGF and angiotensin-II, but not by PGF2α, the COX-produced metabolites of arachidonate and KCl. PP1 only affected the responses to PAR1/PAR2-activating peptides and angiotensin-II. The EGF-kinase inhibitor, AG1478, attenuated contractions initiated by the PARs (PAR2 >> PAR1) and EGF itself, but not by angiotensin-II, PGF2α or KCl. COX-1/2 inhibitors blocked the contractions induced by all the agonists, except KCl and PGF2α. Conclusion and Implications PAR1/2-mediated contractions of the PCA are dependent on Src and MAPKinase and, in part, involve EGF-receptor-kinase transactivation and the generation of a COX-derived contractile agonist. However, the PYK signalling pathways used by PARs are distinct from each other and from those triggered by angiotensin-II and EGF. These signalling pathways may be therapeutic targets for managing coagulation-proteinase-induced coronary vasospasm. PMID:24506284

  10. Protective Effect of Proteinase-Activated Receptor 2 Activation on Motility Impairment and Tissue Damage Induced by Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cattaruzza, Fiore; Cenac, Nicolas; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Impicciatore, Mariannina; Hyun, Eric; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Sternini, Catia

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) modulates intestinal injuries induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Ischemia (1 hour) plus reperfusion (6 hours) significantly delayed gastrointestinal transit (GIT) compared with sham operation. Intraduodenal injection of PAR2-activating peptide SLIGRL-NH2 significantly accelerated transit in ischemia/reperfusion but not in sham-operated rats. GIT was significantly delayed in ischemia/reperfusion and sham-operated PAR2−/− mice compared with PAR2+/+. SLIGRL-NH2 significantly accelerated transit in ischemia/reperfusion in PAR2+/+ but not in PAR2−/− mice. Prevention of mast cell degranulation with cromolyn, ablation of visceral afferents with capsaicin, and antagonism of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurokinin-1 receptors with CGRP8–37 and RP67580, respectively, abolished the SLIGRL-NH2-induced stimulatory effect on transit in ischemia/reperfusion. Tissue damage was significantly reduced by SLIGRL-NH2; this effect was not observed in cromolyn-, capsaicin-, or RP67580-treated rats but was detected following CGRP8–37. Intestinal PAR2 mRNA levels were not affected by SLIGRL-NH2 in ischemia/reperfusion. We propose that PAR2 modulates GIT and tissue damage in intestinal ischemia/reperfusion by a mechanism dependent on mast cells and visceral afferents. PAR2 effect on transit might be mediated by CGRP and substance P, whereas the effect on tissue damage appears to involve substance P but not CGRP. PAR2 might be a signaling system in the neuroimmune communication in intestinal ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:16816371

  11. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  12. Induction of Shock After Intravenous Injection of Adenovirus Vectors: A Critical Role for Platelet-activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhili; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Tian, Jie; Byrnes, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Innate immune responses are a major barrier to safe systemic gene therapy with adenovirus (Ad) vectors. We show that intravenous (IV) injection of rats with Ad5 vectors causes a novel rapid shock reaction that involves hypotension, hemoconcentration, tissue edema, and vasocongestion, with notable pathology in the pancreas and the gastrointestinal system. We show for the first time that this reaction is dependent on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid signaling molecule that is a known shock inducer. Ad upregulated PAF within 5 minutes in vivo, and antagonists of the PAF receptor were able to prevent Ad-induced shock. Ad upregulated PAF via the reticuloendothelial system (RES), because splenectomy or depletion of phagocytes blocked the ability of Ad to induce both PAF and shock. Rats were considerably more sensitive to Ad-induced shock than were mice, but PAF mediated shock in both species. Other Ad-induced innate immune responses such as cytokine induction and thrombocytopenia were not mediated by PAF. In summary, systemic IV injection of Ad stimulates the RES to upregulate PAF within a matter of minutes, which results in shock. The identification of this novel pathway suggests strategies to improve the safety of systemic gene therapy with Ad vectors. PMID:19953082

  13. [Characterization of thermal denaturation process of proteinase K by spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Bing; Na, Xin-Zhu; Yin, Zong-Ning

    2013-07-01

    The effect of different temperatures on the activity and conformational changes of proteinase K was studied. Methods Proteinase K was treated with different temperatures, then denatured natural substrate casein was used to assay enzyme activity, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study tertiary structure, and circular dichroism was used to study secondary structure. Results show with the temperature rising from 25 to 65 degrees C, the enzyme activity and half-life of proteinase K dropped, maximum emission wavelength red shifted from 335 to 354 nm with fluorescence intensity decreasing. Synchronous fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues decreased and that of tyrosine residues increased. Fluorescence lifetime of tryptophan residues reduced from 4. 427 1 to 4. 032 4 ns and the fraction of alpha-helix dropped. It was concluded that it is simple and accurate to use steady-state/time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism to investigate thermal stability of proteinase K. Thermal denaturation of proteinase K followed a three-state process. Fluorescence intensity of proteinase K was affected by fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tyrosine to tryptophan residues. The alpha-helix was the main structure to maintain conformational stability of enzyme active site of proteinase K.

  14. Multiple forms of calcium-dependent proteinase in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) activities in lobster muscles have been resolved by high performance liquid chromatography. These activities differ in molecular weight and net charge. Though optimum activity occurred at high (5 and 10 mM) calcium at pH 6.8, the enzymes differ in activation at lower calcium concentrations. Only one of the CDPs is active at 100 ..mu..M calcium; none are active at 10 ..mu..M and below. Although all four CDPs are inhibited by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors leupeptin, E-64, and iodoacetamide, they show a differential response to the aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin and the serine proteinase inhibitor PMSF. In contrast to CDPs from vertebrate tissues, crustacean muscles contain multiple forms that require calcium at millimolar levels. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  15. High-level eucaryotic in vivo expression of biologically active measles virus hemagglutinin by using an adenovirus type 5 helper-free vector system.

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D J

    1988-01-01

    The entire measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (HA)-coding region was reconstructed from cloned cDNAs and used as part of a hybrid transcription unit to replace a region of the adenovirus type 5 genome corresponding to the entire E1a transcription unit and most of the E1b transcription unit. The resulting recombinant virus was stable and able to replicate to high titers in 293 cells (which constitutively express the complementary E1a-E1b functions) in the absence of helper virus. During infection of 293 cells, the hybrid virus expressed MV HA protein which was indistinguishable from that expressed in MV-infected cells in terms of immunoreactivity, gel mobility, glycosylation, subcellular localization, and biologic activity. Infection of 293 cells with the hybrid virus led to high-level synthesis of the MV HA protein (equivalent to 65 to 130% of the level seen in MV-infected cells). At late times after high-multiplicity hybrid virus infection of HeLa and Vero cells (which do not express E1 functions), the level of HA protein synthesis was at least 35% of that seen in 293 cells. This MV-adenovirus recombinant will be useful in the study of the biologic properties of the MV HA protein and in assessment of the potential usefulness of hybrid adenoviruses as live-virus vaccine vectors. Images PMID:3292790

  16. The active Zot domain (aa 288–293) increases ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation, alters interaction between ZO-1 and its binding partners, and induces tight junction disassembly through proteinase activated receptor 2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, Simeon E.; Rai, Usha; Tripathi, Amit; Thakar, Manjusha; De Leo, Luigina; Di Toro, Nicola; Not, Tarcisio; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Puche, Adam C.; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Fasano, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae-derived zonula occludins toxin (Zot) is a multifunctional protein that reversibly disassembles intestinal tight junctions (tjs). Zot structure-function analysis has mapped this activity to aa 288–293, named AT1002. AT1002 reduced transepithelial electrical resistance across rat small intestine, ex vivo, as did Zot and its processed mature form, ΔG. AT1002 increased in vivo permeability to sugar tracers, whereas scrambled control peptides did not. Binding and barrier assays in proteinase activated receptor (PAR)2-expressing and PAR2-null cells established AT1002 activity to be PAR2 dependent. Coincident with the increased intestinal permeability, confocal microscopy of AT1002-exposed rat intestinal IEC6 cells revealed displacement of ZO-1 and occludin from intercellular boundaries. In coimmunoprecipitation assays, AT1002 decreased ZO-1-occludin and ZO-1-claudin 1 interactions coincident with PKCα-dependent ZO-1 serine/threonine phosphorylation. Further, AT1002 increased serine phosphorylation of myosin 1C and, at the same time, transiently diminished its association with ZO-1. The COOH-terminal domain of ZO-1 was required for its association with myosin 1C. These data indicate that the NH2-terminal portion of active Zot contains a PAR2-activating motif, FCIGRL, that increases PKCα-dependent ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation. These modifications provoke selective disengagement of ZO-1 from its binding partners, occludin, claudin 1, and myosin 1C, coincident with opening of tjs.—Goldblum, S. E., Rai, U., Tripathi, A., Thakar, M., De Leo, L., Di Toro, N., Not, T., Ramachandran, R., Puche, A. C., Hollenberg, M. D., Fasano, A. The active Zot domain (aa 288–293) increases ZO-1 and myosin 1C serine/threonine phosphorylation, alters interaction between ZO-1 and its binding partners, and induces tight junction disassembly through proteinase activated receptor 2 activation. PMID:20852064

  17. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo effects of semipurified proteinase inhibitors from Theobroma seeds on midgut protease activity of Lepidopteran pest insects.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, Luis Cesar Maffei Sartini; Sebbenn, Alexandre Magno; de Carvalho Derbyshire, Maria Tereza Vitral; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; de Paula Brotto, Marco Aurélio; Figueira, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    We have characterized in vitro and in vivo effects of trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma seeds on the activity of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteins from Lepidopteran pest insects. The action of semipurified trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma was evaluated by the inhibition of bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin activities determined by the hydrolysis of N-Benzoyl-DL-Arginine-p-Nitroanilide (BAPA) and N-Succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pho-Phe p-Nitroanilide (S-(Ala)2ProPhe-pNA). Proteinase inhibitor activities from Theobroma cacao and T. obovatum seeds were the most effective in inhibiting trypsin-like proteins, whereas those from T. obovatum and T. sylvestre were the most efficient against chymotrypsin-like proteins. All larvae midgut extracts showed trypsin-like proteolytic activities, and the putative trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma seeds significantly inhibited purified bovine trypsin. With respect to the influence of Theobroma trypsin inhibitors on intact insects, the inclusion of T. cacao extracts in artificial diets of velvet bean caterpillars (Anticarsia gemmatalis) and sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis) produced a significant increase in the percentage of adult deformation, which is directly related to both the survival rate of the insects and oviposition.

  18. Adenovirus 36 attenuates weight loss from exercise but improves glycemic control by increasing mitochondrial activity in the liver.

    PubMed

    Na, Ha-Na; Hong, Young-Mi; Ye, Michael B; Park, Sooho; Kim, In-Beom; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 36 (Ad36) as an obesity agent induces adiposity by increasing glucose uptake and promoting chronic inflammation in fat tissues; in contrast, exercise reduces total body fat and inflammation. Our objective was to determine the association between Ad36 and the effects of exercise on inflammation and glycemic control. In the human trials (n = 54), Korean children (aged 12-14 years) exercised for 60 min on three occasions each week for 2 months. We compared the body mass index (BMI) Z-scores before and after exercise. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Ad36 and Ad2 as a control, and these mice exercised for 12 weeks postinfection. After the exercise period, we determined the serum parameters and assessed the presence of inflammation and the mitochondrial function in the organs. Ad36-seropositive children who were subjected to a supervised exercise regimen had high BMI Z-scores whereas Ad36-seronegative children had lower scores. Similarly, Ad36-infected mice were resistant to weight loss and exhibited chronic inflammation of their adipose tissues despite frequent exercise. However, Ad36 combined with exercise reduced the levels of serum glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, total cholesterol, and insulin in virus-infected mice. Interestingly, virus infection increased the mitochondrial function in the liver, as demonstrated by the numbers of mitochondria, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and transcription of key mitochondrial genes. Therefore Ad36 counteracts the weight-loss effect of exercise and maintains the chronic inflammatory state, but glycemic control is improved by exercise synergistically because of increased mitochondrial activity in the liver.

  19. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new developments since 2006. In addition, we will cover the development of antivirals that interfere with human adenovirus (HAdV) replication and the impact of HAdV on human disease. PMID:23388625

  20. Inhibition of invasion and metastasis of MHCC97H cells by expression of snake venom cystatin through reduction of proteinases activity and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nanhong; Xie, Qun; Wang, Xiaoqian; Li, Xiujin; Chen, Yanlin; Lin, Xu; Lin, Jianyin

    2011-05-01

    Snake venom cystatin (sv-cystatin) is a member of the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors. To further evaluate the possibility of sv-cystatin in cancer therapy, this study examined the effects of sv-cystatin on the invasion and metastasis of liver cancer cells (MHCC97H) in vitro and in vivo as well as the underlying mechanism. sv-cystatin cDNA was transfected into MHCC97H cells and the anti-invasion and antimetastasis effects of sv-cystatin were determined using migration and matrigel invasion assays and a lung-metastasis mice model. The results suggest that sv-cyst clone (sv-cystatin expression in MHCC97H cells) delayed the invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo compared to the parental, mock and si-sv-cyst clone cells (inhibited sv-cystatin expression by siRNA). The decreased activities of cathepsin B, MMP-2 and MMP-9 and EMT change index including higher E-cadherin, lower N-cadherin and decreased Twist activity were observed in the sv-cyst clone, which contributes to the change in invasion and metastasis ability of MHCC97H cells. This study provides evidence that expression of the sv-cystatin gene in MHCC97H cells inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis through the reduction of the proteinases activity and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), which might contribute to the anticancer research of the sv-cystatin protein.

  1. Role of proteinase-activated receptor-2 in anti-bacterial and immunomodulatory effects of interferon-γ on human neutrophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Shpacovitch, Victoria M; Feld, Micha; Holzinger, Dirk; Kido, Makiko; Hollenberg, Morley D; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Ludwig, Stephan; Roth, Johannes; Luger, Thomas; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies show that proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) contributes to the development of inflammatory responses. However, investigations into the precise role of PAR(2) activation in the anti-microbial defence of human leucocytes are just beginning. We therefore evaluated the contribution of PAR(2) to the anti-microbial response of isolated human innate immune cells. We found that PAR(2) agonist, acting alone, enhances phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and killing of Escherichia coli by human leucocytes, and that the magnitude of the effect is similar to that of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). However, co-application of PAR(2) -cAP and IFN-γ did not enhance the phagocytic and bacteria-killing activity of leucocytes beyond that triggered by either agonist alone. On the other hand, IFN-γ enhances PAR(2) agonist-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) secretion by human neutrophils and monocytes. Furthermore, phosphoinositide-3 kinase and janus kinase molecules are involved in the synergistic effect of PAR(2) agonist and IFN-γ on MCP-1 secretion. Our findings suggest a potentially protective role of PAR(2) agonists in the anti-microbial defence established by human monocytes and neutrophils.

  2. Sulfated Low Molecular Weight Lignins, Allosteric Inhibitors of Coagulation Proteinases via the Heparin Binding Site, Significantly Alter the Active Site of Thrombin and Factor Xa Compared to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brian L.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs) have been found to bind in the heparin binding sites of coagulation proteinases. LMWLs represent a library of diverse non-carbohydrate, aromatic molecules which are structures different from heparin, but still potently inhibit thrombin and factor Xa. To better understand their mechanism of action, we studied the effects of three sulfated LMWLs (CDSO3, FDSO3, and SDSO3) on the active sites of thrombin and factor Xa. LMWLs were found to uniformly inhibit the catalytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa, regardless of the substrate used. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies indicate that maximal velocity of hydrolysis of each chromogenic substrate decreases significantly in the presence of sulfated LMWLs, while the effect on Michaelis constant is dependent on the nature of the substrate. These studies indicate that LMWLs inhibit thrombin and factor Xa through allosteric disruption of the catalytic apparatus, specifically through the catalytic step. As opposed to heparin, LMWLs significantly alter the binding of the active site fluorescent ligand p-aminobenzamidine. LMWLs also had a greater effect on the molecular orientation of fluorescein-labeled His 57 than heparin. The molecular geometry surrounding the most important catalytic amino acid, Ser 195, was significantly altered by the binding of LMWLs while heparin had no measurable effect on Ser 195. These results further advance the concept of sulfated LMWLs as heparin mimics and will aid the design of anticoagulants based on their novel scaffold. PMID:25242245

  3. Sulfated low molecular weight lignins, allosteric inhibitors of coagulation proteinases via the heparin binding site, significantly alter the active site of thrombin and factor xa compared to heparin.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brian L; Desai, Umesh R

    2014-11-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs) have been found to bind in the heparin binding sites of coagulation proteinases. LMWLs represent a library of diverse non-carbohydrate, aromatic molecules which are structures different from heparin, but still potently inhibit thrombin and factor Xa. To better understand their mechanism of action, we studied the effects of three sulfated LMWLs (CDSO3, FDSO3, and SDSO3) on the active sites of thrombin and factor Xa. LMWLs were found to uniformly inhibit the catalytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa, regardless of the substrate used. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies indicate that maximal velocity of hydrolysis of each chromogenic substrate decreases significantly in the presence of sulfated LMWLs, while the effect on Michaelis constant is dependent on the nature of the substrate. These studies indicate that LMWLs inhibit thrombin and factor Xa through allosteric disruption of the catalytic apparatus, specifically through the catalytic step. As opposed to heparin, LMWLs significantly alter the binding of the active site fluorescent ligand p-aminobenzamidine. LMWLs also had a greater effect on the molecular orientation of fluorescein-labeled His 57 than heparin. The molecular geometry surrounding the most important catalytic amino acid, Ser 195, was significantly altered by the binding of LMWLs while heparin had no measurable effect on Ser 195. These results further advance the concept of sulfated LMWLs as heparin mimics and will aid the design of anticoagulants based on their novel scaffold. PMID:25242245

  4. Agonists of proteinase-activated receptor-2 enhance IFN-gamma-inducible effects on human monocytes: role in influenza A infection.

    PubMed

    Feld, Micha; Shpacovitch, Victoria M; Ehrhardt, Christina; Kerkhoff, Claus; Hollenberg, Morley D; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Ludwig, Stephan; Steinhoff, Martin

    2008-05-15

    Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) is expressed by different types of human leukocytes and involved in the development of inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, its precise role in the regulation of human monocyte and macrophage function during viral infection remains unclear. Also, the ability of PAR(2) agonists to enhance the effects induced by immune mediators during infection or inflammation is still poorly investigated. Therefore, we investigated the ability of a PAR(2) agonist to enhance IFN-gamma-induced suppression of influenza A virus replication in human monocytes. We found that this effect correlates with an increased abundance of IkappaBalpha after costimulation of cells with PAR(2) agonist and IFN-gamma. Remarkably, coapplication of PAR(2) agonist and IFN-gamma also enhances the effects of IFN-gamma on IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 kDa release, and CD64 and alphaVbeta3 surface expression by human monocytes. Together, these findings indicate a potentially protective role of PAR(2) activation during the progression of influenza A virus infection. This effect could be associated with the ability of PAR(2) agonists to enhance IFN-gamma-induced protective effects on human monocytes.

  5. Proteinase-activated receptors differentially modulate in vitro invasion of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma PANC-1 cells in correlation with changes in the expression of CDC42 protein

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Liora; Katz, Liora S.; Lupu-Meiri, Monica; Shapira, Hagit; Sandbank, Judith; Gershengorn, Marvin C.; Oron, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) -1 and -2 have been associated with increased invasiveness and metastasis in human malignancies. The role of PAR-3 has been less investigated. We examined the role of PARs in a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma PANC-1 cell line phenotype in vitro. Methods We knocked down PAR-1, -2, or -3, while empty vector-infected cells served as controls. Specific peptide PARs agonists were used to stimulate the receptors. In vitro assays of colony formation, migration and invasion were used to characterize the phenotypes and Western analysis to follow CDC42 expression. Results PAR-1 and PAR-2 KDs were markedly less, while PAR-3 KDs were robustly more migratory and invasive than controls. Stimulation of PAR-1 or -2 by their peptide agonists increased, while PAR-3 agonist reduced the invasion of control cells. All three PARs knockdowns exhibited changes in the expression of CDC42, which correlated with the changes in their invasion. Conversely, stimulation of vector-control cells with PAR-1 or PAR-2 agonists enhanced, while PAR-3 agonist reduced the expression of CDC42. In the respective knock-down cells, the effects of agonists were abrogated. Conclusion The expression and/or activation of PARs is linked to PANC-1 cells invasiveness in vitro, probably via modulation of the expression of CDC42. PMID:23921961

  6. Relevance of classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (C-ANCA)-mediated inhibition of proteinase 3-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexation to disease activity in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Dolman, K M; Stegeman, C A; van de Wiel, B A; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Kallenberg, C G; Goldschmeding, R

    1993-09-01

    In the sera of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), C-ANCA can be detected that are directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). We have previously observed that C-ANCA interfere with PR3 proteolytic activity and with complexation of PR3 with its major physiologic inhibitor, alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). In the present study we investigated whether this inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation correlates with clinical activity of WG. Serial serum samples of eight consecutive patients with histologically proven relapses of WG were tested. At the moment of relapse all sera revealed inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation (median 22%, range 10-59%). Disease activity score (r = 0.87, P < 0.02) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (r = 0.66, P < 0.1) correlated with C-ANCA inhibition of PR3-alpha 1AT complexation, while they did not correlate with the C-ANCA titre detected by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) nor with IgG anti-PR3 antibody level measured by ELISA. The inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation had risen significantly at the moment of relapse compared with values 3 months (P < 0.05) and 6 months (P < 0.01) before relapse. Eight patients with established WG and positive for C-ANCA but without clinical evidence of relapse served as controls. In this group no inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation was observed in 7/8 patients sera. Sera of one control patient contained moderate C-ANCA inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation, which remained at a constant level during the 6 months period of observation. Thus, disease activity in WG appears to be more closely related to C-ANCA inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation.

  7. Pathogenesis of periodontitis: a major arginine-specific cysteine proteinase from Porphyromonas gingivalis induces vascular permeability enhancement through activation of the kallikrein/kinin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, T; Pike, R N; Potempa, J; Travis, J

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of production of an inflammatory exudate, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), from periodontal pockets in periodontitis, we examined the vascular permeability enhancement (VPE) activity induced by an arginine-specific cysteine proteinase, Arg-gingipain-1 (RGP-1), produced by a major periopathogenic bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Intradermal injections into guinea pigs of RGP-1 (> 10(-8) M), or human plasma incubated with RGP-1 (> 10(-9) M), induced VPE in a dose- and activity-dependent manner but with different time courses for the two routes of production. VPE activity induced by RGP-1 was augmented by kininase inhibitors, inhibited by a kallikrein inhibitor and unaffected by an antihistamine drug. The VPE activity in human plasma incubated with RGP-1 also correlated closely with generation of bradykinin (BK). RGP-1 induced 30-40% less VPE activity in Hageman factor-deficient plasma and no VPE in plasma deficient in either prekallikrein (PK) or high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK). After incubation with RGP-1, plasma deficient in PK or HMWK, reconstituted with each missing protein, caused VPE, as did a mixture of purified PK and HMWK, but RGP-1 induced no VPE from HMWK. The VPE of extracts of clinically isolated P. gingivalis were reduced to about 10% by anti-RGP-1-IgG, leupeptin, or tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, which paralleled effects observed with RGP-1. These results indicate that RGP-1 is the major VPE factor of P. gingivalis, inducing this activity through PK activation and subsequent BK release, resulting in GCF production at sites of periodontitis caused by infection with this organism. Images PMID:8040277

  8. Effects over time of feeding a beta-adrenergic agonist to wether lambs on animal performance, muscle growth, endogenous muscle proteinase activities, and meat tenderness.

    PubMed

    Pringle, T D; Calkins, C R; Koohmaraie, M; Jones, S J

    1993-03-01

    Forty wether lambs were used in a 2 x 4 factorial arrangement to determine the response of animal performance, muscle growth, proteinase activity, and meat tenderness to beta-adrenergic agonist (BAA) supplementation. Lambs were fed a finishing diet with or without 4 ppm of L644,969 and slaughtered after 0, 2, 4, and 6 wk of treatment. The ADG was higher (P < .05) in the treated than in the control lambs after 2 wk and returned to control levels thereafter. Semitendinosus weight and calpastatin activity were higher and mu-calpain activity was lower in the treated than in the control lambs after 2, 4, and 6 wk. Cathepsin B activity was higher (P < .01) and cystatin-like activity was lower (P < .05) after 2 wk in treated than in control lambs but returned to control levels thereafter. Longissimus protein:DNA was higher after 4 (P < .05) and 6 (P < .01) wk in the treated lambs than in the controls. The concentration of RNA and RNA:DNA ratio were higher (P < .01) in the longissimus and semitendinosus muscles in the treated lambs after 2 wk and remained higher throughout the study. Semitendinosus protein and RNA content were higher after 2, 4, and 6 wk and DNA content was higher after 2 and 6 wk in the treated than in the control lambs. Longissimus shear-force values were higher (P < .001) in the treated than in the control lambs at all slaughter end points. These data indicate a rapid alteration of muscle growth, activity of the calpain-calpastatin system, and meat tenderness during BAA treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  10. The induction of proteinases in corn and soybean by anoxia

    SciTech Connect

    VanToai, T.; Hwang, Shihying )

    1989-04-01

    This study characterized the anaerobic changes in proteinase activities in corn and soybean roots and to investigate the possibility that these changes might contribute to the differential anaerobiosis tolerance of the two species. After 24 h of anoxia, crude protein extracts from H60 corn and Keller soybean root tips (10cm) were assayed for proteinase activities at pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. Turnover of aberrant proteins was studied in seedlings labelled with {sup 3}H-leucine for 12 h under: (a) puromycin (0.64 mM) in air, (b) ethanol (1%) in air, (c) nitrogen and (d) air. After the treatment, the labelled proteins remaining in roots were determined every 2 h for 6 h. In both corn and soybean, activities of alkali proteinases increased, and activities of acid proteinases declined under anoxia. Neutral proteinases increase in anoxic corn roots, but decline in anoxic soybean roots. The protein turnover rate in corn treated with puromycin, ethanol and nitrogen was much higher than in control roots. The protein turnover rate in soybean roots treated with puromycin, ethanol was similar to the rate of the control. The results indicated that: (a) anoxic corn can degrade aberrant proteins, but anoxic soybean cannot, (b) the degradation of aberrant proteins in anoxic corn is accomplished by neutral proteinases, and (c) the accumulation of aberrant proteins in soybean might contribute to the susceptibility of this species to anoxia.

  11. Alternative poly(A) site utilization during adenovirus infection coincides with a decrease in the activity of a poly(A) site processing factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K P; Weiss, E A; Nevins, J R

    1993-01-01

    The recognition and processing of a pre-mRNA to create a poly(A) addition site, a necessary step in mRNA biogenesis, can also be a regulatory event in instances in which the frequency of use of a poly(A) site varies. One such case is found during the course of an adenovirus infection. Five poly(A) sites are utilized within the major late transcription unit to produce more than 20 distinct mRNAs during the late phase of infection. The proximal half of the major late transcription unit is also expressed during the early phase of a viral infection. During this early phase of expression, the L1 poly(A) site is used three times more frequently than the L3 poly(A) site. In contrast, the L3 site is used three times more frequently than the L1 site during the late phase of infection. Recent experiments have suggested that the recognition of the poly(A) site GU-rich downstream element by the CF1 processing factor may be a rate-determining step in poly(A) site selection. We demonstrate that the interaction of CF1 with the L1 poly(A) site is less stable than the interaction of CF1 with the L3 poly(A) site. We also find that there is a substantial decrease in the level of CF1 activity when an adenovirus infection proceeds to the late phase. We suggest that this reduction in CF1 activity, coupled with the relative instability of the interaction with the L1 poly(A) site, contributes to the reduced use of the L1 poly(A) site during the late stage of an adenovirus infection. Images PMID:8384308

  12. Expression of Proteinase-activated Receptor-2 in the Esophageal Mucosa of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Patients: A Histomorphologic and Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rehim, Dalia M; Fath El-Bab, Hanaa K; Kamal, Enas M

    2015-10-01

    Data are limited regarding the role of proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) in the esophageal mucosa in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. Our aim was to study PAR-2 expression and its relationship with different GERD-related clinical and pathologic parameters. Histomorphologic alterations in eosophageal mucosa in nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive reflux disease (ERD) were also, evaluated. Endoscopic biopsies of the esophageal mucosa were obtained from 94 GERD patients and 20 participants for histopathologic analysis and PAR-2 immunohistochemical staining. The present study demonstrated significantly higher PAR-2 expression in GERD patients compared with control, whereas no significant differences were seen between NERD and ERD groups. PAR-2 expression significantly correlated with histologic score (r=0.572, P<0.001) and severity of heartburn (r=0.541, P<0.001). PAR-2 expression was significantly associated with basal cell hyperplasia, and dilated intercellular spaces and inflammatory cell count (P<0.05). Histologic analysis revealed GERD-related histomorphologic alterations in the esophageal mucosa of GERD patients with significant differences (P<0.05) among groups. Total histologic score was significantly correlated with heartburn (r=0.299, P=0.025) and endoscopic severity (r=0.359, P=0.027) in NERD and ERD patients, respectively. Taken together, this study provides evidence for the major role of PAR-2 in the pathogenesis of GERD and GERD-associated mucosal alterations.

  13. C-Npys (S-3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenyl) and peptide derivatives can inhibit a serine-thiol proteinase activity from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Alisson L; Carmona, Adriana K; Silva, Luiz S; Cunha, Carlos E L; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Juliano, Maria A; Puccia, Rosana

    2007-04-20

    The inhibitory capacity of C-Npys (S-[3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenyl]) derivatives over thiol-containing serine proteases has never been tested. In the present work we used an extracellular serine-thiol proteinase activity from the fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (PbST) to describe a potent inhibitory capacity of Bzl-C(Npys)KRLTL-NH(2) and Bzl-MKRLTLC(Npys)-NH(2). The assays were performed with PbST enriched upon affinity chromatography in a p-aminobenzamidine (pABA)-Sepharose column. Although PbST can cleave the fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide Abz-MKRLTL-EDDnp between L-T, the C(Npys) derivatives were not substrates nor were they toxic in a cell detachment assay, allowing therapeutic use. The best inhibitor was Bzl-C(Npys)KRLTL-NH(2) (K(i)=16nM), suggesting that the peptide sequence promoted a favorable interaction, especially when C(Npys) was placed at a further position from the L-T bond, at the N-terminus. Inhibition was completely reverted with dithioerythritol, indicating that it was due to the reactivity of the C(Npys) moiety with a free SH- group. PMID:17328865

  14. The effect of calciums on molecular motions of proteinase K.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Qun; Tao, Yan; Meng, Zhao-Hui; Fu, Yun-Xin; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2011-02-01

    The native serine protease proteinase K binds two calcium cations. It has been reported that Ca(2+) removal decreased the enzyme's thermal stability and to some extent the substrate affinity, but has discrepant effects on catalytic activity of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free proteases to investigate the mechanism by which the calciums affect the structural stability, molecular motions, and catalytic activity of proteinase K. Very similar structural properties were observed between these two forms of proteinase K during simulations; and several long-lived hydrogen bonds and salt bridges common to both forms of proteinase K were found to be crucial in maintaining the local conformations around these two Ca(2+) sites. Although Ca(2+) removal enhanced the overall flexibility of proteinase K, the flexibility in a limited number of segments surrounding the substrate-binding pockets decreased. The largest differences in the equilibrium structures of the two simulations indicate that, upon the removal of Ca(2+), the large concerted motion originating from the Ca1 site can transmit to the substrate-binding regions but not to the catalytic triad residues. In conjunction with the large overlap of the essential subspaces between the two simulations, these results not only provide insight into the dynamics of the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the unchanged enzymatic activity as well as the decreased thermal stability and substrate affinity of proteinase K upon Ca(2+) removal, but also complement the experimentally determined structural and biochemical data.

  15. Characterization of a cloned subtilisin-like serine proteinase from a psychrotrophic Vibrio species.

    PubMed

    Arnórsdottir, Jóhanna; Smáradóttir, Rúna B; Magnússon, Olafur Th; Thorbjarnardóttir, Sigrídur H; Eggertsson, Gudmundur; Kristjánsson, Magnús M

    2002-11-01

    The gene encoding a subtilisin-like serine proteinase in the psychrotrophic Vibrio sp. PA44 has been successfully cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene is 1593 basepairs and encodes a precursor protein of 530 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 55.7 kDa. The enzyme is isolated, however, as an active 40.6-kDa proteinase, without a 139 amino acid residue N-terminal prosequence. Under mild conditions the enzyme undergoes a further autocatalytic cleavage to give a 29.7-kDa proteinase that retains full enzymatic activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme has high homology to proteinases of the proteinase K family of subtilisin-like proteinases. With respect to the enzyme characteristics compared in this study the properties of the wild-type and recombinant proteinases are the same. Sequence analysis revealed that especially with respect to the thermophilic homologues, aqualysin I from Thermus aquaticus and a proteinase from Thermus strain Rt41A, the cold-adapted Vibrio-proteinase has a higher content of polar/uncharged amino acids, as well as aspartate residues. The thermophilic enzymes had a higher content of arginines, and relatively higher number of hydrophobic amino acids and a higher aliphatic index. These factors may contribute to the adaptation of these proteinases to different temperature conditions.

  16. Neutrophil-derived Oxidants and Proteinases as Immunomodulatory Mediators in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Witko-Sarsat, V.

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophils generate potent microbicidal molecules via the oxygen-dependent pathway, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), and via the non-oxygen dependent pathway, consisting in the release of serine proteinases and metalloproteinases stored in granules. Over the past years, the concept has emerged that both ROI and proteinases can be viewed as mediators able to modulate neutrophil responses as well as the whole inflammatory process. This is well illustrated by the oxidative regulation of proteinase activity showing that oxidants and proteinases acts is concert to optimize the microbicidal activity and to damage host tissues. ROI and proteinases can modify the activity of several proteins involved in the control of inflammatory process. Among them, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8, are elective targets for such a modulation. Moreover, ROI and proteinases are also able to modulate the adhesion process of neutrophils to endothelial cells, which is a critical step in the inflammatory process. PMID:18472951

  17. Activation of RNA polymerase III transcription of human Alu repetitive elements by adenovirus type 5: requirement for the E1b 58-kilodalton protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6.

    PubMed Central

    Panning, B; Smiley, J R

    1993-01-01

    We found that transcription of endogenous human Alu elements by RNA polymerase III was strongly stimulated following infection of HeLa cells with adenovirus type 5, leading to the accumulation of high levels of Alu transcripts initiated from Alu polymerase III promoters. In contrast to previously reported cases of adenovirus-induced activation of polymerase III transcription, induction required the E1b 58-kDa protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6 in addition to the 289-residue E1a protein. In addition, E1a function was not required at high multiplicities of infection, suggesting that E1a plays an indirect role in Alu activation. These results suggest previously unsuspected regulatory properties of the adenovirus E1b and E4 gene products and provide a novel approach to the study of the biology of the most abundant class of dispersed repetitive DNA in the human genome. Images PMID:7684492

  18. Fractionation of digestive proteinases from Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae and role in protein digestion.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, K S; Elpidina, E N; Oppert, B; Prabhakar, S; Zhuzhikov, D P; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A

    2006-10-01

    Tenebrio molitor larval digestive proteinases were purified and characterized by gel filtration chromatography combined with activity electrophoresis. Cysteine proteinases, consisting of at least six distinct activities, were found in three chromatographic peaks in anterior and posterior midgut chromatographies. The major activity in the anterior midgut, peak cys II, consisted of cysteine proteinases with Mm of 23 kDa. The predominant peak in the posterior, cys I, was represented by 38 kDa proteinases. The activities of all cysteine proteinases were maximal in buffers from pH 5.0 to 7.0, with 80% stability at pH values from 4.0 to 7.0. In the conditions of the last third of the midgut, the activity and stability of cysteine proteinases was sharply decreased. Trypsin-like activity included a minor peak of "heavy" trypsins with Mm 59 kDa, located mainly in the anterior midgut. An in vitro study of the initial stages of digestion of the main dietary protein, oat 12S globulin, by anterior midgut proteinases revealed that hydrolysis occurred through the formation of intermediate high-Mm products, similar to those formed during oat seed germination. Cysteine proteinases from the cys III peak and heavy trypsins were capable of only limited proteolysis of the protein, whereas incubation with cys II proteinases resulted in substantial hydrolysis of the globulin.

  19. Keratinolytic proteinase from Bacillus thuringiensis AD-12.

    PubMed

    Gegeckas, Audrius; Gudiukaitė, Renata; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2014-08-01

    A new isolated strain noted to produce a novel detergent-stable serine keratinolytic proteinase and identified as Bacillus thuringiensis AD-12. Native keratinolytic proteinase from B. thuringiensis (BtKER) was purified and characterized. The purified BtKER enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 39kDa. Biochemical characterization assays revealed that the BtKER attained optimal activity at pH 7 and 30°C. Residual activity after 1h incubation at 50°C was higher than 80%. The enzyme was activated and stabilized by Mn(2+) and Li(+) metal ions but inactivated by organic solvents. Purified BtKER showed the highest substrate specificity toward keratin from wool>sodium caseinate>collagen>BSA>gelatin in descending order. BtKER is the first reported keratinolytic proteinase from B. thuringiensis and obtained results suggested that new characterized enzyme can be a powerful biocatalyst in peptide production associated to hydrolysis of keratinous and/or keratin-like waste.

  20. Aspartic proteinases in the digestive tract of marine decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Navarrete del Toro, María de Los Angeles; García-Carreño, Fernando; López, Manuel Díaz; Celis-Guerrero, Laura; Saborowski, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    Decapod crustaceans synthesize highly active proteolytic enzymes in the midgut gland and release at least a part of them into the stomach where they facilitate the first step in peptide hydrolysis. The most common proteinases in the gastric fluid characterized so far are serine proteinases, that is, trypsin and chymotrypsin. These enzymes show highest activities at neutral or slightly alkaline conditions. The presence of acid proteinases, as they prevail in vertebrates, has been discussed contradictorily yet in invertebrates. In this study, we show that acid aspartic proteinases appear in the gastric fluid of several decapods. Lobsters Homarus gammarus showed the highest activity with a maximum at pH 3. These activities were almost entirely inhibited by pepstatin A, which indicates a high share of aspartic proteinases. In other species (Panulirus interruptus, Cancer pagurus, Callinectes arcuatus and Callinectes bellicosus), proteolytic activities were present at acid conditions but were distinctly lower than in H. gammarus. Zymograms at pH 3 showed in each of the studied species at least one, but mostly two-four bands of activity. The apparent molecular weight of the enzymes ranged from 17.8 to 38.6 kDa. Two distinct bands were identified which were inhibited by pepstatin A. Acid aspartic proteinases may play an important role in the process of extracellular digestion in decapod crustaceans. Activities were significantly higher in clawed lobster than in spiny lobster and three species of brachyurans. Therefore, it may be suggested that the expression of acid proteinases is favored in certain groups and reduced in others. PMID:16788916

  1. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases.

  2. Effect of the beta-adrenergic agonist L644,969 on muscle growth, endogenous proteinase activities, and postmortem proteolysis in wether lambs.

    PubMed

    Koohmaraie, M; Shackelford, S D; Muggli-Cockett, N E; Stone, R T

    1991-12-01

    To examine the effect of a beta-adrenergic agonist (BAA) on muscle growth, proteinase activities, and postmortem proteolysis, 16 wether lambs were randomly assigned to receive 0 or 4 ppm of L644,969 in a completely mixed high-concentrate diet for 6 wk. Weight of the biceps femoris was 18.6% heavier in treated lambs. At 0 h after slaughter, treated lambs had higher cathepsin B (35.6%), cathepsins B + L (19.1%), calpastatin (62.8%), and m-calpain (24.6%) than control lambs, but both groups had similar mu-calpain activities. In both longissimus and biceps femoris muscles, treated lambs had higher protein and RNA and lower DNA concentrations. However, total DNA was not affected, indicating that the increase in muscle mass was probably due to muscle hypertrophy rather than to hyperplasia. The pattern of postmortem proteolysis was significantly altered by BAA feeding. In treated lambs, postmortem storage had no effect on the myofibril fragmentation index and degradation of desmin and troponin-T. These results indicate that the ability of the muscle to undergo postmortem proteolysis has been dramatically reduced with BAA feeding. Similar proteolytic systems are thought to be involved in antemortem and postmortem degradation of myofibrillar proteins, so BAA-mediated protein accretion is probably due, at least in part, to reduced protein degradation. To examine whether protein synthesis was altered with BAA feeding, the level of skeletal muscle alpha-actin mRNA was quantified. Longissimus muscle alpha-actin mRNA abundance was 30% greater in BAA-fed lambs. Collectively, these results indicate that dietary administration of BAA increases muscle mass through hypertrophy and that the increase in muscle protein accretion is due to reduced degradation and possibly to increased synthesis of muscle proteins.

  3. A low molecular weight proteinase inhibitor produced by T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, D; Teodorescu, M; Dray, S

    1986-01-01

    A low molecular weight (MW) proteinase inhibitor, between 6500 and 21,500 MW, appeared in the supernatant of rabbit spleen cells cultured at high density for 24 hr. The inhibitor inhibited the enzymatic activity of trypsin for both a high MW natural substrate, fibrinogen, and for a low MW artificial substrate, Chromozym TRY. The low MW proteinase inhibitor is protein in nature and is different, in terms of specificity for enzymes, MW and sensitivity to different physical or chemical treatments, from aprotinin, a low MW proteinase inhibitor (6500 MW) of bovine origin, and from the soybean trypsin inhibitor, a relatively high MW proteinase inhibitor (21,500 MW). The inhibitor was found in the supernatant of purified T cells but not B cells, and its production was increased in the presence of an optimal concentration of Con A. The possibility that this proteinase inhibitor has a role in the regulation of trypsin-like proteinases involved to the immune response remains to be investigated. Images Figure 4 PMID:2417942

  4. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  5. Picornaviral 3C cysteine proteinases have a fold similar to the chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire,M.; Chernaia, M.; Malcolm, B.; James, M.

    1994-01-01

    The picornavirus family includes several pathogens such as poliovirus, rhinovirus (the major cause of the common cold), hepatitis A virus and the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Picornaviral proteins are expressed by direct translation of the genomic RNA into a single, large polyprotein precursor. Proteolysis of the viral polyprotein into the mature proteins is assured by the viral 3C enzymes, which are cysteine proteinases. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the 3C proteinase from hepatitis A virus (HAV-3C). The overall architecture of HAV-3C reveals a fold resembling that of the chymotrypsin family of serine proteinases, which is consistent with earlier predictions. Catalytic residues include Cys 172 as nucleophile and His 44 as general base. The 3C cleavage specificity for glutamine residues is defined primarily by His 191. The overall structure suggests that an inter-molecular (trans) cleavage releases 3C and that there is an active proteinase in the polyprotein.

  6. Expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris and characterization of its anti-coxsackievirus activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kebin; Yu, Hua; Xie, Wei; Xu, Zihui; Zhou, Shiwen; Huang, Chunji; Sheng, Halei; He, Xiaomei; Xiong, Junzhi; Qian, Guisheng

    2013-04-15

    Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors (CARs) are the common cellular receptors which mediate coxsackievirus or adenovirus infection. Receptor trap therapy, which uses soluble viral receptors to block the attachment and internalization of virus, has been developed for the inhibition of virus infection. In this study, we have constructed a pPIC3.5K/CAR-Fc expression plasmid for the economical and scale-up production of CAR-Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris. The coding sequence of the fusion protein was optimized according to the host codon usage bias. The amount of the CAR-Fc protein to total cell protein was up to 10% by 1% methanol induction for 96h and the purity was up to 96% after protein purification. Next, the virus pull-down assay demonstrated the binding activity of the CAR-Fc to coxsackievirus. The analyses of MTT assay, immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time PCR after virus neutralization assay revealed that CAR-Fc could significantly block coxsackievirus B3 infection in vitro. In coxsackievirus B3 infected mouse models, CAR-Fc treatment reduced mortality, myocardial edema, viral loads and inflammation, suggesting the significant virus blocking effect in vivo. Our results indicated that the P. pastoris expression system could be used to produce large quantities of bioactive CAR-Fc for further clinical purpose.

  7. Proteinase expression during differentiation of human osteoclasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Blair, H C; Sidonio, R F; Friedberg, R C; Khan, N N; Dong, S S

    2000-06-12

    Osteoclasts are macrophage-derived polykaryons that degrade bone in an acidic extracellular space. This differentiation includes expression of proteinases and acid transport proteins, cell fusion, and bone attachment, but the sequence of events is unclear. We studied two proteins expressed at high levels only in the osteoclast, cathepsin K, a thiol proteinase, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and compared this expression with acid transport and bone degradation. Osteoclastic differentiation was studied using human apheresis macrophages cocultured with MG63 osteosarcoma cells, which produce cytokines including RANKL and CSF-1 that mediate efficient osteoclast formation. Immunoreactive cathepsin K appeared at 3-5 days. Cathepsin K activity was seen on bone substrate but not within cells, and cathepsin K increased severalfold during further differentiation and multinucleation from 7 to 14 days. TRAP also appeared at 3-5 d, independently of cell fusion or bone attachment, and TRAP activity reached much higher levels in osteoclasts attached to bone fragments. Two proteinases that occur in the precursor macrophages, cathepsin B, a thiol proteinase related to cathepsin K, and an unrelated lysosomal aspartate proteinase, cathepsin D, were also studied to determine the specificity of the differentiation events. Cathepsin B occurred at all times, but increased two- to threefold in parallel with cathepsin K. Cathepsin D activity did not change with differentiation, and secreted activity was not significant. In situ acid transport measurements showed increased acid accumulation after 7 days either in cells on osteosarcoma matrix or attached to bone, but bone pit activity and maximal acid uptake required 10-14 days. We conclude that TRAP and thiol proteinase expression begin at essentially the same time, and precede cell fusion and bone attachment. However, major increases in acid secretion and proteinases expression continue during cell fusion and bone

  8. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR(1)) and PAR(2) but not PAR(4) mediate contraction in human and guinea-pig gallbladders.

    PubMed

    Lee, M-C; Huang, S-C

    2008-04-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR(1)) and PAR(2) mediate contraction in the guinea-pig gallbladder. To investigate and compare the effects mediated by PARs in the human gallbladder with those in the guinea-pig gallbladder, we measured contractions of isolated human and guinea-pig gallbladder strips caused by PAR agonists. Results in human were similar to those in guinea-pig gallbladder. The PAR(1) agonists, thrombin, TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2, as well as the PAR(2) agonists, trypsin, SLIGKV-NH2 and SLIGRL-NH2, caused contraction in both human and guinea-pig gallbladders. These indicate the existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) mediating gallbladder contraction. Furthermore, the existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) in the human gallbladder was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, FSLLR-NH2, a PAR(1) control peptide, and VKGILS-NH2, a PAR(2) control peptide, as well as three PAR(4) agonists, GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2, did not cause any contraction or relaxation. The contractile responses to TFLLR-NH2, SFLLRN-NH2 and trypsin in both human and guinea-pig gallbladders were insensitive to atropine and tetrodotoxin, suggesting direct effects. These results demonstrate that, similar to the guinea-pig gallbladder, both PAR(1) and PAR(2) but not PAR(4) mediate muscle contraction in the human gallbladder. PAR(1) and PAR(2) may play important roles in the control of both human and guinea-pig gallbladder motility. PMID:18179608

  9. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  10. Different cysteine proteinases involved in bone resorption and osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Brage, M; Abrahamson, M; Lindström, V; Grubb, A; Lerner, U H

    2005-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases, especially cathepsin K, play an important role in osteoclastic degradation of bone matrix proteins and the process can, consequently, be significantly inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors. We have recently reported that cystatin C and other cysteine proteinase inhibitors also reduce osteoclast formation. However, it is not known which cysteine proteinase(s) are involved in osteoclast differentiation. In the present study, we compared the relative potencies of cystatins C and D as inhibitors of bone resorption in cultured mouse calvariae, osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow cultures, and cathepsin K activity. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity was assessed by determining equilibrium constants for inhibitor complexes in fluorogenic substrate assays. The data demonstrate that whereas human cystatins C and D are equipotent as inhibitors of bone resorption, cystatin D is 10-fold less potent as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis and 200-fold less potent as an inhibitor of cathepsin K activity. A recombinant human cystatin C variant with Gly substitutions for residues Arg8, Leu9, Val10, and Trp106 did not inhibit bone resorption, had 1,000-fold decreased inhibitory effect on cathepsin K activity compared to wildtype cystatin C, but was equipotent with wildtype cystatin C as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. It is concluded that (i) different cysteine proteinases are likely to be involved in bone resorption and osteoclast formation, (ii) cathepsin K may not be an exclusive target enzyme in any of the two systems, and (iii) the enzyme(s) involved in osteoclastogenesis might not be a typical papain-like cysteine proteinase.

  11. human adenoviruses role in ophthalmic pterygium formation

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Mishar; Kelishadi, Mandana; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Javid, Naeme; Bazouri, Masoud; Tabarraei, Alijan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ophthalmic pterygium is a common benign lesion of unknown origin and the pathogenesis might be vision-threatening. This problem is often associated with exposure to solar light. Recent evidence suggests that potentially oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus may be involved in the pathogenesis of pterygia. Expression of specific adenovirus genes such as E1A and E1B, which potentially have many functions, may contribute to their oncogenic activity as well as relevance to cellular immortalization. Objectives: For the first time, we aimed to investigate involvement of adenoviruses in pterygium formation. Patients and Methods: Fifty tissue specimens of pterygium from patients undergoing pterygium surgery (as cases), 50 conjunctival swab samples from the same patients and 10 conjunctival biopsy specimens from individuals without pterygium such as patients undergoing cataract surgery (as controls) were analyzed for evidence of adenovirus infection with polymerase chain reaction using specific primers chosen from the moderately conserved region of the hexon gene. Furthermore, β-globin primers were used to access the quality of extracted DNA. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16) software. Results: Of 50 patients, 20 were men and 30 women with mean age of 61.1 ± 16.9 years ranged between 22 and 85 years. All samples of pterygia had positive results for adenoviruses DNA with polymerase chain reaction, but none of the negative control groups displayed adenoviruses. The pterygium group and the control groups were β-globin positive. Direct sequencing of PCR products confirmed Adenovirus infection. Conclusions: Adenoviruses might act as a possible cause of pterygium formation and other factors could play a synergistic role in the development. However, further larger studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26034543

  12. Differential subcellular targeting of recombinant human α₁-proteinase inhibitor influences yield, biological activity and in planta stability of the protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shweta; Agarwal, Saurabh; Sanyal, Indraneel; Jain, G K; Amla, D V

    2012-11-01

    The response of protein accumulation site on yield, biological activity and in planta stability of therapeutic recombinant human proteinase inhibitor (α₁-PI) was analyzed via targeting to different subcellular locations, like endoplasmic reticulum (ER), apoplast, vacuole and cytosol in leaves of transgenic tomato plants. In situ localization of the recombinant α₁-PI protein in transgenic plant cells was monitored by immunohistochemical staining. Maximum accumulation of recombinant α₁-PI in T₀ and T₁ transgenic tomato plants was achieved from 1.5 to 3.2% of total soluble protein (TSP) by retention in ER lumen, followed by vacuole and apoplast, whereas cytosolic targeting resulted into degradation of the protein. The plant-derived recombinant α₁-PI showed biological activity for elastase inhibition, as monitored by residual porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) activity assay and band-shift assay. Recombinant α₁-PI was purified from transgenic tomato plants with high yield, homogeneity and biological activity. Purified protein appeared as a single band of ∼48-50 kDa on SDS-PAGE with pI value ranging between 5.1 and 5.3. Results of mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy of purified recombinant α₁-PI revealed the structural integrity of the recombinant protein comparable to native serum α₁-PI. Enzymatic deglycosylation and lectin-binding assays with the purified recombinant α₁-PI showed compartment-specific N-glycosylation of the protein targeted to ER, apoplast and vacuole. Conformational studies based on urea-induced denaturation and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed relatively lower stability of the recombinant α₁-PI protein, compared to its serum counterpart. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of plant derived recombinant and human plasma-purified α₁-PI in rat, by intravenous route, revealed significantly faster plasma clearance and lower area under curve (AUC) of recombinant protein. Our data suggested significance of

  13. A single mutation Gln142Lys doubles the catalytic activity of VPR, a cold adapted subtilisin-like serine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Óskarsson, Kristinn R; Nygaard, Mads; Ellertsson, Brynjar Ö; Thorbjarnardottir, Sigríður H; Papaleo, Elena; Kristjánsson, Magnús M

    2016-10-01

    Structural comparisons of the cold adapted subtilase VPR and its thermophilic homologue, aqualysin I (AQUI) indicated the presence of additional salt bridges in the latter. Few of those appear to contribute significantly to thermal stability of AQUI. This includes a putative salt bridge between residues Lys142 and Glu172 as its deletion did not have any significant effect on its stability or activity (Jónsdóttir et al. (2014)). Insertion of this putative salt bridge into the structure of VPR, in a double mutant (VPRΔC_Q142K/S172E), however was detrimental to the stability of the enzyme. Incorporation of either the Q142K or S172E mutations into VPR, were found to significantly affect the catalytic properties of the enzyme. The single mutation Q142K was highly effective, as it increased the kcat and kcat/Km more than twofold. When the Q142K mutation was inserted into a thermostabilized, but a low activity mutant of VPR (VPRΔC_N3P/I5P), the activity increased about tenfold in terms of kcat and kcat/Km, while retaining the stability of the mutant. Molecular dynamics simulations of the single mutants were carried out to provide structural rationale for these experimental observations. Based on root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) profiles, the two mutants were more flexible in certain regions of the structure and the Q142K mutant had the highest overall flexibility of the three enzymes. The results suggest that weakening of specific H-bonds resulting from the mutations may be propagated over some distance giving rise to higher flexibility in the active site regions of the enzyme, causing higher catalytic activity in the mutants. PMID:27456266

  14. EndoS from Streptococcus pyogenes is hydrolyzed by the cysteine proteinase SpeB and requires glutamic acid 235 and tryptophans for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity

    PubMed Central

    Allhorn, Maria; Olsén, Arne; Collin, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    Background The endoglycosidase EndoS and the cysteine proteinase SpeB from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes are functionally related in that they both hydrolyze IgG leading to impairment of opsonizing antibodies and thus enhance bacterial survival in human blood. In this study, we further investigated the relationship between EndoS and SpeB by examining their in vitro temporal production and stability and activity of EndoS. Furthermore, theoretical structure modeling of EndoS combined with site-directed mutagenesis and chemical blocking of amino acids was used to identify amino acids required for the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of EndoS. Results We could show that during growth in vitro S. pyogenes secretes the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing endoglycosidase EndoS prior to the cysteine proteinase SpeB. Upon maturation SpeB hydrolyzes EndoS that then loses its IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity. Sequence analysis and structural homology modeling of EndoS provided a basis for further analysis of the prerequisites for IgG glycan-hydrolysis. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification of amino acids revealed that glutamic acid 235 is an essential catalytic residue, and that tryptophan residues, but not the abundant lysine or the single cysteine residues, are important for EndoS activity. Conclusion We present novel information about the amino acid requirements for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of the immunomodulating enzyme EndoS. Furthermore, we show that the cysteine proteinase SpeB processes/degrades EndoS and thus emphasize the importance of the SpeB as a degrading/processing enzyme of proteins from the bacterium itself. PMID:18182097

  15. Endotoxins and prednisolone alter replication of type 5 adenovirus and its temperature sensitive mutants.

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, J; Bertók, L; Farkas, J; Nász, I; Bendinelli, M

    1994-01-01

    Latency, replication or transformation by adenoviruses require cooperation between their gene products and cellular factors, which are controlled by external stimuli. Clinical observations suggest that bacterial endotoxin (LPS) and steroid hormones have direct effects on the viral permissivity and activation. Therefore, HEp-2 cultures were infected with low multiplicity of wild type (WT) human adenovirus 5 (Ad-5) and its temperature-sensitive mutants ts18 and ts19 damaged in the phosphorylation of structural polypeptides VI and X at 39 degrees C, respectively. Cultures were treated at permissive (32 degrees C) and nonpermissive (39 degrees C) temperatures with native and radio-detoxified (RD) LPS, alpha-tocopherol and prednisolone alone or in combination. Titration of virus yields showed dose-dependent activation and enhanced replication of latent WT and ts mutants by both LPS preparations. alpha-Tocopherol diminished these processes. LPS was likewise unable to augment virus producing capacity of cells. Prednisolone, although activating no latent virus, resulted in augmenting Ad-5 production at 32 degrees C. No compounds activated mutants at 39 degrees C except synergistic effect of LPS and prednisolone resulted in limited but significant replication of mutant ts19. Deliberation of lysosomal enzymes, enhanced cGMP and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) productions by LPS as well as interaction of Ad early gene expression with prednisolone-utilized cellular transcription factors including AP-1 (c-jun, c-fos) are implicated in these processes. Excluding the role in activation of Ad proteinase processing viral structural polypeptides draws attention to the importance of cellular factors in virus replication.

  16. Characterization of a novel Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pariani, Sebastián; Contreras, Marisol; Rossi, Franco R; Sander, Valeria; Corigliano, Mariana G; Simón, Francisco; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Duschak, Vilma G; Clemente, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Many different types of serine proteinase inhibitors have been involved in several kinds of plant physiological processes, including defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which are included in the serine proteinase inhibitor family, are present in several organisms. These proteins play a regulatory role in processes that involve serine proteinases like trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, elastase and/or subtilisin. In the present work, we characterized two putative Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a single putative Kazal-type domain. The expression of these inhibitors is transiently induced in response to leaf infection by Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that they play some role in defense against pathogens. We also evaluated the inhibitory specificity of one of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which resulted to be induced during the local response to B. cinerea infection. The recombinant Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor displayed high specificity for elastase and subtilisin, but low specificity for trypsin, suggesting differences in its selectivity. In addition, this inhibitor exhibited a strong antifungal activity inhibiting the germination rate of B. cinerea conidia in vitro. Due to the important role of proteinase inhibitors in plant protection against pathogens and pests, the information about Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors described in the present work could contribute to improving current methods for plant protection against pathogens.

  17. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation. PMID:26708004

  18. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation.

  19. Cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes from F 344 rats bearing intraocular tumor derived from human adenovirus 12-induced retinoblastoma-like cell line.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Pomeroy, M E

    1984-03-01

    Lymphocyte cytotoxicity using 51Cr releasing assay was investigated in 10 F344 rats bearing intraocular tumor derived from human adenovirus 12 (Ad 12)-induced retinoblastoma -like cell line (EXP-5). Lymphocytes obtained from tumor bored animal (1 X 10(6)/well) incubated with 51Cr-labelled EXP-5 cells (1 X 10(5)/well) for 24 hours, and counted by beta-scintillation counter. The cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes of transplanted animals was higher in 3 out of 10 subjected rats (24-30%) than in 10 rats of control (3-5%). The results support the view that the correspond animal model in its resemblance and suggested that the rats with retinal tumor have concomitant cell-mediated immunity in the early stage of tumor bearing.

  20. Controlled intracellular proteolysis during postpartal involution of the uterus: characterization and regulation of an alkaline proteinase.

    PubMed

    Roth, M; Hoechst, M; Afting, E G

    1981-01-01

    The postpartal involution of the uterus is predominantly due to cellular hypotrophy. This implies an intracellular proteolytic system which must be carefully controlled pre and post partum. We have characterized and partially purified a proteinase with an alkaline pH-optimum of activity and a proteinase inhibitor protein which inhibits this proteinase very strongly. The alkaline proteinase copurifies with the actomyosin complex of the uterine myometrium and degrades the actomyosin complex with a concomitant loss of its myosin-ATPase activity. The alkaline proteinase is a very labile enzyme, markedly sensitive to SH-group modifying agents and has very high molecular weight at the present state of purification. This proteolytic enzyme could specifically be separated from the main components of the actomyosin complex by extraction with low ionic strength phosphate buffers. The proteinase inhibitor protein may control the activity of this alkaline proteinase during pregnancy and involution. The inhibitor protein raises 15-fold during pregnancy, possibly blocks important steps of intracellular proteolysis and permits organ growth. The dramatic fall of the inhibitor protein activity after parturition, which precedes the loss of weight, could release the proteolytic system, including the alkaline proteinase, and permits controlled intracellular degradation.

  1. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward ({sup 3}H)-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics.

  2. Gelatinases and serine proteinase inhibitors of seminal plasma and the reproductive tract of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Kotłowska, M; Kowalski, R; Glogowski, J; Jankowski, J; Ciereszko, A

    2005-04-01

    This study examined proteolytic enzymes and serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma with relation to their distribution within the reproductive tract and to yellow semen syndrome (YSS). Proteases of blood plasma, extracts from the reproductive tract, and seminal plasma were analyzed by gelatin zymography. We found a clear regional distribution of proteolytic enzymes in the turkey reproductive tract. Each part was characterized by a unique profile of serine proteolytic enzymes of molecular weights ranging from 29 to 88 kDa. The ductus deferens was found to be a site of very intense proteolytic activity. Two metalloproteases of 58 and 66 kDa were detected in all parts of the reproductive tract and seminal plasma. Using electrophoretic methods for detection of anti-trypsin activity, we found three serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma. Two inhibitors were found in the testis and epididymis and a third in the ductus deferens and seminal plasma. Blood plasma was characterized by the presence of two metalloproteinases and one serine proteinase inhibitor (of low migration rate) that were also detected in the reproductive tract. Amidase and anti-trypsin activities (expressed per gram of protein) differed for yellow and white seminal plasma. We concluded that turkey seminal plasma contains metalloproteases, serine proteinases, and serine proteinase inhibitors. The metalloproteases and one proteinase inhibitor are related to blood proteinases but the other two inhibitors and serine proteinases seem to be unique for the reproductive tract.

  3. The isolation and properties of a non-pepsin proteinase from human gastric mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, N B; Taylor, W H

    1978-01-01

    1. A non-pepsin proteinase, proteinase 2, was successfully isolated free from pepsinogen (by repetitive chromatography on DEAE- and CM-celluloses) from the gastric mucosa of a patient with a duodenal ulcer and the uninvaded mucosa of a patient with a gastric adenocarcinoma. 2. Proteinases 1a and 1b, found in gastric adenocarcinoma, were not found in the gastic mucosa of these patients. 3. Proteinase 2 was shown to have an asymmetrical broad pH-activity curve with a maximum over the pH range 3.0-3.7. 4. Proteolytic activity of proteinase 2 was inhibited by pepstatin; the concentration of pepstatin giving 50% inhibition is of the order of 3nm. 5. Inhibition of proteolytic activity by carbenoxolone and related triterpenoids indicated that at pH 4.0 proteinase 2 possesses structural characteristics relating it to the pepsins and at pH 7.4 to the pepsinogens. 6. The sites of cleavage of the B-chain of oxidized insulin for proteinase 2 at pH 1.7 and pH 3.5 were shown to be similar to those previously established for human pepsin 3 and for the cathepsin E of rabbit bone marrow. 7. The non-pepsin proteinase 2 (cathepsin) of human gastric mucosa has properties more similar to cathepsin E than to the cathepsins D. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:25649

  4. CBF mediates adenovirus Ela trans-activation by interaction at the C-terminal promoter targeting domain of conserved region 3.

    PubMed

    Agoff, S N; Wu, B

    1994-12-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence suggest that conserved region 3 (CR3) of the adenovirus Ela polypeptide can provide two distinct and separable functions: an N-terminal transcriptional activation region and a C-terminal promoter targeting region. It is thought that the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 interacts with promoter-specific transcription factors, thereby bringing the activation region of Ela CR3 in proximity of the promoter. Here we report that CBF, a CCAAT-box-binding factor that regulates hsp70 gene expression and mediates Ela trans-activation in vivo, interacts with the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 in vitro. Point mutations in Ela CR3 that are defective in stimulating transcription from the hsp70 promoter are also defective in stimulating transcription directed by a synthetic activator, GAL-CBF, composed of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 fused to CBF. These mutations fall into two classes with respect to their abilities to interact with CBF in vitro. Mutations in the transcriptional activation region of Ela CR3 do not affect binding to CBF, but mutation of the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 prevents association with CBF in vitro.

  5. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion does not require activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase: impact of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PDH kinase and PDH phosphate phosphatase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Linda I; Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-03-01

    Glucose-stimulated increases in mitochondrial metabolism are generally thought to be important for the activation of insulin secretion. Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key regulatory enzyme, believed to govern the rate of pyruvate entry into the citrate cycle. We show here that elevated glucose concentrations (16 or 30 vs 3 mM) cause an increase in PDH activity in both isolated rat islets, and in a clonal beta-cell line (MIN6). However, increases in PDH activity elicited with either dichloroacetate, or by adenoviral expression of the catalytic subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase, were without effect on glucose-induced increases in mitochondrial pyridine nucleotide levels, or cytosolic ATP concentration, in MIN6 cells, and insulin secretion from isolated rat islets. Similarly, the above parameters were unaffected by blockade of the glucose-induced increase in PDH activity by adenovirus-mediated over-expression of PDH kinase (PDK). Thus, activation of the PDH complex plays an unexpectedly minor role in stimulating glucose metabolism and in triggering insulin release.

  6. Oncolytic adenovirus and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy results in synergistic antitumor activity against soft-tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Bramante, Simona; Vassilev, Lotta; Hirvinen, Mari; Parviainen, Suvi; Tähtinen, Siri; Guse, Kilian; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Kanerva, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-02-15

    Despite originating from several different tissues, soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) are often grouped together as they share mesenchymal origin and treatment guidelines. Also, with some exceptions, a common denominator is that when the tumor cannot be cured with surgery, the efficacy of current therapies is poor and new treatment modalities are thus needed. We have studied the combination of a capsid-modified oncolytic adenovirus CGTG-102 (Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF) with doxorubicin, with or without ifosfamide, the preferred first-line chemotherapeutic options for most types of STS. We show that CGTG-102 and doxorubicin plus ifosfamide together are able to increase cell killing of Syrian hamster STS cells over single agents, as well as upregulate immunogenic cell death markers. When tested in vivo against established STS tumors in fully immunocompetent Syrian hamsters, the combination was highly effective. CGTG-102 and doxorubicin (without ifosfamide) resulted in synergistic antitumor efficacy against human STS xenografts in comparison with single agent treatments. Doxorubicin increased adenoviral replication in human and hamster STS cells, potentially contributing to the observed therapeutic synergy. In conclusion, the preclinical data generated here support clinical translation of the combination of CGTG-102 and doxorubicin, or doxorubicin plus ifosfamide, for the treatment of STS, and provide clues on the mechanisms of synergy.

  7. The oncolytic adenovirus Δ24-RGD in combination with cisplatin exerts a potent anti-osteosarcoma activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Velez, Naiara; Xipell, Enric; Jauregui, Patricia; Zalacain, Marta; Marrodan, Lucía; Zandueta, Carolina; Vera, Beatriz; Urquiza, Leire; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Julián, Mikel San; Toledo, Gemma; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Torre, Wensceslao; Lecanda, Fernando; Patiño-García, Ana; Alonso, Marta M

    2014-10-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The presence of metastases and the lack of response to conventional treatment are the major adverse prognostic factors. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new treatment strategies that overcome both of these problems. Our purpose was to elucidate whether the use of the oncolytic adenovirus Δ24-RGD alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy would be effective, in vitro and in vivo, against osteosarcoma. Our results showed that Δ24-RGD exerted a potent antitumor effect against osteosarcoma cell lines that was increased by the addition of cisplatin. Δ24-RGD osteosarcoma treatment resulted in autophagy in vitro that was further enhanced when combined with cisplatin. Of importance, administration of Δ24-RGD and/or cisplatin, in novel orthotopic and two lung metastatic models in vivo resulted in a significant reduction of tumor burden meanwhile maintaining a safe toxicity profile. Together, our data underscore the potential of Δ24-RGD to become a realistic therapeutic option for primary and metastatic pediatric osteosarcoma. Moreover, this study warrants a future clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Δ24-RGD for this devastating disease. PMID:24737304

  8. Synergistic antitumor activity of triple-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with VSTM1 and daunorubicin in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiao; Yao, Qiu-Mei; Li, Jin-Lan; Chang, Yan; Li, Ting; Han, Wen-Ling; Wu, Hong-Ping; Li, Lin-Fang; Qian, Qi-Jun; Ruan, Guo-Rui

    2016-10-01

    V-set and transmembrane domain-containing 1 (VSTM1), which is downregulated in bone marrow cells from leukemia patients, may provide a diagnostic and treatment target. Here, a triple-regulated oncolytic adenovirus was constructed to carry a VSTM1 gene expression cassette, SG611-VSTM1, and contained the E1a gene with a 24-nucleotide deletion within the CR2 region under control of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, E1b gene directed by the hypoxia response element, and VSTM1 gene controlled by the cytomegalovirus promoter. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses showed that SG611-VSTM1 expressed VSTM1 highly efficiently in the human leukemic cell line K562 compared with SG611. In Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometric assays, SG611-VSTM1 exhibited more potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in leukemic cells compared with SG611 and exerted synergistic cytotoxicity with low-dose daunorubicin (DNR) in vitro. In xenograft models, SG611-VSTM1 intratumorally injected at a dose of 1 × 10(9) plaque forming units combined with intraperitoneally injected low-dose DNR displayed significantly stronger antitumor effects than either treatment alone. Histopathologic examination revealed that SG611-VSTM1 induced apoptosis of leukemic cells. These results implicate an important role for VSTM1 in the pathogenesis of leukemia, and SG611-VSTM1 may be a promising agent for enhancing chemosensitivity in leukemia therapy. PMID:27472927

  9. Comparison of promoter activities for efficient expression into human B cells and haematopoietic progenitors with adenovirus Ad5/F35.

    PubMed

    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Drouin, Mathieu; Sea, Serey-Phorn; Forest, Audrey; Côté, Serge; Simard, Carl; Boyer, Lucie; Jacques, Annie; Pineault, Nicolas; Jung, Daniel

    2007-04-30

    Adenoviral gene transfer into human B lymphocytes and haematopoietic progenitors would allow the characterization of their function on cellular growth, differentiation and survival. Efficient gene expression is however strongly dependent on the promoter used. In this study, we investigated the relative strength of various promoters by following and measuring the expression of the reporter gene EYFP in human peripheral B lymphocytes, cord blood CD34(+) cells and the megakaryocytic cell line M-07e. The murine PGK promoter provided the best level of transgene expression in CD34(+) cells among the four promoters tested, followed closely by the CMV promoter, and to a lesser extend by a CMV promoter with a beta-globin/IgG chimeric intron, whereas the human CD40 promoter provided the lowest levels of expression. In contrast, the strongest promoters in B lymphocytes were the two CMV promoters. Surprisingly, even the best promoters were unable to induce transgene expression in more than 75-80% of the primary B and CD34(+) cells, even though 100% of the cells were infected. Finally and in contrast to retroviruses, only a minority of B lymphocytes and CD34(+) cells were able to induce the transcription of IRES-containing bicistronic expression cassettes from adenovirus.

  10. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  11. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  12. Expression of virus-encoded proteinases: functional and structural similarities with cellular enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, W G; Semler, B L

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses express their genome, or part of their genome, initially as a polyprotein precursor that undergoes proteolytic processing. Molecular genetic analyses of viral gene expression have revealed that many of these processing events are mediated by virus-encoded proteinases. Biochemical activity studies and structural analyses of these viral enzymes reveal that they have remarkable similarities to cellular proteinases. However, the viral proteinases have evolved unique features that permit them to function in a cellular environment. In this article, the current status of plant and animal virus proteinases is described along with their role in the viral replication cycle. The reactions catalyzed by viral proteinases are not simple enzyme-substrate interactions; rather, the processing steps are highly regulated, are coordinated with other viral processes, and frequently involve the participation of other factors. Images PMID:8302216

  13. Use of a cysteine proteinase from Carica candamarcensis as a protective agent during DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Genelhu, M S; Zanini, M S; Veloso, I F; Carneiro, A M; Lopes, M T; Salas, C E

    1998-09-01

    We describe the use of a plant cysteine proteinase isolated from latex of Carica candamarcensis as a protective agent during isolation of bacterial DNA following growth in culture of these cells. Between 100 to 720 units of proteinase (1 microgram = 6 units) afforded good DNA protection when incubated with various kinds of microorganisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the resulting DNA was similar in size to DNA preparations obtained by treatment with proteinase K. The viability of the resulting material was checked by PCR amplification using species-specific primers. After standing at room temperature (25 degrees C) for 35 days, the enzyme lost 10% of its initial activity. The enzyme stability and good yield of DNA suggest the use of this proteinase as an alternative to proteinase K.

  14. Adenovirus-mediated co-expression of ING4 and PTEN cooperatively enhances their antitumor activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Nargis; Yang, Sijun; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Yi; Deng, Chenghui; Yang, Jiecheng; Yu, Huijun; Wei, Wenxiang

    2016-08-01

    Both inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) are well known as tumor suppressors that are closely related to tumor occurrence and progression. It was reported that ING4 and PTEN showed synergistic antitumor activities in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The two tumor suppressors demonstrated synergistic effect on growth inhibition and apoptosis activation. In this study, we investigated their therapeutic potential in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Recombinant adenoviruses co-expressing ING4 and PTEN (Ad-ING4-PTEN) were constructed, and the antitumor effect on SMMC-7721 and HepG2 HCC cells was evaluated. Ad-ING4-PTEN cooperatively inhibited cell growth, stimulated apoptosis, and suppressed invasion in both HCC cells, and regulated cell cycle in SMMC-7721. Further studies showed that the combination of ING4 and PTEN by Ad-ING4-PTEN cooperatively enhanced the alteration of the expression of cell cycle-related proteins (p53, p21, and cyclin D1) and apoptotic factors (Bad, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bax), which are involved in the regulation of cell cycle and the activation of apoptotic pathways, leading to the synergistic antitumor effect. These results indicate that the combination of ING4 and PTEN may provide an effective therapeutic strategy for HCC.

  15. Adenovirus-mediated ING4/PTEN double tumor suppressor gene co-transfer modified by RGD enhances antitumor activity in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihong; Yang, Jicheng; Sheng, Weihua; Xie, Yufeng; Liu, Jisheng

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitor of growth-4 (ING4) is a member of the inhibitor of growth (ING) family and acts as a tumor suppressor protein. PTEN is a phosphatase and shows potent and extensive antitumor activity. In this study, we constructed an RGD-modified bicistronic ING4/PTEN adenovirus (Ad.RGD-ING4-PTEN) and comprehensively investigated its effects following modification of the CNE human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that Ad.RGD-ING4-PTEN enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Furthermore, expression of P21, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 was upregulated, while that of Bcl-2 and survivin was downregulated in CNE cells and CNE xenografted tumors. Moreover, Ad.RGD-ING4-PTEN treatment additively downregulated CD34, VEGF and microvessel density in subcutaneously (s.c.) xenografted CNE cell tumors. The enhanced antitumor activity generated by Ad.RGD-ING4-PTEN was closely associated with activation of the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways and additive inhibition of tumor angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of this evidence, it is believed that cancer gene therapy combining two tumor suppressors such as ING4 and PTEN can be used to establish an effective and novel therapeutic strategy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma and other cancers.

  16. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated FIR demonstrated TP53-independent cell-killing effect and enhanced antitumor activity of carbon-ion beams.

    PubMed

    Kano, M; Matsushita, K; Rahmutulla, B; Yamada, S; Shimada, H; Kubo, S; Hiwasa, T; Matsubara, H; Nomura, F

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy of carbon-ion beam with the far upstream element-binding protein (FBP)-interacting repressor, FIR, which interferes with DNA damage repair proteins, was proposed as an approach for esophageal cancer treatment with low side effects regardless of TP53 status. In vivo therapeutic antitumor efficacy of replication-defective adenovirus (E1 and E3 deleted adenovirus serotype 5) encoding human FIR cDNA (Ad-FIR) was demonstrated in the tumor xenograft model of human esophageal squamous cancer cells, TE-2. Bleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer agent that introduces DNA breaks. The authors reported that Ad-FIR involved in the BLM-induced DNA damage repair response and thus applicable for other DNA damaging agents. To examine the effect of Ad-FIR on DNA damage repair, BLM, X-ray and carbon-ion irradiation were used as DNA damaging agents. The biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy used with carbon-ion irradiation are more expansive than low-LET conventional radiotherapy, such as X-rays or γ rays. High LET radiotherapy is suitable for the local control of tumors because of its high relative biological effectiveness. Ad-FIR enhanced BLM-induced DNA damage indicated by γH2AX in vitro. BLM treatment increased endogenous nuclear FIR expression in TE-2 cells, and P27Kip1 expression was suppressed by TP53 siRNA and BLM treatment. Further, Ad-FIRΔexon2, a dominant-negative form of FIR that lacks exon2 transcriptional repression domain, decreased Ku86 expression. The combination of Ad-FIR and BLM in TP53 siRNA increased DNA damage. Additionally, Ad-FIR showed synergistic cell toxicity with X-ray in vitro and significantly increased the antitumor efficacy of carbon-ion irradiation in the xenograft mouse model of TE-2 cells (P=0.03, Mann-Whitney's U-test) and was synergistic with the sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) value of 1.15. Therefore, Ad-FIR increased the cell-killing activity of the carbon-ion beam that avoids late

  18. Basis for the Specificity and Activation of the Serpin Protein Z-dependent Proteinase Inhibitor (ZPI) as an Inhibitor of Membrane-associated Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T.; Gettins, Peter G.W.

    2012-12-13

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction {approx}2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca{sup 2+}. To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ{sub {Delta}GD}) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing {approx}5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only {approx}2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional {approx}1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  19. Phosphorylation within the transactivation domain of adenovirus E1A protein by mitogen-activated protein kinase regulates expression of early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S G; Marcellus, R C; Whalen, A; Ahn, N G; Ricciardi, R P; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    A critical role of the 289-residue (289R) E1A protein of human adenovirus type 5 during productive infection is to transactivate expression of all early viral transcription. Sequences within and proximal to conserved region 3 (CR3) promote expression of these viral genes through interactions with a variety of transcription factors requiring the zinc binding motif in CR3 and in some cases a region at the carboxy-terminal end of CR3, including residues 183 to 188. It is known that 3',5' cyclic AMP (cAMP) reduces the level of phosphorylation of the 289R E1A protein through the activation of protein phosphatase 2A by the E4orf4 protein. This study was designed to identify the E1A phosphorylation sites affected by E4orf4 expression and to determine their importance in regulation of E1A activity. We report here that two previously unidentified sites at Ser-185 and Ser-188 are the targets for decreased phosphorylation in response to cAMP. At least one of these sites, presumably Ser-185, is phosphorylated in vitro by purified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and both are hyperphosphorylated in cells which express a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase. Analysis of E1A-mediated transactivation activity indicated that elevated phosphorylation at these sites increased expression of the E4 promoter but not that of E3. We have recently shown that one or more E4 products induce cell death due to p53-independent apoptosis, and thus it seems likely that one role of the E4orf4 protein is to limit production of toxic E4 products by limiting expression of the E4 promoter. PMID:9094626

  20. Sensitive, hydrosoluble, macromolecular fluorogenic substrates for human immunodeficiency virus 1 proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Anjuère, F; Monsigny, M; Lelièvre, Y; Mayer, R

    1993-01-01

    Hydrosoluble macromolecular fluorogenic substrates specific for the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) proteinase have been prepared. The fluoresceinyl peptide Ftc-epsilon-Ahx-Ser-Phe-Asn-Phe-Pro-Gln-Ile-Thr-(Gly)n, corresponding to the first cleavage site of HIV-1 gag-pol native precursor was linked to a water-soluble neutral (Lys)n derivative. The epsilon-aminohexanoyl residue (epsilon-Ahx) and the glycyl sequence were added in order to improve the stability of the substrate and the accessibility of the cleavage site to the HIV-1 proteinase respectively. This macro-molecular peptidic-substrate conjugate is significantly more water-soluble than the free peptide itself on a substrate molar concentration basis. The assay is based on the quantitative precipitation of the polymeric material by adding propan-2-ol whereas the fluorescent peptide moiety released upon proteolysis remains soluble in the supernatant. The proteinase activity is assessed by measuring the fluorescence of the supernatant. This assay allows the detection of a few fmol of HIV-1 proteinase, even in the presence of cell culture media, plasma or cell lysate and it gives accurate results within a large proteinase concentration range. The hydrosoluble macromolecular substrate is also suitable for determining the HIV-1 proteinase activity using 96-well microplates, allowing us to test accurately and rapidly numerous enzyme samples and/or the potency of new proteinase inhibitors. PMID:8489513

  1. Medial hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors regulate neuroendocrine responses to stress and exploratory locomotor activity: application of recombinant adenovirus containing 5-HT1A sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Holmes, Andrew; Ma, Li; Van de Kar, Louis D; Garcia, Francisca; Murphy, Dennis L

    2004-12-01

    Our previous studies found that serotonin transporter (SERT) knock-out mice showed increased sensitivity to minor stress and increased anxiety-like behavior but reduced locomotor activity. These mice also showed decreased density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A) receptors in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and dorsal raphe. To evaluate the contribution of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors to these phenotypes of SERT knock-out mice, two studies were conducted. Recombinant adenoviruses containing 5-HT1A sense and antisense sequences (Ad-1AP-sense and Ad-1AP-antisense) were used to manipulate 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus. The expression of the 5-HT1A genes is controlled by the 5-HT1A promoter, so that they are only expressed in 5-HT1A receptor-containing cells. (1) Injection of Ad-1AP-sense into the hypothalamus of SERT knock-out mice restored 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus; this effect was accompanied by elimination of the exaggerated adrenocorticotropin responses to a saline injection (minor stress) and reduced locomotor activity but not by a change in increased exploratory anxiety-like behavior. (2) To further confirm the observation in SERT-/- mice, Ad-1AP-antisense was injected into the hypothalamus of normal mice. The density and the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus were significantly reduced in Ad-1AP-antisense-treated mice. Compared with the control group (injected with Ad-track), Ad-1A-antisense-treated mice showed a significant reduction in locomotor activity, but again no changes in exploratory anxiety-like behaviors, tested by elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Thus, the present results demonstrate that medial hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors regulate stress responses and locomotor activity but may not regulate exploratory anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:15574737

  2. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-Modified E1A/E1B Double Mutant Adenovirus Enhances Antitumor Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells In Vitro and in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue-Hong; Yang, Fei; Wang, Hua; Cai, Zhi-Jian; Xu, Yi-Peng; Zhao, An; Su, Ying; Zhang, Gu; Zhu, Shao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    CAR is a transmembrane protein that is expressed in various epithelial and endothelial cells. CAR mediates adenoviral infection, as well as adenovirus-mediated oncolysis of AxdAdB-3, an E1A/E1B double-restricted oncolytic adenovirus, in prostate cancer cells. This study further assessed the therapeutic efficacy of AxdAdB-3 with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-fiber modification (AxdAdB3-F/RGD), which enables integrin-dependent infection, in prostate cancer. Susceptibility of prostate cancer cells LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 to adenovirus infection was associated with CAR expression. All of the prostate cancer cell lines expressed integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5. AxdAdB-3 was more cytopathic in CAR-positive prostate cancer cells than in CAR-negative cells, whereas AxdAdB3-F/RGD caused potent oncolysis in both CAR-positive and CAR-negative prostate cancer cells. In contrast, AxdAdB3-F/RGD was not cytopathic against normal prostate epithelial cells, RWPE-1. Intratumoral injection of AxdAdB3-F/RGD into CAR-negative prostate cancer cell xenografts in nude mice inhibited tumor growth. The current study demonstrates that E1A/E1B double-restricted oncolytic adenovirus with an RGD-fiber modification enhances infection efficiency and anti-tumor activity in CAR-deficient prostate cancer cells, while sparing normal cells. Future studies will evaluate the therapeutic potential of AxdAdB3-F/RGD in prostate cancer. PMID:26799485

  3. Adenovirus Replaces Mitotic Checkpoint Controls

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Roberta L.; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with adenovirus triggers the cellular DNA damage response, elements of which include cell death and cell cycle arrest. Early adenoviral proteins, including the E1B-55K and E4orf3 proteins, inhibit signaling in response to DNA damage. A fraction of cells infected with an adenovirus mutant unable to express the E1B-55K and E4orf3 genes appeared to arrest in a mitotic-like state. Cells infected early in G1 of the cell cycle were predisposed to arrest in this state at late times of infection. This arrested state, which displays hallmarks of mitotic catastrophe, was prevented by expression of either the E1B-55K or the E4orf3 genes. However, E1B-55K mutant virus-infected cells became trapped in a mitotic-like state in the presence of the microtubule poison colcemid, suggesting that the two viral proteins restrict entry into mitosis or facilitate exit from mitosis in order to prevent infected cells from arresting in mitosis. The E1B-55K protein appeared to prevent inappropriate entry into mitosis through its interaction with the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53. The E4orf3 protein facilitated exit from mitosis by possibly mislocalizing and functionally inactivating cyclin B1. When expressed in noninfected cells, E4orf3 overcame the mitotic arrest caused by the degradation-resistant R42A cyclin B1 variant. IMPORTANCE Cells that are infected with adenovirus type 5 early in G1 of the cell cycle are predisposed to arrest in a mitotic-like state in a p53-dependent manner. The adenoviral E1B-55K protein prevents entry into mitosis. This newly described activity for the E1B-55K protein appears to depend on the interaction between the E1B-55K protein and the tumor suppressor p53. The adenoviral E4orf3 protein facilitates exit from mitosis, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of cyclin B1. By preventing entry into mitosis and by promoting exit from mitosis, these adenoviral proteins act to prevent the infected cell from arresting in a

  4. Class specific inhibition of house dust mite proteinases which cleave cell adhesion, induce cell death and which increase the permeability of lung epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Winton, Helen L; Wan, Hong; Cannell, Mark B; Thompson, Philip J; Garrod, David R; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Robinson, Clive

    1998-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens with cysteine and serine proteinase activity are risk factors for allergic sensitization and asthma. A simple method to fractionate proteinase activity from HDM faecal pellets into cysteine and serine class activity is described. Both proteinase fractions increased the permeability of epithelial cell monolayers. The effects of the serine proteinase fraction were inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) and soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). The effects of the cysteine proteinase fraction could be inhibited by E-64. No reciprocity of action was found. Treatment of epithelial monolayers with either proteinase fraction caused breakdown of tight junctions (TJs). AEBSF inhibited TJ breakdown caused by the serine proteinase fraction, whereas E-64 inhibited the cysteine proteinase fraction. Agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the proteinases induced DNA cleavage which was inhibited by the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-250. Compound E-64 inhibited DNA fragmentation caused by the cysteine proteinase fraction, but was without effect on the serine proteinase fraction. Staining of proteinase-treated cells with annexin V (AV) and propidium iodide (PI) revealed a diversity of cellular responses. Some cells stained only with AV indicating early apoptosis, whilst others were dead and stained with both AV and PI. HDM proteinases exert profound effects on epithelial cells which will promote allergic sensitization; namely disruption of intercellular adhesion, increased paracellular permeability and initiation of cell death. Attenuation of these actions by proteinase inhibitors leads to the conclusion that compounds designed to be selective for the HDM enzymes may represent a novel therapy for asthma. PMID:9720772

  5. A proteoliposome containing apolipoprotein A-I mutant (V156K) enhances rapid tumor regression activity of human origin oncolytic adenovirus in tumor-bearing zebrafish and mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Juyi; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, Inho; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2012-08-01

    We recently reported that the efficiency of adenoviral gene delivery and virus stability are significantly enhanced when a proteoliposome (PL) containing apolipoprotein (apo) A-I is used in an animal model. In the current study, we tested tumor removal activity of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) using PL-containing wildtype (WT) or V156K. Oncolytic Ad with or without PL was injected into tumors of zebrafish and nude mice as a Hep3B tumor xenograft model. The V156K-PL-Ad-injected zebrafish, group showed the lowest tumor tissue volume and nucleic acids in the tumor area, whereas injection of Ad alone did not result in adequate removal of tumor activity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents increased two-fold in tumor-bearing zebrafish; however, the V156K-PL-Ad injected group showed a 40% decrease in ROS levels compared to that in normal zebrafish. After reducing the tumor volume with the V156K-PL-Ad injection, the swimming pattern of the zebrafish changed to be more active and energetic. The oncolytic effect of PL-Ad containing either V156K or WT was about two-fold more enhanced in mice than that of Ad alone 34 days after the injection. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the PL-Ad-injected groups showed enhanced efficiency of viral delivery with elevated Ad-E1A staining and a diminished number of proliferating tumor cells. Thus, the antitumor effect of oncolytic Ad was strongly enhanced by a PL-containing apoA-I and its mutant (V156K) without causing side effects in mice and zebrafish models. PMID:22851220

  6. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-09-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. PMID:2143540

  7. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2143540

  8. Adenovirus-associated health risks for recreational activities in a multi-use coastal watershed based on site-specific quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Arti; McBride, Graham; Wuertz, Stefan

    2013-10-15

    We used site-specific quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to assess the probability of adenovirus illness for three groups of swimmers: adults with primary contact, children with primary contact, and secondary contact regardless of age. Human enteroviruses and adenoviruses were monitored by qPCR in a multi-use watershed and Adenovirus type 40/41 was detected in 11% of 73 samples, ranging from 147 to 4117 genomes per liter. Enterovirus was detected only once (32 genomes per liter). Seven of eight virus detections occurred when E. coli concentrations were below the single sample maximum water quality criterion for contact recreation, and five of eight virus detections occurred when fecal coliforms were below the corresponding criterion. We employed dose-harmonization to convert viral genome measurements to TCID50 values needed for dose-response curves. The three scenarios considered different amounts of water ingestion and Monte Carlo simulation was used to account for the variability associated with the doses. The mean illness risk in children based on adenovirus measurements obtained over 11 months was estimated to be 3.5%, which is below the 3.6% risk considered tolerable by the current United States EPA recreational criteria for gastrointestinal illnesses (GI). The mean risks of GI illness for adults and secondary contact were 1.9% and 1.0%, respectively. These risks changed appreciably when different distributions were fitted to the data as determined by Monte Carlo simulations. In general, risk was at a maximum for the log-logistic distribution and lowest for the hockey stick distribution in all three selected scenarios. Also, under default assumptions, the risk was lowered considerably when assuming that only a small proportion of Adenovirus 40/41 (3%) was as infectious as Adenovirus type 4, compared to the assumption that all genomes were Adenovirus 4. In conclusion, site-specific QMRA on water-borne adenoviruses in this watershed provided a similar

  9. Limited proteolysis by macrophage elastase inactivities human. cap alpha. /sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Banda, M.J.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Ever since the initial description of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor (..cap alpha../sub 1/PI), the role of this plasma glycoprotein and its allelic polymorphism in disease and in healthy physiology has been the subject of much investigation, ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI inactivates a number of serine proteinases, including granulocyte elastase, and thus affords protection from the connective tissue degradation mediated by this class of proteinases. Because an imbalance in the ratio between ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI and proteinase may contribute to the development of destructive lung diseases, proteinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. Both macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes have been implicated in disruption of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance. In this report, a new mechanism for alteration of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance is demonstrated. It was found that the purified form of macrophage elastase catalytically degrades and inactivates ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI so that it no longer inhibits the elastinolytic activity of granulocyte elastase.

  10. Differential Inhibition of Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) Gut Proteinases by Proteinase Inhibitors of Okra and It's Wild Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Udamale, Shilpa K.; Moharil, M. P.; Ugale, T. B.; Mankar, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The seeds of ten genotypes and twenty-nine wild relatives of okra were analysed for the presence of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Helicoverpa gut proteinases (HGPs) inhibitors (HGPIs), with the aim to identify potent inhibitors of H. armigera gut proteinases. Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) obtained from wild relatives of okra exhibited stronger inhibition of HGPs than the genotypes of okra. In in vitro inhibitory assay against HGPs, A. tuberculatus 90396 and 90515 showed high tryptic inhibitory (71.8% and 69.2%), chymotryptic inhibitory (68.5% and 66.2%), and Helicoverpa gut proteinase activity (70.2% and 68.2%). In electrophoretic profile showed the same variation in the number of trypsin inhibitors (TIs), chymotrypsin Inhibitors (CIs), and HGPIs isoforms with different intensities, whereas genotypes of okra mostly showed monomorphic profile. Maximum eight HGPIs isoforms were found in A. tuberculatus (90396 and 90515). In bioassay studies, significant reduction in weight of H. armigera larvae was found, when larvae fed on PIs obtained from A. tuberculatus (90396 and 90515). Thus, the result of the present investigation indicates that further exploration of PIs obtained from A. tuberculatus (90396 and 90515) will be helpful for developing PIs-based insect resistance management strategies. PMID:25937977

  11. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. II. Contribution of the uni- and bimolecular activation routes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Escribano, J; Masia-Perez, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, J L; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    From the kinetic study carried out in part I of this series (preceding article) an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the uni- and bimolecular routes has been carried out. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect on this relative weight of the initial zymogen, inhibitor and activating enzyme concentrations.

  12. Characterization of a secretory proteinase of Candida parapsilosis and evidence for the absence of the enzyme during infection in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Rüchel, R; Böning, B; Borg, M

    1986-01-01

    The opportunistic yeastlike fungi of the genus Candida comprise three species which are proteolytic in vitro. Among them, C. albicans and C. tropicalis are of foremost medical importance. However, a strict correlation between extracellular proteolytic activity and virulence is opposed by the low virulence of the third proteolytic species, C. parapsilosis. We purified the secretory acid proteinase of C. parapsilosis (clinical isolate 265). The enzyme is a carboxyl proteinase (EC 3.4.23) like all other secretory Candida proteinases handled so far. Proteinase 265 is distinguished by a lower molecular weight (approximately 33,000); it has increased hydrophobicity, which accounts for inhibition of the enzyme by hemin, and required the presence of nonionic detergent in the initial steps of purification. The enzyme already undergoes alkaline denaturation at neutrality. Its activity is thus confined to the acid microenvironment of the fungal cell wall. Within this range, the enzyme may degrade immunoglobulins like immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), IgA2, and secretory IgA. No indication was found for glycosylation of proteinase 265 and the related enzyme of C. albicans CBS 2730. However, the comparable proteinase of C. tropicalis 293 was identified as a manno protein. Antiserum against proteinase 265 cross-reacted strongly with corresponding enzymes from other Candida species. Antisera against proteinases of C. albicans and C. tropicalis reacted only weakly with proteinase 265. Thus, secretory Candida proteinases are likely to possess common and species-specific antigenic sites. In contrast to C. albicans, infection of phagocytes by C. parapsilosis 265 was not accompanied by secretion of fungal proteinase. This lack of induction of the enzyme under conditions of infection may account for the low virulence of most isolates of C. parapsilosis. Images PMID:3525413

  13. Enhancement of fibroblast activation protein α-based vaccines and adenovirus boost immunity by cyclophosphamide through inhibiting IL-10 expression in 4T1 tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiu; Geng, Fei; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Ping; Lu, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2016-08-31

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) of more than 90% of malignant epithelia carcinomas. CAFs are the main type of cells in the tumor microenvironment which offer nutrition and protection to the tumor and regulate immunosuppression. To eliminate CAFs, a vaccine targeting FAPα may be used with a heterologous prime-boost strategy to enhance the FAPα-specific cellular immunity. Here, a FAP vaccine using a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vector was constructed as well as a DNA vaccine reported in our previous work. Although the DNA prime-rAd boost strategy enhanced FAPα-specific immune responses, improvement of anti-tumor immunity effects was not observed. Examination of immunosuppressive factors revealed that high expression of the IL-10 cytokine was considered the main cause of the failure of the prime-boost strategy. However, heterologous vaccination in combination with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide (CY), which was reported to reduce IL-10 production and promote a shift from immunosuppression to immunopotentiation, resulted in enhanced effects in terms of numbers of effector T cells and tumor growth inhibition rates, compared to the CY alone or DNA alone group. Tumor growth was inhibited markedly when the prime-boost strategy was combined with CY in both the prophylactic and therapeutic settings and the survival time of 4T1 tumor bearing mice was also prolonged significantly. With the reduction of IL-10, enhancement of the anti-tumor effect by the prime-boost strategy was observed. These results suggest that FAPα-targeted rAd boosting in combination with CY is an attractive approach to overcoming immunosuppression in cancer vaccines. PMID:27498213

  14. LMP-associated proteolytic activities and TAP-dependent peptide transport for class 1 MHC molecules are suppressed in cell lines transformed by the highly oncogenic adenovirus 12

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens on the surface of cells transformed by adenovirus 12 (Ad12) is generally very low, and correlates with the in vivo oncogenicity of this virus. In primary embryonal fibroblasts (H-2b) that express transgenic swine class I antigen (PD1), Ad12-mediated transformation results in inhibition in transport of newly synthesized class I molecules, as well as significant reduction in transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) gene expression. In this report we show that reexpression of TAP molecules either by stable transfection of mouse TAP genes or by infection with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing human TAP genes, only partially reconstitutes the expression and transport of the class I molecules. Further analysis of Ad12- transformed cells revealed that the expression of both LMP2 and LMP7, but not of other proteasome complex components, was downregulated, resulting in altered proteolytic activities of the 20S proteasomes. Reconstitution of both TAP and LMP expression resulted in complete restoration of PD1 cell surface expression and enhanced expression of the endogenous H-2D(b) molecules encoded by recombinant vaccinia viruses, in reconstituted Ad12-transformed cells, efficient transport of H-2 class I molecules could only be achieved by treatment of the cells with gamma-interferon. These data suggest that an additional factor(s) that is interferon-regulated plays a role in the biosynthetic pathway of the class I complex, and that its function is deficient in this cell system. Thus, Ad12 viral transformation appears to suppress the expression of multiple genes that are important for antigen processing and presentation, which allows such transformed cells to escape immune surveillance. This coordinate downregulation of immune response genes must likely occur through their use of common regulatory elements. PMID:8627162

  15. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Results Two cysteine proteinase (CP) and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Conclusions Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is likely to play a strong role

  16. Successive Use of Non-Host Plant Proteinase Inhibitors Required for Effective Inhibition of Helicoverpa armigera Gut Proteinases and Larval Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Harsulkar, Abhay M.; Giri, Ashok P.; Patankar, Aparna G.; Gupta, Vidya S.; Sainani, Mohini N.; Ranjekar, Prabhakar K.; Deshpande, Vasanti V.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the efficacy of proteinase inhibitors (PIs) from three host plants (chickpea [Cicer arietinum], pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan], and cotton [Gossypium arboreum]) and three non-host (groundnut [Arachis hypogea], winged bean [Psophocarpus tetragonolobus], and potato [Solanum tuberosum]) in retarding the growth of Helicoverpa armigera larvae, a devastating pest of important crop plants. Enzyme assays and electrophoretic analysis of interaction of H. armigera gut proteinases (HGPs) with PIs revealed that non-host PIs inhibited HGP activity efficiently whereas host PIs were ineffective. In the electrophoretic assay, trypsin inhibitor activity bands were detected in all of the host and non-host plants, but HGP inhibitor activity bands were present only in non-host plants (except cotton in the host plant group). H. armigera larvae reared on a diet containing non-host PIs showed growth retardation, a reduction in total and trypsin-like proteinase activity, and the production of inhibitor-insensitive proteinases. Electrophoretic analysis of PI-induced HGP showed differential regulation of proteinase isoforms. Interestingly, HGP activity induced in response to dietary potato PI-II was inhibited by winged bean PIs. The optimized combination of potato PI-II and winged bean PIs identified in the present study and their proposed successive use has potential in developing H. armigera-resistant transgenic plants. PMID:10517841

  17. High-Resolution structure of the stable plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 variant 14-1B in its proteinase-cleaved form: A new tool for detailed interaction studies and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.; Gettins, P.

    2008-10-22

    Wild-type plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) rapidly converts to the inactive latent state under conditions of physiological pH and temperature. For in vivo studies of active PAI-1 in cell culture and in vivo model systems, the 14-1B PAI-1 mutant (N150H-K154T-Q319L-M354I), with its stabilized active conformation, has thus become the PAI-1 of choice. As a consequence of the increased stability, the only two forms likely to be encountered are the active or the cleaved form, the latter either free or complexed with target proteinase. We hereby report the first structure of the stable 14-1B PAI-1 variant in its reactive center cleaved form, to a resolution of 2.0 {angstrom}. The >99% complete structure represents the highest resolved structure of free cleaved PAI-1. This high-resolution structure should be of great use for drug target development and for modeling protein-protein interactions such as those of PAI-1 with vitronectin.

  18. Digestive proteinases of the larger black flour beetle, Cynaeus angustus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Oppert, B; Walters, P; Zuercher, M

    2006-04-01

    Digestion in the larger black flour beetle, Cynaeus angustus (LeConte), was studied to identify new control methods for this pest of stored grains and grain products. The physiological pH of the larval gut, as measured with extracts in water, was approximately 6.1, and the pH for optimal hydrolysis of casein by gut extracts was 6.2 when buffers were reducing. However, under non-reducing conditions, hydrolysis of casein and synthetic serine proteinase substrates was optimal in alkaline buffer. Three major proteinase activities were observed in zymograms using casein or gelatin. Caseinolytic activity of C. angustus gut extracts was inhibited by inhibitors that target aspartic and serine proteinase classes, with minor inhibition by a cysteine proteinase inhibitor. In particular, soybean trypsin and trypsin/chymotrypsin inhibitors were most effective in reducing the in vitro caseinolytic activity of gut extracts. Based on these data, further studies are suggested on the effects of dietary soybean inhibitors of serine proteinases, singly and in combination with aspartic and cysteine proteinase inhibitors, on C. angustus larvae. Results from these studies can be used to develop new control strategies to prevent damage to grains and stored products by C. angustus and similar coleopteran pests.

  19. A novel cysteine proteinase (CP65) of Trichomonas vaginalis involved in cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sánchez, M E; Avila-González, L; Becerril-García, C; Fattel-Facenda, L V; Ortega-López, J; Arroyo, R

    2000-04-01

    The goal of this study was to demonstrate the participation in cellular damage of a Trichomonas vaginalis proteinase with a molecular mass of 65 kDa (CP65). By two dimensional gelatin-gel electrophoresis of trichomonad proteins we detected four spots with proteolytic activity on the 65 kDa region, but only one, pI 7.2, binds to the HeLa cell surface. By indirect immunofluorescence, rabbit antibodies against this proteinase localized the CP65 on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm of T. vaginalis. Pretreatment of parasites with the specific anti-CP65 antibody reduced trichomonal cytotoxicity to HeLa cell monolayers. The specific cysteine proteinase inhibitor, L-3-carboxy-2, 3-trans-epoxypropionyl-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane (E64) abrogated the proteinase activity and reduced cytotoxicity levels of T. vaginalis in cell culture monolayers, indicating that the trichomonad CP65 is a cysteine proteinase. Activity of the CP65 proteinase was optimal at pH 5.5 and 37 degrees C, conditions similar to those of patients with trichomonosis. Also, this proteinase degraded some of the proteins found in the vagina, i.e. collagen IV and fibronectin, but not laminin-1 or haemoglobin. Finally, immunoprecipitation assays showed that sera and vaginal washes from trichomonosis patient possess anti-CP65 antibodies. In conclusion, results presented in this work demonstrate that the CP65 is a surface cysteine proteinase involved in T. vaginalis cytotoxicity to HeLa cell monolayers, as a virulence factor. It is immunogenic during human infection and degrades some extracellular matrix proteins, i.e. collagen IV and fibronectin. PMID:10764610

  20. A novel cysteine proteinase (CP65) of Trichomonas vaginalis involved in cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sánchez, M E; Avila-González, L; Becerril-García, C; Fattel-Facenda, L V; Ortega-López, J; Arroyo, R

    2000-04-01

    The goal of this study was to demonstrate the participation in cellular damage of a Trichomonas vaginalis proteinase with a molecular mass of 65 kDa (CP65). By two dimensional gelatin-gel electrophoresis of trichomonad proteins we detected four spots with proteolytic activity on the 65 kDa region, but only one, pI 7.2, binds to the HeLa cell surface. By indirect immunofluorescence, rabbit antibodies against this proteinase localized the CP65 on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm of T. vaginalis. Pretreatment of parasites with the specific anti-CP65 antibody reduced trichomonal cytotoxicity to HeLa cell monolayers. The specific cysteine proteinase inhibitor, L-3-carboxy-2, 3-trans-epoxypropionyl-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane (E64) abrogated the proteinase activity and reduced cytotoxicity levels of T. vaginalis in cell culture monolayers, indicating that the trichomonad CP65 is a cysteine proteinase. Activity of the CP65 proteinase was optimal at pH 5.5 and 37 degrees C, conditions similar to those of patients with trichomonosis. Also, this proteinase degraded some of the proteins found in the vagina, i.e. collagen IV and fibronectin, but not laminin-1 or haemoglobin. Finally, immunoprecipitation assays showed that sera and vaginal washes from trichomonosis patient possess anti-CP65 antibodies. In conclusion, results presented in this work demonstrate that the CP65 is a surface cysteine proteinase involved in T. vaginalis cytotoxicity to HeLa cell monolayers, as a virulence factor. It is immunogenic during human infection and degrades some extracellular matrix proteins, i.e. collagen IV and fibronectin.

  1. Ozone inactivation of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.

    1980-06-01

    Ozone decreased the trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activities of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor both in plasma and in solutions of the pure inhibitor. The total loss of porcine elastase inhibitory activity required 18 mol of ozone/mol of pure alpha 1-PI and approximately 850 mol of ozone/mol of alpha 1-PI in plasma. A corresponding loss of the ability to inhibit human leukocyte elastase was observed. Inactivated alpha 1-PI contains four residues of methionine sulfoxide, in addition to oxidized tryosine and tryptophan. Electrophoretic analysis demonstrated that the ozone-inactivated alpha 1-PI did not form normal complexes with serine proteinases. These findings suggest that the inhalation of ozone could inactivate alpha 1-PI on the airspace side of the lung to create a localized alpha 1-PI deficiency, which might contribute to the development of emphysema.

  2. [Extracellular proteinases of filamentous fungi as potential markers of phytopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Gruban', T N; Beliakova, G A; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of proteins in the culture liquid of filamentous fungi under study was found to induce the secretion of proteinases. The inhibitory analysis of the major extracellular proteinases of the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata showed that they both belong to the group of serine proteinases. The substrate specificity of these proteinases and their sensitivity to inhibitors suggest that the enzyme of T. harzianum is a subtilisin-like proteinase and the enzyme of A. alternata is a trypsin-like proteinase. This difference between the proteinases may reflect the physiological difference between their producers (saprotroph and phytopathogen). PMID:17205798

  3. [Extracellular proteinases of filamentous fungi as potential markers of phytopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Gruban', T N; Beliakova, G A; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of proteins in the culture liquid of filamentous fungi under study was found to induce the secretion of proteinases. The inhibitory analysis of the major extracellular proteinases of the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata showed that they both belong to the group of serine proteinases. The substrate specificity of these proteinases and their sensitivity to inhibitors suggest that the enzyme of T. harzianum is a subtilisin-like proteinase and the enzyme of A. alternata is a trypsin-like proteinase. This difference between the proteinases may reflect the physiological difference between their producers (saprotroph and phytopathogen).

  4. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  5. Design and synthesis of procollagen C-proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Eric; Chow, Nicholas; Yang, Charles; Sosa, Sergio; Bauer, Udo; Brenner, Mitch; Solow-Cordero, David; Ho, Wen-Bin

    2012-12-15

    Non-peptidic inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase (PCP) were designed from substrate leads. Compounds were optimized for potency and selectivity, with N-substituted aryl sulfonamide hydroxamates having the best combination of these properties. Compounds 89 and 60 have IC(50) values of 10 and 80 nM, respectively, against PCP; excellent selectivity over MMP's 1, 2, and 9; and activity in cell-based collagen deposition assays.

  6. Purification of a native membrane-associated adenovirus tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Katze, M G; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    A 15,000-dalton protein was purified from HeLa cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Proteins solubilized from a membrane fraction of lytically infected cells was used as the starting material for purification. Subsequent purification steps involved lentil-lectin, phosphocellulose, hydroxyapatite, DEAE-cellulose, and aminohexyl-Sepharose chromatographies. A monospecific antiserum, raised against the purified protein, immunoprecipitated a 15,000-dalton protein encoded in early-region E1B (E1B/15K protein) of the adenovirus type 2 DNA. Tryptic finger print analysis revealed that the purified protein was identical to the E1B/15K protein encoded in the transforming part of the viral genome. The antiserum immunoprecipitated the E1B/15K protein from a variety of viral transformed cell lines isolated from humans, rats, or hamsters. The E1B/15K protein was associated with the membrane fraction of both lytically and virus-transformed cell lines and could only be released by detergent treatment. Furthermore, a 11,000- to 12,000-dalton protein that could be precipitated with the anti-E1B/15K serum was recovered from membranes treated with trypsin or proteinase K, suggesting that a major part of the E1B/15K protein is protected in membrane vesicles. Translation of early viral mRNA in a cell-free system, supplemented with rough microsomes, showed that this protein was associated with the membrane fraction also in vitro. Images PMID:7097863

  7. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  8. Heterogeneity of adenovirus type 5 E1A proteins: multiple serine phosphorylations induce slow-migrating electrophoretic variants but do not affect E1A-induced transcriptional activation or transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, J D; Slavicek, J M; Schneider, J F; Jones, N C

    1988-01-01

    The 289-amino-acid product encoded by the adenovirus E1A 13S mRNA has several pleiotropic activities, including transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, and when acting in concert with certain oncogene products, cell transformation. In all cell types in which E1A has been introduced (except bacteria), E1A protein is extensively posttranslationally modified to yield several isoelectric and molecular weight variants. The most striking variant is one that has a retarded mobility, by about Mr = 2,000, in sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. We have investigated the nature of this modification and have assessed its importance for E1A activity. Phosphorylation is responsible for the altered mobility of E1A, since acid phosphatase treatment eliminates the higher apparent molecular weight products. By using several E1A deletion mutants, we show that at least two seryl residues, residing between residues 86 and 120 and 224 and 289, are the sites of phosphorylation and that each phosphorylation can independently induce the mobility shift. However, E1A mutants lacking these seryl residues transcriptionally activate the adenovirus E3 and E2A promoters and transform baby rat kidney cells to near wild-type levels. Images PMID:2835499

  9. CP30, a cysteine proteinase involved in Trichomonas vaginalis cytoadherence.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-López, M R; Becerril-Garcia, C; Fattel-Facenda, L V; Avila-Gonzalez, L; Ruíz-Tachiquín, M E; Ortega-Lopez, J; Arroyo, R

    2000-09-01

    We describe here the participation of a Trichomonas vaginalis 30-kDa proteinase (CP30) with affinity to the HeLa cell surface in attachment of this parasite to host epithelial cells. The CP30 band is a cysteine proteinase because its activity was inhibited by E-64, a thiol proteinase inhibitor. In two-dimensional substrate gel electrophoresis of total extracts of the trichomonad isolate CNCD 147, three spots with proteolytic activity were detected in the 30-kDa region, in the pI range from 4.5 to 5.5. Two of the spots (pI 4.5 and 5.0) bound to the surfaces of fixed HeLa cells corresponding to the CP30 band. The immunoglobulin G fraction of the rabbit anti-CP30 antiserum that recognized a 30-kDa band by Western blotting and immunoprecipitated CP30 specifically inhibited trichomonal cytoadherence to HeLa cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner and reacted with CP30 at the parasite surface. CP30 degraded proteins found on the female urogenital tract, including fibronectin, collagen IV, and hemoglobin. Interestingly, CP30 digested fibronectin and collagen IV only at pH levels between 4.5 and 5.0. Moreover, trichomonosis patients whose diagnosis was confirmed by in vitro culture possessed antibody to CP30 in both sera and vaginal washes, and CP30 activity was found in vaginal washes. Our results suggest that surface CP30 is a cysteine proteinase necessary for trichomonal adherence to human epithelial cells. PMID:10948104

  10. CP30, a cysteine proteinase involved in Trichomonas vaginalis cytoadherence.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-López, M R; Becerril-Garcia, C; Fattel-Facenda, L V; Avila-Gonzalez, L; Ruíz-Tachiquín, M E; Ortega-Lopez, J; Arroyo, R

    2000-09-01

    We describe here the participation of a Trichomonas vaginalis 30-kDa proteinase (CP30) with affinity to the HeLa cell surface in attachment of this parasite to host epithelial cells. The CP30 band is a cysteine proteinase because its activity was inhibited by E-64, a thiol proteinase inhibitor. In two-dimensional substrate gel electrophoresis of total extracts of the trichomonad isolate CNCD 147, three spots with proteolytic activity were detected in the 30-kDa region, in the pI range from 4.5 to 5.5. Two of the spots (pI 4.5 and 5.0) bound to the surfaces of fixed HeLa cells corresponding to the CP30 band. The immunoglobulin G fraction of the rabbit anti-CP30 antiserum that recognized a 30-kDa band by Western blotting and immunoprecipitated CP30 specifically inhibited trichomonal cytoadherence to HeLa cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner and reacted with CP30 at the parasite surface. CP30 degraded proteins found on the female urogenital tract, including fibronectin, collagen IV, and hemoglobin. Interestingly, CP30 digested fibronectin and collagen IV only at pH levels between 4.5 and 5.0. Moreover, trichomonosis patients whose diagnosis was confirmed by in vitro culture possessed antibody to CP30 in both sera and vaginal washes, and CP30 activity was found in vaginal washes. Our results suggest that surface CP30 is a cysteine proteinase necessary for trichomonal adherence to human epithelial cells.

  11. CP30, a Cysteine Proteinase Involved in Trichomonas vaginalis Cytoadherence

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-López, M. Remedios; Becerril-Garcia, Cecilia; Fattel-Facenda, Loriz V.; Avila-Gonzalez, Leticia; Ruíz-Tachiquín, Martha E.; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana

    2000-01-01

    We describe here the participation of a Trichomonas vaginalis 30-kDa proteinase (CP30) with affinity to the HeLa cell surface in attachment of this parasite to host epithelial cells. The CP30 band is a cysteine proteinase because its activity was inhibited by E-64, a thiol proteinase inhibitor. In two-dimensional substrate gel electrophoresis of total extracts of the trichomonad isolate CNCD 147, three spots with proteolytic activity were detected in the 30-kDa region, in the pI range from 4.5 to 5.5. Two of the spots (pI 4.5 and 5.0) bound to the surfaces of fixed HeLa cells corresponding to the CP30 band. The immunoglobulin G fraction of the rabbit anti-CP30 antiserum that recognized a 30-kDa band by Western blotting and immunoprecipitated CP30 specifically inhibited trichomonal cytoadherence to HeLa cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner and reacted with CP30 at the parasite surface. CP30 degraded proteins found on the female urogenital tract, including fibronectin, collagen IV, and hemoglobin. Interestingly, CP30 digested fibronectin and collagen IV only at pH levels between 4.5 and 5.0. Moreover, trichomonosis patients whose diagnosis was confirmed by in vitro culture possessed antibody to CP30 in both sera and vaginal washes, and CP30 activity was found in vaginal washes. Our results suggest that surface CP30 is a cysteine proteinase necessary for trichomonal adherence to human epithelial cells. PMID:10948104

  12. Functions of Manduca sexta hemolymph proteinases HP6 and HP8 in two innate immune pathways.

    PubMed

    An, Chunju; Ishibashi, Jun; Ragan, Emily J; Jiang, Haobo; Kanost, Michael R

    2009-07-17

    Serine proteinases in insect plasma have been implicated in two types of immune responses; that is, activation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) and activation of cytokine-like proteins. We have identified more than 20 serine proteinases in hemolymph of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, but functions are known for only a few of them. We report here functions of two additional M. sexta proteinases, hemolymph proteinases 6 and 8 (HP6 and HP8). HP6 and HP8 are each composed of an amino-terminal clip domain and a carboxyl-terminal proteinase domain. HP6 is an apparent ortholog of Drosophila Persephone, whereas HP8 is most similar to Drosophila and Tenebrio spätzle-activating enzymes, all of which activate the Toll pathway. proHP6 and proHP8 are expressed constitutively in fat body and hemocytes and secreted into plasma, where they are activated by proteolytic cleavage in response to infection. To investigate activation and biological activity of HP6 and HP8, we purified recombinant proHP8, proHP6, and mutants of proHP6 in which the catalytic serine was replaced with alanine, and/or the activation site was changed to permit activation by bovine factor Xa. HP6 was found to activate proPO-activating proteinase (proPAP1) in vitro and induce proPO activation in plasma. HP6 was also determined to activate proHP8. Active HP6 or HP8 injected into larvae induced expression of antimicrobial peptides and proteins, including attacin, cecropin, gloverin, moricin, and lysozyme. Our results suggest that proHP6 becomes activated in response to microbial infection and participates in two immune pathways; activation of PAP1, which leads to proPO activation and melanin synthesis, and activation of HP8, which stimulates a Toll-like pathway. PMID:19487692

  13. The Evaluation of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB) as a Disinfectant for Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; O’Connor, Katherine E.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. The current study determined whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. Methods The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating nine human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with 50 and 0 PPM (µg/ml) of PHMB for 24 hours at room temperature, to simulate swimming pool temperatures, or 40°C, to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays determined adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were Log10 converted and mean ± standard deviation Log10 reductions from controls were calculated. Virucidal (greater than 99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. Results At room temperature, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for two adenovirus types and greater than 1 Log10, but less than 3 Log10, for seven of nine adenovirus types. Conclusions 50 PPM of PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Clinical Relevance Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB has the potential to serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections. PMID:23450376

  14. Hexon modification to improve the activity of oncolytic adenovirus vectors against neoplastic and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schmidt, Christoph Q Andreas; Wortmann, Andreas; Bachem, Max G; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety.

  15. Induction of a heparin-stimulated serine proteinase in sex accessory gland tumors of the Lobund-Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael J; Lind, Jeremy; Sinha, Akhouri A

    2015-08-01

    Induction of new proteinase activities that may process growth factors, modify cell surface receptors, cleave extracellular matrix proteins, etc. is considered fundamental in carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to characterize a novel proteinase activity induced in sex accessory gland cancers (about 70% in seminal vesicles) of adult male Lobund-Wistar rats by a single injection of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU; 25mg/kg) followed by implanted testosterone propionate (45mg in silastic tubing every 2months) treatment for 10-14months. A 28kDa proteinase activity was detected in tumor extracts using SDS-gelatin gel zymography with incubations done without CaCl2. Its activity was stimulated 15 fold by heparin (optimal activity 1.5-3.0μg/lane) added to the tissue extract-SDS sample buffer prior to electrophoresis. No 28kDa heparin-stimulated proteinase (H-SP) was found in the dorsal, lateral and anterior (coagulating gland) prostate lobes or seminal vesicles of untreated adult rats, but there was a 26-30kDa Ca(2+)-independent proteinase activity in the ventral prostate that showed limited heparin stimulation. The 28kDa H-SP was completely inhibited by 1.0mM 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonylfluoride (AESBF) indicating that it was a serine-type proteinase. Other types of proteinase inhibitors were without effect, including serine proteinase inhibitors benzamidine, tranexamic acid and ε-aminocaproic acid. Proteinase activities of about 28kDa were found with casein, fibrinogen or carboxymethylated transferrin as substrate, however, these activities were not stimulated by heparin. Similar levels of activities of the 28kDa H-SP were found in primary tumors and their metastases, but little/no activity was detected in serum, even from rats with large tumor volume and metastases. These data demonstrate overexpression of a heparin-stimulated 28kDa serine proteinase in the primary tumors of sex accessory gland cancers and their metastases. This proteinase either does not

  16. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  17. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 stimulates prostaglandin production in keratinocytes: analysis of prostaglandin receptors on human melanocytes and effects of PGE2 and PGF2alpha on melanocyte dendricity.

    PubMed

    Scott, Glynis; Leopardi, Sonya; Printup, Stacey; Malhi, Namrita; Seiberg, Miri; Lapoint, Randi

    2004-05-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) are key mediators of diverse functions in the skin and several reports suggest that PG mediate post-inflammatory pigmentary changes through modulation of melanocyte dendricity and melanin synthesis. The proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is important for skin pigmentation because activation of keratinocyte PAR-2 stimulates uptake of melanosomes through phagocytosis in a Rho-dependent manner. In this report, we show that activation of keratinocyte PAR-2 stimulates release of PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) and that PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) act as paracrine factors that stimulate melanocyte dendricity. We characterized the expression of the EP and FP receptors in human melanocytes and show that human melanocytes express EP1 and EP3, and the FP receptor, but not EP2 and EP4. Treatment of melanocytes with EP1 and EP3 receptor agonists resulted in increased melanocyte dendricity, indicating that both EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling contribute to PGE(2)-mediated melanocyte dendricity. Certain EP3 receptor subtypes have been shown to increase adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) through coupling to Gs, whereas EP1 is known to couple to Gq to activate phospholipase C with elevation in Ca(2+). The cAMP/protein kinase A system is known to modulate melanocyte dendrite formation through modulation of Rac and Rho activity. Neither PGF(2alpha) or PGE(2) elevated cAMP in human melanocytes showing that dendricity observed in response to PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) is cAMP-independent. Our data suggest that PAR-2 mediates cutaneous pigmentation both through increased uptake of melanosomes by keratinocytes, as well as by release of PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) that stimulate melanocyte dendricity through EP1, EP3, and FP receptors.

  18. Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, John D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent discoveries and delves in detail about what is known about each of the proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) and proteinases (matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-related peptidase-4) that are secreted into the enamel matrix. After an overview of enamel development, this review focuses on these enamel proteins by describing their nomenclature, tissue expression, functions, proteinase activation, and proteinase substrate specificity. These proteins and their respective null mice and human mutations are also evaluated to shed light on the mechanisms that cause nonsyndromic enamel malformations termed amelogenesis imperfecta. Pertinent controversies are addressed. For example, do any of these proteins have a critical function in addition to their role in enamel development? Does amelogenin initiate crystallite growth, does it inhibit crystallite growth in width and thickness, or does it do neither? Detailed examination of the null mouse literature provides unmistakable clues and/or answers to these questions, and this data is thoroughly analyzed. Striking conclusions from this analysis reveal that widely held paradigms of enamel formation are inadequate. The final section of this review weaves the recent data into a plausible new mechanism by which these enamel matrix proteins support and promote enamel development. PMID:24159389

  19. The picornaviral 3C proteinases: cysteine nucleophiles in serine proteinase folds.

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, B. A.

    1995-01-01

    The 3C proteinases are a novel group of cysteine proteinases with a serine proteinase-like fold that are responsible for the bulk of polyprotein processing in the Picornaviridae. Because members of this viral family are to blame for several ongoing global pandemic problems (rhinovirus, hepatitis A virus) as well as sporadic outbreaks of more serious pathologies (poliovirus), there has been continuing interest over the last two decades in the development of antiviral therapies. The recent determination of the structure of two of the 3C proteinases by X-ray crystallography opens the door for the application of the latest advances in computer-assisted identification and design of anti-proteinase therapeutic/chemoprophylactic agents. PMID:8520469

  20. The influence of cis-acting P1 protein and translational elements on the expression of Potato virus Y helper-component proteinase (HCPro) in heterologous systems and its suppression of silencing activity.

    PubMed

    Tena Fernández, Fátima; González, Inmaculada; Doblas, Paula; Rodríguez, César; Sahana, Nandita; Kaur, Harpreet; Tenllado, Francisco; Praveen, Shelly; Canto, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    In the Potyvirus genus, the P1 protein is the first N-terminal product processed from the viral polyprotein, followed by the helper-component proteinase (HCPro). In silencing suppression patch assays, we found that Potato virus Y (PVY) HCPro expressed from a P1-HCPro sequence increased the accumulation of a reporter gene, whereas protein expressed from an HCPro sequence did not, even with P1 supplied in trans. This enhancing effect of P1 has been noted in other potyviruses, but has remained unexplained. We analysed the accumulation of PVY HCPro in infiltrated tissues and found that it was higher when expressed from P1-HCPro than from HCPro sequences. Co-expression of heterologous suppressors increased the steady-state level of mRNA expressed from the HCPro sequence, but not that of protein. This suggests that, in the absence of P1 upstream, either HCPro acquires a conformation that affects negatively its activity or stability, or that its translation is reduced. To test these options, we purified HCPro expressed in the presence or absence of upstream P1, and found no difference in purification pattern and final soluble state. By contrast, alteration of the Kozak context in the HCPro mRNA sequence to favour translation increased partially suppressor accumulation and activity. Furthermore, protein activity was not lower than in protein expressed from P1-HCPro sequences. Thus, a direct role for P1 on HCPro suppressor activity or stability, by influencing its conformation during translation, can be excluded. However, P1 could still have an indirect effect favouring HCPro accumulation. Our data highlight the relevance of cis-acting translational elements in the heterologous expression of HCPro.

  1. Pregnancy zone protein, a proteinase-binding macroglobulin. Interactions with proteinases and methylamine.

    PubMed

    Christensen, U; Simonsen, M; Harrit, N; Sottrup-Jensen, L

    1989-11-28

    Human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is a major pregnancy-associated plasma protein, strongly related to alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). Its properties and its reactions with a number of enzymes, particularly chymotrypsin, and with methylamine have been investigated. It is concluded that native PZP molecules are dimers of disulfide-bridged 180-kDa subunits and that proteinase binding results in covalent 1:1 (tetrameric)PZP-enzyme complexes. Native PZP is unstable, and storage should be avoided, but when kept unfrozen at 0 degree C most PZP preparations stay native 1-3 months. The reaction of PZP with chymotrypsin involves (i) proteolysis of bait regions, (ii) cleavage of beta-cysteinyl-gamma-glutamyl thiol ester groups, (iii) some change of the conformation and quaternary structure of PZP, and (iv) the formation of covalent 1:1 chymotrypsin-PZP(tetramer) complexes in which chymotrypsin is active but shows less activity than free chymotrypsin. The emission spectra of intrinsic fluorescence show significant differences between the PZP-chymotrypsin complex and its native components, whereas no differences are observed between methylamine-reacted PZP and native PZP. Methylamine reacts with the beta-cysteinyl-gamma-glutamyl thiol ester groups of PZP in a second-order process with k = (13.6 +/- 0.5) M-1 s-1, pH 7.6, 25 degrees C. The reaction product is PZP(dimers); no PZP(tetramers) are formed. The proteinase-binding specificity of PZP is far more restricted than that of alpha 2M. Certain chymotrypsin-like and trypsin-like enzymes are bound much less efficiently than is chymotrypsin itself.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. High-molecular-mass multicatalytic proteinase complexes produced by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia strain BR.

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, P; Müller, A; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1992-01-01

    A major-high-molecular mass proteinase and seven latent minor proteinases were found in cell extracts and in concentrates of culture medium from Frankia sp. strain BR after nondenaturing electrophoresis in mixed gelatin-polyacrylamide gels. All of these complexes showed multicatalytic properties. Their molecular masses and their sedimentation coefficients varied from 1,300 kDa (28S) to 270 kDa (12S). The electroeluted 1,300-kDa proteinase complex dissociated into 11 low-molecular-mass proteinases (40 to 19 kDa) after sodium dodecyl sulfate activation at 30 degrees C and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. All of these electroeluted proteinases hydrolyzed N-carbobenzoxy-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-4-methoxy-beta- naphthylamide, D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-beta-naphthylamide, and Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide, whereas Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide was cleaved only by the six lower-molecular-mass proteinases (27.5 to 19 kDa). Examination by electron microscopy of uranyl acetate-stained, electroeluted 1,300- and 650-kDa intracellular and extracellular proteinase complexes showed ring-shaped and cylindrical particles (10 to 11 nm in diameter, 15 to 16 nm long) similar to those of eukaryotic prosomes and proteasomes. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat skeletal muscle proteasomes cross-reacted with all of the high-molecular-mass proteinase complexes and, after denaturation of the electroeluted 1,300-kDa band, with polypeptides of 35 to 38, 65, and 90 kDa. Electrophoresis of the activated cell extracts under denaturing conditions revealed 11 to 17 gelatinases from 40 to 19 kDa, including the 11 proteinases of the 1,300-kDa proteinase complex. The inhibition pattern of these proteinases is complex. Thiol-reactive compounds and 1-10-phenanthroline strongly inhibited all of the proteinases, but inhibitors against serine-type proteinases were also effective for most of them. Images PMID:1537794

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Proteolytic Activation of Pro-matrix Metalloproteinase-9 by Human Skin Is Controlled by Down-regulating Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 and Mediated by Tissue-associated Chymotrypsin-like Proteinase*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuan-Ping; Nien, Yih-Dar; Garner, Warren L.

    2008-01-01

    The proteolytic activation of pro-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 by conversion of the 92-kDa precursor into an 82-kDa active form has been observed in chronic wounds, tumor metastasis, and many inflammation-associated diseases, yet the mechanistic pathway to control this process has not been identified. In this report, we show that the massive expression and activation of MMP-9 in skin tissue from patients with chronically unhealed wounds could be reconstituted in vitro with cultured normal human skin by stimulation with transforming growth factor-β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We dissected the mechanistic pathway for TNF-α induced activation of pro-MMP-9 in human skin. We found that proteolytic activation of pro-MMP-9 was mediated by a tissue-associated chymotrypsin-like proteinase, designated here as pro-MMP-9 activator (pM9A). This unidentified activator specifically converted pro-MMP-9 but not pro-MMP-2, another member of the gelatinase family. The tissue-bound pM9A was steadily expressed and not regulated by TNF-α, which indicated that the cytokine-mediated activation of pro-MMP-9 might be regulated at the inhibitor level. Indeed, the skin constantly secreted tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 at the basal state. TNF-α, but not transforming growth factor-β, down-regulated this inhibitor. The TNF-α-mediated activation of pro-MMP-9 was tightly associated with down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in a dose-dependent manner. To establish this linkage, we demonstrate that the recombinant tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 could block the activation of pro-MMP-9 by either the intact skin or skin fractions. Thus, these studies suggest a novel regulation for the proteolytic activation of MMP-9 in human tissue, which is mediated by tissue-bound activator and controlled by down-regulation of a specific inhibitor. PMID:12004062

  4. Helper component-proteinase enhances the activity of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase and promotes the biosynthesis of plastidic isoprenoids in Potato virus Y-infected tobacco.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Ma, Dongyuan; Jin, Yongsheng; Tu, Yayi; Liu, Liping; Leng, Chunxu; Dong, Jiangli; Wang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Virus-infected plants show strong morphological and physiological alterations. Many physiological processes in chloroplast are affected, including the plastidic isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway [the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway]; indeed, isoprenoid contents have been demonstrated to be altered in virus-infected plants. In this study, we found that the levels of photosynthetic pigments and abscisic acid (ABA) were altered in Potato virus Y (PVY)-infected tobacco. Using yeast two-hybrid assays, we demonstrated an interaction between virus protein PVY helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) and tobacco chloroplast protein 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (NtDXS). This interaction was confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays and pull-down assays. The Transket_pyr domain (residues 394-561) of NtDXS was required for interaction with HC-Pro, while the N-terminal region of HC-Pro (residues 1-97) was necessary for interaction with NtDXS. Using in vitro enzyme activity assays, PVY HC-Pro was found to promote the synthase activity of NtDXS. We observed increases in photosynthetic pigment contents and ABA levels in transgenic plants with HC-Pro accumulating in the chloroplasts. During virus infection, the enhancement of plastidic isoprenoid biosynthesis was attributed to the enhancement of DXS activity by HC-Pro. Our study reveals a new role of HC-Pro in the host plant metabolic system and will contribute to the study of host-virus relationships.

  5. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against Hymenolepis microstoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A; Behnke, J M

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the efficacy of cysteine proteinases (CP) as anthelmintics for cestode infections in vivo. Hymenolepis microstoma is a natural parasite of house mice, and provides a convenient model system for the assessment of novel drugs for anthelmintic activity against cestodes. The experiments described in this paper indicate that treatment of H. microstoma infections in mice with the supernatant of papaya latex (PLS), containing active cysteine proteinases, is only minimally efficacious. The statistically significant effects seen on worm burden and biomass showed little evidence of dose dependency, were temporary and the role of cysteine proteinases as the active principles in PLS was not confirmed by specific inhibition with E-64. Worm fecundity was not affected by treatment at the doses used. We conclude also that this in vivo host-parasite system is not sensitive enough to be used reliably for the detection of cestocidal activity of compounds being screened as potential, novel anthelmintics.

  6. Human adenoviruses: propagation, purification, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Green, Maurice; Loewenstein, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    Detailed protocols are described for the propagation of adenoviruses (Ads) and adenovirus (Ad) vectors and their purification by CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation. A discussion of monolayer and spinner cell culture techniques suitable, respectively, for small- and large-scale growth of adenoviruses is provided. Protocols for cloning into and growth of Ad replication-deficient vectors using a convenient commercially available system are described. Lastly, time-tested plaque titration protocols for the accurate and convenient measurement of the infectivity of adenoviruses and adenovirus vectors are provided in detail.

  7. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of dominant negative ras(asn17) in 3T3L1 adipocytes does not alter insulin-stimulated P13-kinase activity or glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Gnudi, L; Frevert, E U; Houseknecht, K L; Erhardt, P; Kahn, B B

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the ras-map kinase and PI3-kinase cascades converge. We sought to determine whether PI3-kinase is downstream of ras in insulin signaling in a classic insulin target cell. We generated a recombinant adenovirus encoding dominant negative ras by cloning the human H-ras cDNA with a ser to asn substitution at amino acid 17 (ras(asn17)) into the pACCMVpLpA vector and cotransfecting 293 cells with the pJM17 plasmid containing the adenoviral genome. Efficiency of gene transfer was assessed by infecting fully differentiated 3T3L1 adipocytes with a recombinant adenovirus expressing beta-galactosidase (beta-gal); greater than 70% of cells were infected. Infection of adipocytes with ras(asn17) resulted in 10-fold greater expression than endogenous ras. This high efficiency gene transfer allowed biochemical assays. Insulin stimulation of ras-GTP formation was inhibited in ras(asn17)-expressing cells. Map kinase gel mobility shift revealed that insulin (1 UM) or epidermal growth factor (100 ng/ml) resulted in the appearance of a hyperphosphorylated species of p42 map kinase in uninfected cells and those expressing beta-gal but not in cells expressing ras(asn17). In contrast, insulin increased IRS-1-associated PI3-kinase activity approximately 10-fold in control cells and high level overexpression of ras(asn17) did not impair this effect. Similarly, insulin and epidermal growth factor activation of total (no immunoprecipitation) PI3-kinase activity in both cytosol and total cellular membranes and insulin stimulation of glucose transport were not affected by expression of dominant negative ras. Thus, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer is effective for studying insulin signaling in fully differentiated insulin target cells. Inhibition of ras activation abolishes insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of map kinase but does not affect insulin stimulation of PI3-kinase activity. In normal cell physiology, PI3-kinase does not appear to be downstream of ras in

  8. Proteinase A, a storage-globulin-degrading endopeptidase of vetch (Vicia sativa L.) seeds, is not involved in early steps of storage-protein mobilization.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Senyuk, V I; Shutov, A D; Nong, V H; Fischer, J; Horstmann, C; Müntz, K

    1997-09-01

    Proteinase A is a papain-like cysteine endopeptidase of vetch (Vicia sativa L.) which was assumed to initiate storage-globulin breakdown just after the onset of seed germination. This enzyme was purified from cotyledons of vetch seedlings. On gelatin-containg SDS gels, active proteinase A migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 21 kDa, whereas after heat denaturation its molecular size on SDS/PAGE was 29 kDa. Although proteinase A is capable of hydrolyzing storage globulins in vitro it could not be localized in the protein-body fraction of cotyledons from germinating seeds. cDNA clones encoding proteinase A precursor have been obtained by PCR. The precursor is composed of an N-terminal signal sequence followed by a propeptide, the region encoding mature proteinase A, and a C-terminal KDEL sequence. Mature proteinase A with a derived molecular mass of 25,244 Da does not have the KDEL sequence. The derived amino acid sequence of the proteinase A precursor is 78.2% identical to sulfhydryl-endopeptidase (SH-EP), a cysteine endopeptidase from germinating Vigna mungo seedlings. Northern blot analysis indicated that proteinase A mRNA appears de novo in cotyledons of 1-day-germinated vetch seeds, where its amount increases up to day 6. No proteinase A mRNA was detected in other vetch organs, not even in the embryo axis, which contains stored globulins. By means of antibodies raised against the purified and against recombinantly produced proteinase A, the 29-kDa bands of mature proteinase A were detected in cotyledon extracts of 6-day-germinated seeds when globulin degradation has already far proceeded. The reported data do not agree with the proposed triggering role of proteinase A in storage-globulin breakdown during germination.

  9. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  10. Characterization of a nucleotide stimulated aspartic proteinase in rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Paule, C R; Larner, J

    1996-01-01

    Inositol phosphoglycan molecules are believed to mediate multiple intracellular actions of insulin. They are released from plasma membranes in response to insulin binding and are transported into the cell. Release of insulin mediators is stimulated by MnATP and MgATP and is inhibited by p-aminobenzamidine. Inositol phosphoglycan mediators may be released by a poorly characterized mechanism requiring proteolytic cleavage of an attached protein from the mediator and phospholipase cleavage of the mediator from its membrane anchor. We examined rat liver plasma membranes for proteinase activity stimulated by insulin and MnATP. Although we could not demonstrate insulin stimulation, we have found and characterized a nucleotide-stimulated aspartic proteinase bound to rat liver plasma membranes. We also detected and separated a soluble activating factor for the proteinase. The activating factor appears to be a protein with M(r) approximately 70 kDa. PMID:8876431

  11. Proteinase K improves quantitative acylation studies.

    PubMed

    Fränzel, Benjamin; Fischer, Frank; Steegborn, Clemens; Wolters, Dirk Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation is a common PTM of proteins but is still challenging to analyze. Only few acetylome studies have been performed to tackle this issue. Yet, the detection of acetylated proteins in complex cell lysates remains to be improved. Here, we present a proteomic approach with proteinase K as a suitable protease to identify acetylated peptides quantitatively. We first optimized the digestion conditions using an artificial system of purified bovine histones to find the optimal protease. Subsequently, the capability of proteinase K was demonstrated in complex HEK293 cell lysates. Finally, SILAC in combination with MudPIT was used to show that quantification with proteinase K is possible. In this study, we identified a sheer number of 557 unique acetylated peptides originating from 633 acetylation sites.

  12. Characterization of recombinant CDR1, an Arabidopsis aspartic proteinase involved in disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Simões, Isaura; Faro, Rosário; Bur, Daniel; Faro, Carlos

    2007-10-26

    The Arabidopsis thaliana constitutive disease resistance 1 (CDR1) gene product is an aspartic proteinase that has been implicated in disease resistance signaling (Xia, Y., Suzuki, H., Borevitz, J., Blount, J., Guo, Z., Patel, K., Dixon, R. A., and Lamb, C. (2004) EMBO J. 23, 980-988). This apoplastic enzyme is a member of the group of "atypical" plant aspartic proteinases. As for other enzymes of this subtype, CDR1 has remained elusive until recently as a result of its unusual properties and localization. Here we report on the heterologous expression and characterization of recombinant CDR1, which displays unique enzymatic properties among plant aspartic proteinases. The highly restricted specificity requirements, insensitivity toward the typical aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin A, an unusually high optimal pH of 6.0-6.5, proteinase activity without irreversible prosegment removal, and dependence of catalytic activity on formation of a homo-dimer are some of the unusual properties observed for recombinant CDR1. These findings unveil a pattern of unprecedented functional complexity for Arabidopsis CDR1 and are consistent with a highly specific and regulated biological function. PMID:17650510

  13. Molecular insights into mechanisms of lepidopteran serine proteinase resistance to natural plant defenses.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Fábio K; Terra, Walter R

    2015-11-27

    Plants have a wide range of chemical defenses against predation, including substances that target digestive serine proteinases of herbivorous. Previous works demonstrated that lepidopteran insects have digestive serine proteinases resistant to plant proteinase inhibitors (PPIs) and ketone modifications, while coleopteran ones are sensitive to those plant defenses. This paper focuses on molecular aspects that lead lepidopteran serine proteinases to PPI and ketone modification resistance. Using biochemical experiments and computer 3D modeling we demonstrated that lepidopteran trypsins are more hydrophobic than coleopteran ones, a feature associated to trypsin oligomerization and decreased inhibition by PPI. Moreover, the determination of pKa values of chymotrypsin catalytic residues obtained by TPCK modification indicates that the environment around the active site of ketone-resistant and -sensitive chymotrypsins are different. Structural analysis using resistant and sensitive chymotrypsins data allowed us to point 2 hotspot regions around the active site that could explain the observed differences. Our set of results highlights features of serine proteinases important for understanding the resistance of insects to plant chemical defenses.

  14. A low-molecular-weight inhibitor of the neutral proteinase from rat intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Carney, I T; Curtis, C G; Kay, J K; Birket, N

    1980-01-01

    1. Rat intestinal smooth muscle was shown to contain endogenous inhibitory activity towards the neutral trypsin-like muscle proteinase described previously [Beynon & Kay (1978) Biochem. J. 173, 291--298]. 2. Comtamination of the muscle tissue by mucosal, blood and pancreatic inhibitors was shown to be unlikely. 3. The inhibitory activity was resolved into high- and low-molecular-weight components. 4. The low-molecular-weight component was purified to homogeneity. It has a molecular weight of approx. 9000 and was stable over the pH range 3--11. 5. It inhibited the muscle proteinase competitively (Ki congruent to t microM), but had no effect on any of the other proteinases tested. 6. Leupeptin also inhibited the muscle proteinase competitively (Ki congruent to 0.3 microM), whereas the low-molecular weight proteins gastrin, glucagon and insulin B-chain had very little effect. 7. A role for a weakly binding inhibitor in modulating the influence of the neutral proteinase on intracellular protein degradation is considered. Images Fig. 4. PMID:7396824

  15. Determination of proteinase 3-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes in inflammatory fluids.

    PubMed

    Dolman, K M; van de Wiel, B A; Kam, C M; Abbink, J J; Hack, C E; Sonnenberg, A; Powers, J C; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-12-14

    Physiological inhibitors were tested for their in vitro interaction with neutrophil proteinase 3 (PR3). The major plasma proteinase inhibitor of PR3 is alpha 1AT. We have developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for quantitative detection of PR3-alpha 1AT complexes formed in vivo in inflammatory exudates such as synovial fluid and plasma from patients with sepsis. Levels of PR3-alpha 1AT complexes correlated significantly with levels of human neutrophil elastase (HNE)-alpha 1AT complexes. Thus, in vivo alpha 1AT not only protects against excessive HNE activity, but also against excessive PR3 activity.

  16. Toll-like receptors recognize distinct proteinase-resistant glycoconjugates in Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh; Hara, Hiromitsu; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2015-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and autoimmune neuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome. The mechanism by which C. jejuni infection results in such the hyperimmunity is not completely understood. Host immunity plays an important role in the disease pathogenesis; however, little is known how immune system recognizes this human pathogen. In this study, we report that Toll-like receptors recognize distinct proteinase K-resistant glycoconjugates in C. jejuni and Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide is solely proteinase-resistant glycoconjugate in E. coli. In contrast, C. jejuni possesses at least five different components that are resistant to proteinase digestion and are capable of inducing NF-κB activation through TLR2 and TLR4. Possession of multiple activators of Toll-like receptors may be the unique strategy of C. jejuni to trigger hyperimmunity.

  17. Characterisation and mutational analysis of an ORF 1a-encoding proteinase domain responsible for proteolytic processing of the infectious bronchitis virus 1a/1b polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Liu, D X; Brown, T D

    1995-06-01

    Coronavirus gene expression involves proteolytic processing of the mRNA 1-encoded polyproteins by viral and cellular proteinases. Recently, we have demonstrated that an ORF 1b-encoded 100-kDa protein is proteolytically cleaved from the 1a/1b fusion polyprotein by a viral-specific proteinase of the picornavirus 3C proteinase group (3C-like proteinase). In this report, the 3C-like proteinase has been further analysed by internal deletion of a 2.3-kb fragment between the 3C-like proteinase-encoding region and ORF 1b and by substitution mutations of its catalytic centre as well as the two predicted cleavage sites flanking the 100-kDa protein. The results show that internal deletion of ORF 1a sequences from nucleotide 9911 to 12227 does not influence the catalytic activity of the proteinase in processing of the 1a/1b polyprotein to the 100-kDa protein species. Site-directed mutagenesis studies have confirmed that the predicted nucleophilic cysteine residue (Cys2922) and a histidine residue encoded by ORF 1a from nucleotide 8985 to 8987 (His2820) are essential for the catalytic activity of the proteinase, and that the QS(G) dipeptide bonds are its target cleavage sites. Substitution mutations of the third component of the putative catalytic triad, the glutamic acid 2843 (Glu2843) residue, however, do not affect the processing to the 100-kDa protein. In addition, cotransfection experiment shows that the 3C-like proteinase is capable of trans-cleavage of the 1a/1b polyprotein. These studies have confirmed the involvement of the 3C-like proteinase domain in processing of the 1a/1b polyprotein, the predicted catalytic centre of the proteinase, and its cleavage sites. PMID:7778277

  18. [Evalution of activity of acid aspartic proteinase in Candida strains isolated from oral cavity of patients with increased risk of mycosis].

    PubMed

    Rózga, A; Kurnatowska, A J; Raczyńsak-Witońska, G; Loga, G

    2001-01-01

    We have evaluated the activity of acid aspartic protease in 195 strains of Candida isolated from the oral cavity of three groups of patients. The first group comprised patients with cancer of the larynx qualified for surgery, the second- patients with neoplastic disease ( Hodgkin s disease, lymphoma, acute granulocytic leukaemia, lymphatic leukaemia, lung cancer, multiple myeloma, stomach cancer, breast cancer) who were not treated, the third group- patients with neoplastic diseases treated by chemotherapy. The strains of fungi were differentiated using API 20C and Api 20C AUX tests according to the protocol adopted at the Department of Medical Parasitology and Biology, Medical University of Lódz. The activity of acid protease was studied by Staib method in Rózga modification. Almost all strains showed high and very high proteolytic activity. The rang of proteolysis zone of Candida strains from the three groups of patients varied from 2,5 to 12,5 mm. We have found the mean proteolytic zones of strains isolated from groups I and III differed statistically significantly (p<0,001). Similarly, statisticall sihnificant difference was seen between these parameters for groups II and III (p<0,05), while there was no difference between strains from group I and II.

  19. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  20. Suppression of protein phosphatase 2A activity enhances Ad5/F35 adenovirus transduction efficiency in normal human B lymphocytes and in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Samson, Mélanie; Bertrand, Claudia; Dumont, Nellie; Drouin, Mathieu; Jung, Daniel

    2012-02-28

    Investigation of the molecular processes which control the development and function of lymphocytes is essential for our understanding of humoral immunity, as well as lymphocyte associated pathogenesis. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer provided a powerful tool to investigate these processes. We have previously demonstrated that adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 transduces plasma cell lines at a higher efficiency than primary B cells, owing to differences in intracellular trafficking. Given that phosphatases are effectors of intracellular trafficking, here we have analyzed the effects of a panel of phosphatase inhibitors on Ad5/F35 transduction efficiency in B lymphocytes in the present study. FACS analysis was conducted to determine Ad5/F35-EYFP transduction efficiency in lymphoid cells, including human primary B cells, following serine/threonine phosphatase (PSP) inhibitor treatment. We further used confocal microscopy to analyze intracellular trafficking and fate of CY3 labeled Ad5/F35 vectors, in PSP treated lymphoid cell. Finally, we analyzed the MAPK pathway by Western blot in PSP treated cells. Adenoviral transduction efficiency was unresponsive to inhibition of PP1 whereas inhibition of PP2A by cantharidic acid, or PP1 and PP2A by okadaic acid, substantially increased transduction efficiency. Importantly, confocal microscopy analyses revealed that inhibition of PP2A shut down adenovirus recycling. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A resulted in increased phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and MEK1/2. Taken together, these results suggest that Ad5/F35 is more efficiently transduced in cells following PP2A inhibition. Our results are in agreement with reports indicating that PP2A is involved in the formation of recycling vesicles and might be of interest for gene therapy applications.

  1. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  2. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Roger B.; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B.; Soliman, Mayra C.; Souza, Fernanda G.; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V.; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S.; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D.; Spilki, Fernando R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  4. Purification and analysis of proteinase-resistant mutants of recombinant platelet-derived growth factor-BB exhibiting improved biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, A L; Kirwin, P M; Craig, S; Bawden, L J; Green, D R; Price, M J; Richardson, S J; Fallon, A; Drummond, A H; Edwards, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB was expressed and secreted from yeast in order to study the structure-function relationships of this mitogen. A simple purification scheme has been developed which yields greater than 95% pure PDGF-BB. Analysis of this recombinant PDGF-BB shows partial proteolysis after arginine-32. Substitution of this arginine residue, or arginine-28 [a potential KEX2 (lysine-arginine endopeptidase) cleavage site], prevents or reduces cleavage of PDGF-BB respectively. These mutations result in a 5-fold increase in expression levels of PDGF-BB, and the resulting mutant proteins show higher activity in a number of biological assays than the cleaved wildtype PDGF-BB. These data are in accord with previous work by Giese, LaRochelle, May-Siroff, Robbins & Aaronson [(1990) Mol. Cell Biol. 10, 5496-5501] suggesting that the region isoleucine-25-phenylalanine-37 is involved in PDGF-receptor binding. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1731768

  5. Purification and properties of an alkaline proteinase of Fusarium culmorum.

    PubMed

    Pekkarinen, Anja I; Jones, Berne L; Niku-Paavola, Marja-Leena

    2002-02-01

    The disease Fusarium head blight (scab) causes severe problems for farmers and for the industries that use cereals. It is likely that the fungi that cause scab (Fusarium spp.) use various enzymes when they invade grains. We are studying enzymes that the fungi may use to hydrolyze grain proteins. To do this, Fusarium culmorum was grown in a gluten-containing medium from which an alkaline serine proteinase with a molecular mass of 28.7 kDa was purified by size-exclusion and cation exchange chromatographies. The enzyme was maximally active at pH 8.3-9.6 and 50 degrees C, but was unstable under these conditions. It hydrolyzed the synthetic substrates N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide and, to a lesser extent, N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Leu p-nitroanilide. It was inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and chymostatin, but not by soybean trypsin or Bowman-Birk inhibitors. Parts of the amino-acid sequence were up to 82% homologous with those of several fungal subtilisins. One of the active site amino acids was detected and it occupied the same relative position as in the other subtilisins. Therefore, on the basis of these characteristics, the proteinase is subtilisin-like. Purification of the enzyme was complicated by the fact that, when purified, it apparently underwent autolysis. The presence of extraneous protein stabilized the activity.

  6. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  7. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sook-Young; Hearing, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  8. Probing the specificity of cysteine proteinases at subsites remote from the active site: analysis of P4, P3, P2' and P3' variations in extended substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Portaro, F C; Santos, A B; Cezari, M H; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L; Carmona, E

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis by papain, cathepsin B and cathepsin L of internally quenched fluorescent peptides derived from the lead peptides Abz-AAFRSAQ-EDDnp [in which Abz and EDDnp stand for o-aminobenzoic acid and N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine respectively], to map the specificity of S(4) and S(3) subsites, and Abz-AFRSAAQ-EDDnp, to identify the specificity of S(2)' and S(3)'. Abz and EDDnp were the fluorescent quencher pair. These two series of peptides were cleaved at the Arg-Ser bond and systematic modifications at P(4), P(3), P(2)' and P(3)' were made. The S(4) to S(2)' subsites had a significant influence on the hydrolytic efficiencies of the three enzymes. Only papain activity was observed to be dependent on S(3)', indicating that its binding site is larger than those of cathepsins B and L. Hydrophobic amino acids were accepted at S(4), S(3), S(2)' and S(3)' of the three enzymes. The best substrates for cathepsins L and B had Trp and Asn at P(2)' respectively; variations at this position were less accepted by these enzymes. The best substrates for papain were peptides containing Trp, Tyr or Asn at P(3)'. Basic residues at P(3) and P(4) were well accepted by cathepsin L and papain. We also explored the susceptibility of substrates Abz-AFRSXAQ-EDDnp, modified at P(2)' (X), to human cathepsin B mutants from which one or two occluding loop contacts had been removed. The modifications at His(111) (H111A) and His(110) (H110A) of cathepsin B led to an increase in k(cat) values of one or two orders of magnitude. The hydrolytic efficiencies of these cathepsin B mutants became closer to those of papain or cathepsin L. PMID:10727410

  9. Ethylene-regulated expression of a carnation cysteine proteinase during flower petal senescence.

    PubMed

    Jones, M L; Larsen, P B; Woodson, W R

    1995-06-01

    The senescence of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower petals is regulated by the phytohormone ethylene and is associated with considerable catabolic activity including the loss of protein. In this paper we present the molecular cloning of a cysteine proteinase and show that its expression is regulated by ethylene and associated with petal senescence. A 1600 bp cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using a 5'-specific primer and 3'-nonspecific primer designed to amplify a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase cDNA from reverse-transcribed stylar RNA. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned product (pDCCP1) was found to share significant homology to several cysteine proteinases rather than ACC synthase. A single open reading frame of 428 amino acids was shown to share significant homology with other plant cysteine proteinases including greater than 70% identity with a cysteine proteinase from Arabidopsis thaliana. Amino acids in the active site of cysteine proteinases were conserved in the pDCCP1 peptide. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that the expression of pDCCP1 increased substantially with the onset of ethylene production and senescence of petals. Increased pDCCP1 expression was also associated with ethylene production in other senescing floral organs including ovaries and styles. The pDCCP1 transcript accumulated in petals treated with exogenous ethylene within 3 h and treatment of flowers with 2,5-norbornadiene, an inhibitor of ethylene action, prevented the increase in pDCCP1 expression in petals. The temporal and spatial patterns of pDCCP1 expression suggests a role for cysteine proteinase in the loss of protein during floral senescence.

  10. Two novel asparaginyl endopeptidase-like cysteine proteinases from the protist Trichomonas vaginalis: their evolutionary relationship within the clan CD cysteine proteinases.

    PubMed

    León-Félix, Josefina; Ortega-López, Jaime; Orozco-Solís, Ricardo; Arroyo, Rossana

    2004-06-23

    Cysteine proteinases (CPs) are important virulence factors of the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. A total of six genes coding for cathepsin L-like CPs belonging to clan CA have been identified in T. vaginalis. At least 23 distinct spots with proteolytic activity have been detected by two-dimensional (2-D) substrate gel electrophoresis from in vitro grown parasites; however, only few of them have been characterized. In this work, we detected six spots with proteolytic activity and molecular weights between 25 and 35 kDa. The six proteinases correspond to two distinct CP families: the papain-like family, represented by four spots with pIs between 4.5 and 5.5; and the legumain-like family represented by two spots with pI 6.3 and 6.5. Next, we obtained two cDNAs encoding for legumain-like CPs from T. vaginalis, which were named Tvlegu-1 and Tvlegu-2. The size of these cDNA clones were 1225 and 1364 bp, which encoded for 388 and 415 amino acids, respectively. Their putative translation products have molecular masses of 42.8 and 47.2 kDa, corresponding to inactive legumain-like CP precursors. The two sequences share approximately 40% identity at the amino acid level. These protein products can be classified within a branch of the legumain-like family in clan CD cysteine proteinases due to their sensitivity to specific proteinases inhibitors, their DNA sequences, and phylogenetic reconstruction. However, they do not correspond either to the typical asparaginyl endopeptidase or the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI): protein transamidase subfamilies. These results suggest that the TVLEGU-1 and TVLEGU-2 peptidases are likely to be part of a new subfamily within the legumain-like family of clan CD cysteine proteinases. Furthermore, they could be one of the missing links between prokaryotic and eukaryotic CPs in clan CD enzymes.

  11. [Preparation of Recombinant Human Adenoviruses Labeled with miniSOG].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohui; Xiao, Rong; Guo, Xiaojuan; Qu, Jianguo; Lu, Zhuozhuang; Hong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We wished to study the intracellular transport of adenoviruses. We constructed a novel recombinant adenovirus in which the structural protein IX was labeled with a mini-singlet oxygen generator (miniSOG). The miniSOG gene was synthesized by overlapping extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned to the pcDNA3 vector, and expressed in 293 cells. Activation of miniSOG generated sufficient numbers of singlet oxygen molecules to catalyze polymerization of diaminobenzidine into an osmiophilic reaction product resolvable by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To construct miniSOG-labelled recombinant adenoviruses, the miniSOG gene was subcloned downstream of the IX gene in a pShuttle plasmid. Adenoviral plasmid pAd5-IXSOG was generated by homologous recombination of the modified shuttle plasmid (pShuttle-IXSOG) with the backbone plasmid (pAdeasy-1) in the BJ5183 strain of Eschericia coli. Adenovirus HAdV-5-IXSOG was rescued by transfection of 293 cells with the linearized pAd5-IXSOG. After propagation, virions were purified using the CsC1 ultracentrifugation method. Finally, HAdV-5-IXSOG in 2.0 mL with a particle titer of 6 x 1011 vp/mL was obtained. Morphology of HAdV-5-IXSOG was verified by TEM. Fusion of IX with the miniSOG gene was confirmed by PCR. In conclusion, miniSOG-labeled recombinant adenoviruses were constructed, which could be valuable tools for virus tracking by TEM. PMID:27295881

  12. Ozone effects on inhibitors of human neutrophil proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.E.; Stack, M.S.; Johnson, D.A.

    1987-02-15

    The effects of ozone on human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (A-1-PI), alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (A-1-Achy), bronchial leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (BLPI), and Eglin C were studied using in vitro exposures in phosphate-buffered solutions. Following ozone exposure, inhibitory activities against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and/or cathepsin G (Cat G) were measured. Exposure of A-1-PI to 50 mol O3/mol protein resulted in a complete loss of HNE inhibitory activity, whereas A-1-Achy lost only 50% of its Cat G inhibitory activity and remained half active even after exposure to 250 mol of O3. At 40 mol O3/mol protein, BLPI lost 79% of its activity against HNE and 87% of its Cat G inhibitory activity. Eglin C, a leech-derived inhibitor, lost 81% of its HNE inhibitory activity and 92% of its ability to inhibit Cat G when exposed to 40 mol O3/mol. Amino acid analyses of ozone-exposed inhibitors showed destruction of Trp, Met, Tyr, and His with as little as 10 mol O3/mol protein, and higher levels of O3 resulted in more extensive oxidation of susceptible residues. The variable ozone susceptibility of the different amino acid residues in the four proteins indicated that oxidation was a function of protein structure, as well as the inherent susceptibility of particular amino acids. Exposure of A-1-PI and BLPI in the presence of the antioxidants, Trolox C (water soluble vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C), showed that antioxidant vitamins may protect proteins from oxidative inactivation by ozone. Methionine-specific modification of BLPI reduced its HNE and Cat G inhibitory activities. Two moles of N-chlorosuccinimide per mole of BLPI methionine caused an 80% reduction in activity against Cat G, but only a 40% reduction in HNE inhibitory activity.

  13. Excessive fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and interferes enamel proteinases secretion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Yanhui; Wang, Cheng; Zhao, Lijun; Sun, Dianjun

    2013-06-01

    Protein retention in the enamel layer during tooth formation is well known to be associated with dental fluorosis but the underlying mechanism is unclear. The functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) correlate directly with secreted protein metabolism. We used an ameloblast-derived cell line to determine whether excessive amounts of fluoride cause ER stress, and whether this interferes with the secretion of enamel matrix proteinases. ER stress activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). Here, we used real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence to study the effect of fluoride on the expression, translation, and secretion of UPR transcription factors in ameloblast-like cells. Measurement of both the gene and protein expression of UPR transcription factors indicated that high-dose fluoride increases the expression of UPR transcription factors in a dose-dependent manner. We also used ELISA to detect and quantify the enamel proteinases secreted by ameloblasts. We found a corresponding decrease in extracellular secretion of the enamel proteinases matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-4, after exposure to fluoride. Furthermore, correlation analysis indicated that the expression of UPR transcription factors showed a strong inverse correlation with that of enamel proteinases. The results suggest that high-dose fluoride initiates an ER stress response in ameloblasts and induces the UPR, which interferes with the synthesis and secretion of enamel proteinases. Taken together, these results suggest that excessive ingestion of fluoride during tooth formation can decrease the secretion of proteinases, thus causing protein retention in the enamel layer, indicating that the ER stress response may be responsible for dental fluorosis.

  14. Salicylic Acid Inhibits Synthesis of Proteinase Inhibitors in Tomato Leaves Induced by Systemin and Jasmonic Acid.

    PubMed Central

    Doares, S. H.; Narvaez-Vasquez, J.; Conconi, A.; Ryan, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), previously shown to inhibit proteinase inhibitor synthesis induced by wounding, oligouronides (H.M. Doherty, R.R. Selvendran, D.J. Bowles [1988] Physiol Mol Plant Pathol 33: 377-384), and linolenic acid (H. Pena-Cortes, T. Albrecht, S. Prat, E.W. Weiler, L. Willmitzer [1993] Planta 191: 123-128), are shown here to be potent inhibitors of systemin-induced and jasmonic acid (JA)-induced synthesis of proteinase inhibitor mRNAs and proteins. The inhibition by SA and ASA of proteinase inhibitor synthesis induced by systemin and JA, as well as by wounding and oligosaccharide elicitors, provides further evidence that both oligosaccharide and polypeptide inducer molecules utilize the octadecanoid pathway to signal the activation of proteinase inhibitor genes. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) leaves were pulse labeled with [35S]methionine, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the inhibitory effects of SA are shown to be specific for the synthesis of a small number of JA-inducible proteins that includes the proteinase inhibitors. Previous results have shown that SA inhibits the conversion of 13S-hydroperoxy linolenic acid to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, thereby inhibiting the signaling pathway by blocking synthesis of JA. Here we report that the inhibition of synthesis of proteinase inhibitor proteins and mRNAs by SA in both light and darkness also occurs at a step in the signal transduction pathway, after JA synthesis but preceding transcription of the inhibitor genes. PMID:12228577

  15. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  16. A triticale water-deficit-inducible phytocystatin inhibits endogenous cysteine proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Magdalena; Szewińska, Joanna; Mielecki, Marcin; Nykiel, Małgorzata; Imai, Ryozo; Bielawski, Wiesław; Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Water-deficit is accompanied by an increase in proteolysis. Phytocystatins are plant inhibitors of cysteine proteinases that belong to the papain and legumain family. A cDNA encoding the protein inhibitor TrcC-8 was identified in the vegetative organs of triticale. In response to water-deficit, increases in the mRNA levels of TrcC-8 were observed in leaf and root tissues. Immunoblot analysis indicated that accumulation of the TrcC-8 protein occurred after 72h of water-deficit in the seedlings. Using recombinant protein, inhibitory activity of TrcC-8 against cysteine proteases from triticale and wheat tissues was analyzed. Under water-deficit conditions, there are increases in cysteine proteinase activities in both plant tissues. The cysteine proteinase activities were inhibited by addition of the recombinant TrcC-8 protein. These results suggest a potential role for the triticale phytocystatin in modulating cysteine proteinase activities during water-deficit conditions. PMID:25462979

  17. A triticale water-deficit-inducible phytocystatin inhibits endogenous cysteine proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Magdalena; Szewińska, Joanna; Mielecki, Marcin; Nykiel, Małgorzata; Imai, Ryozo; Bielawski, Wiesław; Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Water-deficit is accompanied by an increase in proteolysis. Phytocystatins are plant inhibitors of cysteine proteinases that belong to the papain and legumain family. A cDNA encoding the protein inhibitor TrcC-8 was identified in the vegetative organs of triticale. In response to water-deficit, increases in the mRNA levels of TrcC-8 were observed in leaf and root tissues. Immunoblot analysis indicated that accumulation of the TrcC-8 protein occurred after 72h of water-deficit in the seedlings. Using recombinant protein, inhibitory activity of TrcC-8 against cysteine proteases from triticale and wheat tissues was analyzed. Under water-deficit conditions, there are increases in cysteine proteinase activities in both plant tissues. The cysteine proteinase activities were inhibited by addition of the recombinant TrcC-8 protein. These results suggest a potential role for the triticale phytocystatin in modulating cysteine proteinase activities during water-deficit conditions.

  18. [Downregulation of Human Adenovirus DNA Polymerase Gene by Modified siRNAs].

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Chernolovskaya, E L; Zenkova, M A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses, in particular D8, D19, and D37, cause ocular infections. Currently, there is no available causally directed treatment, which efficiently counteracts adenoviral infectious diseases. In our previous work, we showed that gene silencing by means of RNA interference is an effective approach for downregulation of human species D adenoviruses replication. In this study, we compared the biological activity of siRNAs and their modified analogs targeting human species D adenoviruses DNA polymerase. We found that one of selectively 2'-O-methyl modified siRNAs mediates stable and long-lasting suppression of the target gene (12 days post transfection). We suppose that this siRNA can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against human species D adenoviruses.

  19. Effect of added proteinases and level of starter culture on the formation of biogenic amines in raw milk Manchego cheese.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, E; Tomillo, J; Núñez, M

    1999-11-15

    The influence of two proteinases (Bacillus subtilis neutral proteinase and Micrococcus sp. cysteine proteinase) and two starter culture levels (0.1% and 1%) on biogenic amine formation has been studied in raw ewes' milk Manchego cheese. Amino acid decarboxylating micro-organisms were determined on tyrosine enriched selective media. Biogenic amines were analysed by capillary electrophoresis in citrate buffer at pH 3.6. Addition of proteinases and level of starter culture did not influence the population of micro-organisms with amino acid decarboxylating activity, which represented on average 1% of the bacterial population in 30-day-old cheeses. Tyramine and histamine were detected in all batches of cheese from day 30. Concentrations of tyramine and histamine were higher in cheeses made from milk with neutral proteinase (up to 356 and 284 mg kg(-1), respectively, after 90 days) than in cheeses made from milk with cysteine proteinase (up to 269 and 189 mg kg(-1), respectively) or with no proteinase added (up to 305 and 226 mg kg(-1), respectively). Formation of tyramine and histamine was also favoured in cheeses made with 1% starter culture with respect to cheeses made with only 0.1% starter culture, probably due to the higher pH values of the former cheeses. After 90 days of ripening, concentrations of 10-20 mg kg(-1) phenylethylamine were observed in 9 of the 12 batches, and levels < 10 mg kg(-1) tryptamine were only detected in 3 batches, with no significant relationship between the concentration of these amines and proteinase addition or level of starter culture. PMID:10733250

  20. Use of Recombinant Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 1 To Identify a Potent Inhibitor of Amebic Invasion in a Human Colonic Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Meléndez-López, Samuel G.; Herdman, Scott; Hirata, Ken; Choi, Min-Ho; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles; Caffrey, Conor R.; Hansell, Elisabeth; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Chen, Yen Ting; Roush, William R.; McKerrow, James; Eckmann, Lars; Guo, Jianhua; Stanley, Samuel L.; Reed, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are key virulence factors of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that cysteine proteinases play a central role in tissue invasion and disruption of host defenses by digesting components of the extracellular matrix, immunoglobulins, complement, and cytokines. Analysis of the E. histolytica genome project has revealed more than 40 genes encoding cysteine proteinases. We have focused on E. histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 (EhCP1) because it is one of two cysteine proteinases unique to invasive E. histolytica and is highly expressed and released. Recombinant EhCP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded to an active enzyme with a pH optimum of 6.0. We used positional-scanning synthetic tetrapeptide combinatorial libraries to map the specificity of the P1 to P4 subsites of the active site cleft. Arginine was strongly preferred at P2, an unusual specificity among clan CA proteinases. A new vinyl sulfone inhibitor, WRR483, was synthesized based on this specificity to target EhCP1. Recombinant EhCP1 cleaved key components of the host immune system, C3, immunoglobulin G, and pro-interleukin-18, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. EhCP1 localized to large cytoplasmic vesicles, distinct from the sites of other proteinases. To gain insight into the role of secreted cysteine proteinases in amebic invasion, we tested the effect of the vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors K11777 and WRR483 on invasion of human colonic xenografts. The resultant dramatic inhibition of invasion by both inhibitors in this human colonic model of amebiasis strongly suggests a significant role of secreted amebic proteinases, such as EhCP1, in the pathogenesis of amebiasis. PMID:17513563

  1. Human cytomegalovirus maturational proteinase: expression in Escherichia coli, purification, and enzymatic characterization by using peptide substrate mimics of natural cleavage sites.

    PubMed Central

    Burck, P J; Berg, D H; Luk, T P; Sassmannshausen, L M; Wakulchik, M; Smith, D P; Hsiung, H M; Becker, G W; Gibson, W; Villarreal, E C

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) assembly protein, resulting in truncation of its C terminus, is an essential step in virion maturation. The proteinase responsible for this cleavage is the amino-terminal half of the protein encoded by the UL80a open reading fame. We have obtained high expression levels of this 256-amino-acid HCMV proteinase, assemblin, in Escherichia coli. In addition to the 28-kDa proteinase, a 15-kDa protein comprising the first 143 amino acids and a 13-kDa protein comprising the last 113 amino acids of the 28-kDa HCMV proteinase were present. Both the 28-kDa proteinase and the 15-kDa protein were purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure utilizing anion exchange in urea and dithiothreitol and size exclusion in NaSCN and dithiothreitol. Activation of the purified 28-kDa proteinase required denaturation in urea as well as complete reduction of all five cysteine residues in the molecule. Removal of the urea by dialysis with retention of the reducing agent yielded an active proteinase. Addition of glycerol to 50% enhanced the activity. The HCMV proteinase cleaved the peptides RGVVNASSRLAK and SYVKASVSPE, which are mimics of the maturational (M)- and release (R)-site sequences, respectively, in the UL80a-encoded protein. The cleavage site in the peptides was at the same Ala-Ser scissile bond as observed in the UL80a protein. The Km value for the cleavage of RGVVNASSRLAK (M-site mimic) by the proteinase was similar to that for SYVKASVSPE (R-site mimic), but the turnover (kcat) of the M-site peptide mimic substrate by the proteinase was six to eight times faster. The peptide homologs of the herpes simplex virus type 1 M- and R-site sequences in the UL26-encoded protein were also cleaved by the HCMV proteinase, although at rates slower than those for the HCMV substrates. The HCMV proteinase was inhibited by Zn2+ and by alkylating agents, but only at very high inhibitor concentrations. The purified 15-kDa protein

  2. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  3. A Trypanosoma cruzi-secreted 80 kDa proteinase with specificity for human collagen types I and IV.

    PubMed Central

    Santana, J M; Grellier, P; Schrével, J; Teixeira, A R

    1997-01-01

    Specific interactions between parasites and extracellular matrix components are an important mechanism in the dissemination of Chagas' disease. Binding of the extracellular matrix proteins to Trypanosoma cruzi receptors has been described as a significant step in this phenomenon. In this study, a specific proteinase activity was identified in cell-free extracts of amastigote, trypomastigote and epimastigote forms of T. cruzi using the collagenase fluorogenic substrate N-Suc-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin. Isolation of this activity was achieved by a four-step FPLC procedure. Optimal enzyme activity was found to occur at pH 8.0 and was associated with a single T. cruzi 80 kDa protein (Tc 80 proteinase) on SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions. An internal peptide sequence of Tc 80 proteinase was obtained (AGDNYTPPE), and no similarity was found to previously described proteinases of T. cruzi. This enzyme activity is strongly inhibited by HgCl2, tosyl-lysylchloromethane ('TLCK') p-chloromercuribenzoate and benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Ala-diazomethane. The purified enzyme was able to hydrolyse purified human [14C]collagen types I and IV at neutral pH, but not 14C-labelled BSA, rat laminin, rabbit IgG or small proteins such as insulin or cytochrome c. In addition, Tc 80 proteinase activity was found to be secreted by T. cruzi forms infective to mammalian cells. Furthermore we demonstrated that purified Tc 80 proteinase mediates native collagen type I hydrolysis in rat mesentery. This feature is compared with that of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. These findings suggest that Tc 80 proteinase may facilitate T. cruzi host-cell infection by degrading the collagens of the extracellular matrix and could represent a good target for Chagas' disease chemotherapy. PMID:9224638

  4. Acid-Soluble Material of Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P. A.; Jaume, F.; Flamencourt, P.; Biserte, G.

    1970-01-01

    Two methods are described for adenovirus capsid disruption and extraction of acid-soluble proteins from the viral core. The acid-soluble material of adenovirus consisted of three major proteins, one of them being selectively extracted after mild disruption of the virus particle. Some chemical properties of these proteins are reported. Images PMID:4986288

  5. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic proteinase from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    PubMed

    Llorente, Berta E; Brutti, Cristina B; Caffini, Néstor O

    2004-12-29

    The study of proteinase expression in crude extracts from different organs of the globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) disclosed that enzymes with proteolytic and milk-clotting activity are mainly located in mature flowers. Maximum proteolytic activity was recorded at pH 5.0, and inhibition studies showed that only pepstatin, specific for aspartic proteinases, presented a significant inhibitory effect. Such properties, in addition to easy enzyme inactivation by moderate heating, make this crude protease extract potentially useful for cheese production. Adsorption with activated carbon, together with anion exchange and affinity chromatography, led to the isolation of a heterodimeric milk-clotting proteinase consisting of 30- and 15-kDa subunits. MALDI-TOF MS of the 15-kDa chain determined a 15.358-Da mass, and the terminal amino sequence presented 96% homology with the smaller cardosin A subunit. The amino terminal sequence of the 30-kDa chain proved to be identical to the larger cardosin A subunit. Electrophoresis evidenced proteinase self-processing that was confirmed by immunoblots presenting 62-, 30-, and 15-kDa bands.

  6. Isolation and characterization of cancer procoagulant: a cysteine proteinase from malignant tissue.

    PubMed

    Falanga, A; Gordon, S G

    1985-09-24

    Cancer procoagulant, a proteolytic procoagulant enzyme, has been purified from rabbit V2 carcinoma extracts by two procedures. In the first, the protein was purified by benzamidine--Sepharose affinity chromatography, gel filtration chromatography, and phenyl-Sepharose hydrophobic chromatography. Antiserum was raised against the purified protein and was used to prepare an immunoadsorbent column. In the second, tumor extracts were purified by immunoaffinity chromatography followed by p-(chloromercuri)benzoate affinity chromatography. The second procedure was substantially quicker and easier. The final product of both procedures was homogeneous on the basis of analytical sodium dodecyl sulfate--polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. The molecular weight was 68 000 and the isoelectric point 4.8. The proteinase activity of cancer procoagulant directly activated factor X, in the absence of factor VII, and was inhibited by 1 mM iodoacetamide and 0.1 mM mercury which are classic cysteine proteinase inhibitors. A carbohydrate analysis showed less than 1 mol of hexose or sialic acid/mol of protein. The amino acid analysis showed that serine (19.1%), glycine (18.77%), and glutamic acid (12.5%) were the prevalent amino acids. The amino acid composition of cancer procoagulant was substantially different than other known factor X activating proteinases or other cysteine proteinases including cathepsin B.

  7. Proteinase from germinating bean cotyledons. Evidence for involvement of a thiol group in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Csoma, C; Polgár, L

    1984-09-15

    To degrade storage proteins germinating seeds synthesize proteinases de novo that can be inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents [Baumgartner & Chrispeels (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 77, 223-233]. We have elaborated a procedure for isolation of such a proteinase from the cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris. The purification procedure involved fractionation of the cotyledon homogenate with acetone and with (NH4)2SO4 and successive chromatographies on DEAE-cellulose, activated thiol-Sepharose Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 23,400, proved to be highly specific for the asparagine side chain and blocking of its thiol group resulted in loss of the catalytic activity. The chemical properties of the thiol group of the bean enzyme were investigated by acylation with t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-asparagine p-nitro-phenyl ester and by alkylations with iodoacetamide and iodoacetate. Deviations from normal pH-rate profile were observed, which indicated that the thiol group is not a simple functional group, but constitutes a part of an interactive system at the active site. The pKa value for acylation and the magnitude of the rate constant for alkylation with iodoacetate revealed that the bean proteinase possesses some properties not shared by papain and the other cysteine proteinases studied to date.

  8. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm.

  9. Proteinases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa evoke mucin release by tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, J D; Tandler, B; Liedtke, C M; Boat, T F

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the potential of exoproducts from pathogenic bacteria to stimulate the release of high molecular weight mucins from goblet cells of airway epithelium in a rabbit tracheal explant system. Culture supernatants from proteolytic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens, but not supernatants from a number of non-proteolytic strains, released mucins from goblet cells. Highly purified elastase and alkaline proteinase from P. aeruginosa stimulated goblet cell mucin release in a dose-dependent fashion. Lipopolysaccharide, exotoxin A, and alginate of P. aeruginosa did not possess mucin release properties. Proteolytic activity was required for mucin release by P. aeruginosa elastase, but such release in goblet cells was not mediated by cyclic AMP. Morphologic studies suggested rapid release of mucins from goblet cells was response to elastase by a process resembling apocrine secretion. Several nonbacterial proteinases mimicked the effect of Pseudomonas proteases. These studies provide support for the hypothesis that bacterial and other play a role in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion in acute and chronic lung infections. Images PMID:6568227

  10. Quantitative detection of human adenoviruses in wastewater and combined sewer overflows influencing a Michigan river.

    PubMed

    Fong, Theng-Theng; Phanikumar, Mantha S; Xagoraraki, Irene; Rose, Joan B

    2010-02-01

    Enteric viruses are important pathogens found in contaminated surface waters and have previously been detected in waters of the Great Lakes. Human adenoviruses were monitored because of their high prevalence and persistence in aquatic environments. In this study, we quantified adenoviruses in wastewater, surface water, and combined sewer overflows (CSOs) by real-time PCR. Between August 2005 and August 2006, adenovirus concentrations in raw sewage, primary-treated effluent, secondary-treated effluent, and chlorinated effluent from a wastewater treatment plant in Michigan were examined. CSO samples (n = 6) were collected from a CSO retention basin in Grand Rapids, MI. Adenoviruses were detected in 100% of wastewater and CSO discharge samples. Average adenovirus DNA concentrations in sewage and CSOs were 1.15 x 10(6) viruses/liter and 5.35 x 10(5) viruses/liter, respectively. Adenovirus removal was <2 log(10) (99%) at the wastewater treatment plant. Adenovirus type 41 (60% of clones), type 12 (29%), type 40 (3%), type 2 (3%), and type 3 (3%) were isolated from raw sewage and primary effluents (n = 28). Six of 20 surface water samples from recreational parks at the lower Grand River showed virus concentrations above the real-time PCR detection limit (average, 7.8 x 10(3) viruses/liter). This research demonstrates that wastewater effluents and wastewater-impacted surface waters in the lower Grand River in Michigan contain high levels of viruses and may not be suitable for full-body recreational activities. High concentrations of adenovirus in these waters may be due to inefficient removal during wastewater treatment and to the high persistence of these viruses in the environment.

  11. Subunit structure of karatasin, the proteinase isolated from Bromelia plumieri (karatas).

    PubMed

    Montes, C; Amador, M; Cuevas, D; Cordoba, F

    1990-01-01

    Close to 15% of the karatasin proteinase activity in the fruit juice of Bromelia plumieri (karatas) is present outside dialysis Visking tubing in 7 days in 0.2 M acetate buffer (pH) 3.5 or 6.5) containing phenyl mercuric acetate. The small proteinase(s), distinct from the 85% activity in juice due to nondialysable karatasin with a reported Mr of 24,868, separates across Spectrapore (13 kDa) membranes but not across Spectrapore with 3.5 kDa average pore diameter. The dialyzed proteinase is named karatasin-D (K-D). Purified non-Dialysable karatasin can be dissociated to what seems to be K-D by incubation in a buffer solution, containing SDS and 2-mercaptoethanol with phenyl mercuric acetate, in dialysis experiments for 8 days at room temperature using Spectrapore 13 kDa tubing. Thus, native karatasin in B. plumieri fruit juice seem to be the result of association of 2 small molecular mass K-D subunits, linked together by disulfide bonds and electrostatic forces, in equilibrium with small amounts of free K-D molecules. The amino acid composition and partial sequence of karatasin up to the 14th position from the amino terminus have discrete analogies with papain and with stem bromelain.

  12. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGES

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; et al

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  13. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  14. A chymotrypsin-like proteinase from the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B

    2005-08-01

    A chymotrypsin-like proteinase was isolated from the posterior midgut of larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme, TmC1, was purified to homogeneity as determined by SDS-PAGE and postelectrophoretic activity detection. TmC1 had a molecular mass of 23.0 kDa, pI of 8.4, a pH optimum of 9.5, and the optimal temperature for activity was 51 degrees C. The proteinase displayed high stability at temperatures below 43 degrees C and in the pH range 6.5-11.2, which is inclusive of the pH of the posterior and middle midgut. The enzyme hydrolyzed long chymotrypsin peptide substrates SucAAPFpNA, SucAAPLpNA and GlpAALpNA and did not hydrolyze short chymotrypsin substrates. Kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction demonstrated that the best substrate was SucAAPFpNA, with k(cat app) 36.5 s(-1) and K(m) 1.59 mM. However, the enzyme had a lower K(m) for SucAAPLpNA, 0.5 mM. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) was an effective inhibitor of TmC1, and the proteinase was not inhibited by either tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) or N(alpha)-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK). However, the activity of TmC1 was reduced with sulfhydryl reagents. Several plant and insect proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors were active against the purified enzyme, the most effective being Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI). The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme was IISGSAASKGQFPWQ, which was up to 67% similar to other insect chymotrypsin-like proteinases and 47% similar to mammalian chymotrypsin A. The amino acid composition of TmC1 differed significantly from previously isolated T. molitor enzymes.

  15. Proteinases in Naegleria Fowleri (strain NF3), a pathogenic amoeba: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Mat Amin, Nakisah

    2004-12-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba, known as a causative agent for a fatal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in man such as Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Factors contributing to its pathogenicity and its distribution in the environment have been investigated by previous researchers. In case of its pathogenicity, several enzymes such as phospolipase A and sphingomyelinase, have been proposed to probably act as aggressors in promoting PAM but no study so far have been conducted to investigate the presence of proteinase enzyme in this amoeba although a 56kDa cystein proteinase enzyme has been identified in Entamoeba histolytica as an important contributing factor in the amoeba's virulence. In this preliminary study, a pathogenic amoeba, Naegleria fowleri (strain NF3) was examined for the presence of proteinases. Samples of enzymes in this amoeba were analysed by electrophoresis using SDS-PAGE-gelatin gels. The results showed that this amoeba possesses at least two high molecular weight proteinases on gelatin gels; their apparent molecular weights are approximately 128 kDa and approximately 170 kDa. Band of approximately 128 kDa enzyme is membrane-associated and its activity is higher at alkaline pH compared with lower pH; at lower pH, its activity is greatly stimulated by DTT. The approximately 170 kDa band enzyme appears to be inactivated at pH 8.0, at lower ph its activity is higher and DTT-dependance. The activity of this enzyme is partially inhibited by inhibitor E-64 but markedly inhibited to antipain suggesting it belongs to the cysteine proteinase group.

  16. Clinical and Virologic Characteristics May Aid Distinction of Acute Adenovirus Disease from Kawasaki Disease with Incidental Adenovirus Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunkyung; Kajon, Adriana E; Wang, Huanyu; Salamon, Doug; Texter, Karen; Ramilo, Octavio; Leber, Amy; Jaggi, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Incidental adenovirus detection in Kawasaki disease (KD) is important to differentiate from acute adenovirus disease. Twenty-four of 25 children with adenovirus disease and mimicking features of KD had <4 KD-like features, predominance of species B or E, and higher viral burden compared with those with KD and incidental adenovirus detection. PMID:26707621

  17. Particle Tracking of Intracellular Trafficking of Octaarginine-modified Liposomes: A Comparative Study With Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Hidetaka; Enoto, Kaoru; Masuda, Tomoya; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tani, Tomomi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It is previously reported that octaarginine (R8)-modified liposome (R8-Lip) was taken up via macropinocytosis, and subsequently delivered to the nuclear periphery. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism for the cytoplasmic transport of R8-Lips, comparing with that for adenovirus. Treatment with microtubule-disruption reagent (nocodazole) inhibited the transfection activity of plasmid DNA (pDNA)-encapsulating R8-Lip more extensively than that of adenovirus. The directional transport of R8-Lips along green fluorescent protein (GFP)–tagged microtubules was observed; however, the velocity was slower than those for adenovirus or endosomes that were devoid of R8-Lips. These directional motions were abrogated in R8-Lips by nocodazole treatment, whereas adenovirus continued to undergo random motion. This finding suggests that the nuclear access of R8-Lip predominantly involves microtubule-dependent transport, whereas an apparent diffusive motion is also operative in nuclear access of adenovirus. Furthermore, quantum dot-labeled pDNA underwent directional motion concomitantly with rhodamine-labeled lipid envelopes, indicating that the R8-Lips were subject to microtubule-dependent transport in the intact form. Dual particle tracking of carriers and endosomes revealed that R8-Lip was directionally transported, associated with endosomes, whereas this occurs after endosomal escape in adenovirus. Collectively, the findings reported herein indicate that vesicular transport is a key factor in the cytoplasmic transport of R8-Lips. PMID:20216528

  18. Adenovirus type 5 interactions with human blood cells may compromise systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mark; Onion, David; Green, Nicky K; Aslan, Kriss; Rajaratnam, Ratna; Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Phipps, Sue; Hale, Sarah; Mautner, Vivien; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2006-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenovirus vectors requires that the virus is not inactivated in the bloodstream. Serum neutralizing activity is well documented, but we show here that type 5 adenovirus also interacts with human blood cells. Over 90% of a typical virus dose binds to human (but not murine) erythrocytes ex vivo, and samples from a patient administered adenovirus in a clinical trial showed that over 98% of viral DNA in the blood was cell associated. In contrast, nearly all viral genomes in the murine bloodstream are free in the plasma. Adenovirus bound to human blood cells fails to infect A549 lung carcinoma cells, although dilution to below 1.7 x 10(7) blood cells/ml relieves this inhibition. Addition of blood cells can prevent infection by adenovirus that has been prebound to A549 cells. Adenovirus also associates with human neutrophils and monocytes ex vivo, particularly in the presence of autologous plasma, giving dose-dependent transgene expression in CD14-positive monocytes. Finally, although plasma with a high neutralizing titer (defined on A549 cells) inhibits monocyte infection, weakly neutralizing plasma can actually enhance monocyte transduction. This may increase antigen presentation following intravenous injection, while blood cell binding may both decrease access of the virus to extravascular targets and inhibit infection of cells to which the virus does gain access. PMID:16580883

  19. Viral DNA synthesis-dependent titration of a cellular repressor activates transcription of the human adenovirus type 2 IVa2 gene.

    PubMed

    Iftode, C; Flint, S J

    2004-12-21

    Synthesis of progeny DNA genomes in cells infected by human subgroup C adenoviruses leads to several changes in viral gene expression. These changes include transcription from previously silent, late promoters, such as the IV(a2) promoter, and a large increase in the efficiency of major-late (ML) transcription. Some of these changes appear to take place sequentially, because the product of the IV(a2) gene has been implicated in stimulation of ML transcription. Our previous biochemical studies suggested that IV(a2) transcription is regulated by viral DNA synthesis-dependent relief of transcriptional repression by a cellular protein that we termed IV(a2)-RF. To test the relevance of such a repressor-titration mechanism during the viral infectious cycle, we introduced into the endogenous IV(a2) promoter two mutations that impair in vitro-binding of IV(a2)-RF, but introduce no change (Rep7) or one conservative amino acid substitution (Rep6) into the overlapping coding sequence for the viral DNA polymerase. The results of run-on transcription assays indicated that both mutations induced earlier-than-normal and more efficient IV(a2) transcription. Both mutations were also observed to result in modest increases in the efficiency of viral DNA synthesis. However, measurement of the concentration of IV(a2) transcripts as a function of IV(a2) template concentration demonstrated that the Rep mutations increased by up to 60-fold the efficiency with which IV(a2) templates were used during the initial period of the late phase of infection, as predicted by the repressor titration hypothesis. These mutations also increased the efficiency of ML transcription in infected cells.

  20. Identification of monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, and purification and characterization of a monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, D S; Thøgersen, I B; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1993-01-01

    characterized by steric protection of the proteinase active site and by sensitivity to small primary amines. The frog monomeric alpha-macroglobulin is structurally and functionally similar to the well-characterized monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor rat alpha 1-inhibitor-3. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:7679897

  1. Identification of monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, and purification and characterization of a monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, D S; Thøgersen, I B; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1993-02-15

    characterized by steric protection of the proteinase active site and by sensitivity to small primary amines. The frog monomeric alpha-macroglobulin is structurally and functionally similar to the well-characterized monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor rat alpha 1-inhibitor-3.

  2. Mammalian tolloid proteinases: role in growth factor signalling.

    PubMed

    Troilo, Helen; Bayley, Christopher P; Barrett, Anne L; Lockhart-Cairns, Michael P; Jowitt, Thomas A; Baldock, Clair

    2016-08-01

    Tolloid proteinases are essential for tissue patterning and extracellular matrix assembly. The members of the family differ in their substrate specificity and activity, despite sharing similar domain organization. The mechanisms underlying substrate specificity and activity are complex, with variation between family members, and depend on both multimerization and substrate interaction. In addition, enhancers, such as Twisted gastrulation (Tsg), promote cleavage of tolloid substrate, chordin, to regulate growth factor signalling. Although Tsg and mammalian tolloid (mTLD) are involved in chordin cleavage, no interaction has been detected between them, suggesting Tsg induces a change in chordin to increase susceptibility to cleavage. All members of the tolloid family bind the N terminus of latent TGFβ-binding protein-1, providing support for their role in TGFβ signalling. PMID:27391803

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided. PMID:17656792

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided.

  5. A rapid Q-PCR titration protocol for adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus vectors that produces biologically relevant results.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, Sean D; Berk, Arnold J

    2013-09-01

    Adenoviruses are employed in the study of cellular processes and as expression vectors used in gene therapy. The success and reproducibility of these studies is dependent in part on having accurate and meaningful titers of replication competent and helper-dependent adenovirus stocks, which is problematic due to the use of varied and divergent titration protocols. Physical titration methods, which quantify the total number of viral particles, are used by many, but are poor at estimating activity. Biological titration methods, such as plaque assays, are more biologically relevant, but are time consuming and not applicable to helper-dependent gene therapy vectors. To address this, a protocol was developed called "infectious genome titration" in which viral DNA is isolated from the nuclei of cells ~3 h post-infection, and then quantified by Q-PCR. This approach ensures that only biologically active virions are counted as part of the titer determination. This approach is rapid, robust, sensitive, reproducible, and applicable to all forms of adenovirus. Unlike other Q-PCR-based methods, titers determined by this protocol are well correlated with biological activity.

  6. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  7. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  8. Protein digestion in cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) as a target for plant defence by endogenous proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Prashant; Bandani, Ali R; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2011-07-01

    Gut extracts from cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) showed significant levels of proteolytic activity, which was inhibited by reagents specific for cysteine proteases and chymotrypsin-like proteases. Gut tissue contained cDNAs encoding cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinases, similar to those identified in the closely related pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). Analysis of honeydew (liquid excreta) from cereal aphids fed on diet containing ovalbumin showed that digestion of ingested proteins occurred in vivo. Protein could partially substitute for free amino acids in diet, although it could not support complete development. Recombinant wheat proteinase inhibitors (PIs) fed in diet were antimetabolic to cereal aphids, even when normal levels of free amino acids were present. PIs inhibited proteolysis by aphid gut extracts in vitro, and digestion of protein fed to aphids in vivo. Wheat subtilisin/chymotrypsin inhibitor, which was found to inhibit serine and cysteine proteinases, was more effective in both inhibitory and antimetabolic activity than wheat cystatin, which inhibited cysteine proteases only. Digestion of ingested protein is unlikely to contribute significantly to nutritional requirements when aphids are feeding on phloem, and the antimetabolic activity of dietary proteinase inhibitors is suggested to result from effects on proteinases involved in degradation of endogenous proteins.

  9. Characterization and cloning of metallo-proteinase in the excretory/secretory products of the infective-stage larva of Trichinella spiralis.

    PubMed

    Lun, H M; Mak, C H; Ko, R C

    2003-05-01

    Inhibitor sensitivity assays using azocaesin and FTC-caesin as substrates showed that the excretory/secretory (E/S) products of the infective-stage larvae of Trichinella spiralis contained serine, metallo-, cysteine and aspartic proteinases. The activity of the metallo-proteinase was zinc ion dependent (within a range of ZnSO(4) concentrations). Gelatin-substrate gel electrophoresis revealed two bands of molecular mass 48 and 58 kDa which were sensitive to the metallo-proteinase inhibitor EDTA. The former peptide was probably a cleavage product of the latter. The authenticity of the 58 kDa metallo-proteinase as an E/S product was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Using PCR and RACE reactions, a complete nucleotide sequence of the metallo-proteinase gene was obtained. It comprised 2,223 bp with an open reading frame encoding 604 amino acid residues. The 3' untranslated region consisted of 352 bp, including a polyadenylation signal AATAA. A consensus catalytic zinc-binding motif was present. The conserved domains suggest that the cloned metallo-proteinase belongs to the astacin family and occurs as a single copy gene with 11 introns and 10 exons. Cluster analysis showed that the sequence of the metallo-proteinase gene of T. spiralis resembles those of Caenorhabdites elegans and Strongyloides stercoralis. PMID:12743801

  10. Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional response upon immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. Proteinase inhibitors play a key role in regulating the activity of the respective proteinases. Among serine proteinase inhibitors, kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) are widely found in mammals, avians, and a variety of invertebrates. In this study, we describe the identification of a kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor (Ab-KPI) from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, which is presumably involved in innate immunity. The full-length cDNA of Ab-KPI includes 600 bp nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 143 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ab-KPI contains a putative 17-amino acid signal peptide and two tandem kazal domains with high similarity to other kazal-type SPIs. Each kazal domain consists of reactive site (P1) residue containing a leucine (L), and a threonine (T) located in the second amino acid position after the second conserved cysteine of each domain. Temporal expression of Ab-KPI was assessed by real time quantitative PCR in hemocytes and mantle tissue following bacterial and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) challenge, and tissue injury. At 6 h post-bacterial and -VHSV challenge, Ab-KPI expression in hemocytes was increased 14-fold and 4-fold, respectively, compared to control samples. The highest up-regulations upon tissue injury were shown at 9 h and 12 h in hemocytes and mantle, respectively. The transcriptional modulation of Ab-KPI following bacterial and viral challenges and tissue injury indicates that it might be involved in immune defense as well as wound healing process in abalone.

  11. A Sulfhydryl Reagent Modulates Systemic Signaling for Wound-Induced and Systemin-Induced Proteinase Inhibitor Synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Narvaez-Vasquez, J.; Orozco-Cardenas, M. L.; Ryan, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    The sulfhydryl group reagent p-chloromecuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS), an established inhibitor of active apoplastic phloem loading of sucrose in several plant species, is shown to be a powerful inhibitor of wound-induced and systemin-induced activation of proteinase inhibitor synthesis and accumulation in leaves of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum cv Castlemart). PCMBS, supplied to young tomato plants through their cut stems, blocks accumulation of proteinase inhibitors in leaves in response to wounding. The application of systemin directly to fresh wounds enhances systemic accumulation of proteinase inhibitors to levels higher than wounding alone. Placed on fresh wounds, PCMBS severely inhibits systemic induction of proteinase inhibitors, in both the presence and absence of exogenous systemin. PCMBS inhibition can be reversed by cysteine, dithiothreitol, and glutathione. Radiolabeled systemin placed on fresh wounds is readily transported from the wounded leaves to upper leaves. However, in the presence of PCMBS, radiolabeled systemin is not transported away from wound sites. Induction of proteinase inhibitor I synthesis by oligouronides (degree of polymerization [almost equal to] 20), linolenic acid, or methyl jasmonate was not inhibited by PCMBS. The cumulative data support a possible role for sulfhydryl groups in mediating the translocation of systemin from wound sites to distal receptor sites in tomato plants and further support a role for systemin as a systemic wound signal. PMID:12232239

  12. Induction of release and up-regulated gene expression of interleukin (IL)-8 in A549 cells by serine proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyan; Zheng, Yanshan; He, Shaoheng

    2006-01-01

    Background Hypersecretion of cytokines and serine proteinases has been observed in asthma. Since protease-activated receptors (PARs) are receptors of several serine proteinases and airway epithelial cells are a major source of cytokines, the influence of serine proteinases and PARs on interleukin (IL)-8 secretion and gene expression in cultured A549 cells was examined. Results A549 cells express all four PARs at both protein and mRNA levels as assessed by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thrombin, tryptase, elastase and trypsin induce a up to 8, 4.3, 4.4 and 5.1 fold increase in IL-8 release from A549 cells, respectively following 16 h incubation period. The thrombin, elastase and trypsin induced secretion of IL-8 can be abolished by their specific inhibitors. Agonist peptides of PAR-1, PAR-2 and PAR-4 stimulate up to 15.6, 6.6 and 3.5 fold increase in IL-8 secretion, respectively. Real time PCR shows that IL-8 mRNA is up-regulated by the serine proteinases tested and by agonist peptides of PAR-1 and PAR-2. Conclusion The proteinases, possibly through activation of PARs can stimulate IL-8 release from A549 cells, suggesting that they are likely to contribute to IL-8 related airway inflammatory disorders in man. PMID:16696869

  13. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  14. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  15. Pest protection conferred by a Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene.

    PubMed

    Smigocki, Ann C; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases.

  16. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species. PMID:23643878

  17. Hyaluronidase expression by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances its intratumoral spread and suppresses tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Guedan, Sonia; Rojas, Juan José; Gros, Alena; Mercade, Elena; Cascallo, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2010-07-01

    Successful virotherapy requires efficient virus spread within tumors. We tested whether the expression of hyaluronidase, an enzyme which dissociates the extracellular matrix (ECM), could enhance the intratumoral distribution of an oncolytic adenovirus and improve its therapeutic activity. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated that intratumoral coadministration of hyaluronidase in mice-bearing tumor xenografts improves the antitumor activity of an oncolytic adenovirus. Next, we constructed a replication-competent adenovirus expressing a soluble form of the human sperm hyaluronidase (PH20) under the control of the major late promoter (MLP) (AdwtRGD-PH20). Intratumoral treatment of human melanoma xenografts with AdwtRGD-PH20 resulted in degradation of hyaluronan (HA), enhanced viral distribution, and induced tumor regression in all treated tumors. Finally, the PH20 cDNA was inserted in an oncolytic adenovirus that selectively kills pRb pathway-defective tumor cells. The antitumoral activity of the novel oncolytic adenovirus expressing PH20 (ICOVIR17) was compared to that of the parental virus ICOVIR15. ICOVIR17 showed more antitumor efficacy following intratumoral and systemic administration in mice with prestablished tumors, along with an improved spread of the virus within the tumor. Importantly, a single intravenous dose of ICOVIR17 induced tumor regression in 60% of treated tumors. These results indicate that ICOVIR17 is a promising candidate for clinical testing.

  18. Infectious entry pathway of adenovirus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Varga, M J; Weibull, C; Everitt, E

    1991-01-01

    Internalization of the infectious fraction of human adenovirus type 2 into HeLa cells was followed by a quantitative internalization assay. Treatments known to selectively block receptor-mediated endocytosis reduced the internalization of infectious virus to an extent close to the reduction of endocytosis of transferrin. This suggests that one of the first steps in the infectious cycle of adenovirus type 2 is internalization by the coated-pit and -vesicle pathway. Images PMID:1920625

  19. Crystal structure of a putative aspartic proteinase domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell surface antigen PE_PGRS16☆

    PubMed Central

    Barathy, Deivanayaga V.; Suguna, Kaza

    2013-01-01

    We report the crystal structure of the first prokaryotic aspartic proteinase-like domain identified in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A search in the genomes of Mycobacterium species showed that the C-terminal domains of some of the PE family proteins contain two classic DT/SG motifs of aspartic proteinases with a low overall sequence similarity to HIV proteinase. The three-dimensional structure of one of them, Rv0977 (PE_PGRS16) of M. tuberculosis revealed the characteristic pepsin-fold and catalytic site architecture. However, the active site was completely blocked by the N-terminal His-tag. Surprisingly, the enzyme was found to be inactive even after the removal of the N-terminal His-tag. A comparison of the structure with pepsins showed significant differences in the critical substrate binding residues and in the flap tyrosine conformation that could contribute to the lack of proteolytic activity of Rv0977. PMID:23923105

  20. Adenovirus-vectored Ebola vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Sarah C

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa has highlighted the need for the availability of effective vaccines against outbreak pathogens that are suitable for use in frontline workers who risk their own health in the course of caring for those with the disease, and also for members of the community in the affected area. Along with effective contact tracing and quarantine, use of a vaccine as soon as an outbreak is identified could greatly facilitate rapid control and prevent the outbreak from spreading. This review describes the progress that has been made in producing and testing adenovirus-based Ebola vaccines in both pre-clinical and clinical studies, and considers the likely future use of these vaccines.

  1. Luminal proteinases from Plodia interpunctella and the hydrolysis of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIA(c) protoxin.

    PubMed

    Oppert, B; Kramer, K J; Johnson, D; Upton, S J; Mcgaughey, W H

    1996-06-01

    The ability of proteinases in gut extracts of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella, to hydrolyze Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protoxin, casein, and rho-nitroanilide substrates was investigated. A polyclonal antiserum to protoxin CryIA(c) was used in Western blots to demonstrate slower protoxin processing by gut enzymes from Bt subspecies entomocidus-resistant larvae than enzymes from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant strains. Enzymes from all three strains hydrolyzed N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine rho-nitroanilide, N-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-phenylalanine rho-nitroanilide, and N-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-leucine rho-nitroanilide. Zymograms and activity blots were used to estimate the apparent molecular masses, number of enzymes, and relative activities in each strain. Several serine proteinase inhibitors reduced gut enzyme activities, with two soybean trypsin inhibitors, two potato inhibitors, and chymostatin the most effective in preventing protoxin hydrolysis.

  2. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  3. Adenovirus type 2 terminal protein: purification and comparison of tryptic peptides with known adenovirus-coded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Harter, M L; Lewis, J B; Anderson, C W

    1979-01-01

    The protein covalently bound to the 5' termini of adenovirus type 2 DNA has been purified from virus labeled with [35S]methionine, using exclusion chromatography of disrupted virions to isolate the DNA-protein complex, which is then digested with DNase. The terminal protein isolated from mature virus is most effectively labeled if the cells are exposed to [35S]methionine during the "intermediate" period of 13 to 21 h postinfection, suggesting that the protein is synthesized during this interval. The tryptic peptides of the terminal protein were compared with those of several known adenovirus-coded proteins and found to be unrelated. In particular, the terminal protein is not related to the 38-50K early proteins encoded by the leftmost 4.4% of the adenovirus genome, one region essential for the transforming activity of the virus. Neither is it related to the 72K single-strand-specific DNA binding protein, the minor virion component IVa2, or the major capsid component hexon. Images PMID:513195

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of proteinase-binding of pregnancy zone protein (PZP). Appearance of sulfhydryl groups in reactions with proteinases.

    PubMed

    Christensen, U; Sottrup-Jensen, L; Simonsen, M

    1992-01-01

    Proteinase binding by pregnancy zone protein (PZP), an alpha-macroglobulin involves bait region cleavages, association of dimeric-PZP into tetrameric and reaction of internal gamma-glutamyl-beta-cysteinyl thiol esters of PZP with proteinase side chains. The product is an equimolar enzyme-PZP(tetramer) covalently linked complex with four free sulfhydryl groups. The kinetics of the appearances of sulfhydryl groups during the reaction of PZP with chymotrypsin has been investigated using stopped-flow and conventional mixing techniques over a broad concentration range. Thiol ester cleavages followed double exponential decays corresponding with two steps. The faster one resulted in the appearance of three sulfhydryl groups with an observed rate constant, k(obs) = k1.1 + k1.2 delta E, dependent on the excess concentration of chymotrypsin, delta E, and k1.1 = 0.03 s-1 and k1.2 = 4 x 10(4) M-1 s-1. The last sulfhydryl group appeared in a slower step, with similar concentration dependence and k2.1 approximately 0.003 s-1 and k2.2 approximately 5 x 10(3) M-1s-1. Covalent binding of the enzyme apparently was simultaneous with the faster thiol ester cleavage step. Based on these and previous results a model of the reaction mechanism of the proteinase binding reaction of PZP is proposed. It consists of four major steps: (i) Bait region cleavage of PZP-dimers by the enzyme, (ii) fast association of enzyme-PZP(dimer) species with native PZP or with another enzyme-PZP(dimer) compound resulting in release of one of the associated enzyme molecules (iii) reaction of an average of three thiol esters of the enzyme-PZP(tetramer) intermediate with the associated internal enzyme molecule or with an external one. In this step one enzyme molecule becomes covalently linked to the PZP-(tetramer), three sulfhydryl groups appear and the enzymic activity of the bound enzyme molecule decreases to the level of that of the final complex. (iv) Hydrolysis of the last thiol ester and in the presence of

  5. High-level expression of Proteinase K from Tritirachium album Limber in Pichia pastoris using multi-copy expression strains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hu; Zhai, Chao; Yu, Xianhong; Li, Zhezhe; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yunyun; Ma, Xiaojian; Zhong, Xing; Li, Guolong; Wu, Di; Ma, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Proteinase K is widely used in scientific research and industries. This report was aimed to achieve high-level expression of proteinase K using Pichia pastoris GS115 as the host strain. The coding sequence of a variant of proteinase K that has higher activity than the wild type protein was chosen and optimized based on the codon usage preference of P. pastoris. The novel open reading frame was synthesized and a series of multi-copy expression vectors were constructed based on the pHBM905BDM plasmid, allowing for the tandem integration of multiple copies of the target gene into the genome of P. pastoris with a single recombination. These strains were used to study the correlation between the gene copy number and the expression level of proteinase K. The results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the tandem expression cassettes were integrated into the host genome stably. Meanwhile, the results of qPCR and enzyme activity assays indicated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of the target gene increased as the gene copy number increased. Moreover, the effect of gene dosage on the expression level of the recombinant protein was more obvious using high-density fermentation. The maximum expression level and enzyme activity of proteinase K, which were obtained from the recombinant yeast strain bearing 5 copies of the target gene after an 84-h induction, were approximately 8.069 mg/mL and 108,295 U/mL, respectively. The recombinant proteinase was purified and characterized. The optimum pH and temperature for the activity of this protease were approximately pH 11 and 55 °C, respectively. PMID:26892536

  6. The proteolytic system of Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1: purification and characterization of a proteinase, a dipeptidase, and an aminopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Gobbetti, M; Smacchi, E; Corsetti, A

    1996-01-01

    A cell envelope 57-kDa proteinase, a cytoplasmic 65-kDa dipeptidase, and a 75-kDa aminopeptidase were purified from Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1 sourdough lactic acid bacterium by sequential fast protein liquid chromatography steps. All of the enzymes are monomers. The proteinase was most active at pH 7.0 and 40 degrees C, while aminopeptidase and dipeptidase had optima at pH 7.5 and 30 to 35 degrees C. Relatively high activities were observed at the pH and temperature of the sourdough fermentation. The proteinase is a serine enzyme. Urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of digest of alpha s1- and beta-caseins showed differences in the pattern of peptides released by the purified proteinase and those produced by crude preparations of the cell envelope proteinases of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus B397 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis SK11. Reversed-phase fast protein liquid chromatography of gliadin digests showed a more-complex peptide pattern produced by the proteinase of Lactobacillus sanfrancisco CB1. The dipeptidase is a metalloenzyme with high affinity for dipeptides containing hydrophobic amino acids but had no activity on tripeptides or larger peptides. The aminopeptidase was also inhibited by metal-chelating agents, and showed a broad N-terminal hydrolytic activity including di- and tripeptides. Km values of 0.70 and 0.44 mM were determined for the dipeptidase on Leu-Leu and the aminopeptidase on Leu-p-nitroanilide, respectively. PMID:8795211

  7. High-level expression of Proteinase K from Tritirachium album Limber in Pichia pastoris using multi-copy expression strains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hu; Zhai, Chao; Yu, Xianhong; Li, Zhezhe; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yunyun; Ma, Xiaojian; Zhong, Xing; Li, Guolong; Wu, Di; Ma, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Proteinase K is widely used in scientific research and industries. This report was aimed to achieve high-level expression of proteinase K using Pichia pastoris GS115 as the host strain. The coding sequence of a variant of proteinase K that has higher activity than the wild type protein was chosen and optimized based on the codon usage preference of P. pastoris. The novel open reading frame was synthesized and a series of multi-copy expression vectors were constructed based on the pHBM905BDM plasmid, allowing for the tandem integration of multiple copies of the target gene into the genome of P. pastoris with a single recombination. These strains were used to study the correlation between the gene copy number and the expression level of proteinase K. The results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the tandem expression cassettes were integrated into the host genome stably. Meanwhile, the results of qPCR and enzyme activity assays indicated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of the target gene increased as the gene copy number increased. Moreover, the effect of gene dosage on the expression level of the recombinant protein was more obvious using high-density fermentation. The maximum expression level and enzyme activity of proteinase K, which were obtained from the recombinant yeast strain bearing 5 copies of the target gene after an 84-h induction, were approximately 8.069 mg/mL and 108,295 U/mL, respectively. The recombinant proteinase was purified and characterized. The optimum pH and temperature for the activity of this protease were approximately pH 11 and 55 °C, respectively.

  8. Effect of acute ozone exposure on the proteinase-antiproteinase balance in the rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, J.A.; Gregory, R.E.; Cole, D.J.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.

    1987-04-01

    Lung disease may result from a persisting proteinase excess or a depletion of antiproteinase in pulmonary parenchyma. We investigated the in vivo effect of a 48-hr exposure to ozone at 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 ppm on proteinase and antiproteinase activity of rat lungs. Elastase inhibitory capacities of serum, lung tissue, and airway washings were measured as indicators of antielastase activity. Trypsin inhibitory capacity was measured using an esterolytic procedure. Proteinase was measured as radioactive release from a /sup 14/C-globin substrate. The 48-hr exposures to O/sub 3/ at levels up to 1 ppm produced concentration-dependent decreases of 35-80% of antiproteinase activities in serum and in lung tissue. However, exposure to 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/ resulted in no decrease in antiproteinase activities. Acid proteinase activities (pH 4.2) were increased 65-120% by exposure to 1 or 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/, which correlated with inflammatory cells noted histologically. At 1.5 ppm O/sub 3/, pulmonary edema and hemorrhage were noted in histologic sections. These changes led to a flooding of the alveoli with up to 40 times normal protein levels and a greater than fivefold increase in airway antiproteinase. These data suggest that serum and soluble lung tissue antiproteinase activity decreased upon exposure to low levels of ozone. However, if O/sub 3/ exposure is high enough to produce pulmonary hemorrhage, antiproteinase may increase following serum exudation. These changes may be important in the development of ozone-induced lung diseases, especially emphysema.

  9. [Characteristics of proteinase digestive function in invertebrates--inhabitants of cold seas].

    PubMed

    Mukhin, V A; Smirnova, E B; Novikov, V Iu

    2007-01-01

    Digestive proteinases of various taxa of invertebrates of the Northern seas have been studied: crustaceans Paralithodes camtchaticus, Pandalus borealis; molluscs Chlamys islandicus, Buccinum undatum, Serripes groenlandicus, and echinoderms Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, Cucumaria frondosa, Asterias rubens, and Grossaster papposus. The presence of two proteolytic activity peaks in the acid (pH 2.5-3.5) and low alkaline zones (pH 7.5-8.5) and a similar proteinase spectrum have been revealed in digestive organs of the studied animals. The proteolytic activity in digestive organs of the Barents Sea invertebrates exceeds significantly that of terrestrial homoiothermal animals, which seems to be an extensive compensation for poor differentiation of the digestive system and for low substrate specificity of the enzymes as well as for cold conditions of the habitat. The principal qualitative difference between vertebrates and invertebrates consists in that the latter have no pepsin activity, but do have the cathepsin activity that is absent in vertebrate digestive organs. Contribution to the acid proteolysis is made by lysosomal cathepsins, rather than by pepsins. Activity in the alkaline and neutral pH zones is provided by serine proteinases. In digestive cavities of invertebrates, hydrolysis of proteins and mechanical processing of food occur only in the low alkaline zone, whereas acid proteolysis has intracellular lysosomal localization.

  10. Sequential processing of lysosomal acid phosphatase by a cytoplasmic thiol proteinase and a lysosomal aspartyl proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, S; Waheed, A; Schmidt, B; Laidler, P; von Figura, K

    1989-01-01

    BHK cells expressing human lysosomal acid phosphatase (LAP) transport LAP to lysosomes as an integral membrane protein. In lysosomes LAP is released from the membrane by proteolytic processing, which involves at least two cleavages at the C terminus of LAP. The first cleavage is catalysed by a thiol proteinase at the outside of the lysosomal membrane and removes the bulk of the cytoplasmic tail of LAP. The second cleavage is catalysed by an aspartyl proteinase inside the lysosomes and releases the luminal part of LAP from the membrane-spanning domain. The first cleavage at the cytoplasmic side of the lysosomal membrane depends on acidification of lysosomes and the second cleavage inside the lysosomes depends on prior processing of the cytoplasmic tail. These results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail controls the conformation of the luminal portion of LAP and vice versa. Images PMID:2684640

  11. Expression of the primary coxsackie and adenovirus receptor is downregulated during skeletal muscle maturation and limits the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoglu, J; Pari, G; Karpati, G; Holland, P C

    1999-04-10

    Skeletal muscle fibers are infected efficiently by adenoviral vectors only in neonatal animals. This lack of tropism for mature skeletal muscle may be partly due to inefficient binding of adenoviral particles to the cell surface. We evaluated in developing mouse muscle the expression levels of two high-affinity receptors for adenovirus, MHC class I and the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). The moderate levels of MHC class I transcripts that were detected in quadriceps, gastrocnemius, and heart muscle did not vary between postnatal day 3 and day 60 adult tissue. A low level of CAR expression was detected on postnatal day 3 in quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles, but CAR expression was barely detectable in adult skeletal muscle even by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, CAR transcripts were moderately abundant at all stages of heart muscle development. Ectopic expression of CAR in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells increased their transducibility by adenovirus at all multiplicities of infection (MOIs) tested as measured by lacZ reporter gene activity following AVCMVlacZ infection, with an 80-fold difference between CAR-expressing cells and control C2C12 cells at an MOI of 50. Primary myoblasts ectopically expressing CAR were injected into muscles of syngeneic hosts; following incorporation of the exogenous myoblasts into host myofibers, an increased transducibility of adult muscle fibers by AVCMVlacZ was observed in the host. Expression of the lacZ reporter gene in host myofibers coincided with CAR immunoreactivity. Furthermore, sarcolemmal CAR expression was markedly increased in regenerating muscle fibers of the dystrophic mdx mouse, fibers that are susceptible to adenovirus transduction. These analyses show that CAR expression by skeletal muscle correlates with its susceptibility to adenovirus transduction, and that forced CAR expression in mature myofibers dramatically increases their susceptibility to adenovirus transduction.

  12. Degradation of the human proteinase inhibitors alpha-1-antitrypsin and alpha-2-macroglobulin by Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, J; Herrmann, B F; Höfling, J F; Sundqvist, G K

    1984-01-01

    Various strains of black-pigmented Bacteroides species were grown on horse blood agar and suspended in human serum. After various times of incubation the effect of the bacteria on the serum was evaluated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and "rocket" immunoelectrophoresis. The formation of trichloroacetic acid-soluble material in the suspensions and the capacity of the treated sera to inhibit the activity of trypsin were also determined. The two tested strains of Bacteroides gingivalis (W83, H185) degraded most serum proteins, including the plasma proteinase inhibitors alpha-1-antitrypsin and alpha-2-macroglobulin. They did not, however, degrade alpha-1-antichymotrypsin. Bacteroides intermedius NCTC 9336, Bacteroides asaccharolyticus NCTC 9337, and an asaccharolytic oral strain different from B. gingivalis (BN11a-f) did not degrade the plasma proteinase inhibitors. These strains were, however, able to inactivate the capacity of serum to inhibit the activity of trypsin. Images PMID:6198282

  13. Purification and Characterization of a Keratinolytic Serine Proteinase from Streptomyces albidoflavus

    PubMed Central

    Bressollier, Philippe; Letourneau, François; Urdaci, Maria; Verneuil, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Streptomyces strain K1-02, which was identified as a strain of Streptomyces albidoflavus, secreted at least six extracellular proteases when it was cultured on feather meal-based medium. The major keratinolytic serine proteinase was purified to homogeneity by a two-step procedure. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 18,000 and was optimally active at pH values ranging from 6 to 9.5 and at temperatures ranging from 40 to 70°C. Its sensitivity to protease inhibitors, its specificity on synthetic substrates, and its remarkably high level of NH2-terminal sequence homology with Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) showed that the new enzyme, designated SAKase, was homologous to SGPB. We tested the activity of SAKase with soluble and fibrous substrates (elastin, keratin, and type I collagen) and found that it was very specific for keratinous substrates compared to SGPB and proteinase K. PMID:10347045

  14. Coevolution between pathogen-derived proteinases and proteinase inhibitors of host insects.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Virulence is thought to coevolve as a result of reciprocal selection between pathogens and their hosts. This paper focuses on coevolution between microbial proteinases operating as virulence factors and host defense molecules of insects. Owing to shorter generation times and smaller genomes, microbes exhibit a high evolutionary adaptability in comparison with their hosts. Indeed, the latter can only compete with pathogens if they evolve mechanisms providing a comparable genetic plasticity. Gene or domain duplication and shuffling by recombination is the driving force behind the countermeasures in host defense effectors. Recent literature provides evidence for both diversifications of fungal proteinases involved in pathogenesis and expansion host proteinase inhibitors subsets contributing to insect innate immunity. For example, the pathogen-associated spectrum of proteolytic enzymes encompasses thermolysin-like metalloproteinases that putatively promoted the evolution of corresponding host inhibitors of these virulence factors which complement the insect repertoire of antimicrobial defense molecules. Beyond mutual diversification of effector molecules coevolution resulted also in sophisticated molecular adaptations of host insects such as sensing and feedback-loop regulation of microbial metalloproteinases and corresponding countermeasures of pathogens providing evasion of host immunity induced by these virulence factors.

  15. Several murine metastasizing tumors possess a cysteine proteinase with cancer procoagulant characteristics.

    PubMed

    Falanga, A; Bolognese Dalessandro, A P; Casali, B; Roncaglioni, M C; Donati, M B

    1987-06-15

    Cancer Procoagulant (CP), a cysteine proteinase which triggers blood coagulation by directly activating Factor X (FX) in the absence of Factor VII (F VII), has recently been isolated from rabbit V2 carcinoma and biochemically characterized. We have studied the procoagulant activity of tissue extracts from 4 murine experimental tumors in order to define whether or not a F VII-independent activity with cysteine proteinase characteristics was present. The tumors studied were: Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL), B16 melanoma (B16), JW sarcoma (JWS) and the M4 variant of the mFS6 fibrosarcoma (M4). Extracts from 3LL, B16 and JWS tumor initiated coagulation in both the presence and absence of F VII, their procoagulant activity was sensitive to iodoacetamide (1 mM) and mercury chloride (0.1 mM). The procoagulant of M4 extract was dependent on the presence of F VII and was not significantly affected by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors. An Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion study showed immunological cross-reactivity of all but M4 extracts to a polyclonal antibody to purified CP. The present study suggests that the procoagulant(s) present in the murine tumors 3LL, B16 and JWS are enzymatically and immunologically indistinguishable from cancer procoagulant of the rabbit V2 carcinoma.

  16. Novel Aggregation Properties of Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Sap6 Mediate Virulence in Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohitashw; Saraswat, Darpan; Tati, Swetha; Edgerton, Mira

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans, a commensal fungus of the oral microbiome, causes oral candidiasis in humans with localized or systemic immune deficiencies. Secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps) are a family of 10 related proteases and are virulence factors due to their proteolytic activity, as well as their roles in adherence and colonization of host tissues. We found that mice infected sublingually with C. albicans cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and a Δsap8 strain) had thicker fungal plaques and more severe oral infection, while infection with the Δsap6 strain was attenuated. These hypervirulent strains had highly aggregative colony structure in vitro and higher secreted proteinase activity; however, the levels of proteinase activity of C. albicans Saps did not uniformly match their abilities to damage cultured oral epithelial cells (SCC-15 cells). Hyphal induction in cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and Δsap8 cells) resulted in formation of large cell-cell aggregates. These aggregates could be produced in germinated wild-type cells by addition of native or heat-inactivated Sap6. Sap6 bound only to germinated cells and increased C. albicans adhesion to oral epithelial cells. The adhesion properties of Sap6 were lost upon deletion of its integrin-binding motif (RGD) and could be inhibited by addition of RGD peptide or anti-integrin antibodies. Thus, Sap6 (but not Sap5) has an alternative novel function in cell-cell aggregation, independent of its proteinase activity, to promote infection and virulence in oral candidiasis.

  17. Identification of neutrophil elastase as the proteinase in burn wound fluid responsible for degradation of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Grinnell, F; Zhu, M

    1994-08-01

    To identify proteinases responsible for fibronectin degradation in the wound environment we studied wound fluid obtained from burn patients. Immunoblotting experiments showed that extensive degradation of fibronectin had occurred in some burn wound fluid samples, in which case intact fibronectin molecules were undetectable, and the largest fibronectin fragment was 116 kDa. The 116-kDa fragment as well as a smaller 90-kDa fragment contained the fibronectin cell binding domain. These burn-fluid samples degraded freshly added fibronectin. Activity of the fibronectin-degrading enzyme was blocked by a broad-spectrum serine proteinase inhibitor or by specific neutrophil elastase inhibitors but not by metalloproteinase inhibitors or inhibitors of trypsin-like or chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases. Enzyme activity also was neutralized by antibodies against human neutrophil elastase. Incubation of fibronectin with burn wound fluid or purified human neutrophil elastase generated similar fibronectin-degradation products. Finally, direct assay of burn-wound-fluid samples with a synthetic elastase substrate showed a correlation between fluid-phase elastase activity and fibronectin degradation. Based on these findings, we conclude that burn-wound-fluid elastase is responsible for extensive fibronectin degradation. Acute elevation of elastase did not appear to hinder normal wound repair.

  18. A chestnut seed cystatin differentially effective against cysteine proteinases from closely related pests.

    PubMed

    Pernas, M; Sánchez-Monge, R; Gómez, L; Salcedo, G

    1998-12-01

    Cystatin CsC, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor from chestnut (Castanea sativa) seeds, has been purified and characterized. Its full-length cDNA clone was isolated from an immature chestnut cotyledon library. The inhibitor was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified from bacterial extracts. Identity of both seed and recombinant cystatin was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis, two-dimensional electrophoresis and N-terminal sequencing. CsC has a molecular mass of 11,275 Da and pI of 6.9. Its amino acid sequence includes all three motifs that are thought to be essential for inhibitory activity, and shows significant identity to other phytocystatins, especially that of cowpea (70%). Recombinant CsC inhibited papain (Ki 29 nM), ficin (Ki 65 nM), chymopapain (Ki 366 nM), and cathepsin B (Ki 473 nM). By contrast with most cystatins, it was also effective towards trypsin (Ki 3489 nM). CsC is active against digestive proteinases from the insect Tribolium castaneum and the mite Dermatophagoides farinae, two important agricultural pests. Its effects on the cysteine proteinase activity of two closely related mite species revealed the high specificity of the chestnut cystatin.

  19. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  20. [Inactivation of T4 phage in water environment using proteinase].

    PubMed

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Yang, Qing-xiang; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Zhu, Chun-fang

    2004-09-01

    The inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to viruses was investigated by using T4 phage as a model virus. The results showed that the inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to T4 phage was obvious. In the optimum conditions and 67.5 u/mL concentration, the inactivation rate of proteinase K to T4 phage in sterilized water and in sewage achieved 99.4% and 49.4% respectively in an hour, and achieved >99.9% and 81.1% in three hours. The inactivation rate of the industrial proteinase 1398 to T4 phage in sterilized water achieved 74.4% in an hour. The effects of pH and temperature on the inactivation effectiveness was not evident.

  1. Key features determining the specificity of aspartic proteinase inhibition by the helix-forming IA3 polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Wyatt, David M; Phylip, Lowri H; Bur, Daniel; Harrison, Rebecca J; Berry, Colin; Kay, John

    2007-03-01

    The 68-residue IA(3) polypeptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essentially unstructured. It inhibits its target aspartic proteinase through an unprecedented mechanism whereby residues 2-32 of the polypeptide adopt an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation upon contact with the active site of the enzyme. This potent inhibitor (K(i) < 0.1 nm) appears to be specific for a single target proteinase, saccharopepsin. Mutagenesis of IA(3) from S. cerevisiae and its ortholog from Saccharomyces castellii was coupled with quantitation of the interaction for each mutant polypeptide with saccharopepsin and closely related aspartic proteinases from Pichia pastoris and Aspergillus fumigatus. This identified the charged K18/D22 residues on the otherwise hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix as key selectivity-determining residues within the inhibitor and implicated certain residues within saccharopepsin as being potentially crucial. Mutation of these amino acids established Ala-213 as the dominant specificity-governing feature in the proteinase. The side chain of Ala-213 in conjunction with valine 26 of the inhibitor marshals Tyr-189 of the enzyme precisely into a position in which its side-chain hydroxyl is interconnected via a series of water-mediated contacts to the key K18/D22 residues of the inhibitor. This extensive hydrogen bond network also connects K18/D22 directly to the catalytic Asp-32 and Tyr-75 residues of the enzyme, thus deadlocking the inhibitor in position. In most other aspartic proteinases, the amino acid at position 213 is a larger hydrophobic residue that prohibits this precise juxtaposition of residues and eliminates these enzymes as targets of IA(3). The exquisite specificity exhibited by this inhibitor in its interaction with its cognate folding partner proteinase can thus be readily explained. PMID:17145748

  2. Purification of human leucocyte DNA: proteinase K is not necessary.

    PubMed

    Douglas, A M; Georgalis, A M; Benton, L R; Canavan, K L; Atchison, B A

    1992-03-01

    A rapid nontoxic method for the purification of DNA from human leucocytes is described. Preliminary experiments which tested different methods of DNA purification indicated that digestion of proteins with proteinase K was unnecessary. This led to the development of a simple procedure involving lysis of the cells in SDS followed by extraction with 6 M NaCl. The method described overcomes the requirement for lengthy incubations in the presence of expensive proteinase K and subsequent extraction with toxic chemicals.

  3. Corticosteroid-binding globulin, a structural basis for steroid transport and proteinase-triggered release.

    PubMed

    Klieber, Michael A; Underhill, Caroline; Hammond, Geoffrey L; Muller, Yves A

    2007-10-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) family member that transports glucocorticoids in blood and regulates their access to target cells. The 1.9A crystal structure of rat CBG shows that its steroid-binding site resembles the thyroxin-binding site in the related serpin, thyroxin-binding globulin, and mutagenesis studies have confirmed the contributions of key residues that constitute the steroid-binding pocket. Unlike thyroxin-bound thyroxin-binding globulin, the cortisol-bound CBG displays an "active" serpin conformation with the proteinase-sensitive, reactive center loop (RCL) fully expelled from the regulatory beta-sheet A. Moreover, the CBG structure allows us to predict that complete insertion of the proteolytically cleaved RCL into the serpin fold occurs in concert with a displacement and unwinding of helix D that would disrupt the steroid-binding site. This allosteric coupling between RCL positioning and occupancy of the CBG steroid-binding site, which resembles the ligand (glycosamino-glycan)-dependent activation of the thrombin inhibitory serpins heparin cofactor II and anti-thrombin RCLs, ensures both optimal recognition of CBG by target proteinases and efficient release of steroid to sites of action.

  4. A heat-stable serine proteinase from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Magnani, P; Villa, A; Macchi, F; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1992-08-21

    A proteinase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from crude extracts of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. Molecular mass values assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration were 54 and 118 kDa, respectively, which points to a dimeric structure of the molecule. An isoelectric point of 5.6 was also determined. The enzyme behaved as a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase, as shown by the inhibitory effects exerted by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethyl ketone and chymostatin. Consistently with the inhibition pattern, the enzyme cleaved chromogenic substrates at the carboxyl side of aromatic or bulky aliphatic amino acids; however, it effectively attacked only a small number of such substrates, thus, displaying a specificity much narrower than and clearly different from that of chymotrypsin. This was confirmed by its inability to digest a set of natural substrate proteins, as well as insulin chains A and B; only after alkylation casein was degraded to some extent. Proteinase activity was significantly stimulated by Mn2+ which acted as a mixed-type nonessential activator. The enzyme also displayed a broad pH optimum in the range 6.5-8.0. Furthermore, it was completely stable up to 90 degrees C; above this temperature it underwent first-order thermal inactivation with half-lives ranging from 342 min (92 degrees C) to 7 min (101 degrees C). At 50 degrees C it could withstand 6 M urea and, to some extent, different organic solvents; however, at 95 degrees C it was extensively inactivated by all of these compounds. None of the chemical physical properties of the enzyme, including amino-acid analysis, provided evidence of a possible relation to other well-known microbial serine proteinases.

  5. SARS CoV main proteinase: The monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Yang, Lin; Mangel, Walter F

    2006-12-12

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, have varied more than 65,0000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 microM. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded KD values of 5.8 +/- 0.8 microM (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 +/- 2.2 microM (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 +/- 1.5 microM (obtained from the forward scattering). The KD from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 +/- 1.1 microM, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 +/- 0.4 microM. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar KD values.

  6. Transductional targeting of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, JN; Everts, M; Curiel, DT

    2007-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy approaches will derive considerable benefit from adenovirus (Ad) vectors capable of self-directed localization to neoplastic disease or immunomodulatory targets in vivo. The ablation of native Ad tropism coupled with active targeting modalities has demonstrated that innate gene delivery efficiency may be retained while circumventing Ad dependence on its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and Ad receptor. Herein, we describe advances in Ad targeting that are predicated on a fundamental understanding of vector/cell interplay. Further, we propose strategies by which existing paradigms, such as nanotechnology, may be combined with Ad vectors to form advanced delivery vehicles with multiple functions. PMID:16439993

  7. A serine proteinase inhibitor isolated from Tamarindus indica seeds and its effects on the release of human neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Fook, J M S L L; Macedo, L L P; Moura, G E D D; Teixeira, F M; Oliveira, A S; Queiroz, A F S; Sales, M P

    2005-05-01

    Proteinaceous inhibitors with high inhibitory activities against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) were found in seeds of the Tamarind tree (Tamarindus indica). A serine proteinase inhibitor denoted PG50 was purified using ammonium sulphate and acetone precipitation followed by Sephacryl S-300 and Sephadex G-50 gel filtration chromatographies. Inhibitor PG50 showed a Mr of 14.9 K on Sephadex G-50 calibrated column and a Mr of 11.6 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PG50 had selective activity while cysteine proteinases (papain and bromelain) and serine proteinases (porcine pancreatic elastase and bovine chymotrypsin) were not inhibited, it was strongly effective against serine proteinases such as bovine trypsin and isolated human neutrophil elastase. The IC50 value was determined to be 55.96 microg.mL-1. PG50 showed neither cytotoxic nor haemolytic activity on human blood cells. After pre-incubation of PG50 with cytochalasin B, the exocytosis of elastase was initiated using PAF and fMLP. PG50 exhibited different inhibition on elastase release by PAF, at 44.6% and on release by fMLP, at 28.4%. These results showed that PG50 preferentially affected elastase release by PAF stimuli and this may indicate selective inhibition on PAF receptors.

  8. The Adenovirus Type 5 E1B-55K Oncoprotein Actively Shuttles in Virus-Infected Cells, Whereas Transport of E4orf6 Is Mediated by a CRM1-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dosch, Tanja; Horn, Florian; Schneider, Grit; Krätzer, Friedrich; Dobner, Thomas; Hauber, Joachim; Stauber, Roland H.

    2001-01-01

    The E1B-55K and E4orf6 proteins of adenovirus type 5 are involved in viral mRNA export. Here we demonstrate that adenovirus infection does not inhibit the function of the E1B-55K nuclear export signal and that E1B-55K also shuttles in infected cells. Even during virus infection, E1B-55K was exported by the leptomycin B-sensitive CRM1 pathway, whereas E4orf6 transport appeared to be mediated by an alternative mechanism. Our results strengthen the potential role of E1B-55K as the “driving force” for adenoviral late mRNA export. PMID:11356976

  9. Isolation and characterization of two forms of an acidic bromelain stem proteinase.

    PubMed

    Harrach, T; Eckert, K; Maurer, H R; Machleidt, I; Machleidt, W; Nuck, R

    1998-05-01

    Two forms of an acidic bromelain proteinase isolated from crude bromelain, an extract from pineapple stem, were found by a two-step FPLC purification procedure. The basic main components were removed by cation exchange chromatography and the breakthrough fraction was further resolved by anion exchange chromatography into 15 protein fractions, only two of which, called SBA/a and SBA/b, were proteolytically active. These components were characterized by electrospray mass spectroscopy (ESMS), isoelectric focusing, N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, monosaccharide analysis, and enzymatic parameters. The molecular masses of SBA/a and SBA/b were determined by ESMS to be 23,550 and 23,560, respectively. The isoelectric points (pI) of the two bands of SBA/a were 4.8 and 4.9; SBA/b focused as a single band at pI = 4.8. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequences (11 residues) were identical to SBA/a and SBA/b and identical with those of stem bromelain, the basic main proteinase of the pineapple stem, and fruit bromelain, the acidic main proteinase of the pineapple fruit. Both components are highly glycosylated; hydrolysis of SBA/a yielded about twofold more monosaccharide per protein than SBA/b. The comparison of the catalytic properties of SBA/a with those of SBA/b revealed no relevant differences in the hydrolysis of three peptidyl-NH-Mec substrates and in the inhibition profiles using chicken cystatin and E-64, indicating that these components can be considered as two forms of a single enzyme. Both forms are scarcely inhibited by chicken cystatin and slowly inactivated by E-64, hence are nontypical cysteine proteinases of the papain superfamily.

  10. Clearance of human native, proteinase-complexed, and proteolytically inactivated C1-inhibitor in rats.

    PubMed

    de Smet, B J; de Boer, J P; Agterberg, J; Rigter, G; Bleeker, W K; Hack, C E

    1993-01-01

    C1-inhibitor is the only known inhibitor of the classical pathway of complement and the major inhibitor of the contact pathway of coagulation. Like other serine proteinase inhibitors, C1-inhibitor can exist in three conformations, ie, the native, the proteinase-complexed, and the proteolytically inactivated form. Here we studied the plasma elimination kinetics of these three forms of human C1-inhibitor in rats. The clearance of the complexed form of C1-inhibitor appeared to be the most rapid and depended in part on the proteinase involved (observed plasma t1/2 was 20 minutes for C1s-C1-inhibitor, 32 minutes for kallikrein-C1-inhibitor, and 47 minutes for beta XIIa-C1-inhibitor), whereas that of native C1-inhibitor was the slowest (observed plasma t1/2 4.5 hours). Inactivated C1-inhibitor was cleared with an apparent plasma t1/2 of 1.6 hours. Thus, the short plasma t1/2 of complexed relative to native C1-inhibitor explains why in patients only low concentrations of C1-inhibitor complexes may be observed despite activation of the contact and/or complement systems.

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis: characterization of a 39-kDa cysteine proteinase found in patient vaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Avila-González, Leticia; Ortega-López, Jaime; Cruz-Talonia, Fernando; Gómez-Gutierrez, Guillermo; Arroyo, Rossana

    2004-01-01

    Trichomonosis, a chronic sexually transmitted disease, remains a public health problem affecting yearly over 170 million people worldwide. This disease is caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, a protozoan flagellate rich in cysteine proteinases (CPs). Although CPs are involved in trichomonal cytopathogenicity, only few of them have been defined as virulence factors. In this study, we characterize a T. vaginalis 39-kDa proteinase (CP39) found in vaginal secretions from patients with trichomonosis. The CP39 proteinase bound to HeLa epithelial cells, vaginal epithelial cells (VECs), and human prostatic cancer cells (DU-145). CP39 did not bind to a human colon cancer (CaCo) cell line, suggesting tissue-specific binding. CP39 was found in six fresh trichomonad isolates tested. In two-dimensional gels, CP39 appeared as a single spot with a pI 4.5. CP39 is inhibited by E-64, stable at 50 degrees C, and active in a wide pH range (3.6-9.0), with an optimum pH at 7.0. In addition, CP39 degraded collagens I, III, IV, and V, human fibronectin, human hemoglobin, and human immunoglobulins A and G. Indirect immunofluorescence detected CP39 on the parasite surface with specific polyclonal antibody to purified CP39. Finally, CP39 was found to be immunogenic, as evidenced by detection on immunoblots with serum of patients with trichomonosis, but not control individuals. These data suggest that CP39 may play a role during trichomonal infection.

  12. Ethylene regulates the expression of a cysteine proteinase gene during germination of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Cervantes, E; Rodríguez, A; Nicolás, G

    1994-05-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides corresponding to conserved regions of cysteine proteinases were used as primers in the RT-PCR amplification of a fragment of cDNA corresponding to a region of a cysteine proteinase gene expressed during germination of chickpea (cac for Cicer arietinum cysteine proteinase). The identity of the PCR-amplified fragment was confirmed by sequencing and the fragment used as a probe to investigate the pattern of cac gene expression during germination and its hormonal regulation. The corresponding transcript is undetected in the seed during embryogenesis and before imbibition, being detected 24 h after imbibition. Ablation of the embryonic axis before imbibition results in a dramatic decrease in the amount of transcript detected. Expression of the cac transcript in excised cotyledons is restored in the presence of aqueous extracts from embryonic axes and also by incubating the excised cotyledons in 1 mM ethephon. Experiments with various known inhibitors of ethylene action indicate that ethylene activates the expression of cac gene in the cotyledons of chickpea during normal germination.

  13. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-01-01

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized. PMID:26999188

  14. Neutrophils Interact with Adenovirus Vectors via Fc Receptors and Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Matthew J.; Zaiss, Anne K.; Muruve, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophils are effectors of the innate immune response to adenovirus vectors. Following the systemic administration of Cy2-labeled AdLuc in mice, flow cytometry and PCR analysis of liver leukocytes revealed that 25% of recruited neutrophils interacted with adenovirus vectors. In vitro, flow cytometry of human neutrophils incubated with Cy2-labeled AdLuc also demonstrated a significant interaction with adenovirus vectors. Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed vector internalization by neutrophils. The AdLuc-neutrophil interaction reduced vector transduction efficiency by more than 50% in coincubation assays in epithelium-derived cells. Adenovirus vector uptake by neutrophils occurred independently of coxsackievirus adenovirus receptor (CAR) and capsid RGD motifs, since neutrophils do not express CAR and uptake of the RGD-deleted vector AdL.PB* was similar to that of AdLuc. Furthermore, both AdLuc and AdL.PB* activated neutrophils and induced similar degrees of L-selectin shedding. Neutrophil uptake of AdLuc was dependent on the presence of complement and antibodies, since the interaction between AdLuc and neutrophils was significantly reduced when they were incubated in immunoglobulin G-depleted or heat-inactivated human serum. Blocking of complement receptor 1 (CD35) but not complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18) significantly reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc. Blocking of FcγRI (CD64), FcγRII (CD32), and FcγRIII (CD16) individually or together also reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc, although less than blocking of CD35 alone. Combined CR1 and Fc receptor blockade synergistically inhibited neutrophil-AdLuc interactions close to baseline. These results demonstrate opsonin-dependent adenovirus vector interactions with neutrophils and their corresponding receptors. PMID:16282462

  15. The adenovirus that causes hemorrhagic disease of black-tailed deer is closely related to bovine adenovirus-3.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J M; Hedges, J F; Woods, L W; Reubel, G H; MacLachlan, N J

    1999-01-01

    DNA sequence data was obtained from an adenovirus previously shown to be the cause of a distinctive, fatal hemorrhagic disease of black-tailed deer in California. A 256 base fragment of the viral hexon gene was amplified by PCR from purified adenovirus preparations. The amplicon then was cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic relationships with other mammalian adenoviruses were also determined. Although sequence analysis of this portion of the hexon gene indicates that the black-tailed deer adenovirus is closely related to bovine adenovirus-3, the biologic properties of the two viruses are clearly distinct.

  16. Developing novel anthelmintics from plant cysteine proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Jerzy M; Buttle, David J; Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann; Duce, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal helminth infections of livestock and humans are predominantly controlled by treatment with three classes of synthetic drugs, but some livestock nematodes have now developed resistance to all three classes and there are signs that human hookworms are becoming less responsive to the two classes (benzimidazoles and the nicotinic acetylcholine agonists) that are licensed for treatment of humans. New anthelmintics are urgently needed, and whilst development of new synthetic drugs is ongoing, it is slow and there are no signs yet that novel compounds operating through different modes of action, will be available on the market in the current decade. The development of naturally-occurring compounds as medicines for human use and for treatment of animals is fraught with problems. In this paper we review the current status of cysteine proteinases from fruits and protective plant latices as novel anthelmintics, we consider some of the problems inherent in taking laboratory findings and those derived from folk-medicine to the market and we suggest that there is a wealth of new compounds still to be discovered that could be harvested to benefit humans and livestock. PMID:18761736

  17. Allogeneic lymphocyte stimulation in rabbits: induction of a low MW inhibitor for trypsin and for a concurrently induced alpha-macroglobulin-proteinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, D; Teodorescu, M; Dray, S

    1985-01-01

    We have shown previously that the i.v. inoculation of allogeneic lymph node cells in rabbits induces the appearance in the serum of an alpha M-serine proteinase complex which behaves in an Ig-turnover assay as any polyclonal B-cell activator (PBA), and that this PBA activity is due to the enzyme. Here, we show that the allogeneic stimulation also induces the appearance in the low molecular weight fraction of the serum (1000-110,000 MW) of an inhibitor which blocks the PBA activity of the complex without affecting the PBA activity of LPS or dextran sulphate. The inhibitor blocked the ability of the enzyme associated with alpha M to degrade Chromozym TRY, a low MW trypsin substrate. The inhibitor also blocked the enzymatic activity of trypsin for large as well as for low MW substrates. Thus, allogeneic stimulation in vivo results in the production, not only of an alpha M-proteinase complex, but also of an inhibitor for this proteinase as well as for trypsin. The appearance of the inhibitor, along with the alpha M-serine proteinase complex as a result of allogeneic stimulation in rabbits, is of interest since a similar alpha M-serine proteinase complex and inhibitor may appear in the serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2410355

  18. Proteinases inhibit H(+)-ATPase and Na+/H+ exchange but not water transport in apical and endosomal membranes from rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Sabolić, I; Shi, L B; Brown, D; Ausiello, D A; Verkman, A S

    1992-01-10

    A marked increase in water permeability can be induced in Xenopus oocytes by injection of mRNA from tissues that express water channels, suggesting that the water channel is a protein. In view of this and previous reports which showed that proteinases may interfere with mercurial inhibition of water transport in red blood cells (RBC), we examined the influence of trypsin, chymotrypsin, papain, pronase, subtilisin and thermolysin on water permeability as well as on ATPase activity, H(+)-pump, passive H+ conductance, and Na+/H+ exchange in apical brush-border vesicles (BBMV) and endosomal (EV) vesicles from rat renal cortex. H+ transport was measured by Acridine orange fluorescence quenching and water transport by stopped-flow light scattering. As measured by potential-driven H+ accumulation in BBMV and EV, proteinase treatment had little effect on vesicle integrity. In BBMV, ecto-ATPase activity was inhibited by 15-30%, Na+/H+ exchange by 20-55%, and H+ conductance was unchanged. Osmotic water permeability (Pf) was 570 microns/s and was inhibited 85-90% by 0.6 mM HgCl2; proteinase treatment did not affect Pf or the HgCl2 inhibition. In EV, NEM-sensitive H+ accumulation and ATPase activity were inhibited by greater than 95%. Pf (140 microns/s) and HgCl2 inhibition (75-85%) were not influenced by proteinase treatment. SDS-PAGE showed selective digestion of multiple polypeptides by proteinases. These results confirm the presence of water channels in BBMV and EV and demonstrate selective inhibition of ATPase function and Na+/H+ exchange by proteinase digestion. The lack of effect of proteinases on water transport by mercurials. We conclude that the water channel may be a small integral membrane protein which, unlike the H(+)-ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger, has no functionally important membrane domains that are sensitive to proteolysis. PMID:1309658

  19. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  20. Rapid generation of fowl adenovirus 9 vectors.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Griffin, Bryan; de Jong, Jondavid; Krell, Peter J; Nagy, Éva

    2015-10-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdV) have the largest genomes of any fully sequenced adenovirus genome, and are widely considered as excellent platforms for vaccine development and gene therapy. As such, there is a strong need for stream-lined protocols/strategies for the generation of recombinant adenovirus genomes. Current genome engineering strategies rely upon plasmid based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli BJ5183. This process is time-consuming, involves multiple cloning steps, and low efficiency recombination. This report describes a novel system for the more rapid generation of recombinant fowl adenovirus genomes using the lambda Red recombinase system in E. coli DH10B. In this strategy, PCR based amplicons with around 50 nt long homologous arms, a unique SwaI site and a chloramphenicol resistance gene fragment (CAT cassette), are introduced into the FAdV-9 genome in a highly efficient and site-specific manner. To demonstrate the efficacy of this system we generated FAdV-9 ORF2, and FAdV-9 ORF11 deleted, CAT marked and unmarked FAdV-9 infectious clones (FAdmids), and replaced either ORF2 or ORF11, with an EGFP expression cassette or replaced ORF2 with an EGFP coding sequence via the unique SwaI sites, in approximately one month. All recombinant FAdmids expressed EGFP and were fully infectious in CH-SAH cells. PMID:26238923

  1. Solution structure of PMP-C: a new fold in the group of small serine proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mer, G; Hietter, H; Kellenberger, C; Renatus, M; Luu, B; Lefèvre, J F

    1996-04-26

    The solution structure and the disulfide pairings of a 36-residue proteinase inhibitor isolated from the insect Locusta migratoria have been determined using NMR spectroscopy and simulated annealing calculations. The peptide, termed PMP-C, was previously shown to inhibit bovine alpha-chymotrypsin as well as human leukocyte elastase, and was also found to block high-voltage-activated Ca2+ currents in rat sensory neurones. PMP-C has a prolate ellipsoid shape and adopts a tertiary fold hitherto unobserved in the large group of small "canonical" proteinase inhibitors. The over-all fold consists mainly of three strands arranged in a right-handed twisted, antiparallel, beta-sheet that demarcates a cavity, together with a linear amino-terminal segment oriented almost perpendicular to the three strands of the beta-sheet. Inside the cavity a phenyl ring constitutes the centre of a hydrophobic core. The proteinase binding loop is located in the carboxy-terminal part of the molecule, between two cysteine residues involved in disulfide bridges. Its conformation resembles that found in other small canonical proteinase inhibitors. A comparison of PMP-C structure with the recently published solution structure of the related peptide PMP-D2 shows that the most significant differences are complementary changes involved in the stabilization of similar folds. This comparison led us to review the structure of PMP-D2 and to identify two salt bridges in PMP-D2.

  2. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-12-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis.

  3. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-01-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis. PMID:7693593

  4. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  5. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer With an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Interleukin-12 in Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Bortolanza, Sergia; Bunuales, Maria; Otano, Itziar; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Perez, Daniel; Prieto, Jesus; Hernandez-Alcoceba, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy resistant to most conventional and experimental therapies, including conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds). The incorporation of immunostimulatory genes such as interleukin-12 (IL-12) in these viruses may overcome some of their limitations, but evaluation of such vectors requires suitable preclinical models. We describe a CRAd in which replication is dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activity and alterations of the pRB pathway in cancer cells. Transgenes (luciferase or IL-12) were incorporated into E3 region of the virus using a selective 6.7K/gp19K deletion. A novel permissive model of pancreatic cancer developed in immunocompetent Syrian hamsters was used for in vivo analysis. We show that, in contrast with nonreplicating adenoviruses (NR-Ad), active viral production and enhanced transgene expression took place in vivo. A single intratumor inoculation of the CRAd expressing IL-12 (Ad-DHscIL12) achieved a potent antitumor effect, whereas higher doses of replication-competent adenoviruses carrying luciferase did not. Compared to a standard NR-Ad expressing IL-12, Ad-DHscIL12 was less toxic in hamsters, with more selective tumor expression and shorter systemic exposure to the cytokine. We conclude that the expression of IL-12 in the context of a hypoxia-inducible oncolytic adenovirus is effective against pancreatic cancer in a relevant animal model. PMID:19223865

  6. The synthesis, kinetic characterization and application of biotinylated aminoacylchloromethanes for the detection of chymotrypsin and trypsin-like serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, G; Bailie, J R; Halliday, I M; Nelson, J; Walker, B

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis of two biotinylated affinity labels for chymotrypsin and trypsin-like serine proteinases is described, along with their kinetic characterization and application to the detection of these proteinases after PAGE and Western blotting. Thus the chloromethane analogues biotinylphenylalanylchloromethane (Bio-Phe-CH2Cl; reagent 1) and biotinylarginylchloromethane (Bio-Arg-CH2Cl, reagent 2), have been shown to be potent active-site-directed inactivators of chymotrypsin and trypsin respectively. The apparent overall second-order rate constants (kobs./[I]) for the inactivation of chymotrypsin and trypsin by reagent 1 (approximately 4.9 x 10(3) M-1.min-1) and reagent 2 (approximately 1.0 x 10(5) M-1.min-1) respectively are comparable with those obtained by other workers with simple urethane-protected analogues and demonstrates that the presence of the bulky biotinyl moiety is compatible with inhibitor effectiveness. Samples of chymotrypsin and trypsin that have been inactivated by reagents 1 and 2 respectively and which have been subjected to SDS/PAGE and Western blotting can be revealed with a streptavidin/alkaline phosphatase label. We can presently detect down to 20 ng of inactivated proteinase by using this system. The utility of the arginine derivative for the detection of the plasma trypsin-like proteinases plasmin and thrombin has also been demonstrated, thus holding out the possibility that this reagent may find general application as an active-site-directed label for this class of proteinase. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1575691

  7. Effects of leupeptin on proteinase and germination of castor beans

    SciTech Connect

    Alpi, A.; Beevers, H.

    1981-10-01

    Leupeptin, tripeptide inhibitor of some proteinases, was shown previously to maintain the stability of several enzymes (isocitrate lyase, fumarase, and catalase) in crude extracts of castor bean endosperm. This reagent is now shown to inhibit the breakdown of water-soluble and crystalloid-storage proteins of the protein bodies isolated from castor beans by the SH-proteinase and it also inhibits the endopeptidase from mung beans. When suitably introduced into the endosperm of dry castor beans it strongly inhibits germination and seedling development. Application of leupeptin to endosperm halves removed from the seed prevents the normal development of enzymes concerned with gluconeogenesis from fat and drastically curtails sugar production. The results suggest that the SH-proteinase is intimately involved in the mobilization of storage proteins.

  8. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Jutta; Kontaxis, Georg; Rancan, Chiara; Skern, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb(pro)) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb(pro) L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. (15)N-HSQC measurements of Lb(pro) L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb(pro), lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb(pro), stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb(pro) and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb(pro).

  9. Adenovirus serotype 5 hexon mediates liver gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Simon N; McVey, John H; Bhella, David; Parker, Alan L; Barker, Kristeen; Atoda, Hideko; Pink, Rebecca; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Greig, Jenny A; Denby, Laura; Custers, Jerome; Morita, Takashi; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Monteiro, Robson Q; Barouch, Dan H; van Rooijen, Nico; Napoli, Claudio; Havenga, Menzo J E; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2008-02-01

    Adenoviruses are used extensively as gene transfer agents, both experimentally and clinically. However, targeting of liver cells by adenoviruses compromises their potential efficacy. In cell culture, the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber protein engages the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) to bind cells. Paradoxically, following intravascular delivery, CAR is not used for liver transduction, implicating alternate pathways. Recently, we demonstrated that coagulation factor (F)X directly binds adenovirus leading to liver infection. Here, we show that FX binds to the Ad5 hexon, not fiber, via an interaction between the FX Gla domain and hypervariable regions of the hexon surface. Binding occurs in multiple human adenovirus serotypes. Liver infection by the FX-Ad5 complex is mediated through a heparin-binding exosite in the FX serine protease domain. This study reveals an unanticipated function for hexon in mediating liver gene transfer in vivo. PMID:18267072

  10. Identification and characterization of a serine-like proteinase of the murine coronavirus MHV-A59.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Lu, X; Denison, M R

    1995-01-01

    Gene 1 of the murine coronavirus, MHV-A59, encodes approximately 800 kDa of protein products within two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs 1a and 1b). The gene is expressed as a polyprotein that is processed into individual proteins, presumably by virus-encoded proteinases. ORF 1a has been predicted to encode proteins with similarity to viral and cellular proteinases, such as papain, and to the 3C proteinases of the picornaviruses (A. E. Gorbalenya, A. P. Donchenko, V. M. Blinov, and E. V. Koonin, FEBS Lett. 243:103-114, 1989; A. E. Gorbalenya, E. V. Koonin, A. P. Donchenko, and V. M. Blinov, Nucleic Acids Res. 17:4847-4861, 1989). We have cloned into a T7 transcription vector a cDNA fragment containing the putative 3C-like proteinase domain of MHV-A59, along with portions of the flanking hydrophobic domains. The construct was used to express a polypeptide in a combined in vitro transcription-translation system. Major polypeptides with molecular masses of 38 and 33 kDa were detected at early times, whereas polypeptides with molecular masses of 32 and 27 kDa were predominant after 30 to 45 min and appeared to be products of specific proteolysis of larger precursors. Mutations at the putative catalytic histidine and cysteine residues abolished the processing of the 27-kDa protein. Translation products of the pGpro construct were able to cleave the 27-kDa protein in trans from polypeptides expressed from the noncleaving histidine or cysteine mutants. The amino-terminal cleavage of the 27-kDa protein occurred at a glutamine-serine dipeptide as previously predicted. This study provides experimental confirmation that the coronaviruses express an active proteinase within the 3C-like proteinase domain of gene 1 ORF 1a and that this proteinase utilizes at least one canonical QS dipeptide as a cleavage site in vitro. PMID:7745703

  11. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-10-16

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  12. Critical Role of Autophagy in the Processing of Adenovirus Capsid-Incorporated Cancer-Specific Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Sarah R.; Jiang, Hong; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Fan, Xuejun; Gumin, Joy; Dong, Andrew; Alonso, Marta M.; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are highly immunogenic and are being examined as potential vectors for immunotherapy. Infection by oncolytic adenovirus is followed by massive autophagy in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesize that autophagy regulates the processing of adenoviral proteins for antigen presentation. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the presentation of viral antigens by infected cells using an antibody cocktail of viral capsid proteins. We found that viral antigens were processed by JNK-mediated autophagy, and that autophagy was required for their presentation. Consistent with these results, splenocytes isolated from virus-immunized mice were activated by infected cells in an MHC II-dependent manner. We then hypothesize that this mechanism can be utilized to generate an efficient cancer vaccine. To this end, we constructed an oncolytic virus encompassing an EGFRvIII cancer-specific epitope in the adenoviral fiber. Infection of cancer cells with this fiber-modified adenovirus resulted in recognition of infected cancer cells by a specific anti-EGFRvIII antibody. However, inhibition of autophagy drastically decreased the capability of the specific antibody to detect the cancer-related epitope in infected cells. Our data suggest that combination of adenoviruses with autophagy inducers may enhance the processing and presentation of cancer-specific antigens incorporated into capsid proteins. PMID:27093696

  13. Critical Role of Autophagy in the Processing of Adenovirus Capsid-Incorporated Cancer-Specific Antigens.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sarah R; Jiang, Hong; Hossain, Mohammad B; Fan, Xuejun; Gumin, Joy; Dong, Andrew; Alonso, Marta M; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are highly immunogenic and are being examined as potential vectors for immunotherapy. Infection by oncolytic adenovirus is followed by massive autophagy in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesize that autophagy regulates the processing of adenoviral proteins for antigen presentation. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the presentation of viral antigens by infected cells using an antibody cocktail of viral capsid proteins. We found that viral antigens were processed by JNK-mediated autophagy, and that autophagy was required for their presentation. Consistent with these results, splenocytes isolated from virus-immunized mice were activated by infected cells in an MHC II-dependent manner. We then hypothesize that this mechanism can be utilized to generate an efficient cancer vaccine. To this end, we constructed an oncolytic virus encompassing an EGFRvIII cancer-specific epitope in the adenoviral fiber. Infection of cancer cells with this fiber-modified adenovirus resulted in recognition of infected cancer cells by a specific anti-EGFRvIII antibody. However, inhibition of autophagy drastically decreased the capability of the specific antibody to detect the cancer-related epitope in infected cells. Our data suggest that combination of adenoviruses with autophagy inducers may enhance the processing and presentation of cancer-specific antigens incorporated into capsid proteins. PMID:27093696

  14. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-01

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy. PMID:27195521

  15. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-01

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  16. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis by the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella: comparison of midgut proteinases from susceptible and resistant larvae.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D E; Brookhart, G L; Kramer, K J; Barnett, B D; McGaughey, W H

    1990-03-01

    Midgut homogenates from susceptible and resistant strains of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, were compared for their ability to activate the entomocidal parasporal crystal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis. The properties of midgut proteinases from both types of larvae were also examined. Electrophoretic patterns of crystal protein from B. thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki (HD-1) and aizawai (HD-133 and HD-144) were virtually unchanged following digestion by either type of midgut homogenate. Changes in pH (9.5 to 11.5) or midgut homogenate concentration during digestion failed to substantially alter protein electrophoretic patterns of B. thuringiensis HD-1 crystal toxin. In vitro toxicity of crystal protein activated by either type of midgut preparation was equal toward cultured insect cells from either Manduca sexta or Choristoneura fumiferana. Electrophoresis of midgut extracts in polyacrylamide gels containing gelatin as substrate also yielded matching mobility patterns of proteinases from both types of midguts. Quantitation of midgut proteolytic activity using tritiated casein as a substrate revealed variation between midgut preparations, but no statistically significant differences between proteolytic activities from susceptible and resistant Indian meal moth larvae. Inhibition studies indicated that a trypsin-like proteinase with maximal activity at pH 10 is a major constituent of Indian meal moth midguts. The results demonstrated that midguts from susceptible and resistant strains of P. interpunctella are similar both in their ability to activate B. thuringiensis protoxin and in their proteolytic activity.

  17. Differential inhibition of Helicoverpa armigera gut proteinases by proteinase inhibitors of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) and its wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Nanasaheb P; Hivrale, Vandana K; Chhabda, Pavanjeet J; Giri, Ashok P; Kachole, Manvendra S

    2003-10-01

    The seeds of 36 pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp.] cultivars, resistant and susceptible to pests and pathogens and 17 of its wild relatives were analysed for inhibitors of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and insect gut proteinases to identify potential inhibitors of insect (Helicoverpa armigera) gut enzymes. Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) of pigeonpea cultivars showed total inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin, and moderate inhibition potential towards H. armigera proteinases (HGP). PIs of wild relatives exhibited stronger inhibition of HGP, which was up to 87% by Rhynchosia PIs. Electrophoretic detection of HGPI proteins and inhibition of HGP isoforms by few pigeonpea wild relative PIs supported our enzyme inhibitor assay results. Present results indicate that PIs exhibit wide range of genetic diversity in the wild relatives of pigeonpea whereas pigeonpea cultivars (resistant as well as susceptible to pests and pathogens) are homogeneous. The potent HGPIs identified in this study need further exploration for their use in strengthening pigeonpea defence against H. armigera.

  18. Transductional targeting with recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Valerie; Leissner, Philippe; Winter, Arend; Mehtali, Majid; Lusky, Monika

    2002-09-01

    Replication-deficient adenoviruses are considered as gene delivery vectors for the genetic treatment of a variety of diseases. The ability of such vectors to mediate efficient expression of therapeutic genes in a broad spectrum of dividing and non-dividing cell types constitutes an advantage over alternative gene transfer vectors. However, this broad tissue tropism may also turn disadvantageous when genes encoding potentially harmful proteins (e.g. cytokines, toxic proteins) are expressed in surrounding normal tissues. Therefore, specific restrictions of the viral tropism would represent a significant technological advance towards safer and more efficient gene delivery vectors, in particular for cancer gene therapy applications. In this review, we summarize various strategies used to selectively modify the natural tropism of recombinant adenoviruses. The advantages, limitations and potential impact on gene therapy operations of such modified vectors are discussed. PMID:12189719

  19. Structural analysis of new antihypertensive peptides derived from cheese whey protein by proteinase K digestion.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, A; Saito, T; Kitazawa, H; Kawai, Y; Itoh, T

    1998-12-01

    Whey protein was digested with one of seven kinds of proteases at 37 degrees C (trypsin, proteinase K, actinase E, thermolysin, or papain) or at 25 degrees C (pepsin or chymotrypsin) for 24 h. The digested samples were assayed for the inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme and for changes in the systolic blood pressure caused in spontaneously hypertensive rats after gastric intubation. The strongest depressive effect on the systolic blood pressure (-55 mm Hg) was observed at 6 h after gastric intubation of the whey protein that was digested by proteinase K. Finally, six peptides were chromatographically isolated from the proteinase K digest by a combination of hydrophobic reversed-phase HPLC and gel filtration. The amino acid sequences and their origins were clarified as follows: Val-Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly [beta-casein (CN); f 59-64], Gly-Lys-Pro (beta 2-microglobulin; f 18-20), Ile-Pro-Ala (beta-lactoglobulin; f 78-80), Phe-Pro (serum albumin; f 221-222; beta-CN, f 62-63, f 157-158, and f 205-206), Val-Tyr-Pro (beta-CN; f 59-61), and Thr-Pro-Val-Val-Val-Pro-Pro-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro (beta-CN; f 80-90). Chemical synthesis of these six peptides confirmed that all peptides, except an undecapeptide, have antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The synthetic tripeptide Ile-Pro-Ala, originating from beta-lactoglobulin, showed the strongest antihypertensive activity (-31 mm Hg).

  20. Isolation and Characterization of an Equine Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ardans, Alexander A.; Pritchett, Randall F.; Zee, Yuan Chung

    1973-01-01

    A viral agent was isolated from lung tissue obtained upon necropsy of an Arabian foal which had exhibited clinical signs of pneumonia. The virus is 75 nm in diameter, cubic in symmetry, and resistant to chloroform and low pH (3.0). It contains deoxyribonucleic acid and has a buoyant density of 1.31 g/cm3 in cesium chloride. These findings indicate that the virus is a member of the adenovirus group. Images PMID:16558078

  1. A Novel Psittacine Adenovirus Identified During an Outbreak of Avian Chlamydiosis and Human Psittacosis: Zoonosis Associated with Virus-Bacterium Coinfection in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K. Y.; Zhang, Anna J. X.; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C. Y.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Chan, Andy S. F.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lo, Janice Y. C.; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3′ end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3–54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6–70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1–74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should

  2. Coacervate microspheres as carriers of recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kalyanasundaram, S; Feinstein, S; Nicholson, J P; Leong, K W; Garver, R I

    1999-01-01

    The therapeutic utility of recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) is limited in part by difficulties in directing the viruses to specific sites and by the requirement for bolus administration, both of which limit the efficiency of target tissue infection. As a first step toward overcoming these limitations, rAds were encapsulated in coacervate microspheres comprised of gelatin and alginate followed by stabilization with calcium ions. Ultrastructural evaluation showed that the microspheres formed in this manner were 0.8-10 microM in diameter, with viruses evenly distributed. The microspheres achieved a sustained release of adenovirus with a nominal loss of bioactivity. The pattern of release and the total amount of virus released was modified by changes in microsphere formulation. Administration of the adenovirus-containing microspheres to human tumor nodules engrafted in mice showed that the viral transgene was transferred to the tumor cells. It is concluded that coacervate microspheres can be used to encapsulate bioactive rAd and release it in a time-dependent manner.

  3. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  4. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGES

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  5. Immunotherapy of established tumors in mice by intratumoral injection of an adenovirus vector harboring the human IL-2 cDNA: induction of CD8(+) T-cell immunity and NK activity.

    PubMed

    Slos, P; De Meyer, M; Leroy, P; Rousseau, C; Acres, B

    2001-05-01

    Intratumoral (i.t.) injections of an adenovirus encoding the human interleukin-2 (IL-2) under the control of the RSV (Ad-pRSV-IL-2) or CMV (Ad-pCMV-IL-2) promoter were performed in established mastocytoma P815 tumors in B6D2 mice. Both early and long-term survival were found increased in mice treated with Ad-pCMV-IL-2 as compared with those obtained with Ad-pRSV-IL-2: tumor regression was observed in 30--50% of mice for the former and 5--15% for the latter. Difference in efficacy between the two vectors was directly correlated to the amount of IL-2 produced i.t. between 24 and 48 hours postinjection, which reached 10--20 ng/tumor for Ad-pCMV-IL-2 and 0.3--0.5 ng/tumor for Ad-pRSV-IL-2. In both cases, expression in the tumor was clearly detectable for a period of 7--10 days postinjection. Serum IL-2 was not detectable in mice treated with Ad-pRSV-IL-2, whereas expression peaked at a total of 1--2 ng at 24 hours but declined very rapidly in the Ad-pCMV-IL-2-treated group. Constant production of IL-2 inside the tumor was necessary for successful therapy because i.t. injections of recombinant IL-2 at levels up to 1 microg for five consecutive days did not lead to antitumoral activity. Evidence of induced systemic immunity following Ad-pCMV-IL-2 injections was obtained from rechallenge experiments in which tumor-free mice after treatment rejected a subsequent contralateral injection of a lethal dose of P815 tumor cells and from the observation that regression of nontreated tumors occurred in animals bearing bilateral tumors that were treated i.t. in a single tumor with Ad-pCMV-IL-2. P815-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) were found specifically in spleen cells from cured mice or rechallenged mice but not in control mice. Interestingly, limiting dilution analysis of anti-P815 CTL precursor (CTLp) frequency revealed a significant increase in mice cured of their tumor as compared to that obtained in naive mice or control mice treated or not with Ad-IL-2 but whose

  6. Design, synthesis and inhibitory effect of pentapeptidyl chloromethyl ketones on proteinase K.

    PubMed

    Kore, Anilkumar R; Shanmugasundaram, Muthian

    2010-12-01

    The synthesis and proteolytic inhibitor function of new modified pentapeptide MeOSuc-AAAPF-CH(2)Cl 6 is described. The efficacy of 6 in inhibiting the proteolytic activity of proteinase K at a concentration of 0.10 mM allows a signal to be obtained for an exogenous target ('Xeno RNA') at 29 PCR cycles (i.e., Ct=29), whereas the control MeOSuc-AAAPV-CH₂Cl 1 requires a 7.5-fold higher concentration (0.75 mM) to produce the same Ct.

  7. Purification and characterization of a new serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis with specificity for amino acids at P1 and P2 positions.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, A; Yoshida, N; Noda, K; Ito, A

    1995-12-01

    A proteinase was purified 230-fold to apparent homogeneity from culture filtrates of Bacillus subtilis by a series of column chromatographies on DE52, DEAE-Toyopearl, Cellulofine GC200M, and Mono-Q, using Boc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ser-pNA as a substrate. The molecular weight of the proteinase was estimated to be 42,000 by SDS-PAGE in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Studies on the substrate specificity with peptide p-nitroanilides and natural peptides revealed that this proteinase preferentially hydrolyzed the peptide bond on the carboxyl-terminal side of either serine or alanine residues at the P1 position and hydrophobic bulky amino acids at P2. It was most active at pH 9.5 for the hydrolysis of Boc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ser-pNA. The enzyme was inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), but not by tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) or by EDTA. Based on the reactivity toward substrates and inhibitors, this enzyme differs from elastase- or subtilisin-like proteinase, hence it is a new type of proteinase with specificity for amino acids at P1 and P2 positions. PMID:8519806

  8. Serine proteinases from barley malt may degrade beta-amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley seed proteinases are critically important to seed germination and malting in that they generate amino acids from seed N reserves, supporting embryo growth during germination and yeast fermentation during brewing. However, relatively little is known regarding the endogenous protein substrate ...

  9. Exposure to tobacco-derived materials induces overproduction of secreted proteinases in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Small-Howard, Andrea; Turner, Helen . E-mail: hturner@queens.org

    2005-04-15

    Mast cells reside at interfaces with the environment, including the mucosa of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This localization exposes mast cells to inhaled, or ingested, environmental challenges. In the airways of smokers, resident immune cells will be in contact with the condensed components of cigarette smoke. Mast cells are of particular interest due to their ability to promote airway remodeling and mucus hypersecretion. Clinical data show increased levels of mast cell-secreted tryptase and increased numbers of degranulated mast cells in the lavage and bronchial tissue of smokers. Since mast cell-secreted proteinases (MCPTs), including tryptases, contribute to pathological airway remodeling, we investigated the relationship between mast cell proteinases and smoke exposure. We exposed a mast cell line to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). We show that CSC exposure increases MCPT levels in mast cells using an assay for tryptase-type MCPT activity. We hypothesized that this increase in MCPT activity reflects a CSC-induced increase in the cytosolic pool of proteinase molecules, via stimulation of MCPT transcription. Transcript array data suggested that mRNA changes in response to CSC were limited in number and peaked after 3 h of CSC exposure. However, we noted marked transcriptional regulation of several MCPT genes. CSC-induced changes in the mRNA levels for MCPTs were confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke up-regulates MCPT levels in mast cells at both the protein and the mRNA level. We suggest that the pathological airway remodeling that has been described in clinical studies of smoke inhalation may be attributable to MCPT overproduction in vivo.

  10. Proteinases involved in the degradation of trypsin inhibitor in germinating mung beans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A; Tan-Wilson, A L

    1983-01-01

    The mung bean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) trypsin inhibitor (MBTI) is rapidly modified by limited proteolysis during the early stages of seedling growth. Using an electrophoretic assay that separates the unmodified inhibitor (MBTI-F) and the first two modified species (MBTI-E and -C), a pH optimum of approximately 4 was found for the modification reaction. The inhibitor modifying activity is initially low in ungerminated seeds, with the reaction F leads to E being the primary reaction catalyzed. Activity catalyzing the production of MBTI-C appears on the first day of germination. This activity (F leads to E leads to C) increases up to 6 days after inhibition, at which time the cotyledons begin to abscise. The activity converting MBTI-F and -E to MBTI-C was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (3.3 mM) but only weakly by iodoacetate (9 mM) and not at all by pepstatin A (9 microM), leupeptin (18 microM), or EDTA (5 mM). These results suggest the involvement of proteinases other than the major endopeptidase of the germinating seed, vicilin peptidohydrolase. This conclusion is further supported by gel filtration of the extracts of cotyledons on Sephacryl S-200. At least three proteinases are present in germinated cotyledons capable of modifying MBTI-F to MBTI-C and/or -E. All are distinguishable from vicilin peptidohydrolase on the basis of their molecular weight and inhibition by low molecular weight organic reagents.

  11. Incorporation of porcine adenovirus 4 fiber protein enhances infectivity of adenovirus vector on dendritic cells: implications for immune-mediated cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-Ryan, Ivy; Kim, Julius; Kim, Sojung; Ak, Ferhat; Dodson, Lindzy; Colonna, Marco; Powell, Matthew; Mutch, David; Spitzer, Dirk; Hansen, Ted; Goedegebuure, Simon P; Curiel, David; Hawkins, William

    2015-01-01

    One strategy in cancer immunotherapy is to capitalize on the key immunoregulatory and antigen presenting capabilities of dendritic cells (DCs). This approach is dependent on efficient delivery of tumor specific antigens to DCs, which subsequently induce an anti-tumor T-cell mediated immune response. Human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5) has been used in human studies for gene delivery, but has limited infection in DCs, which lack the proper receptors. Addition of the porcine fiber knob (PK) from porcine adenovirus type 4 to HAdV5 allows the virus to deliver genetic material via binding to glycosylated surface proteins and bypasses the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor required by wild-type HAdV5. In this study we explored the potential therapeutic applications of an adenovirus with PK-based tropism against cancers expressing mesothelin. Infectivity and gene transfer assays were used to compare Ad5-PK to wild-type HAdV5. Mouse models were used to demonstrate peptide specificity and T-cell responses. We show that the PK modification highly augmented infection of DCs, including the CD141+ DC subset, a key subset for activation of naïve CD8+ T-cells. We also show that Ad5-PK increases DC infectivity and tumor specific antigen expression. Finally, vaccination of mice with the Ad5-PK vector resulted in enhanced T-cell-mediated interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release in response to both mesothelin peptide and a tumor line expressing mesothelin. Ad5-PK is a promising tool for cancer immunotherapy as it improves infectivity, gene transfer, protein expression, and subsequent T-cell activation in DCs compared to wild-type HAdV5 viruses.

  12. Biochemical and biological characterization of two serine proteinases from Colombian Crotalus durissus cumanensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Arley Camilo; Pereañez, Jaime Andrés; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Two clotting serine proteinases, named Cdc SI and Cdc SII, were isolated and characterized for the first time from Colombian Crotalus durissus cumanensis snake venom. The enzymes were purified using two chromatographic steps: molecular exclusion on Sephacryl S-200 and RP-HPLC on C8 Column. The molecular masses of the proteins, determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, were 28,561.4 and 28,799.2 Da for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. The aim of the present study was to evaluate enzymatic, coagulant and toxic properties of the two enzymes. The serine proteinases hydrolyzed specific chromogenic substrate (BaPNA) and exhibited a Michaelis-Menten behavior. Cdc SI had V(max) of 0.038 ± 0.003 nmol/min and K(M) of 0.034 ± 0.017 mM, while Cdc SII displayed values of V(max) of 0.267 ± 0.011 nmol/min and K(M) of 0.145 ± 0.023 mM. N-terminal sequences were VIGGDEXNIN and VIGGDICNINEHNFLVALYE for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. Molecular masses, N-terminal sequences, inhibition assays, and enzymatic profile suggest that Cdc SI and Cdc SII belong to the family of snake venom thrombin-like enzymes. These serine proteinases differed in their clotting activity on human plasma, showing a minimum coagulant dose of 25 μg and 0.571 μg for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. Enzymes also showed coagulant activity on bovine fibrinogen and degraded chain α of this protein. Toxins lack hemorrhagic and myotoxic activities, but are capable to induce defibrin(ogen)ation, moderate edema, and an increase in vascular permeability. These serine proteinases may contribute indirectly to the local hemorrhage induced by metalloproteinases, by causing blood clotting disturbances, and might also contribute to cardiovascular alterations characteristic of patients envenomed by C. d. cumanensis in Colombia.

  13. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  14. Digestive proteinases of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) larvae: purification and characterization of a trypsin-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B; Elpidina, E N

    2005-03-01

    A new trypsin-like proteinase was purified to homogeneity from the posterior midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and gel filtration on Superdex-75. The isolated enzyme had molecular mass of 25.5 kD and pI 7.4. The enzyme was also characterized by temperature optimum at 55 degrees C, pH optimum at 8.5, and K(m) value of 0.04 mM (for hydrolysis of Bz-Arg-pNA). According to inhibitor analysis the enzyme is a trypsin-like serine proteinase stable within the pH range of 5.0-9.5. The enzyme hydrolyzes peptide bonds formed by Arg or Lys residues in the P1 position with a preference for relatively long peptide substrates. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, IVGGSSISISSVPXQIXLQY, shares 50-72% identity with other insect trypsin-like proteinases, and 44-50% identity to mammalian trypsins. The isolated enzyme is sensitive to inhibition by plant proteinase inhibitors and it can serve as a suitable target for control of digestion in this stored product pest.

  15. Quantitative determination of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to rat cardiac myocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kass-Eisler, A; Falck-Pedersen, E; Alvira, M; Rivera, J; Buttrick, P M; Wittenberg, B A; Cipriani, L; Leinwand, L A

    1993-01-01

    To optimize the use of modified adenoviruses as vectors for gene delivery to the myocardium, we have characterized infection of cultured fetal and adult rat cardiac myocytes in vitro and of adult cardiac myocytes in vivo by using a replication-defective adenovirus carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter (AdCMVCATgD). In vitro, virtually all fetal or adult cardiocytes express the CAT gene when infected with 1 plaque-forming unit of virus per cell. CAT enzymatic activity can be detected in these cells as early as 4 hr after infection, reaching near-maximal levels at 48 hr. In fetal cells, CAT expression was maintained without a loss in activity for at least 1 week. Using in vitro studies as a guide, we introduced the AdCMVCATgD virus directly into adult rat myocardium and compared the expression results obtained from virus injection with those obtained by direct injection of pAdCMVCATgD plasmid DNA. The amount of CAT activity resulting from adenovirus infection of the myocardium was orders of magnitude higher than that seen from DNA injection and was proportional to the amount of input virus. Immunostaining for CAT protein in cardiac tissue sections following adenovirus injection demonstrated large numbers of positive cells, reaching nearly 100% of the myocytes in many regions of the heart. Expression of genes introduced by adenovirus peaked at 5 days but was still detectable 55 days following infection. Adenoviruses are therefore a very useful tool for high-efficiency gene transfer into the cardiovascular system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8265580

  16. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  17. Molecular interactions between an insect predator and its herbivore prey on transgenic potato expressing a cysteine proteinase inhibitor from rice.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Edith; Michaud, Dominique; Cloutier, Conrad

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic plants expressing resistance to herbivorous insects may represent a safe and sustainable pest control alternative if they do not interfere with the natural enemies of target pests. Here we examined interactions between oryzacystatin I (OCI), a proteinase inhibitor from rice genetically engineered into potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Kennebec, line K52) to increase resistance to insect herbivory, and the insect predator Perillus bioculatus. This stinkbug is a relatively specialized predator of caterpillars and leaf-beetle larvae, and may also include plant sap in its predominantly carnivorous diet. One of its preferred prey is Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), a major target of insect resistance development for potato field crops. Gelatin/sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) confirmed that a major fraction of proteinase (gelatinase) activity in P. bioculatus extracts is OCI-sensitive. Among five gelatinolytic bands detected, the slowest-moving one (proteinase I) was inhibited strongly by purified OCI expressed in Escherichia coli or by OCI-transgenic potato extracts, while three other proteinases were partly sensitive to these treatments. There was also evidence of slight inhibition of proteinase I by untransformed potato foliage, suggesting the presence of a natural inhibitor related to OCI at low level in potato foliage. Interestingly, only about 50% of the maximum potential activity of proteinase I was recovered in extracts of P. bioculatus feeding on L. decemlineata larval prey on a diet of OCI-potato foliage, indicating that the predator was sensitive to OCI in the midgut of its prey. However, P. bioculatus on OCI-prey survived, grew and developed normally, indicating ability to compensate prey-mediated exposure to the OCI inhibitor. Confinement of P. bioculatus to potato foliage provided no evidence that potato plant-derived nutrition is a viable alternative to predation, restriction to potato foliage

  18. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples.

  19. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  20. A Novel Adenovirus in Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins. PMID:24811321

  1. A novel adenovirus in Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-05-07

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins.

  2. [Is there a risk of zoonotic disease due to adenoviruses?].

    PubMed

    Loustalot, Fabien; Creyssels, Sophie; Salinas, Sara; Benkõ, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; Mennechet, Franck J D; Kremer, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Every year brings another round of zoonotic viral infections. Usually they fall under the radar, but the occasional lethal epidemic brings another scare to the public and new urgency to the medical community. The types of these viruses (DNA vs. RNA genomes, enveloped vs. proteinaceous) as well as the preceding host(s) vary. Over the last 20 years, bats have been identified as an enigmatic carrier for several pathogens that have jumped the species barrier and infected humans. Factors that favour the emergence of zoonotic pathogens include the increasing overlap of the human and animal habitats, cultural activities, and the host reservoir. In this context, we asked whether bat and/or nonhuman primate adenoviruses are a risk for human health. PMID:26672663

  3. E1B and E4 oncoproteins of adenovirus antagonize the effect of apoptosis inducing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Roberta L.; Wilkinson, John C.; Ornelles, David A.

    2014-05-15

    Adenovirus inundates the productively infected cell with linear, double-stranded DNA and an abundance of single-stranded DNA. The cellular response to this stimulus is antagonized by the adenoviral E1B and E4 early genes. A mutant group C adenovirus that fails to express the E1B-55K and E4ORF3 genes is unable to suppress the DNA-damage response. Cells infected with this double-mutant virus display significant morphological heterogeneity at late times of infection and frequently contain fragmented nuclei. Nuclear fragmentation was due to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria into the nucleus. The release of AIF was dependent on active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which appeared to be activated by viral DNA replication. Nuclear fragmentation did not occur in AIF-deficient cells or in cells treated with a PARP-1 inhibitor. The E1B-55K or E4ORF3 proteins independently prevented nuclear fragmentation subsequent to PARP-1 activation, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of PAR-modified proteins. - Highlights: • E1B-55K or E4orf3 prevents nuclear fragmentation. • Nuclear fragmentation requires AIF and PARP-1 activity. • Adenovirus DNA replication activates PARP-1. • E1B-55K or E4orf3 proteins alter the distribution of PAR.

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis: characterization of a 39-kDa cysteine proteinase found in patient vaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Avila-González, Leticia; Ortega-López, Jaime; Cruz-Talonia, Fernando; Gómez-Gutierrez, Guillermo; Arroyo, Rossana

    2004-01-01

    Trichomonosis, a chronic sexually transmitted disease, remains a public health problem affecting yearly over 170 million people worldwide. This disease is caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, a protozoan flagellate rich in cysteine proteinases (CPs). Although CPs are involved in trichomonal cytopathogenicity, only few of them have been defined as virulence factors. In this study, we characterize a T. vaginalis 39-kDa proteinase (CP39) found in vaginal secretions from patients with trichomonosis. The CP39 proteinase bound to HeLa epithelial cells, vaginal epithelial cells (VECs), and human prostatic cancer cells (DU-145). CP39 did not bind to a human colon cancer (CaCo) cell line, suggesting tissue-specific binding. CP39 was found in six fresh trichomonad isolates tested. In two-dimensional gels, CP39 appeared as a single spot with a pI 4.5. CP39 is inhibited by E-64, stable at 50 degrees C, and active in a wide pH range (3.6-9.0), with an optimum pH at 7.0. In addition, CP39 degraded collagens I, III, IV, and V, human fibronectin, human hemoglobin, and human immunoglobulins A and G. Indirect immunofluorescence detected CP39 on the parasite surface with specific polyclonal antibody to purified CP39. Finally, CP39 was found to be immunogenic, as evidenced by detection on immunoblots with serum of patients with trichomonosis, but not control individuals. These data suggest that CP39 may play a role during trichomonal infection. PMID:15363938

  5. Enzymic and structural characterization of nepenthesin, a unique member of a novel subfamily of aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed

    Athauda, Senarath B P; Matsumoto, Koji; Rajapakshe, Sanath; Kuribayashi, Masayuki; Kojima, Masaki; Kubomura-Yoshida, Nobuko; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shibata, Chiaki; Inoue, Hideshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2004-07-01

    Carnivorous plants are known to secrete acid proteinases to digest prey, mainly insects, for nitrogen uptake. In the present study, we have purified, for the first time, to homogeneity two acid proteinases (nepenthesins I and II) from the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes distillatoria (a pitcher-plant known locally as badura) and investigated their enzymic and structural characteristics. Both enzymes were optimally active at pH approx. 2.6 towards acid-denatured haemoglobin; the specificity of nepenthesin I towards oxidized insulin B chain appears to be similar, but slightly wider than those of other APs (aspartic proteinases). Among the enzymic properties, however, the most notable is their unusual stability: both enzymes were remarkably stable at or below 50 degrees C, especially nepenthesin I was extremely stable over a wide range of pH from 3 to 10 for over 30 days. This suggests an evolutionary adaptation of the enzymes to their specific habitat. We have also cloned the cDNAs and deduced the complete amino acid sequences of the precursors of nepenthesins I and II (437 and 438 residues respectively) from the pitcher tissue of N. gracilis. Although the corresponding mature enzymes (each 359 residues) are homologous with ordinary pepsin-type APs, both enzymes had a high content of cysteine residues (12 residues/molecule), which are assumed to form six unique disulphide bonds as suggested by computer modelling and are supposed to contribute towards the remarkable stability of nepenthesins. Moreover, the amino acid sequence identity of nepenthesins with ordinary APs, including plant vacuolar APs, is remarkably low (approx. 20%), and phylogenetic comparison shows that nepenthesins are distantly related to them to form a novel subfamily of APs with a high content of cysteine residues and a characteristic insertion, named 'the nepenthesin-type AP-specific insertion', that includes a large number of novel, orthologous plant APs emerging in the gene/protein databases. PMID

  6. Nepenthesin, a unique member of a novel subfamily of aspartic proteinases: enzymatic and structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Athauda, Senarath B P; Matsumoto, Koji; Rajapakshe, Sanath; Kuribayashi, Masayuki; Kojima, Masaki; Kubomura-Yoshida, Nobuko; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shibata, Chiaki; Inoue, Hideshi

    2005-12-01

    Carnivorous plants are known to secrete acid proteinases to digest prey, mainly insects, for nitrogen uptake. In our recent study, we have purified, for the first time, to homogeneity two acid proteinases, nepenthesin I (Nep I) and nepenthesin II (Nep II) from the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes distillatoria and investigated their enzymatic and structural characteristics. Both enzymes were optimally active at pH approx. 2.6 toward acid-denatured hemoglobin; the specificity of Nep I toward oxidized insulin B chain appears to be similar, but slightly wider than those of other aspartic proteinases (APs). At or below 50 degrees C both enzymes were remarkably stable; especially Nep I was extremely stable over a wide range of pH from 3 to 10 for over 30 days. This suggests an evolutionary adaptation of the enzymes to their specific habitat. We have also cloned the cDNAs and deduced the complete amino acid sequences of the precursors of Nep I and Nep II from the pitcher tissue of Nepenthes gracilis. Although the corresponding mature enzymes are homologous with ordinary pepsin-type APs, both enzymes had a high content of cysteine residues (12 residues per molecule), which are assumed to form six unique disulfide bonds as suggested by computer modeling and are thought to contribute toward the remarkable stability of Neps. Moreover, the amino acid sequence identity of Neps with ordinary APs, including plant vacuolar APs, are remarkably low (approx. 20%), and phylogenetic comparison shows that Neps are distantly related to them to form a novel subfamily of APs with a high content of cysteine residues and a characteristic insertion, named 'the Nep-type AP (NAP)-specific insertion', including a large number of novel, orthologous plant APs emerging in the gene/protein databases. PMID:16381601

  7. Nepenthesin, a unique member of a novel subfamily of aspartic proteinases: enzymatic and structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Athauda, Senarath B P; Matsumoto, Koji; Rajapakshe, Sanath; Kuribayashi, Masayuki; Kojima, Masaki; Kubomura-Yoshida, Nobuko; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shibata, Chiaki; Inoue, Hideshi

    2005-12-01

    Carnivorous plants are known to secrete acid proteinases to digest prey, mainly insects, for nitrogen uptake. In our recent study, we have purified, for the first time, to homogeneity two acid proteinases, nepenthesin I (Nep I) and nepenthesin II (Nep II) from the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes distillatoria and investigated their enzymatic and structural characteristics. Both enzymes were optimally active at pH approx. 2.6 toward acid-denatured hemoglobin; the specificity of Nep I toward oxidized insulin B chain appears to be similar, but slightly wider than those of other aspartic proteinases (APs). At or below 50 degrees C both enzymes were remarkably stable; especially Nep I was extremely stable over a wide range of pH from 3 to 10 for over 30 days. This suggests an evolutionary adaptation of the enzymes to their specific habitat. We have also cloned the cDNAs and deduced the complete amino acid sequences of the precursors of Nep I and Nep II from the pitcher tissue of Nepenthes gracilis. Although the corresponding mature enzymes are homologous with ordinary pepsin-type APs, both enzymes had a high content of cysteine residues (12 residues per molecule), which are assumed to form six unique disulfide bonds as suggested by computer modeling and are thought to contribute toward the remarkable stability of Neps. Moreover, the amino acid sequence identity of Neps with ordinary APs, including plant vacuolar APs, are remarkably low (approx. 20%), and phylogenetic comparison shows that Neps are distantly related to them to form a novel subfamily of APs with a high content of cysteine residues and a characteristic insertion, named 'the Nep-type AP (NAP)-specific insertion', including a large number of novel, orthologous plant APs emerging in the gene/protein databases.

  8. Enzymic and structural characterization of nepenthesin, a unique member of a novel subfamily of aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed

    Athauda, Senarath B P; Matsumoto, Koji; Rajapakshe, Sanath; Kuribayashi, Masayuki; Kojima, Masaki; Kubomura-Yoshida, Nobuko; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shibata, Chiaki; Inoue, Hideshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2004-07-01

    Carnivorous plants are known to secrete acid proteinases to digest prey, mainly insects, for nitrogen uptake. In the present study, we have purified, for the first time, to homogeneity two acid proteinases (nepenthesins I and II) from the pitcher fluid of Nepenthes distillatoria (a pitcher-plant known locally as badura) and investigated their enzymic and structural characteristics. Both enzymes were optimally active at pH approx. 2.6 towards acid-denatured haemoglobin; the specificity of nepenthesin I towards oxidized insulin B chain appears to be similar, but slightly wider than those of other APs (aspartic proteinases). Among the enzymic properties, however, the most notable is their unusual stability: both enzymes were remarkably stable at or below 50 degrees C, especially nepenthesin I was extremely stable over a wide range of pH from 3 to 10 for over 30 days. This suggests an evolutionary adaptation of the enzymes to their specific habitat. We have also cloned the cDNAs and deduced the complete amino acid sequences of the precursors of nepenthesins I and II (437 and 438 residues respectively) from the pitcher tissue of N. gracilis. Although the corresponding mature enzymes (each 359 residues) are homologous with ordinary pepsin-type APs, both enzymes had a high content of cysteine residues (12 residues/molecule), which are assumed to form six unique disulphide bonds as suggested by computer modelling and are supposed to contribute towards the remarkable stability of nepenthesins. Moreover, the amino acid sequence identity of nepenthesins with ordinary APs, including plant vacuolar APs, is remarkably low (approx. 20%), and phylogenetic comparison shows that nepenthesins are distantly related to them to form a novel subfamily of APs with a high content of cysteine residues and a characteristic insertion, named 'the nepenthesin-type AP-specific insertion', that includes a large number of novel, orthologous plant APs emerging in the gene/protein databases.

  9. Modulation of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Haddad, I Y; Sorscher, E J; Garver, R I; Hong, J; Tzeng, E; Matalon, S

    1997-05-01

    We assessed the role of .NO in recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo. NIH3T3 fibroblasts, stably transfected with the human inducible nitric oxide synthase, but lacking tetrahydrobiopterin (NIH3T3/iNOS [inducibile nitric oxide synthase]), were infected with replication-deficient adenovirus (E1-deleted), containing either the luciferase or the Lac Z reporter genes (AdCMV-Luc and AdCMV-Lac Z; 1-10 plaque forming units [pfu]/cell). Incubation of infected cells with sepiapterin (50 microM), a precursor of tetrahydrobiopterin, progressively increased nitrate/nitrite levels in the medium and decreased both luciferase and beta-galactosidase protein expression to approximately 60% of their corresponding control values, 24 h later. NIH3T3/iNOS cells had normal ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) levels and did not release LDH(lactic dehydrogenase) into the medium. Pretreatment of these cells with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 1 mM), an inhibitor of iNOS, prevented the sepiapterin-mediated induction of .NO and restored gene transfer to baseline values. Incubation of NIH3T3/iNOS with 8-bromo-cGMP (400 microM) in the absence of sepiapterin, or exposure of AdCMV-Luc to large concentrations of .NO, did not alter the efficacy of gene transfer. .NO produced by NIH3T3/iNOS cells also suppressed beta-galactosidase expression in NIH3T3 cocultured cells stably transfected with beta-galactosidase gene, suggesting .NO inhibited gene expression at either the transriptional or posttranscriptional levels. To investigate the effects of inhaled .NO on gene transfer in vivo, CD1 mice received an intratracheal instillation of AdCMV-Luc (4 x 10(9) pfu in 80 microl of saline) and exposed to .NO (25 ppm in room air) for 72 h. At that time, no significant degree of lung inflammation was detected by histological examination. However, lung luciferase activity decreased by 53% as compared with air breathing controls (P < 0.05; n > or = 8). We concluded that

  10. Functional properties of a cysteine proteinase from pineapple fruit with improved resistance to fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Ning; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhang, Chen; Sun, Guangming; Xie, Jianghui

    2014-02-21

    In plant cells, many cysteine proteinases (CPs) are synthesized as precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum, and then are subject to post-translational modifications to form the active mature proteinases. They participate in various cellular and physiological functions. Here, AcCP2, a CP from pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus L.) belonging to the C1A subfamily is analyzed based on the molecular modeling and homology alignment. Transcripts of AcCP2 can be detected in the different parts of fruits (particularly outer sarcocarps), and gradually increased during fruit development until maturity. To analyze the substrate specificity of AcCP2, the recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from Pichia pastoris. The precursor of purified AcCP2 can be processed to a 25 kDa active form after acid treatment (pH 4.3). Its optimum proteolytic activity to Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-NH-Mec is at neutral pH. In addition, the overexpression of AcCP2 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana can improve the resistance to fungal pathogen of Botrytis cinerea. These data indicate that AcCP2 is a multifunctional proteinase, and its expression could cause fruit developmental characteristics of pineapple and resistance responses in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  11. Adaptation of the behaviour of an aspartic proteinase inhibitor by relocation of a lysine residue by one helical turn.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Wyatt, David M; Phylip, Lowri H; Berry, Colin; Bur, Daniel; Kay, John

    2006-08-01

    In addition to self-inhibition of aspartic proteinase zymogens by their intrinsic proparts, the activity of certain members of this enzyme family can be modulated through active-site occupation by extrinsic polypeptides such as the small IA3 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The unprecedented mechanism by which IA3 helicates to inhibit its sole target aspartic proteinase locates an i, i+4 pair of charged residues (Lys18+Asp22) on an otherwise-hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix. The nature of these residues is not crucial for effective inhibition, but re-location of the lysine residue by one turn (+4 residues) in the helical IA3 positions its side chain in the mutant IA3-proteinase complex in an orientation essentially identical to that of the key lysine residue in zymogen proparts. The binding of the extrinsic mutant IA3 shows pH dependence reminiscent of that required for the release of intrinsic zymogen proparts so that activation can occur. PMID:16895485

  12. An in-built proteinase inhibitor system for the protection of recombinant proteins recovered from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Daniel; Anguenot, Raphaël; Brunelle, France; Le, Van Quy; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Trépanier, Sonia; Michaud, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Proteolytic degradation represents a significant barrier to the efficient production of several recombinant proteins in plants, both in vivo during their expression and in vitro during their recovery from source tissues. Here, we describe a strategy to protect recombinant proteins during the recovery process, based on the coexpression of a heterologous proteinase inhibitor acting as a 'mouse trap' against the host proteases during extraction. After confirming the importance of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities in crude protein extracts of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) leaves, transgenic lines of potato expressing either tomato cathepsin D inhibitor (CDI) or bovine aprotinin, both active against trypsin and chymotrypsin, were generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation. Leaf crude protein extracts from CDI-expressing lines, showing decreased levels of cathepsin D-like and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase hydrolysing activities in vitro, conducted decreased turnover rates of the selection marker protein neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) relative to the turnover rates measured for transgenic lines expressing only the marker protein. A similar stabilizing effect on NPTII was observed in leaf protein extracts from plant lines coexpressing bovine aprotinin, confirming the ability of ectopically expressed broad-spectrum serine proteinase inhibitors to reproduce the protein-stabilizing effect of low-molecular-weight proteinase inhibitors generally added to protein extraction media.

  13. Adenovirus type 12 gene 401 function and temperature sensitivity of cytochalasin B effects on transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Ledinko, N; Bhe, F T

    1980-01-01

    Rat (3Y1) cells transformed by wild-type adenovirus type 12 or the temperature-sensitive mutant ts401 with an active function required for transformation maintenance were exposed at the permissive(36 degrees) or nonpermissive (40 degrees) temperature to cytochalasin B (CB). At 40 degrees, the ts401-transformed cells, but not the wild-type transformants, exhibited, at least partially, the untransformed 3Y1 cell phenotype; most of the cells became bi- and trinucleated and DNA synthesis was inhibited. AT 36 degrees, both groups of cells became highly multinucleated, and there was no apparent inhibition of DNA synthesis by CB. These characteristics were exhibited also by the wild-type transformants at 40 degrees. These findings provide additional evidence that an active 401 gene function is required for maintenance of the adenovirus-transformed cell phenotype. PMID:7251331

  14. Experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease in yearling black-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Hanley, R S; Chiu, P H; Burd, M; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Swift, P K

    1997-10-01

    An apparently novel adenovirus was associated with an epizootic of hemorrhagic disease that is believed to have killed thousands of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California (USA) during 1993-1994. A systemic vasculitis with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy or a localized vasculitis associated with necrotizing stomatitis/pharyngitis/glossitis or osteomyelitis of the jaw were common necropsy findings in animals that died during this epizootic. Six black-tailed yearling deer (O. hemionus columbianus) were inoculated with purified adenovirus isolated from a black-tailed fawn that died of acute adenovirus hemorrhagic disease during the epizootic. Three of six inoculated deer also received intramuscular injections of dexamethasone sodium phosphate every 3 days during the study. Eight days post-inoculation, one deer (without dexamethasone) developed bloody diarrhea and died. Necropsy and histopathologic findings were identical to lesions in free-ranging animals that died of the natural disease. Hemorrhagic enteropathy and pulmonary edema were the significant necropsy findings and there was microscopic vascular damage and endothelial intranuclear inclusion bodies in the vessels of the intestines and lungs. Adenovirus was identified in necrotic endothelial cells in the lungs by fluorescent antibody staining, immunohistochemistry and by transmission electron microscopy. Adenovirus was reisolated from tissues of the animal that died of experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease. Similar gross and microscopic lesions were absent in four of six adenovirus-inoculated deer and in the negative control animal which were necropsied at variable intervals during the 14 wk study. One deer was inoculated with purified adenovirus a second time, 12 wk after the first inoculation. Fifteen days after the second inoculation, this deer developed severe ulceration of the tongue, pharynx and rumen and necrotizing osteomyelitis of the mandible which was associated with

  15. Regulation of transcription of the adenovirus EII promoter by gene products: Absence of sequence specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, R.E.; Kaufman, R.J.; Sharp, P.A.

    1984-10-01

    During adenovirus infection, the EII promoter is positively regulated by products of the EIa region. The authors have studied this regulation by fusing a DNA segment containing the adenovirus EII promoter to a dihydrofolate reductase cDNA segment. Expression of this hybrid gene is stimulated in trans when cell lines containing an integrated copy are either transfected with plasmids carrying the EIa region or infected with adenovirus. This suggests that EIa activity regulates transcription of the EII promoter in the absence of other viral proteins and that this stimulation can occur when the EII promoter is organized in cellular chromatin. Transcription from the EII promoter is initiated at two sites in cell lines lacking EIa activity. Introduction of the EIa region preferentially stimulated transcription from one of these two sites. A sensitive, stable cotransfection assay was used to test for specific EII sequences required for stimulation. EIa activity stimulates all mutaant promoters; the most extensive deletion retained only 18 base pairs of sequences upstream of the initiation site. They suggest that regulation of a promoter by the EIa region does not depend on the presence of a set of specific sequences, but instead reflects a characteristic of promoters that have been exogenously introduced into cells. Insertion of the 72-base-pair repeat of simian-virus 40 in cis enhances transcription from the EII promoter. The stimulatory effects of EIa activity and of the simian virus 40 sequence are additive and appear to differ mechanistically.

  16. Mutational analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease suggests functional homology with aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, D D; Hutchison, C A; Edgell, M H; Farmerie, W G; Swanstrom, R

    1989-01-01

    Processing of the retroviral gag and pol gene products is mediated by a viral protease. Bacterial expression systems have been developed which permit genetic analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease as measured by cleavage of the pol protein precursor. Deletion analysis of the pol reading frame locates the sequences required to encode a protein with appropriate proteolytic activity near the left end of the pol reading frame but largely outside the gag-pol overlap region, which is at the extreme left end of pol. Most missense mutations within an 11-amino-acid domain highly conserved among retroviral proteases and with sequence similarity to the active site of aspartic proteinases abolish appropriate processing, suggesting that the retrovirus proteases share a catalytic mechanism with aspartic proteinases. Substitution of the amino acids flanking the scissile bond at three of the processing sites encoded by pol demonstrates distinct sequence requirements for cleavage at these different sites. The inclusion of a charged amino acid at the processing site blocks cleavage. A subset of these substitutions also inhibits processing at the nonmutated sites. Images PMID:2642305

  17. Characterization of a New Cell Envelope Proteinase PrtP from Lactobacillus rhamnosus CGMCC11055.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tingting; Ouyang, Xudong; Xin, Yongping; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Susu; Kong, Jian

    2016-09-21

    Cell envelope proteinases (CEPs) play essential roles in lactic acid bacteria growth in milk and health-promoting properties of fermented dairy products. The genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CGMCC11055 possesses two putative CEP genes prtP and prtR2, and the PrtP displays the distinctive domain organization from PrtR2 reported. The PrtP was purified and biochemically characterized. The results showed that the optimal activity occurred at 44 °C, pH 6.5. p-Amidinophenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride obviously inhibited enzymatic activity, suggesting PrtP was a member of serine proteinases. Under the optimal conditions, β-casein was a favorite substrate over αS1- and κ-casein, and 35 oligopeptides were identified in the β-casein hydrolysate, including the phosphoserine peptide and bioactive isoleucine-proline-proline. By analysis of the amino acid sequences of those oligopeptides, proline was the preferred residue at the breakdown site. Therefore, we speculated that PrtP was a new type of CEPs from Lb. rhamnosus. PMID:27585760

  18. Neutralization of adenoviruses: kinetics, stoichiometry, and mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfart, C

    1988-01-01

    Kinetic curves for neutralization of adenovirus type 2 with anti-hexon serum revealed no lag periods even when the serum was highly diluted or when the temperature was lowered to 4 degrees C, thus indicating a single-hit mechanism. Multiplicity curves determined with anti-hexon serum displayed a linear correlation between the degree of neutralization and dilution of antiserum. Neutralization values experimentally obtained under steady-state conditions fully fitted a single-hit model based on Poisson calculations. Quantitation of the amount of 125I-labeled type-specific anti-hexon antibodies needed for full neutralization of adenovirus showed that 1.4 antibodies were attached per virion under such conditions. Virions already attached to HeLa cells at 4 degrees C were, to a large extent, neutralizable by anti-hexon serum, whereas anti-fiber and anti-penton base antisera were negative. It is suggested that adenovirus may be neutralized by two pathways: aggregation of the virions (extracellular neutralization) as performed by anti-fiber antibodies and blocking of virion entrance from the acidic endosomes into the cytoplasm (intracellular neutralization). The latter effect could be obtained by (i) covering of the penton bases, as performed by anti-penton base antibodies, thereby preventing interaction between the penton bases and the endosomal membrane, which results in trapping of virions within endosomes, and (ii) inhibition of the low-pH-induced conformational change of the viral capsid, which seems to occur in the endosomes and is necessary for proper exposure of the penton bases, as performed by anti-hexon antibodies. Images PMID:3373570

  19. Alterations in cysteine proteinase content of rat lung associated with development of Pneumocystis carinii infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, D J; Stubberfield, C R; McBride, J D; Wilson, D L

    1991-01-01

    The rate of hydrolysis of three cysteine-type proteinase substrates, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Arg-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide (AMC) (cathepsin B), Arg-AMC (cathepsin H), and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Arg-AMC (cathepsin L), were determined in rat lung throughout the time course of the induction of Pneumocystis carinii infection by immunosuppression. Cathepsin B-like and cathepsin L-like activities fell below control values initially, but from week 8 of the immunosuppressive treatment significant increases above the control were noted. Cathepsin H-like activity was greater than control levels from week 3, and by week 12 it was 7,600% of the mean control value. When compared with the relative degree of infection, as assessed from the number of cysts present in lung impression smears, cathepsin B-like and cathepsin L-like activities were significantly increased only at heavy parasite burdens while cathepsin H-like activity displayed a close correlation with parasite number (r = 0.884; P less than 0.001). Activity was detected in lysates of purified P. carinii with all three substrates. Treatment of heavily infected animals with co-trimoxazole cleared the lungs of P. carinii, and this was accompanied by a marked reduction in proteinase activity, in particular, cathepsin H-like activity, which fell from 108- to 3-fold the mean control value following drug treatment. Analysis of cathepsin H isozyme patterns by fluorography following isoelectric focusing revealed differences between treated and control lung samples. In the immunosuppressed group, there was a time-dependent increase in the intensity of some of the bands observed in the controls and an appearance of several novel bands which corresponded to bands observed in lysates of P. carinii. It is likely, therefore, that the increased proteinase activity observed in the treated group is due, at least in part, to isozymes from P. carinii; consequently, cathepsin H-like activity might be of use diagnostically in the

  20. Adenovirus-based genetic vaccines for biodefense.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Julie L; Kobinger, Gary; Wilson, James M; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-02-01

    The robust host responses elicited against transgenes encoded by (E1-)(E3-) adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be used to develop Ad-based vectors as platform technologies for vaccines against potential bioterror pathogens. This review focuses on pathogens of major concern as bioterror agents and why Ad vectors are ideal as anti-bioterror vaccine platforms, providing examples from our laboratories of using Ad vectors as vaccines against potential bioterror pathogens and how Ad vectors can be developed to enhance vaccine efficacy in the bioterror war.

  1. PEGylated Adenoviruses: From Mice to Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wonganan, Piyanuch; Croyle, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Covalent modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), a non-toxic polymer used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations for over 60 years, can profoundly influence the pharmacokinetic, pharmacologic and toxciologic profile of protein and peptide-based therapeutics. This review summarizes the history of PEGylation and PEG chemistry and highlights the value of this technology in the context of the design and development of recombinant viruses for gene transfer, vaccination and diagnostic purposes. Specific emphasis is placed on the application of this technology to the adenovirus, the most potent viral vector with the most highly characterized toxicity profile to date, in several animal models. PMID:21994645

  2. Characterisation of functional and insecticidal properties of a cathepsin L-like proteinase from flesh fly (Sacrophaga peregrina) involved in differentiation of imaginal discs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase from Sacrophaga peregrina (flesh fly), which is involved in differentiation of imaginal discs. The protein has a potential insecticidal activity, since recombinant baculoviruses engineered to express ScathL have an enhanced ability to kill lepidoptera...

  3. A thermolabile aspartic proteinase from Mucor mucedo DSM 809: gene identification, cloning, and functional expression in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yegin, Sirma; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the cDNA encoding the aspartic proteinase of Mucor mucedo DSM 809 has been identified by RNA ligased-mediated and oligo-capping rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The gene contained an open reading frame of 1,200 bp and encoded for a signal peptide of 21 amino acid residues. Two N-glycosylation sites were observed within the identified sequence. The proteinase gene was cloned into the vector pGAPZαA and expressed in Pichia pastoris X-33 for the first time. The protein has been secreted in functionally active form into the culture medium. The expression system does not require any acid activation process. The factors affecting the expression level were optimized in shaking flask cultures. Maximum enzyme production was observed with an initial medium pH of 3.5 at 20 °C and 220 rpm shaking speed utilizing 4 % glucose as a carbon and energy source. The enzyme was purified with cation exchange chromatography and further studies revealed that the enzyme was secreted in glycosylated form. The purified enzyme exhibited remarkable sensitivity to thermal treatment and became completely inactivated after incubation at 55 °C for 10 min. These results indicated that the recombinant proteinase could be considered as a potential rennet candidate for the cheese-making industry.

  4. The death enzyme CP14 is a unique papain-like cysteine proteinase with a pronounced S2 subsite selectivity.

    PubMed

    Paireder, Melanie; Mehofer, Ulrich; Tholen, Stefan; Porodko, Andreas; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Biniossek, Martin L; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Lenarcic, Brigita; Novinec, Marko; Schilling, Oliver; Mach, Lukas

    2016-08-01

    The cysteine protease CP14 has been identified as a central component of a molecular module regulating programmed cell death in plant embryos. CP14 belongs to a distinct subfamily of papain-like cysteine proteinases of which no representative has been characterized thoroughly to date. However, it has been proposed that CP14 is a cathepsin H-like protease. We have now produced recombinant Nicotiana benthamiana CP14 (NbCP14) lacking the C-terminal granulin domain. As typical for papain-like cysteine proteinases, NbCP14 undergoes rapid autocatalytic activation when incubated at low pH. The mature protease is capable of hydrolysing several synthetic endopeptidase substrates, but cathepsin H-like aminopeptidase activity could not be detected. NbCP14 displays a strong preference for aliphatic over aromatic amino acids in the specificity-determining P2 position. This subsite selectivity was also observed upon digestion of proteome-derived peptide libraries. Notably, the specificity profile of NbCP14 differs from that of aleurain-like protease, the N. benthamiana orthologue of cathepsin H. We conclude that CP14 is a papain-like cysteine proteinase with unusual enzymatic properties which may prove of central importance for the execution of programmed cell death during plant development. PMID:27246477

  5. Secreted Frizzled Related Protein 2 is a procollagen C proteinase enhancer with a role in myocardial infarction-associated fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Luo, Min; Zhang, Yue; Wilkes, David C.; Ge, Gaoxiang; Grieskamp, Thomas; Yamada, Chikaomi; Liu, Ting-Chun; Huang, Guorui; Basson, Craig T.; Kispert, Andreas; Greenspan, Daniel S.; Sato, Thomas N.

    2009-01-01

    Secreted frizzled related proteins (sFRPs) have emerged as key regulators of a wide range of developmental and disease processes, with virtually all known functions of mammalian sFRPs attributed to their ability to antagonize Wnt signaling. Recently however, the Xenopus and zebrafish sFRP, Sizzled, was shown to function as an antagonist of Chordin processing by Tolloid-like metalloproteinases, leading to the proposal that sFRPs may function as evolutionarily-conserved antagonists of the chordinase activities of this class of proteinases. Herein, in contrast to this proposal, we show that the mammalian sFRP, sFRP2, does not affect Chordin processing, but instead can serve as a direct enhancer of the procollagen C-proteinase activity of Tolloid-like metalloproteinases. We further show that the level of fibrosis, in which procollagen processing by Tolloid-like proteinases plays a rate-limiting role, is markedly reduced in sFRP2-null mice subjected to myocardial infarction. Importantly, this reduced level of fibrosis is accompanied by significantly improved cardiac function. This study thus uncovers a novel function for sFRP2 and a potential therapeutic application for sFRP2 antagonism in controlling fibrosis in the infarcted heart. PMID:19079247

  6. Coexpression of potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors gives cotton plants protection against insect damage in the field

    PubMed Central

    Dunse, K. M.; Stevens, J. A.; Lay, F. T.; Gaspar, Y. M.; Heath, R. L.; Anderson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Potato type I and II serine protease inhibitors are produced by solanaceous plants as a defense mechanism against insects and microbes. Nicotiana alata proteinase inhibitor (NaPI) is a multidomain potato type II inhibitor (pin II) that is produced at high levels in the female reproductive tissues of the ornamental tobacco, Nicotiana alata. The individual inhibitory domains of NaPI target the major classes of digestive enzymes, trypsin and chymotrypsin, in the gut of lepidopteran larval pests. Although consumption of NaPI dramatically reduced the growth and development of a major insect pest, Helicoverpa punctigera, we discovered that surviving larvae had high levels of chymotrypsin activity resistant to inhibition by NaPI. We found a potato type I inhibitor, Solanum tuberosum potato type I inhibitor (StPin1A), was a strong inhibitor of the NaPI-resistant chymotrypsin activity. The combined inhibitory effect of NaPI and StPin1A on H. armigera larval growth in the laboratory was reflected in the increased yield of cotton bolls in field trials of transgenic plants expressing both inhibitors. Better crop protection thus is achieved using combinations of inhibitors in which one class of proteinase inhibitor is used to match the genetic capacity of an insect to adapt to a second class of proteinase inhibitor. PMID:20696895

  7. Impact of Mercury(II) on proteinase K catalytic center: investigations via classical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Panek, Jarosław J; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Novič, Marjana; Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta

    2011-02-01

    Mercury(II) has a strong affinity for the thiol groups in proteins often resulting in the disruption of their biological functions. In this study we present classical and first-principles, DFT-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a complex of Hg(II) and proteinase K, a well-known serine protease with a very broad and diverse enzymatic activity. It contains a catalytic triad formed by Asp39, His69, and Ser224, which is responsible for its biological activity. It was found previously by X-ray diffraction experiments that the presence of Hg(II) inhibits the enzymatic action of proteinase K by affecting the stereochemistry of the triad. Our simulations predict that (i) the overall structure as well as the protein backbone dynamics are only slightly affected by the mercury cation, (ii) depending on the occupied mercury site, the hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad are either severely disrupted (both bonds for mercury at site 1, and the His69-Ser224 contact for mercury at site 2) or slightly strengthened (the Asp39-His69 bond when mercury is at site 2), (iii) the network of hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad is not static but undergoes constant fluctuations, which are significantly modified by the presence of the Hg(II) cation, influencing in turn the triad's ability to carry out the enzymatic function--these facts explain the experimental findings on the inhibition of proteinase K by Hg(II).

  8. Biochemical and immunological characterization of a recombinantly-produced antifungal cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa).

    PubMed

    Popovic, Milica; Andjelkovic, Uros; Burazer, Lidija; Lindner, Buko; Petersen, Arnd; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2013-10-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors are considered important defense molecules against insect and pathogen attack. The cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) belongs to the cystatin family and shows potent antifungal activity (in vitro and in vivo). However, the low abundance of this molecule in fruit (6μg/g of fresh fruit) seems to limit further investigations on the interaction between phytocystatin and photopathogenic fungi. In this paper the cDNA of the kiwi CPI was expressed in Escherichia coli. Fifteen N-terminal amino acids were identified by Edman degradation, and 77% of the rCPI primary structure was confirmed by mass fingerprint. The structural homology of recombinant CPI (rCPI) to its natural counterpart has been clearly demonstrated in immunological assays (immunoblot and ELISA inhibition). Biological activity of rCPI was demonstrated in inhibition assay with cysteine proteinase papain (EC50 2.78nM). In addition, rCPI reveals antifungal properties toward pathogenic fungi (Alternaria radicina and Botrytis cinerea), which designates it as an interesting model protein for the exploration of plant phytocystatins - pathogen interactions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of natural plant resistance could lead to the development of ecologically safe fungicides for controlling post-harvest diseases and maintaining food quality.

  9. Combination of oncolytic adenovirus and endostatin inhibits human retinoblastoma in an in vivo mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiping; Wei, Fang; Li, Huiming; Ji, Xunda; Li, Shuxia; Chen, Xiafang

    2013-02-01

    There is a critical need for new paradigms in retinoblastoma (RB) treatment that would more efficiently inhibit tumor growth while sparing the vision of patients. Oncolytic adenoviruses with the ability to selectively replicate and kill tumor cells are a promising strategy for cancer gene therapy. Exploration of a novel targeting strategy for RB utilizing combined oncolytic adenovirus and anti-angiogenesis therapy was applied over the course of the current study with positive results. The oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-E2F1 p-E1A and Ad-TERT p-E1 were constructed. The E1 region was regulated by the E2F-1 promoter or the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter, respectively. Effects on both replication and promotion of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression were observed in the replication-defective adenovirus Ad-EGFP in diverse cancer cell lines, HXO-RB44, Y79, Hep3B, NCIH460, MCF-7 and HLF. The cancer cell death induced by these agents was also explored. The in situ RB model demonstrated that mice with tumors treated with the oncolytic adenovirus and replication-defective adenovirus Ad-endostatin exhibited notable cancer cell death. This anticancer effect was further examined by stereo microscope, and the survival rate of experimental mice was determined. Both Ad-E2F1 p-E1A and Ad-TERT p-E1 replicated specifically in cancer cells in vitro and promoted EGFP expression in Ad-EGFP, although Ad-E2F1 p-E1A demonstrated superior EGFP promotion activity than Ad-TERT p-E1. In Hep3B, NCIH460 and MCF-7 cells, the number of Ad-TERT p-E1 copies was observed to exceed of the number of Ad-E2F1 p-E1A copies by a minimum of 10-fold. Furthermore, Ad-TERT p-E1 demonstrated significantly superior oncolytic effects in the RB mouse model, and Ad-endostatin effectively suppressed tumor growth and extended the overall lifespan of subjects; however, the Ad-E2F1 p-E1A was clearly less effective in attaining these goals. Most notably, the antitumor effect and

  10. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Rui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Lin; Jin, Haifeng; Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-06-29

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma.

  11. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberger, Jutta; Rancan, Chiara; Skern, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb{sup pro}) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb{sup pro} L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. {sup 15}N-HSQC measurements of Lb{sup pro} L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb{sup pro}, lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb{sup pro}, stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb{sup pro} and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb{sup pro}. - Highlights: • We examine self-processing of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus. • NMR analysis strongly supports intramolecular self-processing. • Self-processing is a dynamic process with no stable complex. • Structural comparison with nsp1α of PRRSV which forms stable intramolecular complex. • Subdomain orientation explains differences in stability of intramolecular complexes.

  12. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  13. Biochemical characterization of Acacia schweinfurthii serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Odei-Addo, Frank; Frost, Carminita; Smith, Nanette; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Gráf, László; Naude, Ryno

    2014-10-01

    One of the many control mechanisms of serine proteinases is their specific inhibition by protein proteinase inhibitors. An extract of Acacia schweinfurthii was screened for potential serine proteinase inhibition. It was successfully purified to homogeneity by precipitating with 80% (v/v) acetone and sequential chromatographic steps, including ion-exchange, affinity purification and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions revealed an inhibitor (ASTI) consisting of two polypeptide chains A and B of approximate molecular weights of 16 and 10 kDa, respectively, and under non-reducing conditions, 26 kDa was observed. The inhibitor was shown to inhibit bovine trypsin (Ki of 3.45 nM) at an approximate molar ratio of inhibitor:trypsin (1:1). The A- and B-chains revealed complete sequences of 140 and 40 amino acid residues, respectively. Sequence similarity (70%) was reported between ASTI A-chain and ACTI A-chain (Acacia confusa) using ClustalW. The B-chain produced a 76% sequence similarity between ASTI and Leucaena leucocephala trypsin inhibitor. PMID:24090421

  14. A serine proteinase homologue, SPH-3, plays a central role in insect immunity.

    PubMed

    Felföldi, Gabriella; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Venekei, István

    2011-04-15

    Numerous vertebrate and invertebrate genes encode serine proteinase homologues (SPHs) similar to members of the serine proteinase family, but lacking one or more residues of the catalytic triad. These SPH proteins are thought to play a role in immunity, but their precise functions are poorly understood. In this study, we show that SPH-3 (an insect non-clip domain-containing SPH) is of central importance in the immune response of a model lepidopteran, Manduca sexta. We examine M. sexta infection with a virulent, insect-specific, Gram-negative bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. RNA interference suppression of bacteria-induced SPH-3 synthesis severely compromises the insect's ability to defend itself against infection by preventing the transcription of multiple antimicrobial effector genes, but, surprisingly, not the transcription of immune recognition genes. Upregulation of the gene encoding prophenoloxidase and the activity of the phenoloxidase enzyme are among the antimicrobial responses that are severely attenuated on SPH-3 knockdown. These findings suggest the existence of two largely independent signaling pathways controlling immune recognition by the fat body, one governing effector gene transcription, and the other regulating genes encoding pattern recognition proteins.

  15. Functional Characterization of Cucumis metuliferus Proteinase Inhibitor Gene (CmSPI) in Potyviruses Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Su, Mei-Hsiu; Lin, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Chien-Hung; Ku, Hsin-Mei

    2015-07-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are ubiquitous proteins that block the active center or interact allosterically with proteinases and are involved in plant physiological processes and defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The CmSPI gene identified from Cucumis metuliferus encodes a serine type PI (8 kDa) that belongs to potato I type family. To evaluate the effect of silencing CmSPI gene on Papaya ringspot virus resistance, RNA interference (RNAi) with an inter-space hairpin RNA (ihpRNA) construct was introduced into a PRSV-resistant C. metuliferus line. CmSPI was down-regulated in CmSPI RNAi transgenic lines in which synchronously PRSV symptoms were evident at 21 day post inoculation. Alternatively, heterogeneous expression of CmSPI in Nicotiana benthamiana was also conducted and showed that CmSPI can provide resistance to Potato virus Y, another member of Potyvirus, in transgenic N. benthamiana lines. This study demonstrated that CmSPI plays an important role in resistant function against potyviruses in C. metuliferus and N. benthamiana. PMID:26184285

  16. Diversity in proteinase specificity of thermophilic lactobacilli as revealed by hydrolysis of dairy and vegetable proteins.

    PubMed

    Pescuma, Micaela; Espeche Turbay, María Beatriz; Mozzi, Fernanda; Font de Valdez, Graciela; Savoy de Giori, Graciela; Hebert, Elvira María

    2013-09-01

    Ability of industrially relevant species of thermophilic lactobacilli strains to hydrolyze proteins from ani