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Sample records for activated alveolar macrophages

  1. Mechanisms of particle-induced activation of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gercken, G; Berg, I; Dörger, M; Schlüter, T

    1996-11-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to quartz dusts, metal-containing dusts or silica particles coated with a single metal oxide. The release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) was measured in short-term incubations (90 min). The secretion of both ROI was markedly enhanced by silica particles coated with vanadium oxide and lowered by copper oxide-coated particles. The particle-induced ROI release was significantly decreased by the inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as phospholipase A2, suggesting the involvement of both enzymes in the NADPH oxidase activation. Quartz dusts induced a transient increase of free cytosolic calcium ion concentration, slight intracellular acidification, and depolarization of the plasma membrane. In the presence of EGTA or verapamil the rise of [Ca2+]i was diminished, suggesting an influx of extracellular calcium ions. The PKC inhibitor GF 109203X did not inhibit the quartz-induced calcium rise, while both the cytosolic acidification and depolarization were prevented. BSA-coating of the quartz particles abolished the calcium influx as well as the decrease of pHi, and possibly hyperpolarized the plasma membrane.

  2. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yutong; Zhao, Jing; Donahoe, Michael P.; Barge, Suchitra; Horne, William T.; Kolls, Jay K.; McVerry, Bryan J.; Birukova, Anastasiya; Tighe, Robert M.; Foster, W. Michael; Hollingsworth, John; Ray, Anuradha; Mallampalli, Rama; Ray, Prabir; Lee, Janet S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF)7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP)-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:27434537

  3. Plutonium behavior after pulmonary administration according to solubility properties, and consequences on alveolar macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Van der Meeren, Anne; Gremy, Olivier; Renault, Daniel; Miroux, Amandine; Bruel, Sylvie; Griffiths, Nina; Tourdes, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The physico-chemical form in which plutonium enters the body influences the lung distribution and the transfer rate from lungs to blood. In the present study, we evaluated the early lung damage and macrophage activation after pulmonary contamination of plutonium of various preparation modes which produce different solubility and distribution patterns. Whatever the solubility properties of the contaminant, macrophages represent a major retention compartment in lungs, with 42 to 67% of the activity from broncho-alveolar lavages being associated with macrophages 14 days post-contamination. Lung changes were observed 2 and 6 weeks post-contamination, showing inflammatory lesions and accumulation of activated macrophages (CD68 positive) in plutonium-contaminated rats, although no increased proliferation of pneumocytes II (TTF-1 positive cells) was found. In addition, acid phosphatase activity in macrophages from contaminated rats was enhanced 2 weeks post-contamination as compared to sham groups, as well as inflammatory mediator levels (TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1) in macrophage culture supernatants. Correlating with the decrease in activity remaining in macrophages after plutonium contamination, inflammatory mediator production returned to basal levels 6 weeks post-exposure. The production of chemokines by macrophages was evaluated after contamination with Pu of increasing solubility. No correlation was found between the solubility properties of Pu and the activation level of macrophages. In summary, our data indicate that, despite the higher solubility of plutonium citrate or nitrate as compared to preformed colloids or oxides, macrophages remain the main lung target after plutonium contamination and may participate in the early pulmonary damage.

  4. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Tang, Ming-Chi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  5. Alveolar Macrophage Recruitment and Activation by Chronic Second Hand Smoke Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ellwanger, Almut; Solon, Margaret; Cambier, Christopher J.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Koth, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% of cases of COPD occur in non-smokers. Among the potential risk factors for COPD in non-smokers is second hand smoke (SHS) exposure. However, the Surgeon General reported in 2006 that the evidence linking second hand smoke and COPD is insufficient to infer a causal relationship, largely because current evidence does not establish a biological link. Objectives The goal of this study was to determine whether SHS exposure can induce alveolar macrophage recruitment and expression of activation markers that we have previously demonstrated in human smokers and in mouse models of emphysema. To achieve these goals, we studied mice exposed to an ambient mixture of predominantly [89%] sidestream smoke at increasing doses over 3 months. Results We found that second hand smoke exposure induced a dose-dependent increase in alveolar macrophage recruitment (mean ± sd; 224,511 ± 52,330 vs 166,152 ± 47,989 macrophages/ml of bronchoalveolar lavage in smoke-exposed vs air-exposed controls at 3 months, p=0.003). We also found increased expression of several markers of alveolar macrophage activation (PLA2g7, dkfzp434l142, Trem-2, and pirin, all p<0.01 at 3 months) and increased lavage levels of two inflammatory mediators associated with COPD (CCL2 [MCP-1], 58 ± 12 vs. 43 ± 22 pg/ml, p=0.03; and TNFα, 138 ± 43 vs 88 ± 78 pg/ml, p=0.04 at 3 months). Conclusions These findings indicate that second smoke exposure can cause macrophage recruitment and activation, providing a biological link between second hand smoke exposure and the development of inflammatory processes linked to COPD. PMID:19378221

  6. Effect of transcription factor GATA-2 on phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages from Pneumocystis carinii-infected hosts.

    PubMed

    Lasbury, Mark E; Tang, Xing; Durant, Pamela J; Lee, Chao-Hung

    2003-09-01

    Alveolar macrophages from Pneumocystis carinii-infected hosts are defective in phagocytosis (W. Chen, J. W. Mills, and A. G. Harmsen, Int. J. Exp. Pathol. 73:709-720, 1992; H. Koziel et al., J. Clin. Investig. 102:1332-1344, 1998). Experiments were performed to determine whether this defect is specific for P. carinii organisms. The results showed that these macrophages were unable to phagocytose both P. carinii organisms and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated latex beads, indicating that alveolar macrophages from P. carinii-infected hosts have a general defect in phagocytosis. To determine whether this defect correlates with the recently discovered down-regulation of the GATA-2 transcription factor gene during P. carinii infection, alveolar macrophages from dexamethasone-suppressed or healthy rats were treated with anti-GATA-2 oligonucleotides and then assayed for phagocytosis. Aliquots of the alveolar macrophages were also treated with the sense oligonucleotides as the control. Cells treated with the antisense oligonucleotides were found to have a 46% reduction in phagocytosis of P. carinii organisms and a 65% reduction in phagocytosis of FITC-latex beads compared to those treated with the sense oligonucleotides. To determine whether the defect in phagocytosis in alveolar macrophages from P. carinii-infected hosts can be corrected by overexpression of GATA-2, a plasmid containing the rat GATA-2 gene in the sense orientation driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter was introduced into alveolar macrophages from P. carinii-infected rats. Aliquots of the same cells transfected with a plasmid containing GATA-2 in the antisense orientation relative to the CMV promoter served as the control. Alveolar macrophages treated with the sense GATA-2 expression construct were found to increase their phagocytic activity by 66% in phagocytosis of P. carinii organisms and by 280% in phagocytosis of FITC-latex beads compared to those that received the antisense GATA-2

  7. High frequency oscillatory ventilation attenuates the activation of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka; Fujino; Taenaka; Hiroi; Kiyono; Yoshiya

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent investigations have shown that leukocyte activation is involved in the pathogenesis of ventilator-associated lung injury. This study was designed to investigate whether the inflammatory responses and deterioration of oxygenation in ventilator-associated lung injury are attenuated by high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFO). We analyzed the effects of HFO compared with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) on the activation of pulmonary macrophages and neutrophils in 10 female rabbits. RESULTS: After surfactant depletion, the rabbits were ventilated by CMV or HFO at the same mean airway pressure. Surfactant-depletion followed by 4 h mechanical ventilation hindered pulmonary oxygenation in both groups. Impairment of oxygenation was less severe in the HFO group than in the CMV group. In the HFO group the infiltration of granulocytes into alveolar spaces occurred more readily than in the CMV group. Compared with CMV, HFO resulted in greater attenuation of beta2-integrin expression, not only on granulocytes, but also on macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: In the surfactant-depleted lung, the activation of leukocytes was attenuated by HFO. Reduced inflammatory response correlated with decreased impairment of oxygenation. HFO may reduce lung injury via the attenuation of pulmonary inflammation.

  8. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  9. Interrelationships between the Human Alveolar Macrophage and Alpha-1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.

    1973-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages lavaged from human lungs contain protease activity at an optimum pH of 3.0 and possibly a lesser peak of activity at pH 5.5. Protease activity measured at pH 4.1 is inhibited by purified alpha-1-antitrypsin. Fluorescent antibody studies of human alveolar macrophages showed that alpha-1-antitrypsin is present in normal alveolar macrophages. In addition, macrophages from a patient with a homozygous deficiency of alpha-1-antitrypsin exhibited less fluorescence when incubated in autologous serum than the same macrophages incubated in normal serum. Macrophages from normal subjects showed maximal fluorescence when removed from the lung and additional incubation with serum did not increase fluorescence. These results implicate the human alveolar macrophage as a possible source of an enzyme that may cause emphysema in patients deficient in alpha-1-antitrypsin. They also show that alpha-1-antitrypsin has access to the alveolus in normal subjects. Images PMID:4201266

  10. Activation of several MAP kinases upon stimulation of rat alveolar macrophages: role of the NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Torres, M; Forman, H J

    1999-06-15

    Zymosan-activated serum (ZAS), a source of C5a, stimulates the rat alveolar macrophages (AM) to release superoxide anion. Here we show that treatment of rat AM with ZAS induced a time-dependent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins (116, 105-110, 82-78, 66-72, 62, 45, 42, and 38 kDa). This increase was sensitive to genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. ZAS stimulated the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of three members of a family of serine/threonine kinases known as the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), i.e., ERK1 and ERK2, as assessed by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and phosphotransferase activity, and p38 MAPK, as determined by immunoblotting with phospho-specific antibodies. In addition, ZAS induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of the SHC proteins and their association with GRB2, suggesting a role for this complex in the activation of the ERK pathway. Addition of extracellular catalase during ZAS stimulation significantly reduced the tyrosine phosphorylation response and the activation of ERK1 and ERK2 and their activator MEK1/2 while it did not affect that of p38 MAPK and MKK3/MKK6. Superoxide dismutase marginally increased the response to ZAS, supporting a role for hydrogen peroxide. In contrast to the results with AM, stimulation of human neutrophils with ZAS in the presence of catalase minimally altered the activation of ERK1 and ERK2. These data show that, in ZAS-stimulated rat AM, activation of the respiratory burst and production of hydrogen peroxide via superoxide dismutation are largely responsible for the activation of the ERK pathway through an upstream target.

  11. ADP stimulates the respiratory burst without activation of ERK and AKT in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gozal, E; Forman, H J; Torres, M

    2001-09-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are the first line of defense against infection in the lungs. We previously showed that the production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, i.e., the respiratory burst, is stimulated by adenine nucleotides (ADP > ATP) in rat AM through signaling pathways involving calcium and protein kinase C. Here, we further show that ADP induces a rapid increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins that was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, which also inhibited the respiratory burst. Interestingly, ADP did not trigger the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1 and ERK2, or that of protein kinase B/AKT, a downstream target of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. This is in contrast to another stimulus of the respiratory burst, zymosan-activated serum (ZAS), which activates both the ERK and PI3K pathways. Thus, this study demonstrates that the receptor for ADP in rat AM is not coupled to the ERK and AKT pathways and, that neither the ERK pathway nor AKT is essential to induce the activation of the NAPDH oxidase by ADP in rat AM while tyrosine kinases appeared to be required. The rate and amount of hydrogen peroxide released by the ADP-stimulated respiratory burst was similar to that produced by ZAS stimulation. The absence of ERK activation after ADP stimulation therefore suggests that hydrogen peroxide is not sufficient to activate the ERK pathway in rat AM. Nonetheless, as hydrogen peroxide was necessary for ERK activation by ZAS, this indicates that, in contrast to ADP, ZAS stimulates a pathway that is targeted by hydrogen peroxide and leads to ERK activation.

  12. Tachykinins activate guinea-pig alveolar macrophages: involvement of NK2 and NK1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brunelleschi, S.; Vanni, L.; Ledda, F.; Giotti, A.; Maggi, C. A.; Fantozzi, R.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) were evaluated on superoxide anion (O2-.) production by guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AM). 2. SP dose-dependently (ED50 = 0.7 nM) evoked O2-. production from guinea-pig AM; the N-terminal heptapeptide, SP(1-7), was ineffective. In the presence of thiorphan (10(-5) M), an enkephalinase inhibitor, the stimulating effects of SP were not significantly modified. NKA and NKB were both able to induce O2-. production from guinea-pig AM, ED50 values being 0.1 and 1.3 nM, respectively. Therefore, the rank order of activity of natural tachykinins was NKA greater than SP greater than NKB. Tachykinin-evoked effects were quantitatively similar to those elicited by the autacoid mediator PAF-acether and less than those induced by the synthetic peptide N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). 3. The NK2 receptor agonist [beta-Ala8]-NKA (4-10) dose-dependently evoked O2-. production from guinea-pig AM; the NK1 receptor agonist [Pro9]-SP sulphone acted only at high concentrations, while the NK3 receptor agonist [Me,Phe7]-NKB was ineffective. 4. These findings indicate that guinea-pig AM possess NK2 and possibly some NK1 tachykinin receptors and further suggest tachykinin involvement in lung pathophysiology. PMID:1697194

  13. Inhibition of proteasome activity is involved in cobalt-induced apoptosis of human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Araya, Jun; Maruyama, Muneharu; Inoue, Akira; Fujita, Tadashi; Kawahara, Junko; Sassa, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Ryuji; Kawagishi, Yukio; Yamashita, Naohiro; Sugiyama, Eiji; Kobayashi, Masashi

    2002-10-01

    Inhalation of particulate cobalt has been known to induce interstitial lung disease. There is growing evidence that apoptosis plays a crucial role in physiological and pathological settings and that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Cadmium, the same transitional heavy metal as cobalt, has been reported to accumulate ubiquitinated proteins in neuronal cells. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that cobalt would induce apoptosis in the lung by disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To evaluate this, we exposed U-937 cells and human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) and examined their apoptosis by DNA fragmentation assay, 4',6-diamidino-2'-phenylindol dihydrochloride staining, and Western blot analysis. CoCl(2) induced apoptosis and accumulated ubiquitinated proteins. Exposure to CoCl(2) inhibited proteasome activity in U-937 cells. Cobalt-induced apoptosis was mediated via mitochondrial pathway because CoCl(2) released cytochrome c from mitochondria. These results suggest that cobalt-induced apoptosis of AMs may be one of the mechanisms for cobalt-induced lung injury and that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins might be involved in this apoptotic process.

  14. Effects of pseudorabies virus infection upon cytotoxicity and antiviral activities of porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, G; Pijoan, C; Molitor, T

    1992-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) infected with Pseudorabies virus (PRV) were compared to noninfected AM for cytotoxicity against foreign or transformed cells and production of interferon (IFN). Five PRV strains were used to infect AM including strains that are known to be highly virulent for pigs, i.e. strain 4892 and strain S-62 as well as strains that are regarded as mild or nonvirulent, i.e. BUK and Bartha. The multiplicity of infection ranged from 0.005 to 0.05 TCID50/cell. The target cells in the cytotoxicity assays were either chicken red blood cells, PRV-infected vero cells, or human myeloblastoma cells (K562 cell line). For the production of IFN, AM cultures were treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) diluted in tissue culture media at a concentration of 5 micrograms/10(6) cells. Culture supernatants were collected at various times poststimulation and tested for antiviral activity using the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus replication inhibition test. Swine AM were able to lyse chicken red blood cells in an antibody-independent way but not in an antibody-dependent way, whereas lysis of PRV-infected vero cells was accomplished both ways. The cytotoxicity against chicken red blood cells was reduced in the PRV-infected AM as compared to noninfected cells, particularly in AM infected with virulent PRV strains. Specific 51Cr release values for AM infected with S-62 and 4892 strains were 14 and 19, while the noninfected AM had values of 36. Similarly, in the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay against PRV-infected vero cells there was no activity of AM against K562 cells. The production of IFN was readily stimulated with Poly I:C. The optimal time for supernatant collection was between 12 and 16 h poststimulation. The antiviral activity was abrogated by treatment of the supernatant with antiserum against human leukocyte IFN; it was therefore considered to be due to interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) released from the macrophages. The antiviral activity present in

  15. In vitro study of gas effects on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Voisin, C

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the biological effects of gas pollutants on alveolar macrophages several in vitro systems have been developed. We described here an original method of cell culture in aerobiosis, which permitted direct contact between the atmosphere and the target cells. We studied the long term (24 h) and short term (30 min) effects of NO2 on alveolar macrophages. Our results demonstrated that exposure of alveolar macrophages to gas pollutants may be responsible for either cell injury or cell activation associated with the release of various bioactive mediators (superoxide anion, neutrophil chemotactic activity). Cell culture in aerobiosis opens new ways for the research on the biological effects of gas pollutants.

  16. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanling; Xu, Sanpeng; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sui; Yan, Weiming; Ning, Qin

    2010-05-28

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  17. [The in vivo penetration of erythromycin into alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Carré, P; Piva, F; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1990-01-01

    In order to appreciate the in vivo penetration of erythromycin the alveolar spaces a broncho-alveolar lavage was carried out in 24 guinea pigs, 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes and three hours after a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mgms. of erythromycin. The erythromycin dose was assessed by a microbiological method in the alveolar macrophages and the supernatant of the broncho-alveolar lavage liquid. The intramacrophage concentrations of erythromycin were 3.9, 11.5 and 12 times higher than the serum concentrations at 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 and three hours respectively. The concentrations in the broncho-alveolar lavage liquid was always higher than the serum concentrations tacking account of the different dilutions estimated with relation to the glucose concentrations. At 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes and three hours the alveolar macrophages contained 1.9; 7.6 and 6 times more erythromycin respectively than the lavage supernatant. From the first half hour of its administration the erythromycin was concentrated in the alveolar spaces, in particular within the macrophages. Already noted in vitro, this rapidity of erythromycin concentration in vivo in alveolar macrophages appears to be one of the reasons to explain its activity against micro-organisms developing within macrophages.

  18. Degradation of fibrin and elastin by intact human alveolar macrophages in vitro. Characterization of a plasminogen activator and its role in matrix degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, H A; Stone, O L; Vavrin, Z

    1984-01-01

    Fibrin deposition is prominent in the histopathology of a number of inflammatory lung diseases. Plasmin, activated locally in the lung, can degrade not only this fibrin but potentially structural proteins important to normal lung architecture. Because alveolar macrophages are prominent in inflammatory processes of the lung, we examined the plasminogen activator (PA) activity of human alveolar macrophages. Intact alveolar macrophages from each of 10 healthy subjects expressed PA activity. There was no difference in activity between smoking and nonsmoking individuals. The activator activity was largely cell-associated, but under certain culture conditions, macrophages released a soluble activator into the culture medium. The membrane-bound activator had an apparent molecular mass of 52-55 kD in nonreduced sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels, and monospecific antibody to urokinase neutralized the enzyme activity. Immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled cells showed that human alveolar macrophages actually synthesize the PA in vitro. SDS-gel analysis of the immunoprecipitated material revealed the predominant species of PA to be structurally similar to reduced, active urokinase. We also examined the role of PA in the degradation of both insoluble fibrin and elastin matrices by live macrophages. Cells degraded an insoluble fibrin matrix in the presence of plasminogen whether or not the macrophages contacted the fibrin as long as proteinase inhibitors were not in the culture medium. In the presence of serum proteinase inhibitors, macrophages still degraded a fibrin matrix, but only if they were in contact with the fibrin. Live macrophages also degraded insoluble elastin only when in contact with the elastin but could do so even in the presence of serum proteinase inhibitors. In matrices containing a mixture of fibrin and elastin, cells did not degrade elastin unless plasminogen was added to the medium. These results indicate that normal alveolar macrophages

  19. Trimellitic anhydride-conjugated serum albumin activates rat alveolar macrophages in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Valstar, Dingena L; Schijf, Marcel A; Stelekati, Erietta; Nijkamp, Frans P; Bloksma, Nanne; Henricks, Paul AJ

    2006-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to airborne low molecular weight chemicals, like trimellitic anhydride (TMA), can result in occupational asthma. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are among the first cells to encounter these inhaled compounds and were previously shown to influence TMA-induced asthma-like symptoms in the Brown Norway rat. TMA is a hapten that will bind to endogenous proteins upon entrance of the body. Therefore, in the present study we determined if TMA and TMA conjugated to serum albumin induced the production of the macrophage mediators nitric oxide (NO), tumour necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in vitro using the rat AM cell line NR8383 and primary AMs derived from TMA-sensitized and naïve Brown Norway rats. Methods Cells were incubated with different concentrations of TMA, TMA conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA), and BSA as a control for 24 h and the culture supernatant was analyzed for mediator content. Results TMA alone was not able to induce the production of mediators by NR8383 cells and primary AMs from sensitized and sham-treated rats. TMA-BSA, on the contrary, dose-dependently stimulated the production of NO, TNF, and IL-6 by NR8383 cells and of NO and TNF, but not IL-6, by primary AMs independent of sensitization. Conclusion Results suggest that although TMA is a highly reactive compound, conjugation to a suitable protein is necessary to induce mediator production by AMs. Furthermore, the observation that effects of TMA-BSA were independent of sensitization suggests involvement of an immunologically non-specific receptor. In the discussion it is argued that a macrophage scavenger receptor is a likely candidate. PMID:16796737

  20. Activation of NK cell cytotoxicity by aerosolized CpG-ODN/poly(I:C) against lung melanoma metastases is mediated by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sommariva, Michele; Le Noci, Valentino; Storti, Chiara; Bianchi, Francesca; Tagliabue, Elda; Balsari, Andrea; Sfondrini, Lucia

    2017-03-01

    Controversies remain about NK cells direct responsiveness to Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists or dependence on macrophages. In a melanoma lung metastasis model, aerosolized TLR9 and TLR3 agonists have been reported to induce antitumor immunity through NK cells activation. In the current study, we demonstrated that in vitro TLR9/TLR3 stimulation induced IFN-γ secretion by NK cells, but an increase in their cytotoxicity was detected only after NK cells co-culture with in vitro TLR9/TLR3 agonists pretreated alveolar macrophages. Alveolar macrophages from melanoma lung metastases-bearing mice, treated with aerosolized TLR agonists, also promoted NK cell cytotoxicity. Activated NK cells from lungs of melanoma metastases-bearing mice that were given aerosolized TLR9/TLR3 agonists were able to polarize naive alveolar macrophages toward a M1-like phenotype. Our results demonstrate that activation of NK cells in the lung after TLR engagement is mediated by alveolar macrophages and that activated NK cells shape macrophage behavior.

  1. Depressant effects of ambroxol and erdosteine on cytokine synthesis, granule enzyme release, and free radical production in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yoon Young; Song, Jin Ho; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Han, Eun Sook; Lee, Chung Soo

    2003-04-01

    The present study examined the effects of ambroxol and erdosteine, bronchial expectorants, on the cytokine synthesis, granule enzyme release, and free radical production in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. Ambroxol and erdosteine significantly decreased the production of tumour necrosis factors-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6 in alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. These drugs significantly reduced the production of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide and the release of acid phosphatase and lysozyme in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages. Ambroxol and erdosteine showed no scavenging effect on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, whereas both drugs effectively decomposed nitric oxide. The results show that ambroxol and erdosteine may inhibit the responses, including cytokine synthesis and free radical production, in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. Unlike the production of reactive oxygen species, the inhibitory effect of ambroxol and erdosteine on the production of nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide-activated alveolar macrophages may be accomplished by a scavenging action on the species and inhibition of the respiratory burst.

  2. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Aravind T; Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R; Reddy, Raju C

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs' electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease.

  3. Eradication of spontaneous metastases and activation of alveolar macrophages by intravenous injection of liposomes containing muramyl dipeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, I J; Sone, S; Fogler, W E; Barnes, Z L

    1981-01-01

    The multiple systemic administration of multilamellar liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine (molar ratio 3:7) that contained water-soluble muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activated alveolar macrophages to become tumoricidal and eradicated established spontaneous pulmonary and lymph node metastases. Spontaneously metastasizing melanoma cells were injected into the footpads of mice. After 4-5 weeks, the tumors were resected by a midfemoral amputation; 3 days later, twice-weekly injections of liposomes were initiated and continued for 4 weeks. In some experiments the mice were killed 2 weeks after the final treatment. Seventy-four percent of animals injected with liposomes containing MDP were free of visible metastases. In a separate life-span experiment, 60% of mice treated with liposome-encapsulated MDP were tumor-free 120 days after the last liposome treatment or 110 days after all control mice treated with free MDP or control liposome preparations had died of disseminated cancer. These data suggest that the systemic administration of liposomes containing MDP, or similar compounds that produce macrophage activation, may provide an additional useful approach to the therapeutic regimens currently used to eradicate cancer metastases. Images PMID:6940181

  4. Fas ligand-expressing lymphocytes enhance alveolar macrophage apoptosis in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Lea; Bednarek, Joseph M.; Yunt, Zulma X.; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and their subsequent clearance by neighboring phagocytes are necessary steps in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. We have recently identified that activation of the Fas death receptor on the cell surface of macrophages drives macrophage apoptosis. However, the source of the cognate ligand for Fas (FasL) responsible for induction of alveolar macrophage apoptosis is not defined. Given their known role in the resolution of inflammation and ability to induce macrophage apoptosis ex vivo, we hypothesized that T lymphocytes represented a critical source of FasL. To address this hypothesis, C57BL/6J and lymphocyte-deficient (Rag-1−/−) mice were exposed to intratracheal lipopolysaccharide to induce pulmonary inflammation. Furthermore, utilizing mice expressing nonfunctional FasL, we adoptively transferred donor lymphocytes into inflamed lymphocyte-deficient mice to characterize the effect of lymphocyte-derived FasL on alveolar macrophage apoptosis in the resolution of inflammation. Herein, evidence is presented that lymphocytes expressing FasL enhance alveolar macrophage apoptosis during the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation. Moreover, lymphocyte induction of alveolar macrophage apoptosis results in contraction of the alveolar macrophage pool, which occurs in a FasL-dependent manner. Specifically, FasL-expressing CD8+ T lymphocytes potently induce alveolar macrophage apoptosis and contraction of the alveolar macrophage pool. Together, these studies identify a novel role for CD8+ T lymphocytes in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. PMID:24838751

  5. Interleukin-33 drives activation of alveolar macrophages and airway inflammation in a mouse model of acute exacerbation of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Melissa M; Shadie, Alexander M; Flesher, Rylie P; Nikiforova, Valentina; Garthwaite, Linda; Tedla, Nicodemus; Herbert, Cristan; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33) in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM) were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  6. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  7. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  8. Alveolar epithelial cells are critical in protection of the respiratory tract by secretion of factors able to modulate the activity of pulmonary macrophages and directly control bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Chuquimia, Olga D; Petursdottir, Dagbjort H; Periolo, Natalia; Fernández, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a physical and functional barrier actively involved in the clearance of environmental agents. The alveolar compartment is lined with membranous pneumocytes, known as type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC I), and granular pneumocytes, type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II). AEC II are responsible for epithelial reparation upon injury and ion transport and are very active immunologically, contributing to lung defense by secreting antimicrobial factors. AEC II also secrete a broad variety of factors, such as cytokines and chemokines, involved in activation and differentiation of immune cells and are able to present antigen to specific T cells. Another cell type important in lung defense is the pulmonary macrophage (PuM). Considering the architecture of the alveoli, a good communication between the external and the internal compartments is crucial to mount effective responses. Our hypothesis is that being in the interface, AEC may play an important role in transmitting signals from the external to the internal compartment and in modulating the activity of PuM. For this, we collected supernatants from AEC unstimulated or stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These AEC-conditioned media were used in various setups to test for the effects on a number of macrophage functions: (i) migration, (ii) phagocytosis and intracellular control of bacterial growth, and (iii) phenotypic changes and morphology. Finally, we tested the direct effect of AEC-conditioned media on bacterial growth. We found that AEC-secreted factors had a dual effect, on one hand controlling bacterial growth and on the other hand increasing macrophage activity.

  9. Relative effects of asbestos and wollastonite on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pailes, W H; Judy, D J; Resnick, H; Castranova, V

    1984-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were exposed in culture to chrysotile asbestos, wollastonite, or latex, and the effects on various biochemical and physiological parameters related to cellular viability and fibrogenicity were determined. Exposure of alveolar macrophages to asbestos, wollastonite, or latex for 3 d has no effect on oxygen consumption or cellular volume. However, treatment of alveolar macrophages with as little as 25 micrograms asbestos/ml for 1 d increases lysosomal enzyme release and decreases membrane integrity, i.e., decreases trypan blue exclusion and increases leakage of cytosolic enzymes. In contrast, exposure of alveolar macrophages to wollastonite or latex at 250 micrograms/ml does not induce lysosomal enzyme release or alter membrane integrity even after 3 d of exposure in culture. These data suggest that chrysotile asbestos damages rabbit alveolar macrophages, while wollastonite, a potential substitute for asbestos, is far less cytotoxic.

  10. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  11. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  12. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Poncy, J.L.; Dhilly, M.; Verry, M. ); Metivier, H. ); Masse, R. )

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Functional and morphological differences between human alveolar and interstitial macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fathi, M; Johansson, A; Lundborg, M; Orre, L; Sköld, C M; Camner, P

    2001-04-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in pulmonary host defense. They are, however, a heterogeneous cell population located in different lung compartments. This study was designed to elucidate differences between two macrophage populations obtained from the human lung, i.e., alveolar macrophages (AM) and interstitial macrophages (IM). Macroscopically tumor-free lung segments from nine patients undergoing lobectomy or pulmectomy were studied. All patients had a diagnosis of primary lung cancer. AM were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage and IM were isolated by mechanical fragmentation of the lavaged lung segments followed by enzymatic treatment. The cell fractions were analyzed with respect to morphology (transmission electron microscopy) and function (phagocytosis). The cells in the IM fraction were smaller (7.6 +/- 1.8 microm (mean +/- SD) compared with 16.0 +/- 4.1 microm) and morphologically more heterogeneous than those in the AM fraction. Interestingly, a considerable portion of the cells in the IM fraction had a typical AM-like appearance. Despite this, the AM fraction had a higher phagocytic activity compared to IM, with faster attachment and ingestion processes (P <0.001 for both). We conclude that the heterogeneity of human lung macrophages must be taken into consideration when their role in the inflammatory response is studied.

  14. Activity testing of alveolar macrophages and changes in surfactant phospholipids after irradiation in bronchoalveolar lavage: Experimental and clinical data

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, F.; Rehn, B.; Kraus, R.; Quabeck, K.; Bruch, J.; Beelen, D.W.; Schaefer, U.W.; Streffer, C. )

    1992-07-01

    This study presents results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after irradiation to the lungs in mice as well as clinical data. The number of BAL cells, mainly macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes, changed in a time-dependent manner. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages measured as the phagocytosis of microbeads and measured as the esterase activity also showed a strong time-dependent increase during the acute phase up to 21 days after irradiation. The contents of surfactant phospholipids (SF) and sphingomyelin (SPH; as a parameter for cell death) were quantified by HPLC. Both were significantly changed between day 2 and 21 after irradiation. Three BALs of a patient with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, who had received an allogenic bone marrow graft after total body irradiation with 10 Gy, showed similar effects in the cellular and surfactant parameters. These data indicate that there are positive interactions between the number of different BAL cells, macrophage activity, and SF and SPH content in the preclinical model of the mouse as well as in the clinical situation after lung irradiation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Synergistic effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor by alveolar macrophages of rats.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Kido, M; Tanaka, I; Fujino, A; Higashi, T; Yokosaki, Y

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by alveolar macrophages. Rats were exposed to cigarette smoke in vivo, and production of TNF by alveolar macrophages was measured in the presence of mineral fibres in vitro. For smoke exposure, rats were divided into two groups. Five were exposed to a daily concentration of 10 mg/m3 of cigarette smoke for an eight hour period, and five rats (controls) were not exposed to smoke. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed after exposure to smoke and the recovered alveolar macrophages were incubated with either chrysotile or ceramic fibres on a microplate for 24 hours. Activity of TNF in the supernatant was determined by the L-929 fibroblast cell bioassay. When alveolar macrophages were not stimulated by mineral fibres, production of TNF by rats exposed to smoke and unexposed rats was essentially the same. When alveolar macrophages were stimulated in vitro by chrysotile or ceramic fibres, production of TNF by alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to smoke was higher than that by alveolar macrophages from unexposed rats. The findings suggest that cigarette smoke and mineral fibres have a synergistic effect on TNF production by alveolar macrophages.

  16. Synergistic effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor by alveolar macrophages of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Y; Kido, M; Tanaka, I; Fujino, A; Higashi, T; Yokosaki, Y

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of mineral fibres and cigarette smoke on the production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by alveolar macrophages. Rats were exposed to cigarette smoke in vivo, and production of TNF by alveolar macrophages was measured in the presence of mineral fibres in vitro. For smoke exposure, rats were divided into two groups. Five were exposed to a daily concentration of 10 mg/m3 of cigarette smoke for an eight hour period, and five rats (controls) were not exposed to smoke. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed after exposure to smoke and the recovered alveolar macrophages were incubated with either chrysotile or ceramic fibres on a microplate for 24 hours. Activity of TNF in the supernatant was determined by the L-929 fibroblast cell bioassay. When alveolar macrophages were not stimulated by mineral fibres, production of TNF by rats exposed to smoke and unexposed rats was essentially the same. When alveolar macrophages were stimulated in vitro by chrysotile or ceramic fibres, production of TNF by alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to smoke was higher than that by alveolar macrophages from unexposed rats. The findings suggest that cigarette smoke and mineral fibres have a synergistic effect on TNF production by alveolar macrophages. Images PMID:8217857

  17. Marked differences between MARC-145 cells and swine alveolar macrophages in IFN beta-induced activation of antiviral state against PRRSV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The replication kinetics of field isolates and a vaccine virus of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were evaluated in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM). In MARC-145 cells, the eclipse period of the vaccine virus was about 10 hours and was shorter than t...

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and JNK mediate Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exotoxin ApxI-induced apoptosis in porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Ming; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Hsuan, Shih-Ling

    2011-08-05

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exotoxins (Apx) are major virulence factors that play important roles in the pathogenesis of pleuropneumonia in swine. A previous study has demonstrated that native ApxI at low concentrations induces apoptosis in primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) via a caspase-3-dependent pathway. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ApxI-induced apoptosis remain largely unknown. In this study, it was shown that ApxI treatment in PAMs rapidly induced phosphorylation of both p38 and JNK, members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family. Application of a selective p38 or JNK inhibitor significantly reduced ApxI-induced apoptosis, indicating the involvement of p38 and JNK pathways in this event. Furthermore, activation of both caspase-8 and -9 were observed in ApxI-stimulated PAMs. Inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-9 activity significantly protected PAMs from ApxI-induced apoptosis. In addition, Bid activation was also noted in ApxI-treated PAMs, and inhibition of caspase-8 suppressed the activation of Bid and caspase-9, suggesting that ApxI was able to activate the caspases-8-Bid-caspase-9 pathway. Notably, inhibition of p38 or JNK pathway greatly attenuated the activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9. This study is the first to demonstrate that ApxI-induced apoptosis of PAMs involves the activation of p38 and JNK, and engages the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  19. PPAR{gamma} regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Anna D.; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPAR{gamma} has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPAR{gamma} promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXR{alpha}) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPAR{gamma} knockout (PPAR{gamma} KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPAR{gamma} would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPAR{gamma}) to restore PPAR{gamma} expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPAR{gamma} (1) induced transcription of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  20. Influence of Pneumocystis carinii on nitrite production by rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Simonpoli, A M; Rajagopalan-Levasseur, P; Brun-Pascaud, M; Bertrand, G; Pocidalo, M A; Girard, P M

    1996-01-01

    Nitrite production by rat alveolar macrophages was studied to determine the role of L-arginine oxidation in the interaction between these cells and Pneumocystis carinii. Alveolar macrophages from rats obtained from two different breeders were used: rats from Janvier breeder had latent P. carinii infection, while those from Charles River breeder were bred in a germ-free environment. Pneumocystis carinii increased in vitro nitrite generation by unstimulated alveolar macrophages from Janvier rats only, and this was blocked by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Incubation of cells from Janvier and Charles River rats with lipopolysaccharide and/or interferon-gamma increased nitrite production to a similar extent. Pneumocystis carinii partially decreased nitrite release by activated alveolar macrophages, and this was still inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. In the presence of P. carinii, superoxide dismutase used as a superoxide anion scavenger had no effect on nitrite production by activated cells. These results show that prior exposure to P. carinii leads to nitric oxide production by rat alveolar macrophages. Although the magnitude of this production seems to be moderate, it is of biological significance since cells of P. carinii-naive rats do not generate nitrite whereas those of latently infected rats do.

  1. Influence of Rhodococcus equi on the respiratory burst of resident alveolar macrophages from horses

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbaugh, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the etiologic agent of a devastating pneumonia of sporadic incidence in foals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of R. equi on the superoxide anion production, measured spectrophotometrically as the reduction of cytochrome C, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity, measured by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ liberation from /sup 14/C-1-D-glucose, of alveolar macrophages from horses. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 6 anesthetized, healthy, light-breed, adult horses by bronchoalveolar lavage. Following a randomized complete block design, the suspension of cells was divided into aliquots of 10/sup 6/ viable alveolar macrophages which were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 g. of opsonized R. equi or opsonized zymosan A at 37 C for 2 hours. In this study the respiratory burst of equine alveolar macrophages was only evidenced by the hexose monophosphate shunt activity and superoxide anion was not coincidentally produced. Rhodococcus equi did not adversely affect that response. The insignificant superoxide anion production by the alveolar macrophages suggests that this may not be a significant oxygen metabolite in those cells.

  2. Interaction of Mycoplasma dispar with bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, R A; Wannemuehler, M J; Rosenbusch, R F

    1992-01-01

    The capacity to avoid phagocytosis and the activation of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) by encapsulated Mycoplasma dispar or purified M. dispar capsule was investigated. Encapsulated and unencapsulated M. dispar were cocultured with BAM in the presence or absence of antisera prepared against unencapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule antiserum. Unopsonized mycoplasmas resisted phagocytosis, while only anti-capsule antibodies enhanced the phagocytosis of encapsulated mycoplasmas. BAM were cultured in the presence of purified M. dispar capsule or either live or heat-killed encapsulated or unencapsulated M. dispar. These BAM were then activated with Escherichia coli endotoxin or left without further activation. The supernatants of these cultures were assayed for tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and glucose consumption as indicators of macrophage activation. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 were produced by BAM stimulated with unencapsulated M. dispar but not when encapsulated M. dispar or its purified capsule was used. Similarly, glucose consumption was increased in the presence of unencapsulated M. dispar, but not when BAM were cocultured with encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule. When BAM were treated with purified capsule or encapsulated mycoplasmas, they could not be subsequently activated by endotoxin. These results indicate that encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule exerts an inhibitory effect on the activity of BAM and prevents the activation of these cells. PMID:1612758

  3. Effects of quartz, airborne particulates and fly ash fractions from a waste incinerator on elastase release by activated and nonactivated rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyas, H.; Labedzka, M.; Schmidt, N.; Gercken, G.

    1988-01-01

    Elastase release from cultured, activated and nonactivated rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) was investigated after stimulation by different environmentally related mineral dusts (50-1000 micrograms/10(6) cells). Eight different dusts were analyzed for element contents and grain size: one rural and three urban airborne dusts, a coarse and a fine fraction of a sieved waste incinerator fly ash, a sonicated coarse fly ash fraction, and the standard quartz dust DQ 12. The fine fly ash fraction, the sonicated coarse fly ash fraction, and the quartz dust DQ 12 enhanced elastase release by activated AM. Only one of the tested airborne dusts effected a comparable elastase release. The untreated coarse fraction of the fly ash did not cause a significant increase of extracellular elastase activities. Elastase release was dependent on particle numbers and chemical composition and correlated best with barium and tin contents. Nonactivated AM released higher elastase activities than activated AM at low-dose levels. The possible role of dust-induced elastase secretion in the pathogenesis of emphysema is discussed.

  4. Reaction of alveolar macrophages to inhaled metal aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Camner, P; Johansson, A

    1992-01-01

    For more than a decade we have exposed rabbits to different metals, usually in soluble form, and investigated the effects on the lungs. The metal concentrations have been around 1 mg/m3,i.e., not more than a factor of 10 above occupational threshold limit values. The exposure periods have been 1-8 months (6 hr/day, 5 days/week). We have studied especially the morphology and function of alveolar macrophages (AM), the morphology of alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells, and analyzed lung phospholipids. Several metals produce specific, complex effects. For example, metallic and soluble nickel (NiCl2) increase both number and size of the type II cells, increase the production of surfactant, and affect morphology and function of AM. Cobalt (CoCl2) induces a different effect on type II cells from nickel, causing the formation of nodules in these cells. Trivalent chromium [Cr(NO3)3] does not affect either type II cells or the amount of surfactant significantly, but markedly affects AM. The administered metals affect AM both directly and indirectly. For example, nickel induces an increased production of surfactant, resulting in overfed AM with an increased metabolic activity. However, nickel also induces a direct decrease in the release of lysozyme activity by AM. Our results emphasize the complexity of the effects on the lungs of inhaled agents, which can act both directly and indirectly on AM. PMID:1396456

  5. Surfactant Proteins A and D Suppress Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytosis via Interaction with SIRPα

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, William J.; McPhillips, Kathleen A.; Dickinson, Matthew G.; Linderman, Derek J.; Morimoto, Konosuke; Xiao, Yi Qun; Oldham, Kelly M.; Vandivier, R. William; Henson, Peter M.; Gardai, Shyra J.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Efficient removal of apoptotic cells is essential for the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. Alveolar macrophages ingest apoptotic cells less avidly than other professional phagocytes at rest but overcome this defect during acute inflammation. Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D are potent modulators of macrophage function and may suppress clearance of apoptotic cells through activation of the transmembrane receptor signal inhibitory regulatory protein α (SIRPα). Objectives: To investigate whether binding of SP-A and SP-D to SIRPα on alveolar macrophages suppresses apoptotic cell clearance. Methods: Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was assessed using macrophages pretreated with SP-A, SP-D, or the collectin-like molecule C1q. Binding of SP-A and SP-D to SIRPα was confirmed in vitro using blocking antibodies and fibroblasts transfected with active and mutant SIRPα. The effects of downstream molecules SHP-1 and RhoA on phagocytosis were studied using SHP-1–deficient mice, sodium stibogluconate, and a Rho kinase inhibitor. Lipopolysaccharide was given to chimeric mice to study the effects of SP-A and SP-D binding on inflammatory macrophages. Measurements and Main Results: Preincubation of macrophages with SP-A or SP-D suppressed apoptotic cell clearance. Surfactant suppression of macrophage phagocytosis was reversed by blocking SIRPα and inhibiting downstream molecules SHP-1 and RhoA. Macrophages from inflamed lungs ingested apoptotic cells more efficiently than resting alveolar macrophages. Recruited mononuclear phagocytes with low levels of SP-A and SP-D mediated this effect. Conclusions: SP-A and SP-D tonically inhibit alveolar macrophage phagocytosis by binding SIRPα. During acute pulmonary inflammation, defects in apoptotic cell clearance are overcome by recruited mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:18420961

  6. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  7. NF-kappaB regulatory mechanisms in alveolar macrophages from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moine, P; McIntyre, R; Schwartz, M D; Kaneko, D; Shenkar, R; Le Tulzo, Y; Moore, E E; Abraham, E

    2000-02-01

    Activation of the nuclear regulatory factor NF-kappaB occurs in the lungs of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and may contribute to the increased expression of immunoregulatory cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators in this setting. Because of the important role that NF-kappaB activation appears to play in the development of acute lung injury, we examined cytoplasmic and nuclear NF-kapppaB counterregulatory mechanisms, involving IkappaB proteins, in alveolar macrophages obtained from 7 control patients without lung injury and 11 patients with established ARDS. Cytoplasmic levels of the NF-kappaB subunits p50, p65, and c-Rel were significantly decreased in alveolar macrophages from patients with ARDS, consistent with enhanced migration of liberated NF-kappaB dimers from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of IkappaBalpha were not significantly altered in alveolar macrophages from patients with established ARDS, compared with controls. In contrast, nuclear levels of Bcl-3 were significantly decreased in patients with ARDS compared with controls (P = 0.02). No IkappaBgamma, IkappaBbeta, or p105 proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages from control patients or patients with ARDS. The presence of activated NF-kappaB in alveolar macrophages from patients with established ARDS implies the presence of an ongoing stimulus for NF-kappaB activation. In this setting, appropriate counterregulatory mechanisms to normalize nuclear levels of NF-kappaB and to suppress NF-kappaB-mediated transcription, such as increased cytoplasmic and nuclear IkappaBalpha levels or decreased Bcl-3 levels, appeared to be induced. Nevertheless, even though counterregulatory mechanisms to NF-kappaB activation are activated in lung macrophages of patients with ARDS, NF-kappaB remains activated. These results suggest that fundamental abnormalities in transcriptional mechanisms involving NF-kappaB and important in the

  8. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae clearance by alveolar macrophages is impaired by exposure to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Martí-Lliteras, Pau; Regueiro, Verónica; Morey, Pau; Hood, Derek W; Saus, Carles; Sauleda, Jaume; Agustí, Alvar G N; Bengoechea, José Antonio; Garmendia, Junkal

    2009-10-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an opportunistic gram-negative pathogen that causes respiratory infections and is associated with progression of respiratory diseases. Cigarette smoke is a main risk factor for development of respiratory infections and chronic respiratory diseases. Glucocorticoids, which are anti-inflammatory drugs, are still the most common therapy for these diseases. Alveolar macrophages are professional phagocytes that reside in the lung and are responsible for clearing infections by the action of their phagolysosomal machinery and promotion of local inflammation. In this study, we dissected the interaction between NTHI and alveolar macrophages and the effect of cigarette smoke on this interaction. We showed that alveolar macrophages clear NTHI infections by adhesion, phagocytosis, and phagolysosomal processing of the pathogen. Bacterial uptake requires host actin polymerization, the integrity of plasma membrane lipid rafts, and activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling cascade. Parallel to bacterial clearance, macrophages secrete tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) upon NTHI infection. In contrast, exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytosis, although NTHI-induced TNF-alpha secretion was not abrogated. Mechanistically, our data showed that CSE reduced PI3K signaling activation triggered by NTHI. Treatment of CSE-exposed cells with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone reduced the amount of TNF-alpha secreted upon NTHI infection but did not compensate for CSE-dependent phagocytic impairment. The deleterious effect of cigarette smoke was observed in macrophage cell lines and in human alveolar macrophages obtained from smokers and from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  9. The equine alveolar macrophage: functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Anna E; Kapetanovic, Ronan; McGorum, Bruce C; Hume, David A; Pirie, Scott R

    2013-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) constitute the first line of defence in the lung of all species, playing a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses to inhaled pathogens. A detailed understanding of the function and phenotype of AMs is a necessary pre-requisite to both elucidating their role in preventing opportunistic bacterial colonisation of the lower respiratory tract and developing appropriate preventative strategies. The purpose of the study was to characterise this important innate immune cell at the tissue level by making functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages (PMs). We hypothesised that the tissue of origin determines a unique phenotype of AMs, which may constitute an appropriate therapeutic target for certain equine respiratory diseases. Macrophages isolated from the lung and the peritoneal cavity of 9 horses were stimulated with various toll like receptor (TLR) ligands and the production of nitrite, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were measured by the Griess reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Cells were also compared on the basis of phagocytic-capacity and the expression of several cell surface markers. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated increased TNFα release following stimulation with LPS, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) and heat-killed Salmonella typhinurium and increased TNFα and IDO mRNA expression when stimulated with LPS. AMs showed high expression of the specific macrophage markers cluster of differentiation (CD) 14, CD163 and TLR4, whereas PMs showed high expression of TLR4 only. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated efficient phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate that AMs are more active than PMs when stimulated with various pro-inflammatory ligands, thus supporting the importance of the local microenvironment in the activation status of the macrophage. This

  10. Aggregates of ultrafine particles impair phagocytosis of microorganisms by human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Margot; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Johard, Urban; Gerde, Per; Jarstrand, Connie; Camner, Per; Låstbom, Lena

    2006-02-01

    We investigated whether exposure of alveolar macrophages to aggregates of ultrafine carbon particles affected subsequent phagocytosis of microorganisms. Human alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and exposed to aggregates of ultrafine carbon particles or diesel exhaust particles (DEP) for 20 h before measurements of phagocytosis. The particle loads were estimated to be comparable to those of air pollution exposure with established health effects in humans. Phagocytotic activity was measured as attachment and ingestion of four different test particles (amorphous silica particles, yeast cells from Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans opsonized with specific IgG or fresh serum) that bind to scavenger, mannose, Fc, and complement receptors, respectively. Carbon preloading significantly impaired the attachment and ingestion process (P<0.01) for all particles, except for yeast cells from C. neoformans opsonized with specific IgG. On the average, the accumulated attachment decreased by 30% and the ingested fraction decreased by 10%. Loading of alveolar macrophages with either aggregates of ultrafine DEP or carbon particles impaired the phagocytosis of silica test particles in a similar way. Exposure of human alveolar macrophages to aggregates of carbon or DEP, in concentrations relevant to human environmental exposures, caused significant impairment of phagocytosis of silica particles and microorganisms. The inhibitory effect on particle phagocytosis mediated by four different receptors suggests that air pollution particles cause a general inhibition of macrophage phagocytosis. Such an effect may contribute to increased susceptibility to infections and, for example, result in more exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  11. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-14

    germinate into vegetative bacteria (10, 23), which are capable of secreting anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin . In the lymph nodes, bacteria ...inability of AM to completely eradicate bacteria suggests that intracellularly secreted lethal FIG. 5. Lethal toxin impairs bactericidal activity but...Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis

  12. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings. PMID:27080155

  13. Changes in cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages after oral administration of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Broug-Holub, E; Persoons, J H; Schornagel, K; Kraal, G

    1995-01-01

    Oral administration of the bacterial immunomodulator Broncho-Vaxom (OM-85), a lysate of eight bacteria strains commonly causing respiratory disease, has been shown to enhance the host defence of the respiratory tract. In this study we examined the effect of orally administered (in vivo) OM-85 on stimulus-induced cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The results show that alveolar macrophages isolated from OM-85-treated rats secreted significantly more nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1 beta upon in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), whereas, in contrast, LPS-induced IL-6 secretion was significantly lower. The observed effects of in vivo OM-85 treatment on stimulus-induced cytokine secretion in vitro are not due to a direct effect of OM-85 on the cells, because in vitro incubation of alveolar macrophages with OM-85 did not result in altered activity, nor did direct intratracheal instillation of OM-85 in the lungs of rats result in altered alveolar macrophage activity in vitro. It is hypothesized that oral administration of OM-85 leads to priming of alveolar macrophages in such a way that immune responses are non-specifically enhanced upon stimulation. The therapeutic action of OM-85 may therefore result from an enhanced clearance of infectious bacteria from the respiratory tract due to increased alveolar macrophage activity. PMID:7648713

  14. IL-1α induces CD11b(low) alveolar macrophage proliferation and maturation during granuloma formation.

    PubMed

    Huaux, François; Lo Re, Sandra; Giordano, Giulia; Uwambayinema, Francine; Devosse, Raynal; Yakoub, Yousof; Panin, Nadtha; Palmai-Pallag, Mihaly; Rabolli, Virginie; Delos, Monique; Marbaix, Etienne; Dauguet, Nicolas; Couillin, Isabelle; Ryffel, Bernhard; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Lison, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages play a central role in immune and tissue responses of granulomatous lung diseases induced by pathogens and foreign bodies. Circulating monocytes are generally viewed as central precursors of these tissue effector macrophages. Here, we provide evidence that granulomas derive from alveolar macrophages serving as a local reservoir for the expansion of activated phagocytic macrophages. By exploring lung granulomatous responses to silica particles in IL-1-deficient mice, we found that the absence of IL-1α, but not IL-1β, was associated with reduced CD11b(high) phagocytic macrophage accumulation and fewer granulomas. This defect was associated with impaired alveolar clearance and resulted in the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Reconstitution of IL-1α(-/-) mice with recombinant IL-1α restored lung clearance functions and the pulmonary accumulation of CD11b(high) phagocytic macrophages. Mechanistically, IL-1α induced the proliferation of CD11b(low) alveolar macrophages and differentiated these cells into CD11b(high) macrophages which perform critical phagocytic functions and organize granuloma. We newly discovered here that IL-1α triggers lung responses requiring macrophage proliferation and maturation from tissue-resident macrophages.

  15. Agonist-stimulated alveolar macrophages: apoptosis and phospholipid signaling.

    PubMed

    Lütjohann, J; Spiess, A N; Gercken, G

    1998-08-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) were labeled with [3H]-choline or [3H]-ethanolamine and exposed to quartz dust, metal oxide-coated silica particles, Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor promotor 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (PMA). The activation of phospholipases A2, C and D (PLA2, PLC and PLD) acting on phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and liquid scintillation counting of water- and lipid-soluble phospholipid metabolites. Exposure of BAM to quartz dust, metal oxide-coated silica particles, and LPS led to a transient PLD activation while treatment with PMA caused a prolonged rise in PLD activity. LPS and quartz dust induced a short-term increase of PLC cleavage products. All agonists caused a transient activation of PLA2. To induce apoptosis, BAM were stimulated with C8-ceramide, calcium-ionophore 23187, or gliotoxin. Apoptosis was investigated by qualitative and quantitative methods like flow cytometry, propidium iodide/Hoechst 33258 double staining, Cell Death Detection ELISA, and electrophoretical detection of DNA fragmentation. All three agonists led to apoptosis of BAM in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. After stimulation with gliotoxin an increase in ceramide and a drastic decrease in sphingosine-1-phosphate levels were observed, suggesting an involvement of these sphingolipids in gliotoxin-mediated apoptosis.

  16. Treatment of alveolar macrophages with cytochalasin D inhibits uptake and subsequent growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J A; Winn, W C

    1986-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila multiplied rapidly in guinea pig and rat alveolar macrophages but failed to grow when phagocytic activity was inhibited by pretreatment with 0.5 or 1.0 microgram of cytochalasin D per ml. Attachment was not inhibited by cytochalasin D. No extracellular multiplication occurred when L. pneumophila were in close proximity to viable functional macrophages or even when the bacteria were attached to plasma membranes of the macrophages. Nonopsonized L. pneumophila were avidly phagocytized by alveolar macrophages. When bacteria were centrifuged onto a cell pellet, more than 85% of the phagocytes contained one or more bacteria within 15 min. In contrast, under the same conditions only approximately 15% of the macrophages contained nonopsonized Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. Phagocytosis of L. pneumophila by untreated guinea pig macrophages occurred by extension of pseudopodia around the bacteria in a classical manner. The failure of the bacteria to actively penetrate the phagocyte suggests that their intracellular survival must not depend on avoidance of a phagosome but rather on an inhibition of or resistance to subsequent microbicidal functions of the macrophage. Images PMID:3941000

  17. Toxicity of metallic ions and oxides to rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Labedzka, M.; Gulyas, H.; Schmidt, N.; Gercken, G. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of soluble compounds and oxides of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, V, and Zn on oxidative metabolism and membrane integrity of rabbit alveolar macrophages were studied by 24-hr in vitro exposure. Oxidative metabolism induced by phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan was measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and by chemiluminescence in the presence of luminol. Membrane integrity was estimated by extracellular LDH activity. Metallic ions and oxides inhibited the release of active oxygen species. Cd(II), As(III), and V(V) were the most toxic elements as measured by all investigated parameters. Cu(II) decreased O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and chemiluminescence effectively but H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and membrane integrity less. Chemiluminescence was decreased strongly by Hg(II) while O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release were depressed moderately. Zn(II) and Sb(III) compounds caused medium toxicity and the tested Sn, Ni, and Pb compounds showed only faint toxic effects.

  18. Quantitative assessment of rabbit alveolar macrophage function by chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, P.C.; Kirchner, F.R.

    1985-08-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages (RAM) were cultured for 24 hr with concentrations ranging from 3 to 12 ..mu..g/ml of vanadium oxide (V/sub 2/O/sub 5/), a known cytotoxic agent, or with high-molecular-weight organic by-products from coal gasification processes. After culture the cells were harvested and tested for functional capacity using three types of indicators: (1) luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL), which quantitatively detects photon emission due to respiratory burst activity measured in a newly designed instrument with standardized reagents; (2) the reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium-saturated polyacrylamide beads, a semiquantitative measure of respiratory burst activity; and (3) phagocytic efficiency, defined as percentage of cells incorporating immunoglobulin-coated polyacrylamide beads. Chemiluminescence declined linearly with increasing concentrations of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ over the dose range tested. Dye reduction and phagocytic efficiency similarly decreased with increasing V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ concentration, but were less sensitive indicators of functional impairment than CL as measured by the amount required to reduce the response to 50% of untreated cells. The effect of coal gasification condensates on RAM function varied, but in general these test also indicated that the CL response was the most sensitive indicator.

  19. [Expression and secretion of alpha-2-macroglobulin by dust-stimulated alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Ossege, L M; Voss, B; Müller, K M

    1994-04-01

    In dust-induced, fibrosing lung processes macrophages are increased activated by foreign body reactions. The release of monokines and proteolytic enzymes, which depends on phagocytosis, may lead to destruction of the extracellular matrix with the consequence of degradation and restitution. Also the transcellular signaling or cell-matrix-interaction may finally result in development of fibrosis. However the proteolytic effect of elastase and collagenase can be inhibited by alpha-2-macroglobulin. Alpha-2-macroglobulin is a protease-inhibitor, which is synthesized by macrophages and has a wide spectrum of inhibitory abilities. Our interest was focused on observation of the production of alpha-2-macroglobulin by alveolar macrophages after stimulation with inorganic dusts of different chemical and physical properties. Rat alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage and exposed to crocidolite, quarz or welder steam dust in vitro. The expression and secretion of alpha-2-macroglobulin was examined by non radioactive in situ hybridization, indirect immunofluorescence and radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. The stimulated rat alveolar macrophages showed an increased expression of alpha-2-macroglobulin-mRNA and also an enhanced synthesis of alpha-2-macroglobulin-protein. Besides only small differences between the substances used for stimulation were demonstrated.

  20. Dissolution of beryllium in artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    Dissolution of a lung burden of poorly soluble beryllium particles is hypothesized to be necessary for development of chronic beryllium lung disease (CBD) in humans. As such, particle dissolution rate must be sufficient to activate the lung immune response and dissolution lifetime sufficient to maintain chronic inflammation for months to years to support development of disease. The purpose of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that poorly soluble beryllium compounds release ions via dissolution in lung fluid. Dissolution kinetics of 17 poorly soluble particulate beryllium materials that span extraction through ceramics machining (ores, hydroxide, metal, copper-beryllium [CuBe] fume, oxides) and three CuBe alloy reference materials (chips, solid block) were measured over 31 d using artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (pH 4.5). Differences in beryllium-containing particle physicochemical properties translated into differences in dissolution rates and lifetimes in artificial phagolysosomal fluid. Among all materials, dissolution rate constant values ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-10)gcm(-2)d(-1) and half-times ranged from tens to thousands of days. The presence of magnesium trisilicate in some beryllium oxide materials may have slowed dissolution rates. Materials associated with elevated prevalence of CBD had faster beryllium dissolution rates [10(-7)-10(-8)gcm(-2)d(-1)] than materials not associated with elevated prevalence (p<0.05).

  1. Trace elements in human alveolar macrophages studied by PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, G.; Roelandts, I.; Corhay, J. L.; Radermecker, M.; Delavignette, J. P.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the metal content of alveolar macrophages by PIXE from 94 subjects divided into two groups as follows: group (1) — subjects with non-occupational exposure to industrial dust: 30 healthy volunteers (controls), 16 patients suffering from lung cancer; group (2) — 48 healthy steel workers from the Liège area (blast-furnace [ n=29] and coke oven [ n=19]). We hope to define more precisely the influence of carcinoma, smoking habit, pathology and occupational exposure in the steel industry on the macrophage metal content. This study has shown: (a) an Fe and Sr increase and a Br decrease in the macrophages of smokers (especially in heavy smokers): (b) a significant Fe, Ti, Br and Cu increase and a trend to Pb, Cr, As and Sr increase in macrophages of healthy steel workers (especially blast-furnace workers) in comparison with non-exposed controls; (c) a significant Fe, Br, Cu and Zn increase and a trend to Pb, As and Ni increase in macrophages of non-exposed patients with lung cancer by comparison with non-exposed controls. The mechanism of metal change could be explained by professional exposure and endogenous changes (protein synthesis, inflammation, bronchial bleeding, …)

  2. Interactions between alveolar macrophage subpopulations modulate their migratory function.

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, C.; Lemaire, I.

    1990-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms by which alveolar macrophages (AM) are attracted to local sites in the lung, the locomotion of AM in response to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) was investigated. Total bronchoalveolar cells (99% AM) obtained by a nondiscriminating bronchoalveolar lavage procedure migrated toward FMLP over a range of concentrations of 10(-12) M to 10(-6) M. Dose-response experiments showed a biphasic response with two peaks of migration obtained respectively at 5 x 10(-10) M and 10(-8) M. Analysis in the presence and absence of a positive gradient of FMLP revealed that the first peak of migration (5 x 10(-10) M FMLP) corresponded predominantly to chemotactic activity whereas the second peak of migration (10(-8) M FMLP) was associated with chemokinetic activity. To further evaluate these activities of oriented (chemotaxis) vs. random (chemokinesis) migration, AM were separated into two fractions by a two-step bronchoalveolar lavage procedure. Whereas fraction 1 displayed exclusively chemokinesis in response to higher concentrations of FMLP (10(-8) M), fraction 2 was totally unresponsive to FMLP over a wide range of concentrations (5 x 10(-11) M - 10(-7) M). When both fractions were combined, however, the chemotactic response to low concentrations of FMLP (5 x 10(-10) M) was restored. Additional analysis of these two AM fractions indicated that fraction 1 AM had a significantly lower degree of adherence and aggregation than fraction 2 AM. These data suggest that cell-cell cooperation is important for AM chemotactic response to FMLP and that such interaction may involve changes in adherence and aggregation. Images Figure 5 PMID:2297048

  3. Role of matrix metalloproteinases in models of macrophage-dependent acute lung injury. Evidence for alveolar macrophage as source of proteinases.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, D F; Shanley, T P; Warner, R L; Murphy, H S; Varani, J; Johnson, K J

    1999-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in the tissue injury seen in neutrophil-dependent models of acute lung injury. However, the role of MMPs in macrophage-dependent models of lung injury is unknown. To address this issue, the macrophage-dependent immunoglobulin A immune complex-induced lung injury model and the macrophage-dependent portion of the lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury model in the rat were assessed for MMP involvement and for the source of these activities. In both models, injury was inhibited by the recombinant human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) from injured animals in both models showed increased levels of MMPs. Characterization of MMP production by isolated lung fibroblasts, endothelial cells, type II epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophages revealed that only the macrophage had the same spectrum of MMP activity as seen in the BALF. Further, isolated alveolar macrophages from injured lungs showed evidence of in vivo activation with the release of the same spectrum of MMP activities. Together these studies show that MMPs are produced during macrophage-dependent lung injury, that these MMPs play a role in the development of the lung injury, and that the alveolar macrophage is the likely source of these MMPs.

  4. Comparative damage to alveolar macrophages after phagocytosis of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Gray, R.H.; DeNee, P.B.; Newton, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Backscatter electron and secondary electron imaging were used in a scanning electron microscope study of the in vitro toxic effects of particles ingested by alveolar macrophages. Relatively nontoxic aluminosilicate fly ash particles from the Mount St. Helens eruption and from a coal-fired power plant as well as toxic quartz particles from the Westphalia (Germany) mine deposits were readily taken up by macrophages. The presence of fly ash particles inside the cells was not associated with any changes in surface morphology. The presence of intracellular quartz particles, on the other hand, was correlated with damage to the cell membrane as determined by alterations in surface morphology, uptake of trypan blue, and release of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The use of backscatter electron imaging is useful in scanning electron microscope studies which attempt to establish cause and effect relationships between exposure to respirable particles and the morphological and cytotoxic response.

  5. Biomonitoring of industrial dusts on animals. II. Bioindication on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kaváciková, Z

    1986-01-01

    Rats and rabbits were exposed through the respiratory system to industrial dusts (magnesite emissions, solid wastes from nickel refinery dump, cement emissions) at biomonitory stations or in experimental chamber. Following exposure the animals were killed, the alveolar macrophages isolated and acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase estimated in the isolated cells. The activity of both enzymes was enhanced in the exposed animals in all cases. The enhancement was dependent on the length of exposure and amount of inhaled particles.

  6. Alendronate inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice by induction of apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Manabu; Maeno, Toshitaka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Ogata, Fusa; Masubuchi, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenichiro; Yamaguchi, Kouichi; Aoki, Fumiaki; Suga, Tatsuo; Nagai, Ryozo; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-10

    Alveolar macrophages play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, for which there is currently no effective treatment. Bisphosphonates are widely used to treat osteoclast-mediated bone diseases. Here we show that delivery of the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate alendronate via aerosol inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced emphysema in mice. Inhaled, but not orally ingested, alendronate inhibits airspace enlargement after elastase instillation, and induces apoptosis of macrophages in bronchoalveolar fluid via caspase-3- and mevalonate-dependent pathways. Cytometric analysis indicates that the F4/80(+)CD11b(high)CD11c(mild) population characterizing inflammatory macrophages, and the F4/80(+)CD11b(mild)CD11c(high) population defining resident alveolar macrophages take up substantial amounts of the bisphosphonate imaging agent OsteoSense680 after aerosol inhalation. We further show that alendronate inhibits macrophage migratory and phagocytotic activities and blunts the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signalling. Given that the alendronate inhalation effectively induces apoptosis in both recruited and resident alveolar macrophages, we suggest this strategy may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of emphysema.

  7. Genetic engineering alveolar macrophages for host resistance to PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Prather, Randall S; Whitworth, Kristin M; Schommer, Susan K; Wells, Kevin D

    2017-02-10

    Standard strategies for control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have not been effective, as vaccines have not reduced the prevalence of disease and many producers depopulate after an outbreak. Another method of control would be to prevent the virus from infecting the pig. The virus was thought to infect alveolar macrophages by interaction with a variety of cell surface molecules. One popular model had PRRSV first interacting with heparin sulfate followed by binding to sialoadhesin and then being internalized into an endosome. Within the endosome, PRRSV was thought to interact with CD163 to uncoat the virus so the viral genome could be released into the cytosol and infect the cell. Other candidate receptors have included vimentin, CD151 and CD209. By using genetic engineering, it is possible to test the importance of individual entry mediators by knocking them out. Pigs engineered by knockout of sialoadhesin were still susceptible to infection, while CD163 knockout resulted in pigs that were resistant to infection. Genetic engineering is not only a valuable tool to determine the role of specific proteins in infection by PRRSV (in this case), but also provides a means to create animals resistant to disease. Genetic engineering of alveolar macrophages can also illuminate the role of other proteins in response to infection. We suggest that strategies to prevent infection be pursued to reduce the reservoir of virus.

  8. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) (isolate ATCC VR-2385) infection on bactericidal activity of porcine pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs): in vitro comparisons with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs).

    PubMed

    Thanawongnuwech, R; Thacker, E L; Halbur, P G

    1997-11-01

    Porcine pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) were recovered by in situ pulmonary vascular perfusion with 0.025% collagenase in saline from six 8-week old, crossbred pigs. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from the same pigs for comparisons in each assay. The macrophages were exposed to PRRSV (ATCC VR-2385) in vitro for 24 h and infection was confirmed by an indirect immunofluorescence test or transmission electron microscopy. Viral particles tended to accumulate in the vesicles of the Golgi apparatus or endoplasmic reticulum. Bactericidal function assays were performed on the recovered macrophages to determine the effects of the virus on macrophage functions. In vitro PRRSV infection reduced the bactericidal ability of PIMs from 68.3% to 56.4% (P < 0.09), and PAMs from 69.3% to 61.0% (P > 0.1) at 24 h post-infection. The mean percentage of bacteria killed by macrophages after PRRSV infection was not significantly different among the treatment groups or between the treatment groups and non-infected controls based on colorimetric MTT bactericidal (Staphylococcus aureus) assay. PRRSV did not affect the ability of PIMs or PAMs to internalize opsonized 125I-iododeoxyuridine-labeled S. aureus (P > 0.05). PRRSV infection significantly decreased the production of superoxide anion (P < 0.01) by 67.0% in PIMs and by 69.4% in PAMs. PRRSV reduced the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide product (P < 0.01) by 36.5% for PIMs and by 48.1% for PAMs. The results suggest: (1) PIMs should be considered as an important replication site of PRRSV; (2) PRRSV may have a detrimental effect on both PIMs and PAMs; (3) loss of bactericidal function in PIMs may facilitate hematogenous bacterial infections.

  9. Enhanced rifampicin delivery to alveolar macrophages by solid lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Junlan; Li, Yanzhen; Yang, Likai; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2013-05-01

    The present study aimed at developing a drug delivery system targeting the densest site of tuberculosis infection, the alveolar macrophages (AMs). Rifampicin (RFP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (RFP-SLNs) with an average size of 829.6 ± 16.1 nm were prepared by a modified lipid film hydration method. The cytotoxicity of RFP-SLNs to AMs and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECs) was examined using MTT assays. The viability of AMs and AECs was above 80 % after treatment with RFP-SLNs, which showed low toxicity to both AMs and AECs. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy was employed to observe the interaction between RFP-SLNs and both AMs and AECs. After incubating the cells with RFP-SLNs for 2 h, the fluorescent intensity in AMs was more and remained longer (from 0.5 to 12 h) when compared with that in AECs (from 0.5 to 8 h). In vitro uptake characteristics of RFP-SLNs in AMs and AECs were also investigated by detection of intracellular RFP by High performance liquid chromatography. Results showed that RFP-SLNs delivered markedly higher RFP into AMs (691.7 ng/mg in cultured AMs, 662.6 ng/mg in primary AMs) than that into AECs (319.2 ng/mg in cultured AECs, 287.2 ng/mg in primary AECs). Subsequently, in vivo delivery efficiency and the selectivity of RFP-SLNs were further verified in Sprague-Dawley rats. Under pulmonary administration of RFP-SLNs, the amount of RFP in AMs was significantly higher than that in AECs at each time point. Our results demonstrated that solid lipid nanoparticles are a promising strategy for the delivery of rifampicin to alveolar macrophages selectively.

  10. Autophagy decreases alveolar macrophage apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tao; Chen, Lei; Huang, Zhixin; Mao, Zhangfan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Boyou; Xu, Yao; Pan, Shize; Hu, Hao; Geng, Qing

    2016-01-01

    To study the impact of autophagy on alveolar macrophage apoptosis and its mechanism in the early stages of hypoxia, we established a cell hypoxia-reoxygenation model and orthotopic left lung ischemia-reperfusion model. Rat alveolar macrophages stably expressing RFP-LC3 were treated with autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine, 3-MA) or autophagy promoter (rapamycin), followed by hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment 2 h, 4 h or 6 h later. Twenty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into four different groups: no blocking of left lung hilum (model group), left lung hilum blocked for 1h with DMSO lavage (control group), left lung hilum blocked for 1 h with 100 ml/kg 3-MA (5 μmol/L) lavage (3-MA group), and left lung hilum blocked for 1 h with 100 ml/kg rapamycin (250 nmol/L) lavage (rapamycin group). Rapamycin decreased the unfolded protein response, which reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in the presence of oxygen deficiency. Rapamycin increased superoxide dismutase activities and decreased malondialdehyde levels, whereas 3-MA decreased superoxide dismutase activities and increased malondialdehyde levels. Thus, autophagy decreases alveolar macrophage apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in the early stage of hypoxia in vitro and in vivo. This could represent a new approach to protecting against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27888631

  11. Particle-macrophage relationships during the clearance of particles from the alveolar macrophage compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Toevs, K.E.; Valdez, Y.E.; Sebring, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    In this study, we quantitatively characterized the distributions of particles among lavageable AM over a 30 day period after the acute intratracheal instillation of /approximately/3 mg of 1.9 ..mu..m dia. polystyrene microspheres into the lungs of rats. Information obtained for particles retained in the lavageable AM compartment and particle-AM distribution data were collectively examined using a simple, first order kinetic model for AM removal from the lung. The results of our analyses suggest that a volume load of particles in a macrophage up to at least /approximately/450 ..mu..m/sup 3/ does not inhibit the mobilization of macrophages from the alveolar compartment. Additionally, the kinetic analyses of the particle-macrophage distributions suggest that macrophages that replenish those AM that are translocated from the lung on a continual basis during alveolar clearance are not and/or do not remain particle-free in the alveoli. This latter observation can be explained by: (1) the influx of particle-bearing macrophages into the alveoli, or (2) the in situ proliferation of particle bearing AM, or (3) the release of particles by AM and the subsequent phagocytosis of the particles by newly arrived cells, or (4) a combination of these possibilities. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Targeting Nrf2 signaling improves bacterial clearance by alveolar macrophages in patients with COPD and in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Christopher J; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Xiaoni; Yarmus, Lonny; Brown, Robert H; Feller-Kopman, David; Wise, Robert; Biswal, Shyam

    2011-04-13

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have innate immune dysfunction in the lung largely due to defective macrophage phagocytosis. This deficiency results in periodic bacterial infections that cause acute exacerbations of COPD, a major source of morbidity and mortality. Recent studies indicate that a decrease in Nrf2 (nuclear erythroid-related factor 2) signaling in patients with COPD may hamper their ability to defend against oxidative stress, although the role of Nrf2 in COPD exacerbations has not been determined. Here, we test whether activation of Nrf2 by the phytochemical sulforaphane restores phagocytosis of clinical isolates of nontypeable Haemophilus influenza (NTHI) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) by alveolar macrophages from patients with COPD. Sulforaphane treatment restored bacteria recognition and phagocytosis in alveolar macrophages from COPD patients. Furthermore, sulforaphane treatment enhanced pulmonary bacterial clearance by alveolar macrophages and reduced inflammation in wild-type mice but not in Nrf2-deficient mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months. Gene expression and promoter analysis revealed that Nrf2 increased phagocytic ability of macrophages by direct transcriptional up-regulation of the scavenger receptor MARCO. Disruption of Nrf2 or MARCO abrogated sulforaphane-mediated bacterial phagocytosis by COPD alveolar macrophages. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Nrf2 and its downstream target MARCO in improving antibacterial defenses and provide a rationale for targeting this pathway, via pharmacological agents such as sulforaphane, to prevent exacerbations of COPD caused by bacterial infection.

  13. Regulation of alpha 1 proteinase inhibitor function by rabbit alveolar macrophages. Evidence for proteolytic rather than oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Banda, M J; Clark, E J; Werb, Z

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were cultured in an environment conducive to the secretion of both reactive oxygen and proteinases, so that the relative importance of proteolytic and oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar macrophages could be evaluated. The inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was proportional to its proteolysis, and there was no detectable inactivation in the absence of proteolysis. Although the live macrophages were capable of secreting reactive oxygen, they did not inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by oxidation. The inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by proteolysis was proportional to the secretion of elastinolytic activity by the alveolar macrophages. The inability of the alveolar macrophages to oxidize alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was attributed to the methionine in the macrophages, in secreted proteins, and in the culture medium competing for oxidants. The data suggest that proteolytic inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may be important in vivo and that the methionine concentration in vivo may protect alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor from significant oxidative inactivation. Images PMID:2989330

  14. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  15. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Altered sialylation of alveolar macrophages in HIV-1-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    PERRIN, C; GIORDANENGO, V; BANNWARTH, S; BLAIVE, B; LEFEBVRE, J-C

    1997-01-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that O-glycans at the surface of HIV-1-infected cell lines were hyposialylated. Moreover, we and others have shown that HIV+ individuals produced autoantibodies that react with hyposialylated CD43, on T cell lines. Since the autoantigen responsible for this abnormal immune response was not easily found in the peripheral blood cells of corresponding patients, we searched for its possible presence in other sites. Using fluorescence staining of alveolar macrophages with various lectins, we show that the binding of the PNA lectin specific for asialo O-glycans is much more efficient on cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, the degree of reactivity of PNA is correlated with the clinical stage of the illness. PMID:9353144

  17. Altered sialylation of alveolar macrophages in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Giordanengo, V; Bannwarth, S; Blaive, B; Lefebvre, J C

    1997-10-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that O-glycans at the surface of HIV-1-infected cell lines were hyposialylated. Moreover, we and others have shown that HIV+ individuals produced autoantibodies that react with hyposialylated CD43, on T cell lines. Since the autoantigen responsible for this abnormal immune response was not easily found in the peripheral blood cells of corresponding patients, we searched for its possible presence in other sites. Using fluorescence staining of alveolar macrophages with various lectins, we show that the binding of the PNA lectin specific for asialo O-glycans is much more efficient on cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, the degree of reactivity of PNA is correlated with the clinical stage of the illness.

  18. Transcription repressor Bach2 is required for pulmonary surfactant homeostasis and alveolar macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Ebina-Shibuya, Risa; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Muto, Akihiko; Shima, Hiroki; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Ebina, Masahito; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) results from a dysfunction of alveolar macrophages (AMs), chiefly due to disruptions in the signaling of granulocyte macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We found that mice deficient for the B lymphoid transcription repressor BTB and CNC homology 2 (Bach2) developed PAP-like accumulation of surfactant proteins in the lungs. Bach2 was expressed in AMs, and Bach2-deficient AMs showed alterations in lipid handling in comparison with wild-type (WT) cells. Although Bach2-deficient AMs showed a normal expression of the genes involved in the GM-CSF signaling, they showed an altered expression of the genes involved in chemotaxis, lipid metabolism, and alternative M2 macrophage activation with increased expression of Ym1 and arginase-1, and the M2 regulator Irf4. Peritoneal Bach2-deficient macrophages showed increased Ym1 expression when stimulated with interleukin-4. More eosinophils were present in the lung and peritoneal cavity of Bach2-deficient mice compared with WT mice. The PAP-like lesions in Bach2-deficient mice were relieved by WT bone marrow transplantation even after their development, confirming the hematopoietic origin of the lesions. These results indicate that Bach2 is required for the functional maturation of AMs and pulmonary homeostasis, independently of the GM-CSF signaling. PMID:24127487

  19. Alveolar macrophage count as an indicator of lung reaction to industrial air pollution.

    PubMed

    Mylius, E A; Gullvåg, B

    1986-01-01

    The major proportion of the cellular components found in most of the sputa from persons working in polluted atmospheres are alveolar macrophages, and counts of the alveolar macrophages present in smears made from sputa from exposed workers probably reflect the lung reaction to air pollution. An investigation of this phenomenon was undertaken using the sputa of workers in different types of industries: a coke plant, two different aluminum reduction plants, a ship-building yard and asphalt work on a road. The results showed that the alveolar macrophage count increases with a higher level of particulate pollution in the workplace. A synergistic effect of occupational air pollution and smoking habits was also recorded.

  20. Effects of asbestos and silica on superoxide anion production in the guinea pig alveolar macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Roney, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effect of asbestos and silica on the activation pathway of the guinea pig alveolar macrophage. Activation of macrophages by physiological agents results in stimulation of phospholipase C causing phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. Phosphatidyl inositol turnover produces diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C causing superoxide anion production. Chrysotile stimulated alveolar macrophages to produce superoxide anion. This stimulation proceeded via phospholipase C, since chrysotile stimulated phosphatidyl inositol turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization. The possible involvement of a coupling protein was evaluated by pretreating cells with pertussis toxin. Potential binding sites for chrysotile stimulation were examined using a series of nine lectins. Chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production was blocked by pretreatment with lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine, but not by lectins which bound to mannose, fucose, or N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, incubation with the N-acetylglucosamine polymer, chitin, inhibited chrysotile-stimulated superoxide anion production, suggesting that chrysotile stimulated superoxide anion production by binding to N-acetylglucosamine residues. On the other hand, silica did not stimulate superoxide anion production. The effect of silica on agonist stimulation of this pathway was examined using two stimulants of superoxide anion production, N-formyl-nle-leu-phe (FNLP, which stimulates through phospholipase C) and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (which directly activates protein kinase C).

  1. Surfactant Protein D Binds to Coxiella burnetii and Results in a Decrease in Interactions with Murine Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soltysiak, Kelly A; van Schaik, Erin J; Samuel, James E

    2015-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of Q fever. Infections are usually acquired after inhalation of contaminated particles, where C. burnetii infects its cellular target cells, alveolar macrophages. Respiratory pathogens encounter the C-type lectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) during the course of natural infection. SP-D is a component of the innate immune response in the lungs and other mucosal surfaces. Many Gram-negative pulmonary pathogens interact with SP-D, which can cause aggregation, bactericidal effects and aid in bacterial clearance. Here we show that SP-D binds to C. burnetii in a calcium-dependent manner with no detectable bacterial aggregation or bactericidal effects. Since SP-D interactions with bacteria often alter macrophage interactions, it was determined that SP-D treatment resulted in a significant decrease in C. burnetii interactions to a mouse alveolar macrophage model cell line MH-S indicating SP-D causes a significant decrease in phagocytosis. The ability of SP-D to modulate macrophage activation by C. burnetii was tested and it was determined that SP-D does not alter the correlates measured for macrophage activation. Taken together these studies support those demonstrating limited activation of alveolar macrophages with C. burnetii and demonstrate interactions with SP-D participate in reduction of phagocyte attachment and phagocytosis.

  2. Defective nitric oxide production by alveolar macrophages during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lasbury, Mark E; Liao, Chung-Ping; Hage, Chadi A; Durant, Pamela J; Tschang, Dennis; Wang, Shao-Hung; Zhang, Chen; Lee, Chao-Hung

    2011-04-01

    The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on Pneumocystis (Pc) organisms, the role of NO in the defense against infection with Pc, and the production of NO by alveolar macrophages (AMs) during Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) were investigated. The results indicate that NO was toxic to Pc organisms and inhibited their proliferation in culture. When the production of NO was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of rats with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl) ornithine, progression of Pc infection in immunocompetent rats was enhanced. Concentrations of NO in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from immunosuppressed, Pc-infected rats and mice were greatly reduced, compared with those from uninfected animals, and AMs from these animals were defective in NO production. However, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein concentrations were high in AMs from Pc-infected rats and mice. Immunoblot analysis showed that iNOS in AMs from Pc-infected rats existed primarily as a monomer, but the homo-dimerization of iNOS monomers was required for the production of NO. When iNOS dimerization cofactors, including calmodulin, were added to macrophage lysates, iNOS dimerization increased, whereas incubation of the same lysates with all cofactors except calmodulin did not rescue iNOS dimer formation. These data suggest that NO is important in the defense against Pc infection, but that the production of NO in AMs during PCP is defective because of the reduced dimerization of iNOS.

  3. Alveolar Macrophages Prevent Lethal Influenza Pneumonia By Inhibiting Infection Of Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardani, Amber; Boulton, Adam; Kim, Taeg S.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major human pathogen that produces significant morbidity and mortality. To explore the contribution of alveolar macrophages (AlvMΦs) in regulating the severity of IAV infection we employed a murine model in which the Core Binding Factor Beta gene is conditionally disrupted in myeloid cells. These mice exhibit a selective deficiency in AlvMΦs. Following IAV infection these AlvMΦ deficient mice developed severe diffuse alveolar damage, lethal respiratory compromise, and consequent lethality. Lethal injury in these mice resulted from increased infection of their Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells (T1AECs) and the subsequent elimination of the infected T1AECs by the adaptive immune T cell response. Further analysis indicated AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of the cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) pathway genes in T1AECs in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes in a T1AECs cell line reduced the susceptibility of T1AECs to IAV infection, suggesting that AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of this pathway contributes to the resistance of T1AECs to IAV infection. Furthermore, inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes, as well as blockade of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptors in the AlvMΦ deficient mice reduced the susceptibility of their T1AECs to IAV infection and protected these mice from lethal infection. These results suggest that AlvMΦs may utilize a previously unappreciated mechanism to protect T1AECs against IAV infection, and thereby reduce the severity of infection. The findings further suggest that the cysLT pathway and the receptors for cysLT metabolites represent potential therapeutic targets in severe IAV infection. PMID:28085958

  4. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of a CD14-like molecule on porcine alveolar macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielian, T. L.; Ross, C. R.; McVey, D. S.; Chapes, S. K.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) functions as a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) LPS-binding protein (LBP) complexes. Because LPS has varying effects on CD14 expression in vitro, we evaluated CD14 expression in response to LPS with a fully differentiated macrophage phenotype, the alveolar macrophage. By using flow microfluorometric analysis and a radioimmunoassay with an anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibody (My4) that cross-reacts with porcine CD14, we found that macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24 h exhibited a two- to fivefold increase in CD14-like antigen compared with unstimulated cells. At low concentrations of LPS, up-regulation of the CD14-like antigen was dependent on serum; at higher concentrations of LPS, serum was not required. In the absence of serum a 10-fold higher dose of LPS (10 ng/ml) was required to increase CD14-like expression. In addition, LPS-induced CD14-like up-regulation correlated with secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, regardless of serum concentration. Blockade with My4 antibody significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion at 1 ng/ml of LPS. However, inhibition decreased as we increased the LPS concentration, suggesting the existence of CD14-independent pathways of macrophage activation in response to LPS. Alternatively, My4 may have a lower affinity for the porcine CD14 antigen than LPS, which may have only partially blocked the LPS-LBP binding site at high concentrations of LPS. Therefore, these data suggest that LPS activation of porcine alveolar macrophages for 24 h increased CD14-like receptor expression. The degree of CD14-like up-regulation was related to LPS concentration, however, activation did not require the presence of serum at high concentrations of LPS.

  5. [Study of the in vivo penetration of cotrimoxazole in alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Lopez, I; Dubar, V; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1990-04-01

    Kinetic of cotrimoxazole was studied in serum, alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid from guinea pigs receiving sulfamethoxazole (SMX, 100 mg/kg) and trimethoprim (TMP, 20 mg/kg). Guinea pigs were killed by cervical dislocation 30 min, 1 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after intraperitoneal injection. Lung lavage was performed to obtain alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid. TMP and SMX levels were assayed using high-performance-liquid chromatography. Highest SMX levels were obtained in serum at 30 min, in BAL fluid at 1 h and in alveolar macrophages at 3 h. Mean SMX/TMP ratios (30 min, 1 h, 3 h) was 26.5 +/- 0.8 in serum, 3.76 +/- 1.8 in BAL fluid and 1.15 +/- 0.02 in alveolar macrophages.

  6. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  7. Vitamin E prevents NRF2 suppression by allergens in asthmatic alveolar macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dworski, Ryszard; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S; Hoskins, Aimee; Freeman, Michael L

    2011-07-15

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease associated with increased generation of reactive oxidant species and disturbed antioxidant defenses. NRF2 is the master transcription factor that regulates the expression of Phase II antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. Disruption of NRF2 augments oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of asthma, suggesting a protective role for NRF2 in the lungs in vivo. Yet, little is known about the regulation and function of NRF2 in human asthmatics. Using segmental allergen challenge, a well-established experimental model of IgE-mediated asthma exacerbation in human atopic asthmatics, we investigated the effects of a specific allergen and the modulatory role of vitamin E on NRF2 and a NRF2-target gene, superoxide dismutase, in alveolar macrophages recovered from the airways at 24h after allergen instillation in vivo. Allergen-provoked airway inflammation in sensitive asthmatics caused a profound inhibition of macrophage NRF2 activity and superoxide dismutase, rendering them incapable of responding to the NRF2 inducers. Prolonged treatment with high doses of the antioxidant vitamin E lessened this allergen-induced drop in alveolar macrophage NRF2. These results are the first to demonstrate that NRF2 expression in human asthmatics is compromised upon allergen challenge but can be rescued by vitamin E in vivo.

  8. Modulation of Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes by Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Henry; Sweeney, Jan A.; Herscowitz, Herbert B.; Barsoum, Ibrahim S.; Kagan, Elliott

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the effect of cocultivation of T-cell-enriched human peripheral blood lymphocytes with autologous alveolar macrophages on mitogen-induced proliferation as determined by [3H]thymidine uptake. Cells obtained by fiberoptic bronchoscopy and saline bronchial lavage from 14 normal volunteers were enriched for macrophages by adherence in plastic dishes for 1 h in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Nonadherent mononuclear cells were prepared from heparinized venous blood after Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation by passage over nylon wool columns. T-cell-enriched populations were incubated with and without alveolar macrophages, either in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin. In these experiments, the number of lymphocytes was held constant (105 per well), while the number of alveolar macrophages was varied (0.1 × 105 to 4.0 × 105 per well). Alveolar macrophages generally tended to stimulate phytohemagglutinin-induced lymphoproliferation at lymphocyte/macrophage ratios of 10:1 but consistently and significantly suppressed proliferation at ratios which approach those usually observed in recovered human bronchial lavage fluid, namely, 1:4. The suppressive effect of alveolar macrophages was observed as early as 48 h after culture initiation, while the magnitude of suppression increased with time. Suppression did not appear to be due to alteration in lymphocyte viability, nor was it sensitive to indomethacin. These results indicate that human alveolar macrophages can modulate the in vitro proliferative response of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes. This observation may have relevance to interactions between alveolar macrophages and bronchial lymphocytes in the human lung in vivo. PMID:6982862

  9. Surfactant and varespladib co-administration in stimulated rat alveolar macrophages culture.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Daniele; Vendittelli, Francesca; Trias, Joaquim; Fraser, Heather; Minucci, Angelo; Gentile, Leonarda; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Conti, Giorgio; Antonelli, Massimo; Capoluongo, Ettore D

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening condition characterized by surfactant dysfunction and raised secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity. Varespladib is a sPLA2 inhibitor shown to be effective in animal models of acute lung injury. We aimed at investigating the effect of co-administration of surfactant and varespladib on sPLA2 activity. Alveolar macrophages were cultured and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and then treated with either varespladib, surfactant, varespladib followed by surfactant or nothing. sPLA2 activity, free fatty acids, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and protein concentrations were measured in culture supernatants. Treatment with varespladib (p=0.019) and varespladib + surfactant (p=0.013), reduced the enzyme activity by approximately 15% from the basal level measured in the untreated cultures. Surfactant, varespladib and varespladib + surfactant, respectively decreased free fatty acids by -45% (p=0.045), - 62% (p=0.009) and -48% (p=0.015), from the baseline concentration of the untreated cultures. Varespladib and poractant- α co-administration reduces sPLA2 activity and free fatty acids release in cultured rat alveolar macrophages, although a clear drug synergy was not evident. Since co-administration may be useful to reduce inflammation and surfactant inactivation in acute lung injury, further in vivo studies are warranted to verify its clinical usefulness.

  10. Characterization of alveolar macrophage receptors involved in opsonin independent phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Godleski, J.J.; Parod, R.J.; Katler, M.; Brain, J.D.

    1986-03-05

    Hamster alveolar macrophages (AM) avidly ingest particles in the absence of serum. This process is calcium dependent and can be blocked by HAMM, a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for hamster AM's. The purpose of this study was to identify the membrane receptors involved. AM membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I, lysed with RIPA-PMSF, and then reacted with uncoated latex beads or with beads coated with BSA, gelatin, or poly-L-lysine. Lysed membranes were also reacted with zymosan particles. All of these reactions were done in the presence and absence of calcium and magnesium ions. After reaction, the particles were boiled in SDS to remove attached membrane constituents which were then separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Only one AM membrane protein (37 kilodaltons (kd)) bound to BSA and gelatin coated latex, uncoated latex, and zymosan particles in the presence of Ca/sup + +/ and Mg/sup + +/. Proteins of 45 and 19 kd attached to all particles even in the absence of divalent cations. In contrast, HAMM reacted with a membrane constituent of 102 kd. The authors conclude that the Ca/sup + +/ dependent receptor for opsonin independent phagocytosis has a molecular weight of 37 kd and is different from the antigen identified by HAMM.

  11. Carbocisteine promotes phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masako; Ishibashi, Yuji; Nogawa, Hisashi; Yasue, Tokutaro

    2012-02-29

    Clearance of apoptotic cells, so-called efferocytosis, by alveolar macrophages (AMs) is important for lung homeostasis and is impaired in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Carbocisteine, a mucoregulatory drug, corrects the contents of fucose in airway mucus and has anti-inflammatory properties in airway inflammation. Thus, we conducted the present study to better understand the anti-inflammatory properties of carbocisteine. First, we induced airway inflammation in mice with lipopolysaccharide intratracheally. Carbocisteine significantly decreased neutrophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the resolution phase of inflammation, implying the promotion of neutrophil clearance. Then, we investigated whether carbocisteine would enhance the efferocytosis by AMs isolated from mice and found that this drug promoted not only the phagocytosis but also the binding of apoptotic cells to AMs in vitro. Furthermore, carbocisteine decreased the fucose residues stained with fluorescent fucose-binding lectin, Lens culinaris agglutinin, on the cell surface of AMs. We found here that removing fucose residues from cell surfaces of AMs by fucosidase markedly enhanced both the binding and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Finally, AMs from mice orally given carbocisteine also promoted both the binding and phagocytosis ex vivo similarly to in vitro. These results suggest that carbocisteine could promote the clearance of apoptotic cells by AMs in airway. In addition, the present findings suggest that the binding and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells may be modulated by fucose residues on the cell surface of AMs.

  12. Evidence for particle transport between alveolar macrophages in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Nikula, K.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies at this Institute have focused on determining the role of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the transport of particles within and form the lung. For those studies, AMs previously labeled using the nuclear stain Hoechst 33342 and polychromatic Fluoresbrite microspheres (1 {mu}m diameter, Polysciences, Inc., Warrington, PA) were instilled into lungs of recipient F344 rats. The fate of the donor particles and the doubly labeled AMs within recipient lungs was followed for 32 d. Within 2-4 d after instillation, the polychromatic microspheres were found in both donor and resident AMs, suggesting that particle transfer occurred between the donor and resident AMs. However, this may also have been an artifact resulting from phagocytosis of the microspheres form dead donor cells or from the fading or degradation of Hoechst 33342 within the donor cells leading to their misidentification as resident AMs. The results support the earlier findings that microspheres in donor AMs can be transferred to resident AMs within 2 d after instillation.

  13. Macrophage depletion abates Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced alveolar bone resorption in mice.

    PubMed

    Lam, Roselind S; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Brammar, Gail C; Walsh, Katrina A; McNaughtan, Judith E; Rowler, Dennis K; Van Rooijen, Nico; Reynolds, Eric C

    2014-09-01

    The role of the macrophage in the immunopathology of periodontitis has not been well defined. In this study, we show that intraoral inoculation of mice with Porphyromonas gingivalis resulted in infection, alveolar bone resorption, and a significant increase in F4/80(+) macrophages in gingival and submandibular lymph node tissues. Macrophage depletion using clodronate-liposomes resulted in a significant reduction in F4/80(+) macrophage infiltration of gingival and submandibular lymph node tissues and significantly (p < 0.01) less P. gingivalis-induced bone resorption compared with controls in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In both mouse strains, the P. gingivalis-specific IgG Ab subclass and serum cytokine [IL-4, IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12 (p70)] responses were significantly (p < 0.01) lower in the macrophage-depleted groups. Macrophage depletion resulted in a significant reduction in the level of P. gingivalis infection, and the level of P. gingivalis infection was significantly correlated with the level of alveolar bone resorption. M1 macrophages (CD86(+)), rather than M2 macrophages (CD206(+)), were the dominant macrophage phenotype of the gingival infiltrate in response to P. gingivalis infection. P. gingivalis induced a significant (p < 0.01) increase in NO production and a small increase in urea concentration, as well as a significant increase in the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), eotaxin, G-CSF, GM-CSF, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-α and -β, and TNF-α in isolated murine macrophages. In conclusion, P. gingivalis infection induced infiltration of functional/inflammatory M1 macrophages into gingival tissue and alveolar bone resorption. Macrophage depletion reduced P. gingivalis infection and alveolar bone resorption by modulating the host immune response.

  14. The Systemic Inflammation of Alveolar Hypoxia Is Initiated by Alveolar Macrophage–Borne Mediator(s)

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Wood, John G.; Blanco, Victor Gustavo; Gonzalez, Norberto C.

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar hypoxia produces widespread systemic inflammation in rats. The inflammation appears to be triggered by activation of mast cells by a mediator released from alveolar macrophages, not by the reduced systemic partial pressure of oxygen (PO2). If this is correct, the following should apply: (1) neither mast cells nor tissue macrophages should be directly activated by hypoxia; and (2) mast cells should be activated when in contact with hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not with hypoxic tissue macrophages. We sought here to determine whether hypoxia activates isolated alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and peritoneal mast cells, and to study the response of the microcirculation to supernatants of these cultures. Rat mesenteric microcirculation intravital microscopy was combined with primary cultures of alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and peritoneal mast cells. Supernatant of hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not of hypoxic peritoneal macrophages, produced inflammation in mesentery. Hypoxia induced a respiratory burst in alveolar, but not peritoneal macrophages. Cultured peritoneal mast cells did not degranulate with hypoxia. Immersion of mast cells in supernatant of hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not in supernatant of hypoxic peritoneal macrophages, induced mast cell degranulation. Hypoxia induced release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a mast cell secretagogue, from alveolar, but not peritoneal macrophages or mast cells. We conclude that a mediator released by hypoxic alveolar macrophages activates mast cells and triggers systemic inflammation. Reduced systemic PO2 and activation of tissue macrophages do not play a role in this phenomenon. The inflammation could contribute to systemic effects of diseases featuring alveolar hypoxia. PMID:19244200

  15. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits the spontaneous release of superoxide radical by alveolar macrophages in vitro in asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Harkin, T. )

    1991-08-01

    Asbestosis is characterized by an alveolar macrophage alveolitis with injury and fibrosis of the lower respiratory tract. Alveolar macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage spontaneously release exaggerated amounts of oxidants including superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide that may mediate alveolar epithelial cell injury. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a normally occurring adrenal androgen that inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the pentose phosphate shunt necessary for NADPH generation and superoxide anion formation. In this regard, the authors hypothesized that DHEA may reduce asbestos-induced oxidant release. DHEA added in vitro to alveolar macrophages lavaged from 11 nonsmoking asbestos workers significantly reduced superoxide anion release. DHEA is an antioxidant and potential anticarcinogenic agent that may have a therapeutic role in reducing the increased oxidant burden in asbestos-induced alveolitis of the lower respiratory tract.

  16. Metabolic reduction of chromium by alveolar macrophages and its relationships to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed Central

    Petrilli, F L; Rossi, G A; Camoirano, A; Romano, M; Serra, D; Bennicelli, C; De Flora, A; De Flora, S

    1986-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 47 individuals, reduced hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and decreased its mutagenicity. Their specific activity--mostly mediated by cytosolic, enzyme-catalyzed mechanisms--was significantly higher than in corresponding preparations of mixed-cell populations from human peripheral lung parenchyma or bronchial tree, or from rat lung or liver. At equivalent number of PAM, Cr(VI) reduction, total protein, and some oxidoreductase activities were significantly increased in smokers. No appreciable variation could be detected between lung cancer and noncancer patients. In rats, the Cr(VI)-reducing activity of PAM preparations was induced by Aroclor 1254. Thus, alveolar macrophages provide crucial defense mechanisms not only by phagocytizing metals, but also by metabolically reducing Cr(VI). The epithelial-lining fluid (ELF) also displayed some Cr(VI) reduction. Together with already investigated metabolic processes occurring inside lung cells, these mechanisms are expected to determine thresholds in the pulmonary carcinogenicity of chromium. PMID:2423559

  17. M2 polarized macrophages induced by CSE promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Shi, Hengfei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Weiyun; Dong, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking plays an important role in the genesis of lung cancer, and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are believed to accelerate the process. We therefore sought to clarify the relationship between cigarette smoking, TAMs and tumorigenesis. We treated macrophages (THP-1) with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and found that the mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α decreased, while TGF-β mRNA levels increased. CSE significantly inhibited the phagocytic ability of macrophages, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of FITC-dextran internalization. JAK2/STAT3 was significantly activated by CSE, as determined by Western blot analysis. When the scavenger receptor CD163, a specific marker of M2 macrophages, was analyzed by flow cytometry, its expression was significantly increased. After inducing M2 polarization of THP-1 cells, we co-cultured macrophages and alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549). The proliferation of A549 cells was detected by the MTT assay and cell cycle analysis, while their migration and invasion were detected by scratch wound assay and transwell assay. The results showed that the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 cells were significantly promoted by M2 macrophages but were slightly inhibited by CSE. In conclusion, we demonstrated that macrophage M2 polarization induced by CSE promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of alveolar basal epithelial cells.

  18. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in pulmonary alveolar macrophages from patients with tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The high-output pathway of nitric oxide production helps protect mice from infection by several pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, based on studies of cells cultured from blood, it is controversial whether human mononuclear phagocytes can express the corresponding inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS;NOS2). The present study examined alveolar macrophages fixed directly after bronchopulmonary lavage. An average of 65% of the macrophages from 11 of 11 patients with untreated, culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis reacted with an antibody documented herein to be monospecific for human NOS2. In contrast, a mean of 10% of bronchoalveolar lavage cells were positive from each of five clinically normal subjects. Tuberculosis patients' macrophages displayed diaphorase activity in the same proportion that they stained for NOS2, under assay conditions wherein the diaphorase reaction was strictly dependent on NOS2 expression. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens also contained NOS2 mRNA. Thus, macrophages in the lungs of people with clinically active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection often express catalytically competent NOS2. PMID:8642338

  19. The equine alveolar macrophage: Functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages☆

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, Anna E.; Kapetanovic, Ronan; McGorum, Bruce C.; Hume, David A.; Pirie, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) constitute the first line of defence in the lung of all species, playing a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses to inhaled pathogens. A detailed understanding of the function and phenotype of AMs is a necessary pre-requisite to both elucidating their role in preventing opportunistic bacterial colonisation of the lower respiratory tract and developing appropriate preventative strategies. The purpose of the study was to characterise this important innate immune cell at the tissue level by making functional and phenotypic comparisons with peritoneal macrophages (PMs). We hypothesised that the tissue of origin determines a unique phenotype of AMs, which may constitute an appropriate therapeutic target for certain equine respiratory diseases. Macrophages isolated from the lung and the peritoneal cavity of 9 horses were stimulated with various toll like receptor (TLR) ligands and the production of nitrite, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL) 10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were measured by the Griess reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Cells were also compared on the basis of phagocytic-capacity and the expression of several cell surface markers. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated increased TNFα release following stimulation with LPS, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) and heat-killed Salmonella typhinurium and increased TNFα and IDO mRNA expression when stimulated with LPS. AMs showed high expression of the specific macrophage markers cluster of differentiation (CD) 14, CD163 and TLR4, whereas PMs showed high expression of TLR4 only. AMs, but not PMs, demonstrated efficient phagocytic activity. Our results demonstrate that AMs are more active than PMs when stimulated with various pro-inflammatory ligands, thus supporting the importance of the local microenvironment in the activation status of the macrophage. This

  20. Species differences in impairment and recovery of alveolar macrophage functions following single and repeated ozone exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J.; Van Bree, L. )

    1991-08-01

    Effects of single (0.4 ppm for 3, 6, or 12 hr) and repeated (0.4 ppm, 12 hr/day for 3 or 7 days) in vivo ozone exposures on rat and mouse alveolar macrophage functions and cell number were investigated. Single ozone exposure of rats resulted in a small (approximately 15%) decrease in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and phorbol ester-induced superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages and was followed by recovery above control levels within 12 hr of exposure. Repeated exposures of rats for up to 7 days did not alter alveolar macrophage functions, with the exception of the effects of 3 days of exposure on superoxide production (71 {plus minus} 9% as compared with the controls). In mice, significant changes in alveolar macrophage functions were not observed until 12 hr of exposure (at that timepoint phagocytosis was 74 {plus minus} 2%). Repeated ozone exposures of mice did not cause a further decrease in phagocytosis (at Day 7, 74 {plus minus} 14%). Both after 3 and 7 days of repeated ozone exposure of mice, superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages was inhibited approximately 50%. In rats and mice, repeated ozone exposures led to an increase in the number of alveolar macrophages. In mice, this increase appeared at a later time point (at Day 7 vs Day 3) and was less pronounced (at Day 7, 139 {plus minus} 9% vs 179 {plus minus} 17%) as compared with rats. In summary, our data show that rat and mouse alveolar macrophages have different susceptibilities to both single and repeated in vivo ozone exposures.

  1. Autophagy plays an essential role in the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kefei; Huang, Canhua; Fox, John; Laturnus, Donna; Carlson, Edward; Zhang, Binjie; Yin, Qi; Gao, Hongwei; Wu, Min

    2012-01-15

    Intracellular bacteria have been shown to cause autophagy, which impacts infectious outcomes, whereas extracellular bacteria have not been reported to activate autophagy. Here, we demonstrate that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative extracellular bacterium, activates autophagy with considerably increased LC3 punctation in both an alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S) and primary alveolar macrophages. Using the LC3 Gly120 mutant, we successfully demonstrated a hallmark of autophagy, conjugation of LC3 to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The accumulation of typical autophagosomes with double membranes was identified morphologically by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the increase of PE-conjugated LC3 was indeed induced by infection rather than inhibition of lysosome degradation. P. aeruginosa induced autophagy through the classical beclin-1-Atg7-Atg5 pathway as determined by specific siRNA analysis. Rapamycin and IFN-γ (autophagy inducers) augmented bacterial clearance, whereas beclin-1 and Atg5 knockdown reduced intracellular bacteria. Thus, P. aeruginosa-induced autophagy represents a host protective mechanism, providing new insight into the pathogenesis of this infection.

  2. WIN 57273 is bactericidal for Legionella pneumophila grown in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H; Edelstein, M A

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activity of WIN 57273, a new quinolone antimicrobial agent, was determined for 21 Legionella strains, using broth macrodilution and agar dilution testing methods; ciprofloxacin and erythromycin were tested as well. Three different buffered yeast extract media were used for the agar dilution studies, two of which were made with starch rather than charcoal. Broth macrodilution susceptibility testing was performed with buffered yeast extract broth and two Legionella pneumophila strains. Antimicrobial inhibition of L. pneumophila growth in guinea pig alveolar macrophages was also studied, using a method able to detect bacterial killing. The MICs for 90% of the 21 strains of Legionella spp. grown on buffered charcoal yeast extract medium were 0.125 microgram/ml for WIN 57273, 0.25 microgram/ml for ciprofloxacin, and 1.0 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. These MICs were falsely high, because of inhibition of drug activity by the medium used. Use of less drug-antagonistic, starch-containing media did not support good growth of the test strains. The broth macrodilution MICs for two strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less than or equal to 0.03 microgram/ml for WIN 57273 and ciprofloxacin and 0.125 microgram/ml for erythromycin. WIN 57273, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin all inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in guinea pig alveolar macrophages at concentrations of 1 microgram/ml, but only WIN 57273 prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antimicrobial agent. PMID:2619277

  3. The human alveolar macrophage: isolation, cultivation in vitro, and studies of morphologic and functional characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.; Cline, Martin J.

    1971-01-01

    Human alveolar macrophages were lavaged from surgically resected lungs and from lungs of normal subjects. Macrophages that had been purified by glass adherence were maintained in tissue culture for as long as 54 days. After 3-4 wk in vitro they underwent transformation into multinucleated giant cells. These aged cells had more than 30 times the phagocytic capacity that the same group of cells had had after 1 day in vitro. Phagocytosis of heat-killed Candida albicans was inhibited by iodoacetate, sodium fluoride, potassium cyanide, and low partial pressures of oxygen, suggesting that these cells require both oxidative and glycolytic energy sources for maximal particle ingestion. Alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages killed Listeria monocytogenes with similar efficiency, but neutrophils were more efficient than either of the other cell types. Bacterial killing is probably not dependent upon myeloperoxidase in the monocyte-derived macrophage or in the alveolar macrophage since histochemical stains for peroxidase do not stain either cell type. C. albicans blastospores, which are killed by neutrophils and monocytes that contain myeloperoxidase, were not killed by human alveolar macrophages during the 4 hr of observation. Large cells with supernormal phagocytic capacity were recovered from patients with postobstructive pheumonia and from one patient with recurrent bacterial pneumonia, indicating that macrophage function can be altered in certain disease states. Human alveolar macrophages are unique human phagocytes in their dependence on an oxygen tension greater than 25 mm HG for maximal phagocytosis. Carbon dioxide tensions as high as 70 mm Hg did not alter phagocytosis when the pH of the medium was held constant. These data suggest that the increased susceptibility to pneumonia of patients with chronic bronchitis or atelectasis may be in part related to suboptimal phagocytosis by macrophages in areas of the lung with depressed oxygen tension. Images

  4. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Charles A; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A; Anderson, Gregory G; Petrache, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophage cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. A mannuronic-specific alginate lyase did not restore efferocytosis inhibited by exogenous guluronic-rich marine alginate, but had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to chronic airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate

  5. Temperature effect on endocytosis and exocytosis by rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoda, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Lee, Y.C. )

    1989-09-15

    Endocytosis of 125I-mannose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) and exocytosis of {sup 125}I-mannose-poly-D-lysine by rabbit alveolar macrophages were examined as a function of temperature. A plot for total ligand uptake (cell-associated ligand plus degraded ligand) versus time shows a single inflection point at 20{degrees}C. Ligand degradation does not occur below 20{degrees}C. Internalization of surface-bound {sup 125}I-mannose-BSA is negligible below 10{degrees}C. The rate constant for internalization increases dramatically above 20{degrees}C: 0.02 min-1 at 20{degrees}C, 0.05 min-1 at 25 degrees C, 0.13 min-1 at 30{degrees}C, and 0.29 min-1 at 35{degrees}C. {sup 125}I-Mannose-N-acetyl-poly-D-lysine preloaded in lysosomes is exocytosed in a temperature and time-dependent fashion. Even at lower temperatures (2-10{degrees}C), secretion of {sup 125}I-mannose-N-acetyl-poly-D-lysine was detected, indicating that movement of lysosomal content to plasma membrane and beyond cannot be suppressed at these temperatures. Thus, the temperature dependence of exocytosis of an {sup 125}I-labeled ligand is quite different from that of endocytosis, suggesting that the two processes are controlled by different mechanisms. Stimulation of secretion of preloaded {sup 125}I-mannose-N-acetyl-poly-D-lysine by mannose-BSA was more pronounced at lower temperatures with a sharp inflection point at 10{degrees}C. These findings suggest that endosomes containing newly internalized mannose-BSA interact with the exocytosis pathway and enhance secretion of {sup 125}I-mannose-N-acetyl-poly-D-lysine from lysosomes.

  6. [In vivo kinetics of cotrimoxazole in alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Lopez, I; Dubar, V; Aerts, C; Lhermitte, M; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the kinetic of intramacrophage penetration of cotrimoxazole in guinea pigs which had received 100 mg/kg of sulfamethoxazole and 20 mg/kg of trimethoprim after a single intraperitoneal injection. 30 minutes, 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours after this injection an intra-cardiac blood sample was taken and pulmonary lavage was performed immediately after sacrificing the animal by cervical cord dislocation. The level of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole was measured in each sample by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An estimation of the dilution of the supernatant was obtained by comparing the supernatant glucose with the serum glucose. The serum kinetics of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole progressed in a parallel fasion with time with a maximal concentration at 30 minutes (for trimethoprim: 6.7 +/- 0.9 micrograms/ml and for sulfamethoxazole 176.1 +/- 16.2 micrograms/ml). On the other hand their penetration capacity was different in the supernatant and in the alveolar macrophages: the maximal concentrations were obtained after one hour in the supernatant and after 3 hours in the cellular extract and were respectively for trimethoprim 0.43 +/- 0.07 microgram/ml and 20.9 +/- 8.06 micrograms/ml of intramacrophage water and for sulfamethoxazole 1.86 +/- 0.24 micrograms/ml and 23.8 +/- 12.7 micrograms/ml of intramacrophage water. A concentration around six times greater was noted for the trimethoprim inside the cells compared with serum and was only 0.25 time for sulfamethoxazole. On the other hand the supernatant/serum ratio showed a greater concentration for trimethoprim (4 to 10) than for sulfamethoxazole (0.6 to 1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae by human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hickman-Davis, Judy M; O'Reilly, Philip; Davis, Ian C; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Davis, Glenda; Young, K Randall; Devlin, Robert B; Matalon, Sadis

    2002-05-01

    We investigated putative mechanisms by which human surfactant protein A (SP-A) effects killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae by human alveolar macrophages (AMs) isolated from bronchoalveolar lavagates of patients with transplanted lungs. Coincubation of AMs with human SP-A (25 microg/ml) and Klebsiella resulted in a 68% decrease in total colony forming units by 120 min compared with AMs infected with Klebsiella in the absence of SP-A, and this SP-A-mediated effect was abolished by preincubation with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine. Incubation of transplant AMs with SP-A increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) by 70% and nitrite and nitrate (NO(x)) production by 45% (from 0.24 +/- 0.02 to 1.3 +/- 0.21 nmol small middle dot 10(6) AMs(-1).h(-1)). Preincubation with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and abrogated the SP-A-mediated Klebsiella phagocytosis and killing. In contrast, incubation of AMs from normal volunteers with SP-A decreased both [Ca(2+)](i) and NO(x) production and did not result in killing of Klebsiella. Significant killing of Klebsiella was also seen in a cell-free system by sustained production of peroxynitrite (>1 microM/min) at pH 5 but not at pH 7.4. These findings indicate that SP-A mediates pathogen killing by AMs from transplant lungs by stimulating phagocytosis and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen intermediates.

  8. Transcriptome analysis highlights the conserved difference between embryonic and postnatal-derived alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gibbings, Sophie L.; Goyal, Rajni; Desch, A. Nicole; Leach, Sonia M.; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M.; Bratton, Donna L.; Janssen, William

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) reside on the luminal surfaces of the airways and alveoli where they maintain host defense and promote alveolar homeostasis by ingesting inhaled particulates and regulating inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that AMs populate the lungs during embryogenesis and self-renew throughout life with minimal replacement by circulating monocytes, except under extreme conditions of depletion or radiation injury. Here we demonstrate that on a global scale, environment appears to dictate AM development and function. Indeed, transcriptome analysis of embryonic host-derived and postnatal donor-derived AMs coexisting within the same mouse demonstrated >98% correlation and overall functional analyses were similar. However, we also identified several genes whose expression was dictated by origin rather than environment. The most differentially expressed gene not altered by environment was Marco, a gene recently demonstrated to have enhancer activity in embryonic-derived but not postnatal-derived tissue macrophages. Overall, we show that under homeostatic conditions, the environment largely dictates the programming and function of AMs, whereas the expression of a small number of genes remains linked to the origin of the cell. PMID:26232173

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells impair alveolar macrophages through PD-1 receptor ligation during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lei, Guang-Sheng; Zhang, Chen; Lee, Chao-Hung

    2015-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were recently found to accumulate in the lungs during Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP). Adoptive transfer of these cells caused lung damage in recipient mice, suggesting that MDSC accumulation is a mechanism of pathogenesis in PcP. In this study, the phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages (AMs) was found to decrease by 40% when they were incubated with MDSCs from Pneumocystis-infected mice compared to those incubated with Gr-1(+) cells from the bone marrow of uninfected mice. The expression of the PU.1 gene in AMs incubated with MDSCs also was decreased. This PU.1 downregulation was due mainly to decreased histone 3 acetylation and increased DNA methylation caused by MDSCs. MDSCs were found to express high levels of PD-L1, and alveolar macrophages (AMs) were found to express high levels of PD-1 during PcP. Furthermore, PD-1 expression in AMs from uninfected mice was increased by 18-fold when they were incubated with MDSCs compared to those incubated with Gr-1(+) cells from the bone marrow of uninfected mice. The adverse effects of MDSCs on AMs were diminished when the MDSCs were pretreated with anti-PD-L1 antibody, suggesting that MDSCs disable AMs through PD-1/PD-L1 ligation during PcP.

  10. Depletion of alveolar macrophages in CD11c diphtheria toxin receptor mice produces an inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Tuladhar, Shraddha; Rana, Deepa; Steele, Shaun P; Sempowski, Gregory D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in initiating the immune response to inhaled pathogens and have been shown to be the first cell type infected following intranasal inoculation with several pathogens, including Francisella tularensis. In an attempt to further dissect the role of alveolar macrophages in the immune response to Francisella, we selectively depleted alveolar macrophages using CD11c.DOG mice. CD11c.DOG mice express the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) under control of the full CD11c promoter. Because mice do not express DTR, tissue restricted expression of the primate DTR followed by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) has been widely used as a tool in immunology to examine the effect of acute depletion of a specific immune subset following normal development. We successfully depleted alveolar macrophages via intranasal administration of DT. However, alveolar macrophage depletion was accompanied by many other changes to the cellular composition and cytokine/chemokine milieu in the lung that potentially impact innate and adaptive immune responses. Importantly, we observed a transient influx of neutrophils in the lung and spleen. Our experience serves as a cautionary note to other researchers using DTR mice given the complex changes that occur following DT treatment that must be taken into account when analyzing data.

  11. Depletion of alveolar macrophages in CD11c diphtheria toxin receptor mice produces an inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Tuladhar, Shraddha; Rana, Deepa; Steele, Shaun P; Sempowski, Gregory D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in initiating the immune response to inhaled pathogens and have been shown to be the first cell type infected following intranasal inoculation with several pathogens, including Francisella tularensis. In an attempt to further dissect the role of alveolar macrophages in the immune response to Francisella, we selectively depleted alveolar macrophages using CD11c.DOG mice. CD11c.DOG mice express the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) under control of the full CD11c promoter. Because mice do not express DTR, tissue restricted expression of the primate DTR followed by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) has been widely used as a tool in immunology to examine the effect of acute depletion of a specific immune subset following normal development. We successfully depleted alveolar macrophages via intranasal administration of DT. However, alveolar macrophage depletion was accompanied by many other changes to the cellular composition and cytokine/chemokine milieu in the lung that potentially impact innate and adaptive immune responses. Importantly, we observed a transient influx of neutrophils in the lung and spleen. Our experience serves as a cautionary note to other researchers using DTR mice given the complex changes that occur following DT treatment that must be taken into account when analyzing data. PMID:26029367

  12. Macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando Oneissi; Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells that play an indispensable role in homeostasis and defense. They can be phenotypically polarized by the microenvironment to mount specific functional programs. Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: classically activated macrophages (or M1), whose prototypical activating stimuli are IFNgamma and LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages (or M2), further subdivided in M2a (after exposure to IL-4 or IL-13), M2b (immune complexes in combination with IL-1beta or LPS) and M2c (IL-10, TGFbeta or glucocorticoids). M1 exhibit potent microbicidal properties and promote strong IL-12-mediated Th1 responses, whilst M2 support Th2-associated effector functions. Beyond infection M2 polarized macrophages play a role in resolution of inflammation through high endocytic clearance capacities and trophic factor synthesis, accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Similar functions are also exerted by tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which also display an alternative-like activation phenotype and play a detrimental pro-tumoral role. Here we review the main functions of polarized macrophages and discuss the perspectives of this field.

  13. Role of alveolar macrophage chemotaxis and phagocytosis in pulmonary clearance responses to inhaled particles: Comparisons among rodent species

    SciTech Connect

    Warheit, D.B.; Hartsky, M.A. . Du Pont Haskell Lab.)

    1993-12-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important role in clearing inhaled particles from the lung. The mechanisms through which macrophages identify particles that have been deposited in the alveolar regions is not well understood, although macrophage motility and phagocytic functions appear to be prerequisites for efficient clearance of inhaled materials. The current studies were undertaken to compare pulmonary clearance responses in several rodent species exposed to carbonyl iron (CI) particles. In vitro and in vivo pulmonary clearance responses were evaluated using one strain each of mouse, hamster, rat, and guinea pig. In vitro studies showed that hamster AM had the greatest phagocytic activity and that rat AM migrated best to complement-dependent chemotactic factors. Subsequently, groups of animals from each species were exposed to CI particles for 1 or 6 hr at aerosol concentrations of 100 mg/m[sup 3]. Particle deposition patterns in the distal lung were nearly identical for all species, although enhanced numbers of CI particles were deposited on alveolar duct bifurcations of either rats or mice compared to hamsters, and particle deposition in guinea pigs was substantially lower. Time course studies showed that enhanced numbers of rat AM migrated to deposition sites and phagocytized particles, and this correlated with increased numbers and percentages of phagocytic macrophages recovered by lavage (P < 0.01). In vivo phagocytic rates were the lowest in the mouse, and this correlated with reduced phagocytic rates in vitro.

  14. [Foamy alveolar macrophages in various lung diseases, and their origin in rabbit lungs].

    PubMed

    Yuasa, K; Kanazawa, T

    1995-07-01

    The present studies were done to clarify the significance of foamy alveolar macrophages (FAM) in lung diseases, and the mechanism of the production of macrophages in rabbit lungs. Human subjects consisted of 18 normal volunteers (NV) and 47 patients with lung disorders: chronic bronchitis (CB), 7 cases; pulmonary fibrosis (PF), 8 cases; old pulmonary tuberculosis (OPT), 7 cases; lung cancer (LC), 20 cases; and bronchiectasis (BE), 5 cases. In each case, over 30 macrophages in the BALF were observed by transmission electron microscopy. There were no significant differences in the percentage of FAm in the BALF among NV, CB, and PF. Furthermore, OPT and LC were not significantly different. Many more FAM were seen in OPT and LC than in NV, CB, and PF (p < 0.005). The percentage of FAM obtained from BE was much higher than that from OPT and LC (p < 0.005). These results suggest that the grade of foamy change in macrophages differs among lung diseases. Three groups of rabbits were studied. Group I rabbits (n = 6) were control, Group II rabbits (n = 6) underwent bronchial clamping, and Group III rabbits (n = 6) underwent complete replacement of blood with saline. The number of macrophages and type II cells was much greater in Group II rabbits than in Group I rabbits. In Group III rabbits, the number of macrophages was lower than in Group I rabbits. In Group III rabbits, vacuole-like structures were seen in the cytoplasma of type II cells, but not from in macrophages. These findings suggest that anoxia and blood flow are important for the appearance of macrophages in alveolar space. Group III rabbits had few alveolar macrophages. Therefore, alveolar macrophages may be derived from monocytes in blood.

  15. Asbestos fibres and man made mineral fibres: induction and release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha from rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ljungman, A G; Lindahl, M; Tagesson, C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Mounting evidence suggests that asbestos fibres can stimulate alveolar macrophages to generate the potent inflammatory and fibrogenic mediator, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and that this may play an important part in the onset and development of airway inflammation and lung fibrosis due to asbestos fibre inhalation. Little is known, however, about the ability of other mineral fibres to initiate formation and release of TNF-alpha by alveolar macrophages. Therefore the effects of different fibres (crocidolite, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, two man made mineral fibres (MMVF 21 and MMVF 22), a ceramic fibre (RCF 1), and a silicon carbide whisker fibre (SiCwh)) on formation and release of TNF-alpha by rat alveolar macrophages were examined. METHODS--Cells were isolated and incubated at 37 degrees C with the different fibres, or with culture medium alone (controls), and the amounts of TNF-alpha messenger RNA (mRNA) in the cells and TNF-alpha bioactivity released into the culture medium were measured at different time points. RESULTS--Significantly (P < 0.05 v control) increased amounts of TNF-alpha mRNA were found in cells exposed to crocidolite, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, MMVF 21, RCF 1, or SiCwh for 90 minutes, and significantly (P < 0.05 v control) increased activities of TNF-alpha were found in the medium of macrophages exposed to crocidolite, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, or MMVF 21 for four hours. CONCLUSION--These observations suggest that not only natural mineral fibres but also certain man made mineral fibres are able to induce the formation and release of TNF-alpha by alveolar macrophages in vitro. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7849857

  16. Enhanced phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages induced by short-term ozone insult

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, C.A.; Schwartz, L.W.

    1982-08-01

    In vitro phagocytosis of inert microspheres by the alveolar macrophage (AM) was evaluated after in vivo exposure to 0.8 ppm ozone for 3, 7, or 20 days. AM were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage from rats, allowed to adhere to glass, and incubated with carbon-coated latex microspheres. The percentages of phagocytic cells were determined by light microscopy after 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hr of incubation. Morphological features of AM were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an index of cell spreading was determined by image analysis of SEM photomicrographs. An enhanced phagocytic activity was observed after ozone exposure, with the greatest increase on Day 3. This enhanced phagocytic activity correlated with an increase in cell spreading. The results, which suggest that prolonged ozone insult produces an altered AM population, support previous morphological observations.

  17. Prevention of in vitro oxidant-mediated alveolar macrophage injury by cellular glutathione and precursors.

    PubMed

    Voisin, C; Aerts, C; Wallaert, B

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the toxic effects of various oxidants on alveolar macrophages (O2, NO2, tobacco smoke and silica), we used an original method of cell culture in aerobiosis, which permitted direct contact between the atmosphere and the target cells. Our results demonstrated that the variations of cell sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of oxidants were associated with various levels in cellular antioxidant equipment. A significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and/or cellular glutathione. Addition of N-acetylcysteine, a polypeptide known to have an antioxidant activity and to be a precursor of glutathione, was responsible for a decrease of oxidant-mediated cytotoxicity. Whether this protective effect was due to an increase in glutathione cell content or to a scavenger effect of N-acetylcysteine still needs to be elucidated.

  18. Mck2-dependent infection of alveolar macrophages promotes replication of MCMV in nodular inflammatory foci of the neonatal lung.

    PubMed

    Stahl, F R; Keyser, K A; Heller, K; Bischoff, Y; Halle, S; Wagner, K; Messerle, M; Förster, R

    2015-01-01

    Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) shows a worldwide high prevalence with only immunocompromised individuals or newborns to become symptomatic. The host's constitution and the pathogen's virulence determine whether disease occurs after infection. Mouse CMV (MCMV) is an appreciated pathogen for in vivo investigation of host-pathogen interactions. It has recently been reported that a single base pair deletion can spontaneously occur in the open reading frame of MCMV-encoded chemokine 2 (MCK2), preventing the expression of the full-length gene product. To study the consequences of this mutation, we compared the Mck2-defective reporter virus MCMV-3D with the newly generated repaired Mck2(+) mutant MCMV-3DR. Compared with MCMV-3D, neonatal mice infected with MCMV-3DR showed severe viral disease after lung infection. Viral disease coincided with high viral activity in multiple organs and increased virus replication in previously described nodular inflammatory foci (NIF) in the lung. Notably, MCMV-3DR showed tropism for alveolar macrophages in vitro and in vivo, whereas MCMV-3D did not infect this cell type. Moreover, in vivo depletion of alveolar macrophages reduced MCMV-3DR replication in the lung. We proposed an Mck2-mediated mechanism by which MCMV exploits alveolar macrophages to increase replication upon first encounter with the host's lung mucosa.

  19. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  20. Down modulation of IFN-{gamma} signaling in alveolar macrophages isolated from smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhillon, Navneet K.; Murphy, William J.; Filla, Michael B.; Crespo, Ana J.; Latham, Heath A.; O'Brien-Ladner, Amy

    2009-05-15

    The master cytokine, IFN-{gamma} possesses a wide spectrum of biological effects and is crucial for development of the highly activated macrophage phenotype characteristically found during inflammation. However, no data exists regarding the potential influence of cigarette smoke on the status of the expression of the cell surface receptor for IFN-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}R) on alveolar macrophages (AM) of smokers. Here in, we report reduction in the expression of the IFN-{gamma}R {alpha}-chain on AM of cigarette smokers, when compared with non-smokers. Ensuing from the loss of receptor expression on the AM of smokers there was a decrease in IFN-{gamma}-mediated cell signaling. This included a decrease in the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 and induction of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1. Further, diminished activation/induction of transcription factors did not appear to result from induction of known members of the 'suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)' family. Decreased IFN-{gamma} signal transduction in AM from smokers may have an important implication regarding the use of therapeutic IFN-{gamma} in the lungs of patients that develop respiratory disorders as a result of tobacco use.

  1. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSIVENESS TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of diesel exhaust particles on human alveolar macrophage responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide
    S. Mundandhara1 , S. Becker2 and M. Madden2, 1UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, 2US EPA, NHEERL, HSD, Chapel Hill, NC, US

    Epidemiological...

  2. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P. )

    1991-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke.

  3. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Brocato, Rebecca L.; Bell, Todd M.; Schellhase, Christopher W.; Mraz, Steven R.; Queen, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) is associated with a lethal vascular leak syndrome in humans termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The mechanism for the massive vascular leakage associated with HPS is poorly understood; however, dysregulation of components of the immune response is often suggested as a possible cause. Alveolar macrophages are found in the alveoli of the lung and represent the first line of defense to many airborne pathogens. To determine whether alveolar macrophages play a role in HPS pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages were depleted in an adult rodent model of HPS that closely resembles human HPS. Syrian hamsters were treated, intratracheally, with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes or control liposomes and were then challenged with ANDV. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes resulted in significant reduction in alveolar macrophages, but depletion did not prevent pathogenesis or prolong disease. Depletion also did not significantly reduce the amount of virus in the lung of ANDV-infected hamsters but altered neutrophil recruitment, MIP-1α and MIP-2 chemokine expression, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in hamster bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid early after intranasal challenge. These data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages may play a limited protective role early after exposure to aerosolized ANDV but do not directly contribute to hantavirus disease pathogenesis in the hamster model of HPS. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses continue to cause disease worldwide for which there are no FDA-licensed vaccines, effective postexposure prophylactics, or therapeutics. Much of this can be attributed to a poor understanding of the mechanism of hantavirus disease pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease has long been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, by directly manipulating the Syrian hamster model, we continue to eliminate individual immune cell types. As the most numerous immune cells present in the respiratory tract

  4. Exposure to cigarette smoke downregulates β2-adrenergic receptor expression and upregulates inflammation in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaoguang; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke-triggered inflammation is important in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). β2-Adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) is abundantly expressed on inflammatory cells, which is associated with inflammation regulation. To observe alterations in inflammation, pathological changes in lung tissues, and detect changes in β2-AR expression, rats were exposed for 4 months to cigarette smoke. Pathological changes were observed in lung tissue sections. The levels of inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissues were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Exposure to this regimen of cigarette smoke induced peribronchial and perivascular lymphocytic aggregates and parenchymal accumulation of macrophages in rats. EMSA demonstrated that smoke exposure enhanced NF-κB activation in rats' alveolar macrophages (AMs). Compared with the control group, smoke exposure induced a notable increase in TNF-α and IL-1β in BALF, lung tissues, and a decrease of β2-AR expression of AMs. The expression of β2-AR from AMs was inversely correlated with TNF-α and IL-1β levels of BALF. These data demonstrated that chronic smoke-triggered lung inflammation was accompanied by down-regulation of β2-AR in rat lungs' AMs.

  5. Differential responses of rat alveolar and peritoneal macrophages to man-made vitreous fibers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dörger, M; Münzing, S; Allmeling, A M; Messmer, K; Krombach, F

    2001-03-01

    Different approaches, including inhalation and intraperitoneal injection assays, have been used to assess the potential health effects of man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF). The purpose of this study was to compare the phagocytic activity and the formation of reactive oxygen species by rat alveolar macrophages (AM) and peritoneal macrophages (PM) upon exposure to MMVF10 glass wool and MMVF21 rock wool fibers. Macrophage (Mphi) phagocytosis of mineral fibers was assessed by optical videomicroscopy and computer-aided image analysis. Mphi were classified as cells not associated with fibers, cells with attached fibers, cells with incompletely phagocytized fibers (an appearance known as "frustrated phagocytosis"), and cells with completely phagocytized fibers. The production of superoxide anions by AM and PM upon incubation with MMVF10 and MMVF21 fibers was determined by the superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome C. PM were found to have a lower phagocytic activity than AM. A significantly higher percentage of AM than of PM underwent frustrated phagocytosis of MMVF10 and MMVF21 fibers. In line with these findings, AM generated higher levels of oxygen radicals than PM upon exposure to MMVF21 fibers. In contrast, MMVF10 fibers failed to induce the generation of reactive oxygen species by both AM and PM. Our in vitro results show that the phagocytic activity, in particular the frustrated phagocytosis of mineral fibers, was significantly lower in PM than in AM. The data support the idea that the durability and biopersistence of mineral fibers are higher in the peritoneal cavity than in the lung.

  6. Importance of bacterial replication and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Brown, Jeremy S

    2015-03-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae.

  7. TLR4 signaling induces TLR3 up-regulation in alveolar macrophages during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Tong, Yao; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Zhixia; Mei, Shuya; Zhang, Liming; Billiar, Timothy R.; Li, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening inflammatory response caused by severe infection. Toll-like receptors in alveolar macrophages (AMΦ) recognize the molecular constituents of pathogens and activate the host’s innate immune responses. Numerous studies have documented the importance of TLR-TLR cross talk, but few studies have specifically addressed the relationship between TLR4 and TLR3. We explored a novel mechanism of TLR3 up-regulation that is induced by LPS-TLR4 signaling in a dose- and time-dependent manner in AMΦ from C57BL/6 mice, while the LPS-induced TLR3 expression was significantly reduced in TLR4−/− and Myd88−/− mice and following pretreatment with a NF-κB inhibitor. The enhanced TLR3 up-regulation in AMΦ augmented the expression of cytokines and chemokines in response to sequential challenges with LPS and Poly I:C, a TLR3 ligand, which was physiologically associated with amplified AMΦ-induced PMN migration into lung alveoli. Our study demonstrates that the synergistic effect between TLR4 and TLR3 in macrophages is an important determinant in acute lung injury and, more importantly, that TLR3 up-regulation is dependent on TLR4-MyD88-NF-κB signaling. These results raise the possibility that bacterial infections can induce sensitivity to viral infections, which may have important implications for the therapeutic manipulation of the innate immune system. PMID:28198368

  8. Modeling the cellular impact of nanoshell-based biosensors using mouse alveolar macrophage cultures.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Vimal P; Huang, Yiming; Murillo, Genoveva; Saleiro, Diana; Mehta, Rajendra G; Bishnoi, Sandra Whaley

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the relative toxicity of native gold-silica nanoshells (NS) has been compared to nanoshells modified with poly(ethylene glycol)-thiol (PEG-SH) and a Raman-active PEG, p-mercaptoaniline-poly(ethylene glycol) (pMA-PEG), in mouse alveolar macrophage cell cultures (RAW 264.7). The results from toxicity profiling using an MTT assay demonstrate that cell viability post-particle exposure is a function of three factors: nanoshell concentration, surface functionalization, and incubation time. By minimizing particle concentrations and incubation times, cell cultures are able to recover within 24 h of nanoshell removal, indicative of nanoshells having more of a cytostatic versus cytotoxic effect on macrophage cells. The mechanism of the cytostatic effect has been investigated by imaging the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using a fluorescence assay kit (Image-iT™ LIVE) after the introduction of NS to the cell cultures. Elevated ROS signals are seen in the cells containing higher concentration of NS, and indicate that the major reason of toxicity may due to the oxidative stress caused by excess NS particles. Raman imaging experiments with pMA-PEG coated nanoshells showed that cells exposed for even short exposure times (∼2 h) retained those particles up to 24 h after exposure, while migration experiments suggest that surviving cells retain their nanoshells and may reallocate them to progeny cells upon cell division.

  9. Toxicity of Lunar and Martian Dust Simulants to Alveolar Macrophages Isolated from Human Volunteers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latch, Judith N.; Hamilton, Raymond F., Jr.; Holian, Andrij; James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is planning to build a habitat on the Moon and use the Moon as a stepping stone to Mars. JSC-1, an Arizona volcanic ash that has mineral properties similar to lunar soil, is used to produce lunar environments for instrument and equipment testing. NASA is concerned about potential health risks to workers exposed to these fine dusts in test facilities. The potential toxicity of JSC-1 and a Martian soil simulant (JSC-Mars-1, a Hawaiian volcanic ash) was evaluated using human alveolar macrophages (HAM) isolated from volunteers; titanium dioxide and quartz were used as reference dusts. This investigation is a prerequisite to studies of actual lunar dust. HAM were treated in vitro with these test dusts for 24 h; assays of cell viability and apoptosis showed that JSC-1 and TiO2 were comparable, and more toxic than saline control, but less toxic than quartz. HAM treated with JSC-1 or JSC-Mars 1 showed a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. To elucidate the mechanism by which these dusts induce apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of the scavenger receptor (SR). Pretreatment of cells with polyinosinic acid, an SR blocker, significantly inhibited both apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggest HAM cytotoxicity may be initiated by interaction of the dust particles with SR. Besides being cytotoxic, silica is known to induce shifting of HAM phenotypes to an immune active status. The immunomodulatory effect of the simulants was investigated. Treatment of HAM with either simulant caused preferential damage to the suppressor macrophage subpopulation, leading to a net increase in the ratio of activator (RFD1+) to suppressor (RFD1+7+) macrophages, a result similar to treatment with silica. It is recommended that appropriate precautions be used to minimize exposure to these fine dusts in large-scale engineering applications.

  10. Chloroquine inhibits Rhodococcus equi replication in murine and foal alveolar macrophages by iron-starvation.

    PubMed

    Gressler, Leticia T; Bordin, Angela I; McQueen, Cole M; Cohen, Noah D; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2016-05-30

    Rhodococcus equi preferentially infects macrophages causing pyogranulomatous pneumonia in young foals. Both the vapA and rhbC genes are up-regulated in an iron (Fe)-deprived environment, such as that found within macrophages. Chloroquine (CQ) is a drug widely used against malaria that suppresses the intracellular availability of Fe in eukaryotic cells. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of CQ to inhibit replication of virulent R. equi within murine (J774A.1) and foal alveolar macrophages (AMs) and to verify whether the mechanism of inhibition could be Fe-deprivation-dependent. CQ effect on R. equi extracellular survival and toxicity to J774A.1 were evaluated. R. equi survival within J774A.1 and foal AMs was evaluated under CQ (10 and 20μM), bovine saturated transferrin (bHTF), and bovine unsaturated transferrin (bATF) exposure. To explore the action mechanism of CQ, the superoxide anion production, the lysozyme activity, as well as the relative mRNA expression of vapA and rhbC were examined. CQ at≤20μM had no effect on R. equi extracellular multiplication and J774A.1 viability. Exposure to CQ significantly and markedly reduced survival of R. equi within J774A.1 and foal AMs. Treatment with bHTF did not reverse CQ effect on R. equi. Exposure to CQ did not affected superoxide anion production or lysozyme activity, however vapA and rhbC expression was significantly increased. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that intracellular availability of Fe is required for R. equi survival, and our initial hypothesis that CQ can limit replication of R. equi in J774A.1 and foal AMs, most likely by Fe starvation.

  11. Toxicity of lunar and martian dust simulants to alveolar macrophages isolated from human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Latch, Judith N; Hamilton, Raymond F; Holian, Andrij; James, John T; Lam, Chiu-wing

    2008-01-01

    NASA is planning to build a habitat on the Moon and use the Moon as a stepping stone to Mars. JSC-1, an Arizona volcanic ash that has mineral properties similar to those of lunar soil, is used to produce lunar environments for instrument and equipment testing. NASA is concerned about potential health risks to workers exposed to these fine dusts in test facilities. The potential toxicity of JSC-1 lunar soil simulant and a Martian soil simulant (JSC-Mars-1, a Hawaiian volcanic ash) was evaluated using human alveolar macrophages (HAM) isolated from volunteers; titanium dioxide and quartz were used as reference dusts. This investigation is a prerequisite to studies of actual lunar dust. HAM were treated in vitro with these test dusts for 24 h; assays of cell viability and apoptosis showed that JSC-1 and TiO2 were comparable, and more toxic than saline control but less toxic than quartz. HAM treated with JSC-1 or JSC-Mars 1 showed a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. To elucidate the mechanism by which these dusts induce apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of scavenger receptors (SR). Pretreatment of cells with polyinosinic acid, an SR blocker, significantly inhibited both apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggest HAM cytotoxicity may be initiated by interaction of the dust particles with SR. Besides being cytotoxic, silica is known to induce shifting of HAM phenotypes to an immune active status. The immunomodulatory effect of the dust simulants was investigated. Treatment of HAM with either simulant caused preferential damage to the suppressor macrophage subpopulation, leading to a net increase in the ratio of activator (RFD1+) to suppressor (RFD1+7+) macrophages, an effect similar to that of treatment with silica. It is recommended that appropriate precautions be used to minimize exposure to these fine dusts in large-scale engineering applications.

  12. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes.

  13. Brief Glutamine Pretreatment Increases Alveolar Macrophage CD163/Heme Oxygenase-1/p38-MAPK Dephosphorylation Pathway and Decreases Capillary Damage but Not Neutrophil Recruitment in IL-1/LPS-Insufflated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Agazio, Amanda; Wilson, Paul; Elkins, Nancy; Domaleski, Luke; He, Qianbin; Baer, Kaily A.; Moss, Angela F. D.; Wischmeyer, Paul E.; Repine, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamine (GLN) attenuates acute lung injury (ALI) but its effect on alveolar macrophages is unknown. We hypothesized that GLN pretreatment would induce the anti-inflammatory CD163/heme oxygenase (HO)-1/p38-MAPK dephosphorylation pathway in alveolar macrophages and reduce ALI in rats insufflated with interleukin-1 (IL-1) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to the following groups: GLN-IL-1/LPS-, GLN+IL-1/LPS-, GLN-IL-1/LPS+, and GLN+IL-1/LPS+. GLN pretreatment was given via gavage (1g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine) daily for 2 days. ALI was subsequently induced by insufflating 50ng IL-1 followed by 5mg/kg E.coli LPS. After 24h, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and neutrophil concentrations were analyzed. BAL alveolar macrophage CD163+ expression, HO-1 and p38-MAPK concentrations were measured, as well as alveolar macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10 concentrations. Histology and immunofluorescence studies were also performed. Results Following IL-1/LPS insufflation, GLN pretreated rats had significantly decreased BAL protein and LDH concentrations, but not BAL neutrophil counts, compared to non-GLN pretreated rats. The number of alveolar macrophages and the number of CD163+ macrophages were significantly increased in GLN pretreated IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats compared to non-GLN pretreated, IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats. GLN pretreatment before IL-1/LPS also significantly increased HO-1 concentrations and dephosphorylated p38-MAPK levels but not cytokine levels in alveolar macrophages. Immunofluorescence localized CD163 and HO-1 in alveolar macrophages. Conclusion Short-term GLN pretreatment activates the anti-inflammatory CD163/HO-1/p38-MAPK dephosphorylation pathway of alveolar macrophages and decreases capillary damage but not neutrophil recruitment in IL-1/LPS-insufflated rats. PMID:26147379

  14. Quantitative comparison of C-X-C chemokines produced by endotoxin-stimulated human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Goodman, R B; Strieter, R M; Frevert, C W; Cummings, C J; Tekamp-Olson, P; Kunkel, S L; Walz, A; Martin, T R

    1998-07-01

    The C-X-C chemokines are a structurally related and functionally redundant family of proteins with neutrophil chemotactic activity. Many of the C-X-C chemokines are produced by endotoxin-stimulated alveolar macrophages (AMs), but knowledge of their relative quantities and their relative contributions to the total chemotactic activity released from these cells is incomplete. Human AMs were stimulated with or without Escherichia coli endotoxin for 2, 4, 8, and 24 h. The mRNA sequences of interleukin (IL)-8, the 78-amino acid epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activator (ENA-78), growth-related protein (GRO) alpha, GRObeta, and GROgamma were cloned by PCR and identified by sequence analysis. The relative mRNA quantities were compared by Northern analysis, and IL-8 was found to predominate. Similarly, IL-8 protein concentrations in the cell supernatants were consistently higher than either the ENA-78 or GRO concentration, and by 24 h, IL-8 concentrations were 10-fold higher than those of the other C-X-C chemokines. Blocking polyclonal antibodies to IL-8 substantially reduced the chemotactic activity in the AM supernatants, whereas antibodies to ENA-78 and GRO had little or no effect. We conclude that IL-8 is the predominant C-X-C chemokine and the dominant neutrophil chemoattractant accumulating in 24-h supernatants of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human AMs. These studies provide insight into potentially effective strategies of interrupting AM-derived inflammatory signals in the lungs.

  15. Ultrastructural and biochemical changes in alveolar macrophages exposed to nickel hydroxy carbonate.

    PubMed

    Arsalane, K; Hildebrand, H F; Martinez, R; Wallaert, B; Voisin, C

    1994-06-06

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the cytotoxic effect of nickel hydroxy carbonate (NiHC) on guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AMs) by studying ultrastructural modifications and by determining beta-glucuronidase (BG) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, as well as cellular ATP content. The ultrastructural studies revealed phagocytosis of NiHC particles and a general vacuolisation of the cells, especially at high concentrations. X-ray microprobe analyses of these particles demonstrated the presence of Ni, P and Ca which suggests the formation of Ni-P-Ca complexes. In exposed cells, a biphasic change in intracellular ATP concentrations was observed which could indicate 'activation' of AMs at low concentrations and inhibition of energy generation at higher concentrations. As for enzymatic activities, a dose-dependent increase in LDH release was observed except at low doses which increased ATP. There was a good correlation between ATP decrease and LDH release, consistent with a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect of NiHC. However beta-glucuronidase activity remained unchanged at all NiHC concentrations. It has been concluded that NiHC undergoes an intracellular, biological transformation to form Ni-P-Ca. Further investigations are needed to determine the precise nature and importance of these complexes.

  16. Broncho Alveolar Dendritic Cells and Macrophages Are Highly Similar to Their Interstitial Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Maisonnasse, Pauline; Bordet, Elise; Bouguyon, Edwige; Bertho, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In human medicine, bronchoalveolar lavage is the main non-traumatic procedure allowing an insight into the respiratory Dendritic Cells (DC) and Macrophages populations. However, it has never been demonstrated in a relevant model that alveolar DC subpopulations were comparable to their interstitial counterparts. In a precedent work we observed that respiratory pig DC and Macrophages were more similar to the human ones than to the mouse ones. In the present work, thanks to our animal model, we were able to collect the rare bronchoalveolar DC and compare them to their interstitial counterparts. We observed that DC presented very similar gene-expression patterns in the alveolar and interstitial compartments, validating the study of human bronchoalveolar DC as surrogate of their interstitium counterparts. PMID:27992536

  17. Role of alveolar macrophages in the dissolution of two different industrial uranium oxides.

    PubMed

    Hengé-Napoli, M H; Ansoborlo, E; Claraz, M; Berry, J P; Cheynet, M C

    1996-05-01

    This study was aimed at assessing and understanding some mechanisms involved in the intracellular particle transformation of two uranium oxides (U3O8 and UO2 + Umetal) produced by a new isotopic enrichment plant using laser technology. Instillations were conducted on rats with both uranium compounds and alveolar macrophages were harvested at different dates and prepared in order to be studied using transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The presence of particles in the cells was observed from the first day after instillation, and crystalline needles of uranyl phosphate appeared in the cytoplasm of the cells. These needles were more numerous after instillation with the mixture UO2 + Umetal than after administration of U3O8 and may be correlated with the higher solubility of UO2 + Umetal observed in vitro. The formation of insoluble needles in lysosomes is consistent with the insolubilisation of uranium observed after phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages.

  18. Ultrastructural visualisation of carbohydrate groups in the surface coating of hamster alveolar macrophages and pneumonocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Meban, C

    1986-01-01

    The surface coating of the alveolar macrophages and pneumonocytes of hamster lung was studied using an electron microscopy technique. Slices of lung tissue were fixed in aldehyde, labelled with a battery of lectin-horseradish peroxidase conjugates, incubated in a diaminobenzidine-hydrogen peroxide medium and then postfixed in an osmium tetroxide solution. The results of the study suggest that the surface coating of the pneumonocytes and macrophages contains the following carbohydrate groups: N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, D-galactose and sialic acid. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:2447050

  19. Rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages in-vitro cytotoxicity to six metal dusts. Technical report, May-August 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.S.; Gutshall, L.L.; Thomson, S.A.

    1987-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were harvested from rats by bronchopulmonary lavage and exposed in vitro to aqueous suspensions of six metal dusts: aluminum, silicated aluminum, carbon, graphite, titanium dioxide, and silica. The LC50 value for each dust was calculated by logarithmic linear regression analysis of the toxicity data from the experimental exposure concentrations. Cytotoxicity was determined by metal concentration-dependent inability of PAMs to exclude the trypan blue dye from their cytroplasm. After exposure, PAMs usually bore numerous bound metal particles; but phagocytosis was rare, probably because the cells were not activated in situ prior to removal from the lungs.

  20. RNA sequencing provides exquisite insight into the manipulation of the alveolar macrophage by tubercle bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Nalpas, Nicolas C.; Magee, David A.; Conlon, Kevin M.; Browne, John A.; Healy, Claire; McLoughlin, Kirsten E.; Rue-Albrecht, Kévin; McGettigan, Paul A.; Killick, Kate E.; Gormley, Eamonn; Gordon, Stephen V.; MacHugh, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the agent of bovine tuberculosis, causes an estimated $3 billion annual losses to global agriculture due, in part, to the limitations of current diagnostics. Development of next-generation diagnostics requires a greater understanding of the interaction between the pathogen and the bovine host. Therefore, to explore the early response of the alveolar macrophage to infection, we report the first application of RNA-sequencing to define, in exquisite detail, the transcriptomes of M. bovis-infected and non-infected alveolar macrophages from ten calves at 2, 6, 24 and 48 hours post-infection. Differentially expressed sense genes were detected at these time points that revealed enrichment of innate immune signalling functions, and transcriptional suppression of host defence mechanisms (e.g., lysosome maturation). We also detected differentially expressed natural antisense transcripts, which may play a role in subverting innate immune mechanisms following infection. Furthermore, we report differential expression of novel bovine genes, some of which have immune-related functions based on orthology with human proteins. This is the first in-depth transcriptomics investigation of the alveolar macrophage response to the early stages of M. bovis infection and reveals complex patterns of gene expression and regulation that underlie the immunomodulatory mechanisms used by M. bovis to evade host defence mechanisms. PMID:26346536

  1. Transcription analysis of the porcine alveolar macrophage response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bin, Li; Luping, Du; Bing, Sun; Zhengyu, Yu; Maojun, Liu; Zhixin, Feng; Yanna, Wei; Haiyan, Wang; Guoqing, Shao; Kongwang, He

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod)-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae.

  2. In vivo Targeting of Alveolar Macrophages via RAFT-Based Glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun-Ho; Manganiello, Matthew J.; Chow, Yu-Hua; Ghosn, Bilal; Convertine, Anthony J.; Stayton, Partick S.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting cell populations via endogenous carbohydrate receptors is an appealing approach for drug delivery. However, to be effective, this strategy requires the production of high affinity carbohydrate ligands capable of engaging with specific cell-surface lectins. To develop materials that exhibit high affinity towards these receptors, we synthesized glycopolymers displaying pendant carbohydrate moieties from carbohydrate-functionalized monomer precursors via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. These glycopolymers were fluorescently labeled and used to determine macrophage-specific targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Mannose- and N-acetylglucosamine-containing glycopolymers were shown to specifically target mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner as compared to a galactose-containing glycopolymer (30- and 19-fold higher uptake, respectively). In addition, upon macrophage differentiation, the mannose glycopolymer exhibited enhanced uptake in M2-polarized macrophages, an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype prevalent in injured tissue. This carbohydrate-specific uptake was retained in vivo, as alveolar macrophages demonstrated 6-fold higher internalization of mannose glycopolymer, as compared to galactose, following intratracheal administration in mice. We have shown the successful synthesis of a class of functional RAFT glycopolymers capable of macrophage-type specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo, with significant implications for the design of future targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22770567

  3. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 10 derived ApxI induces apoptosis in porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chien, Maw-Sheng; Chan, You-Yu; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Wu, Chi-Ming; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng; Hsuan, Shih-Ling

    2009-03-30

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (AP) is the causative agent of swine pleuropneumonia, a fibrinous, exudative, hemorrhagic, necrotizing pleuropneumonia affecting all ages of pigs. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exotoxins (Apx) are one of the major virulence factors of AP. Due to the complex nature of Apx toxins produced by AP, little is known regarding the interactions of individual species of Apx toxin with target cells. The objective of this study was to examine whether AP serotype 10-derived exotoxin, ApxI, caused apoptosis in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and to delineate the underlying signaling pathways. Isolated PAMs were stimulated with different concentrations of native ApxI and monitored for apoptosis using Hoechst staining, TUNEL, and DNA laddering assays. The ApxI-stimulated PAMs exhibited typical morphological features of apoptosis, including condensation of chromatin, formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA laddering. ApxI-induced apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, to delineate the signaling events involved in ApxI-induced apoptosis, it was observed that caspase 3 was activated in ApxI-stimulated PAMs. Ablation of caspase 3 activity via specific inhibitors protected PAMs from apoptosis by ApxI. This study is the first to demonstrate that native ApxI causes apoptosis in PAMs at low concentrations and that these apoptotic events are mediated via a caspase 3-dependent pathway. These findings suggest a role of ApxI in AP infection as it might impair the host defense system through the induction of apoptosis in PAMs.

  4. Nickel hydroxy carbonate increases tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 secretion by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Arsalane, K; Gosset, P; Hildebrand, H F; Voisin, C; Tonnel, A B; Wallaert, B

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the in vitro effects of nickel hydroxy carbonate (NiHC) at noncytotoxic concentrations on the production of cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in alveolar macrophages (AMs). The effect of NiHC was evaluated in both unstimulated AMs and cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cytotoxicity was related to lactate dehydrogenase release and ATP cell content. The results confirm that NiHC at concentrations of 0.125, 1.25 and 3.125 micrograms NiHC 10(-6) cells was not cytotoxic. The NiHC exposure of unstimulated AMs significantly increased the release of TNF-alpha at all concentrations and that of IL-6 at 1.25 micrograms NiHC 10(-6) cells. LPS addition significantly increased the secretion of both cytokines. However, NiHC did not cause a significant increase in the release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated cells. In conclusion, the ability of NiHC to activate AMs and to release increased amounts of pro-inflammatory mediators may be responsible, at least partly, for inflammation and pneumotoxicity associated with nickel exposure.

  5. Entry and elimination of marine mammal Brucella spp. by hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anett K; Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Boysen, Preben; Tryland, Morten; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of Brucellapinnipedialis serology and bacteriology positive animals has been found in the Northeast Atlantic stock of hooded seal (Cystophoracristata); however no associated gross pathological changes have been identified. Marine mammal brucellae have previously displayed different infection patterns in human and murine macrophages. To investigate if marine mammal Brucella spp. are able to invade and multiply in cells originating from a presumed host species, we infected alveolar macrophages from hooded seal with a B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate. Hooded seal alveolar macrophages were also challenged with B. pinnipedialis reference strain (NCTC 12890) from harbor seal (Phocavitulina), B. ceti reference strain (NCTC 12891) from harbor porpoise (Phocoenaphocoena) and a B. ceti Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchusacutus) isolate (M83/07/1), to evaluate possible species-specific differences. Brucella suis 1330 was included as a positive control. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by post mortem bronchoalveolar lavage of euthanized hooded seals. Phenotyping of cells in the lavage fluid was executed by flow cytometry using the surface markers CD14 and CD18. Cultured lavage cells were identified as alveolar macrophages based on morphology, expression of surface markers and phagocytic ability. Alveolar macrophages were challenged with Brucella spp. in a gentamicin protection assay. Following infection, cell lysates from different time points were plated and evaluated quantitatively for colony forming units. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate was verified by immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the marine mammal brucellae were able to enter hooded seal alveolar macrophages; however, they did not multiply intracellularly and were eliminated within 48 hours, to the contrary of B. suis that showed the classical pattern of a pathogenic strain. In conclusion, none of the four marine mammal strains tested were able

  6. Entry and Elimination of Marine Mammal Brucella spp. by Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata) Alveolar Macrophages In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Anett K.; Nymo, Ingebjørg H.; Boysen, Preben; Tryland, Morten; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of Brucellapinnipedialis serology and bacteriology positive animals has been found in the Northeast Atlantic stock of hooded seal (Cystophoracristata); however no associated gross pathological changes have been identified. Marine mammal brucellae have previously displayed different infection patterns in human and murine macrophages. To investigate if marine mammal Brucella spp. are able to invade and multiply in cells originating from a presumed host species, we infected alveolar macrophages from hooded seal with a B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate. Hooded seal alveolar macrophages were also challenged with B. pinnipedialis reference strain (NCTC 12890) from harbor seal (Phocavitulina), B. ceti reference strain (NCTC 12891) from harbor porpoise (Phocoenaphocoena) and a B. ceti Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchusacutus) isolate (M83/07/1), to evaluate possible species-specific differences. Brucella suis 1330 was included as a positive control. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by post mortem bronchoalveolar lavage of euthanized hooded seals. Phenotyping of cells in the lavage fluid was executed by flow cytometry using the surface markers CD14 and CD18. Cultured lavage cells were identified as alveolar macrophages based on morphology, expression of surface markers and phagocytic ability. Alveolar macrophages were challenged with Brucella spp. in a gentamicin protection assay. Following infection, cell lysates from different time points were plated and evaluated quantitatively for colony forming units. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate was verified by immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the marine mammal brucellae were able to enter hooded seal alveolar macrophages; however, they did not multiply intracellularly and were eliminated within 48 hours, to the contrary of B. suis that showed the classical pattern of a pathogenic strain. In conclusion, none of the four marine mammal strains tested were able

  7. Diesel and biodiesel exhaust particle effects on rat alveolar macrophages with in vitro exposure.

    PubMed

    Bhavaraju, Laya; Shannahan, Jonathan; William, Aaron; McCormick, Robert; McGee, John; Kodavanti, Urmila; Madden, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Combustion emissions from diesel engines emit particulate matter which deposits within the lungs. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) encounter the particles and attempt to engulf the particles. Emissions particles from diesel combustion engines have been found to contain diverse biologically active components including metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons which cause adverse health effects. However little is known about AM response to particles from the incorporation of biodiesel. The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity in Wistar Kyoto rat AM of biodiesel blend (B20) and low sulfur petroleum diesel (PDEP) exhaust particles. Particles were independently suspended in media at a range of 1-500μgmL(-1). Results indicated B20 and PDEP initiated a dose dependent increase of inflammatory signals from AM after exposure. After 24h exposure to B20 and PDEP gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) increased. B20 exposure resulted in elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release at lower particle concentrations compared to PDEP. B20 and PDEP demonstrated similar affinity for sequestration of PGE2 at high concentrations, suggesting detection is not impaired. Our data suggests PGE2 release from AM is dependent on the chemical composition of the particles. Particle analysis including measurements of metals and ions indicate B20 contains more of select metals than PDEP. Other particle components generally reduced by 20% with 20% incorporation of biodiesel into original diesel. This study shows AM exposure to B20 results in increased production of PGE2in vitro relative to diesel.

  8. Diesel and biodiesel exhaust particle effects on rat alveolar macrophages with in vitro exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bhavaraju, Laya; Shannahan, Jonathan; William, Aaron; McCormick, Robert; McGee, John; Kodavanti, Urmila; Madden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Combustion emissions from diesel engines emit particulate matter which deposits within the lungs. Alveolar macrophages (AM) encounter the particles and attempt to engulf the particles. Emissions particles from diesel combustion engines have been found to contain diverse biologically active components including metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons which cause adverse health effects. However little is known about AM response to particles from the incorporation of biodiesel. The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity in Wistar Kyoto rat AM of biodiesel blend (B20) and low sulfur petroleum diesel (PDEP) exhaust particles. Particles were independently suspended in media at a range of 1–500µg/mL. Results indicated B20 and PDEP initiated a dose dependent increase of inflammatory signals from AM after exposure. After 24hr exposure to B20 and PDEP gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) increased. B20 exposure resulted in elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release at lower particle concentrations compared to PDEP. B20 and PDEP demonstrated similar affinity for sequesteration of PGE2 at high concentrations, suggesting detection is not imparied. Our data suggests PGE2 release from AM is dependent on the chemical composition of the particles. Particle analysis including measurments of metals and ions indicate B20 contains more of select metals than PDEP. Other particle components generally reduced by 20% with 20% incoporation of biodiesel into original diesel. This study shows AM exposure to B20 results in increased production of PGE2 in vitro relative to diesel. PMID:24268344

  9. Role of alveolar macrophages in dissemination of Marek’s disease virus from lungs to lymphoid organs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the specific role of macrophages in the control or exacerbation of Marek’s disease (MD), alveolar macrophages of chickens were depleted by intra-tracheal (IT) instillation of Cl2MBP. Forty-eight hours post treatment chicks were inoculated with 100 micro liter of cell-free MD virus (MD...

  10. Enhanced responsiveness of ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pig alveolar macrophages to tachykinins.

    PubMed Central

    Brunelleschi, S.; Parenti, A.; Ceni, E.; Giotti, A.; Fantozzi, R.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have evaluated the ability of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and the selective NK2 receptor agonist [beta-Ala8]-NKA(4-10) to induce superoxide anion (O2-) production and prostanoid (prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2) release from alveolar macrophages (AMs) isolated from control or actively sensitized guinea-pigs. 2. The dose-response curves for NKA and SP were shifted to the left (three orders and one order of magnitude, respectively) in AMs isolated from sensitized animals, with no variation in maximal effects. 3. By evaluating the effects of [beta-Ala8]-NKA(4-10), we observed that not only was the concentration-response curve shifted to the left in both the functional parameters examined, but also maximal effects were significantly enhanced in AMs isolated from sensitized guinea-pigs. 4. This varied responsiveness seems to be specific for tachykinins, as it was not reproduced by another AM stimulant, the bacterial peptide N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). 5. Only small amounts of beta-glucuronidase were released following tachykinin or ovalbumin stimulation both in control and sensitized AMs. 6. These results indicate that AMs isolated from sensitized guinea-pigs show an increased responsiveness to NK2 receptor stimulation and further stress the role played by AMs in allergic lung diseases. PMID:1281723

  11. Effect of hochuekkito on alveolar macrophage inflammatory responses in hyperglycemic mice.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Yamasawa, Hideaki; Soda, Manabu; Mato, Naoko; Hosono, Tatsuya; Bando, Masashi

    2012-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus reduces immunological activity and increases susceptibility to various infections. Hochuekkito (TJ-41) has been reported to improve the weakened physical condition of various chronic diseases. BALB/c mice were divided into three groups; groups A and B were fed a standard diet, and group C, a TJ-41 diet. Two weeks after starting these diets, hyperglycemia was induced in groups B and C by injection with streptozotocin. Two weeks later, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed. Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands (TLR2: peptidoglycan, PGN; TLR4: lipopolysaccharide, LPS; TLR5: flagellin, FLG) were used to stimulate alveolar macrophages (AMs), and TNF-α production was measured. Under hyperglycemic conditions and PGN or FLG stimulation, TNF-α production from AMs was significantly reduced in group B compared with group A. However, treatment with TJ-41 (group C) significantly improved the impaired production of TNF-α. These results suggest that, under hyperglycemic conditions, TJ-41 can improve the inflammatory responses of AMs with stimulation of TLR ligands.

  12. Cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on pulmonary alveolar macrophages of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, K.; Chen, B.T.; Mauderly, J.L.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Brooks, A.L. )

    1989-01-01

    To determine accurately the potential genetic damage induced by toxic inhaled agents, the cells that receive a high concentration of such agents should be analyzed. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) represent such cells. The authors compared the cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on PAMs of rats exposed repeatedly by different methods. This study was part of a larger investigation of the health effects resulting from different methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke. Fischer 344/N male rats were randomly selected from five different exposure groups. The rats were exposed 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 22-24 days. All smoke-exposed rats received the same daily concentrations {times} time product of cigarette smoke. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with colchicine at the end of exposure. PAMs were obtained by lung lavage and chromosomal damage was measured. Highly significant smoke-induced differences in both structural and numerical aberrations were observed in continuously exposed rats vs. sham controls, regardless route of exposure. The structural aberrations observed were chromatid-type deletions. Both hypoploid and hyperploid cells were detected. The data suggest that cigarette smoke is clastogenic and may disrupt spindle-fiber formation. These activities may play a role in the induction of human carcinogenesis caused by cigarette smoke exposure.

  13. Effect of 60Co gamma-irradiation on the nonspecific cytotoxicity of alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Y; Hu, L; Wu, D

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of radiation on the nonspecific cytotoxicity of rat alveolar macrophages (AM). AM (effector cells) of bacille Calmette-Guerin-activated Wistar rats were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in vitro to give doses of 0, 100, 300, and 500 Gy. Three hours after irradiation, the AM were cultured with human lung adenocarcinoma AGZY83-a and HeLa target cells in 125I-deoxyuridine-containing media for 6 hr and the cytotoxicity indexes determined. The results indicated that the cytotoxicity indexes of AM against human lung adenocarcinoma cells and HeLa cells were 94.3 +/- 0.3% and 81.3 +/- 1.9%, respectively. The cytotoxicity indexes using an effector/target cell ratio (E/T) of 10 seemed to be greater than with ratios of 20 and 30. The cytotoxicity indexes of AM (7 rats), irradiated to give doses of 0, 100, 300, and 500 Gy, against adenocarcinoma cells at an E/T ratio of 10 were 87.9 +/- 8.4%, 65.4 +/- 14.1%, 47.5 +/- 17.5%, and 36.7 +/- 9.7%, respectively. The significance of the nonspecific cytotoxicity of AM in the immunological elimination of tumors and the inhibitory effect of radiation on AM cytotoxicity are discussed. PMID:1396453

  14. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV.

  15. Neutrophil chemotaxis caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease alveolar macrophages: the role of CXCL8 and the receptors CXCR1/CXCR2.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Singh, Dave

    2013-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages produce neutrophil chemoattractants; this cellular cross-talk contributes to neutrophilic airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We have investigated the chemotaxis cross-talk mechanisms between these cells using COPD alveolar macrophages. Using conditioned media from stimulated COPD alveolar macrophages, we investigated the relative contributions of growth-related oncogene (CXCL1), interleukin-8 (CXCL8), and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (CCL5) to neutrophil chemotaxis and evaluated the effect of blocking the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 on chemotaxis caused by macrophage-conditioned media. Furthermore, we evaluated whether corticosteroid treatment of stimulated alveolar macrophages inhibited the chemotaxis ability of conditioned media. Alveolar macrophages isolated from COPD (n = 8) and smoker (S) (n = 8) lungs were treated with ultra-pure lipopolysaccharide in the presence and absence of dexamethasone (1 μM). Supernatants were used for neutrophil chemotaxis assays. SB656933 (2-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-3-{2-[[(R)-1-(5-methyl-furan-2-yl)-propyl]amino]-3,4-dioxo-cyclobut-1-enylamino}-benzamide) (CXCR2 antagonist) and Sch527123 [1-(2-chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-piperazin-1-ylsulfonylphenyl)urea, 3-(2-chloro-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1-(4-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-piperazin-1-ylsulfonyl-phenyl)urea] (dual CXCR1 and CXCR2 antagonist) and blocking antibodies for CXCL8, CXCL1, and CCL5 were assessed. Conditioned media caused neutrophil chemotaxis in COPD and smokers (60.5 and 79.9% of total cells, respectively). Dexamethasone did not significantly reduce neutrophil chemotaxis in COPD or S. SB656933 and Sch527123 inhibited chemotaxis in a concentration-dependent manner, with the dual antagonist Sch527123 causing greater inhibition of chemotaxis. CXCL8 antibody inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis to basal levels, although there was no significant effect of blocking either CXCL1 or CCL5 (P

  16. [Expression of TNF-alpha in alveolar macrophages after stimulation with quartz dust, welding fume dust and asbestos fibers].

    PubMed

    Wiethege, T

    1992-12-01

    Alveolar macrophages have a potential for expressing and excreting many factors that are immunologically active and active on cytokines (monokines and lymphokines) and are thus indirectly involved in the genesis of pulmonary fibroses. One of these factors is the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In the study presented here, the expression of TNF alpha-mRNA was investigated in macrophages stimulated in vitro with quartz dust, dust from cinders of welding furnaces, and asbestos, using non-radioactive in situ hybridization. There was a marked dependence of the expression of this cytokine on both time and stimulation. Macrophages stimulated by quartz dust showed the highest rate of expression compared with controls and other related stimuli. In addition, all stimuli yielded an expression that was elevated for a short period only and reached its peak after four hours. The results permit the conclusion that various professionally inhaled dusts possess different risk potentials in respect of lung damage mediated by macrophages and do not behave uniformly.

  17. Urban particle-induced apoptosis and phenotype shifts in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Holian, A; Hamilton, R F; Morandi, M T; Brown, S D; Li, L

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological studies report a small but positive association between short-term increases in airborne particulate matter and small increases in morbidity and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular disease in urban areas. However, the lack of a mechanistic explanation to link particle exposure and human health effects makes it difficult to validate the human health effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that urban particles could cause apoptosis of human alveolar macrophages(AM) and a shift of their phenotypes to a higher immune active state, which would provide a mechanism to explain an inflammatory response. Freshly isolated human AM were incubated for 24 hr with urban particles (#1648 and #1649), Mount Saint Helen's ash (MSH), and residual oil fly ash (ROFA).Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and apoptosis was demonstrated by morphology, cell death ELISA, and DNA ladder formation. Additionally, AM were characterized according to RFD1(+) (immune stimulatory macrophages) and RFD1(+)7(+) (suppressor macrophages) phenotypes by flow cytometry. ROFA particles caused AM necrosis at concentrations as low as 10 microg/ml, urban particles had no effect except at 200 microg/ml, and MSH had no effect at 200 microg/ml. ROFA (25 microg/ml) and particles #1648 or #1649 (100 microg/ml) caused apoptosis of AM by all three criteria, but 200 microg/ml MSH had no effect. Finally, 25 microg/ml ROFA and 100 microg/ml particles #1648 or #1649 up regulated the expression of the RFD1(+) AM phenotype, while only ROFA decreased the RFD1(+)7(+) phenotype. Consequently, ROFA and urban particles can induce apoptosis of human AM and increase the ratio of AM phenotypes toward a higher immune active state (i.e., increased RFD1(+):RFD1(+)7(+) ratio). Ifurban particles cause similar changes in vivo, this could result in lung inflammation and possible increased pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID

  18. Aerosolized liposome-based delivery of amphotericin B to alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Suresh P; Quraishi, Shama; Gupta, Swati; Jaganathan, K S

    2005-05-30

    The present study was aimed at preparation, characterization, and performance evaluation of amphotericin B (Amp B)-loaded aerosolized liposomes for their selective presentation to lungs (alveolar macrophages), that being the densest site of Aspergillosis infection. Egg phosphatidylcholine (PC)- and cholesterol (Chol)-based liposomes were modified by coating them with alveolar macrophage-specific ligands (O-palmitoyl mannan, OPM, and O-polmitoyl pullulan, OPP). The prepared formulations were characterized in vitro for vesicle morphology, mean vesicle size, vesicle size distribution and percent drug entrapment. Pressurized packed systems based on preformed liposomal formulations in chlorofluorocarbon aerosol propellants were prepared. In vitro airways penetration efficiency of the liposomal aerosols was determined by percent dose reaching the peripheral airways, it was recorded 1.4-1.6 times lower as compared to plain drug solution-based aerosol. In vivo tissue distribution studies on albino rats suggested the preferential accumulation of OPM- and OPP-coated formulations in the lung macrophages. Higher lung drug concentration was recorded in case of ligand-anchored liposomal aerosols as compared to plain drug solution and plain liposome-based aerosols. The drug was estimated in the lung in high concentration even after 24 h. The drug-localization index calculated after 6 h was nearly 1.42-, 4.47-, and 4.16-fold, respectively, for plain, OPM-, and OPP-coated liposomal aerosols as compared to plain drug solution-based aerosols. These results suggest that the ligand anchored liposomal aerosols are not only effective in rapid attainment of high-drug concentration in lungs with high population of alveolar macrophages but also maintain the same over prolonged period of time. The significance of targeting potential of the developed systems was established.

  19. IKKβ Activity Drives Fetal Lung Macrophage Maturation Along a Non-M1/M2 Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Stouch, Ashley N.; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Barham, Whitney J.; Stinnett, Amanda M.; Slaughter, James C.; Yull, Fiona E.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Prince, Lawrence S.

    2014-01-01

    In preterm infants, exposure to inflammation increases the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a chronic, developmental lung disease. While macrophages are the key cells that initiate lung inflammation, less is known about lung macrophage phenotype and maturation. We hypothesized that fetal lung macrophages mature into distinct subpopulations during mouse development, and that activation could influence macrophage maturation. Expression of the fetal macrophage markers CD68, CD86, CD206, Ym1, fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2), and indolamine-2, 3-dioxygenase (Ido1) were developmentally regulated, with each marker having different temporal patterns. Flow cytometry analysis showed macrophages within the fetal lung were less diverse than the distinctly separate subpopulations in newborn and adult lungs. Similar to adult alveolar macrophages, fetal lung macrophages responded to the TLR4 agonist LPS and the alternative activation cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Using a macrophage-specific constitutively active IKKβ transgenic model (IKFM), we demonstrated that macrophage activation increased proinflammatory gene expression and reduced the response of fetal lung macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. Activation also increased fetal lung macrophage proliferation. Fetal IKFM lungs contained increased percentages of more mature, CD11bloF4/80hi cells that also expressed higher levels of the alternative activation markers CD204 and CD206. Development of fetal lung macrophages into mature alveolar macrophages may therefore include features of both proinflammatory and alternative activation paradigms. PMID:24981452

  20. Urokinase plasminogen activator released by alveolar epithelial cells modulates alveolar epithelial repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Van Leer, Coretta; Stutz, Monika; Haeberli, André; Geiser, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Intra-alveolar fibrin is formed following lung injury and inflammation and may contribute to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrin turnover is altered in patients with pulmonary fibrosis, resulting in intra-alveolar fibrin accumulation, mainly due to decreased fibrinolysis. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC) repair the injured alveolar epithelium by migrating over the provisional fibrin matrix. We hypothesized that repairing alveolar epithelial cells modulate the underlying fibrin matrix by release of fibrinolytic activity, and that the degree of fibrinolysis modulates alveolar epithelial repair on fibrin. To test this hypothesis we studied alveolar epithelial wound repair in vitro using a modified epithelial wound repair model with human A549 alveolar epithelial cells cultured on a fibrin matrix. In presence of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta, wounds increase by 800% in 24 hours mainly due to detachment of the cells, whereas in serum-free medium wound areas decreases by 22.4 +/- 5.2% (p < 0.01). Increased levels of D-dimer, FDP and uPA in the cell supernatant of IL-1beta-stimulated A549 epithelial cells indicate activation of fibrinolysis by activation of the plasmin system. In presence of low concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, including specific blocking anti-uPA antibodies, alveolar epithelial repair in vitro was improved, whereas in presence of high concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, a decrease was observed mainly due to decreased spreading and migration of cells. These findings suggest the existence of a fibrinolytic optimum at which alveolar epithelial repair in vitro is most efficient. In conclusion, uPA released by AEC alters alveolar epithelial repair in vitro by modulating the underlying fibrin matrix.

  1. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  2. Synthesis of lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid in rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Thornburg, T.; Roddick, V.; Wykle, R.L.; Waite, M.

    1987-05-01

    Reported here are studies on the biosynthetic pathway used by normal and BCG elicited alveolar macrophages for the synthesis of lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid (L(bis)PA). Earlier observations by this laboratory have shown that although L(bis)PA is abundant in these cells, there is little de novo synthesis of this lipid. Diaceyl phosphatidylglycerol (PG) labeled with either (1,2,3-/sup 3/H) glycerol or /sup 32/P demonstrated that PG is used as an exogenous substrate for L(bis)PA formation; both glycerol moieties are incorporated. Other phospholipids do not have this capacity. BCG-elicited macrophages are capable of only one-quarter the synthesis of L(bis)PA seen with normal cells, and also show a decreased amount of cell associated substrate. In addition, (/sup 3/H) 1-0-alkyl PG was used as a substrate to test the importance of the sn-1 acyl linkage in the synthetic pathway. This substrate produced less L(bis)PA while dramatically increasing the amounts of labelled phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine within the cell. The alkyl substrate also showed increased uptake by the cell. They conclude that the hydrolysis of the acyl group at the sn-1 position of PG is essential in the synthetic pathway leading to the production of L(bis)PA. They further suggest that the PG used by these cells as an exogenous substrate in vitro is obtained from the PG-rich surfactant surrounding the alveolar macrophage.

  3. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  4. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  5. Relationship between oxygen-induced alveolar macrophage injury and cell antioxidant defence.

    PubMed

    Aerts, C; Wallaert, B; Gosset, P; Voisin, C

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to hyperoxia causes alveolar macrophage (AM) injury. The present study investigates the roles of intracellular antioxidant enzymes and of glutathione in the protection of AMs against hyperoxia in a biphasic cell culture system in aerobiosis. The effect of normoxia or hyperoxia on the integrity of AMs was related to indices of cell injury (ATP cell content and lactate dehydrogenase release into culture medium) and cell mass (protein content of AMs). Antioxidant activities were measured in guinea-pig AMs exposed to 95% O2 or to normoxia (control cells) for 3 days. A 3-day AM culture in normoxia showed a significant decrease in protein and catalase, whereas ATP cell content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) (both Cu,Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities significantly increased. The content of reduced glutathione (GSH) did not change. Using the ATP content in AMs expressed as a cell injury index (CII), AM injury increased with increasing O2 exposure time (1 day: 13 +/- 4.4%; 2 days: 34 +/- 3.8%; 3 days: 40 +/- 4.1%; 4 days: 55 +/- 7.3%; 6 days: 87.5 +/- 5.4%). Exposure to 95% O2 for 3 days was associated with a significant decrease in ATP cell content, protein, catalase and GSH to the total glutathione ratio, whereas SOD, GSH and total glutathione did not change significantly. The GPx activities increased significantly. There was no significant correlation between the AM CII and SOD or GPx content. In contrast, a significant correlation was observed between hyperoxia-induced AM CII and catalase content (r = 0.71) and glutathione content (r = 0.71).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Amphiregulin may be a new biomarker of classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chen; Liu, Guilin; Mu, Honglan; Zhou, Miaomiao; Zhang, Shihai; Xu, Younian

    2015-10-23

    Amphiregulin (Areg) participates in tissue repair and inflammation regulation. As important effector cells in inflammation, macrophages can be polarized to classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated phenotype with diverse functions in immunity. However, the relationship between Areg expression and macrophage activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Areg was significantly expressed in M1 but not in M2 macrophages. This was confirmed by analyses of RT-PCR and ELISA in peritoneal macrophages, and by evaluating protein expression in alveolar macrophages and RAW264.7 cells. Selective inhibitors of TLR4 (CLI-095) and MAP kinase, including Erk1/2 (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580), significantly reduced Areg expression in M1 macrophages, suggesting that M1 macrophages produce Areg mainly through the TLR4-MAPK pathway, which is involved in the mechanism of M1 activation. When compared with productions of classical biomarkers of M1 macrophages, Areg expression was highly consistent in time series. Taken together, Areg may be an effective new biomarker of M1 macrophages.

  8. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar macrophages from healthy smokers requires the presence of myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Gressier, B; Aerts, C; Mizon, C; Voisin, C; Mizon, J

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ability of human alveolar macrophages (AM) of 10 healthy smokers to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1PI). Purified alpha 1PI was incubated for 45 min, with human alveolar macrophages before and after stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or opsonized zymosan. As a positive control, the same experiments were performed in parallel with blood human neutrophils (PMN). Results are expressed as percentage of inactivation of alpha 1PI as evaluated from its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase. A strong correlation (r = 0.99) was shown when inhibitory activity of alpha 1PI was evaluated against porcine pancreatic elastase or human neutrophil elastase. Unstimulated AM (1.57 +/- 0.9%) as well as stimulated AM (PMA: 1 +/- 0.4%; zymosan: 3 +/- 0.6%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1PI. Gel electrophoresis of alpha 1PI demonstrated that AM before or after stimulation induced a slight proteolysis of alpha 1PI, whereas both cleaved and complexed alpha 1PI were found when alpha 1PI was incubated with activated PMN. Both unstimulated (22 +/- 2.6%) and activated PMN (PMA: 91.7 +/- 4.7%; zymosan: 90 +/- 5.5%) were responsible for a significant inactivation of alpha 1PI. Catalase, in contrast to superoxide dismutase, was responsible for a near complete protection of alpha 1PI inactivation by PMN. To better determine the role of PMN secretory products, especially myeloperoxidase (MPO), we also investigated the effect of zymosan-activated PMN supernatants or of purified MPO on the alpha 1PI-AM reaction. MPO assay in PMN supernatants demonstrated that activated neutrophils released significant amounts of MPO (16.8 +/- 4.1 U/ml), whereas MPO was undetectable in activated AM supernatants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Role of lysosomal enzymes released by alveolar macrophages in the pathogenesis of the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, M. N.; Martín, T.; Sánchez, M. L.; Buitrago, J. M. González; Jiménez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are the major constituents of alveolar macrophages (AM) and have been shown to be involved in many aspects of the inflammatory pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of lysosomal enzymes in the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HPs). An experimental study on AM lysosomal enzymes of an HP-guinea-pig model was performed. The results obtained both in vivo and in vitro suggest that intracellular enzymatic activity decrease is, at least partly, due to release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. A positive but slight correlation was found between extracellular lysosomal activity and four parameters of lung lesion (lung index, bronchoalveolar fluid total (BALF) protein concentration, BALF LDH and BALF alkaline phosphatase activities). All the above findings suggest that the AM release of lysosomal enzymes during HP is a factor involved, although possibly not the only one, in the pulmonary lesions appearing in this disease. PMID:18475615

  10. Alveolar Macrophages Are a Prominent but Nonessential Target for Murine Cytomegalovirus Infecting the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Oliveira, Martha T.; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) infect the lungs and cause pathological damage there in immunocompromised hosts. How lung infection starts is unknown. Inhaled murine CMV (MCMV) directly infected alveolar macrophages (AMs) and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) but not type 1 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC1s). In contrast, herpes simplex virus 1 infected AEC1s and murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) infected AEC1s via AMs. MCMV-infected AMs prominently expressed viral reporter genes from a human CMV IE1 promoter; but most IE1-positive cells were AEC2s, and CD11c-cre mice, which express cre in AMs, switched the fluorochrome expression of <5% of floxed MCMV in the lungs. In contrast, CD11C-cre mice exhibited fluorochrome switching in >90% of floxed MuHV-4 in the lungs and 50% of floxed MCMV in the blood. AM depletion increased MCMV titers in the lung during the acute phase of infection. Thus, the influence of AMs was more restrictive than permissive. Circulating monocytes entered infected lungs in large numbers and became infected, but not directly; infection occurred mainly via AEC2s. Mice infected with an MCMV mutant lacking its m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which promotes macrophage infection, showed levels of lung infection equivalent to those of wild-type MCMV-infected mice. The level of lung infiltration by Gr-1-positive cells infected with the MCMV m131/m129-null mutant was modestly different from that for wild-type MCMV-infected lungs. These results are consistent with myeloid cells mainly disseminating MCMV from the lungs, whereas AEC2s provide local amplification. IMPORTANCE Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) chronically and systemically infect most mammals. Human CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but causes lung disease in people with poor immune function. As human infection is hard to analyze, studies with related animal viruses provide important insights. We show that murine CMV has two targets in the lungs: macrophages and surfactant-secreting epithelial cells

  11. Cytogenetic analysis of pulmonary alveolar macrophages from treated mice: the effects of cyclophosphimide and benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Harper, B.L.; Gad-El-Karim, M.; Ward, J.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S.

    1982-02-01

    The lung is a unique organ in environmental toxicology due to its role in chemical absorption, metabolism and clearance. The development of assays for genotoxic events in the lung would allow observation of effects at a site of chemical administration. We are evaluating the genotoxic effects of chemical on the lung by cytogenetic analysis of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM's). Using male, Swiss (ICR) mice and a modified standard lavage technique, we can consistently recover 1.0-1.5 x 10/sup 6/ PAM cells per animal. Cells from the lavage material were prepared by standard cytogenetic procedures. In two experiments, cyclophosphamide was administered interperatoneally at 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg to 5-6 animals in each treatment group. This was to ascertain whether a clastogen, administered systemically, would manifest its effects in PAM cells, whether such effects were observable, and whether these effects were dose related. The results, analyzed as percent damaged cells, were respectively, 1.89%, 6.40% and 14.32%, (p-value < .001). Benzene was tested using the PAM cytogenetic technique. Doses of 440 and 880 mg/kg, administered via oral gavage, resulted in increased damage: 43.8% and 55.3% cells containing chromosome breaks, respectively. SKF had no apparent protective effect, suggesting the non-involvement of P-450 metabolism in the clastogenic process. In addition, in benzene treated animals a characteristic lesion involving destabilization of the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes resulted in linkage arrangements in over half of all metaphases. These results are consistent with the clastogenic activity of these agents in bone marrow.

  12. Quantitative analysis of the role of fiber length on phagocytosis and inflammatory response by alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Padmore, Trudy; Stark, Carahline; Turkevich, Leonid A.; Champion, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    Background In the lung, macrophages attempt to engulf inhaled high aspect ratio pathogenic materials, secreting inflammatory molecules in the process. The inability of macrophages to remove these materials leads to chronic inflammation and disease. How the biophysical and biochemical mechanisms of these effects are influenced by fiber length remains undetermined. This study evaluates the role of fiber length on phagocytosis and molecular inflammatory responses to non-cytotoxic fibers, enabling development of quantitative length-based models. Methods Murine alveolar macrophages were exposed to long and short populations of JM-100 glass fibers, produced by successive sedimentation and repeated crushing, respectively. Interactions between fibers and macrophages were observed using time-lapse video microscopy, and quantified by flow cytometry. Inflammatory biomolecules (TNF-α, IL-1 α, COX-2, PGE2) were measured. Results Uptake of short fibers occurred more readily than for long, but long fibers were more potent stimulators of inflammatory molecules. Stimulation resulted in dose-dependent secretion of inflammatory biomolecules but no cytotoxicity or strong ROS production. Linear cytokine dose-response curves evaluated with length-dependent potency models, using measured fiber length distributions, resulted in identification of critical fiber lengths that cause frustrated phagocytosis and increased inflammatory biomolecule production. Conclusion Short fibers played a minor role in the inflammatory response compared to long fibers. The critical lengths at which frustrated phagocytosis occurs can be quantified by fitting dose-response curves to fiber distribution data. PMID:27784615

  13. Chronic Household Air Pollution Exposure Is Associated with Impaired Alveolar Macrophage Function in Malawian Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Rylance, Jamie; Chimpini, Chikondi; Semple, Sean; Russell, David G.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Household air pollution in low income countries is an important cause of mortality from respiratory infection. We hypothesised that chronic smoke exposure is detrimental to alveolar macrophage function, causing failure of innate immunity. We report the relationship between macrophage function and prior smoke exposure in healthy Malawians. Methods Healthy subjects exposed daily to cooking smoke at home volunteered for bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophage particulate content was measured as a known correlate of smoke exposure. Phagocytosis and intraphagosomal function (oxidative burst and proteolysis) were measured by a flow cytometric assay. Cytokine responses in macrophages were compared following re-exposure in vitro to wood smoke, before and after glutathione depletion. Results Volunteers had a range of alveolar macrophage particulate loading. The macrophage capacity for phagosomal oxidative burst was negatively associated with alveolar macrophage particulate content (n = 29, r2 = 0.16, p = 0.033), but phagocytosis per se and proteolytic function were unaffected. High particulate content was associated with lower baseline CXCL8 release (ratio 0.51, CI 0.29–0.89) and lower final concentrations on re-exposure to smoke in vitro (ratio 0.58, CI 0.34–0.97). Glutathione depletion augmented CXCL8 responses by 1.49x (CI 1.02–2.17) compared with wood smoke alone. This response was specific to smoke as macrophages response to LPS were not modulated by glutathione. Conclusion Chronic smoke exposure is associated with reduced human macrophage oxidative burst, and dampened inflammatory cytokine responses. These are critical processes in lung defence against infection and likely to underpin the relationship between air pollution and pneumonia. PMID:26406307

  14. Triptolide mitigates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis via inhibition of axis of alveolar macrophages-NOXes-ROS-myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Hong, Jingshen; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Steven B.; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: IR-induced pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most severe late complications of radiotherapy for lung cancer. It is urgently needed to discover a new drug for anti-IR lung fibrosis. Our previous studies have indicated that TPL exhibits both anti-IR lung fibrosis and anti-tumor activities. To reveal the mechanism of TPL on anti-IR lung fibrosis, alveolar macrophages (AMs) were examined for TPL effect on their axis of Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-reactive oxygen species (NOXes-ROS) and myofibroblast activation. Methods and Materials: The fibrosis-prone C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with 15 Gy on whole chest, then one day later, mice were treated without or with TPL (i.v. 0.25 mg/kg, qod for 1 month). The AMs were collected from bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and studied for the production of ROS and the levels of NOXes. The effect of AMs on myofibroblast activation as labeled with F4/80 or α-SMA (α-smooth muscle actin) were examined using flow cytometry, Western blotting, or immunohistochemical staining. Results: TPL effectively reduced the IR-induced lung fibrosis as evidenced by the less myofibroblasts, less collagen deposit and less ROS in the IR-lung tissues. We found that ROS which responsible for myofibroblasts activation was mainly from AMs and was NOX2 and NOX4 dependent. TPL significantly reduced the infiltrated AMs in IR-lung tissues, and in addition, down regulated the level of NOX2 and NOX4 in AMs both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, by inhibiting NOXes dependent ROS in AMs, TPL deprived AMs' paracrine activation of myofibroblasts. Conclusions: Our work demonstrated that the anti-fibrotic effect of TPL on IR-induced pulmonary fibrosis was related to its inhibition on the axis of alveolar macrophages-NOXes-ROS-myofibroblasts. PMID:27003327

  15. Effect of titanium dioxide on the oxidative metabolism of alveolar macrophages: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Deborah R; Guglielmotti, María B; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2005-05-01

    Metallic implants of titanium are used therapeutically in biomedicine because of its excellent biocompatibility. However, no metal or alloy is completely inert. We have previously shown that titanium oxide (TiO(2)) is transported in blood by phagocytic monocytes and deposited in organs such as liver, spleen, and lung 6 months after intraperitoneal injection (ip). Furthermore, it is well known that exposure to metal traces alters the cellular redox status. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the presence of titanium in target organs after chronic exposure, assess the potential structural alterations, and evaluate the oxidative metabolism of alveolar macrophages (AM) in the lung. Rats were ip injected with 1.60 g/100 g body wt of TiO(2) in saline solution. Organs (liver, spleen, lung) were processed for histological evaluation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in AM obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were evaluated using the nitroblue tetrazolium test and quantitative evaluation by digital image analysis. The histological analysis of organs revealed the presence of titanium in the parenchyma of these organs with no associated tissue damage. Although in lung alveolar macrophages TiO(2) induced a significant rise in ROS generation, it failed to cause tissue alteration. This finding may be attributed to an adaptive response.

  16. Effect of kerosene and its soot on the chrysotile-mediated toxicity to the rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Arif, J M; Khan, S G; Ahmad, I; Joshi, L D; Rahman, Q

    1997-02-01

    In order to examine the pulmonary toxicity of kerosene oil and its combustion product (soot) in asbestos-exposed rats, various biochemical and chemical parameters were assayed. Treatment of rats with a single intratracheal dose of chrysotile asbestos (5 mg) and kerosene (50 microliters) or its soot (5 mg) in combination led to an increased number of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide, and thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, alterations in the activities of primary (glutathione peroxidase and catalase) and secondary (glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) endogenous antioxidant enzymes, and depletion in the levels of glutathione in PAM compared to the chrysotile, kerosene, or soot alone. These changes may indicate the generation of oxidative stress in the macrophages. The resulting oxidative stress may be subsequently critical in collapsing the cellular membrane, which may change the cell membrane permeability and may also damage the phagolysosomal membrane, thereby releasing the membrane bound enzymes as indicated by an increased leakage of intracellular acid phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase. The injury to macrophages may trigger events that lead to lung fibrosis and/or malignancies in the exposed animals. This study may be helpful in understanding the etiology of certain clinical and pathological disorders in the population exposed simultaneously to both asbestos and kerosene or its combustion products.

  17. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages contribute to the premetastatic niche by suppressing antitumor T cell responses in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sharad K; Chintala, Navin K; Vadrevu, Surya Kumari; Patel, Jalpa; Karbowniczek, Magdalena; Markiewski, Maciej M

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, or inflammatory monocytes, functions of tissue resident macrophages, including alveolar macrophages (AM), in cancer were not well studied. Using a mouse model of breast cancer, we show that AM promote cancer metastasis to the lungs by suppressing antitumor T cells in this organ. AM accumulated in the premetastatic lungs through complement C5a receptor-mediated proliferation but not through recruitment from the circulation. AM preconditioned by breast tumors inhibited Th1 and favored generation of Th2 cells that had lower tumoricidal activity than Th1 cells. In addition, AM reduced the number and maturation of lung dendritic cells by regulating TGF-β in the lung environment. Depletion of AM reversed immunosuppression imposed by these cells and strengthened local Th1 responses, which significantly reduced lung metastatic burden. C5a receptor deficiency, which also lessens myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the premetastatic niche, synergized with the depletion of AM in preventing metastasis, leading to protection of mice from lung metastases. This study identifies AM as a new component of the premetastatic niche, which is harnessed by tumors to impose immunosuppression, and as a new target for cancer immunotherapies to eliminate or reduce metastasis. Because the lungs are the most common target for hematogenous metastasis, this research offers a plausible explanation for susceptibility of the lungs to cancer metastasis.

  18. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma

    PubMed Central

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E

    2014-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation. PMID:25504013

  19. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2015-07-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation.

  20. Alveolar macrophages are required for protective pulmonary defenses in murine Klebsiella pneumonia: elimination of alveolar macrophages increases neutrophil recruitment but decreases bacterial clearance and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Broug-Holub, E; Toews, G B; van Iwaarden, J F; Strieter, R M; Kunkel, S L; Paine, R; Standiford, T J

    1997-01-01

    To study the in vivo role of alveolar macrophages (AM) in gram-negative bacterial pneumonia in mice, AM were eliminated by the intratracheal (i.t.) administration of dichloromethylene diphosphonate encapsulated liposomes. Subsequently, the AM-depleted mice were infected i.t. with 100 CFU of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and the effects of AM depletion on survival, bacterial clearance, and neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte [PMN]) recruitment were assessed. It was shown that depletion of AM decreases survival dramatically, with 100% lethality at day 3 postinfection, versus 100% long-term survival in the control group. This increased mortality was accompanied by 20- to 27- and 3- to 10-fold increases in the number of K. pneumoniae CFU in lung and plasma, respectively, compared to those in nondepleted animals. This decreased bacterial clearance was not due to an impaired PMN recruitment; on the contrary, the K. pneumoniae-induced PMN recruitment in AM-depleted lungs was sevenfold greater 48 h postinfection than that in control infected lungs. Together with an increased PMN infiltration, 3- and 10-fold increases in lung homogenate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) levels, respectively, were measured. Neutralization of TNF-alpha or MIP-2, 2 h before infection, reduced the numbers of infiltrating PMN by 41.6 and 64.2%, respectively, indicating that these cytokines mediate PMN influx in infected lungs, rather then just being produced by the recruited PMN themselves. Our studies demonstrate, for the first time, the relative importance of the AM in the containment and clearance of bacteria in the setting of Klebsiella pneumonia. PMID:9119443

  1. Surface morphology and morphometry of rat alveolar macrophages after ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dormans, J.A.; Rombout, P.J.; van Loveren, H. )

    1990-09-01

    As the ultrastructural data on the effects of ozone on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are lacking, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were performed on rat PAM present in alveolar lavages following exposure to ozone. Rats were continuously exposed for 7 d to ozone concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mg/m3 for 7 d followed by a 5-d recovery period. Additionally, morphometry on lung sections was performed to quantitate PAM. In a second experiment rats were continuously exposed to 1.50 mg O3/m3 for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. To study the influence of concurrent ozone exposure and lung infection, due to Listeria monocytogenes, rats were exposed for 7 d to 1.50 mg O3/m3 after a Listeria infection. The surface area of lavaged control PAM was uniformly covered with ruffles as shown by SEM and TEM. Exposure to 0.5 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d resulted in cells partly covered with microvilli and blebs in addition to normal ruffles. The number of large size PAM increased with an increase in ozone concentration. After 1 d of exposure, normal-appearing as well as many small macrophages with ruffles and scattered lymphocytes were seen. Lavage samples taken after 5 or 7 d of exposure showed an identical cell composition to that taken after 3 d of exposure. After Listeria infection alone, lavage samples consisted of mainly lymphocytes and some macrophages. Small quantitative changes, such as an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and large-size PAM, occurred in lavages after ozone exposure and infection with L. monocytogenes. Morphometric examination of lung sections revealed a concentration-related increase in the number of PAM, even in animals exposed to 0.25 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d. Centriacinar regions were more severely affected than other regions of lung tissue.

  2. Sialic acid mediates the initial binding of positively charged inorganic particles to alveolar macrophage membranes.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; George, G; Brody, A R

    1987-06-01

    Pulmonary macrophages phagocytize inhaled particles and are postulated to play a role in the development of pulmonary interstitial fibrogenesis. The basic biologic mechanisms through which inhaled particles bind to macrophage membranes and subsequently are phagocytized remain unclear. We hypothesize that positively charged particles bind to negatively charged sialic acid (SA) residues on macrophage membranes. Alveolar Macrophages (AM) were collected by saline lavage from normal rat lungs. The cells adhered to plastic coverslips in serum-free phosphate buffered saline at 37 degrees C for 45 min and then were maintained at 4 degrees C for the binding experiments. Even distribution of SA groups on AM surfaces was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated to 50 nm gold spheres. The WGA is a lectin that binds specifically to sialic acid, and pretreatment of AM with this lectin prevented the binding of positively charged carbonyl iron (C-Fe) spheres, aluminum (Al) spheres, and chrysotile asbestos fibers to AM surfaces. Limulus protein, another lectin with binding specificity for SA, similarly blocked the binding of positively charged spheres and chrysotile asbestos fibers but not negatively charged glass spheres or crocidolite asbestos fibers. Con A and ricin, lectins that bind to mannose and galactose residues, respectively, did not block particle binding. When both positively charged iron spheres and negatively charged glass spheres were prebound to AM membranes, subsequent treatment with WGA displaced only the positively charged spheres from macrophage surfaces. Con A and ricin had no effect on prebound positively charged C-Fe and Al spheres.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. MRT letter: Auto-fluorescence by human alveolar macrophages after in vitro exposure to air pollution particles.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Sangani, Rahul G; Brighton, Luisa E; Carson, John L

    2010-06-01

    Macrophages from smokers demonstrate an increased auto-fluorescence. Similarly, auto-fluorescence follows in vitro exposure of macrophages to cigarette smoke condensate (i.e., the particulate fraction of cigarette smoke). The composition of particles in cigarette smoke can be comparable to air pollution particles. We tested the postulate that macrophages exposed to air pollution particles could demonstrate auto-fluorescence. Healthy nonsmoking and healthy smoking volunteers (both 18-40 years of age) underwent fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and alveolar macrophages isolated. Macrophages were incubated at 37 degrees C in 5% CO(2) with either PBS or 100 microg/mL particle for both 1 and 24 h. Particles included a residual oil fly ash, Mt. St. Helens volcanic ash, and ambient air particles collected from St. Louis, Missouri and Salt Lake City, Utah. At the end of incubation, 50 microL of the cell suspension was cytocentrifuged and examined at modes for viewing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and rhodamine fluorescence. Both emission source air pollution particles demonstrated FITC and rhodamine auto-fluorescence at 1 and 24 h, but the signal following incubation of the macrophages with oil fly ash appeared greater. Similarly, the ambient particles were associated with auto-fluorescence by the alveolar macrophages and this appeared to be dose-dependent. We conclude that exposure of macrophages to air pollution particles can be associated with auto-fluorescence in the FITC and rhodamine modes.

  4. Kinetics of uptake and distribution of arachidonic acid by rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, T.W.; Duncan, D.P.; Forman, H.J.

    1988-10-01

    The time course of uptake and distribution of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid (/sup 3/H-AA) into rat alveolar macrophage phospholipid pools was examined. Macrophages incubated with exogenous /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI-1640 containing 0.1% bovine serum albumin (BSA), incorporated this radiolabel into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol (PI) with plateaus reached within 2 to 4 hours, which remained relatively constant for up to 18 hours. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-AA into phosphatidylethanolamine was small, but continued to increase for 14 hours. Analysis of phosphate content in phospholipid pools revealed that treatment with exogenous 5 nM arachidonic acid had no effect upon pool sizes, but there was a selective incorporation of /sup 3/H-AA into PI. Cells were incubated with /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI alone or medium containing either 0.2% lactalbumin, fetal calf serum at variable concentrations, 10% Nu Serum, or 0.1% BSA. Incubation of macrophages with /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI alone or containing 0.2% lactalbumin, resulted in approximately 70% of the radiolabel taken up by the cells being incorporated into triglyceride. The addition of BSA to RPMI-1640 medium was found to facilitate selective uptake of /sup 3/H-AA into phospholipids. Approximately 70% of incorporated /sup 3/H-AA was releasable through the action of exogenous phospholipase A2.

  5. Transcription analysis of the porcine alveolar macrophage response to porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the causal agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), which has severely impacted the swine industry worldwide. PCV2 triggers a weak and atypical innate immune response, but the key genes and mechanisms by which the virus interferes with host innate immunity have not yet been elucidated. In this study, genes that control the response of primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), the main target of PCV2, were profiled in vitro. Results PAMs were successfully infected by PCV2-WH strain, as evidenced quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) results. Infection-related differential gene expression was investigated using pig microarrays from the US Pig Genome Coordination Program and validated by real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microarray analysis at 24 and 48 hours post-infection (HPI) revealed 266 and 175 unique genes, respectively, that were differentially expressed (false discovery rate <0.05; fold-change >2). Only six genes were differentially expressed between 24 and 48 HPI. The up-regulated genes were principally related to immune response, cytokine activity, locomotion, regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell growth arrest, and antigen procession and presentation. The down-regulated genes were mainly involved in terpenoid biosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, translation, proteasome degradation, signal transducer activity, and ribosomal proteins, which were representative of the reduced vital activity of PCV2-infected cells. Conclusions PCV2 infection of PAMs causes up-regulation of genes related to inflammation, indicating that PCV2 may induce systematic inflammation. PCV2 persistently induced cytokines, mainly through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 1 and TLR9 pathways, which may promote high levels of cytokine secretion. PCV2 may prevent apoptosis in PAMs by up-regulating SERPINB9 expression, possibly to

  6. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    PubMed Central

    Refsnes, Magne; Hetland, Ragna B; Øvrevik, Johan; Sundfør, Idunn; Schwarze, Per E; Låg, Marit

    2006-01-01

    Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α), a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr), with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm), but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm) seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm) and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm) in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm). The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm) was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm) and quartz (≤ 2 μm) to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses, but contributed less

  7. HUMAL ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSES TO AIR POLLUTION PARTICULATES ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INSOLUBLE OCMPONENTS OF COARSE MATERIAL, INCLUDING PARTICULATE ENDOTOXIN

    EPA Science Inventory


    Inhalation of particulate matter in the ambient air has been shown to cause pulmonary morbidity and exacerbate asthma. Alveolar macrophage (AM) are essential for effective removal of inhaled particles and microbes in the lower airways. While some particles minimally effect AM...

  8. FERRITIN EXPRESSION AFTER IN VITRO EXPOSURES OF HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES TO SILICA IS IRON-DEPENDENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased availability of catalytically active iron after silica exposure can present an oxidative injury to a living system. Sequestration of reactive iron would, therefore, confer a protective effect. The intracellular storage of iron by ferritin within macrophages can limi...

  9. Alveolar macrophages and eicosanoids but not neutrophils, mediate bronchoconstriction induced by FMLP in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Boukili, M. A.; Bureau, M. F.; Lellouch-Tubiana, A.; Lefort, J.; Simon, M. T.; Vargaftig, B. B.

    1989-01-01

    1. N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), when administered by aerosol to guinea-pigs, induced a dose-dependent bronchoconstriction (BC) with no overt effect on platelet and leukocyte blood counts. Repeated administration of FMLP by aerosol was followed by desensitization. 2. Electron microscopy studies showed that administration of FMLP by aerosol is accompanied by alveolar macrophage activation, accumulation and aggregation in the alveolar lumens. Non-degranulated eosinophils were observed in the lungs and a few platelet micro-aggregates in the pulmonary microvasculature. 3. No significant accumulation of 131I-labelled albumin, 111In-labelled neutrophils or 111Inlabelled platelets was detected in the lungs after the administration of FMLP by aerosol, whereas the intravenous administration was accompanied by an increase of extravascular albumin and significant neutrophil sequestration in the lungs. 4. Aspirin administered intravenously or by aerosol reduced significantly the BC induced by an aerosol of FMLP. By contrast, intravenous indomethacin reduced only BC induced by the sub-maximal dose of FMLP as an aerosol whereas, when administered by inhalation, it inhibited BC induced by FMLP administered either intravenously or by aerosol at all the concentrations tested. 5. FMLP induced a dose-dependent contraction of the guinea-pig trachea, which was not inhibited by indomethacin. 6. The dual cyclo-oxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor compound BW755C suppressed the BC induced by an aerosol of FMLP at all the concentrations used, whereas the histamine H1-antagonist mepyramine was inactive. 7. Leukocyte depletion with vinblastine failed to reduce BC induced by intravenous or an aerosol of FMLP. 8. Our studies indicate that: (a) FMLP administered by aerosol induces dose-dependent BC followed by desensitization, indicating that local mechanisms account for BC; (b) BC induced by i.v. FMLP, but not by its inhalation, is accompanied by albumin extravasation and

  10. Stimulation of alveolar macrophages by mineral dusts in vitro: luminol-dependent chemiluminescence study

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, V.; Wilhelm, J.; Brzak, P.; Hurych, J.

    1987-02-01

    Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) of normal (nonactivated) rabbit alveolar macrophages (AMs) was measured in suspension upon stimulation by various size fractions of one quartz dust sample or by various mineral dusts (quartz, corundum, anatas, and chrysotile asbestos as an example of fibrous dust). The CL-triggering capacity of the tested dusts was inhibited by their preincubation with autologous serum. The intensity of luminol-dependent CL induced by particulate dusts upon their action on AMs depended on the kind of dust, on the dust particle sizes, and on the ratio of the number of particles to the number of cells in a given suspension. The cytotoxicity and/or fibrogenicity of the dust and its capacity to trigger the luminol-dependent CL of nonadherent AMs were not directly correlated.

  11. An Intracellular Arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeast-Aggregates Generates Nuclear Damage to the Cultured Murine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Voltan, Aline R.; dos Santos, Claudia T.; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; da Silva, Rosangela A. M.; Souza, Felipe O.; Soares, Christiane P.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a “crown.” This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast's persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms. PMID:26793172

  12. Distribution characteristics of grepafloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, in lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Yoshiharu; Sun, Jin; Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Shigeko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of Grepafloxacin (GPFX), a new quinolone antimicrobial agent, in the lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and the alveolar macrophage (AM) in rats, which are potential infection sites in respiratory tract infections. We also aimed to clarify the mechanism governing the transferability of GPFX into the alveolus compartment from a kinetic point of view. The AUC ratios of ELF/plasma and AM/plasma after the oral administration of GPFX were 5.69 +/- 1.00 and 352 +/- 57, respectively, which were several-fold greater than those of ciprofloxacin (CPFX). Pharmacokinetic analyses of time profiles of GPFX concentrations in ELF and AM revealed that the influx clearance from plasma to ELF across the alveolar barrier is 5-fold greater than the efflux clearance from ELF. In addition, the permeability of GPFX across the cultured AM cell membrane was 7-fold and 11-fold greater than that of levofloxacin (LVFX) and CPFX, respectively. The extent of intracellular binding to AM cells (expressed as a constant (alpha)) was the greatest for GPFX, followed by CPFX and LVFX. There was a significant correlation between the alpha value and the partitioning to the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) column, which consists of phospholipid residues covalently bound to silica. These results suggest that GPFX is highly distributed in ELF and AM, and that the high transferability of GPFX into ELF may be attributable to the existence of asymmetrical transport across the alveolar barrier. In addition, it was suggested that both rapid permeability across the AM cell membrane and avid binding to the membrane phospholipids may be responsible for the high accumulation of GPFX in AM.

  13. Differential gene expression profiling of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae during induction of primary alveolar macrophage apoptosis in piglets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Ruidong, Zhai; Liu, Shiting; Zhang, Hu; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Gu, Jingmin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a disease that causes serious problems for the swine industry. Successful infection by this bacterium requires breaking the first line of defence in the lungs, the primary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Therefore, exploring A. pleuropneumoniae-PAM interactions will provide vital groundwork for the scientific control of this infectious disease, which has been little studied up to now. In this work, PAMs were isolated from piglets and co-incubated with A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 5b strain L20 in vitro, and their interaction, PAM cell death, and differential gene expression of A. pleuropneumoniae in response to PAM cell death were observed and analysed using confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blot, flow cytometry and the use of a gene expression profile chip. A. pleuropneumoniae quickly adhered to and invaded PAMs, inducing apoptosis, which was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The highest percentage of apoptosis in cells was confirmed using flow cytometry when the cells were infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10 and incubated for 5 h, with higher expression of activated caspase-3 as measured by Western blot. Using microarray gene chips with 2868 probes containing nearly all of the genomic sequence of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5b strain L20, a total of 185 bacterial genes were found to be differentially expressed (including 92 up-regulated and 93 down-regulated genes) and involved in the process of apoptosis, as compared with the expression of control bacteria cultured without PAMs in BHI medium (mean expression ratios >1.5-fold, p < 0.05). The up-regulated genes are involved in energy metabolism, gene transcription and translation, virulence related gene such as LPS, Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin, RTX and similar genes. The down-regulated genes are

  14. The immune toxicity of titanium dioxide on primary pulmonary alveolar macrophages relies on their surface area and crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Yin, Li-hong; Pu, Yue-pu; Li, Yun-hui; Zhang, Xiao-qiang; Liang, Ge-yu; Li, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Juan; Li, Yan-fen; Zhang, Xue-yan

    2010-12-01

    Surface properties are critical to assess effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) primary nanoparticles on the immune function of pulmonary alveolar macrophage (PAMs). In this study the immune toxicity of TiO2 primary nanoparticles on PAMs relies on their surface area and crystal structure were determined. The primary PAMs of rats exposed to different sizes and crystal structure of TiO2 particles at different dosages for 24 hrs were evaluated for cytokines, phagocytosis, chemotaxis and surface molecules expression. Nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) level of PAMs significantly increased when exposed to TiO2 primary particles and there were significant association with the exposure total surface area and crystal structure of TiO2 particles in the former. TiO2 particles showed significant inhibiting effects on phagocytotic ability, chemotactic ability, Fc receptors and MHC-II molecular expression of macrophages compared with control. Exposure dosage and crystal structure of TiO2 particles play effects on phagocytotic ability and chemotactic ability of PAMs. These results suggested that TiO2 nanoparticles could induce the release of inflammatory mediators, initiate the inflammation development and inhibit the immune function of PAMs associated with non-specific immunity and specific immunity relies on surface area and crystal structure. NO activity might be a candidate marker indicating the TiO2 exposure burden and cell damage in PAMs.

  15. Transfer of arachidonate from phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylethanolamine and triacylglycerol in guinea pig alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Nijssen, J.G.; Oosting, R.S.; Nkamp, F.Pv.; van den Bosch, H.

    1986-10-01

    Guinea pig alveolar macrophages were labeled by incubation with either arachidonate or linoleate. Arachidonate labeled phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and triglycerides (TG) equally well, with each lipid containing about 30% of total cellular radioactivity. In comparison to arachidonate, linoleate was recovered significantly less in PE (7%) and more in TG (47%). To investigate whether redistributions of acyl chains among lipid classes took place, the macrophages were incubated with 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)arachidonoyl PC or 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)linoleoyl PC. After harvesting, the cells incubated with 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)linoleoyl PC contained 86% of the recovered cellular radioactivity in PC, with only small amounts of label being transferred to PE and TG (3 and 6%, respectively). More extensive redistributions were observed with arachidonate-labeled PC. In this case, only 60% of cellular radioactivity was still associated with PC, while 22 and 12%, respectively, had been transferred to PE and TG. Arachidonate transfer from PC to PE was unaffected by an excess of free arachidonate which inhibited this transfer to TG for over 90%, indicating that different mechanisms or arachidonoyl CoA pools were involved in the transfer of arachidonate from PC to PE and TG. Cells prelabeled with 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)arachidonoyl PC released /sup 14/C-label into the medium upon further incubation. This release was slightly stimulated by zymosan and threefold higher in the presence of the Ca2+-ionophore A23187. Labeling of macrophages with intact phospholipid molecules appears to be a suitable method for studying acyl chain redistribution and release reactions.

  16. Cellular interaction of different forms of aluminum nanoparticles in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andrew J; Bleckmann, Charles A; Murdock, Richard C; Schrand, Amanda M; Schlager, John J; Hussain, Saber M

    2007-06-28

    Nanomaterials, with dimensions in the 1-100 nm range, possess numerous potential benefits to society. However, there is little characterization of their effects on biological systems, either within the environment or on human health. The present study examines cellular interaction of aluminum oxide and aluminum nanomaterials, including their effect on cell viability and cell phagocytosis, with reference to particle size and the particle's chemical composition. Experiments were performed to characterize initial in vitro cellular effects of rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) after exposure to aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3-NP at 30 and 40 nm) and aluminum metal nanoparticles containing a 2-3 nm oxide coat (Al-NP at 50, 80, and 120 nm). Characterization of the nanomaterials, both as received and in situ, was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), and/or CytoViva150 Ultra Resolution Imaging (URI)). Particles showed significant agglomeration in cell exposure media using DLS and the URI as compared to primary particle size in TEM. Cell viability assay results indicate a marginal effect on macrophage viability after exposure to Al2O3-NP at doses of 100 microg/mL for 24 h continuous exposure. Al-NP produced significantly reduced viability after 24 h of continuous exposure with doses from 100 to 250 microg/mL. Cell phagocytotic ability was significantly hindered by exposure to 50, 80, or 120 nm Al-NP at 25 microg/mL for 24 h, but the same concentration (25 microg/mL) had no significant effect on the cellular viability. However, no significant effect on phagocytosis was observed with Al2O3-NP. In summary, these results show that Al-NP exhibit greater toxicity and more significantly diminish the phagocytotic ability of macrophages after 24 h of exposure when compared to Al2O3-NP.

  17. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators.

    PubMed

    Orona, N S; Tasat, D R

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5-200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃ 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO₃. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O₂⁻). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O₂⁻ may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O₂⁻ may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium-related diseases.

  18. Short term exposure to NO sup 2 decreases intrapulmonary killing of Mycoplasma pulmonis by damaging alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.K.; Davidson, M.K.; Schoeb, T.R.; Lindsey, J.R. Veteran Administration Medical Center, Birmingham, AL )

    1991-03-11

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of pathogen free C57BL/6N mice to 5 or 10 ppm of NO{sub 2} increased severity of murine respiratory mycoplasmosis and that this effect was associated with decreased intrapulmonary killing (IPK) of Mycoplasma pulmonis (MP). The purposes of the present studies were to titrate the NO{sub 2} effect and to determine if the changes in IPK were due to the effects of NO{sub 2} on alveolar macrophages. Exposure to less than 5 ppm NO{sub 2} had no effect on IPK of MP. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells killed MP in vitro only if they were allowed to associate with mycoplasmas in vivo. Prior exposure to NO{sub 2} abrogated killing in this in vivo-in vitro model. Exposure to NO{sub 2} did not increase the protein content of BAL within 24 hours. Greater than 95% of the BAL cells were macrophages, and greater than 98% of the cell-associated mycoplasmas were on or in alveolar macrophages. Immediately after exposure, viability of alveolar macrophages, as measured by trypan blue exclusion and fluorescein diacetate uptake, was 89 {plus minus} 4% and 88 {plus minus} 4% in the control group, respectively; 56 {plus minus} 19% and 64 {plus minus} 11% in the group receiving MP alone; 23 {plus minus} 7% and 48 {plus minus} 9% in the group receiving 10 ppm NO{sub 2}; and 16 {plus minus} 6% and 25 {plus minus} 6% in the group receiving both MP and NO{sub 2} exposures. Viability was significantly decreased following exposure to 5 or 10 ppm NO{sub 2}, but not following exposure to 2 ppm. Viability did not return to normal until 7 days after exposure to NO{sub 2}, at which time IPK also returned to normal. The cellular target of NO{sub 2} exposure in relation to IPK of MP appears to be the alveolar macrophage.

  19. ROS-mediated TNF-alpha and MIP-2 gene expression in alveolar macrophages exposed to pine dust.

    PubMed

    Long, Huayan; Shi, Tingming; Borm, Paul J; Määttä, Juha; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Savolainen, Kai; Krombach, Fritz

    2004-12-13

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory symptoms, impaired lung function, and asthma have been reported in workers exposed to wood dust in a number of epidemiological studies. The underlying pathomechanisms, however, are not well understood. Here, we studied the effects of dust from pine (PD) and heat-treated pine (HPD) on the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators in rat alveolar macrophages. METHODS: Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) protein release, TNF-alpha and MIP-2 mRNA expression, and generation of ROS were studied as end points after treatment of rat alveolar macrophages with PD or HPD. In a separate series of experiments, the antioxidants glutathione and N-acetyl-L-cysteine were included in combination with wood dust. To determine the endogenous oxidative and antioxidant capacity of wood dusts, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used. RESULTS: After 4 h incubation, both PD and HPD elicited a significantly (p < 0.05) increased mRNA expression of TNF-alpha and MIP-2 as well as a concentration-dependent release of TNF-alpha and MIP-2 protein. Interestingly, PD induced a significantly higher TNF-alpha and MIP-2 production than HPD. Moreover, a significantly increased ROS production was observed in alveolar macrophages exposed to both PD and HPD. In the presence of the antioxidants glutathione and N-acetyl-L-cysteine, the PD- and HPD-induced release of ROS, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2 was significantly reduced. Finally, electron spin resonance analyses demonstrated a higher endogenous antioxidant capacity of HPD compared to PD. Endotoxin was not present in either dust sample. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that pine dust is able to induce expression of TNF-alpha and MIP-2 in rat alveolar macrophages by a mechanism that is, at least in part, mediated by ROS.

  20. In Vitro Study of Mutagenesis Induced by Crocidolite-Exposed Alveolar Macrophages NR8383 in Cocultured Big Blue Rat2 Embryonic Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Yves; Gaté, Laurent; Darne, Christian; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Goutet, Michèle; Julien, Schmit; Stéphane, Binet

    2010-01-01

    Asbestos-induced mutagenicity in the lung may involve reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) released by alveolar macrophages. With the aim of proposing an alternative in vitro mutagenesis test, a coculture system of rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) and transgenic Big Blue Rat2 embryonic fibroblasts was developed and tested with a crocidolite sample. Crocidolite exposure induced no detectable increase in ROS production from NR8383, contrasting with the oxidative burst that occurred following a brief exposure (1 hour) to zymosan, a known macrophage activator. In separated cocultures, crocidolite and zymosan induced different changes in the gene expressions involved in cellular inflammation in NR8383 and Big Blue. In particular, both particles induced up-regulation of iNOS expression in Big Blue, suggesting the formation of potentially genotoxic nitrogen species. However, crocidolite exposure in separated or mixed cocultures induced no mutagenic effects whereas an increase in Big Blue mutants was detected after exposure to zymosan in mixed cocultures. NR8383 activation by crocidolite is probably insufficient to induce in vitro mutagenic events. The mutagenesis assay based on the coculture of NR8383 and Big Blue cannot be used as an alternative in vitro method to assess the mutagenic properties of asbestos fibres.

  1. Macrophage Biochemistry, Activation and Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    glucoeidase +8 . . Sulfatase c +8 Modified from Morahan, 1980. b(+)Exhibit@ activity; (-) lacks activity; (+) weak or marginal activity. ’References: (1...endoplasmic reticulum enzymes, sulfatase c and alkaline a-glucosidase. Dissociation of the lysosomal enzyme patterns from sulfatase c and alkaline r...1974; Beaufay et al., 1974). Peritoneal macrophages are deficient or contain inauf- • -𔃼 :’- 41 ficient quantities of the classical constituents to be

  2. Effects of asbestos on the random migration of rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Myrvik, Q.N.; Knox, E.A.; Gordon, M.; Shirley, P.S.

    1985-05-01

    The toxicity of sized and characterized chrysotile, crocidolite, and amosite preparations have been evaluated using alveolar macrophage (AM) migration inhibition assays and viability tests. These results have been compared with asbestos samples obtained from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). These latter samples are designated chrysotile A (RT), crocidolite (RT), and amosite (RT). In addition, filter-isolated preparations of chrysotile A (RT) that consisted mainly of large nonphagocytosable fibers were also tested. Chrysotile (Spurny) and sonicated chrysotile A (RT) produced 50% migration inhibition at about 115 g/mL. Spurny crocidolite produced 50% migration inhibition at about 340 g/mL, where RT crocidolite produced 50% migration inhibition at about 230 g/mL. RT amosite caused 50% migration inhibition at about 180 g/mL, where Spurny amosite was inactive up to 500 g/mL. The large nonphagocytosable chrysotile A (RT) fibers produced 50% migration inhibition at about 66 g/mL. This indicates that fibers can be toxic for AM through extracellular membrane contact. In general the results from the viability studies paralleled the migration inhibition observations. None of the asbestos preparations induced a burst in the hexose monophosphate shunt of BCG-immune AM at 1 mg/mL. BCG-immune AM were more susceptible to cell death than normal AM when incubated with chrysotile A (RT), amosite (RT) and zymosan. Migration inhibition induced by asbestos fibers probably reflects toxicity of the asbestos preparations and could play an important role in blocking normal alveolar clearance of inhaled particles.

  3. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models.

  4. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models. PMID:27350756

  5. Involvement of protein kinase C, phospholipase C, and protein tyrosine kinase pathways in oxygen radical generation by asbestos-stimulated alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y; Kim, S H; Kim, K A; Oh, M W; Lee, K H

    1997-09-01

    Although asbestos stimulates oxygen radical generation in alveolar macrophages, the exact mechanism is still not clear. The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of three asbestos fibers (amosite, chrysotile, and crocidolite) to generate oxygen radicals in macrophages and examine the mechanism of this action. All asbestos fibers were able to induce chemiluminescence but chrysotile induced maximal chemiluminescence at higher concentrations than amosite and crocidolite. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (sphingosine and staurosporine) suppressed the ability of asbestos to induce oxygen radical generation. Phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitors (U73122 and neomycin) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors (erbstatin and genistein) decreased oxygen radical generation of asbestos-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Oxygen radical generation was not suppressed by an adenylate cyclase activator (forskolin), a protein kinase A inhibitor (H-8), and a protein serine-threonine phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid). PLC and PTK inhibitors suppressed the increment of phosphoinositide turnover by amosite. These results suggest that asbestos fibers induce the generation of oxygen radicals through PTK, PLC, and PKC pathways in a dose-response pattern.

  6. DNA synthesis in pulmonary alveolar macrophages and type II cells: effects of ozone exposure and treatment with alpha-difluoromethylornithine

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.S.; White, D.M.; Brady, A.N.; Li, L.C.; D'Arcy, J.B.; Smiler, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in the number of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (AM) can be induced by a number of toxic insults to the lung, including ozone, an important photochemical oxidant air pollutant. This increase could arise from an influx of monocytes from the vascular or interstitial compartments, or from proliferation of AM in situ. While proliferation of alveolar type II cells after oxidant exposure has been well documented, it is not clear whether AM are also capable of this response. Rats were exposed to air or to 0.12, 0.25, or 0.50 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 3, 7, or 14 d, 20 h/d. The labeling index in both AM and type II cells increased about 10-fold after 2 d of exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ppm of ozone, but returned to control levels by the end of 1 wk of exposure. These changes closely paralleled the temporal and dose-response characteristics of changes in total lung DNA synthesis. alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) administered to rats during a 2-d exposure to 0.50 ppm ozone did not inhibit the ozone-induced increase in labeling index in AM or type II cells, although evidence of inhibition of lung ornithine decarboxylase activity was obtained, and the ozone-induced increase in total lung DNA synthesis was inhibited by 23%. These results suggest that, like type II cells, AM are capable of entering the cell cycle and synthesizing new DNA in situ in response to short-term exposure to environmentally relevant doses of ozone, and that the ozone-induced stimulation of DNA synthesis in these cell types was refractory to inhibition by DFMO.

  7. Respiratory burst in alveolar macrophages exposed to urban particles is not a predictor of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Breznan, Dalibor; Goegan, Patrick; Chauhan, Vinita; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Kumarathasan, Prem; Cakmak, Sabit; Nadeau, Denis; Brook, Jeffrey R; Vincent, Renaud

    2013-06-01

    We examined the utility of respiratory burst measurements in alveolar macrophages to assess adverse cellular changes following exposure to urban particles. Cells were obtained by bronchioalveolar lavage of Fisher 344 rats and exposed (0-100 μg/well) to urban particles (EHC-93, SRM-1648, SRM-1649, PM2.5), the soluble (EHC-93sol) and insoluble (EHC-93insol) fractions of EHC-93 (EHC-93tot), mineral particles (TiO(2), SiO(2)) and metal oxides (iron III oxide, iron II/III oxide, copper II oxide, nickel II oxide). The particle-induced respiratory burst was measured by chemiluminescence for 2h after the addition of particles. The cells were then stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), yeast Zymosan fragments (Zymosan), or lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma (LPS/IFN-γ) and the stimulant-induced respiratory burst was measured. Independently of the potential of particles to induce directly a respiratory burst, exposure to most particles attenuated the subsequent stimulant-induced burst. The notable exception was SiO(2), which produced a strong respiratory burst upon contact with the macrophages and enhanced the subsequent response to PMA or LPS/IFN-γ. Based on the degree of inhibition of the stimulant-dependent respiratory burst, particles were clustered into groups of high (SRM-1649, iron III oxide), intermediate (EHC-93tot, EHC-93insol, SRM-1648, VERP, iron II/III oxide, copper II oxide), and low (EHC-93sol, SiO(2), TiO2 and nickel II oxide) potency. Across these clusters, the potency of the particles to inhibit the stimulant-dependent respiratory burst showed poor correlation with cytotoxicity determined by XTT reduction assay.

  8. Lipopolysaccharides may aggravate apoptosis through accumulation of autophagosomes in alveolar macrophages of human silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi; Yuan, Juxiang; Yao, Sanqiao; Jin, Yulan; Chen, Gang; Tian, Wei; Xi, Jinkun; Xu, Zhelong; Weng, Dong; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Silica dust mainly attacks alveolar macrophages (AMs) and increases the apoptosis of AMs in silicosis patients. However, it is still unclear whether autophagy is affected. Autophagy mainly has defensive functions in response to stress, contributing to cell survival in adverse conditions, and conversely it has also been implicated in cell death. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces autophagy and apoptosis in macrophages. The role of LPS in autophagy and apoptosis in AMs of silicosis patients is unknown. In this study, we collected AMs from 53 male workers exposed to silica and divided them into an observer (control) group, and stage I, II and III patient groups. We found increased levels of LC3B, SQSTM1/p62 and BECN1,whereas the phosphorylation of MTOR,and levels of LAMP2, TLR4, MYD88, TICAM1, as well as the number of lysosomes decreased with the development of silicosis. LPS stimulation triggered autophagy and increased levels of SQSTM1 in AMs. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA), inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis in the AMs of silicosis patients. Moreover, 3MA reversed the LPS-induced decrease in BCL2 and the increase in BAX and CASP3 levels in AMs. These results suggest that autophagosomes accumulate in AMs during silicosis progression. LPS can induce the formation of autophagosomes through a TLR4-dependent pathway, and LPS may exacerbate the apoptosis in AMs. Blockade of the formation of autophagosomes may inhibit LPS-induced apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in AMs. These findings describe novel mechanisms that may lead to new preventive and therapeutic strategies for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26553601

  9. Cigarette smoke exposure impairs pulmonary bacterial clearance and alveolar macrophage complement-mediated phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Phipps, John C; Aronoff, David M; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Goel, Deepti; O'Brien, Edmund; Mancuso, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of pulmonary and invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most commonly isolated organism from patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Despite this association, the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke exposure diminishes host defense against S. pneumoniae infections are poorly understood. In this study, we compared the responses of BALB/c mice following an intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae after 5 weeks of exposure to room air or cigarette smoke in a whole-body exposure chamber in vivo and the effects of cigarette smoke on alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae in vitro. Bacterial burdens in cigarette smoke-exposed mice were increased at 24 and 48 h postinfection, and this was accompanied by a more pronounced clinical appearance of illness, hypothermia, and increased lung homogenate cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). We also found greater numbers of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from cigarette smoke-exposed mice following a challenge with heat-killed S. pneumoniae. Interestingly, overnight culture of alveolar macrophages with 1% cigarette smoke extract, a level that did not affect alveolar macrophage viability, reduced complement-mediated phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae, while the ingestion of unopsonized bacteria or IgG-coated microspheres was not affected. This murine model provides robust additional support to the hypothesis that cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia and defines a novel cellular mechanism to help explain this immunosuppressive effect.

  10. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Orona, N.S.; Tasat, D.R.

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup −} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup −} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through

  11. Innate immune responses to replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in isolated Swine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ait-Ali, Tahar; Wilson, Alison D; Westcott, David G; Clapperton, Mary; Waterfall, Martin; Mellencamp, Martha A; Drew, Trevor W; Bishop, Stephen C; Archibald, Alan L

    2007-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an infectious disease caused by a positive RNA strand arterivirus. PRRS virus (PRRSV) interacts primarily with lung macrophages. Identifying the genetic components involved in host resistance/susceptibility would represent an important step forward in the design of disease control programs. In this study, alveolar macrophages derived from five commercial pig lines were used to study the innate immune response to PRRSV infection in vitro. Analysis by flow cytometry has demonstrated that bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) preparations were almost exclusively composed of alveolar macrophages and that the pigs tested were free from infection. Macrophages from the Landrace line showed significantly reduced virus replication and poor growth of PRRSV during 30 h of infection. By 72 h, PRRSV viral load was down to 2.5 log(10) TCID(50) compared with an average of 5 log(10) TCID(50) for the other breeds tested. These observations suggest that factors intrinsic to the Landrace breed may be responsible for this reduced or delayed response to PRRSV. Preliminary investigation suggests that the PRRSV coreceptor, sialoadhesin, may not be responsible for the Landrace macrophage phenotype as its abundance and localisation were comparable in all the breeds. Strikingly, we found that the reduced or delayed growth of PRRSV was temporally associated with high levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-8 mRNA accumulation and substantial reduction of secretion of IL-8, suggesting a key contributory role for cytokine synthesis and secretion during the innate immune response to PRRSV infection.

  12. Alveolar Macrophages Can Control Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in the Absence of Type I Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Spyridon; Bajorek, Monika; Culley, Fiona J.; Goritzka, Michelle; Johansson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of lower respiratory tract infections. Immunity to RSV is initiated upon detection of the virus by pattern recognition receptors, such as RIG-I-like receptors. RIG-I-like receptors signal via MAVS to induce the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators, including type I interferons (IFNs), which trigger and shape antiviral responses and protect cells from infection. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are amongst the first cells to encounter invading viruses and the ones producing type I IFNs. However, it is unclear whether IFNs act to prevent AMs from serving as vehicles for viral replication. In this study, primary AMs from MAVS (Mavs-/-)- or type I IFN receptor (Ifnar1-/-)-deficient mice were exposed to RSV ex vivo. Wild-type (wt) AMs but not Mavs-/- and Ifnar1-/- AMs produced inflammatory mediators in response to RSV. Furthermore, Mavs-/- and Ifnar1-/- AMs accumulated more RSV proteins than wt AMs, but the infection was abortive. Thus, RIG-I-like receptor-MAVS and IFNAR signalling are important for the induction of proinflammatory mediators from AMs upon RSV infection, but this signalling is not central for controlling viral replication. The ability to restrict viral replication makes AMs ideal sensors of RSV infection and important initiators of immune responses in the lung. PMID:27423203

  13. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Ameliorates Virus-Induced Disease following a Pulmonary Coronavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Stacey M.; Holman, Kaitlyn M.; Varga, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause respiratory disease in humans that can range from mild to severe. However, the pathogenesis of pulmonary coronavirus infections is poorly understood. Mouse hepatitis virus type 1 (MHV-1) is a group 2 coronavirus capable of causing severe morbidity and mortality in highly susceptible C3H/HeJ mice. We have previously shown that both CD4 and CD8 T cells play a critical role in mediating MHV-1-induced disease. Here we evaluated the role of alveolar macrophages (AM) in modulating the adaptive immune response and subsequent disease. Depletion of AM using clodronate liposomes administered prior to MHV-1 infection was associated with a significant amelioration of MHV-1-induced morbidity and mortality. AM depletion resulted in a decreased number of virus-specific CD4 T cells in the lung airways. In addition, a significant increase in the frequency and total number of Tregs in the lung tissue and lung airways was observed following MHV-1 infection in mice depleted of AM. Our results indicate that AM play a critical role in modulating MHV-1-induced morbidity and mortality. PMID:24608125

  14. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.; Devlin, R.B.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3)(0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hr). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, the authors found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced after exposure of HAM to O3 while the basal O2 release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3-exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when simulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  15. Swine alveolar macrophage cell model allows optimal replication of influenza A viruses regardless of their origin.

    PubMed

    Kasloff, Samantha B; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-03-01

    The importance of pigs in interspecies transmission of influenza A viruses has been repeatedly demonstrated over the last century. Eleven influenza A viruses from avian, human and swine hosts were evaluated for replication phenotypes at three physiologically relevant temperatures (41°C, 37°C, 33°C) in an immortalized swine pulmonary alveolar macrophage cell line (IPAM 3D4/31) to determine whether this system would allow for their efficient replication. All isolates replicated well in IPAMs at 37°C while clear distinctions were observed at 41°C and 33°C, correlating to species of origin of the PB2, reflected in distinct amino acid residue profiles rather than in one particular PB2 residue. A strong TNF-α response was induced by some mammalian but not avian IAVs, while other selected cytokines remained below detection levels. Porcine IPAMs represent a natural host cell model for influenza virus replication where the only condition requiring modification for optimal IAV replication, regardless of virus origin.

  16. Three-dimensional characteristics of alveolar macrophages in vitro observed by dark field microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarat, Dominic; Wiemann, Martin; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are cells from immune defense inside the lung. They engulf particles in vacuoles from the outer membrane. Volume and surface are important parameters to characterize the particle uptake. AM change their shape within a few seconds, therefore it is hard to obtain by confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is commonly used to generate 3D-images. So we used an intensified dark field microscopy (DFM) as an alternative method to generate contrast rich AM gray tone image slices used for 3D-reconstructions of AM cells by VTK software applications. From these 3D-reconstructions approximate volume and surface data of the AM were obtained and compared to values found in the literature. Finally, simple geometrical 3D-models of the AM were created and compared to real data. Averaged volume and surface data from the DFM images are close to values found in the literature. Furthermore, calculation of volume and surface data from DFM images could be done faster if simplified geometrical 3D-models of the cells were used.

  17. An in vitro alveolar macrophage assay for the assessment of inflammatory cytokine expression induced by atmospheric particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Sijan, Zana; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Heo, Jongbae; Kado, Norman Y; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos; Shafer, Martin M

    2015-07-01

    Exposures to air pollution in the form of particulate matter (PM) can result in excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the respiratory system, potentially causing both localized cellular injury and triggering a systemic inflammatory response. PM-induced inflammation in the lung is modulated in large part by alveolar macrophages and their biochemical signaling, including production of inflammatory cytokines, the primary mechanism via which inflammation is initiated and sustained. We developed a robust, relevant, and flexible method employing a rat alveolar macrophage cell line (NR8383) which can be applied to routine samples of PM from air quality monitoring sites to gain insight into the drivers of PM toxicity that lead to oxidative stress and inflammation. Method performance was characterized using extracts of ambient and vehicular engine exhaust PM samples. Our results indicate that the reproducibility and the sensitivity of the method are satisfactory and comparisons between PM samples can be made with good precision. The average relative percent difference for all genes detected during 10 different exposures was 17.1%. Our analysis demonstrated that 71% of genes had an average signal to noise ratio (SNR) ≥ 3. Our time course study suggests that 4 h may be an optimal in vitro exposure time for observing short-term effects of PM and capturing the initial steps of inflammatory signaling. The 4 h exposure resulted in the detection of 57 genes (out of 84 total), of which 86% had altered expression. Similarities and conserved gene signaling regulation among the PM samples were demonstrated through hierarchical clustering and other analyses. Overlying the core congruent patterns were differentially regulated genes that resulted in distinct sample-specific gene expression "fingerprints." Consistent upregulation of Il1f5 and downregulation of Ccr7 was observed across all samples, while TNFα was upregulated in half of the samples and downregulated in

  18. Atorvastatin protected from paraquat-induced cytotoxicity in alveolar macrophages via down-regulation of TLR-4.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh-Tabrizi, Nazli; Malekinejad, Hassan; Varasteh, Soheil; Cheraghi, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The current study designed to clarify the mechanism of paraquat-induced cytotoxicity and protective effects of Atorvastatin on freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AMs). AMs were collected via bronchoalveolar lavage and exposed to various concentrations of paraquat in the presence and absence of atorvastatin for 24h. Cell viability, myeloperoxidase activity; nitric oxide generation and total antioxidant capacity were assessed. Expression of TLR-4 at mRNA and protein levels were studied by using PCR and western blot methods Atorvastatin enhanced the paraquat-reduced cell viability and reduced the paraquat-induced myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide production. Moreover, atorvastatin down-regulated by 60% the paraquat up-regulated expression of TLR-4 at protein and mRNA level. Our results suggest that, AMs in vitro model could be a novel cytological tool for studies on paraquat poisoning and therapy regimens. Additionally, atorvastatin cytoprotective effects on paraquat-induced cytotoxicity partly attribute to its anti-myeloperoxidase, antioxidant properties, which might be regulated via TLR-4 expression.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of myrtol standardized and other essential oils on alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Myrtol standardized is established in the treatment of acute and chronic bronchitis and sinusitis. It increases mucociliar clearance and has muco-secretolytic effects. Additional anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties have been confirmed for Myrtol standardized, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil in several in vitro studies. Objective The aim of this study was to prove the ability of essential oils to reduce cytokines release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production derived from ex vivo cultured alveolar macrophages. Material and methods Alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, n = 26, GOLD III-IV) were pre-cultured with essential oils (10-3-10-8%) for 1 h and then stimulated with LPS (1 μg/ml). After 4 h and 20 h respectively a) cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), and b) TNF-α, IL-8, and GM-CSF secretion were quantified. Results In comparison with negative controls, pre-cultured Myrtol, eucalyptus oil and orange oil (10-4%) reduced in the LPS-activated alveolar macrophages ROS release significantly after 1+20 h as follows: Myrtol - 17.7% (P = 0.05), eucalyptus oil -21.8% (P < 0.01) and orange oil -23.6% (P < 0.01). Anti-oxidative efficacy was comparable to NAC (1 mmol/l). Essential oils also induced a TNF-α reduction: Myrtol (-37.3%, P < 0.001), eucalyptus oil (-26.8%, P < 0.01) and orange oil (-26.6%, P < 0.01). TNF-α reduction at 1+4 h and 1+20 h did not vary (Myrtol: -31.9% and -37.3% respectively, P = 0.372) indicating that this effect occurs early and cannot be further stimulated. Myrtol reduced the release of GMCSF by -35.7% and that of IL-8 only inconsiderably. Conclusions All essential oils tested have effective antioxidative properties in ex vivo cultured and LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Additionally, Myrtol inhibited TNF-α and GM-CSF release best indicating additional potent anti-inflammator y activity. PMID:20156758

  20. In-Depth Global Analysis of Transcript Abundance Levels in Porcine Alveolar Macrophages Following Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laura C.; Neill, John D.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Lager, Kelly M.; Laegreid, William W.; Kehrli, Marcus E.

    2010-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Identifying specific cell signaling or activation pathways that associate with variation in PRRSV replication and macrophage function may lead to identification of novel gene targets for the control of PRRSV infection. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) was used to create and survey the transcriptome of in vitro mock-infected and PRRSV strain VR-2332-infected porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) at 0, 6, 12, 16, and 24 hours after infection. The transcriptome data indicated changes in transcript abundance occurring in PRRSV-infected PAMs over time after infection with more than 590 unique tags with significantly altered transcript abundance levels identified (P < .01). Strikingly, innate immune genes (whose transcript abundances are typically altered in response to other pathogens or insults including IL-8, CCL4, and IL-1β) showed no or very little change at any time point following infection. PMID:22331987

  1. Effect of Calcium on Superoxide Production by Phagocytic Vesicles from Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lew, P. Daniel; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1981-01-01

    Phagocytic vesicles from rabbit lung macrophages produced superoxide in the presence of NADH or NADPH. At 37°C, these vesicles generated 51±7.8 nmol O2−/min per mg protein in the presence of 0.5 mM NADPH. The apparent Km for NADPH and NADH (66 and 266 μM, respectively), the pH optimum for the reaction (6.9), and the cyanide insensitivity were similar to properties of plasma membrane-rich fractions of stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes studied by others. The activity of the phagocytic vesicles was trypsin sensitive. The specific superoxide-generating activity of macrophage phagocytic vesicles isolated from cells incubated up to 90 min with phagocytic particles remained constant. Calcium in micromolar concentrations inhibited the NADPH-dependent O2−-generating activity of phagocytic vesicles. In a physiological ionic medium (100 mM KCl, 2.5 mM MgCl2, 30 mM imidazole-HCl, pH 6.9), a maximal inhibition of O2− generation by phagocytic vesicles of 80% was observed at 40 μM free Ca2+. The half maximum inhibitory effect was at 0.7 μM Ca2+. Variations of the calcium concentration resulted in rapid and reversible alterations in O2−-forming activity. Preincubation of phagocytic vesicles in the presence of EGTA rendered their O2− generation rate in the presence of NADPH insensitive to alterations in the free calcium concentration. This desensitization by low EGTA concentrations (≤100 μM) was reversible by the addition of excess calcium, but desensitization by high EGTA concentrations (>1 mM) was not reversible by the addition of calcium either in the presence or absence of purified rabbit lung macrophage or bovine brain calmodulins. Furthermore, trifluoperazine, a drug that inhibits calmodulin-stimulated reactions, did not alter the activity or the calcium sensitivity of the superoxide-generating system of sensitive phagocytic vesicles. Peripheral plasma membrane vesicles (podosomes) prepared by gentle sonication of macrophages possessed on O2

  2. Suppression and recovery of the alveolar macrophage phagocytic system during continuous exposure to 0. 5 ppm ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Hmieleski, R.R.; Stafford, E.A.; Jakab, G.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Short-term exposures to ozone (O3) are known to impair pulmonary antibacterial defenses and alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis in a dose-related manner. To determine the effect of prolonged O3 exposure, Swiss mice were exposed continuously to 0.5 ppm O3. At 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, intrapulmonary killing was assessed by inhalation challenge with Staphylococcus aureus or Proteus mirabilis and by comparing the number of viable bacteria remaining in the lungs at 4 h between O3-exposed and control animals. To evaluate the effects of O3 on the functional capacity of the AMs, Fc-receptor mediated phagocytosis was assessed. Ozone exposure impaired the intrapulmonary killing of S. aureus at 1 and 3 days; however, with prolonged exposure, the bactericidal capacity of the lungs returned to normal. This trend of an initial suppression followed by recovery was reflected in the phagocytic capacity of the AMs. In contrast to S. aureus, when P. mirabilis was used as the challenge organism, O3 exposure had no suppressive effect on pulmonary bactericidal activity, which correlated with an increase in the phagocytic cell population in the lungs. Morphologic examination of the lavaged macrophages showed that after 1 day of O3 exposure, the AMs were more foamy, and contained significantly more vacuoles. There was also a significant increase in binucleated cells at 3 days. These studies demonstrate that continuous exposure to O3 modulates AM-dependent lung defenses and points to the importance of the challenge organism and exposure protocol in establishing the adverse effect of O3.

  3. Kinetics and ultrastructural studies of the induction of rat alveolar macrophage fusion by mediators released from mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sone, S.; Bucana, C.; Hoyer, L. C.; Fidler, I. J.

    1981-01-01

    Treatment of F344 rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro with cell-free supernatant fluids obtained from concanavalin-A (Con A)-stimulated syngeneic lymphocytes induced extensive fusion. The lymphokine responsible for the fusion of AMs (but not other cells) is here referred to as AM fusion factor (Con-A-MFF). Fusion is dependent on the dose of Con-A-MFF and the population density of AM cultures and occurred 10 hours after Con-A-MFF was added to cultures of normal AMs. Con-A-MFF must interact with AMs for more than 8 hours before full expression of fusion is reached at 24 hours. Using a technique allowing for sequential scanning to transmission electron microscopy analysis of cells, the authors determined the relationship of the morphologic characteristics of the surface and the internal structure of cells fusing to form multinucleate giant cells (MGCs). The process of AM fusion begins with the aggregation of AMs, followed by interdigitation of cell processes. Serial sections of MGCs showed lysosomes associated with remnants of plasma membrane in the cytoplasm. The MGCs contained numerous organelles associated with increased secretory activity of cells. Images Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7234965

  4. Plant derived antioxidants - Geraniol and camphene protect rat alveolar macrophages against t-BHP induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, M; Kakkar, P

    2009-03-01

    Exploration of antioxidants of plant origin and scientific validation of their efficacies has unraveled bioactives from natural sources. In this study, two terpenoids camphene and geraniol were assessed for their cytoprotective and antioxidant potential using t-BHP stressed rat alveolar macrophages. Effect of these test substances along with a known plant derived antioxidant quercetin was seen on cell viability, some oxidative stress markers as well as on mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the test substances geraniol and camphene increased the cell viability significantly as indicated by MTT assay and LDH release assay, during pre-treatment of test compound. Camphene and geraniol showed 29% (P<0.05) and 45% (P<0.05) increase in SOD activity, 28% and 120% (P<0.001) increase in GSH content and restored the mitochondrial membrane potential during pre-treatment as compared to stressed cells. Camphene and geraniol were found to significantly decrease lipid peroxidation, inhibit NO release (83.84% and 64.61%) and ROS generation in the pre-treated cells as compared to stressed cells. The test compounds also showed significant protection against ROS during post-treatment of the test compounds. Results indicate the pharmacological potential of these phytochemicals in lung inflammatory diseases where oxidative stress is a critical control point.

  5. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung alveolar epithelial cells via PGE2, PGD2, and HGF

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance results in the release of growth factors and the action of signaling molecules involved in tissue homeostasis maintenance. Here, we investigated whether and how macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit the TGF-β1-induced Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment with conditioned medium derived from macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells, but not viable or necrotic cells, inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT, including loss of E-cadherin, synthesis of N-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin, and induction of EMT-activating transcription factors, such as Snail1/2, Zeb1/2, and Twist1. Exposure of macrophages to cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398 and COX-2 siRNA) or RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors (Y-27632 and RhoA siRNA) and LA-4 cells to antagonists of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP4 [AH-23848]), PGD2 receptors (DP1 [BW-A868C] and DP2 [BAY-u3405]), or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met (PHA-665752), reversed EMT inhibition by the conditioned medium. Additionally, we found that apoptotic cell instillation inhibited bleomycin-mediated EMT in primary mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells in vivo. Our data suggest a new model for epithelial cell homeostasis, by which the anti-EMT programming of macrophages by apoptotic cells may control the progressive fibrotic reaction via the production of potent paracrine EMT inhibitors. PMID:26875548

  6. Comparison of arachidonate metabolism by alveolar macrophages from bighorn and domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Silflow, R M; Foreyt, W J; Taylor, S M; Laegreid, W W; Liggitt, H D; Leid, R W

    1991-02-01

    We have defined the metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) secreted by alveolar macrophages (AMs) of bighorn sheep and domestic sheep in response to three agents: calcium ionophore A23187, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and opsonized zymosan. Cells were labeled with [3H]AA prior to stimulation and 11 tritiated metabolites, including prostaglandins (PGs), thromboxanes (TXs), leukotrienes (LTs), and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), were detected and quantitated by high-performance liquid chromotography and radiometry. Zymosan stimulation resulted in the release of significantly elevated quantities (P less than 0.05), of LTB4, [5(S), 12(R)-dihydroxy-6,14-cis-8,10-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid], 5-HETE, [5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid], and the nonenzymatic isomers of LTB4, [LTB I, 5(S),12(R)-6-trans-LTB4] and LTB II, [5(S), 12(S)-6-trans-LTB4], from domestic sheep AM when compared to bighorn sheep AM. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation released significantly elevated quantities (P less than 0.04), of TXB2, (thromboxane B2), HHT, [12(S)-12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecaenoic acid], LTB I, LTB II, and 15-HETE, [15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid] from domestic sheep AMs when compared to bighorn sheep AMs. However, after A23187 challenge, only 15-HETE was significantly elevated (P less than 0.04) in domestic sheep AMs when compared to bighorn sheep AMs. These clear differences in AA metabolism of AMs obtained from bighorn and domestic sheep in response to three different agonists suggest not only different control mechanisms for lung metabolism of AA in the two species, but also suggest that differences in the metabolites released may lead to quite different regulation of lung defense mechanisms in the two sheep species.

  7. Surface iron inhibits quartz-induced cytotoxic and inflammatory responses in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ghiazza, Mara; Scherbart, Agnes M; Fenoglio, Ivana; Grendene, Francesca; Turci, Francesco; Martra, Gianmario; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P F; Fubini, Bice

    2011-01-14

    The mechanism of enhancement/inhibition of quartz toxicity induced by iron is still unclear. Here the amount of iron on a fibrogenic quartz (Qz) was increased by wet impregnation (Fe(NO(3))(3) 0.67 and 6.7 wt %). X-ray diffraction (XRD), XRF diffuse reflectance, UV-vis, and infrared (IR) spectroscopies revealed dispersed ferric ions, and hematite aggregates at the higher loading. Surface features relevant to pathogenicity and cell responses were compared not only to the original quartz but also to reference quartz DQ12. Surface charge (ζ-potential) was more negative on the original and low-loaded specimen than on the high-loaded one. DQ12 had a less negative ζ-potential than Qz, ascribed to the absence of aluminium present in Qz (1.7 wt %). All quartz specimens were able to generate HO(•) radicals, iron-loaded samples being more reactive than original quartz. Iron deposition inhibited the rupture of a C-H bond. All quartzes were phagocytized by alveolar macrophages (AMΦ cell line NR8383) to the same extent, irrespective of their surface state. Conversely, iron loading increased AMΦ viability (evaluated by cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis). Qz was found to be much less cytotoxic than DQ12. The induction of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses (evaluated by HO-1 mRNA expression and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression) revealed a reduction in inflammogenicity upon iron loading and a more inflammogenic potency of DQ12 ascribed to undissociated SiOH interacting via H-bonding with cell membrane components. The results suggest that besides aluminium also iron at the quartz surface may have an inhibitory effect on adverse health responses.

  8. Glucocorticoid-augmented efferocytosis inhibits pulmonary pneumococcal clearance in mice by reducing alveolar macrophage bactericidal function

    PubMed Central

    Stolberg, Valerie R.; McCubbrey, Alexandra L.; Freeman, Christine M.; Brown, Jeanette P.; Crudgington, Sean W.; Taitano, Sophina H.; Saxton, Bridget L.; Mancuso, Peter; Curtis, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroid(s) (ICS) increase community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) incidence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by unknown mechanisms. Apoptosis is increased in the lungs of COPD patients. Uptake of apoptotic cells (AC) (“efferocytosis”) by alveolar macrophages (AMø) reduces their ability to combat microbes, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most common cause of CAP in COPD patients. Having shown that ICS significantly increase AMø efferocytosis, we hypothesized that this process, termed glucocorticoid-augmented efferocytosis (GCAE), might explain the association of CAP with ICS therapy in COPD. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of fluticasone, AC or both on AMø of C57BL/6 mice in vitro and in an established model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Fluticasone plus AC significantly reduced TLR4-stimulated AMø IL-12 production, relative to either treatment alone, and decreased TNF-α, CCL3, CCL5 and KC, relative to AC. Mice treated with fluticasone plus AC before infection with viable pneumococci developed significantly more lung CFU at 48 h. However, none of the pretreatments altered inflammatory cell recruitment to the lungs at 48 h post-infection, and fluticasone plus AC less markedly reduced in vitro mediator production to heat-killed pneumococci. Fluticasone plus AC significantly reduced in vitro AMø killing of pneumococci, relative to other conditions, in part by delaying phagolysosome acidification without affecting production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. These results support GCAE as a potential explanation for the epidemiological association of ICS therapy of COPD patients with increased risk of CAP, and establish murine experimental models to dissect underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:25987742

  9. Effect of heavy metal ions on the release of reactive oxygen intermediates by bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, T; Berg, I; Dörger, M; Gercken, G

    1995-04-12

    Short-term incubations of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) with metal-containing dusts induce the release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Incubations of BAM (90 min) with dissolved metal compounds (0.1-100 microM) combined with quartz dusts were performed to investigate the effects of single elements on BAM stimulation. As(III), as well as the calcium antagonists, Ni(II) and Ce(III), inhibited the secretion of superoxide anions (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). O2- concentrations were lowered by Mn(II) and Fe(II). Increased ROI concentrations were observed with V(IV) (O2- and H2O2) and Fe(III) (O2-). The addition of Cd(II), Cr(III) and V(V) showed no effect on the dust-induced respiratory burst. The influence of insoluble heavy metal compounds on ROI secretion by BAM were studied with metal oxide-coated silica particles. In most cases the release of ROI was not affected by the chemical modification of the particle surface. Coating with CuO markedly lowered the concentrations of O2- and H2O2, whereas vanadium(IV) oxide considerably increased both ROIs. Although most of the investigated metal compounds did not alter ROI secretion our present results with V(IV) and Fe(III) confirm our recent statistical evaluation of the effects of heavy metal-containing dusts on ROI secretion (Berg et al., 1993, J. Toxicol. Environ. Health 39, 341).

  10. Pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge activates lung interstitial macrophages which correlate with IFN-γ production and infection control in mice.

    PubMed

    Gracey, Eric; Baglaenko, Yuriy; Prayitno, Nadia; Van Rooijen, Nico; Akram, Ali; Lin, Aifeng; Chiu, Basil; Inman, Robert D

    2015-12-01

    Protective immunity to the pathogen Chlamydia is dependent on a robust IFN-γ response generated by innate and adaptive lymphocytes. Here we assess the role of the macrophage in orchestrating a protective response in vivo to the murine pathogen, Chlamydia muridarum. During acute pulmonary and peritoneal infection, resident macrophages in both sites are infected with C. muridarum and adopt an inflammatory phenotype. In the lung, this activation is restricted to interstitial macrophages, which harbor higher levels of C. muridarum 16sRNA than alveolar macrophages. We examined innate and adaptive lymphocyte activation in the peritoneal cavity with macrophage depletion and with adoptive transfer of infected macrophages. These experiments demonstrate macrophage activation correlates with a protective IFN-γ response and effective control of C. muridarum. These studies suggest that a quantitative or qualitative alteration in macrophages may play a key role in the development of Chlamydia-associated diseases.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide induces alveolar macrophage necrosis via CD14 and the P2x7 receptor leading to Interleukin-1α release

    PubMed Central

    Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Jones, Heather D.; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Zhang, Wenxuan; Wawrowsky, Kolja A.; Crother, Timothy R.; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute lung injury (ALI) remains a serious health issue with little improvement in our understanding of the pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches. We investigated the mechanism that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces early neutrophil recruitment to lungs and increases pulmonary vascular permeability during ALI. Intratracheal LPS induced release of pro-interleukin-1α (IL-1α) from necrotic alveolar macrophages (AM), which activated endothelial cells (EC) to induce vascular leakage via loss of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. LPS triggered the AM purinergic receptor P2X7(R) to induce Ca2+ influx and ATP depletion, which led to necrosis. P2X7R deficiency significantly reduced necrotic death of AM and release of pro-IL-1α into the lung. CD14 was required for LPS binding to P2X7R, as CD14 neutralization significantly diminished LPS induced necrotic death of AM and pro-IL-1α release. These results demonstrate a key role for pro-IL-1α from necrotic alveolar macrophages in LPS-mediated ALI, as a critical initiator of increased vascular permeability and early neutrophil infiltration. PMID:25862090

  12. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Alveolar Macrophage Necrosis via CD14 and the P2X7 Receptor Leading to Interleukin-1α Release.

    PubMed

    Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Jones, Heather D; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Zhang, Wenxuan; Wawrowsky, Kolja A; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-04-21

    Acute lung injury (ALI) remains a serious health issue with little improvement in our understanding of the pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches. We investigated the mechanism that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces early neutrophil recruitment to lungs and increases pulmonary vascular permeability during ALI. Intratracheal LPS induced release of pro-interleukin-1α (IL-1α) from necrotic alveolar macrophages (AM), which activated endothelial cells (EC) to induce vascular leakage via loss of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. LPS triggered the AM purinergic receptor P2X7(R) to induce Ca(2+) influx and ATP depletion, which led to necrosis. P2X7R deficiency significantly reduced necrotic death of AM and release of pro-IL-1α into the lung. CD14 was required for LPS binding to P2X7R, as CD14 neutralization significantly diminished LPS induced necrotic death of AM and pro-IL-1α release. These results demonstrate a key role for pro-IL-1α from necrotic alveolar macrophages in LPS-mediated ALI, as a critical initiator of increased vascular permeability and early neutrophil infiltration.

  13. Ovine progressive pneumonia virus capsid antigen as found in CD163- and CD172a-positive alveolar macrophages of persistently infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Noh, S M; Snekvik, K R; White, S N; Schneider, D A; Truscott, T; Knowles, D P

    2010-05-01

    In situ detection of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) and the phenotypic identification of the cells that harbor OPPV have not been described for the OPPV-affected tissues, which include lung, mammary gland, synovial membranes of the carpal joint, and choroid plexus of the brain. In this study, the authors first developed a single enzyme-based automated immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis for detection of OPPV capsid antigen (CA) on OPPV-affected tissues, using 2 anti-CAEV CA monoclonal antibodies, 5A1 and 10A1, and 2 enzyme-based IHC systems. Out of 10 naturally and persistently OPPV-infected ewes, OPPV CA was detected in intercellular regions of the carpal synovial membrane of 1 ewe, in cells resembling alveolar macrophages and pulmonary interstitial macrophages in lung tissue of 3 ewes, and in mammary alveolar cells of 1 ewe. Furthermore, dual enzyme-based automated IHC analyses revealed that OPPV CA was predominantly detected in CD172a- or CD163-positive alveolar macrophages of the lungs and mammary gland. That anti-inflammatory (CD163) and downregulatory (CD172a) types of alveolar macrophage harbor OPPV CA leads to the possibility that during persistent infection with OPPV, the host alveolar macrophage might serve to limit inflammation while OPPV persists undetected by the host adaptive immune response in the lung and mammary gland.

  14. Ozone-enhanced pulmonary infection with Streptococcus zooepidemicus in mice. The role of alveolar macrophage function and capsular virulence factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Park, P.; Selgrade, M.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Ozone exposure has been shown to increase the susceptibility of mice to pulmonary bacterial infection. We report here the differences in susceptibility of two strains of mice (C3H/HeJ and C57Bl/6) to pulmonary challenge with Streptococcus zooepidemicus, and demonstrate an association between O3 exposure, reduced alveolar macrophage (AM) function, and increased mortality to infection. After a 3-h exposure to air or to 0.4 or 0.8 ppm O3, mice received an infection of bacteria by aerosol. Subsequent mortality observed over a 20-day period for any given exposure concentration was greater in the C3H/HeJ mice than in the C57Bl/6 mice. Phagocytosis assays identified the AM from O3-exposed lungs as having an impaired ability to engulf the bacteria. Baseline phagocytic activity in C3H/HeJ mice was lower than that in C57Bl/6 mice. Microbiologic assessment of the lungs at various times after infection revealed that the streptococci proliferated rapidly in the lungs of O3-exposed mice, grew more quickly upon isolation, and displayed a mucoid colony appearance indicative of increased encapsulation. In vitro assays confirmed that the encapsulated isolates prevented binding of the bacteria to AM, and reinfection of nonexposed mice with the encapsulated isolate resulted in increased mortality compared with infection with similar numbers of the original unencapsulated bacteria. We have demonstrated that O3 inhalation impairs AM activity in the lung. The streptococci are then able to proliferate and more fully express virulence factors, in particular, the antiphagocytic capsule, which prohibits the ingestion of bacteria by pulmonary phagocytes and leads to increased severity of infection.

  15. Sheet-type titania, but not P25, induced paraptosis accompanying apoptosis in murine alveolar macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Seung Yun; Lee, Gwang-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Younghun; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we identified the toxic effects of sheet-type titania (TNS), which are being developed as a material for UV-blocking glass, comparing with P25, a benchmark control for titania, in MH-S cells, a mouse alveolar macrophage cell line. After 24 h exposure, the TNS-exposed cells formed large vacuoles while the P25-exposed ones did not. The decreased levels of cell viability were similar between the P25 and TNS groups, but ATP production was clearly lower in cells exposed to the TNS. P25 decreased the expression of calnexin protein, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane marker, and increased the number of cells generating ROS in a dose dependent manner. Meanwhile, TNS dilated the ER and mitochondria and increased the secretion of NO and pro-inflammatory cytokines, but not of ROS. Subsequently, we studied the molecular response following TNS-induced vacuolization. TNS started to form vacuoles in the cytosol since 20 min after exposure, and the expression of the mitochondria function-related genes were down-regulated the most in the cells exposed for 1 h. After 24 h exposure, the number of apoptotic cells and the relative levels of BAX to Bcl-2 increased. The expression of SOD1 protein, but not of SOD2, also dose-dependently increased with an increase in caspase-8 activity. Additionally, the MAPK pathway was significantly activated, even though the expression of p-EGFR did not change significantly. Furthermore, the number of apoptotic cells increased rapidly with time and with the inhibition of vacuole formation. Taken together, we suggest that P25 and TNS may target different organelles. In addition, TNS, but not P25, induced paraptosis accompanied by apoptosis in MH-S cells, and the formation of the cytoplasmic vacuoles allowed delay apoptosis following TNS exposure.

  16. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor is elevated in alveolar macrophages from sheep naturally infected with maedi-visna virus and stimulates maedi-visna virus replication in macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Harkiss, G D; Hopkins, J; Woodall, C J

    2002-08-01

    Infection by maedi-visna virus, a lentivirus of sheep, leads to chronic inflammatory reactions of various tissues. In this report we have analysed the role of specific cytokines in the disease process. A significant increase in expression of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA was observed in alveolar macrophages isolated from the lungs of naturally infected animals when compared with lungs of seronegative controls. Levels of GM-CSF mRNA expression in alveolar macrophages correlated with the presence of lung lesions, but there was no correlation of interleukin-10, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA levels in alveolar macrophages from animals with pulmonary lesions. In vitro investigation showed that GM-CSF in the range 0.1-10 ng/ml induced a significant increase in viral p25 production after 7 days in acutely infected blood monocyte-derived macrophages. The production of p25 peaked between 7 and 14 days exposure to 10 ng/ml of GM-CSF. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the level of viral DNA in monocyte-derived macrophages was dose-dependent following GM-CSF treatment in the range 0.1-100 ng/ml after 7 days. Viral mRNA expression was also enhanced. These findings indicate a role for GM-CSF in the pathogenesis of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia in infected animals.

  17. In vitro acute effects of tobacco smoke on tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 production by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubar, V; Gosset, P; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B

    1993-01-01

    Tobacco smoke is a usual form of oxidant aggression present in the domestic environment. In the present study, the in vitro acute effects of a 2-cigarette smoke gas phase were evaluated on cell viability and cytokine secretion by alveolar macrophages (AM) from guinea pigs and human healthy subjects. Cell injury was estimated immediately after smoke exposure by evaluation of ATP cell content (measured by bioluminescence) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the culture medium. LDH release was also measured when the interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) activities were evaluated. No cytotoxic effect was found: The ATP cell content of both guinea pig AM and human AM did not significantly change after tobacco smoke exposure. Similarly, the LDH release in the culture medium was unchanged both immediately after tobacco smoke exposure and at the time of the cytokine evaluation (18-20 h later) compared to cells cultured in the air. The total protein synthesis by the guinea pig AM evaluated by 35S-L-methionine labeling was unaffected by tobacco smoke exposure. The production of IL-6 and TNF activities was evaluated 18-20 h after smoke exposure. The IL-6 activity was measured by the proliferation test of 7TD1 hybridoma cell line; the TNF activity was evaluated by the L929 mouse fibroblast cytotoxic test and by an immunoradiometric assay (for human AM). A 2-cigarette smoke exposure decreased both activities significantly. The exposure of the guinea pig AM reduced IL-6 activity by 24.3 +/- 6.7%, 42.4 +/- 7.8%, and 39.7 +/- 9.6% and TNF activity by 33.8 +/- 10.4%, 35.1 +/- 10.7%, and 38.8 +/- 9.9% (respectively unstimulated cells and AM activated by 0.1 and 10 micrograms LPS/mL). The decrease in monokine production by the human AM was, respectively, 57.8 +/- 8.8%, 59.7 +/- 11.4%, and 49.9 +/- 10.5% of IL-6 activity and 37.4 +/- 14.6%, 17.6 +/- 9.6%, and 37.2 +/- 6.3% of TNF activity. The possible release of cytokine inhibitors was also investigated

  18. Klotho Reduction in Alveolar Macrophages Contributes to Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Wang, Yujie; Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Sini; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal inflammation and accelerated decline in lung function occur in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Klotho, an anti-aging protein, has an anti-inflammatory function. However, the role of Klotho has never been investigated in COPD. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Klotho by alveolar macrophages in airway inflammation in COPD. Klotho levels were assessed in the lung samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of non-smokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. The regulation of Klotho expression by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) was studied in vitro, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) and recombinant Klotho were employed to investigate the role of Klotho on CSE-induced inflammation. Klotho expression was reduced in alveolar macrophages in the lungs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COPD patients. CSE decreased Klotho expression and release from MH-S cells. Knockdown of endogenous Klotho augmented the expression of the inflammatory mediators, such as MMP-9, IL-6, and TNF-α, by MH-S cells. Exogenous Klotho inhibited the expression of CSE-induced inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, we showed that Klotho interacts with IκBα of the NF-κB pathway. Dexamethasone treatment increased the expression and release level of Klotho in MH-S cells. Our findings suggest that Klotho plays a role in sustained inflammation of the lungs, which in turn may have therapeutic implications in COPD.

  19. Iron modulates the replication of virulent Mycobacterium bovis in resting and activated bovine and possum macrophages.

    PubMed

    Denis, Michel; Buddle, Bryce M

    2005-09-15

    Bovine and possum macrophages were infected in vitro with a virulent strain of Mycobacterium bovis, and mycobacterial replication was measured in the infected macrophages cultured under a variety of conditions. Virulent M. bovis replicated substantially in alveolar possum macrophages as well as in bovine blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Addition of recombinant bovine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) rendered bovine macrophages significantly more resistant to M. bovis replication. Disruption of iron levels in infected macrophages by addition of apotransferrin or bovine lactoferrin blocked replication of M. bovis in both bovine and possum macrophages. On the other hand, addition of exogenous iron, either in the form of iron citrate or iron-saturated transferrin, rendered macrophages of both species much more permissive for the replication of M. bovis. The impact of iron deprivation/loading on the mycobacteriostatic activity of cells was independent of nitric-oxide release, as well as independent of the generation of oxygen radical species in both possum and bovine macrophages. Exogenous iron was shown to reverse the ability of IFN-gamma/LPS pulsed bovine macrophages to restrict M. bovis replication. When autologous possum lymphocytes from animals vaccinated with M. bovis strain BCG were added to infected macrophages, they rendered the macrophages less permissive for virulent M. bovis replication. Loading the cells with iron prior to this macrophage-lymphocyte interaction, reversed this immune effect induced by sensitized cells. We conclude that, in two important animal species, intracellular iron level plays an important role in M. bovis replication in macrophages, irrespective of their activation status.

  20. Scavenging of hydrogen peroxide by alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII) and macrophages (MAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, L.; Slater, M.; Baker, R.; Matalon, S. )

    1990-02-26

    The pulmonary epithelium is often a target of increased concentrations of extracellularly generated reactive oxygen species (PROS). In this study the authors quantified whether freshly isolated ATII and unstimulated MAC may scavenge extracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and to determine the mechanisms involved. Cells were suspended in Eagles minimum essential medium and incubated with 500 {mu}M xanthine and 10 mU/ml xanthine oxidase for 60 min at 37C. In a separate series of experiments cells were preincubated with 10 {mu}M aminotriazole (ATZ) which decreased their catalase activity 60% of their initial values. Both ATII and MAC scavenged significant amounts of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. After exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cell viabilities for the control (-ATZ) and ATZ treated cells were {ge}50%. The ability of ATII and MAC to scavenge extracellular H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may protect the alveolar epithelium from reactive oxygen species injury.

  1. Reduced binding and phagocytosis of Pneumocystis carinii by alveolar macrophages from persons infected with HIV-1 correlates with mannose receptor downregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Koziel, H; Eichbaum, Q; Kruskal, B A; Pinkston, P; Rogers, R A; Armstrong, M Y; Richards, F F; Rose, R M; Ezekowitz, R A

    1998-01-01

    The macrophage mannose receptor, a pattern recognition molecule and component of innate immunity, mediates binding and phagocytosis of Pneumocystis carinii and likely represents an important clearance mechanism in the lungs of immunocompetent hosts. The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected individuals to bind and phagocytose P. carinii, and to investigate the role of the macrophage mannose receptor in mediating this interaction. Compared with healthy individuals, alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of P. carinii from HIV+ persons was reduced up to 74% (P = 0.02), primarily reflecting a reduction in the number of organisms associated with each macrophage (P = 0.019). Furthermore, macrophages from HIV+ individuals demonstrated up to an 80% (P < 0.05) reduction in mannose receptor surface expression and endocytosis. Mannose receptor affinity was unaltered, and mRNA levels were modestly reduced (P < 0.05). Cells from HIV+ individuals with CD4(+) counts < 200 cells/mm3 (representing individuals at high clinical risk for P. carinii pneumonia) demonstrated the lowest levels of P. carinii phagocytosis and mannose receptor endocytosis. In vitro HIV infection of alveolar macrophages from healthy individuals reduced mannose receptor endocytosis to 53.2% (P < 0.05) and P. carinii binding and phagocytosis to 67.4% (P < 0.05) of control. Our studies suggest that HIV infection may alter innate immunity in the lungs, and that impaired alveolar macrophage mannose receptor-mediated binding and phagocytosis of P. carinii may contribute to the susceptibility of HIV-infected individuals to this opportunistic pulmonary pathogen. PMID:9769325

  2. Lack of marked cyto- and genotoxicity of cristobalite in devitrified (heated) alkaline earth silicate wools in short-term assays with cultured primary rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Christina; Harrison, Paul T C; Bellmann, Bernd; Brown, Robert C; Zoitos, Bruce K; Class, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools are low-biopersistence high-temperature insulation wools. Following prolonged periods at high temperatures they may devitrify, producing crystalline silica (CS) polymorphs, including cristobalite, classified as carcinogenic to humans. Here we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic significance of cristobalite present in heated AES wools. Primary rat alveolar macrophages were incubated in vitro for 2 h with 200 µg/cm² unheated/heated calcium magnesium silicate wools (CMS1, CMS2, CMS3; heat-treated for 1 week at, or 4 weeks 150 °C below, their respective classification temperatures) or magnesium silicate wool (MS; heated for 24 h at 1260 °C). Types and quantities of CS formed, and fiber size distribution and shape were determined by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Lactate dehydrogenase release and alkaline and hOGG1-modified comet assays were used, ± aluminum lactate (known to quench CS effects), for cytotoxicity/genotoxicity screening. Cristobalite content of wools increased with heating temperature and duration, paralleled by decreases in fiber length and changes in fiber shape. No marked cytotoxicity, and nearly no (CMS) or only slight (MS) DNA-strand break induction was observed, compared to the CS-negative control Al₂O₃, whereas DQ12 as CS-positive control was highly active. Some samples induced slight oxidative DNA damage, but no biological endpoint significantly correlated with free CS, quartz, or cristobalite. In conclusion, heating of AES wools mediates changes in CS content and fiber length/shape. While changes in fiber morphology can impact biological activity, cristobalite content appears minor or of no relevance to the intrinsic toxicity of heated AES wools in short-term assays with rat alveolar macrophages.

  3. Recovery of Alveolar Macrophages from Rhesus and Cynomolgus Monkeys by Lung Lavage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-07

    diseast~; (14 , 16—18). Pulmonary alveolar macrop hages arc relat ivel y d i f f i cu l t to obtain and , in the past , studies requiring harvest of...human pulmonary alveolar macrop hages by ci garette smoking. :~~ Clin. T nv ”.l 52: 1881—1884, 1973. 3. GOLDSTEIN , E. , V. LI PPERT , and P. W A R S I I...A U ! R . Pulmonary a lveo lar macrop hage . Defender against bacter ia l infec t ion of the lung. 3. d in. Invest. 54: 519—528 , 1974. 4. GREEN , C

  4. Response of rat alveolar macrophages to ozone: quantitative assessment of population size, morphology, and proliferation following acute exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, J.A.; Harkema, J.R.; Kirkpatrick, D.T.; Henderson, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of an acute exposure to low levels of ozone on rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM). Fisher 344 rats exposed to 0.0, 0.12, 0.8, or 1.5 ppm O3 for 6 h were killed immediately after and 3, 18, 42, or 66 h after ozone exposure and their lungs were lavaged. Compared to sham-exposed (control) rats, exposure to 0.12 ppm O3 had no measurable effect on the total number, labeling index (LI), mitotic index (MI), or morphology of rat alveolar macrophages. The number of neutrophils was significantly (p less than or equal to 0.001) greater than in controls at 3, 18, and 42 h after exposure to 1.5 ppm O3 and 42 h after exposure to 0.8 ppm O3. The number of PAM was approximately twice that of controls 42 and 66 h after exposure to 0.8 and 1.5 ppm O3. There was a significant (p less than or equal to 0.001) increase in PAM MI 42 and 66 h after exposure to 1.5 ppm O3 and 42 h after 0.8 ppm O3. The increase in the number of PAM in mitosis was preceded by an increase in PAM LI. The PAM LI was significantly (p less than or equal to 0.001) greater than controls 18 and 42 h after exposure but returned to near normal levels by 66 h after exposure. There was a transient decrease in the mean nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of PAM from rats exposed to 1.5 ppm O3 18 and 42 h after exposure due to an increase in the mean PAM cytoplasmic area. Comparison of the PAM population doubling time (Dt) and cell cycle time (Ct) suggest that PAM proliferation played a significant role in the observed increase in PAM following exposure to 0.8 and 1.5 ppm O3. These results highlight the dynamic response of PAM to an acute exposure to ozone and suggest that the proliferative response of pulmonary alveolar macrophages may be a useful indicator of pulmonary damage following inhalation of an irritant oxidant.

  5. In depth global analysis of transcript abundance levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Infection of the primary target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not under...

  6. In depth global analysis of gene expression levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide. Infection of the preferential target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not understood. Serial Analysis of Gene Ex...

  7. Stimulation of interleukin-1 and -6 production in alveolar macrophages by the neotropical liana, Uncaria tomentosa (uña de gato)

    PubMed

    Lemaire, I; Assinewe, V; Cano, P; Awang, D V; Arnason, J T

    1999-02-01

    Two extracts of different collections of the traditional medicine uña de gato (Uncaria tomentosa) from Peru were characterized by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography as containing approximately 6 mg/g total oxindole content prior to studies with alveolar macrophages. The plant preparations greatly stimulated IL-1 and IL-6 production by rat macrophages in a dose dependent manner in the range of 0.025-0.1 mg/ml. They were also able to enhance IL-1 and -6 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. The results suggest a strong immunostimulant action of this plant.

  8. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide

  9. Effect of 0. 64 ppm ozone on alveolar macrophage lysozyme levels in rats with chronic pulmonary bacterial infection. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, R.L.; Lippert, W.E.; Goldstein, E.

    1986-12-01

    A rat model of chronic pulmonary infection (CPI) initiated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in agar beads was used to test the effect of ozone on lysosomal enzyme levels in alveolar macrophages (AM). CPI was induced by intratracheal instillation of a 0.1-ml suspension of infected beads into the left lung. Ten days after infection half the rats were exposed to atmospheres of air and half to 0.64 ppm ozone for 4 weeks. Enzyme levels were measured using a scanning cytospectrophotometer linked to a PDP/11 computer. Measurement of lysozyme in individual rat AM in situ showed a significant decrease in cell size and enzyme content in ozone-exposed uninfected animals. Cell size and enzyme content of ozone-exposed animals with CPI were further reduced, suggesting a synergistic effect between ozone exposure and chronic infection.

  10. Dysregulation of alveolar macrophage PPARγ, NADPH oxidases and TGFβ1 in otherwise healthy HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Yeligar, Samantha M; Ward, Janine M; Harris, Frank L; Brown, Lou Ann; Guidot, David; Cribbs, Sushma K

    2017-03-17

    Rationale: Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), respiratory infections increase mortality in individuals living with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In experimental and clinical studies of chronic HIV infection, alveolar macrophages (AMs) exhibit impaired phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, NADPH oxidase (Nox) isoforms Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ1) are critical mediators of AM oxidative stress and phagocytic dysfunction. Therefore, we hypothesized that HIV alters AM expression of these targets, resulting in chronic lung oxidative stress and subsequent immune dysfunction. Methods: A cross-sectional study of HIV-infected (n=22) and HIV-uninfected (n=6) subjects was conducted. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and AMs were isolated. Lung H2O2 generation was determined by measuring H2O2 in the BAL fluid. In AMs, PPARγ, Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβ1 mRNA (qRT-PCR) and protein (fluorescent immunomicroscopy) levels were assessed. Results: Compared to HIV-uninfected (control) subjects, HIV-infected subjects were relatively older and the majority were African American; ~86% were on ART and their median CD4 count was 445 with a median viral load of 0 log copies/mL. HIV infection was associated with increased H2O2 in the BAL, decreased AM mRNA and protein levels of PPARγ, and increased AM mRNA and protein levels of Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβ1. Conclusions: PPARγ attenuation and increases in Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβ1 contribute to AM oxidative stress and immune dysfunction in the AMs of otherwise healthy HIV-infected subjects. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which HIV increases susceptibility to pulmonary infections.

  11. Membrane-Tethered MUC1 Mucin Counter-Regulates the Phagocytic Activity of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kosuke; Uchino, Reina; Lillehoj, Erik P; Knox, Kenneth; Lin, Yong; Kim, K Chul

    2016-04-01

    MUC1 (MUC in human; Muc in animals) is a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein expressed in mucosal epithelial cells and hematopoietic cells. MUC1 is involved in the resolution of inflammation during airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) infection by suppressing Toll-like receptor signaling in airway epithelial cells. Although alveolar macrophages are recognized as critical mediators of cell-mediated immunity against microorganisms inhaled into the airways, the role of MUC1 in regulating their response is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine whether macrophages express MUC1, and, if so, whether MUC1 expression might be associated with macrophage M0/M1/M2 differentiation or phagocytic activity. Human and mouse MUC1/Muc1 expression was drastically up-regulated in classically activated (M1) macrophages compared with nonactivated (M0) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 polarization and Pa stimulation each increased MUC1 ectodomain shedding from the macrophage surface in a TNF-α-converting enzyme-dependent manner. MUC1/Muc1 deficiency in M0 macrophages increased adhesion and phagocytosis of Pa and Escherichia coli compared with MUC1/Muc1-expressing cells, and attenuation of phagocytosis by MUC1 was augmented after polarization into M1 macrophages compared with M0 macrophages. Finally, MUC1/Muc1 deficiency in macrophages increased reactive oxygen species production and TNF-α release in response to Pa compared with MUC1/Muc1-sufficient cells. These results indicate that MUC1/Muc1 expression by macrophages is predominantly in the M1 subtype, and that MUC1/Muc1 expression in these cells decreases their phagocytic activity in an antiinflammatory manner.

  12. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  13. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 small interfering RNA were administered to alveolar macrophage-depleted mice via a jugular venous cannula 30 min before the start of the ventilation protocol. In some experiments, mice were ventilated in the absence and presence of autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (15 mg/kg ip) or trichostatin A (1 mg/kg ip). Mechanical ventilation with a high tidal volume caused rapid (within minutes) activation of autophagy in the lung. Conventional transmission electron microscopic examination of lung sections showed that mechanical ventilation-induced autophagy activation mainly occurred in lung macrophages. Autophagy activation in the lungs during mechanical ventilation was dramatically attenuated in alveolar macrophage-depleted mice. Selective silencing of autophagy-related protein 5 in lung macrophages abolished mechanical ventilation-induced nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation and lung inflammatory injury. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also significantly attenuated the inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. The activation of autophagy in macrophages mediates early lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation via NLRP3 inflammasome signaling. Inhibition of autophagy activation in lung macrophages may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury.

  14. Alveolar macrophages are a major determinant of early responses to viral lung infection but do not influence subsequent disease development.

    PubMed

    Pribul, Philippa K; Harker, James; Wang, Belinda; Wang, Hongwei; Tregoning, John S; Schwarze, Jürgen; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2008-05-01

    Macrophages are abundant in the lower respiratory tract. They play a central role in the innate response to infection but may also modulate excessive inflammation. Both macrophages and ciliated epithelial cells respond to infection by releasing soluble mediators, leading to the recruitment of innate and adaptive effector cells. To study the role of lung macrophages in acute respiratory viral infection, we depleted them by the inhalation of clodronate liposomes in an established mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease. Infection caused an immediate local release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, peaking on day 1, which was virtually abolished by clodronate liposome treatment. Macrophage depletion inhibited the activation (days 1 to 2) and recruitment (day 4) of natural killer (NK) cells and enhanced peak viral load in the lung (day 4). However, macrophage depletion did not affect the recruitment of activated CD4 or CD8 T cells, weight loss, or virus-induced changes in lung function. Therefore, lung macrophages play a central role in the early responses to viral infection but have remarkably little effect on the adaptive response occurring at the time of peak disease severity.

  15. Towards a global analysis of porcine alveolar macrophages proteins through two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Reinado, Eva; Ramírez-Boo, María; Garrido, Juan J; Jorrín, Jesús V; Moreno, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are the primary phagocytes of the innate immune systems, constituting a link between innate and adaptive immunity. With the aim of studying the porcine AM biology and the dynamics of pig-pathogen cell interactions, we have obtained a reference 2-DE map of the porcine AM proteins. The proteins were separated by 2-DE using a 5-8 range pH gradient in isoelectric focusing and over 800 spots were detected. A set of proteins, covering the pI 5.2-7.4 and M(W) 19 to 106kDa ranges, was subjected to MS analysis and 106 proteins were assigned identification by PMF, this identification being confirmed by MS/MS. An important number of proteins is involved in immunological functions, signalling process, transport or apoptosis, confirming that macrophages are involved in a wide range of biological functions. This reference map provides a useful tool for identifying protein pattern changes as a result of inflammation, exposure to infectious agents or genetic diseases.

  16. Effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT6-CFP10 Protein on Cell Viability and Production of Nitric Oxide in Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoli; Han, Meng; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Laixing; Gu, Zuye; Yang, Mei; Yang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major pathogen of tuberculosis, which affects approximately one-third of the world’s population. The 6 kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT6) and the 10 kDa culture filtrate protein (CFP10), which are secreted by the ESX-1 system in M. tuberculosis, can contribute to mycobacterial virulence. Objectives The aim of this study was to research the effects of M. tuberculosis ESAT6-CFP10 protein on macrophages during a host’s was first and second exposures to M. tuberculosis. Materials and Methods In this study, the ESAT6 and CFP10 genes were amplified to create a fusion gene (ESAT6-CFP10) and cloned into the pET-32a(+) and pEGFP-N1 expression vectors, respectively. The recombinant pET-32a(+)-ESAT6-CFP10 plasmid was transformed into the Escherichia coli Origami strain, and the fusion protein was expressed and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. The recombinant pEGFP-N1-ESAT6-CFP10 plasmid was transfected into rat alveolar macrophage cells (NR8383). The cell line expressing the ESAT6-CFP10 protein was selected with RT-PCR and designated as NR8383-EC. Finally, the effects of the ESAT6-CFP10 fusion protein on the NR8383 cell line, as well as on the newly constructed NR8383-EC cells, were further assessed. Results The recombinant ESAT6-CFP10 protein was expressed in E. coli and in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages. This protein affected the proliferation and nitric oxide (NO) generation of the NR8383 and NR8383-EC cells. Although NO generation was inhibited in both cell lines, proliferation was inhibited in NR8383 while it was increased NR8383-EC. Conclusions The data indicate that ESAT6-CFP10 could support the survival of M. tuberculosis in the host through altering the host immune response. It also indicates that the host may gain some level of protection from a second exposure to M. tuberculosis, as evidenced by increased proliferation of NR8383-EC. PMID:27635210

  17. Alveolar macrophages contribute to the pathogenesis of human metapneumovirus infection while protecting against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Deepthi; Gupta, Meera R; Sbrana, Elena; Velayutham, Thangam S; Chao, Hong; Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P

    2014-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are leading causes of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in young children and among elderly and immunocompromised patients. The pathogenesis of hMPV-induced lung disease is poorly understood. The lung macrophage population consists of alveolar macrophages (AMs) residing at the luminal surface of alveoli and interstitial macrophages present within the parenchymal lung interstitium. The involvement of AMs in innate immune responses to virus infections remains elusive. In this study, BALB/c mice depleted of AMs by intranasal instillation of dichloromethylene bisphosphonate (L-CL2MBP) liposomes were examined for disease, lung inflammation, and viral replication after infection with hMPV or RSV. hMPV-infected mice lacking AMs exhibited improved disease in terms of body weight loss, lung inflammation, airway obstruction, and hyperresponsiveness compared with AM-competent mice. AM depletion was associated with significantly reduced hMPV titers in the lungs, suggesting that hMPV required AMs for early entry and replication in the lung. In contrast, AM depletion in the context of RSV infection was characterized by an increase in viral replication, worsened disease, and inflammation, with increased airway neutrophils and inflammatory dendritic cells. Overall, lack of AMs resulted in a broad-spectrum disruption in type I IFN and certain inflammatory cytokine production, including TNF and IL-6, while causing a virus-specific alteration in the profile of several immunomodulatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Our study demonstrates that AMs have distinct roles in the context of human infections caused by members of the Paramyxoviridae family.

  18. Effects of prostaglandin E{sub 2} on the subcellular localization of Epac-1 and Rap1 proteins during Fc{gamma}-receptor-mediated phagocytosis in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Thomas G.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Carstens, Jennifer K.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Aronoff, David M.

    2008-01-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated a central role for the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) in the inhibition of Fc{gamma}-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and bacterial killing by prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in macrophages. However, the subcellular localization of Epac, and its primary target Rap1, has yet to be determined in primary macrophages. Therefore, we used immunofluorescent techniques and phagosome isolation to localize Epac-1 and Rap1 in alveolar macrophages. Epac-1 was predominantly expressed on punctate and tubular membranes throughout the cell body; on the plasma membrane; and co-localized with microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Rap1 was abundant on punctate membranes, less abundant on plasma membrane, and also found on MTOCs. Following PGE{sub 2} treatment, Epac-1, but not Rap1, accumulated on the nuclear envelope and disappeared from MTOCs. By immunofluorescent microscopy, both Epac-1 and Rap1 were seen to associate with phagosomes containing IgG-opsonized beads, but this association appeared weak, as we failed to observe such interactions in phagosomes isolated from cells at various time points after bead ingestion. Strikingly, however, Epac-1, but not Rap1, appeared to accumulate on maturing phagosomes, but only after PGE{sub 2} treatment (or treatment with a selective Epac-1 agonist). This association was confirmed in isolated phagosome preparations. The changes in Epac-1 localization were too slow to account for the inhibitory effects of PGE{sub 2} on phagocytosis. However, the appearance of Epac-1 on late phagosomes following PGE{sub 2} treatment might be important for suppressing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production and inhibiting the killing of intraphagosomal pathogens. The absence of Rap1 on late phagosomes suggests that the effect of Epac-1 might not require Rap1.

  19. Effects of Toxins on Arachidonic Acid Metabolism in Cultured Rat Pulmonary Alveolar Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-28

    contributing to their in-vivo, anti-inflammatory effect (19, 20). Pretreatment of macrophages with steriod significantly augmented-the T-2 induced release...effects of steriods are not limited to induction of phospholipase A2 inhibitory protein. Dunham et al. (24) reported that leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and

  20. Reactomes of porcine alveolar macrophages infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has devastated pig industries worldwide for many years. It is caused by a small RNA virus (PRRSV), which targets almost exclusively pig monocytes or macrophages. In the present study, five SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries derive...

  1. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-Yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na).

  2. IL-33 and M2a alveolar macrophages promote lung defense against the atypical fungal pathogen Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael P; Christmann, Benjamin S; Werner, Jessica L; Metz, Allison E; Trevor, Jennifer L; Lowell, Clifford A; Steele, Chad

    2011-02-15

    We have recently reported that mice deficient in the myeloid Src-family tyrosine kinases Hck, Fgr, and Lyn (Src triple knockout [TKO]) had augmented innate lung clearance of Pneumocystis murina that correlated with a higher ability of alveolar macrophages (AMs) from these mice to kill P. murina. In this article, we show that despite possessing enhanced killing, AMs from naive Src TKO mice did not demonstrate enhanced inflammatory responses to P. murina. We subsequently discovered that both AMs and lungs from P. murina-infected Src TKO mice expressed significantly greater levels of the M2a markers RELM-α and Arg1, and the M2a-associated chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 than did wild-type mice. IL-4 and IL-13, the primary cytokines that promote M2a polarization, were not differentially produced in the lungs between wild-type and Src TKO mice. P. murina infection in Src TKO mice resulted in enhanced lung production of the novel IL-1 family cytokine IL-33. Immunohistochemical analysis of IL-33 in lung tissue revealed localization predominantly in the nucleus of alveolar epithelial cells. We further demonstrate that experimental polarization of naive AMs to M2a resulted in more efficient killing of P. murina compared with untreated AMs, which was further enhanced by the addition of IL-33. Administration of IL-33 to C57BL/6 mice increased lung RELM-α and CCL17 levels, and enhanced clearance of P. murina, despite having no effect on the cellular composition of the lungs. Collectively, these results indicate that M2a AMs are potent effector cells against P. murina. Furthermore, enhancing M2a polarization may be an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of Pneumocystis.

  3. Phenylarsine oxide-induced increase in alveolar macrophage surface receptors: evidence for fusion of internal receptor pools with the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages which were treated at 0 degrees C with phenylarsine oxide and then incubated at 37 degrees C for 10 min exhibited a two- to threefold increase in surface receptor activity for macroglobulin.protease complexes, diferric transferrin, and mannose- terminal glycoproteins. Analysis of the concentration-dependence of ligand binding indicated that changes in ligand-binding activity were due to changes in receptor number rather than alterations in ligand- receptor affinity. Surface receptor number could also be increased by treatment of cells with three other sulfhydryl reagents, N- ethylmaleimide, p-chloromercurobenzoate, and iodoacetic acid. The increase in receptor activity was maximal after 10 min and decreased over the next hour. This decrease in cell-associated receptor activity was due to the release of large membrane vesicles which demonstrated a uniform buoyant density by isopycnic sucrose gradient centrifugation. Treatment of cells with phenylarsine oxide did not decrease the cellular content of lactate dehydrogenase or beta-galactosidase, indicating that cell integrity was maintained and lysosomal enzyme release did not occur. Our studies indicate that phenylarsine oxide treatment in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ results in the fusion of receptor-containing vesicles with the cell surface. PMID:2409094

  4. Effect of alveolar macrophage motility and chemotaxis on clearance of particles from lung surfaces: Progress report, year No. 1 (1987-1988)

    SciTech Connect

    Lauffenburger, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In the distal airways, the alveolar macrophage plays a crucial role in defense of the lung against inhaled pathogens. These cells have been observed in vitro to move chemotactically in response to many types of attractants that may be present on the lung's surface during a bacterial or particulate challenge. This paper investigates the hypothesis that chemotactic ability is an important part of the defensive action of these cells as they ingest bacteria on the lung surface. We compare our mathematical model for lung clearance to previously published bacterial clearance data, and determine the amount of alveolar macrophage chemotactic ability required to account for observed clearance rates. The results show that while random motion is insufficient for clearance, only a moderate amount of chemotactic ability is actually necessary for our predicted clearance rates to agree with experimentally measured clearance rates.

  5. Effects of lead ion on immune function of rabbit alveolar macrophages: quantitation of immune phagocytosis and rosette formation by V Cr in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Xu, Y.H.; Chang, H.F.

    1985-05-01

    Experiments by a V Cr-labeling technique were performed to investigate the effects of lead (PbS ) on immune phagocytosis and Fc-rosette formation of rabbit pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Evidence is presented that PbS at concentrations of 10( T) and 10( and=2$)M could inhibit these functions of PAMs. The degree of inhibition corresponded to the concentration of this heavy metal ion in vitro.

  6. Anionic Pulmonary Surfactant Phospholipids Inhibit Inflammatory Responses from Alveolar Macrophages and U937 Cells by Binding the Lipopolysaccharide-interacting Proteins CD14 and MD-2*♦

    PubMed Central

    Kuronuma, Koji; Mitsuzawa, Hiroaki; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Nishitani, Chiaki; Chan, Edward D.; Kuroki, Yoshio; Nakamura, Mari; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), derived from Gram-negative bacteria, is a major cause of acute lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome. Pulmonary surfactant is secreted as a complex mixture of lipids and proteins onto the alveolar surface of the lung. Surfactant phospholipids are essential in reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface and preventing alveolar collapse at the end of the respiratory cycle. In the present study, we determined that palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol, which are minor components of pulmonary surfactant, and synthetic dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol regulated the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages. The anionic lipids significantly inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production from rat and human alveolar macrophages and a U937 cell line by reducing the LPS-elicited phosphorylation of multiple intracellular protein kinases. The anionic lipids were also effective at attenuating inflammation when administered intratracheally to mice challenged with LPS. Binding studies revealed high affinity interactions between the palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and the Toll-like receptor 4-interacting proteins CD14 and MD-2. Our data clearly identify important anti-inflammatory properties of the minor surfactant phospholipids at the environmental interface of the lung. PMID:19584052

  7. Implicating Exudate Macrophages and Ly-6Chigh Monocytes in CCR2-Dependent Lung Fibrosis Following Gene-Targeted Alveolar Injury1

    PubMed Central

    Osterholzer, John J; Olszewski, Michal A; Murdock, Benjamin J; Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; Erb-Downward, John; Subbotina, Natalya; Browning, Keely; Lin, Yujing; Morey, Roger E.; Dayrit, Jeremy K.; Horowitz, Jeffrey C.; Simon, Richard H.; Sisson, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is characteristically abnormal in fibrotic lung disease, and we recently established a direct link between injury to the type II alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) and the accumulation of interstitial collagen. The mechanisms by which damage to the epithelium induces lung scarring remain poorly understood. It is particularly controversial whether an insult to the type II AEC initiates an inflammatory response that is required for the development of fibrosis. To explore whether local inflammation occurs following a targeted epithelial insult and contributes to lung fibrosis, we administered diphtheria toxin to transgenic mice with type II AEC-restricted expression of the diphtheria toxin receptor. We employed immunophenotyping techniques and diphtheria toxin receptor-expressing, chemokine-receptor-2 deficient (CCR2−/−) mice to determine the participation of lung leukocyte subsets in pulmonary fibrogenesis. Our results demonstrate that targeted type II AEC injury induces an inflammatory response that is enriched for CD11b+ non-resident exudate macrophages (ExM) and their precursors, Ly-6Chigh monocytes. CCR2-deficiency abrogates the accumulation of both cell populations and protects mice from fibrosis, weight loss, and death. Further analyses revealed that the ExM are alternatively-activated and that ExM and Ly-6Chigh monocytes express mRNA for IL-13, TGF-β, and the collagen genes, COL1A1 and COLIIIA1. Furthermore, the accumulated ExM and Ly-6Chigh monocytes contain intracellular collagen as detected by immunostaining. Together, these results implicate CCR2 and the accumulation of ExM and Ly-6Chigh monocytes as critical determinants of pulmonary fibrosis induced by selective type II AEC injury. PMID:23467934

  8. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections.

  9. Calcitonin Peptide Family Members Are Differentially Regulated by LPS and Inhibit Functions of Rat Alveolar NR8383 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soultanova, Aichurek; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Pfeil, Uwe; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the calcitonin peptide family—calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (AM), and adrenomedullin2/intermedin (IMD)–exert modulatory effects upon monocytes and macrophages of various extrapulmonary origins. Utilizing the rat alveolar macrophage (AMφ) cell line NR8383, we here set out to determine to which extent these three peptides and their receptors are differentially regulated in AMφ and what specific effects they have on AMφ key functions. LPS treatment differentially up-regulated expression of the peptides and receptors. Among the three peptides, IMD mRNA content was lowest both in primary rat AMφ and NR8383 cells, whereas IMD peptide dominated in basal and LPS-stimulated secretion from NR8383 cells. Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis and TNF-α production were inhibited by AM, IMD, and CGRP, whereas pro-IL-1β mRNA was slightly down-regulated exclusively by CGRP. Neither of these peptides affected IL-6 or IL-10 production. None increased intracellular calcium concentration, but AM significantly inhibited store-operated calcium entry. In conclusion, the rat AMφ cell line NR8383 is both a source and a target of the calcitonin peptide family members AM, IMD, and CGRP. Despite sharing proteins of the receptor complexes, AM, IMD, and CGRP each showed a characteristic pattern of effects and regulation, suggesting that these closely related peptides are not just redundant members of one common signaling pathway but act in concert by addressing parallel signaling cascades. Since peptide and receptor expression are up-regulated by LPS, these signaling pathways might act as inhibitory feedback mechanisms in pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27737007

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activates Human Macrophage Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Linking Mannose Receptor Recognition to Regulation of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Brooks, Michelle N.; Morris, Jessica D.; Torrelles, Jordi B.; Azad, Abul K.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances its survival in macrophages by suppressing immune responses in part through its complex cell wall structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is a transcriptional factor that regulates inflammation and has high expression in alternatively activated alveolar macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells, both cell types relevant to tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this study, we show that virulent M. tuberculosis and its cell wall mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan induce PPARγ expression through a macrophage mannose receptor-dependent pathway. When activated, PPARγ promotes IL-8 and cyclooxygenase 2 expression, a process modulated by a PPARγ agonist or antagonist. Upstream, MAPK-p38 mediates cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation, which is required for PPARγ ligand production. The induced IL-8 response mediated by mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan and the mannose receptor is independent of TLR2 and NF-κB activation. In contrast, the attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin induces less PPARγ and preferentially uses the NF-κB–mediated pathway to induce IL-8 production. Finally, PPARγ knockdown in human macrophages enhances TNF production and controls the intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis. These data identify a new molecular pathway that links engagement of the mannose receptor, an important pattern recognition receptor for M. tuberculosis, with PPARγ activation, which regulates the macrophage inflammatory response, thereby playing a role in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:20554962

  11. Analysis of HLA-DR from alveolar macrophages and blood monocytes by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, T.J.; Monos, D.S.; Spear, B.T.; Rossman, M.D.; Zmijewski, C.M.; Kamoun, M.; Daniele, R.P.

    1986-03-01

    Human blood monocytes (BM) are more effective than alveolar macrophages (AM) in promoting lymphocyte proliferation to antigen. To further understand these differences, the HLA-DR molecules synthesized by these two cell types were compared. AM were prepared by adherence of cells obtained by bronchoscopic lavage; BM were prepared by adherence of blood mononuclear cells from the same normal volunteer. Cells were cultured for 7 hours with /sup 3/H-leucine and HLA-DR was immunoprecipitated with the murine monoclonal antibody L243. Immunoprecipitates were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In three experiments, protein synthetic rate was greater and more HLA-DR was immunoprecipitated per cell in BM than in AM. Isoelectric focusing showed identical charge variation for BM and AM. However, molecular weight analysis of AM HLA-DR revealed multiple bands of slightly different molecular weight for each beta-chain peptide, whereas only a single band occurred with BM HLA-DR. Neuraminidase treatment reduced the charge heterogeneity but did not affect the molecular weight differences. These findings may relate to the differential ability of AM and BM to promote lymphocyte proliferation to antigen.

  12. Porcine circovirus type 2 decreases the infection and replication of attenuated classical swine fever virus in porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Liang; Pang, Victor Fei; Deng, Ming-Chung; Chang, Chia-Yi; Jeng, Chian-Ren

    2014-02-01

    Recently, it has been noted that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection adversely affects the protective efficacy of Lapinized Philippines Coronel (LPC) vaccine, an attenuated strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), in pigs. In order to investigate the possible mechanisms of the PCV2-derived interference, an in vitro model was established to study the interaction of LPC virus (LPCV) and PCV2 in porcine alveolar macrophages (AMs). The results showed that PCV2 reduced the LPCV infection in AMs and the levels of PCV2-derived interference were dose-dependent. The PCV2-derived interference also reduced the replication level of LPCV in AMs. The full-length PCV2 DNA and its fragment DNA C9 CpG-ODN were involved in the reduction of LPCV infection in AMs, whereas UV-inactivated PCV2 was not. In addition, a moderate negative correlation between the LPCV antigen-containing rate and IFN-γ production was observed, and had a dose-dependent trend with the level of PCV2-inoculation. The results of the present study may partially explain how PCV2 infection interferes with the efficacy of LPC vaccine.

  13. The penetration of co-trimoxazole into alveolar macrophages and its effect on inflammatory and immunoregulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Dubar, V; Lopez, I; Gosset, P; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1990-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of co-trimoxazole in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage-fluid (BAL-fluid) and alveolar macrophages (AM) of guinea pigs receiving sulphamethoxazole (100 mg/kg) and trimethoprim (20 mg/kg) were studied. HPLC showed that peak co-trimoxazole levels were obtained in serum at 30 min, in BAL-fluid at 1 h and in AM at 3 h. A comparison between mean concentrations in serum, BAL-fluid and AM showed a six-fold higher concentration of trimethoprim in cells than in serum, but only 0.25-fold of sulphamethoxazole. The BAL-fluid/serum ratio was four to ten times higher for trimethoprim than for sulphamethoxazole (0.6-to-one-fold). Sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim ratios (30 min, 1 and 3 h) were lower in BAL-fluid (4.9 +/- 0.5) and in AM (1.4 +/- 0.5) than in serum (30.7 +/- 1.6). The influence of co-trimoxazole in vitro on microbicidal capacities (superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide generations), immunoregulation (production of interleukin 1) and pro-inflammatory agent production (tumour necrosis factor) of guinea pigs' AM was also studied. No significant effect of co-trimoxazole on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide generations, or on interleukin 1 and TNF production, was demonstrable.

  14. Cooperativity Between CD8+ T Cells, Non-Neutralizing Antibodies, and Alveolar Macrophages Is Important for Heterosubtypic Influenza Virus Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Brian J.; Decman, Vilma; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Abt, Michael C.; Wolf, Amaya I.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Artis, David; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential “universal” vaccine. PMID:23516357

  15. Influence of surfactant components and exposure geometry on the effects of quartz and asbestos on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Schimmelpfeng, J; Drosselmeyer, E; Hofheinz, V; Seidel, A

    1992-01-01

    Bovine (BAM) and rat (RAM) alveolar macrophages were incubated in vitro with DQ12 quartz or UICC chrysotile asbestos either alone or in the presence of dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL). The reaction of the cells of both species to the untreated dust particles was similar qualitatively and quantitatively, with a loss of viability and release of lactate dehydrogenase and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase after 20 hr of incubation. In the presence of DPL, the toxicity of quartz to BAM disappeared completely, whereas the protective influence of the phospholipid was distinctly diminished in the case of RAM. The presence of lavage fluid was less effective than that of pure DPL. There was no protective influence of DPL with asbestos either for BAM or for RAM. The effects of phagocytizable, suspended quartz particles were compared with the effects of the same type of particles fixed on a glass surface to exclude the possibility of phagocytosis. The effect of the suspended particles on the viability and release of enzymes was more pronounced than that of the fixed particles. On the other hand, superoxide anion production was stimulated to a much higher degree by the fixed quartz particles. This could be explained by the continuing contact of the outer cell membrane with the silica surfaces, whereas free particles were rapidly phagocytized. The release of lysosomal enzymes induced by fixed quartz particles was a secondary phenomenon following cell death. Images FIGURE 4. A FIGURE 4. B FIGURE 4. C FIGURE 4. D PMID:1327736

  16. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-κB activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.0±3.3 μm and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.4±5.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-κB more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1β. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects.

  17. Suppression of oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory mediators by Cymbopogon citratus D. Stapf extract in lipopolysaccharide stimulated murine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, M; Dwivedi, U N; Kakkar, P

    2010-10-01

    Exploration of antioxidants of plant origin and their scientific validation for their immense pharmacological potential is emerging as an issue of intense research now-a-days.The effect of Cymbopogon citratus extract was seen on cell viability, oxidative stress markers i.e. ROS production, SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and GSH content of murine alveolar macrophages stressed with lipopolysaccharide. Modulation in release of NO and pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α along with alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential under stress were compared with known plant derived antioxidant quercetin. The extract was not found to be cytotoxic at any of the selected doses. At 5 and 10 μg the extract showed significant increase in SOD activity, GSH content (p<0.001), decrease in ROS production as seen by fluorescent dye DCFH-DA and also MDA formation (lipid peroxidation marker) significantly. The extract also showed reduction in the release of pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α and NO significantly indicating an anti-inflammatory effect. The extract was able to restore mitochondrial membrane potential as estimated by spectrofluorimetry using the fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123. The results suggest potential use of the cytoprotective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory property of C. citratus in the form of dietary component and also in formulations against lung inflammatory diseases where oxidative stress plays an important role.

  18. DNA damage, redox changes, and associated stress-inducible signaling events underlying the apoptosis and cytotoxicity in murine alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S by methanol-extracted Stachybotrys chartarum toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyan; Yadav, Jagjit S. . E-mail: Jagjit.Yadav@uc.edu

    2006-08-01

    Spore-extracted toxins of the indoor mold Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) caused cytotoxicity (release of lactate dehydrogenase), inhibition of cell proliferation, and cell death in murine alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptotic cell death, confirmed based on morphological changes, DNA ladder formation, and caspase 3/7 activation, was detectable as early as at 3 h during treatment with a toxin concentration of 1 spore equivalent/macrophage and was preceded by DNA damage beginning at 15 min, as evidenced by DNA comet formation in single cell gel electrophoresis assay. The apoptotic dose of SC toxins did not induce detectable nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1{beta}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha}) but showed exacerbated cytotoxicity in presence of a non-apoptotic dose of the known pro-inflammatory agent LPS (10 ng/ml). Intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level showed a significant decrease beginning at 9 h of the toxin treatment whereas oxidized glutathione (GSSG) showed a corresponding significant increase, indicating a delayed onset of oxidative stress in the apoptosis process. The toxin-treated macrophages accumulated p53, an indicator of DNA damage response, and showed activation of the stress-inducible MAP kinases, JNK, and p38, in a time-dependent manner. Chemical blocking of either p38 or p53 inhibited in part the SC toxin-induced apoptosis whereas blocking of JNK did not show any such effect. This study constitutes the first report on induction of DNA damage and associated p53 activation by SC toxins, and demonstrates the involvement of p38- and p53-mediated signaling events in SC toxin-induced apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

  19. MR imaging and targeting of a specific alveolar macrophage subpopulation in LPS-induced COPD animal model using antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Shaik, Asma Sultana; Afzal, Sibtain; Al Sayed, Baraa; Halwani, Rabih

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Targeting and noninvasive imaging of a specific alveolar macrophage subpopulation in the lung has revealed the importance for early and better diagnosis and therapy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this study, the in vivo effect of pulmonary administration of iron oxide nanoparticles on the polarization profile of macrophages was assessed, and a noninvasive free-breathing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol coupled with the use of biocompatible antibody-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles was developed to enable specific targeting and imaging of a particular macrophage subpopulation in lipopolysaccharide-induced COPD mice model. Materials and methods Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Real-time polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry analysis were performed to assess the biocompatibility of PEGylated dextran-coated SPIO nanoparticles. Specific biomarkers for M1 and M2 macrophages subsets were selected for conjugation with magnetic nanoparticles. MRI protocol using ultra-short echo time sequence was optimized to enable simultaneous detection of inflammation progress in the lung and detection of macrophages subsets. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry analysis were finally performed to confirm MRI readouts and to characterize the polarization profile of targeted macrophages. Results The tested SPIO nanoparticles, under the current experimental conditions, were found to be biocompatible for lung administration in preclinical settings. Cluster of differentiation (CD)86- and CD206-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles enabled successful noninvasive detection of M1 and M2 macrophage subpopulations, respectively, and were found to co-localize with inflammatory regions induced by lipopolysaccharide challenge. No variation in the polarization profile of targeted macrophages was observed, even though a continuum switch in their polarization might occur. However, further confirmatory studies are required to

  20. Akt2 deficiency protects from acute lung injury via alternative macrophage activation and miR-146a induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Vergadi, Eleni; Vaporidi, Katerina; Theodorakis, Emmanuel E; Doxaki, Christina; Lagoudaki, Eleni; Ieronymaki, Eleftheria; Alexaki, Vassilia I; Helms, Mike; Kondili, Eumorfia; Soennichsen, Birte; Stathopoulos, Efstathios N; Margioris, Andrew N; Georgopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsatsanis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of respiratory failure, with limited effective treatments available. Alveolar macrophages participate in the pathogenesis of ARDS. To investigate the role of macrophage activation in aseptic lung injury and identify molecular mediators with therapeutic potential, lung injury was induced in wild-type (WT) and Akt2(-/-) mice by hydrochloric acid aspiration. Acid-induced lung injury in WT mice was characterized by decreased lung compliance and increased protein and cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Alveolar macrophages acquired a classical activation (M1) phenotype. Acid-induced lung injury was less severe in Akt2(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Alveolar macrophages from acid-injured Akt2(-/-) mice demonstrated the alternative activation phenotype (M2). Although M2 polarization suppressed aseptic lung injury, it resulted in increased lung bacterial load when Akt2(-/-) mice were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. miR-146a, an anti-inflammatory microRNA targeting TLR4 signaling, was induced during the late phase of lung injury in WT mice, whereas it was increased early in Akt2(-/-) mice. Indeed, miR-146a overexpression in WT macrophages suppressed LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and promoted M2 polarization, whereas miR-146a inhibition in Akt2(-/-) macrophages restored iNOS expression. Furthermore, miR-146a delivery or Akt2 silencing in WT mice exposed to acid resulted in suppression of iNOS in alveolar macrophages. In conclusion, Akt2 suppression and miR-146a induction promote the M2 macrophage phenotype, resulting in amelioration of acid-induced lung injury. In vivo modulation of macrophage phenotype through Akt2 or miR-146a could provide a potential therapeutic approach for aseptic ARDS; however, it may be deleterious in septic ARDS because of impaired bacterial clearance.

  1. Toxicity of penicillic acid for rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. [Aspergillus; Penicillium

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, W.G.; Simpson, J.

    1985-12-01

    Penicillic acid (PA) is a polyketide mycotoxin produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. This mycotoxin is toxic in experimental animals and has also been reported to be carcinogenic. The cytotoxicity of penicillic acid was studied in rat albeolar macrophages (AM) in vitro. The effects of penicillic acid on membrane integrity were studied by measuring cell volume changes and /sup 51/Cr release. There was a significant decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in cell cultures exposed to 1.0 mM penicillic acid for 4 hr. Inhibition of the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into protein was both dose- and time-dependent and protein synthesis was inhibited significantly after 2 hr exposure to greater than or equal to0.1 mM penicillic acid. RNA synthesis was inhibited to a lesser extent than protein synthesis. There was significant inhibition of phagocytosis after 2 hr exposure at greater than or equal to0.3 mM penicillic acid and the ED/sub 50/ for phagocytosis was 0.09 mM. Thus phagocytosis was more sensitive to the toxic effects of penicillic acid than any other cellular process studied. The data suggest the possibility of a respiratory hazard to agricultural workers exposed to contaminated grain.

  2. Intracellular multiplication of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in macrophages: killing and restriction of multiplication by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brummer, E; Hanson, L H; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of coculturing yeast-form Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with murine cells was studied. Coculture of resident peritoneal or pulmonary macrophages with P. brasiliensis for 72 h dramatically enhanced fungal multiplication 19.3 +/- 2.4- and 4.7 +/- 0.8-fold, respectively, compared with cocultures with lymph node cells or complete tissue culture medium alone. Support of P. brasiliensis multiplication by resident peritoneal macrophages was macrophage dose dependent. Lysates of macrophages, supernatants from macrophage cultures, or McVeigh-Morton broth, like complete tissue culture medium, did not support multiplication of P. brasiliensis in 72-h cultures. Time course microscopic studies of cocultures in slide wells showed that macrophages ingested P. brasiliensis cells and that the ingested cells multiplied intracellularly. In sharp contrast to resident macrophages, lymphokine-activated peritoneal and pulmonary macrophages not only prevented multiplication but reduced inoculum CFU by 96 and 100%, respectively, in 72 h. Microscopic studies confirmed killing and digestion of P. brasiliensis ingested by activated macrophages in 48 h. These findings indicate that resident macrophages are permissive for intracellular multiplication of P. brasiliensis and that this could be a factor in pathogenicity. By contrast, activated macrophages are fungicidal for P. brasiliensis. Images PMID:2744848

  3. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated

  4. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-GuC)rin) activates disabled naC/ve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-N1), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1N2), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-N2) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions.

  5. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Graham, Joseph G.; Onyilagha, Frances I.; MacDonald, Laura J.; Doeppler, Heike R.; Storz, Peter; Kurten, Richard C.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E) mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E) mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E) expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A) in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA in human

  6. Measurement of beta-glucuronidase in effluent of perifused alveolar macrophages challenged with chemically modified chrysotile asbestos.

    PubMed

    Forget, G; Lacroix, M J; Calvert, R; Sirois, P

    1984-06-01

    Chrysotile asbestos has been implicated with lung disorders, notably fibrotic lesions and cancer. In vitro, chrysotile fibers are cytotoxic to lung macrophages and stimulate the release of inflammatory mediators. Reports to the effect that chemical modifications of asbestos fibers reduce their cytotoxic and inflammatory potential initiated the present study of three fiber modifications. The cytotoxic and inflammatory effects of magnesium-leached chrysotile, POCL3-treated chrysotile, and CaO-treated chrysotile were studied in a perifused rat alveolar macrophage culture system, relative to untreated fibers. Natural Canadian chrysotile (UICC "B") caused dose-dependent cell mortality and clumping. The release of beta-glucuronidase (beta-Glu), a lysosomal enzyme, was also dose dependent. Rhodesian chrysotile (UICC "A") caused similar cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. However, magnesium-leached chrysotile was less cytotoxic (39% less) and had a lesser clumping capacity (31% less) than untreated chrysotile. Total secretion of beta-Glu elicited by magnesium-leached chrysotile was reduced by 43% from the untreated sample, but kinetic monitoring indicates that this reduction in inflammatory potential is only significant during the first 12 h of an 18-h culture period. POCl3 treatment of chrysotile fibers produced differing effects depending on the length of the fibers under study. Treating fibers with a mean length of 8 micron produced a secretion pattern similar to that produced by acid leaching. The total output for the treated sample was 44% lower than with untreated chrysotile; the difference was only significant during the first 12 h of perifusion. Cell mortality and aggregation were not reduced in any important way with POCl3 treatment of these longer fibers. When ultra-short fibers (mean length = 0.8 micron) were treated with POCl3, the total decrease in beta-Glu output was equal to 41%, and the release of enzyme was significantly lower during the whole 18-h

  7. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Eiko . E-mail: ekoike@nies.go.jp; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-12-15

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP, organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP.

  8. Role of the JNK pathway on the expression of inflammatory factors in alveolar macrophages under mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jin; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the regulatory role of the c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway on interleukin (IL)-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of injured lung. Lung injury was induced in the New Zealand white rabbit by applying continuous mechanical ventilation with or without inhibitor of JNK (SP600125), p38 (SB203580), or ERK (PD98059). Non-ventilated rabbits (controls) were compared with the different ventilation-days groups, and untreated rabbits ventilated for 3 days (controls) were compared with the different inhibitor groups. We found that mechanical ventilation caused significant decreases in partial pressures of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and oxygen (pO2) of untreated rabbits (all times, P<0.05), but the inhibitor-treated groups showed no change in either blood-gas indicator (all times, P>0.05). Mechanical ventilation caused time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and IL-8 in AMs and in serum of untreated rabbits, with the peak levels occurring at day 3 of ventilation. The SP600125-treated group showed significantly decreased TNF-α expression, but no significant change in IL-8 expression. Neither the SB203580- nor PD98059-treated groups showed any significant change in TNF-α or IL-8 expression. MAPKs' inhibitors could reduce mechanical ventilation-induced inflammation, and SP600125 produced the most robust decrease in inflammation. Mechanical ventilation-induced lung injury stimulates IL-8 and TNF-α expression in rabbit AMs in a time-dependent manner. The JNK pathway plays an important role in mechanical ventilation-stimulated TNF-α expression in AMs, but the injury-stimulated IL-8 expression may be regulated by other signaling pathways.

  9. Involvement of alveolar macrophages in the formation of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine associated with exogenous particles in human lungs.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Hiroshi; Sera, Nobuyuki; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2005-10-01

    Lung specimens were collected from 161 non-smoking male patients with carcinoma to determine the deposition of carbon particles and oxidative damage in lung tissues. Morphologically, carbon particles deposited in human lungs with carcinoma were similar to those of diesel exhaust like particles, and mass of particles showed a significant increase with the increasing age of the patients. An increasing age of patient with carcinomas was also associated with 8-oxodeoxy-guanosine (8-oxo-dG) formation, which was analyzed using the HPLC-electrochemical detector method. In addition, it was found that 8-oxo-dG increased in cancerous tissues rather than in non-cancerous ones. To determine whether particles in lung tissues were associated with 8-oxo-dG formation, carbon particles deposited in lung tissues were partially purified by cycling of alkali fusion with 1 M KOH; mutagenic chemicals in particles were extracted and excluded by removal with an equal volume of benzene/methanol and dichloromethane. It was also found that 8-oxo-dG was formed by non-mutagenic particles, and enhanced in the in vivo test using mouse rather than in the in vitro using RAW 254.7 tissue cultured cells. The 8-oxo-dG formation in vivo was due to the fact that hydroxyl radicals might be involved with phagocytosis of non-mutagenic particles in inflammatory cells, and the mutation was induced by hydroxylation of guanine residue on DNA. These results were also demonstrated by the occurrence of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils after intratracheal instillation of particles. These observations suggest that small particles from lung cancer patients further promote oxidative damage when used to treat the mouse lung. Especially, particles from which organic chemicals were removed were highly reactive to oxidative damage and formed 8-oxo-dG.

  10. Phagosomal pH and glass fiber dissolution in cultured nasal epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, N F

    1994-01-01

    The dissolution rate of glass fibers has been shown to be pH sensitive using in vitro lung fluid simulant models. The current study investigated whether there is a difference in phagosomal pH (ppH) between rat alveolar macrophages (AM) and rat nasal epithelial cells (RNEC) and whether such a difference would influence the dissolution of glass fibers. The ppH was measured in cultured AM and RNEC using flow cytometric, fluorescence-emission rationing techniques with fluorescein-labeled, amorphous silica particles. Glass fiber dissolution was determined in AM and RNEC cultured for 3 weeks with fast dissolving glass fibers (GF-A) or slow dissolving ones (GF-B). The mean diameters of GF-A were 2.7 microns and of GF-B, 2.6 microns, the average length of both fibers was approximately 22 to 25 microns. Dissolution was monitored by measuring the length and diameter of intracellular fibers and estimating the volume, assuming a cylindrical morphology. The ppH of AM was 5.2 to 5.8, and the ppH of RNEC was 7.0 to 7.5. The GF-A dissolved more slowly in RNEC than in AM, and no dissolution was evident in either cell type with GF-B. The volume loss with GF-A after a 3-week culture with AM was 66% compared to 45% for cultured RNEC. These results are different from those obtained using in vitro lung fluid-simulant models where dissolution is faster at higher pH. This difference suggests that dissolution rates of glass fibers in AM should not be applied to the dissolution of fibers in epithelial cells. Images Figure 1. a Figure 1. b Figure 2. a Figure 2. b Figure 3. a Figure 3. b PMID:7882965

  11. Low pH Environmental Stress Inhibits LPS and LTA-Stimulated Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Stanley F.; Fung, Christopher; Helinski, Jadwiga D.; Alluri, Ravi; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric aspiration increases the risks for developing secondary bacterial pneumonia. Cytokine elaboration through pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) is an important mechanism in initiating innate immune host response. Effects of low pH stress, a critical component of aspiration pathogenesis, on the PRR pathways were examined, specifically toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) and TLR4, using isolated rat alveolar macrophages (aMØs). We assessed the ability of aMØs after brief exposure to acidified saline to elaborate proinflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) stimulation, known ligands of TLR4 and TLR2, respectively. Low pH stress reduced LPS- and LTA-mediated cytokine release (CINC-1, MIP-2, TNF-α, MCP-1, and IFN-β). LPS and LTA increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations while Ca2+ chelation by BAPTA decreased LPS- and LTA-mediated cytokine responses. BAPTA blocked the effects of low pH stress on most of LPS-stimulated cytokines but not of LTA-stimulated responses. In vivo mouse model demonstrates suppressed E. coli and S. pneumoniae clearance following acid aspiration. In conclusion, low pH stress inhibits antibacterial cytokine response of aMØs due to impaired TLR2 (MyD88 pathway) and TLR4 signaling (MyD88 and TRIF pathways). The role of Ca2+ in low pH stress-induced signaling is complex but appears to be distinct between LPS- and LTA-mediated responses. PMID:24288685

  12. Adenovirus Vectors Block Human Immunodeficiency Virus–1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages by Inhibition of the Long Terminal Repeat

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Robert J.; Santiago, Francisco; Rahaghi, Franck; Michaels, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Heterologous viruses may transactivate or suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–1 replication. An adenovirus type 5 gene transfer vector (Ad5) HIV-1 vaccine was recently evaluated in a clinical trial, without efficacy. In this context, it is relevant to ask what effect Ad vectors have on HIV-1 replication, particularly in cells that are part of the innate immune system. Infection of HIV-1–infected human alveolar macrophages (AMs) obtained from HIV-1+ individuals with an Ad vector containing no transgene (AdNull) resulted in dose-responsive inhibition of endogenous HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 replication in normal AMs infected with HIV-1 in vitro was inhibited by AdNull with a similar dose response. Ad reduced AM HIV-1 replication up to 14 days after HIV-1 infection. Fully HIV-1–infected AMs were treated with 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine, after which Ad infection still inhibited HIV-1 replication, suggesting a postentry step was affected. Substantial HIV-1 DNA was still produced after Ad infection, as quantified by TaqMan real-time PCR, suggesting that the replication block occurred after reverse transcription. AdNull blocked HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) transcription, as assessed by an vesicular stomatitis virus G protein pseudotyped HIV-1 LTR luciferase construct. The formation of HIV-1 DNA integrated into the host chromosome was not inhibited by Ad, as quantified by a two-step TaqMan real-time PCR assay, implying a postintegration block to HIV-1 replication. These data indicate that Ad vectors are inhibitory to HIV-1 replication in human AMs based, in part, on their ability to inhibit LTR-driven transcription. PMID:19805482

  13. Functional consequences for primary human alveolar macrophages following treatment with long, but not short, multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Grandolfo, Davide; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Tetley, Teresa D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a potential human health hazard, primarily via inhalation. In the lung, alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide the first line of immune cellular defense against inhaled materials. We hypothesized that, 1 and 5 days after treating AMs with short (0.6 μm in length; MWCNT-0.6 μm) and long (20 μm in length; MWCNT-20 μm) MWCNTs for 24 hours, AMs would exhibit increased markers of adverse bioreactivity (cytokine release and reactive oxygen species generation) while also having a modified functional ability (phagocytosis and migration). Methods Primary human AMs were treated with short and long MWCNTs for 24 hours, 1 and 5 days after which toxicity end points, including cell death, reactive oxygen species generation, and inflammatory mediator release, were measured. AM functional end points involving phagocytic ability and migratory capacity were also measured. Results AM viability was significantly decreased at 1 and 5 days after treatment with MWCNT-20 μm, while superoxide levels and inflammatory mediator release were significantly increased. At the same time, there was reduced phagocytosis and migratory capacity alongside increased expression of MARCO; this coincided with frustrated phagocytosis observed by scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, the adverse bioreactivity of the shorter MWCNT-0.6 μm with AMs (and any resulting reduction in AM functional ability) was substantially less marked or absent altogether. Conclusion This study shows that after 24-hour treatment with long, but not short, MWCNTs, AM function is severely affected up to 5 days after the initial exposure. This has potentially significant pathophysiological consequences for individuals who may be intentionally (via therapeutic applications) or unintentionally exposed to these nanomaterials. PMID:25960651

  14. Constitutive expression of types 1 and 2 cytokines by alveolar macrophages from feline immunodeficiency virus-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, J W; Levy, J K; Bliss, S K; Tompkins, W A; Tompkins, M B

    2001-05-10

    Evidence suggests that feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), causes pulmonary immunodeficiency. The overall objective of this study was to explore FIV-induced alterations in cell counts and cytokine gene expression in the pulmonary compartment during the acute stage infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells were collected from FIV-infected and control cats at 0, 4, 10, and 16 weeks post-FIV infection for phenotype and cytokine analysis. The major change in BAL cellular populations following FIV-infection was the development of a neutrophilia. Total BAL cell counts and relative numbers of alveolar macrophages (AM), eosinophils, and lymphocytes remained similar in both groups. The RT-qcPCR analyses of AM purified from BAL showed constitutive expression of TNFalpha, IL6 and IL10 mRNAs that peaked during the acute stage of infection then declined. The TNFalpha and IL6 bioactive protein secretion showed a similar response. In contrast, IFNgamma expression increased progressively with time after infection and paralleled a progressive increase in FIV-gag mRNA in AM. The IL12 p40 expression also differed from the other cytokines in that there was a progressive decrease in the number of cats with AM IL12 expression following FIV infection. Infection of AM in vitro with FIV also caused an increase in TNFalpha and IL6 mRNA and bioactive protein suggesting that the increased cytokine response by AM following infection of cats with FIV is an intrinsic characteristic of FIV-infected AM. In summary, pulmonary immune changes seen in FIV-infected cats are similar to those seen in HIV-infected human patients.

  15. Alveolar macrophages have a dual role in a rat model for trimellitic anhydride-induced occupational asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Valstar, Dingena L.; Schijf, Marcel A.; Nijkamp, Frans P.; Storm, Gert; Arts, Josje H.E.; Kuper, C. Frieke; Bloksma, Nanne; Henricks, Paul A.J. . E-mail: p.a.j.henricks@pharm.uu.nl

    2006-02-15

    Occupational exposure to low molecular weight chemicals, like trimellitic anhydride (TMA), can result in occupational asthma. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are among the first cells to encounter inhaled compounds. These cells can produce many different mediators that have a putative role in asthma. In this study, we examined the role of AMs in lung function and airway inflammation of rats exposed to TMA. Female Brown Norway rats were sensitized by dermal application of TMA or received vehicle alone on days 0 and 7. One day before challenge, rats received intratracheally either empty or clodronate-containing liposomes to deplete the lungs of AMs. On day 21, all rats were challenged by inhalation of TMA in air. Lung function parameters were measured before, during, within 1 h after, and 24 h after challenge. IgE levels and parameters of inflammation and tissue damage were assessed 24 h after challenge. Sensitization with TMA led to decreased lung function parameters during and within 1 h after challenge as compared to non-sensitized rats. AM depletion alleviated the TMA-induced drop in lung function parameters and induced a faster recovery compared to sham-depleted TMA-sensitized rats. It also decreased the levels of serum IgE 24 h after challenge, but did not affect the sensitization-dependent increase in lung lavage fluid IL-6 and tissue TNF-{alpha} levels. In contrast, AM depletion augmented the TMA-induced tissue damage and inflammation 24 h after challenge. AMs seem to have a dual role in this model for TMA-induced occupational asthma since they potentiate the immediate TMA-induced decrease in lung function but tended to dampen the TMA-induced inflammatory reaction 24 h later.

  16. MCP-1 antibody treatment enhances damage and impedes repair of the alveolar epithelium in influenza pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Narasaraju, T; Ng, H H; Phoon, M C; Chow, Vincent T K

    2010-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an essential role of alveolar macrophages during influenza virus infection. Enhanced mortalities were observed in macrophage-depleted mice and pigs after influenza virus infection, but the basis for the enhanced pathogenesis is unclear. This study revealed that blocking macrophage recruitment into the lungs in a mouse model of influenza pneumonitis resulted in enhanced alveolar epithelial damage and apoptosis, as evaluated by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, Western blot, RT-PCR, and TUNEL assays. Abrogation of macrophage recruitment was achieved by treatment with monoclonal antibody against monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) after sub-lethal challenge with mouse-adapted human influenza A/Aichi/2/68 virus. Interestingly, elevated levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a mitogen for alveolar epithelium, were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage samples and in lung homogenates of control untreated and nonimmune immunoglobulin (Ig)G-treated mice after infection compared with anti-MCP-1-treated infected mice. The lungs of control animals also displayed strongly positive HGF staining in alveolar macrophages as well as alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia. Co-culture of influenza virus-infected alveolar epithelial cells with freshly isolated alveolar macrophages induced HGF production and phagocytic activity of macrophages. Recombinant HGF added to mouse lung explants after influenza virus infection resulted in enhanced BrdU labeling of alveolar type II epithelial cells, indicating their proliferation, in contrast with anti-HGF treatment showing significantly reduced epithelial regeneration. Our data indicate that inhibition of macrophage recruitment augmented alveolar epithelial damage and apoptosis during influenza pneumonitis, and that HGF produced by macrophages in response to influenza participates in the resolution of alveolar epithelium.

  17. Killing of Aspergillus spores depends on the anatomical source of the macrophage.

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, A; Douglas, H; Braude, A I; Davis, C E

    1983-01-01

    To resolve the controversy over the capacity of macrophages to kill or inhibit germination of Aspergillus spores, we compared this function in peritoneal and alveolar macrophages. Alveolar macrophages from rabbits killed 82 to 90% and completely digested 72 to 82% of spores of Aspergillus fumigatus in 30 h. In contrast, peritoneal macrophages could not even inhibit the germination of ingested spores; more than 85% transformed into mycelia within 24 h. Killing by alveolar macrophages was delayed for 3 to 6 h after phagocytosis and was independent of oxidative killing mechanisms and immune activation. The ability of alveolar macrophages to kill Aspergillus spores without modulation by T lymphocytes or the generation of oxygen intermediates points out that concepts built on studies of peritoneal macrophages may be misleading and underscores the importance of studying the role of macrophages in immunity with cells from the appropriate anatomical site. Images PMID:6642661

  18. Autocrine abscisic acid plays a key role in quartz-induced macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Magnone, Mirko; Sturla, Laura; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Scarfì, Sonia; Bruzzone, Santina; Usai, Cesare; Guida, Lucrezia; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2012-03-01

    Inhalation of quartz induces silicosis, a lung disease where alveolar macrophages release inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Here we report the pivotal role of abscisic acid (ABA), a recently discovered human inflammatory hormone, in silica-induced activation of murine RAW264.7 macrophages and of rat alveolar macrophages (AMs). Stimulation of both RAW264.7 cells and AMs with quartz induced a significant increase of ABA release (5- and 10-fold, respectively), compared to untreated cells. In RAW264.7 cells, autocrine ABA released after quartz stimulation sequentially activates the plasma membrane receptor LANCL2 and NADPH oxidase, generating a Ca(2+) influx resulting in NFκ B nuclear translocation and PGE(2) and TNF-α release (3-, 2-, and 3.5-fold increase, respectively, compared to control, unstimulated cells). Quartz-stimulated RAW264.7 cells silenced for LANCL2 or preincubated with a monoclonal antibody against ABA show an almost complete inhibition of NFκ B nuclear translocation and PGE(2) and TNF-α release compared to controls electroporated with a scramble oligonucleotide or preincubated with an unrelated antibody. AMs showed similar early and late ABA-induced responses as RAW264.7 cells. These findings identify ABA and LANCL2 as key mediators in quartz-induced inflammation, providing possible new targets for antisilicotic therapy.

  19. Recombinant swine beta interferon protects swine alveolar macrophages and MARC-145 cells from infection with Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Overend, C; Mitchell, R; He, D; Rompato, G; Grubman, M J; Garmendia, A E

    2007-03-01

    Swine beta interferon (swIFN-beta) produced in HEK 293 cells infected with a recombinant, replication-defective human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) encoding the swIFN-beta gene was tested for antiviral activity against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). MARC-145 cells were incubated overnight with dilutions of supernatant fluids from HEK 293 cells infected with Ad5-swIFN-beta or with an Ad5 control virus (Ad5-Blue). Treated cells were infected with PRRSV; MARC-145 cells incubated with Ad5-Blue supernatants developed cytopathic effects (CPE), whereas those incubated with swIFN-beta showed no CPE. To confirm the antiviral activity of swIFN-beta, culture fluids from Ad5-swIFN-beta-infected cells were affinity-purified on a Sepharose-anti-swIFN-beta matrix, and the resulting fractions exhibited antiviral activity upon infection with PRRSV. The antiviral effects were specific, as they were blocked by mAbs against swIFN-beta. Additional cultures of MARC-145 cells treated with swIFN-beta-containing supernatants or affinity-purified swIFN-beta were infected with PRRSV and tested by real-time RT-PCR for viral RNA in culture supernatants at various times post-inoculation. These experiments confirmed the protective effects of swIFN-beta. swIFN-beta was also tested for antiviral activity on porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from PRRSV-negative swine. PAMs were treated with dilutions of swIFN-beta or Ad5-Blue culture fluids, infected with PRRSV and tested for viral RNA by real-time RT-PCR. The viral load data showed a dose-dependent protection in swIFN-beta-treated PAMs, whereas no protection was evident from Ad5-Blue culture fluids. The data demonstrate that swIFN-beta protects both MARC-145 cells and PAMs from PRRSV infection.

  20. Modulation of macrophage activation by prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Carnuccio, R.; D'Acquisto, F.; Rosa, M. Di

    1996-01-01

    The effect of prostaglandtn E2, iloprost and cAMP on both nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α release in J774 macrophages has been studied. Both prostaglandin E2 and iloprost inhibited, in a concentration-dependent fashion, the lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α. The inhibitory effect of these prostanoids seems to be mediated by an increase of the second messenger cAMP since it was mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP and potentiated by the selective type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor RO-20-1724. Our results suggest that the inhibition of nitric oxide release by prostaglandin E2 and iloprost in lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 macrophages may be secondary to the inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α generation, which in turn is likely to be mediated by cAMP. PMID:18475691

  1. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  2. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  3. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    PubMed

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  4. In vitro Toxicity and Inflammatory Response Induced by Copper Nanoparticles in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    biomolecules; thus nanoparticles serve as markers to track enzymes and receptor ligands (Thomas and Sayre, 2005:319). Non -viral nanoparticulate...showed bactericidal activity of C60 in an aquatic environment (2004:1061). Problem Identification Despite the potential benefits of...117). In addition, Warheit and colleagues reported a non -dose dependent development of multifocal granulomas (2004:124). Warheit also points out

  5. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-20

    that recruit other innate immune cell types to areas of infection and secreting 82 antiviral cytokines. However, activation of AMθ, can also contribute...Hooper JW, Li D. 2001. Vaccines against hantaviruses. Current topics in microbiology and 627 immunology 256:171-191. 628 7. Schmaljohn CSaJWH. 2001...experimental immunology 91:314-319. 658 TR-16-089 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 17

  6. THE ENHANCEMENT OF MACROPHAGE BACTERIOSTASIS BY PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fowles, Robert E.; Fajardo, Ileana M.; Leibowitch, Jacques L.; David, John R.

    1973-01-01

    It was reported previously that the incubation of normal guinea pig macrophages with partially purified products of activated lymphocytes resulted in altered macrophage function including increased cell adherence to culture vessels, spreading, phagocytosis, and glucose carbon-1 oxidation. Studies reported here demonstrate that such macrophages also exhibit enhanced bacteriostasis. Lymphocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A, the culture supernatant was chromatographed over Sephadex G-100 and the fraction of mol wt 25,000–55,000, rich in lymphocyte mediators, was cultured with normal guinea pig macrophages for 1–3 days. Macrophages incubated with fractions from unstimulated lymphocyte cultures served as controls. The resulting macrophage monolayers were infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Macrophages incubated with mediator-rich fractions exhibited 2- to 10-fold enhanced bacteriostasis compared to controls. Further studies indicate that this enhancement was attributable to intrinsic changes in the macrophages and not simply a consequence of the number of macrophages on the monolayers. The studies support the concept that macrophage bacteriostasis can be enhanced by lymphocyte mediators. However, macrophages, which have been preincubated directly with sensitive lymphocytes and antigen exhibit even greater bacteriostasis and sometimes bactericidal capacity, suggesting that either a labile lymphocyte factor or direct lymphocyte macrophage interaction may also be involved in bactericidal activity. PMID:4200649

  7. D-penicillamine-induced autoimmunity: relationship to macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinze; Uetrecht, Jack P

    2009-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions represent a serious health problem, and they remain unpredictable largely due to our limited understanding of the mechanisms involved. Penicillamine-induced autoimmunity in Brown Norway (BN) rats represents one model of an idiosyncratic reaction, and this drug can also cause autoimmune reactions in humans. We previously demonstrated that penicillamine binds to aldehydes on the surface of macrophages. There is evidence that an imine bond formed by aldehyde groups on macrophages and amine groups on T cells is one type of interaction between these two cells that is involved in the induction of an immune response. We proposed that the binding of penicillamine with aldehyde groups on macrophages could lead to their activation and in some patients could lead to autoimmunity. In this study, the transcriptome profile of spleen macrophages 6 h after penicillamine treatment was used to detect effects of penicillamine on macrophages with a focus on 20 genes known to be macrophage activation biomarkers. One biological consequence of macrophage activation was investigated by determining mRNA levels for IL-15 and IL-1 beta which are crucial for NK cell activation, as well as levels of mRNA for selected cytokines in spleen NK cells. Up-regulation of the macrophage activating cytokines, IFN-gamma and GM-CSF, and down-regulation of IL-13 indicated activation of NK cells, which suggests a positive feedback loop between macrophages and NK cells. Furthermore, treatment of a murine macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, with penicillamine increased the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-23, providing additional evidence that penicillamine activates macrophages. Hydralazine and isoniazid cause a lupus-like syndrome in humans and also bind to aldehyde groups. These drugs were also found to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Together, these data support the hypothesis that drugs that bind irreversibly with aldehydes lead to macrophage activation, which in some

  8. Effects of Neuromedin S on the Proliferation of Splenic Lymphocytes and the Cytokine Secretion by Pulmonary Alveolar Macrophages in Pigs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, R; Wang, Q; Qi, B; Huang, Y; Yang, G

    2016-09-01

    Neuromedin S (NMS), a 36-amino acid neuropeptide, has been found to be involved in the regulation of the endocrine activity. It has been also detected in immune tissues in mammals, what suggests that NMS may play an important role in the regulation of immune response. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the presence of NMS receptor 1 (NMU1R) and effect of NMS in pig splenic lymphocytes (SPLs) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). The presence of NMU1R in pig SPLs and PAMs was respectively confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis and immunocytochemical methods. Furthermore, SPL proliferation was analyzed using the 3-(4,5)-dimethyl-thiahiazo-(-2-yl)-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) method. Additionally, the secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in PAMs was all measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. In the present study, the results of RT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that NMU1R mRNA and protein were both expressed in pig SPLs and PAMs, and the immunocytochemical investigations further revealed that the positive signal of NMU1R immunoreactivity was observed in plasma membranes of both SPLs and PAMs. In the in vitro study, we found that at concentrations of 0.001-1000 nM NMS alone or combined with lipopolysaccharide or phytohemagglutinin significantly increased SPL proliferation. Application of ELISA method showed that NMS could induce the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in PAMs. These results suggest that NMS can act as a potently positive pro-inflammatory factor and immunomodulatory agent that affects the immune response of immune cells by combining with its receptor NMU1R.

  9. Polarization dictates iron handling by inflammatory and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Corna, Gianfranca; Campana, Lara; Pignatti, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Alessandra; Tagliafico, Enrico; Bosurgi, Lidia; Campanella, Alessandro; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Apostoli, Pietro; Silvestri, Laura; Camaschella, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a key role in iron homeostasis. In peripheral tissues, they are known to polarize into classically activated (or M1) macrophages and alternatively activated (or M2) macrophages. Little is known on whether the polarization program influences the ability of macrophages to store or recycle iron and the molecular machinery involved in the processes. Design and Methods Inflammatory/M1 and alternatively activated/M2 macrophages were propagated in vitro from mouse bone-marrow precursors and polarized in the presence of recombinant interferon-γ or interleukin-4. We characterized and compared their ability to handle radioactive iron, the characteristics of the intracellular iron pools and the expression of molecules involved in internalization, storage and export of the metal. Moreover we verified the influence of iron on the relative ability of polarized macrophages to activate antigen-specific T cells. Results M1 macrophages have low iron regulatory protein 1 and 2 binding activity, express high levels of ferritin H, low levels of transferrin receptor 1 and internalize – albeit with low efficiency -iron only when its extracellular concentration is high. In contrast, M2 macrophages have high iron regulatory protein binding activity, express low levels of ferritin H and high levels of transferrin receptor 1. M2 macrophages have a larger intracellular labile iron pool, effectively take up and spontaneously release iron at low concentrations and have limited storage ability. Iron export correlates with the expression of ferroportin, which is higher in M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells activate antigen-specific, MHC class II-restricted T cells. In the absence of the metal, only M1 macrophages are effective. Conclusions Cytokines that drive macrophage polarization ultimately control iron handling, leading to the differentiation of macrophages into a subset which has a relatively sealed intracellular iron content (M1) or into a subset endowed with

  10. Mycoplasma bovis isolates recovered from cattle and bison (Bison bison) show differential in vitro effects on PBMC proliferation, alveolar macrophage apoptosis and invasion of epithelial and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Clarke, Kyle; Burrage, Pat; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-04-15

    In the last few years, several outbreaks of pneumonia, systemically disseminated infection, and high mortality associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in North American bison (Bison bison) have been reported in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota, and Kansas. M. bovis causes Chronic Pneumonia and Polyarthritis Syndrome (CPPS) in young, stressed calves in intensively-managed feedlots. M. bovis is not classified as a primary pathogen in cattle, but in bison it appears to be a primary causative agent with rapid progression of disease with fatal outcomes and an average 20% mature herd mortality. Thus, there is a possibility that M. bovis isolates from cattle and bison differ in their pathogenicity. Hence, we decided to compare selected cattle isolates to several bison isolates obtained from clinical cases. We show differences in modulation of PBMC proliferation, invasion of trachea and lung epithelial cells, along with modulation of apoptosis and survival in alveolar macrophages. We concluded that some bison isolates showed less inhibition of cattle and bison PBMC proliferation, were not able to suppress alveolar macrophage apoptosis as efficiently as cattle isolates, and were more or less invasive than the cattle isolate in various cells. These findings provide evidence about the differential properties of M. bovis isolated from the two species and has helped in the selection of bison isolates for genomic sequencing.

  11. Alternatively activated macrophages in infection and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Cihakova, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play an important role in activation of the immune response and wound healing. Pathogens that require T helper-type 2 (Th2) responses for effective clearance, such as parasitic worms, are strong inducers of alternatively activated or M2 macrophages. However, infections such as bacteria and viruses that require Th1-type responses may induce M2 as a strategy to evade the immune system. M2 are particularly efficient at scavenging self tissues following injury through receptors like the mannose receptor and scavenger receptor-A. Thus, M2 may increase autoimmune disease by presenting self tissue to T cells. M2 may also exacerbate immune complex (IC)-mediated pathology and fibrosis, a hallmark of autoimmune disease in women, due to the release of profibrotic factors such as interleukin (IL)-1β, transforming growth factor-β, fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases. We have found that M2 comprise anywhere from 30% to 70% of the infiltrate during acute viral or experimental autoimmune myocarditis, and shifts in M2 populations correlate with increased IC-deposition, fibrosis and chronic autoimmune pathology. Thus, women may be at an increased risk of M2-mediated autoimmunity due to estrogen’s ability to increase Th2 responses. PMID:19819674

  12. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  13. Modulation of macrophage activation and programming in immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangwei; Yang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Macrophages are central mediators of the immune, contributing both to the initiation and the resolution of inflammation. The concept of macrophage activation and program has stimulated interest in its definition, and functional significance in homeostasis and diseases. It has been known that macrophages could be differently activated and programmed into different functional subtypes in response to different types of antigen stumuli or different kinds of cytokines present in the microenvironment and could thus profoundly influence immune responses, but little is known about the state and exact regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program from cell or molecular signaling level in immunity. In this review, we summarize the recent finding regarding the regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program toward M1 and M2, especially on M2 macrophages.

  14. Immunomodulation by Blastomyces dermatitidis: functional activity of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, L S; Cozad, G C

    1983-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays the dominant role in the immune response of mice to Blastomyces dermatitidis infections. Since macrophages play an important role in cell-mediated immunity, the interactions between sensitized murine peritoneal macrophages and the yeast phase of B. dermatitidis were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the sensitized macrophages readily phagocytized B. dermatitidis yeast cells. In addition, there appeared to be activation of metabolic pathways within the sensitized macrophages, as indicated by increased chemiluminescence activity during phagocytosis. Sensitized macrophages were significantly better at controlling intracellular proliferation of the yeast cells when compared to nonsensitized cells. This was determined by disruption of macrophages and plating for viable yeasts. Scanning electron microscope observations offered further substantiation. Experiments with Candida albicans indicated that B. dermatitidis non-specifically activated macrophages. At 2 h postphagocytosis, 30% fewer C. albicans in B. dermatitidis-activated macrophages were able to form germ tubes. These studies demonstrated the multiple potential of activated macrophages with regard to their functional activity. Images PMID:6840859

  15. Titanium particles that have undergone phagocytosis by macrophages lose the ability to activate other macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhiqing; Schwab, Luciana P; Alley, Carie F; Hasty, Karen A; Smith, Richard A

    2008-04-01

    Titanium particles derived from the wear of the orthopaedic implant surfaces can activate macrophages to secrete cytokines and stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption, causing osteolysis around orthopaedic implants. However, what happens to the titanium particles after being phagocytosed by macrophages is not known. We prepared titanium particles (as received, clean, and LPS-coated), and exposed them to macrophages in culture. Free particles were washed away after 24 h and the intracellular particles were kept in culture for additional 48 h until being harvested by lysing the cells. Particles that had been cell treated or noncell treated were examined by scanning electronic microscopy to analyze the shape, size, and concentration of the particles. The cell treated and noncell treated particles were exposed to macrophages in culture with a particle to cell ratio of 300:1. After 18 h, the levels of TNF-alpha in culture medium and the viability of the cells were examined. Clean particles did not stimulate TNF-alpha secretion by macrophages, while LPS-coated particles dramatically increased that response. Phagocytosis by macrophages did not change the shape and size of the particles, but depleted the ability of the particles to stimulate TNF-alpha secretion by macrophages. This indicates that macrophages are capable of rendering titanium particles inactive without degrading the particles, possibly by altering the surface chemistry of the particles.

  16. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  17. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  18. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jun; Qin, Guozheng; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-20

    In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii and investigated the molecular mechanism of EPS-mediated activation of macrophages. Results revealed that EPS could significantly induce the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and enhance phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that EPS promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that EPS increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein, the degradation of IκB-α and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with specific inhibitors of NF-κB and MAPKs significantly attenuated EPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production. EPS also induced the inhibition of cytokine secretion by special antibodies against Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and Dectin-1. These data suggest that EPS from Trichoderma pseudokoningii activates RAW 264.7 cells through NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways via TLR4 and Dectin-1.

  19. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-02

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  20. [Active alveolar expansion for prevention of postoperative atelectasis. Functional and clinical effectiveness].

    PubMed

    Adolf, J; Dickmann, A

    1985-12-13

    In a prospective study, the functional and clinical effectiveness of active alveolar expansion was tested by means of an incentive spirometer on 30 patients each of a treatment and control group. All patients (average age 61 and 58 years, respectively) had undergone a transabdominal pelvic artery reconstruction. Pre-operatively active alveolar expansion significantly reduced intrapulmonary right to left shunting from 11.1% to 4.2% of cardiac output (P less than 0.01). Correspondingly, right to left shunting on the second to fifth postoperative day was reduced significantly (P less than 0.05) by 5-10% of cardiac output in the treatment group, cardiac output being significantly (P less than 0.05) reduced by 1 l/min average. Clinically and radiologically there was a definite reduction in pulmonary complications from 40% to 13%. Peri-operatively performed active alveolar expansion is thus an effective method for the reduction of postoperative functional atelectasis and pulmonary complications.

  1. Control of tumor-associated macrophage alternative activation by MIF

    PubMed Central

    Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Putty, Kalyani; Rendon, Beatriz E.; Lamont, Gwyneth J.; Faughn, Jonathan D.; Satoskar, Abhay; Lasnik, Amanda; Eaton, John W.; Mitchell, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor stromal alternatively activated macrophages are important determinants of anti-tumor T lymphocyte responses, intratumoral neovascularization and metastatic dissemination. Our recent efforts to investigate the mechanism of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in antagonizing anti-melanoma immune responses reveal that macrophage-derived MIF participates in macrophage alternative activation in melanoma-bearing mice. Both peripheral and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) isolated from melanoma bearing MIF-deficient mice display elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and reduced anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic gene products compared to macrophages from tumor bearing MIF wildtype mice. Moreover, TAMs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) from MIF-deficient mice exhibit reduced T lymphocyte immunosuppressive activities than do those from their wildtype littermates. Corresponding with reduced tumor immunosuppression and neoangiogenic potential by TAMs, MIF-deficiency confers protection against transplantable subcutaneous melanoma outgrowth and melanoma lung metastatic colonization. Finally, we report for the first time that our previously discovered MIF small molecule antagonist, 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP), recapitulates MIF-deficiency in vitro and in vivo and attenuates tumor polarized macrophage alternative activation, immunosuppression, neoangiogenesis and melanoma tumor outgrowth. These studies describe an important functional contribution by MIF to tumor-associated macrophage alternative activation and provide justification for immunotherapeutic targeting of MIF in melanoma patients. PMID:23390297

  2. Sodium-activated macrophages: the salt mine expands.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Liliana E; Hafler, David A

    2015-08-01

    High sodium consumption has been raising interest as a putative environmental factor linking Western lifestyle to the growing epidemic of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Now Zhang and colleagues show that high sodium drives macrophage to acquire a new proinflammatory effector phenotype with a distinct signature, paving the path to assess the role of salt-activated macrophages in human disease.

  3. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  4. Phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from lung, isolated alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Pool, G L; Bubacz, D G; Lumb, R H; Mason, R J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from rat and mouse whole lung, isolated rat alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived mouse pulmonary adenomas. We report an enrichment in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (but not phosphatidylinositol) protein-catalysed transfer in the type II cell and adenoma cytosols compared with the whole-lung cytosols. The activities from these cytosols were resolved using column chromatofocusing, which clearly demonstrated the presence of a phosphatidylcholine-specific transfer protein in each of the four tissues. In addition, two proteins (rat) or three proteins (mouse) catalysing both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol transfer were resolved from whole lung, whereas in both the rat isolated alveolar type II cells and the mouse type II cell-derived adenomas one of these less specific proteins is not present. PMID:6661189

  5. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ferranda; Fuster, Gemma; Adda, Mélanie; Blanch, Lluís; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC) on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml) or vehicle (control). Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM) or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  6. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Suppress Phagolysosome Activation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric; Choe, Yoona; Ng, Tat Fong; Taylor, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The eye is an immune-privileged microenvironment that has adapted several mechanisms of immune regulation to prevent inflammation. One of these potential mechanisms is retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) altering phagocytosis in macrophages. Methods The conditioned media of RPE eyecups from eyes of healthy mice and mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) were used to treat primary macrophage phagocytizing pHrodo bacterial bioparticles. In addition, the neuropeptides were depleted from the conditioned media of healthy RPE eyecups and used to treat phagocytizing macrophages. The conditioned media from healthy and EAU RPE eyecups were assayed for IL-6, and IL-6 was added to the healthy conditioned media, and neutralized in the EAU conditioned media. The macrophages were treated with the conditioned media and assayed for fluorescence. The macrophages were imaged, and the fluorescence intensity, relative to active phagolysosomes, was measured. Also, the macrophages were assayed using fluorescent viability dye staining. Results The conditioned media from healthy, but not from EAU RPE eyecups suppressed phagolysosome activation. Depletion of the neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y from the healthy RPE eyecup conditioned media resulted in macrophage death. In the EAU RPE eyecup conditioned media was 0.96 ± 0.18 ng/mL of IL-6, and when neutralized the conditioned media suppressed phagolysosome activation. Conclusions The healthy RPE through soluble molecules, including alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y, suppresses the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages. In EAU, the IL-6 produced by the RPE promotes the activation of phagolysosomes in macrophages. These results demonstrate that under healthy conditions, RPE promotes an altered pathway of phagocytized material in macrophages with implications on antigen processing and clearance. PMID:28241314

  7. Neither classical nor alternative macrophage activation is required for Pneumocystis clearance during immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-Qian; Wang, Jing; Hoy, Zachary; Keegan, Achsah; Bhagwat, Samir; Gigliotti, Francis; Wright, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocystis is a respiratory fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia [PcP]) in immunocompromised patients. Alveolar macrophages are critical effectors for CD4(+) T cell-dependent clearance of Pneumocystis, and previous studies found that alternative macrophage activation accelerates fungal clearance during PcP-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, the requirement for either classically or alternatively activated macrophages for Pneumocystis clearance has not been determined. Therefore, RAG2(-/-) mice lacking either the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptor (IFN-γR) or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) were infected with Pneumocystis. These mice were then immune reconstituted with wild-type lymphocytes to preserve the normal T helper response while preventing downstream effects of Th1 or Th2 effector cytokines on macrophage polarization. As expected, RAG2(-/-) mice developed severe disease but effectively cleared Pneumocystis and resolved IRIS. Neither RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) nor RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice displayed impaired Pneumocystis clearance. However, RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice developed a dysregulated immune response, with exacerbated IRIS and greater pulmonary function deficits than those in RAG2 and RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice. RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice had elevated numbers of lung CD4(+) T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and NK cells but severely depressed numbers of lung CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Impaired lung CD8(+) T cell responses in RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice were associated with elevated lung IFN-γ levels, and neutralization of IFN-γ restored the CD8 response. These data demonstrate that restricting the ability of macrophages to polarize in response to Th1 or Th2 cytokines does not impair Pneumocystis clearance. However, a cell type-specific IFN-γ/IFN-γR-dependent mechanism regulates CD8(+) T suppressor cell recruitment, limits immunopathogenesis, preserves lung function, and enhances the resolution of PcP-related IRIS.

  8. Elastolytic activity and alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage after chronic LPS inhalation: Effects of dexamethasone and rolipram

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Frederick J. . E-mail: JohnsonFJ@Cardiff.ac.uk; Reynolds, Lucy J.; Toward, Toby J.

    2005-09-15

    This study investigated whether a correlation between leukocyte-derived elastolytic activity, alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage, and leukocyte infiltration of the airways existed in guinea-pigs chronically exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The airway pathology of this model, notably the neutrophilia, resembles chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The effect of the corticosteroid, dexamethasone, or the phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4)-inhibitor, rolipram, on these features was studied. Conscious guinea-pigs were exposed for 1 h to single or repeated (nine) doses of LPS (30 {mu}g ml{sup -1}). Dexamethasone (20 mg kg{sup -1}, ip) or rolipram (1 mg kg{sup -1}, ip) was administered 24 and 0.5 h before the first exposure and daily thereafter. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was removed and elastolytic activity determined as the elastase-like release of Congo Red from impregnated elastin. The presence of the specific epithelial cell type-1 protein (40-42 kDa) RT1{sub 40} in BALF was identified by Western blotting using a rat monoclonal antibody and semi-quantified by dot-blot analysis. The antibody was found to identify guinea-pig RT1{sub 40}. BALF inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils and macrophages, and elastolytic activity were increased in chronic LPS-exposed guinea-pigs, the latter by 90%. Chronic LPS exposure also increased (10.5-fold) RT1{sub 40} levels, indicating significant alveolar epithelial type-1 cell damage. Dexamethasone or rolipram treatment reduced the influx of inflammatory cells, the elastolytic activity (by 40% and 38%, respectively), and RT1{sub 40} levels (by 50% and 57%, respectively). In conclusion, chronic LPS-exposed guinea-pigs, like COPD, exhibit elastolytic lung damage. This was prevented by a PDE4 inhibitor and supports their development for suppressing this leukocyte-mediated pathology.

  9. Is Radiologic Assessment of Alveolar Crest Height Useful to Monitor Periodontal Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Hattan; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Hausmann, Ernest; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary While the mainstay of periodontal assessment is clinical probing, radiographic assessment is also commonly employed and has the potential to provide facile quantitative information on the status of tooth-supporting bone. This article provides a brief review of standard methods to assess periodontal structures, including basic tenants of radiograph acquisition, assessment of alveolar crest levels, and typical patterns of bone loss seen in periodontal patients. Studies of the use of computer technology to objectively assess loss of alveolar crest from standardized and non-standardized radiographs are reviewed. Several recent developments in computer-assisted quantitation of alveolar crest height are described. Although probing measurements continue to be viewed as more practical than radiographic measurements, radiographic assessment can be made quantitative and likely easier and more precise than probing for routine assessment of periodontal disease activity. PMID:26427571

  10. Alternatively Activated (M2) Macrophage Phenotype Is Inducible by Endothelin-1 in Cultured Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Stefano; Pizzorni, Carmen; Paolino, Sabrina; Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Montagna, Paola; Brizzolara, Renata; Ruaro, Barbara; Sulli, Alberto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are phenotypically characterized by the expression of specific markers, mainly macrophage scavenger receptors (CD204 and CD163) and mannose receptor-1 (CD206), and participate in the fibrotic process by over-producing pro-fibrotic molecules, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1) and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is implicated in the fibrotic process, exerting its pro-fibrotic effects through the interaction with its receptors (ETA and ETB). The study investigated the possible role of ET-1 in inducing the transition from cultured human macrophages into M2 cells. Methods Cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) were activated into macrophages (M0 macrophages) with phorbol myristate acetate and subsequently maintained in growth medium (M0-controls) or treated with either ET-1 (100nM) or interleukin-4 (IL-4, 10ng/mL, M2 inducer) for 72 hours. Similarly, primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocyte (PBM)-derived macrophages obtained from healthy subjects, were maintained in growth medium (untreated cells) or treated with ET-1 or IL-4 for 6 days. Both M0 and PBM-derived macrophages were pre-treated with ET receptor antagonist (ETA/BRA, bosentan 10-5M) for 1 hour before ET-1 stimulation. Protein and gene expression of CD204, CD206, CD163, TGFbeta1 were analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene expression of interleukin(IL)-10 and macrophage derived chemokine (CCL-22) was evaluated by qRT-PCR. MMP-9 production was investigated by gel zymography. Results ET-1 significantly increased the expression of M2 phenotype markers CD204, CD206, CD163, IL-10 and CCL-22, and the production of MMP-9 in both cultures of M0 and PBM-derived macrophages compared to M0-controls and untreated cells. In cultured PBM-derived macrophages, ET-1 increased TGFbeta1 protein and gene expression compared to untreated cells. The ET-1

  11. Molecular and epigenetic basis of macrophage polarized activation.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Riboldi, Elena; Ippolito, Alessandro; Sica, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are unique cells for origin, heterogeneity and plasticity. At steady state most of macrophages are derived from fetal sources and maintained in adulthood through self-renewing. Despite sharing common progenitors, a remarkable heterogeneity characterized tissue-resident macrophages indicating that local signals educate them to express organ-specific functions. Macrophages are extremely plastic: chromatin landscape and transcriptional programs can be dynamically re-shaped in response to microenvironmental changes. Owing to their ductility, macrophages are crucial orchestrators of both initiation and resolution of immune responses and key supporters of tissue development and functions in homeostatic and pathological conditions. Herein, we describe current understanding of heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages using the M1-M2 dichotomy as operationally useful simplification of polarized activation. We focused on the complex network of signaling cascades, metabolic pathways, transcription factors, and epigenetic changes that control macrophage activation. In particular, this network was addressed in sepsis, as a paradigm of a pathological condition determining dynamic macrophage reprogramming.

  12. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  13. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  14. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Pessoni, André Moreira; Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Pedersoli, Wellington Ramos; Mineo, José Roberto; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50°C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection. PMID:26659253

  15. Inhibitory effect of deferoxamine or macrophage activation on transformation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia ingested by macrophages: reversal by holotransferrin.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Gomez, B; Brummer, E; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1994-04-01

    Conidia of P. brasiliensis ingested by murine macrophages at 37 degrees C showed enhanced transformation to yeast cells and further intracellular growth compared with conidia in culture medium alone. Treatment of macrophages with the iron chelator deferoxamine inhibited the intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. Cytokine-activated macrophages could also exert this inhibitory effect. Holotransferrin reversed the inhibitory effect of either deferoxamine or activated macrophages on intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. These results indicate that iron restriction is one of the mechanisms by which activated macrophages control the intracellular transformation of ingested conidia and growth of yeast cells.

  16. Inhibitory effect of deferoxamine or macrophage activation on transformation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia ingested by macrophages: reversal by holotransferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Gomez, B; Brummer, E; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1994-01-01

    Conidia of P. brasiliensis ingested by murine macrophages at 37 degrees C showed enhanced transformation to yeast cells and further intracellular growth compared with conidia in culture medium alone. Treatment of macrophages with the iron chelator deferoxamine inhibited the intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. Cytokine-activated macrophages could also exert this inhibitory effect. Holotransferrin reversed the inhibitory effect of either deferoxamine or activated macrophages on intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. These results indicate that iron restriction is one of the mechanisms by which activated macrophages control the intracellular transformation of ingested conidia and growth of yeast cells. PMID:8132359

  17. The effects of Eucheuma cottonii on alveolar macrophages and malondialdehyde levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in chronically particulate matter 10 coal dust-exposed rats

    PubMed Central

    Saputri, Romadhiyana Kisno; Setiawan, Bambang; Nugrahenny, Dian; Kania, Nia; Wahyuni, Endang Sri; Widodo, M Aris

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the effect of Eucheuma cottonii on alveolar macrophages (AM) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) in particulate matter 10 (PM10) coal dust-exposed rats. Materials and Methods: Ten groups, including a non exposed group and groups exposed to coal dust at doses of 6.25 (CD6.25), 12.5 (CD12.5), or 25 mg/m3 (CD25) an hour daily for 6 months with or without supplementation of ethanolic extract of E. cottonii at doses of 150 (EC150) or 300 mg/kg BW (EC300). The number of macrophages was determined using a light microscope. MDA levels were measured by TBARS assay. Results: EC150 insignificantly (P > 0.05) reduces the AM in CD groups compared to non treatment groups. EC150 and EC300 significantly (P < 0.05) decreased MDA levels in CD12.5 and CD25 groups relative to non treatment groups. Conclusion: E. cottonii attenuated oxidative stress in chronic exposure of PM10 coal dust. PMID:25429347

  18. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  19. Alternatively activated macrophages promote pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing; Sharma, Vishal; Hsieh, Michael H.; Chawla, Ajay; Murali, Ramachandran; Pandol, Stephen J.; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive and irreversible inflammatory and fibrotic disease with no cure. Unlike acute pancreatitis, we find that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are dominant in mouse and human CP. AAMs are dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 signaling and we show that mice lacking IL-4Rα, myeloid specific IL-4Rα, and IL-4/IL-13 were less susceptible to pancreatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mouse and human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are a source of IL-4/IL-13. Notably, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of IL-4/IL-13 in human ex-vivo studies as well as in established mouse CP decreases pancreatic AAMs and fibrosis. We identify a critical role for macrophages in pancreatic fibrosis and in turn PSCs as important inducers of macrophage alternative activation. Our study challenges and identifies pathways involved in cross talk between macrophages and PSCs that can be targeted to reverse or halt pancreatic fibrosis progression. PMID:25981357

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression in macrophages is controlled by lymphocytes during macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chong; Yang, Xiqiang; Yao, Lan; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Wei; Li, Xin; Wang, Lijia

    2012-01-01

    The viewpoints on the control of innate immune cells by the adaptive immune system during sepsis remain controversial. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is essential to the negative control of innate immunity and suppresses the activation of macrophages by inhibiting activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The purpose of the current study was to observe inflammatory response and macrophage activation in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with endotoxemia and to determine the role of MKP-1 in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system. Endotoxemia was induced in wild-type and SCID mice by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and all of the SCID mice died. SCID mice produced more inflammatory cytokines than BALB/c mice systemically and locally. TNF-α mRNA expression was higher and MKP-1 mRNA expression was lower in peritoneal macrophages (PMa) from SCID mice compared to PMa from wild-type mice after and even before LPS injection. Thioglycollate-stimulated PMa from wild-type mice were stimulated with LPS in vitro in the presence or absence of pan-T cells. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were higher in the supernatants from PMa cultured alone compared to PMa co-cultured with pan-T cells, and PMa MKP-1 mRNA and protein expression were higher when PMa were co-cultured with pan-T cells. Therefore, pan-T cells can up-regulate MKP-1 expression in macrophages and inhibit the secretion of inflammatory cytokines secretion by macrophages. In SCID mice, lymphocyte deficiency, especially T cell deficiency, causes insufficient MKP-1 expression in macrophages, which can be responsible for the severe inflammation and bad prognosis of septic SCID mice. MKP-1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage activation by the adaptive immune system.

  1. The application of high-content analysis in the study of targeted particulate delivery systems for intracellular drug delivery to alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O'Sullivan, Mary P; Sivadas, Neera; O'Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J; Keane, Joseph; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-08-01

    With an ever increasing number of particulate drug delivery systems being developed for the intracellular delivery of therapeutics a robust high-throughput method for studying particle-cell interactions is urgently required. Current methods used for analyzing particle-cell interaction include spectrofluorimetry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence/confocal microscopy, but these methods are not high throughput and provide only limited data on the specific number of particles delivered intracellularly to the target cell. The work herein presents an automated high-throughput method to analyze microparticulate drug delivery system (DDS) uptake byalveolar macrophages. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles were prepared in a range of sizes using a solvent evaporation method. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was differentiated into macrophage like cells using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and cells were treated with microparticles for 1 h and studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), spectrofluorimetry and a high-content analysis (HCA). PLGA microparticles within the size range of 0.8-2.1 μm were found to be optimal for macrophage targeting (p < 0.05). Uptake studies carried out at 37 °C and 4 °C indicated that microparticles were internalized in an energy dependent manner. To improve particle uptake, a range of opsonic coatings were assessed. Coating PLGA particles with gelatin and ovalbumin was found to significantly increase particle uptake from 2.75 ± 0.98 particles per cell for particles coated with gelatin. Opsonic coating also significantly increased particle internalization into primary human alveolar macrophages (p < 0.01) with a 1.7-fold increase in uptake from 4.19 ± 0.48 for uncoated to 7.53 ± 0.88 particles per cell for coated particles. In comparison to techniques such as spectrofluorimetry and CLSM, HCA provides both qualitative and quantitative data on the influence of carrier design on cell targeting that can be

  2. Up-regulation of alveolar macrophage platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) mRNA by interferon-gamma from Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen (PPD)-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wangoo, A; Taylor, I K; Haynes, A R; Shaw, R J

    1993-01-01

    Macrophage production of PDGF-B is believed to be important in the pathogenesis of diseases where chronic lung inflammation develops into fibrosis. Since tuberculosis is characterized by chronic inflammation and tissue fibrosis, we asked if lymphokines from lymphocytes stimulated by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen PPD, contained factors capable of increasing human alveolar macrophage PDGF-B mRNA. Supernatants from both phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)- and purified protein derivative (PPD)-stimulated lymphocytes, when added to macrophages, induced an increase in the mRNA of PDGF-B, but not transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). When lymphocytes from contacts of patients with tuberculosis, patients with tuberculosis, and normal subjects were compared following PPD stimulation, the lymphocytes from the contacts had the greatest proliferation response, the greatest production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and their lymphokines induced the greatest increase in PDGF-B mRNA in macrophages. Recombinant human IFN-gamma reproduced this ability of lymphokines to increase macrophage PDGF-B mRNA. Finally, the increase in macrophage PDGF-B mRNA following incubation with supernatants from PPD-stimulated lymphocytes was shown to be due to IFN-gamma, when the increase in macrophage PDGF-B mRNA was prevented by addition of anti-human IFN-gamma antibody to the lymphocyte supernatant. This study indicated that antigen-stimulated lymphocytes released IFN-gamma, which in turn resulted in an increase in PDGF-B mRNA in alveolar macrophages. Such a mechanism provides a link between the DTH response and the first stages of a fibrotic reaction, and may offer an explanation for the progression of chronic inflammation to fibrosis, as occurs in the lungs of patients with untreated pulmonary tuberculosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8403516

  3. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  4. Key role of Toll-like receptor 2 in the inflammatory response and major histocompatibility complex class ii downregulation in Brucella abortus-infected alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Hielpos, M Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Oliveira, Sergio C; Baldi, Pablo C

    2014-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival.

  5. Efficacy of liposomal gentamicin against Rhodococcus equi in a mouse infection model and colocalization with R. equi in equine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Burton, Alexandra J; Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Hondalus, Mary K; Arnold, Robert D

    2015-04-17

    Rhodococcus equi, a facultative intracellular pathogen and an important cause of pneumonia in foals, is highly susceptible to killing by gentamicin in vitro. However, gentamicin is not effective in vivo, due to its poor cellular penetration. Encapsulation of drugs in liposomes enhances cellular uptake. The objectives of this study were to compare liposomal gentamicin and free gentamicin with respect to their uptake by equine macrophages and intracellular colocalization with R. equi and to compare the efficacies of liposomal gentamicin, free gentamicin and clarithromycin with rifampin for the reduction of R. equi CFU in a mouse model of infection. After ex vivo exposure, a significantly higher mean (±SD) percentage of equine alveolar macrophages contained liposomal gentamicin (91.9±7.6%) as opposed to free gentamicin (16.8±12.5%). Intracellular colocalization of drug and R. equi, as assessed by confocal microscopy, occurred in a significantly higher proportion of cells exposed to liposomal gentamicin (81.2±17.8%) compared to those exposed to free gentamicin (10.4±8.7%). The number of R. equi CFU in the spleen was significantly lower in mice treated with liposomal gentamicin compared to that of mice treated with free gentamicin or to untreated control mice. Treatment with liposomal gentamicin also resulted in a significantly greater reduction in the number of R. equi CFU in the liver compared to treatment with clarithromycin in combination with rifampin. These results support further investigation of liposomal gentamicin as a new treatment for infections caused by R. equi.

  6. Alveolar macrophage kinetics after inhalation of 239PuO2 by CBA/Ca mice: changes in synthesis of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kellington, J P; Gibson, K; Buckle, T M; Talbot, R J; Hornby, S B

    1992-01-01

    For workers in the nuclear industry, the primary route for the entry of radioactive materials into the body is by inhalation, and the rate of clearance of particles from the pulmonary region of the lung is an important factor in determining radiation dose. It is the function of alveolar macrophages (AM) to maintain the sterility of the lung and to remove insoluble particles from the respiratory surfaces and airways. The AM population is not static, and under normal conditions the loss of macrophages from the alveoli via the conducting airways is balanced by renewal. Studies of the effects of external irradiation on the kinetics of AM are numerous, but to date little is known about the effects of inhaled radioactive particles. In this investigation the effects of inhaled 239PuO2 (plutonium dioxide) particles on the synthesis of DNA by AM were studied at times up to 77 days after exposure. We also measured the number of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage and the incidence of AM with nuclear aberrations. The latter provides a sensitive indicator of the effects of radiation. One of the earliest effects observed after exposure to 239PuO2 is a reduction in the number of AM recovered by lavage. This reduction is associated with a 3-fold reduction in the proportion of AM undergoing DNA synthesis at early times after exposure. The overall mean pulse labeling index of AM recovered from sham-exposed mice is 1.68%, and no trend is observed with time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1396470

  7. [Macrophages in asthma].

    PubMed

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  8. Endogenous Epoxygenases Are Modulators of Monocyte/Macrophage Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Mary C.; Holness, Mark J.; Swales, Karen E.; Warner, Timothy D.; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid is metabolized through three major metabolic pathways, the cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and CYP450 enzyme systems. Unlike cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases, the role of CYP450 epoxygenases in monocyte/macrophage-mediated responses is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings When transfected in vitro, CYP2J2 is an efficient activator of anti-inflammatory pathways through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α. Human monocytes and macrophages contain PPARα and here we show they express the epoxygenases CYP2J2 and CYP2C8. Inhibition of constitutive monocyte epoxygenases using the epoxygenase inhibitor SKF525A induces cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and activity, and the release of TNFα, and can be reversed by either add back of the endogenous epoxygenase products and PPARα ligand 11,12- epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) or the addition of the selective synthetic PPARα ligand GW7647. In alternatively activated (IL-4-treated) monocytes, in contrast to classically activated cells, epoxygenase inhibition decreased TNFα release. Epoxygenases can be pro-inflammatory via superoxide anion production. The suppression of TNFα by SKF525A in the presence of IL-4 was associated with a reduction in superoxide anion generation and reproduced by the superoxide dismutase MnCl2. Similar to these acute activation studies, in monocyte derived macrophages, epoxygenase inhibition elevates M1 macrophage TNFα mRNA and further decreases M2 macrophage TNFα. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, epoxygenase activity represents an important endogenous pathway which limits monocyte activation. Moreover endogenous epoxygenases are immuno-modulators regulating monocyte/macrophage activation depending on the underlying activation state. PMID:22028915

  9. Antiosteoclastogenesis activity of a CO2 laser antagonizing receptor activator for nuclear factor kappaB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation of murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Liang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-03-01

    Macrophage cells are the important effector cells in the immune reaction which are indispensable for osteoclastogenesis; their heterogeneity and plasticity renders macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. In recent years, there have been very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteoclastogenesis. In this study, RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were treated with RANKL to regulate osteoclastogenesis. We used a CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of osteoclastogenic. We also evaluated cell viability, cell death and cathepsin K expression. The CO2 laser inhibited a receptor activator of the NF-ĸB ligand (RANKL)-induced formation of osteoclasts during the osteoclast differentiation process. It was also found that irradiation for two times reduced RANKL-enhanced TRAP activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CO2 laser-treatment diminished the expression and secretion of cathepsin K elevated by RANKL and was concurrent with the inhibition of TRAF6 induction and NF-ĸB activation. The current report demonstrates that CO2 laser abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by retarding osteoclast differentiation. The CO2 laser can modulate every cell through dose-dependent in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, such as the proliferation and fusion of preosteoclasts and the maturation of osteoclasts. Therefore, the current results serve as an improved explanation of the cellular roles of macrophage cell populations in osteoclastogenesis as well as in alveolar bone remodeling by CO2 laser-treatment.

  10. Motion and twisting of magnetic particles ingested by alveolar macrophages in non-smokers and smokers: Implementation of viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Winfried; Felten, Kathrin; Kohlhäufl, Martin; Häussinger, Karl; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.

    2007-04-01

    Ferrimagnetic iron oxide particles were inhaled by 17 healthy volunteers (9 non-smokers, 8 smokers), and the retained particles were magnetized and detected by a SQUID. Stochastic particle transport due to cytoskeletal reorganizations within macrophages (relaxation) and directed particle motion in a weak magnetic twisting field were investigated with respect to viscous and elastic properties of the cytoskeleton. Relaxation and cytoskeletal stiffness were not influenced by cigarette smoking. Relaxation and particle twisting revealed a non-Newtonian viscosity with a pure viscous and a viscoelastic compartment. Viscous and elastic data obtained from relaxation correlated with particle twisting, indicating that the proposed simple model is a reasonable approximation of cytoskeletal mechanical properties.

  11. Effects of Astragalus and Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharides on alveolar macrophage phagocytosis and inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mice exposed to PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xu; Liu, Xiao-Ju; Qiu, Jing-Man; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Bao, Hai-Rong; Shu, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Astragalus and Codonopsis pilosula are used for their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we investigated the effects of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) and Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharides (CPP) on alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis and inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) associated with exposure to particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5μm (PM2.5). A mouse model of COPD was established by cigarette smoke exposure. PM2.5 exposure was performed by inhalation of a PM2.5 solution aerosol. APS and CPP were administered intragastrically. COPD showed defective AM phagocytosis and increased levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum. PM2.5 exposure aggravated the damage, and this effect was reversed by APS and CPP gavage. The results indicate that APS and CPP may promote defective AM phagocytosis and ameliorate the inflammatory response in COPD with or without PM2.5 exposure.

  12. Immune response of porcine alveolar macrophages to a concurrent infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Haemophilus parasuis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kavanová, Lenka; Prodělalová, Jana; Nedbalcová, Kateřina; Matiašovic, Ján; Volf, Jiří; Faldyna, Martin; Salát, Jiří

    2015-10-22

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) can predispose pigs to secondary respiratory infection with bacteria such as Haemophilus parasuis. Animals infected with both pathogens develop more severe clinical disease. The immune response of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) to simultaneous infection with PRRSV and H. parasuis was analysed in vitro, describing cytokine production, expression of cell surface molecules, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Concurrent infection with PRRSV and H. parasuis increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8) in PAMs in comparison with PAMs infected with PRRSV or H. parasuis alone. An additive effect of dual infection on IL-1β production was confirmed at the protein level. PAMs infected with PRRSV showed increased production of ROS compared to controls. Conversely, simultaneous infection of PAMs with PRRSV and H. parasuis decreased production of ROS, indicating the presence of an H. parasuis defence mechanism against respiratory burst. Concurrent infection of PAMs with PRRSV and H. parasuis was shown to elicit a pro-inflammatory immune response represented by significant IL-1β production. Severe multifactorial respiratory disease in natural conditions caused by both pathogens could be the consequence of pro-inflammatory mediated immunopathology.

  13. Molecular characterization of transcriptome-wide interactions between highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine alveolar macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Zhai, Shanli; Zhou, Xiang; Lin, Ping; Jiang, Tengfei; Hu, Xueying; Jiang, Yunbo; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Qingde; Xu, Xuewen; Li, Jin-Ping; Liu, Bang

    2011-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infects mainly the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and causes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). Previous studies have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of lung tissue in vivo and PAMs in vitro following infection with PRRSV, however, transcriptome-wide understanding of the interaction between highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and PAMs in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, we employed Affymetrix microarrays to investigate the gene expression patterns of PAMs isolated from Tongcheng piglets (a Chinese indigenous breed) after infection with HP-PRRSV. During the infection, Tongcheng piglets exhibited typical clinical signs, e.g. fever, asthma, coughing, anorexia, lethargy and convulsion, but displayed mild regional lung damage at 5 and 7 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed that HP-PRRSV infection has affected PAMs in expression of the important genes involved in cytoskeleton and exocytosis organization, protein degradation and folding, intracellular calcium and zinc homeostasis. Several potential antiviral strategies might be employed in PAMs, including upregulating IFN-induced genes and increasing intracellular zinc ion concentration. And inhibition of the complement system likely attenuated the lung damage during HP-PRRSV infection. Transcriptomic analysis of PAMs in vivo could lead to a better understanding of the HP-PRRSV-host interaction, and to the identification of novel antiviral therapies and genetic components of swine tolerance/susceptibility to HP-PRRS.

  14. In vitro biodegradation of chrysotile fibres by alveolar macrophages and mesothelial cells in culture: comparison with a pH effect.

    PubMed

    Jaurand, M C; Gaudichet, A; Halpern, S; Bignon, J

    1984-08-01

    The modification of the chemistry of asbestos chrysotile fibres (Mg3(Si2O5)(OH)4) after their ingestion by cultured cells has been studied. Two types of cells involved in asbestos related pulmonary disease were used, rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM), recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage, and pleural mesothelial cells (PMC) obtained from the rat parietal pleura. Chemical characterisation of intracellular fibres was performed on unstained ultrathin sections by electron probe microanalysis. The results showed a progressive leaching of Mg, characterised by a time dependent decrease of Mg/Si. AM were more efficient than PMC at leaching intracellular chrysotile fibres since it took longer to obtain the same proportion of leached fibres with PMC than with AM. As in vitro Mg-leaching can be obtained by acid treatment, chrysotile fibres were incubated, either untreated or pretreated with cell membranes, at pH 4 or 7 for various times. The data show that the kinetic of leaching by AM was comparable with leaching at pH 4. The leaching by PMC was of the same order as leaching at pH 7. When membranes were adsorbed on to the fibres, a delayed leaching was observed. The results indicate that the solubilisation of chrysotile by AM could be an intraphagolysosomal event due to a pH effect. With PMC, however, it is not possible to draw this conclusion since nothing is known about the intracellular pH.

  15. Dissolution of man-made vitreous fibers in rat alveolar macrophage culture and Gamble's saline solution: influence of different media and chemical composition of the fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Luoto, K; Holopainen, M; Karppinen, K; Perander, M; Savolainen, K

    1994-01-01

    The effect of different chemical compositions of man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF) on their dissolution by alveolar macrophages (AM) in culture and in Gamble's solution was studied. The fibers were exposed to cultured rat AMs, culture medium alone; or Gamble's saline solution for 2, 4, or 8 days. The dissolution of the fibers was studied by measuring the amount of silicon (Si), iron (Fe), and aluminum (Al) in each medium. The AMs in culture dissolved Fe and Al from the fibers but the dissolution of Si was more marked in the cell culture medium without cells and in the Gamble's solution. The dissolution of Si, Fe, and Al was different for different fibers, and increased as a function of time. The Fe and Al content of the fibers correlated negatively with the dissolution of Si by AMs from the MMVF, i.e., when the content of Fe and Al of the fibers increased the dissolution of Si decreased. These results suggest that the chemical composition of MMVFs has a marked effect on their dissolution. AMs seem to affect the dissolution of Fe and Al from the fibers. This suggests that in vitro models with cells in the media rather than only culture media or saline solutions would be preferable in dissolution studies of MMVFs. PMID:7882911

  16. ERK5 Activation in Macrophages Promotes Efferocytosis and Inhibits Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Kyung-Sun; Cushman, Hannah J.; Akaike, Masashi; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Wang, Xin; Qiu, Xing; Fujiwara, Keigi; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Efferocytosis is a process by which dead and dying cells are removed by phagocytic cells. Efferocytosis by macrophages is thought to curb the progression of atherosclerosis, but the mechanistic insight of this process is lacking. Methods and Results When macrophages were fed apoptotic cells or treated with pitavastatin in vitro, efferocytosis-related signaling and phagocytic capacity were upregulated in an ERK5 activity–dependent manner. Macrophages isolated from macrophage-specific ERK5-null mice exhibited reduced efferocytosis and levels of gene and protein expression of efferocytosis-related molecules. When these mice were crossed with low-density lipoprotein receptor−/− mice and fed a high-cholesterol diet, atherosclerotic plaque formation was accelerated, and the plaques had more advanced and vulnerable morphology. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that ERK5, which is robustly activated by statins, is a hub molecule that upregulates macrophage efferocytosis, thereby suppressing atherosclerotic plaque formation. Molecules that upregulate ERK5 and its signaling in macrophages may be good drug targets for suppressing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25001623

  17. Alternatively activated macrophages produce catecholamines to sustain adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoa D.; Qiu, Yifu; Cui, Xiaojin; Goh, Y.P. Sharon; Mwangi, Julia; David, Tovo; Mukundan, Lata; Brombacher, Frank; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    All homeotherms utilize thermogenesis to maintain core body temperature, ensuring that cellular functions and physiologic processes can ensue in cold environments1-3. In the prevailing model, when the hypothalamus senses cold temperatures, it triggers sympathetic discharge, resulting in the release of noradrenaline in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT)4,5. Acting via the β3-adrenergic receptors, noradrenaline induces lipolysis in white adipocytes6, whereas it stimulates the expression of thermogenic genes, such as PPARγ coactivator 1a (Ppargc1a), uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1), and acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (Acsl1), in brown adipocytes7-9. However, the precise nature of all the cell types involved in this efferent loop is not well established. Here we report an unexpected requirement for the interleukin 4 (IL4)-stimulated program of alternative macrophage activation in adaptive thermogenesis. Cold exposure rapidly promoted alternative activation of adipose tissue macrophages, which secrete catecholamines to induce thermogenic gene expression in BAT and lipolysis in WAT. Absence of alternatively activated macrophages impaired metabolic adaptations to cold, whereas administration of IL4 increased thermogenic gene expression, fatty acid mobilization, and energy expenditure, all in a macrophage-dependent manner. We have thus discovered a surprising role for alternatively activated macrophages in the orchestration of an important mammalian stress response, the response to cold. PMID:22101429

  18. ROFA INCREASES CASPASE-3 ACTIVITY IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACRAPHAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to air pollution particles produces pulmonary inflammation and injury, but the mechanisms of this injury are unclear. Apoptosis, involving activation of caspases, may be one potential mechanism. In this study, we hypothesized that ROFA, a constituent of air pollution...

  19. An inducible transgene reports activation of macrophages in live zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Leslie E; Chien, An-Tzu; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Hall, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are the most functionally heterogenous cells of the hematopoietic system. Given many diseases are underpinned by inappropriate macrophage activation, macrophages have emerged as a therapeutic target to treat disease. A thorough understanding of what controls macrophage activation will likely reveal new pathways that can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. Live imaging fluorescent macrophages within transgenic zebrafish larvae has provided a valuable window to investigate macrophage behavior in vivo. Here we describe the first transgenic zebrafish line that reports macrophage activation, as evidenced by induced expression of an immunoresponsive gene 1(irg1):EGFP transgene. When combined with existing reporter lines that constitutively mark macrophages, we reveal this unique transgenic line can be used to live image macrophage activation in response to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide and xenografted human cancer cells. We anticipate the Tg(irg1:EGFP) line will provide a valuable tool to explore macrophage activation and plasticity in the context of different disease models.

  20. Gene expression profiling of human alveolar macrophages infected by B. anthracis spores demonstrates TNF-α and NF-κb are key components of the innate immune response to the pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of anthrax, has recently been used as an agent of bioterrorism. The innate immune system initially appears to contain the pathogen at the site of entry. Because the human alveolar macrophage (HAM) plays a key role in lung innate immune responses, studying the HAM response to B. anthracis is important in understanding the pathogenesis of the pulmonary form of this disease. Methods In this paper, the transcriptional profile of B. anthracis spore-treated HAM was compared with that of mock-infected cells, and differentially expressed genes were identified by Affymetrix microarray analysis. A portion of the results were verified by Luminex protein analysis. Results The majority of genes modulated by spores were upregulated, and a lesser number were downregulated. The differentially expressed genes were subjected to Ingenuity Pathway analysis, the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) analysis, the Promoter Analysis and Interaction Network Toolset (PAINT) and Oncomine analysis. Among the upregulated genes, we identified a group of chemokine ligand, apoptosis, and, interestingly, keratin filament genes. Central hubs regulating the activated genes were TNF-α, NF-κB and their ligands/receptors. In addition to TNF-α, a broad range of cytokines was induced, and this was confirmed at the level of translation by Luminex multiplex protein analysis. PAINT analysis revealed that many of the genes affected by spores contain the binding site for c-Rel, a member of the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Other transcription regulatory elements contained in many of the upregulated genes were c-Myb, CP2, Barbie Box, E2F and CRE-BP1. However, many of the genes are poorly annotated, indicating that they represent novel functions. Four of the genes most highly regulated by spores have only previously been associated with head and neck and lung carcinomas. Conclusion The results demonstrate not only

  1. Periodontitis-activated monocytes/macrophages cause aortic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Shin-ichi; Naruse, Keiko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Nishikawa, Toru; Adachi, Kei; Suzuki, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Mizutani, Makoto; Ohno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Toshihide; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2014-06-04

    A relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has been suggested by epidemiological studies. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis is an adequate model for clinical periodontitis, which starts from plaque accumulation, followed by inflammation in the periodontal tissue. Here we have demonstrated using a ligature-induced periodontitis model that periodontitis activates monocytes/macrophages, which subsequently circulate in the blood and adhere to vascular endothelial cells without altering the serum TNF-α concentration. Adherent monocytes/macrophages induced NF-κB activation and VCAM-1 expression in the endothelium and increased the expression of the TNF-α signaling cascade in the aorta. Peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells from rats with experimental periodontitis showed enhanced adhesion and increased NF-κB/VCAM-1 in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that periodontitis triggers the initial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation of the vasculature, through activating monocytes/macrophages.

  2. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  3. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  4. Proatherogenic macrophage activities are targeted by the flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guzman, Oscar J; Tabares-Guevara, Jorge H; Leon-Varela, Yudy M; Álvarez, Rafael M; Roldan, Miguel; Sierra, Jelver A; Londoño-Londoño, Julian A; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2012-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the flavonoid quercetin protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors. Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of CVD, is also attenuated by oral quercetin administration in animal models. Although macrophages are key players during fatty streak formation and plaque progression and aggravation, little is known about the effects of quercetin on atherogenic macrophages. Here, we report that primary bone marrow-derived macrophages internalized less oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and accumulated less intracellular cholesterol in the presence of quercetin. This reduction of foam cell formation correlated with reduced surface expression of the oxLDL receptor CD36. Quercetin also targeted the lipopolysaccharide-dependent, oxLDL-independent pathway of lipid droplet formation in macrophages. In oxLDL-stimulated macrophages, quercetin inhibited reactive oxygen species production and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In a system that evaluated cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion via nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 inflammasome activation, quercetin also exhibited an inhibitory effect. Dyslipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice chronically treated with intraperitoneal quercetin injections had smaller atheromatous lesions, reduced lipid deposition, and less macrophage and T cell inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic roots than vehicle-treated animals. Serum levels of total cholesterol and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde were also reduced in these mice. Our results demonstrate that quercetin interferes with both key proatherogenic activities of macrophages, namely foam cell formation and pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses, and these effects may explain the atheroprotective properties of this common flavonoid.

  5. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pre-treatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pre-treatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pre-treatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from a M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia, and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Nanotoxicology screening strategies

  6. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  7. Fine-tuning of macrophage activation using synthetic rocaglate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bidisha; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Devine, William G.; Kobzik, Lester; Beeler, Aaron B.; Porco, John A.; Kramnik, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria represent a significant global threat. Given the dearth of new antibiotics, host-directed therapies (HDTs) are especially desirable. As IFN-gamma (IFNγ) plays a central role in host resistance to intracellular bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we searched for small molecules to augment the IFNγ response in macrophages. Using an interferon-inducible nuclear protein Ipr1 as a biomarker of macrophage activation, we performed a high-throughput screen and identified molecules that synergized with low concentration of IFNγ. Several active compounds belonged to the flavagline (rocaglate) family. In primary macrophages a subset of rocaglates 1) synergized with low concentrations of IFNγ in stimulating expression of a subset of IFN-inducible genes, including a key regulator of the IFNγ network, Irf1; 2) suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and type I IFN and 3) induced autophagy. These compounds may represent a basis for macrophage-directed therapies that fine-tune macrophage effector functions to combat intracellular pathogens and reduce inflammatory tissue damage. These therapies would be especially relevant to fighting drug-resistant pathogens, where improving host immunity may prove to be the ultimate resource. PMID:27086720

  8. Porcine circovirus type 2 increases IL-1β and IL-10 production via the MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway in porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyuan; Zhang, Shuxia; Zhang, Yaqun; Chen, Mengmeng; Lv, Yingjun

    2016-07-25

    Porcine alveolar macrophages represent the first line of defense in the porcine lung after infection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) via the respiratory tract. However, PCV2 infection impairs the microbicidal capability of PAMs and alters cytokine production and/or secretion. Currently, the reason for the imbalance of cytokines has not been fully elucidated and the regulatory mechanisms involved are not clear. Here, we investigated the expression levels and regulation of IL-1β and IL-10 in PAMs following incubation with PCV2 in vitro. Both levels of IL-1β and IL-10 increased in PAM supernatants, and the distribution of NF-κB p65 staining in the nucleus, the expression of MyD88 and p-IκB in the cytoplasm and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB increased after incubation with PCV2, while the expression of p65 in the cytoplasm of PAMs decreased. However, when PAMs were co-incubated with PCV2 and small interfering RNA targeting MyD88, these effects were reversed. Additionally, mRNA expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, -3, -4, -7, -8 and -9 were increased when PAMs were incubated with PCV2. These findings showed that PCV2 induced increased IL-1β and IL-10 production in PAMs, and these changes in expression were relative to the TLR-MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway.

  9. Activated alveolar epithelial cells initiate fibrosis through autocrine and paracrine secretion of connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jibing; Velikoff, Miranda; Canalis, Ernesto; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Kim, Kevin K

    2014-04-15

    Fibrogenesis involves a pathological accumulation of activated fibroblasts and extensive matrix remodeling. Profibrotic cytokines, such as TGF-β, stimulate fibroblasts to overexpress fibrotic matrix proteins and induce further expression of profibrotic cytokines, resulting in progressive fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a profibrotic cytokine that is indicative of fibroblast activation. Epithelial cells are abundant in the normal lung, but their contribution to fibrogenesis remains poorly defined. Profibrotic cytokines may activate epithelial cells with protein expression and functions that overlap with the functions of active fibroblasts. We found that alveolar epithelial cells undergoing TGF-β-mediated mesenchymal transition in vitro were also capable of activating lung fibroblasts through production of CTGF. Alveolar epithelial cell expression of CTGF was dramatically reduced by inhibition of Rho signaling. CTGF reporter mice demonstrated increased CTGF promoter activity by lung epithelial cells acutely after bleomycin in vivo. Furthermore, mice with lung epithelial cell-specific deletion of CTGF had an attenuated fibrotic response to bleomycin. These studies provide direct evidence that epithelial cell activation initiates a cycle of fibrogenic effector cell activation during progressive fibrosis. Therapy targeted at epithelial cell production of CTGF offers a novel pathway for abrogating this progressive cycle and limiting tissue fibrosis.

  10. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  11. Carbon nanohorns allow acceleration of osteoblast differentiation via macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Eri; Miyako, Eijiro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ushijima, Natsumi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Russier, Julie; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the proof-of-concept on the osteoblast differentiation capacity by CNHs will allow future studies focused on CNHs as ideal therapeutic materials for bone regeneration.Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the

  12. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  13. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  14. Dynamics of lung macrophage activation in response to helminth infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of our understanding of the development and phenotype of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) has been obtained from studies investigating the response of bone marrow- and peritoneal-derived cells to IL-4 or IL-13 stimulation. Comparatively little is known about the development of the AAM...

  15. Regulation of cytokine production in human alveolar macrophages and airway epithelial cells in response to ambient air pollution particles: Further mechanistic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Susanne; Mundandhara, Sailaja; Devlin, Robert B.; Madden, Michael . E-mail: madden.michael@epa.gov

    2005-09-01

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endpoints of inflammation, and oxidant stress. Separation of Chapel Hill PM 10 into fine and coarse size particles revealed that the main proinflammatory response (TNF, IL-6, COX-2) in AM was driven by material present in the coarse PM, containing 90-95% of the stimulatory material in PM10. The particles did not affect expression of hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), a sensitive marker of oxidant stress. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) also responded to the coarse fraction with higher levels of IL-8 and COX-2, than induced by fine or ultrafine PM. All size PM induced oxidant stress in NHBE, while fine PM induced the highest levels of HO-1 expression. The production of cytokines in AM by both coarse and fine particles was blocked by the toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist E5531 involved in the recognition of LPS and Gram negative bacteria. The NHBE were found to recognize coarse and fine PM through TLR2, a receptor with preference for recognition of Gram positive bacteria. Compared to ambient PM, diesel PM induced only a minimal cytokine response in both AM and NHBE. Instead, diesel suppressed LPS-induced TNF and IL-8 release in AM. Both coarse and fine ambient air PM were also found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF release while silica, volcanic ash or carbon black had no inhibitory effect. Diesel particles did not affect cytokine mRNA induction nor protein accumulation but interfered with the release of cytokine from the cells. Ambient coarse and fine PM, on the other hand, inhibited both mRNA induction and protein production. Exposure to coarse and fine PM decreased the expression of TLR4 in the macrophages. Particle-induced decrease in TLR4 and hyporesponsiveness to LPS

  16. Transcription analysis on response of porcine alveolar macrophages to co-infection of the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Du, Luping; Xu, Xiangwei; Sun, Bing; Yu, Zhengyu; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Wei, Yanna; Wang, Haiyan; Shao, Guoqing; He, Kongwang

    2015-01-22

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is of great concern economically, for swine producers worldwide. Co-infections with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) are considered the major causative agents of PRDC, and responsible for mass mortality in pigs. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying the host factors involved in pathogenesis and persistent infection have not been clearly established because of a lack of information regarding host responses following co-infection. In the current study, high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) to co-infection with highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and Mhp. A total of 2152 and 1760 genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the control group and PRRSV+Mhp co-infected group at 6 and 15 h post infection, respectively. The DE genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, defense response, signal transduction. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were associated with chemokine signaling pathway, cytokine, TLR, RLR and NLR signaling pathways and Jak-STAT signaling pathway. STRING analysis demonstrated that IL-1β is an integral gene in co-infections with PRRSV and Mhp. The present study is the first to document the response of PAMs to co-infection with HP-PRRSV and Mhp. The observed gene expression profile could help with the screening of potential host agents for reducing the prevalence of co-infections, and to further develop our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis associated with PRRSV and Mhp co-infection in pigs.

  17. Down-regulation by prostaglandins of type-II phospholipase A2 expression in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages: a possible involvement of cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Vial, D; Arbibe, L; Havet, N; Dumarey, C; Vargaftig, B; Touqui, L

    1998-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that isolated guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AM) synthesize type-II phospholipase A2 (PLA2-II) through a tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent process. This synthesis is enhanced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and accompanied by a release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) into the medium. Because agents elevating intracellular cAMP, such as PGE2, have been shown to stimulate PLA2-II expression in various cell types, we investigated the modulation of PLA2-II synthesis by cAMP in AM. Surprisingly, incubation of AM with PGE2, dibutyryl-cAMP, cholera toxin or rolipram (an inhibitor of specific cAMP-phosphodiesterase) inhibited both basal and LPS-stimulated PLA2-II expression. The inhibitory effect of PGE2 was observed at concentrations similar to those released by AM. Moreover, treatment of AM with either aspirin or neutralizing PGE2 monoclonal antibody stimulated PLA2-II synthesis. These effects were closely correlated with the ability of these agents to modulate TNF-alpha release, which was decreased by dibutyryl-cAMP and exogenous PGE2, whereas neutralizing PGE2 antibody markedly increased this release. Hence, in contrast to other cell systems, we report that: (i) agents elevating intracellular cAMP levels down-regulate both basal and LPS-induced PLA2-II synthesis, (ii) prostaglandins exert a negative feedback effect on this synthesis, probably through an elevation of intracellular cAMP levels, and (iii) inhibition of TNF-alpha release may account, at least in part, for the down-regulation of PLA2-II expression by endogenously produced prostaglandins and cAMP-elevating agents. PMID:9461495

  18. RNA-sequence analysis of primary alveolar macrophages after in vitro infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains of differing virulence.

    PubMed

    Badaoui, Bouabid; Rutigliano, Teresa; Anselmo, Anna; Vanhee, Merijn; Nauwynck, Hans; Giuffra, Elisabetta; Botti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) mainly infects porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), resulting in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in pigs. Most of the transcriptomic studies on PAMs infected with PRRSV conducted thus far have made use of microarray technology. Here, we investigated the transcriptome of PAMs in vitro at 12 h post-infection with two European PRRSV strains characterized by low (Lelystad, LV) and high (Lena) virulence through RNA-Seq. The expression levels of genes, isoforms, alternative transcription start sites (TSS) and differential promoter usage revealed a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation upon infection with the two strains. Gene ontology analysis confirmed that infection of PAMs with both the Lena and LV strains affected signaling pathways directly linked to the innate immune response, including interferon regulatory factors (IRF), RIG1-like receptors, TLRs and PKR pathways. The results confirmed that interferon signaling is crucial for transcriptional regulation during PAM infection. IFN-β1 and IFN-αω, but not IFN-α, were up-regulated following infection with either the LV or Lena strain. The down-regulation of canonical pathways, such as the interplay between the innate and adaptive immune responses, cell death and TLR3/TLR7 signaling, was observed for both strains, but Lena triggered a stronger down-regulation than LV. This analysis contributes to a better understanding of the interactions between PRRSV and PAMs and outlines the differences in the responses of PAMs to strains with different levels of virulence, which may lead to the development of new PRRSV control strategies.

  19. [Alveolar macrophages and mononuclear cells of the peripheral blood in sulfur dioxide and chrysotile B exposure: a realistic in vitro test of oxygen free radical liberation].

    PubMed

    Knorst, M M; Kienast, K; Müller-Quernheim, J; Ferlinz, R

    1993-05-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and Asbest are frequently found at workplaces. They can induce airway and lung parenchymal injury. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important and decisive role in the damage of respiratory tissue. We evaluated the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) production of AM and peripheral blood mononuclear cells after exposure with SO2 and Chrysotile B. The cells were exposed in a special gas exposure chamber at 37 degrees C and 100% air humidity for 30 minutes to 1.5 or 2.5 ppm SO2. Afterwards they were incubated for one hour with 100 micrograms or 200 micrograms Chrysotile B. Control experiments were performed with cell exposure to synthetic air without SO2 and Chrysotile B. Spontaneous and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated ROI-release were measured by chemiluminescence and the cell toxicity was evaluated with the trypan blue exclusion test. Our results show a dose-dependent increase of the spontaneous ROI-production of AM after SO2 and Chrysotile B exposure. Exposure to 100 micrograms Chrysotile B caused an 1.5 fold, exposure to 1.5 or 2.5 ppm SO2 plus 100 micrograms Chrysotile B resulted in an 2.4 respectively 3.3 fold increase in ROI-release compared to control experiments. Exposure of AM to 200 micrograms Chrysotile B yielded an 1.9 fold, exposure to 2.5 ppm SO2 plus 200 micrograms Chrysotile B a 3.9 fold elevation in the spontaneous ROI-production compared to control experiment with standard air. A similar reaction pattern was observed in PMA-stimulated AM and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT)-induced interstitial fibrosis in the lungs of rats is associated with increased levels of PDGF mRNA and the formation of unique intercellular carbon structures that bridge alveolar macrophages In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, James B; Turpin, Elizabeth A; Antao-Menezes, Aurita; Cesta, Mark F; Bermudez, Edilberto; Bonner, James C

    2006-01-01

    Background Nanotechnology is a rapidly advancing industry with many new products already available to the public. Therefore, it is essential to gain an understanding of the possible health risks associated with exposure to nanomaterials and to identify biomarkers of exposure. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic potential of SWCNT synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using cobalt (Co) and molybdenum (Mo) as catalysts. Following a single oropharyngeal aspiration of SWCNT in rats, we evaluated lung histopathology, cell proliferation, and growth factor mRNAs at 1 and 21 days post-exposure. Comparisons were made to vehicle alone (saline containing a biocompatible nonionic surfactant), inert carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, or vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) as a known inducer of fibrosis. Results SWCNT or CB caused no overt inflammatory response at 1 or 21 days post-exposure as determined by histopathology and evaluation of cells (>95% macrophages) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. However, SWCNT induced the formation of small, focal interstitial fibrotic lesions within the alveolar region of the lung at 21 days. A small fraction of alveolar macrophages harvested by BAL from the lungs of SWCNT-exposed rats at 21 days were bridged by unique intercellular carbon structures that extended into the cytoplasm of each macrophage. These "carbon bridge" structures between macrophages were also observed in situ in the lungs of SWCNT-exposed rats. No carbon bridges were observed in CB-exposed rats. SWCNT caused cell proliferation only at sites of fibrotic lesion formation as measured by bromodeoxyuridine uptake into alveolar cells. SWCNT increased platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-A, PDGF-B, and PDGF-C mRNA levels significantly at 1 day as measured by Taqman quantitative real-time RT-PCR. At 21 days, SWCNT did not increase any mRNAs evaluated, while V2O5 significantly increased mRNAs encoding PDGF-A, -B, and -C chains, PDGF-Rα, osteopontin (OPN), connective

  1. Modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; Matthys, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    L-Arginine is converted to the highly reactive and unstable nitric oxide (NO) and L-citrulline by an enzyme named nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO decomposes into other nitrogen oxides such as nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO2-), and in the presence of superoxide anion to the potent oxidizing agent peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Activated rodent macrophages are capable of expressing an inducible form of this enzyme (iNOS) in response to appropriate stimuli, i.e., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ). Other cytokines can modulate the induction of NO biosynthesis in macrophages. NO is a major effector molecule of the anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity of rodent macrophages against certain micro-organisms and tumour cells, respectively. The NO synthesizing pathway has been demonstrated in human monocytes and other cells, but its role in host defence seems to be accessory. A delicate functional balance between microbial stimuli, host-derived cytokines and hormones in the microenvironment regulates iNOS expression. This review will focus mainly on the known and proposed mechanisms of the regulation of iNOS induction, and on agents that can modulate NO release once the active enzyme has been expressed in the macrophage. PMID:18475620

  2. Macrophages make me sick: how macrophage activation states influence sickness behavior.

    PubMed

    Moon, Morgan L; McNeil, Leslie K; Freund, Gregory G

    2011-11-01

    The macrophage (MΦ) is an essential cellular first responder in the innate immune system, sensing, alerting, removing and destroying intrinsic and extrinsic pathogens. While congenital aplasia of granulocytes, T or B lymphocytes leads to serious disease, lack of MΦs is incompatible with life. The MΦ, however, is not a monomorphic entity. These constructers, repairers and defenders of the body are diverse in form and function. What controls MΦ phenotype is beginning to be understood and involves a complex interplay of origination, location and microenvironment. Common to all MΦ developmental pathways are pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. MΦs respond to these bioactives in distinct ways developing recently recognized activation phenotypes that canonically support bacterial clearance (classical activation), parasite defense/tissue repair (alternative activation) and anti-inflammation (deactivation). Critically, the same cytokines which orchestrate immune defense and homeostasis dramatically impact sense of well being and cognition by eliciting sickness symptoms. Such behaviors are the manifestation of pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine action in the brain and are a direct consequence of MΦ function. This review describes the "new" archetypal MΦ activation states, delineates microglia phenotypic plasticity and explores the importance of these macrophage activation states to sickness behavior.

  3. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 2 Signaling Shapes Macrophage Plasticity in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-Induced Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Bethany A; Steinkamp, Heidi M; Gaestel, Matthias; Kirkwood, Keith L

    2017-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is associated with aggressive periodontal disease, which is characterized by inflammation-driven alveolar bone loss. A. actinomycetemcomitans activates the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) stress pathways in macrophages that are involved in host responses. During the inflammatory process in periodontal disease, chemokines are upregulated to promote recruitment of inflammatory cells. The objective of this study was to determine the role of MK2 signaling in chemokine regulation during A. actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis. Utilizing a murine calvarial model, Mk2(+/+) and Mk2(-/-) mice were treated with live A. actinomycetemcomitans bacteria at the midsagittal suture. MK2 positively regulated the following macrophage RNA: Emr1 (F4/80), Itgam (CD11b), Csf1r (M-CSF Receptor), Itgal (CD11a), Tnf, and Nos2 Additionally, RNA analysis revealed that MK2 signaling regulated chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 in murine calvarial tissue. Utilizing the chimeric murine air pouch model, MK2 signaling differentially regulated CCL3 and CCL4 in the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. Bone resorption pits in calvaria, observed by micro-computed tomography, and osteoclast formation were decreased in Mk2(-/-) mice compared to Mk2(+/+) mice after A. actinomycetemcomitans treatment. In conclusion, these data suggest that MK2 in macrophages contributes to regulation of chemokine signaling during A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced inflammation and bone loss.

  4. ADHESION AND POLLUTION PARTICLE-INDUCED OXIDANT GENERATION IS NEITHER NECESSARY NOR SUFFICIENT FOR CYTOKINE INDUCTION IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adhesion of human monocytes (MOs) results in the rapid transcriptional activation of cytokine genes that are dependent on nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB. Several pathways leading to activation of NF-kappaB have been described, including those involving reactive oxygen intermediates (...

  5. Expression of caveolin-1 and podocalyxin in rat lungs challenged with 2-kDa macrophage-activating lipopeptide and Flt3L.

    PubMed

    Tschernig, T; Pabst, R; Kasper, M; El-Hadi, Mustafa; Singh, B

    2014-04-01

    Caveolin-1 is one of the important regulators of vascular permeability in inflamed lungs. Podocalyxin is a CD34 protein expressed on vascular endothelium and has a role in podocyte development in the kidney. Few data are available on the expression of caveolin-1 and podocalyxin in lungs challenged with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonists such as mycoplasma-derived macrophage activating lipopeptide or with immune modulators such as Fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 ligand (Flt3L), which expands dendritic cell populations in the lung. Because of the significance of pathogen-derived molecules that act through TLR2 and of the role of immune modulators in lung physiology, we examine the immunohistochemical expression of caveolin-1 and podocalyxin in lungs from rats challenged with a 2-kDa macrophage-activating lipopeptide (MALP-2) and Flt3L. Normal rat lungs expressed caveolin-1 in alveolar septa, vascular endothelium and airway epithelium, especially along the lateral borders of epithelial cells but not in alveolar macrophages. MALP-2 and Flt3L decreased and increased, respectively, the expression of caveolin-1. Caveolin-1 expression seemed to increase in microvessels in bronchiole-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in Flt3L-challenged lungs but not in normal or MALP-2-treated lungs. Podocalyxin was absent in the epithelium and alveolar macrophages but was present in the vasculature of control, Flt3L- and MALP-2-treated rats. Compared with control and MALP-2-treated rats, Flt3L-treated lungs showed greater expression of podocalyxin in BALT vasculature and at the interface of monocytes and the endothelium. These immunohistochemical data describing the altered expression of caveolin-1 and podocalyxin in lungs treated with MALP-2 or Flt3L encourage further mechanistic studies on the role of podocalyxin and caveolin-1 in lung inflammation.

  6. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  7. Role of activated macrophages in experimental Fusarium solani keratitis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianzhang; Hu, Yingfeng; Chen, Shikun; Dong, Chenhuan; Zhang, Jingjin; Li, Yanling; Yang, Juan; Han, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xuejun; Xu, Guoxing

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages under the conjunctival tissue are the first line defender cells of the corneas. Elimination of these cells would lead to aggravation of fungal keratitis. To determine how the course of fungal keratitis would be altered after the activation of these macrophages, a murine model was achieved by intrastromal instillation of latex beads before the corneas were infected with Fusarium solani. The keratitis was observed and clinically scored daily. Infected corneas were homogenized for colony counts. The levels of the IL-12, IL-4, MPO, MIF and iNOS cytokines were measured in the corneas using real-time polymerase chain reactions and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes in the corneas, submaxillary lymph nodes and peripheral blood were detected using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. The latex bead-treated mice exhibited aggravated keratitis. Substantially increased macrophage and polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration was detected in the corneas, although few colonies were observed. There was a marked increase in the IL-12, IL-4, MPO, MIF and iNOS expression in the corneas. The numbers of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio were significantly enhanced in the corneas and submaxillary lymph nodes. However, the number of CD4+ lymphocytes was decreased in the peripheral blood, while the number of CD8+ lymphocytes increased. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the activation of macrophages in the cornea may cause an excessive immune response. Macrophages appear to play a critical role in regulating the immune response to corneal infections with F. solani.

  8. Rickettsia australis Activates Inflammasome in Human and Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, Claire; Bechelli, Jeremy; Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Saito, Tais; Azar, Sasha R.; Ismail, Nahed; Walker, David H.; Fang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsiae actively escape from vacuoles and replicate free in the cytoplasm of host cells, where inflammasomes survey the invading pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of Rickettsia australis with the inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages. R. australis induced a significant level of IL-1β secretion by human macrophages, which was significantly reduced upon treatment with an inhibitor of caspase-1 compared to untreated controls, suggesting caspase-1-dependent inflammasome activation. Rickettsia induced significant secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in vitro by infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) as early as 8–12 h post infection (p.i.) in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of these cytokines was accompanied by cleavage of caspase-1 and was completely abrogated in BMMs deficient in caspase-1/caspase-11 or apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC), suggesting that R. australis activate the ASC-dependent inflammasome. Interestingly, in response to the same quantity of rickettsiae, NLRP3-/- BMMs significantly reduced the secretion level of IL-1β compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to cytosolic recognition of R. australis in vitro. Rickettsial load in spleen, but not liver and lung, of R. australis-infected NLRP3-/- mice was significantly greater compared to WT mice. These data suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome plays a role in host control of bacteria in vivo in a tissue-specific manner. Taken together, our data, for the first time, illustrate the activation of ASC-dependent inflammasome by R. australis in macrophages in which NLRP3 is involved. PMID:27362650

  9. Role of Chemokines in Shaping Macrophage Activity in AMD.

    PubMed

    Rutar, Matt; Provis, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disorder that affects millions of individuals worldwide. While the advent of anti-VEGF therapy has allowed for effective treatment of neovascular 'wet' AMD, no treatments are available to mitigate the more prevalent 'dry' forms of the disease. A role for inflammatory processes in the progression of AMD has emerged over a period of many years, particularly the characterisation of leukocyte infiltrates in AMD-affected eyes, as well as in animal models. This review focuses on the burgeoning understanding of chemokines in the retina, and their potential role in shaping the recruitment and activation of macrophages in AMD. Understanding the mechanisms which promote macrophage activity in the degenerating retina may be key to controlling the potentially devastating consequences of inflammation in diseases such as AMD.

  10. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) engulf and regain elastin particles and do not respond to some stimuli of neutrophil (PMN) elastinolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tricomi, S.M.; Hyers, T.M.; Yu, S.Y.; Liao, J.J.

    1986-03-05

    Elastin degradation by PMN and by PAM differs in the proteinases produced and in the method of cellular attack on the substrate. To further characterize the elastinolytic mechanisms of these two cells, /sup 14/C-labelled bovine ligament elastin was dried onto 24-well culture plates and live cells were placed on the substrate in culture medium. Incubation times were 4 hours for PMN and 20 hours for PAM. Elastinolytic activity was determined by counting /sup 14/C-elastin peptides in the supernatant. By lidocaine release of PAM from the surface, /sup 14/C-elastin retained by the cell was measured. Studies on rabbit PAM showed that 40% of dpm remain associated with the cell at 20 hours. Transmission electron microscopy of human PAM confirmed that PAM can engulf and retain elastin particles at 4 and 24 hours of incubation when in close contact with the substrate. Of the number of dpm released by PMN in 4 hours, PAM in 20 hours released only 23% of that number into supernatant and retained 17% closely associated with the cell after lidocaine treatment. Platelet factor 4, a protein released by platelets upon aggregation which stimulates activity of PMN elastase on elastin, was shown to enhance elastinolysis by whole PMN by 57% at 10 ..mu..g/ml in this assay. Platelet factor 4 did not enhance elastinolysis by PAM at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..g/ml.

  11. RP105 facilitates macrophage activation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Antje; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Pierini, Lynda M; Banaei, Niaz; Ernst, Joel D; Miyake, Kensuke; Ehrt, Sabine

    2009-01-22

    RP105, phylogenetically related to Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, is reported to facilitate B cell activation by the TLR4-agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS)--but to limit LPS-induced cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells. Here, we show that the role of RP105 extends beyond LPS recognition and that RP105 positively regulates macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) lipoproteins. Mtb-infected RP105(-/-) mice exhibited impaired proinflammatory cytokine responses associated with enhanced bacterial burden and increased lung pathology. The Mtb 19 kDa lipoprotein induced release of tumor necrosis factor in a manner dependent on both TLR2 and RP105, and macrophage activation by Mtb lacking mature lipoproteins was not RP105 dependent. Thus, mycobacterial lipoproteins are RP105 agonists. RP105 physically interacted with TLR2, and both RP105 and TLR2 were required for optimal macrophage activation by Mtb. Our data identify RP105 as an accessory molecule for TLR2, forming part of the receptor complex for innate immune recognition of mycobacterial lipoproteins.

  12. By Homing to the Kidney, Activated Macrophages Potently Exacerbate Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Cai, Qi; Zheng, Guoping; Lee, Vincent W.S.; Zheng, Dong; Li, Xiaomei; Kui Tan, Thian; Harris, David C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are important mediators of injury in most types of human kidney diseases; however, the pathogenic importance of both macrophage number and activation status is unknown. To examine this question, severe-combined immunodeficient mice with adriamycin nephrosis, an experimental model of human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, were treated intravenously with either resting (1 × 106 to 5 × 106) or activated (1 × 103 to 1 × 106) macrophages on day 6 postadriamycin administration, and the effects on kidney injury were examined. On day 28, renal injury was worse in the group that received activated macrophages at doses as low as 1 × 104 macrophages per mouse compared with control adriamycin nephrotic mice. However, treatment with resting macrophages at doses as high as 5 × 106 macrophages per mouse had no significant effect on either renal histology or function. The transferred activated macrophages homed to inflamed kidneys during the middle-to-late stages of the disease, but such homing was not observed for resting macrophages. This study of in vivo cell adoptive transfer supports the importance of macrophage activation status over macrophage number in causing renal injury. These data suggest that therapeutic strategies for treating progressive kidney diseases should target activated macrophages. PMID:18467704

  13. In Vitro and in Silico Tools To Assess Extent of Cellular Uptake and Lysosomal Sequestration of Respiratory Drugs in Human Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ufuk, Ayşe; Assmus, Frauke; Francis, Laura; Plumb, Jonathan; Damian, Valeriu; Gertz, Michael; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2017-04-03

    Accumulation of respiratory drugs in human alveolar macrophages (AMs) has not been extensively studied in vitro and in silico despite its potential impact on therapeutic efficacy and/or occurrence of phospholipidosis. The current study aims to characterize the accumulation and subcellular distribution of drugs with respiratory indication in human AMs and to develop an in silico mechanistic AM model to predict lysosomal accumulation of investigated drugs. The data set included 9 drugs previously investigated in rat AM cell line NR8383. Cell-to-unbound medium concentration ratio (Kp,cell) of all drugs (5 μM) was determined to assess the magnitude of intracellular accumulation. The extent of lysosomal sequestration in freshly isolated human AMs from multiple donors (n = 5) was investigated for clarithromycin and imipramine (positive control) using an indirect in vitro method (±20 mM ammonium chloride, NH4Cl). The AM cell parameters and drug physicochemical data were collated to develop an in silico mechanistic AM model. Three in silico models differing in their description of drug membrane partitioning were evaluated; model (1) relied on octanol-water partitioning of drugs, model (2) used in vitro data to account for this process, and model (3) predicted membrane partitioning by incorporating AM phospholipid fractions. In vitro Kp,cell ranged >200-fold for respiratory drugs, with the highest accumulation seen for clarithromycin. A good agreement in Kp,cell was observed between human AMs and NR8383 (2.45-fold bias), highlighting NR8383 as a potentially useful in vitro surrogate tool to characterize drug accumulation in AMs. The mean Kp,cell of clarithromycin (81, CV = 51%) and imipramine (963, CV = 54%) were reduced in the presence of NH4Cl by up to 67% and 81%, respectively, suggesting substantial contribution of lysosomal sequestration and intracellular binding in the accumulation of these drugs in human AMs. The in vitro data showed variability in drug

  14. Pathogenicity of influenza viruses with genes from the 1918 pandemic virus: functional roles of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in limiting virus replication and mortality in mice.

    PubMed

    Tumpey, Terrence M; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Palese, Peter; Swayne, David E; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Solórzano, Alicia; Van Rooijen, Nico; Katz, Jacqueline M; Basler, Christopher F

    2005-12-01

    The Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918 to 1919 swept the globe and resulted in the deaths of at least 20 million people. The basis of the pulmonary damage and high lethality caused by the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus remains largely unknown. Recombinant influenza viruses bearing the 1918 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) glycoproteins were rescued in the genetic background of the human A/Texas/36/91 (H1N1) (1918 HA/NA:Tx/91) virus. Pathogenesis experiments revealed that the 1918 HA/NA:Tx/91 virus was lethal for BALB/c mice without the prior adaptation that is usually required for human influenza A H1N1 viruses. The increased mortality of 1918 HA/NA:Tx/91-infected mice was accompanied by (i) increased (>200-fold) viral replication, (ii) greater influx of neutrophils into the lung, (iii) increased numbers of alveolar macrophages (AMs), and (iv) increased protein expression of cytokines and chemokines in lung tissues compared with the levels seen for control Tx/91 virus-infected mice. Because pathological changes in AMs and neutrophil migration correlated with lung inflammation, we assessed the role of these cells in the pathogenesis associated with 1918 HA/NA:Tx/91 virus infection. Neutrophil and/or AM depletion initiated 3 or 5 days after infection did not have a significant effect on the disease outcome following a lethal 1918 HA/NA:Tx/91 virus infection. By contrast, depletion of these cells before a sublethal infection with 1918 HA/NA:Tx/91 virus resulted in uncontrolled virus growth and mortality in mice. In addition, neutrophil and/or AM depletion was associated with decreased expression of cytokines and chemokines. These results indicate that a human influenza H1N1 virus possessing the 1918 HA and NA glycoproteins can induce severe lung inflammation consisting of AMs and neutrophils, which play a role in controlling the replication and spread of 1918 HA/NA:Tx/91 virus after intranasal infection of mice.

  15. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples.

    PubMed

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites.

  16. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples

    PubMed Central

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites. PMID:25537601

  17. A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sudan, Bayan; Wacker, Mark A.; Wilson, Mary E.; Graff, Joel W.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC)-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression) sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and determined the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples. PMID:26074920

  18. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F.; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N.; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G.; Croce, Carlo M.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27007158

  19. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G; Croce, Carlo M; Christman, John W

    2016-04-05

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation.

  20. LPS-Induced Macrophage Activation and Plasma Membrane Fluidity Changes are Inhibited Under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    de la Haba, Carlos; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz; Palacio, José R

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage activation is essential for a correct and efficient response of innate immunity. During oxidative stress membrane receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics can be altered, leading to dysfunctional cell responses. Our aim is to analyze membrane fluidity modifications and cell function under oxidative stress in LPS-activated macrophages. Membrane fluidity of individual living THP-1 macrophages was evaluated by the technique two-photon microscopy. LPS-activated macrophage function was determined by TNFα secretion. It was shown that LPS activation causes fluidification of macrophage plasma membrane and production of TNFα. However, oxidative stress induces rigidification of macrophage plasma membrane and inhibition of cell activation, which is evidenced by a decrease of TNFα secretion. Thus, under oxidative conditions macrophage proinflammatory response might develop in an inefficient manner.

  1. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) inhibits epithelial sodium channel activity in primary alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Kreiner, Lisa; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Trac, Phi; Johnson, Nicholle M.; Hansen, Jason M.; Brown, Lou Ann

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC) regulate fluid balance in the alveoli and are regulated by oxidative stress. Since glutathione (GSH) is the predominant antioxidant in the lungs, we proposed that changes in glutathione redox potential (Eh) would alter cell signaling and have an effect on ENaC open probability (Po). In the present study, we used single channel patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of oxidative stress, via direct application of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), on ENaC activity. We found a linear decrease in ENaC activity as the GSH/GSSG Eh became less negative (n = 21; P < 0.05). Treatment of 400 μM GSSG to the cell bath significantly decreased ENaC Po from 0.39 ± 0.06 to 0.13 ± 0.05 (n = 8; P < 0.05). Likewise, back-filling recording electrodes with 400 μM GSSG reduced ENaC Po from 0.32 ± 0.08 to 0.17 ± 0.05 (n = 10; P < 0.05), thus implicating GSSG as an important regulatory factor. Biochemical assays indicated that oxidizing potentials promote S-glutathionylation of ENaC and irreversible oxidation of cysteine residues with N-ethylmaleimide blocked the effects of GSSG on ENaC Po. Additionally, real-time imaging studies showed that GSSG impairs alveolar fluid clearance in vivo as opposed to GSH, which did not impair clearance. Taken together, these data show that glutathione Eh is an important determinant of alveolar fluid clearance in vivo. PMID:25713321

  2. Key Role of MicroRNA in the Regulation of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor Expression in Murine Alveolar Epithelial Cells during Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Anne; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Baker, Jessica; Rowley, Jesse; Paine, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GM-CSF is an endogenous pulmonary cytokine produced by normal alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) that is a key defender of the alveolar space. AEC GM-CSF expression is suppressed by oxidative stress through alternations in mRNA turnover, an effect that is reversed by treatment with recombinant GM-CSF. We hypothesized that specific microRNA (miRNA) would play a key role in AEC GM-CSF regulation. A genome-wide miRNA microarray identified 19 candidate miRNA altered in primary AEC during oxidative stress with reversal by treatment with GM-CSF. Three of these miRNA (miR 133a, miR 133a*, and miR 133b) are also predicted to bind the GM-CSF 3′-untranslated region (UTR). PCR for the mature miRNA confirmed induction during oxidative stress that was reversed by treatment with GM-CSF. Experiments using a GM-CSF 3′-UTR reporter construct demonstrated that miR133a and miR133b effects on GM-CSF expression are through interactions with the GM-CSF 3′-UTR. Using lentiviral transduction of specific mimics and inhibitors in primary murine AEC, we determined that miR133a and miR133b suppress GM-CSF expression and that their inhibition both reverses oxidant-induced suppression of GM-CSF expression and increases basal expression of GM-CSF in cells in normoxia. In contrast, these miRNAs are not active in regulation of GM-CSF expression in murine EL4 T cells. Thus, members of the miR133 family play key roles in regulation of GM-CSF expression through effects on mRNA turnover in AEC during oxidative stress. Increased understanding of GM-CSF gene regulation may provide novel miRNA-based interventions to augment pulmonary innate immune defense in lung injury. PMID:24371146

  3. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  4. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar machrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient pollutant particles (APP) increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to APP. Upon contact with APP, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope ofthis ox...

  5. New insights into the multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function.

    PubMed

    Ginhoux, Florent; Schultze, Joachim L; Murray, Peter J; Ochando, Jordi; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have protective roles in immunity to pathogens, tissue development, homeostasis and repair following damage. Maladaptive immunity and inflammation provoke changes in macrophage function that are causative of disease. Despite a historical wealth of knowledge about macrophages, recent advances have revealed unknown aspects of their development and function. Following development, macrophages are activated by diverse signals. Such tissue microenvironmental signals together with epigenetic changes influence macrophage development, activation and functional diversity, with consequences in disease and homeostasis. We discuss here how recent discoveries in these areas have led to a multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function. In connection with this, we also discuss how technical advances facilitate a new roadmap for the isolation and analysis of macrophages at high resolution.

  6. [Hepatic manifestation of a macrophage activation syndrome (MAS)].

    PubMed

    Nagel, Michael; Schwarting, Andreas; Straub, Beate K; Galle, Peter R; Zimmermann, Tim

    2017-04-04

    Background Elevated liver values are the most common pathological laboratory result in Germany. Frequent findings, especially in younger patients, are nutritive- or medicamentous- toxic reasons, viral or autoimmune hepatitis. A macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) may manifest like a viral infectious disease with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia and is associated with a high mortality. It is based on an enhanced activation of macrophages with increased cytokine release, leading to organ damage and multi-organ failure. In addition to genetic causes, MAS is commonly associated with infections and rheumatic diseases. We report the case of a 26-year-old female patient suffering from MAS as a rare cause of elevated liver enzymes. Methods Patient characteristics, laboratory values, liver histology, bone marrow and radiological imaging were documented and analyzed. Case Report After an ordinary upper airway infection with bronchitis, a rheumatic arthritis appeared and was treated with leflunomide und methotrexate. In the further course of the disease, the patient developed an acute hepatitis with fever, pancytopenia and massive hyperferritinemia. Immunohistochemistry of the liver biopsy revealed hemophagocytosis and activation of CD68-positive macrophages. In the radiological and histological diagnostics of the liver and bone marrow, an MAS was diagnosed as underlying disease of the acute hepatitis. Under therapy with prednisolone, the fever disappeared and transaminases and ferritin rapidly normalized. Conclusion Aside from the frequent causes of elevated liver values in younger patients, such as nutritive toxic, drug induced liver injury, viral or autoimmune hepatitis, especially in case of massive hyperferritinemia, a MAS should be considered as a rare cause of acute liver disease.

  7. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani França; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane – subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies - whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection. PMID:26192447

  8. Asbestos-activated peritoneal macrophages release a factors(s) which inhibits lymphocyte mitogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, K.; Davis, J.M.G.; James, K.

    1984-10-01

    Intraperitoneal asbestos injection in mice has previously been reported to elicit an activated macrophage population. In the present study supernatants from such macrophages were tested for their effect on thymocyte mitogenesis in response to concanavalin A; control supernantants were obtained from saline- and latex-elicited macrophages. Supernatants from asbestos-elicited macrophages were significantly inhibitory to thymocyte mitogenesis while saline- and latex-elicited macrophages did not release significant amounts of such activity. Asbestos-activated macrophage supernatants were inhibitory in a dose-dependent way and the activity was not secreted by macrophages from mice which had received asbestos in the long term. The inhibitory activity was partially dialysable. Supernatants prepared by treating macrophages in vitro with a lethal dose of asbestos were not inhibitory suggesting that the inhibitory activity in the supernatants of asbestos-activated macrophages did not leak from dead or dying cells. The asbestos macrophage supernatant was also significantly inhibitory to mature T-cell-enriched spleen cells but had no effect on fibroblasts, suggesting that the inhibitory effect could be lymphoid cell specific.

  9. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J.; Aksoylar, H. Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26360589

  10. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, H Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  11. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Nadhia H. C.; Ferrari, Raquel A. M.; Silva, Daniela F. T.; Nunes, Fabio D.; Bussadori, Sandra K.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. METHOD: J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle. PMID:25076002

  12. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  13. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  14. Macrophages migrate in an activation-dependent manner to chemokines involved in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In neuroinflammatory diseases, macrophages can play a dual role in the process of tissue damage, depending on their activation status (M1 / M2). M1 macrophages are considered to exert damaging effects to neurons, whereas M2 macrophages are reported to aid regeneration and repair of neurons. Their migration within the central nervous system may be of critical importance in the final outcome of neurodegeneration in neuroinflammatory diseases e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). To provide insight into this process, we examined the migratory capacity of human monocyte-derived M1 and M2 polarised macrophages towards chemoattractants, relevant for neuroinflammatory diseases like MS. Methods Primary cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages were exposed to interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evoke proinflammatory (M1) activation or IL-4 to evoke anti-inflammatory (M2) activation. In a TAXIScan assay, migration of M0, M1 and M2 towards chemoattractants was measured and quantified. Furthermore the adhesion capacity and the expression levels of integrins as well as chemokine receptors of M0, M1 and M2 were assessed. Alterations in cell morphology were analysed using fluorescent labelling of the cytoskeleton. Results Significant differences were observed between M1 and M2 macrophages in the migration towards chemoattractants. We show that M2 macrophages migrated over longer distances towards CCL2, CCL5, CXCL10, CXCL12 and C1q compared to non-activated (M0) and M1 macrophages. No differences were observed in the adhesion of M0, M1 and M2 macrophages to multiple matrix components, nor in the expression of integrins and chemokine receptors. Significant changes were observed in the cytoskeleton organization upon stimulation with CCL2, M0, M1 and M2 macrophages adopt a spherical morphology and the cytoskeleton is rapidly rearranged. M0 and M2 macrophages are able to form filopodia, whereas M1 macrophages only adapt a spherical morphology. Conclusions

  15. Macrophage activation syndrome in the course of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Emmi, Giacomo; Fastiggi, Michele; Silvestri, Elena; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-08-01

    An overwhelming activation of cytotoxic T cells and well-differentiated macrophages leading to systemic overload of inflammatory mediators characterizes the so-called macrophage activation syndrome (MAS); this potentially life-threatening clinical entity may derive from several genetic defects involved in granule-mediated cytotoxicity but has been largely observed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, many rheumatologic diseases, infections, and malignancies. The occurrence of MAS in the natural history or as the revealing clue of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs), rare conditions caused by disrupted innate immunity pathways with overblown release of proinflammatory cytokines, has been only reported in few isolated patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome since 2001. All these patients displayed various clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic features of MAS and have often required intensive care support. Only one patient has died due to MAS. Defective cytotoxic cell function was documented in a minority of patients. Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment, but anakinra was clinically effective in three refractory cases. Even if MAS and AIDs share multiple clinical features as well as heterogeneous pathogenetic scenes and a potential response to anti-interleukin-1 targeted therapies, MAS requires a prompt specific recognition in the course of AIDs due to its profound severity and high mortality rate.

  16. Macrophage immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Opuntia polyacantha

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Xie, Gang; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Klein, Robyn A.; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Opuntia polyacantha (prickly pear cactus) has been used extensively for its nutritional properties; however, less is known regarding medicinal properties of Opuntia tissues. In the present study, we extracted polysaccharides from O. polyacantha and used size-exclusion chromatography to fractionate the crude polysaccharides into four polysaccharide fractions (designated as Opuntia polysaccharides C-I to C-IV). The average Mr of fractions C-I through C-IV was estimated to be 733, 550, 310, and 168 kDa, respectively, and sugar composition analysis revealed that Opuntia polysaccharides consisted primarily of galactose, galacturonic acid, xylose, arabinose, and rhamnose. Analysis of the effects of Opuntia polysaccharides on human and murine macrophages demonstrated that all four fractions had potent immunomodulatory activity, inducing production of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6. Furthermore, modulation of macrophage function by Opuntia polysaccharides was mediated, at least in part, through activation of nuclear factor κB. Together, our results provide a molecular basis to explain a portion of the beneficial therapeutic properties of extracts from O. polyacantha and support the concept of using Opuntia polysaccharides as an immunotherapeutic adjuvant. PMID:18597716

  17. Macrophage immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Opuntia polyacantha.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Xie, Gang; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Klein, Robyn A; Jutila, Mark A; Quinn, Mark T

    2008-10-01

    Opuntia polyacantha (prickly pear cactus) has been used extensively for its nutritional properties; however, less is known regarding medicinal properties of Opuntia tissues. In the present study, we extracted polysaccharides from O. polyacantha and used size-exclusion chromatography to fractionate the crude polysaccharides into four polysaccharide fractions (designated as Opuntia polysaccharides C-I to C-IV). The average M(r) of fractions C-I through C-IV was estimated to be 733, 550, 310, and 168 kDa, respectively, and sugar composition analysis revealed that Opuntia polysaccharides consisted primarily of galactose, galacturonic acid, xylose, arabinose, and rhamnose. Analysis of the effects of Opuntia polysaccharides on human and murine macrophages demonstrated that all four fractions had potent immunomodulatory activity, inducing production of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6. Furthermore, modulation of macrophage function by Opuntia polysaccharides was mediated, at least in part, through activation of nuclear factor kappaB. Together, our results provide a molecular basis to explain a portion of the beneficial therapeutic properties of extracts from O. polyacantha and support the concept of using Opuntia polysaccharides as an immunotherapeutic adjuvant.

  18. STAT1 signaling within macrophages is required for antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Mueller, Mathias; Wormley, Floyd L

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ), denoted H99γ, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO.

  19. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage a