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Sample records for activated antigen-presenting cells

  1. Janus particles as artificial antigen-presenting cells for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Jia, Yilong; Gao, Yuan; Sanchez, Lucero; Anthony, Stephen M; Yu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the multifunctionality of Janus particles can be exploited for in vitro T cell activation. We engineer bifunctional Janus particles on which the spatial distribution of two ligands, anti-CD3 and fibronectin, mimics the "bull's eye" protein pattern formed in the membrane junction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. Different levels of T cell activation can be achieved by simply switching the spatial distribution of the two ligands on the surfaces of the "bull's eye" particles. We find that the ligand pattern also affects clustering of intracellular proteins. This study demonstrates that anisotropic particles, such as Janus particles, can be developed as artificial antigen-presenting cells for modulating T cell activation. PMID:25343426

  2. Artificial antigen presenting cell (aAPC) mediated activation and expansion of natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Webb, Tonya J

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of T cells that display markers characteristic of both natural killer (NK) cells and T cells(1). Unlike classical T cells, NKT cells recognize lipid antigen in the context of CD1 molecules(2). NKT cells express an invariant TCRα chain rearrangement: Vα14Jα18 in mice and Vα24Jα18 in humans, which is associated with Vβ chains of limited diversity(3-6), and are referred to as canonical or invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Similar to conventional T cells, NKT cells develop from CD4-CD8- thymic precursor T cells following the appropriate signaling by CD1d (7). The potential to utilize NKT cells for therapeutic purposes has significantly increased with the ability to stimulate and expand human NKT cells with α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and a variety of cytokines(8). Importantly, these cells retained their original phenotype, secreted cytokines, and displayed cytotoxic function against tumor cell lines. Thus, ex vivo expanded NKT cells remain functional and can be used for adoptive immunotherapy. However, NKT cell based-immunotherapy has been limited by the use of autologous antigen presenting cells and the quantity and quality of these stimulator cells can vary substantially. Monocyte-derived DC from cancer patients have been reported to express reduced levels of costimulatory molecules and produce less inflammatory cytokines(9,10). In fact, murine DC rather than autologous APC have been used to test the function of NKT cells from CML patients(11). However, this system can only be used for in vitro testing since NKT cells cannot be expanded by murine DC and then used for adoptive immunotherapy. Thus, a standardized system that relies on artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (aAPC) could produce the stimulating effects of DC without the pitfalls of allo- or xenogeneic cells(12, 13). Herein, we describe a method for generating CD1d-based aAPC. Since the engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) by CD1d-antigen complexes is

  3. Particle shape dependence of CD8+ T cell activation by artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Previous work developing particle-based acellular, artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) has focused exclusively on spherical platforms. To explore the role of shape, we generated ellipsoidal PLGA microparticles with varying aspect ratios (ARs) and synthesized aAPCs from them. The ellipsoidal biomimetic aAPCs with high-AR showed significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo activity above spherical aAPCs with particle volume and antigen content held constant. Confocal imaging indicates that CD8+ T cells preferentially migrate to and are activated by interaction with the long axis of the aAPC. Importantly, enhanced activity of high-AR aAPCs was seen in a mouse melanoma model, with high-AR aAPCs improving melanoma survival compared to non-cognate aAPCs (p = 0.004) and cognate spherical aAPCs (p = 0.05). These findings indicate that particle geometry is a critical design criterion in the generation of aAPCs, and may offer insight into the essential role of geometry in the interaction between CD8+ T cells and biological APCs. PMID:24099710

  4. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  5. Biodegradable nanoellipsoidal artificial antigen presenting cells for antigen specific T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Kosmides, Alyssa K; Aje, Kent; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2015-04-01

    Non-spherical nanodimensional artificial antigen presenting cells (naAPCs) offer the potential to systemically induce an effective antigen-specific immune response. In this report it is shown biodegradable ellipsoidal naAPCs mimic the T-Cell/APC interaction better than equivalent spherical naAPCs. In addition, it is demonstrated ellipsoidal naAPCs offer reduced non-specific cellular uptake and a superior pharmacokinetic profile compared to spherical naAPCs. PMID:25641795

  6. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. PMID:26899824

  7. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  8. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  9. Loss of proliferation and antigen presentation activity following internalization of polydispersed carbon nanotubes by primary lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Mandavi; Sachar, Sumedha; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs) and primary lung epithelial (PLE) cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells) were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells.

  10. Malassezia yeasts activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in antigen-presenting cells via Syk-kinase signalling.

    PubMed

    Kistowska, Magdalena; Fenini, Gabriele; Jankovic, Dragana; Feldmeyer, Laurence; Kerl, Katrin; Bosshard, Philipp; Contassot, Emmanuel; French, Lars E

    2014-12-01

    Although being a normal part of the skin flora, yeasts of the genus Malassezia are associated with several common dermatologic conditions including pityriasis versicolour, seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD), folliculitis, atopic eczema/dermatitis (AE/AD) and dandruff. While Malassezia spp. are aetiological agents of pityriasis versicolour, a causal role of Malassezia spp. in AE/AD and SD remains to be established. Previous reports have shown that fungi such as Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus are able to efficiently activate the NLRP3 inflammasome leading to robust secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. To date, innate immune responses to Malassezia spp. are not well characterized. Here, we show that different Malassezia species could induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation and subsequent IL-1β secretion in human antigen-presenting cells. In contrast, keratinocytes were not able to secrete IL-1β when exposed to Malassezia spp. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-1β secretion in antigen-presenting cells was dependent on Syk-kinase signalling. Our results identify Malassezia spp. as potential strong inducers of pro-inflammatory responses when taken up by antigen-presenting cells and identify C-type lectin receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome as crucial actors in this process. PMID:25267545

  11. Antigen presenting cells - diversity, differentiation, and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schook, L.B. ); Tew, J.G. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 35 papers. Some of the titles are: DNA-mediated gene transfer as a tool for analyzing Ia structure-function relationships and antigen presentation; Regulation of immune-associated genes during macrophage differentiation; Presentation of arsonate-tyrosine to cloned T-cells by L-Cells transfected with class II genes; and The duration of class II MHC glycoprotein expression by mononuclear phagocytes is regulated by the Bcg gene.

  12. PD-1 on Immature and PD-1 Ligands on Migratory Human Langerhans Cells Regulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Cruz, Victor; McDonough, Sean M.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Crum, Christopher P.; Carrasco, Ruben D.; Freeman, Gordon J.

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are known as “sentinels” of the immune system that function as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after migration to draining lymph node. LCs are proposed to have a role in tolerance and the resolution of cutaneous immune responses. The Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, are a co-inhibitory pathway that contributes to the negative regulation of T-lymphocyte activation and peripheral tolerance. Surprisingly, we found PD-1 to be expressed on immature LCs (iLCs) in situ. PD-1 engagement on iLCs reduced IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α cytokine production in response to TLR2 signals but had no effect on LC maturation. PD-L1 and PD-L2 were expressed at very low levels on iLCs. Maturation of LCs upon migration from epidermis led to loss of PD-l expression and gain of high expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 as well as co-stimulatory molecules. Blockade of PD-L1 and/or PD-L2 on migratory LCs (mLCs) and DDCs enhanced T-cell activation, as has been reported for other APCs. Thus the PD-1 pathway is active in iLCs and inhibits iLC activities, but expression of receptor and ligands reverses upon maturation and PD-L1 and PD-L2 on mLC function to inhibit T-cell responses. PMID:20445553

  13. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  14. P2X7 receptor activation impairs exogenous MHC class I oligopeptides presentation in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+) T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8(+) T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8(+) T cell immunity.

  15. Interethnic Differences in Antigen-Presenting Cell Activation and TLR Responses in Malian Children during Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Stéphanie; Dara, Victor; Traore, Boubacar; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara; Varani, Stefania; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2011-01-01

    The Fulani ethnic group from West Africa is relatively better protected against Plasmodium falciparum malaria as compared to other sympatric ethnic groups, such as the Dogon. However, the mechanisms behind this lower susceptibility to malaria are largely unknown, particularly those concerning innate immunity. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and in particular dendritic cells (DCs) are important components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether APCs obtained from Fulani and Dogon children exhibited differences in terms of activation status and toll-like receptor (TLR) responses during malaria infection. Lower frequency and increased activation was observed in circulating plasmacytoid DCs and BDCA-3+ myeloid DCs of infected Fulani as compared to their uninfected counterparts. Conversely, a higher frequency and reduced activation was observed in the same DC subsets obtained from peripheral blood of P. falciparum-infected Dogon children as compared to their uninfected peers. Moreover, infected individuals of both ethnic groups exhibited higher percentages of both classical and inflammatory monocytes that were less activated as compared to their non-infected counterparts. In line with APC impairment during malaria infection, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 responses were strongly inhibited by P. falciparum infection in Dogon children, while no such TLR inhibition was observed in the Fulani children. Strikingly, the TLR-induced IFN-γ release was completely abolished in the Dogon undergoing infection while no difference was seen within infected and non-infected Fulani. Thus, P. falciparum infection is associated with altered activation status of important APC subsets and strongly inhibited TLR responses in peripheral blood of Dogon children. In contrast, P. falciparum induces DC activation and does not affect the innate response to specific TLR ligands in Fulani children. These findings suggest that DCs and TLR signalling may be

  16. Interethnic differences in antigen-presenting cell activation and TLR responses in Malian children during Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Arama, Charles; Giusti, Pablo; Boström, Stéphanie; Dara, Victor; Traore, Boubacar; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara; Varani, Stefania; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2011-03-31

    The Fulani ethnic group from West Africa is relatively better protected against Plasmodium falciparum malaria as compared to other sympatric ethnic groups, such as the Dogon. However, the mechanisms behind this lower susceptibility to malaria are largely unknown, particularly those concerning innate immunity. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and in particular dendritic cells (DCs) are important components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether APCs obtained from Fulani and Dogon children exhibited differences in terms of activation status and toll-like receptor (TLR) responses during malaria infection. Lower frequency and increased activation was observed in circulating plasmacytoid DCs and BDCA-3+ myeloid DCs of infected Fulani as compared to their uninfected counterparts. Conversely, a higher frequency and reduced activation was observed in the same DC subsets obtained from peripheral blood of P. falciparum-infected Dogon children as compared to their uninfected peers. Moreover, infected individuals of both ethnic groups exhibited higher percentages of both classical and inflammatory monocytes that were less activated as compared to their non-infected counterparts. In line with APC impairment during malaria infection, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 responses were strongly inhibited by P. falciparum infection in Dogon children, while no such TLR inhibition was observed in the Fulani children. Strikingly, the TLR-induced IFN-γ release was completely abolished in the Dogon undergoing infection while no difference was seen within infected and non-infected Fulani. Thus, P. falciparum infection is associated with altered activation status of important APC subsets and strongly inhibited TLR responses in peripheral blood of Dogon children. In contrast, P. falciparum induces DC activation and does not affect the innate response to specific TLR ligands in Fulani children. These findings suggest that DCs and TLR signalling may be

  17. Establishment and characterization of a cell based artificial antigen-presenting cell for expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weijuan; Ji, Mingchun; Cao, Zhengfeng; Wang, Liheng; Qian, Yayun; Hu, Maozhi; Qian, Li; Pan, Xingyuan

    2008-02-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells are expected to stimulate the expansion and acquisition of optimal therapeutic features of T cells before infusion. Here CD32 that binds to a crystallizable fragment of IgG monoclonal antibody was genetically expressed on human K562 leukemia cells to provide a ligand for T-cell receptor. CD86 and 4-1BBL, which are ligands of co-stimulating receptors of CD28 and 4-1BB, respectively, were also expressed on K562 cells. Then we accomplished the artificial antigen-presenting cells by coupling K32/CD86/4-1BBL cell with OKT3 monoclonal antibody against CD3, named K32/CD86/4-1BBL/OKT3 cells. These artificial modified cells had the abilities of inducing CD8+ T cell activation, promoting CD8+ T cell proliferation, division, and long-term growth, inhibiting CD8+ T cell apoptosis, and enhancing CD8+ T cell secretion of IFN-gamma and perforin. Furthermore, antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be retained in the culture stimulated with K32/CD86/4-1BBL/OKT3 cells at least within 28 days. This approach was robust, simple, reproducible and economical for expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells and may have important therapeutic implications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:18318994

  18. [Mucose associated lymphoid tissue. Antigen presenting cells].

    PubMed

    Luzardo-Baptista, Mario J; Luzardo, José Rafael

    2013-12-01

    We studied samples of normal and abnormal human mucosae, including oral tissue and uterine cervix, using electron microscopy. Special attention was given to the functions and mechanisms of defense carried out by the epithelial (EC) and dendritic cells (DC). Activated epithelial cells posses the capacity to uptake and process antigens, in order to present them, subsequently, to the dendritic cells. The structures and elements of the cells intervening on this function are: micropinocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes, phagosomes, clathrin-covered vesicles, dense granules covered by a unit membrane, granules with onion likes leaves, microbodies, and dense granules with acid phosphatase activity. When they first arrive within the epithelial layers, the DC are clear with long cytoplasmic projections, which later become short, and the density of their cytoplasm increases. They possess mycropinocytic vesicles, some clathrine-covered vesicles, lysososmes and Birbeck granules. At this moment, they are known as Langerhans cells. EC and DC present many surface folds rich in micropynocytic vesicles. Between EC and DC there are many contacts (close junctions or tight junctions), through which antigens, phagocitized and processed by the EC, are given to the DC. These cells join them to major histocompatibility complex molecules or to other molecules with similar functions (CD1). Then the Langerhans cells travel to the lymphatic node to activate T cells and continue the immunologic task. So, in this way, both the EC and the DC are a link between the natural and the acquired immunological mechanisms. PMID:24502183

  19. The actin cytoskeleton modulates the activation of iNKT cells by segregating CD1d nanoclusters on antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Salio, Mariolina; Aichinger, Michael C.; Oddone, Anna; Lakadamyali, Melike; Shepherd, Dawn; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize endogenous and exogenous lipid antigens presented in the context of CD1d molecules. The ability of iNKT cells to recognize endogenous antigens represents a distinct immune recognition strategy, which underscores the constitutive memory phenotype of iNKT cells and their activation during inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms regulating such “tonic” activation of iNKT cells remain unclear. Here, we show that the spatiotemporal distribution of CD1d molecules on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) modulates activation of iNKT cells. By using superresolution microscopy, we show that CD1d molecules form nanoclusters at the cell surface of APCs, and their size and density are constrained by the actin cytoskeleton. Dual-color single-particle tracking revealed that diffusing CD1d nanoclusters are actively arrested by the actin cytoskeleton, preventing their further coalescence. Formation of larger nanoclusters occurs in the absence of interactions between CD1d cytosolic tail and the actin cytoskeleton and correlates with enhanced iNKT cell activation. Importantly and consistently with iNKT cell activation during inflammatory conditions, exposure of APCs to the Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist R848 increases nanocluster density and iNKT cell activation. Overall, these results define a previously unidentified mechanism that modulates iNKT cell autoreactivity based on the tight control by the APC cytoskeleton of the sizes and densities of endogenous antigen-loaded CD1d nanoclusters. PMID:26798067

  20. Antigen Presenting Cell-Mediated Expansion of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Yields Log-Scale Expansion of Natural Killer Cells with Anti-Myeloma Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nina; Martin-Antonio, Beatriz; Yang, Hong; Ku, Stephanie; Lee, Dean A.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Decker, William K.; Li, Sufang; Robinson, Simon N.; Sekine, Takuya; Parmar, Simrit; Gribben, John; Wang, Michael; Rezvani, Katy; Yvon, Eric; Najjar, Amer; Burks, Jared; Kaur, Indreshpal; Champlin, Richard E.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of anti-tumor immunity and are active against several hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Umbilical cord blood (CB) is a promising source of allogeneic NK cells but large scale ex vivo expansion is required for generation of clinically relevant CB-derived NK (CB-NK) cell doses. Here we describe a novel strategy for expanding NK cells from cryopreserved CB units using artificial antigen presenting feeder cells (aAPC) in a gas permeable culture system. After 14 days, mean fold expansion of CB-NK cells was 1848-fold from fresh and 2389-fold from cryopreserved CB with >95% purity for NK cells (CD56+/CD3−) and less than 1% CD3+ cells. Though surface expression of some cytotoxicity receptors was decreased, aAPC-expanded CB-NK cells exhibited a phenotype similar to CB-NK cells expanded with IL-2 alone with respect to various inhibitory receptors, NKG2C and CD94 and maintained strong expression of transcription factors Eomesodermin and T-bet. Furthermore, CB-NK cells formed functional immune synapses with and demonstrated cytotoxicity against various MM targets. Finally, aAPC-expanded CB-NK cells showed significant in vivo activity against MM in a xenogenic mouse model. Our findings introduce a clinically applicable strategy for the generation of highly functional CB-NK cells which can be used to eradicate MM. PMID:24204673

  1. Nanoscale Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells for T Cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Perica, Karlo; De León Medero, Andrés; Durai, Malarvizhi; Chiu, Yen Ling; Bieler, Joan Glick; Sibener, Leah; Niemöller, Michaela; Assenmacher, Mario; Richter, Anne; Edidin, Michael; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC), which deliver stimulatory signals to cytotoxic lymphocytes, are a powerful tool for both adoptive and active immunotherapy. Thus far, aAPC have been synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins such as CD3 or MHC-peptide to micron-sized beads. Nanoscale platforms have different trafficking and biophysical interaction properties and may allow development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. We therefore manufactured aAPC based on two types of nanoscale particle platforms: biocompatible iron-dextran paramagnetic particles (50–100 nm in diameter) and avidin-coated quantum dot nanocrystals, (~30 nm). Nanoscale aAPC induced antigen-specific T cell proliferation from mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood T cells. When injected in vivo, both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhanced tumor rejection in a subcutaneous mouse melanoma model. This is the first description of nanoscale aAPC that induce antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vitro and lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. PMID:23891987

  2. Novel CD47: SIRPα Dependent Mechanism for the Activation of STAT3 in Antigen-Presenting Cell

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Natan; Gur-Wahnon, Devorah; Ben-Yehuda, Adi; Rachmilewitz, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface CD47 interacts with its receptor, signal-regulatory-protein α (SIRPα) that is expressed predominantly on macrophages, to inhibit phagocytosis of normal, healthy cells. This “don’t eat me” signal is mediated through tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPα at the cytoplasmic ITIM motifs and the recruitment of the phosphatase, SHP-1. We previously revealed a novel mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 pathway and the regulation of human APC maturation and function that is based on cell:cell interaction. In this study, we present evidence supporting the notion that CD47:SIRPα serves as a cell surface receptor: ligand pair involved in this contact-dependent STAT3 activation and regulation of APC maturation. We show that upon co-culturing APC with various primary and tumor cell lines STAT3 phosphorylation and IL-10 expression are induced, and such regulation could be suppressed by specific CD47 siRNAs and shRNAs. Significantly, >50% reduction in CD47 expression abolished the contact-dependent inhibition of T cell activation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical association between SIRPα and STAT3. Thus, we suggest that in addition to signaling through the ITIM-SHP-1 complex that transmit an anti-phagocytotic, CD47:SIRPα also triggers STAT3 signaling that is linked to an immature APC phenotype and peripheral tolerance under steady state and pathological conditions. PMID:24073274

  3. Artificial antigen presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen presenting cells can affect T cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen presenting cell systems and their use in T cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  4. Artificial antigen-presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Cameron J; Riddell, Stanley R

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen-presenting cells can affect T-cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen-presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen-presenting cell systems and their use in T-cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  5. Mitochondrial H2O2 in Lung Antigen-Presenting Cells Blocks NF-κB Activation to Prevent Unwarranted Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Khare, Anupriya; Raundhal, Mahesh; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Das, Sudipta; Corey, Catherine; Kamga, Christelle K; Quesnelle, Kelly; St Croix, Claudette; Watkins, Simon C; Morse, Christina; Oriss, Timothy B; Huff, Rachael; Hannum, Rachel; Ray, Prabir; Shiva, Sruti; Ray, Anuradha

    2016-05-24

    Inhalation of environmental antigens such as allergens does not always induce inflammation in the respiratory tract. While antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells and macrophages, take up inhaled antigens, the cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms that prevent an inflammatory response during this process, such as activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, are not well understood. Here, we show that the nuclear receptor PPARγ plays a critical role in blocking NF-κB activation in response to inhaled antigens to preserve immune tolerance. Tolerance induction promoted mitochondrial respiration, generation of H2O2, and suppression of NF-κB activation in WT, but not PPARγ-deficient, APCs. Forced restoration of H2O2 in PPARγ-deficient cells suppressed IκBα degradation and NF-κB activation. Conversely, scavenging reactive oxygen species from mitochondria promoted IκBα degradation with loss of regulatory and promotion of inflammatory T cell responses in vivo. Thus, communication between PPARγ and the mitochondria maintains immune quiescence in the airways.

  6. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from cirrhotic patients retain similar capacity for maturation/activation and antigen presentation as those from healthy subjects☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Shiroh; Chang, Li-Yuan; Li, Yonghai; Kaplan, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of liver cirrhosis on dendritic cell function. The purpose of this study was to compare the activation and antigen-presentation capacity of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) from cirrhotic patients (CIR) relative to healthy donors (HD). MoDC from CIR and HD were matured, phenotyped, irradiated and pulsed with 15mer peptides for two hepatocellular carcinoma-related antigens, alphafetoprotein and glypican-3, then co-cultured with autologous T-cells. Expanded T-cells were evaluated by interferon-gamma ELISPOT and intracellular staining. 15 CIR and 7 HD were studied. While CD14+ monocytes from CIR displayed enhanced M2 polarization, under MoDC-polarizing conditions, we identified no significant difference between HD and CIR in maturation-induced upregulation of co-stimulation markers. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed between CIR and HD in subsequent expansion of tumor antigen-specific IFNγ+ T-cells. Conclusion MoDCs isolated from cirrhotic individuals retain similar capacity for in vitro activation, maturation and antigen-presentation as those from healthy donors. PMID:25734547

  7. Podocytes Are Nonhematopoietic Professional Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burkard, Miriam; Ölke, Martha; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Hugo, Christian; Kurts, Christian; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Gessner, André

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes are essential to the structure and function of the glomerular filtration barrier; however, they also exhibit increased expression of MHC class II molecules under inflammatory conditions, and they remove Ig and immune complexes from the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). This finding suggests that podocytes may act as antigen-presenting cells, taking up and processing antigens to initiate specific T cell responses, similar to professional hematopoietic cells such as dendritic cells or macrophages. Here, MHC–antigen complexes expressed exclusively on podocytes of transgenic mice were sufficient to activate CD8+ T cells in vivo. In addition, deleting MHC class II exclusively on podocytes prevented the induction of experimental anti-GBM nephritis. Podocytes ingested soluble and particulate antigens, activated CD4+ T cells, and crosspresented exogenous antigen on MHC class I molecules to CD8+ T cells. In conclusion, podocytes participate in the antigen-specific activation of adaptive immune responses, providing a potential target for immunotherapies of inflammatory kidney diseases and transplant rejection. PMID:23539760

  8. Antigen-presenting cells in the female reproductive tract: influence of sex hormones on antigen presentation in the vagina.

    PubMed Central

    Wira, C R; Rossoll, R M

    1995-01-01

    We report here that the stage of the reproductive cycle and the administration of physiological amounts of oestradiol to ovariectomized rats influences antigen presentation by macrophage/dendritic cells in the vagina. Antigen presentation is elevated when oestradiol levels in blood are low, and reduced just prior to ovulation. Of those hormones tested, only oestradiol lowered vaginal antigen presentation. When progesterone was given along with oestradiol, the inhibitory effect of oestradiol on vaginal antigen presentation was reversed. These studies demonstrate that the vagina is an inductive site and that antigen presentation is under hormonal control. Our results suggest that immunization studies designed to enhance mucosal immunity in the female reproductive tract should take into account the stage of the reproductive cycle when antigen is deposited. PMID:7790022

  9. The inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed

    Vink, A A; Moodycliffe, A M; Shreedhar, V; Ullrich, S E; Roza, L; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1997-05-13

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase (Photosomes; Applied Genetics, Freeport, NY), which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosome treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function. PMID:9144224

  10. Immunomodulatory Glycan Lacto-N-Fucopentaose III Requires Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis To Induce Alternative Activation of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Leena; Tundup, Smanla; Choi, Beak-San; Norberg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of alternative activation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is largely unknown. Lacto-N-fucopentaose III (LNFPIII) is a biologically conserved pentasaccharide that contains the Lewisx trisaccharide. LNFPIII conjugates and schistosome egg antigens, which contain the Lewisx trisaccharide, drive alternative activation of APCs and induce anti-inflammatory responses in vivo, preventing inflammation-based diseases, including psoriasis, transplant organ rejection, and metabolic disease. In this study, we show that LNFPIII conjugates and schistosome egg antigens interact with APCs via a receptor-mediated process, requiring internalization of these molecules through a clathrin/dynamin-dependent but caveolus-independent endocytic pathway. Using inhibitors/small interfering RNA (siRNA) against dynamin and clathrin, we show for the first time that endocytosis of Lewisx-containing glycans is required to drive alternative maturation of antigen-presenting cells and Th2 immune responses. We identified mouse SIGNR-1 as a cell surface receptor for LNFPIII conjugates. Elimination of SIGNR-1 showed no effect on uptake of LNFPIII conjugates, suggesting that other receptors bind to and facilitate uptake of LNFPIII conjugates. We demonstrate that disruption of actin filaments partially prevented the entry of LNFPIII conjugates into APCs and that LNFPIII colocalizes with both early and late endosomal markers and follows the classical endosomal pathway leading to lysosome maturation. The results of this study show that the ability of LNFPIII to induce alternative activation utilizes a receptor-mediated process that requires a dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Thus, key steps have been defined in the previously unknown mechanism of alternative activation that ultimately leads to induction of anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:24566617

  11. Impairments of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, Ludmila V; Shevela, Ekaterina Ya; Tikhonova, Marina A; Nikonov, Sergey D; Ostanin, Alexandr A; Chernykh, Elena R

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype and functional properties of antigen-presenting cells (APC), that is, circulating monocytes and generated in vitro macrophages and dendritic cells, were investigated in the patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) differing in lymphocyte reactivity to M. tuberculosis antigens (PPD-reactive versus PPD-anergic patients). We revealed the distinct impairments in patient APC functions. For example, the monocyte dysfunctions were displayed by low CD86 and HLA-DR expression, 2-fold increase in CD14(+)CD16(+) expression, the high numbers of IL-10-producing cells, and enhanced IL-10 and IL-6 production upon LPS-stimulation. The macrophages which were in vitro generated from peripheral blood monocytes under GM-CSF were characterized by Th1/Th2-balance shifting (downproduction of IFN-γ coupled with upproduction of IL-10) and by reducing of allostimulatory activity in mixed lymphocyte culture. The dendritic cells (generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes upon GM-CSF + IFN-α) were characterized by impaired maturation/activation, a lower level of IFN-γ production in conjunction with an enhanced capacity to produce IL-10 and IL-6, and a profound reduction of allostimulatory activity. The APC dysfunctions were found to be most prominent in PPD-anergic patients. The possible role of APC impairments in reducing the antigen-specific T-cell response to M. tuberculosis was discussed. PMID:26339660

  12. Fibroblasts as Efficient Antigen-Presenting Cells in Lymphoid Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundig, Thomas M.; Bachmann, Martin F.; Dipaolo, Claudio; Simard, John J. L.; Battegay, Manuel; Lother, Heinz; Gessner, Andre; Kuhlcke, Klaus; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1995-06-01

    Only so-called "professional" antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of hematopoietic origin are believed capable of inducing T lymphocyte responses. However, fibroblasts transfected with viral proteins directly induced antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo, without involvement of host APCs. Fibroblasts induced T cells only in the milieu of lymphoid organs. Thus, antigen localization affects self-nonself discrimination and cell-based vaccine strategies.

  13. Antigen-bound C3b and C4b enhance antigen-presenting cell function in activation of human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Arvieux, J; Yssel, H; Colomb, M G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of complement fragments C3b and C4b, on the triggering of antigen-specific human T-cell clones by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid B cells (LCL) when these fragments are covalently coupled to the antigen tetanus toxin (TT) is described. TT was chemically cross-linked to purified C3b [(TT-C3b)n], C4b [(TT-C4b)n] or bovine serum albumin [(TT-BSA)n] as a control. T-cell activation was quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation and 51Cr release. (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n induced proliferative responses comparable to (TT-BSA)n but at 18-25 and 4-6 lower concentrations, respectively. This enhancing effect required the covalent cross-linking of the complement fragments to the antigen and involved intracellular processing of the latter by LCL. Antigen presentation was similarly enhanced when measuring the cytotoxic activity of a helper T-cell clone against LCL previously pulsed with (TT-C3b)n or (TT-C4b)n compared with (TT-BSA)n. Binding studies, carried out on LCL using TT radiolabelled with 125I before cross-linking, indicated that (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n gave three- to four-fold more binding than (TT-BSA)n. Addition of antibodies against CR1 and CR2 or proteolytic removal of these complement receptors with trypsin inhibited by about 60% the enhancing effect of TT-bound C3b and C4b in both binding and functional assays. These results indicate that binding of C3b or C4b to antigen enhances antigen-specific proliferative and cytotoxic responses of T cells by targeting opsonized antigen onto complement receptors CR1 and CR2 of LCL. The putative significance of these findings in terms of regulation of immune responses by complement is discussed.

  14. Antigen-bound C3b and C4b enhance antigen-presenting cell function in activation of human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Arvieux, J; Yssel, H; Colomb, M G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of complement fragments C3b and C4b, on the triggering of antigen-specific human T-cell clones by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid B cells (LCL) when these fragments are covalently coupled to the antigen tetanus toxin (TT) is described. TT was chemically cross-linked to purified C3b [(TT-C3b)n], C4b [(TT-C4b)n] or bovine serum albumin [(TT-BSA)n] as a control. T-cell activation was quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation and 51Cr release. (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n induced proliferative responses comparable to (TT-BSA)n but at 18-25 and 4-6 lower concentrations, respectively. This enhancing effect required the covalent cross-linking of the complement fragments to the antigen and involved intracellular processing of the latter by LCL. Antigen presentation was similarly enhanced when measuring the cytotoxic activity of a helper T-cell clone against LCL previously pulsed with (TT-C3b)n or (TT-C4b)n compared with (TT-BSA)n. Binding studies, carried out on LCL using TT radiolabelled with 125I before cross-linking, indicated that (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n gave three- to four-fold more binding than (TT-BSA)n. Addition of antibodies against CR1 and CR2 or proteolytic removal of these complement receptors with trypsin inhibited by about 60% the enhancing effect of TT-bound C3b and C4b in both binding and functional assays. These results indicate that binding of C3b or C4b to antigen enhances antigen-specific proliferative and cytotoxic responses of T cells by targeting opsonized antigen onto complement receptors CR1 and CR2 of LCL. The putative significance of these findings in terms of regulation of immune responses by complement is discussed. PMID:2973431

  15. Activation requirements of circulating antigen-specific human CD8(+) memory T cells probed with insect cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Guelly, Christian; Küpcü, Zaruhi; Zalusky, Doris; Karner, Margarete; Zehetner, Margit; Schweighoffer, Tamás

    2002-01-01

    We sought to define the molecular setup of an antigen-presenting cell that elicits antigen-specific T cell responses in vitro using insect cells that were infected with recombinant baculoviruses. Expression of single-chain HLA was complemented step-by-step with costimulatory molecules, including CD54 and CD80, by co-infection with the relevant viruses. Role of CD8 was assessed by introducing hybrid class I molecules where the alpha-3 domain of the HLA heavy chain molecule was replaced by its murine K(b) counterpart. Circulating T cells that respond to the EBV-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptide GLGCTLVAML were previously shown to bear hallmarks of memory cells. We found that the HLA+peptide complex alone displayed on the surface of insect cells was sufficient to elicit IFN-gamma secretion from these freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells in ELISpot assays. Binding of CD8 was absolutely required, but coexpression of costimulatory molecules resulted only in minimal increase in the number of spots. Tumor antigen-specific CTL clones also reacted in a strictly antigen-specific manner, but required CD54 for quantitative responses. The amount of IFN-gamma produced by the individual reactive T cells was evaluated as spot size, and was also influenced by the costimulatory molecules: CD54 increased also the response magnitude of cultured CTL lines, while CD80 enhanced cytokine release from freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells. Understanding the stimulatory requirements of functionally competent effector/memory T cells and their exact enumeration will be helpful for increasing the efficacy of vaccines.

  16. Activation requirements of circulating antigen-specific human CD8(+) memory T cells probed with insect cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Guelly, Christian; Küpcü, Zaruhi; Zalusky, Doris; Karner, Margarete; Zehetner, Margit; Schweighoffer, Tamás

    2002-01-01

    We sought to define the molecular setup of an antigen-presenting cell that elicits antigen-specific T cell responses in vitro using insect cells that were infected with recombinant baculoviruses. Expression of single-chain HLA was complemented step-by-step with costimulatory molecules, including CD54 and CD80, by co-infection with the relevant viruses. Role of CD8 was assessed by introducing hybrid class I molecules where the alpha-3 domain of the HLA heavy chain molecule was replaced by its murine K(b) counterpart. Circulating T cells that respond to the EBV-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptide GLGCTLVAML were previously shown to bear hallmarks of memory cells. We found that the HLA+peptide complex alone displayed on the surface of insect cells was sufficient to elicit IFN-gamma secretion from these freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells in ELISpot assays. Binding of CD8 was absolutely required, but coexpression of costimulatory molecules resulted only in minimal increase in the number of spots. Tumor antigen-specific CTL clones also reacted in a strictly antigen-specific manner, but required CD54 for quantitative responses. The amount of IFN-gamma produced by the individual reactive T cells was evaluated as spot size, and was also influenced by the costimulatory molecules: CD54 increased also the response magnitude of cultured CTL lines, while CD80 enhanced cytokine release from freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells. Understanding the stimulatory requirements of functionally competent effector/memory T cells and their exact enumeration will be helpful for increasing the efficacy of vaccines. PMID:11754359

  17. Activation and propagation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on clinical-grade designer artificial antigen presenting cells for adoptive immunotherapy of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Marie-Andrée; Malu, Shruti; Liu, Hui; Toth, Christopher; Maiti, Sourindra; Kale, Charuta; Haymaker, Cara; Bernatchez, Chantale; Huls, Helen; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Hwu, Patrick; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Radvanyi, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) with autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a therapy for metastatic melanoma with response rates up to 50%. However, the generation of the TIL transfer product is challenging, requiring pooled allogeneic normal donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) used in vitro as “feeders” to support a rapid expansion protocol (REP). Here, we optimized a platform to propagate TIL to a clinical scale using K562-cells genetically modified to express costimulatory molecules such as CD86, CD137-ligand and membrane-bound IL-15 to function as artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) as an alternative to using PBMC feeders. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We used aAPC or γ-irradiated PBMC feeders to propagate TIL and measured rates of expansion. The activation and differentiation state was evaluated by flow cytometry and differential gene expression analyses. Clonal diversity was assessed based on pattern of T-cell receptor (TCR) usage. T-cell effector function was measured by evaluation of cytotoxic granule content and killing of target cells. RESULTS The aAPC propagated TIL at numbers equivalent to that found with PBMC feeders, while increasing the frequency of CD8+ T-cell expansion with a comparable effector-memory phenotype. mRNA profiling revealed an up-regulation of genes in the Wnt and stem-cell pathways with the aAPC. The aAPC platform did not skew clonal diversity and CD8+ T cells showed comparable anti-tumor function as those expanded with PBMC feeders. CONCLUSIONS TIL can be rapidly expanded with aAPC to clinical scale generating T cells with similar phenotypic and effector profiles as with PBMC feeders. These data support the clinical-application of aAPC to manufacture TIL for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25304728

  18. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  19. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  20. Norovirus Antagonism of B cell Antigen Presentation Results in Impaired Control of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Jones, Melissa K.; Hickman, Danielle; Han, Shuhong; Reeves, Westley; Karst, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis so vaccine development is desperately needed. Elucidating viral mechanisms of immune antagonism can provide key insight into designing effective immunization platforms. We recently revealed that B cells are targets of norovirus infection. Because noroviruses can regulate antigen presentation by infected macrophages and B cells can function as antigen presenting cells, we tested whether noroviruses regulate B cell-mediated antigen presentation and the biological consequence of such regulation. Indeed, murine noroviruses could prevent B cell expression of antigen presentation molecules and this directly correlated with impaired control of acute infection. In addition to B cells, acute control required MHC class I molecules, CD8+ T cells, and granzymes, supporting a model whereby B cells act as antigen presenting cells to activate cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. This immune pathway was active prior to the induction of antiviral antibody responses. As in macrophages, the minor structural protein VP2 regulated B cell antigen presentation in a virus-specific manner. Commensal bacteria were not required for activation of this pathway and ultimately only B cells were required for clearance of viral infection. These findings provide new insight into the role of B cells in stimulating antiviral CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:27007673

  1. Increase in a distinct pulmonary macrophage subset possessing an antigen-presenting cell phenotype and in vitro APC activity following silica exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Migliaccio, Christopher T. . E-mail: christopher.migliaccio@umontana.edu; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Holian, Andrij

    2005-06-01

    Silica inhalation results in chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. While the role of the alveolar macrophage (AM) is considered key to the effects of silica on lung pathology, the etiology is not completely understood. Evidence suggests an increase in antigen presenting cell (APC) activity as a contributing factor to this process, as well as potential roles for both AM and interstitial macrophages (IM) in silicosis. In order to study the effects of crystalline silica on the APC activity of pulmonary macrophages, mice were exposed intranasally and changes in pulmonary macrophage populations were assessed using flow cytometry. Following intranasal instillation of silica, a significant increase in the APC activity of AM was observed, as well as a significant increase in a subset of IM expressing classic APC markers (MHC class II, CD11c). In addition, an in vitro system using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) was generated to assess the effects of silica on the APC activity of macrophages in vitro. Data using BMDM in the in vitro APC assay demonstrated a significant increase in APC activity following silica exposure, but not following exposure to saline or a control particle (TiO{sub 2}). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments, the current study describes a significant increase in an interstitial macrophage subset with an APC phenotype, as well as an increase in the APC activity of both AM and BMDM, as a direct result of exposure to crystalline silica. These studies suggest a specific mechanism, macrophage subset activation, by which crystalline silica exposure results in chronic pulmonary inflammation and, eventually, fibrosis.

  2. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing AFP158-166 peptide and interleukin-15 activate AFP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Longhao; Guo, Hao; Jiang, Ruoyu; Lu, Li; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Zhixiang; He, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are potent generators of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for adoptive immunotherapy; however, generation of APCs is cumbersome, expensive, and subject to the tumor microenvironment. Artificial APCs (aAPCs) have been developed as a cost-effective alternative to APCs. We developed a cellular aAPC that efficiently generated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-specific CTLs. We genetically modified the human B cell lymphoma cell line BJAB with a lentiviral vector to establish an aAPC called BA15. The expression of AFP158-166-HLA-A*02:01 complex, CD80, CD86, and interleukin (IL)-15 in BA15 cells was assessed. The efficiency of BA15 at generating AFP-specific CTLs and the specific cytotoxicity of CTLs against AFP+ cells were also determined. BA15 cells expressed high levels of AFP158-166 peptide, HLA-A2, CD80, CD86, and IL-15. BA15 cells also exhibited higher efficiency in generating AFP-specific CTLs than did dendritic cells. These CTLs had greater cytotoxicity against AFP+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells than did CTLs obtained from dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo. Our novel aAPC system could provide a robust platform for the generation of functional AFP-specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27007051

  3. Cholera Toxin B Subunit as a Carrier Molecule Promotes Antigen Presentation and Increases CD40 and CD86 Expression on Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    George-Chandy, Annie; Eriksson, Kristina; Lebens, Michael; Nordström, Inger; Schön, Emma; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is an efficient mucosal carrier molecule for the generation of mucosal antibody responses and/or induction of systemic T-cell tolerance to linked antigens. CTB binds with high affinity to GM1 ganglioside cell surface receptors. In this study, we evaluated how conjugation of a peptide or protein antigen to CTB by chemical coupling or genetic fusion influences the T-cell-activating capacity of different antigen-presenting cell (APC) subsets. Using an in vitro system in which antigen-pulsed APCs were incubated with antigen-specific, T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, we found that the dose of antigen required for T-cell activation could be decreased >10,000-fold using CTB-conjugated compared to free antigen. In contrast, no beneficial effects were observed when CTB was simply admixed with antigen. CTB conjugation enhanced the antigen-presenting capacity not only of dendritic cells and B cells but also of macrophages, which expressed low levels of cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and were normally poor activators of naive T cells. Enhanced antigen-presenting activity by CTB-linked antigen resulted in both increased T-cell proliferation and increased interleukin-12 and gamma interferon secretion and was associated with up-regulation of CD40 and CD86 on the APC surface. These results imply that conjugation to CTB dramatically lowers the threshold concentration of antigen required for immune cell activation and also permits low-MHC II-expressing APCs to prime for a specific immune response. PMID:11500448

  4. An Overview of B-1 Cells as Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popi, Ana F.; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Mariano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has been extensively studied, mainly in relation to the activation of memory T cells. Considering the B cell subtypes, the role of B-1 cells as APCs is beginning to be explored. Initially, it was described that B-1 cells are activated preferentially by T-independent antigens. However, some reports demonstrated that these cells are also involved in a T-dependent response. The aim of this review is to summarize information about the ability of B-1 cells to play a role as APCs and to briefly discuss the role of the BCR and toll-like receptor signals in this process. Furthermore, some characteristics of B-1 cells, such as natural IgM production and phagocytic ability, could interfere in the participation of these cells in the onset of an adaptive response. PMID:27148259

  5. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Djekic, Aleksandra; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirectly prevent H. pylori-specific T-cell responses and immune control of the infection. In particular, the ability of VacA-proficient H. pylori to skew T-cell responses towards regulatory T-cells and the effects of Tregs on H. pylori chronicity are highlighted. The by-stander effects of VacA-driven immunomodulation on extragastric diseases are discussed as well. PMID:27322319

  6. Identification and manipulation of antigen specific T-cells with artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Koffeman, Eva; Keogh, Elissa; Klein, Mark; Prakken, Berent; Albani, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    T-cells specific for a particular antigen represent a small percentage of the overall T-cell population. Detecting the presence of antigen specific T-cells in patients, animal models or populations of cultured cells has presented a challenge to researchers. The T-cell capture method described here utilizes a truly artificial method of antigen presentation and requires only 50,000 cells for the detection of the major histomcompatibility complex (MHC) class II and antigen restricted T-cells. With this method, liposomes, prepared with readily available materials, are loaded with neutravidin "rafts" comprised of MHC/peptide complexes, anti-CD28, a costimulatory molecule, and anti-LFA-1, an adhesion molecule. These artificial APCs are easily manipulated to include any MHC, antibodies to cell surface markers and/or costimulatory signals of interest thereby enabling not only T-cell identification but also the manipulation of mechanisms of T-cell activation. PMID:17983141

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Modulates In Vivo Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecules on Antigen-Presenting Cells and T-Cell Stimulatory Activity of Dendritic Cells in a Strain-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Alba Soto, Catalina D.; Mirkin, Gerardo A.; Solana, Maria E.; González Cappa, Stella M.

    2003-01-01

    A striking feature of Chagas' disease is the diversity of clinical presentations. Such variability may be due to the heterogeneity among Trypanosoma cruzi isolates or to the host immune response. Employing two strains which differ in their virulence, we investigated the effect of in vivo infection on professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). Acute infection with the virulent RA strain downregulated the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II on splenic dendritic cells (DC) and inhibited its induction on peritoneal macrophages and splenic B cells. It also impaired the ability of DC to prime allogeneic T cells and to form homotypic clusters, suggesting a low maturation state of these cells. In contrast, the low-virulence K98 strain maintained the expression of MHC class II on DC or stimulated it on peritoneal macrophages and B cells and preserved DC's T-cell priming capacity and homotypic clustering. DC from RA-infected mice elicited a lower activation of T. cruzi-specific T-cell proliferation than those from K98-infected mice. APC from RA-infected mice that reached the chronic phase of infection restored MHC class II levels to those found in K98-infected mice and upregulated costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that the immunosuppression caused by this strain is only transient. Taken together, the results indicate that in vivo infection with T. cruzi modulates APC functionality and that this is accomplished in a strain-dependent manner. PMID:12595432

  8. SAMHD1 Limits HIV-1 Antigen Presentation by Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Timothée; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Porrot, Françoise; Prado, Julia G.; Moris, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) stimulate CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) by presenting endogenous and exogenous viral peptides via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. MDDC are poorly susceptible to HIV-1, in part due to the presence of SAMHD1, a cellular enzyme that depletes intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and degrades viral RNA. Vpx, an HIV-2/SIVsm protein absent from HIV-1, antagonizes SAMHD1 by inducing its degradation. The impact of SAMHD1 on the adaptive cellular immune response remains poorly characterized. Here, we asked whether SAMHD1 modulates MHC-I-restricted HIV-1 antigen presentation. Untreated MDDC or MDDC pretreated with Vpx were exposed to HIV-1, and antigen presentation was examined by monitoring the activation of an HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL clone. SAMHD1 depletion strongly enhanced productive infection of MDDC as well as endogenous HIV-1 antigen presentation. Time-lapse microscopy analysis demonstrated that in the absence of SAMHD1, the CTL rapidly killed infected MDDC. We also report that various transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 strains poorly infected MDDC and, as a consequence, did not stimulate CTL. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyping of T/F alleviated a block in viral entry and induced antigen presentation only in the absence of SAMHD1. Furthermore, by using another CTL clone that mostly recognizes incoming HIV-1 antigens, we demonstrate that SAMHD1 does not influence exogenous viral antigen presentation. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the antiviral activity of SAMHD1 impacts antigen presentation by DC, highlighting the link that exists between restriction factors and adaptive immune responses. IMPORTANCE Upon viral infection, DC may present antigens derived from incoming viral material in the absence of productive infection of DC or from newly synthesized viral proteins. In the case of HIV, productive infection of DC is blocked at an early

  9. Tubulin and actin interplay at the T cell and antigen-presenting cell interface.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off.

  10. Tubulin and Actin Interplay at the T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off. PMID:22566814

  11. Antigen-presenting cells in parotid glands contain cystatin D originating from acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Nashida, Tomoko; Sato, Ritsuko; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Yoshie, Sumio; Yoshimura, Ken; Imai, Akane; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2013-02-01

    Cystatin D encoded by Cst5 is a salivary classified type II cystatin. We investigated the dynamism of cystatin D by examining the distribution of cystatin D protein and mRNA in rats, to identify novel functions. The simultaneous expression of Cst5 and cystatin D was observed in parotid glands, however in situ hybridization showed that only acinar cells produced cystatin D. Synthesized cystatin D was localized in small vesicles and secreted from the apical side to the saliva, and from the basolateral side to the extracellular region, a second secretory pathway for cystatin D. We also identified antigen-presenting cells in the parotid glands that contained cystatin D without the expression of Cst5, indicating the uptake of cystatin D from the extracellular region. Cystatin D was detected in blood serum and renal tubular cells with megalin, indicating the circulation of cystatin D through the body and uptake by renal tubular cells. Thus, the novel dynamism of cystatin D was shown and a function for cystatin D in the regulation of antigen-presenting cell activity was proposed.

  12. Modular Three-component Delivery System Facilitates HLA Class I Antigen Presentation and CD8(+) T-cell Activation Against Tumors.

    PubMed

    Umlauf, Benjamin J; Chung, Chin-Ying; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2015-06-01

    Cell-mediated immunotherapies have potential as stand-alone and adjuvant therapies for cancer. However, most current protocols suffer from one or more of three major issues: cost, safety, or efficacy. Here we present a nanoparticle delivery system that facilitates presentation of an immunogenic measles antigen specifically in cancer cells. The delivery system does not contain viral particles, toxins, or biologically derived material. Treatment with this system facilitates activation of a secondary immune response against cancer cells, bypassing the need to identify tumor-associated antigens or educate the immune system through a primary immune response. The delivery system consists of a stealth liposome displaying a cancer-specific targeting peptide, named H1299.3, on its exterior surface and encapsulating H250, an immunogenic human leukocyte antigen class 1 restricted peptide. This targeted-nanoparticle facilitates presentation of the H250 peptide in major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Activation is dependent on the targeting peptide, previous antigen exposure, and utilizes a novel autophagy-mediated mechanism to facilitate presentation. Treatment with this liposome results in a significant reduction of tumor growth using an aggressive LLC1 model in vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. These data provide proof-of-principle for a novel cell-mediated immunotherapy that is scalable, contains no biologically derived material, and is an efficacious cancer therapy.

  13. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tundup, Smanla; Srivastava, Leena; Norberg, Thomas; Watford, Wendy; Harn, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 "favoring" chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 "favoring" chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1-3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1-3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK) axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo therapeutic effect of

  14. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tundup, Smanla; Srivastava, Leena; Norberg, Thomas; Watford, Wendy; Harn, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 “favoring” chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 “favoring” chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1–3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1–3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK) axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo therapeutic

  15. Recombinant Ov-ASP-1, a Th1-biased protein adjuvant derived from the helminth Onchocerca volvulus, can directly bind and activate antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yuxian; Barker, Sophie J; MacDonald, Angus J; Yu, Yu; Cao, Long; Li, Jingjing; Parhar, Ranjit; Heck, Susanne; Hartmann, Susanne; Golenbock, Douglas T; Jiang, Shibo; Libri, Nathan A; Semper, Amanda E; Rosenberg, William M; Lustigman, Sara

    2009-04-01

    We previously reported that rOv-ASP-1, a recombinant Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1, was a potent adjuvant for recombinant protein or synthetic peptide-based Ags. In this study, we further evaluated the adjuvanticity of rOv-ASP-1 and explored its mechanism of action. Consistently, recombinant full-length spike protein of SARS-CoV or its receptor-binding domain in the presence of rOv-ASP-1 could effectively induce a mixed but Th1-skewed immune response in immunized mice. It appears that rOv-ASP-1 primarily bound to the APCs among human PBMCs and triggered Th1-biased proinflammatory cytokine production probably via the activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and the TLR, TLR2, and TLR4, thus suggesting that rOv-ASP-1 is a novel potent innate adjuvant. PMID:19299698

  16. Modes of Antigen Presentation by Lymph Node Stromal Cells and Their Immunological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hirosue, Sachiko; Dubrot, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is no longer the exclusive domain of cells of hematopoietic origin. Recent works have demonstrated that lymph node stromal cell (LNSC) populations, such as fibroblastic reticular cells, lymphatic and blood endothelial cells, not only provide a scaffold for lymphocyte interactions but also exhibit active immunomodulatory roles that are critical to mounting and resolving effective immune responses. Importantly, LNSCs possess the ability to present antigens and establish antigen-specific interactions with T cells. One example is the expression of peripheral tissue antigens, which are presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules with tolerogenic consequences on T cells. Additionally, exogenous antigens, including self and tumor antigens, can be processed and presented on MHC-I complexes, which result in dysfunctional activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. While MHC-I is widely expressed on cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins, antigen presentation via MHC-II is more precisely regulated. Nevertheless, LNSCs are capable of endogenously expressing, or alternatively, acquiring MHC-II molecules. Transfer of antigen between LNSC and dendritic cells in both directions has been recently suggested to promote tolerogenic roles of LNSCs on the CD4+ T cell compartment. Thus, antigen presentation by LNSCs is thought to be a mechanism that promotes the maintenance of peripheral tolerance as well as generates a pool of diverse antigen-experienced T cells for protective immunity. This review aims to integrate the current and emerging literature to highlight the importance of LNSCs in immune responses, and emphasize their role in antigen trafficking, retention, and presentation. PMID:26441957

  17. MHC Class II Association with Lipid Rafts on the Antigen Presenting Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Howard A.; Roche, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules function by binding peptides derived from either self-or foreign proteins and expressing these peptides on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs) for recognition by CD4 T cells. MHC-II is known to exist on clusters on the surface of APCs, and a variety of biochemical and functional studies have suggested that these clusters represent lipid raft microdomain-associated MHC-II. This review will summarize data exploring the biosynthesis of raft-associated MHC-II and the role that lipid raft association plays in regulating T cell activation by APCs. PMID:25261705

  18. Nanoengineering approaches to the design of artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have shown great initial promise for ex vivo activation of cytotoxic T cells. The development of aAPCs has focused mainly on the choice of proteins to use for surface presentation to T cells when conjugated to various spherical, microscale particles. We review here biomimetic nanoengineering approaches that have been applied to the development of aAPCs that move beyond initial concepts about aAPC development. This article also discusses key technologies that may be enabling for the development of nano- and micro-scale aAPCs with nanoscale features, and suggests several future directions for the field. PMID:23837856

  19. Survival and signaling changes in antigen presenting cell subsets after radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jennifer Janell

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment that has the potential to influence anti-tumor immune responses. Both myeloablative and non-myeloablative radiation are often used as part of preparatory regimens for hematopoetic stem cell transplantation, in combination with other chemotherapy or immuno-modulatory (e.g. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)) therapies for both cytotoxic and immune modulatory purposes. However, the mechanisms responsible for the effect of radiation on antigen presenting cell (APC) responsiveness and radioresistance are poorly understood. The first studies described in this thesis were designed to identify and characterize early radiation-induced signaling changes in antigen presenting cells and to determine the effects of these signaling changes on APC receptor expression and function. The NFkappaB pathway in antigen presenting cells was chosen for study because it is activated by radiation in a wide range of other cell types and plays a vital role in the maintenance and regulation of the immune system. The effects of therapeutically relevant doses radiation (2 and 20 Gy) were compared at various timepoints in the human monocytic cell line (U937) using phospho-flow cytometry staining methods and cytometric analysis. These studies demonstrated that radiation-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of NFkappaB family members that were p53 independent. However, these changes were dependent upon activation of ATM in response to single or double-stranded breaks in DNA, as shown in experiments using an inhibitor of ATM and ATM siRNA knockdown U937 cells. In addition, studies examining the effect of radiation on co-stimulatory receptors with and without inhibition of the NFkappaB pathway via phospho-flow cytometry revealed that radiation-induced phosphorylation of NEMO promoted the activation and functional maturation of U937 cells. Furthermore, functional studies using both phospho-flow cytometry and/or mixed lymphocyte reactions to

  20. Hemopoietic cell kinase (Hck) and p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2) are involved in the down-regulation of CD1a lipid antigen presentation by HIV-1 Nef in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Eiji; Shimizu, Masumi; Owaki, Atsuko; Paoletti, Samantha; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in in vivo pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Therefore, DCs may provide a promising strategy to control and eventually overcome the fatal infection. Especially, immature DCs express all CD1s, the non-MHC lipid antigen -presenting molecules, and HIV-1 Nef down-regulates CD1 expression besides MHC. Moreover, CD1d-restricted CD4(+) NKT cells are infected by HIV-1, reducing the number of these cells in HIV-1-infected individuals. To understand the exact role of DCs and CD1-mediated immune response during HIV-1 infection, Nef down-regulation of CD1a-restricted lipid/glycolipid Ag presentation in iDCs was analyzed. We demonstrated the involvement of the association of Nef with hemopoietic cell kinase (Hck) and p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2), and that Hck, which is expressed strongly in iDCs, augmented this mutual interaction. Hck might be another therapeutic target to preserve the function of HIV-1 infected DCs, which are potential reservoirs of HIV-1 even after antiretroviral therapy.

  1. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: a novel strategy to delete specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Mackensen, Andreas; Zoso, Alessia; Halbritter, Dagmar; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2008-04-01

    Several cell-based immunotherapy strategies have been developed to specifically modulate T cell-mediated immune responses. These methods frequently rely on the utilization of tolerogenic cell-based antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, APCs are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T-cell responses, thus limiting their therapeutic capacity. Here, we describe a novel bead-based approach to modulate T-cell responses in an antigen-specific fashion. We have generated killer artificial APCs (kappaaAPCs) by coupling an apoptosis-inducing alpha-Fas (CD95) IgM mAb together with HLA-A2 Ig molecules onto beads. These kappaaAPCs deplete targeted antigen-specific T cells in a Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-dependent fashion. T-cell depletion in cocultures is rapidly initiated (30 minutes), dependent on the amount of kappaaAPCs and independent of activation-induced cell death (AICD). kappaaAPCs represent a novel technology that can control T cell-mediated immune responses, and therefore has potential for use in treatment of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection. PMID:18096763

  2. Ethanol Metabolism Alters Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation In Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    The proteasome is a major enzyme that cleaves proteins for antigen presentation. Cleaved peptides traffic to the cell surface, where they are presented in the context of MHC class I. Recognition of these complexes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is crucial for elimination of cells bearing “non-self” proteins. Our previous studies revealed that ethanol suppresses proteasome function in ethanol-metabolizing liver cells. We hypothesized that proteasome suppression reduces the hydrolysis of antigenic peptides, thereby decreasing the presentation of the peptide-MHC class I-complexes on the cell surface. To test this, we used the mouse hepatocyte cell line (CYP2E1/ADH-transfected HepB5 cells) or primary mouse hepatocytes, both derived from livers of C57Bl/6 mice, which present the ovalbumin peptide, SIINFEKL, complexed with H2Kb. To induce H2Kb expression, HepB5 cells were treated with interferon gamma (IFNγ) and then exposed to ethanol. In these cells, ethanol metabolism decreased not only proteasome activity, but also hydrolysis of the C-extended peptide, SIINFEKL-TE and the presentation of SIINFEKL-H2Kb complexes measured after the delivery of SIINFEKL-TE to cytoplasm. The suppressive effects of ethanol were, in part, attributed to ethanol-elicited impairment of IFNγ signaling. However, in primary hepatocytes, even in the absence of IFNγ, we observed a similar decline in proteasome activity and antigen presentation after ethanol exposure. We conclude that proteasome function is directly suppressed by ethanol metabolism and indirectly, by preventing the activating effects of IFNγ. Ethanol-elicited reduction in proteasome activity contributes to the suppression of SIINFEKL-H2Kb presentation on the surface of liver cells. Immune response to viral antigens plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C or B viral infections (HCV and HBV, respectively). Professional antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) are responsible for priming the

  3. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages.

  4. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  5. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Shenoda, Botros B; Ajit, Seena K

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  6. Linking form to function: Biophysical aspects of artificial antigen presenting cell design.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Kosmides, Alyssa K; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2015-04-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) are engineered platforms for T cell activation and expansion, synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins to the surface of cell lines or biocompatible particles. They can serve both as model systems to study the basic aspects of T cell signaling and translationally as novel approaches for either active or adoptive immunotherapy. Historically, these reductionist systems have not been designed to mimic the temporally and spatially complex interactions observed during endogenous T cell-APC contact, which include receptor organization at both micro- and nanoscales and dynamic changes in cell and membrane morphologies. Here, we review how particle size and shape, as well as heterogenous distribution of T cell activating proteins on the particle surface, are critical aspects of aAPC design. In doing so, we demonstrate how insights derived from endogenous T cell activation can be applied to optimize aAPC, and in turn how aAPC platforms can be used to better understand endogenous T cell stimulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling. PMID:25200637

  7. Towards efficient cancer immunotherapy: advances in developing artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Loek J; Paulis, Leonie E; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G

    2014-09-01

    Active anti-cancer immune responses depend on efficient presentation of tumor antigens and co-stimulatory signals by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Therapy with autologous natural APCs is costly and time-consuming and results in variable outcomes in clinical trials. Therefore, development of artificial APCs (aAPCs) has attracted significant interest as an alternative. We discuss the characteristics of various types of acellular aAPCs, and their clinical potential in cancer immunotherapy. The size, shape, and ligand mobility of aAPCs and their presentation of different immunological signals can all have significant effects on cytotoxic T cell activation. Novel optimized aAPCs, combining carefully tuned properties, may lead to efficient immunomodulation and improved clinical responses in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24998519

  8. Towards efficient cancer immunotherapy: advances in developing artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, Loek J.; Paulis, Leonie E.; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G.

    2014-01-01

    Active anti-cancer immune responses depend on efficient presentation of tumor antigens and co-stimulatory signals by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Therapy with autologous natural APCs is costly and time-consuming and results in variable outcomes in clinical trials. Therefore, development of artificial APCs (aAPCs) has attracted significant interest as an alternative. We discuss the characteristics of various types of acellular aAPCs, and their clinical potential in cancer immunotherapy. The size, shape, and ligand mobility of aAPCs and their presentation of different immunological signals can all have significant effects on cytotoxic T cell activation. Novel optimized aAPCs, combining carefully tuned properties, may lead to efficient immunomodulation and improved clinical responses in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24998519

  9. Modulation of liver tolerance by conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells and regulatory immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Andrea Kristina; Neumann, Katrin; Diehl, Linda; Tiegs, Gisa

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a tolerogenic organ with exquisite mechanisms of immune regulation that ensure upkeep of local and systemic immune tolerance to self and foreign antigens, but that is also able to mount effective immune responses against pathogens. The immune privilege of liver allografts was recognized first in pigs in spite of major histo-compatibility complex mismatch, and termed the “liver tolerance effect”. Furthermore, liver transplants are spontaneously accepted with only low-dose immunosuppression, and induce tolerance for non-hepatic co-transplanted allografts of the same donor. Although this immunotolerogenic environment is favorable in the setting of organ transplantation, it is detrimental in chronic infectious liver diseases like hepatitis B or C, malaria, schistosomiasis or tumorigenesis, leading to pathogen persistence and weak anti-tumor effects. The liver is a primary site of T-cell activation, but it elicits poor or incomplete activation of T cells, leading to their abortive activation, exhaustion, suppression of their effector function and early death. This is exploited by pathogens and can impair pathogen control and clearance or allow tumor growth. Hepatic priming of T cells is mediated by a number of local conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which promote tolerance by immune deviation, induction of T-cell anergy or apoptosis, and generating and expanding regulatory T cells. This review will focus on the communication between classical and nonclassical APCs and lymphocytes in the liver in tolerance induction and will discuss recent insights into the role of innate lymphocytes in this process. PMID:27041638

  10. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines. PMID:26583156

  11. Modulation of Th1/Th2 immune responses by killed Propionibacterium acnes and its soluble polysaccharide fraction in a type I hypersensitivity murine model: induction of different activation status of antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Squaiella-Baptistão, Carla Cristina; Teixeira, Daniela; Mussalem, Juliana Sekeres; Ishimura, Mayari Eika; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus present in normal human skin microbiota, which exerts important immunomodulatory effects, when used as heat- or phenol-killed suspensions. We previously demonstrated that heat-killed P. acnes or its soluble polysaccharide (PS), extracted from the bacterium cell wall, suppressed or potentiated the Th2 response to ovalbumin (OVA) in an immediate hypersensitivity model, depending on the treatment protocol. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for these effects, using the same model and focusing on the activation status of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We verified that higher numbers of APCs expressing costimulatory molecules and higher expression levels of these molecules are probably related to potentiation of the Th2 response to OVA induced by P. acnes or PS, while higher expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) seems to be related to Th2 suppression. In vitro cytokines production in cocultures of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes indicated that P. acnes and PS seem to perform their effects by acting directly on APCs. Our data suggest that P. acnes and PS directly act on APCs, modulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and TLRs, and these differently activated APCs drive distinct T helper patterns to OVA in our model. PMID:25973430

  12. Modulation of Th1/Th2 Immune Responses by Killed Propionibacterium acnes and Its Soluble Polysaccharide Fraction in a Type I Hypersensitivity Murine Model: Induction of Different Activation Status of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mussalem, Juliana Sekeres; Ishimura, Mayari Eika; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus present in normal human skin microbiota, which exerts important immunomodulatory effects, when used as heat- or phenol-killed suspensions. We previously demonstrated that heat-killed P. acnes or its soluble polysaccharide (PS), extracted from the bacterium cell wall, suppressed or potentiated the Th2 response to ovalbumin (OVA) in an immediate hypersensitivity model, depending on the treatment protocol. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for these effects, using the same model and focusing on the activation status of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We verified that higher numbers of APCs expressing costimulatory molecules and higher expression levels of these molecules are probably related to potentiation of the Th2 response to OVA induced by P. acnes or PS, while higher expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) seems to be related to Th2 suppression. In vitro cytokines production in cocultures of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes indicated that P. acnes and PS seem to perform their effects by acting directly on APCs. Our data suggest that P. acnes and PS directly act on APCs, modulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and TLRs, and these differently activated APCs drive distinct T helper patterns to OVA in our model. PMID:25973430

  13. Engineering artificial antigen-presenting cells to express a diverse array of co-stimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Suhoski, Megan M; Golovina, Tatiana N; Aqui, Nicole A; Tai, Victoria C; Varela-Rohena, Angel; Milone, Michael C; Carroll, Richard G; Riley, James L; June, Carl H

    2007-05-01

    To facilitate the therapeutic application of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), we have developed a cell-based artificial APC (aAPC) system by engineering K562 cells with lentiviruses to direct the stable expression and secretion of a variety of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. Here we report the use of a combinatorial lentiviral gene transfer approach to achieve long-term stable expression of at least seven genes in the K562 parental cell line. Expression of various combinations of genes on the aAPC enables the precise determination of human T-cell activation requirements, such that aAPCs can be tailored for the optimal propagation of T-cell subsets with specific growth requirements and distinct functions. The aAPCs support ex vivo growth and long-term expansion of functional human CD8 T cells without requiring the addition of exogenous cytokines, in contrast to the use of natural APCs. Distinct populations of T cells can be expanded with aAPCs expressing CD137L (4-1BBL) and/or CD80. Finally, the aAPCs provide an efficient platform to expand genetically modified T cells and to maintain CD28 expression on CD8 T cells. Therefore, K562-based aAPCs have therapeutic potential for adoptive immunotherapies and vaccinations. PMID:17375070

  14. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  15. Synthetic surfaces as artificial antigen presenting cells in the study of T cell receptor triggering and immunological synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Darrell J; Doh, Junsang

    2007-08-01

    T cell activation occurs when T cell receptors engage peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules displayed on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Clustering of TCRs and other receptors in physical patterns at the T-APC interface forms a structure known as an immunological synapse (IS). Studies of the IS are challenging due to the cell-cell contact context of the governing interactions. Model surfaces as synthetic APCs have thus been developed, where the type, quantity, and physical arrangement of ligands displayed to T cells are precisely controlled. These model systems have provided important insights into the structure and function of the IS. PMID:17398113

  16. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response.

  17. Enrichment and Expansion with Nanoscale Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Bieler, Joan Glick; Schütz, Christian; Varela, Juan Carlos; Douglass, Jacqueline; Skora, Andrew; Chiu, Yen Ling; Oelke, Mathias; Kinzler, Kenneth; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2015-07-28

    Adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) can mediate durable regression of cancer, but widespread adoption of AIT is limited by the cost and complexity of generating tumor-specific T cells. Here we develop an Enrichment + Expansion strategy using paramagnetic, nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) to rapidly expand tumor-specific T cells from rare naïve precursors and predicted neo-epitope responses. Nano-aAPC are capable of enriching rare tumor-specific T cells in a magnetic column and subsequently activating them to induce proliferation. Enrichment + Expansion resulted in greater than 1000-fold expansion of both mouse and human tumor-specific T cells in 1 week, with nano-aAPC based enrichment conferring a proliferation advantage during both in vitro culture and after adoptive transfer in vivo. Robust T cell responses were seen not only for shared tumor antigens, but also for computationally predicted neo-epitopes. Streamlining the rapid generation of large numbers of tumor-specific T cells in a cost-effective fashion through Enrichment + Expansion can be a powerful tool for immunotherapy. PMID:26171764

  18. Engineering tolerance using biomaterials to target and control antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Tostanoski, Lisa H; Gosselin, Emily A; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when cells of the adaptive immune system incorrectly recognize and attack "self" tissues. Importantly, the proliferation and differentiation of these cells is triggered and controlled by interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells. Thus, modulating the signals transduced by APCs (e.g., cytokines, costimulatory surface proteins) has emerged as a promising strategy to promote tolerance for diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and lupus. However, many approaches have been hindered by non-specific activity of immunosuppressive or immunoregulatory cues, following systemic administration of soluble factors via traditional injections routes (e.g., subcutaneous, intravenous). Biomaterials offer a unique opportunity to control the delivery of tolerogenic signals in vivo via properties such as controlled particle size, tunable release kinetics, and co-delivery of multiple classes of cargo. In this review, we highlight recent reports that exploit these properties of biomaterials to target APCs and promote tolerance via three strategies, i) passive or active targeting of particulate carriers to APCs, ii) biomaterial-mediated control over antigen localization and processing, and iii) targeted delivery of encapsulated or adsorbed immunomodulatory signals. These reports represent exciting advances toward the goal of more effective therapies for autoimmune diseases, without the broad suppressive effects associated with current clinically-approved therapies. PMID:27355336

  19. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: the synthetic embodiment of a 'guided missile'.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P; Mackensen, Andreas; Fleck, Martin

    2010-07-01

    At present, the treatment of T-cell-dependent autoimmune diseases relies exclusively on strategies leading to nonspecific suppression of the immune systems causing a substantial reduced ability to control concomitant infections or malignancies. Furthermore, long-term treatment with most drugs is accompanied by several serious adverse effects and does not consequently result in cure of the primary immunological malfunction. By contrast, antigen-specific immunotherapy offers the potential to achieve the highest therapeutic efficiency in accordance with minimal adverse effects. Therefore, several studies have been performed utilizing antigen-presenting cells specifically engineered to deplete allo- or antigen-specific T cells ('guided missiles'). Many of these strategies take advantage of the Fas/Fas ligand signaling pathway to efficiently induce antigen-presenting cell-mediated apoptosis in targeted T cells. In this article, we discuss the advantages and shortcomings of a novel non-cell-based 'killer artificial antigen-presenting cell' strategy, developed to overcome obstacles related to current cell-based approaches for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:20636007

  20. Impact of surface chemistry and topography on the function of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rostam, H M; Singh, S; Vrana, N E; Alexander, M R; Ghaemmaghami, A M

    2015-03-01

    Antigen presenting cells (APCs) such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in orchestrating immune responses against foreign materials. The activation status of APCs can determine the outcome of an immune response following implantation of synthetic materials, towards either healing or inflammation. A large range of biomaterials are used in the fabrication of implantable devices and drug delivery systems. These materials will be in close contact with APCs and characteristics such as surface chemistry and topography may have a critical role in initiating pro- or anti-inflammatory immune responses. Controlling biomaterial surface attributes provides a powerful tool for modulating the phenotype and function of immune cells with the aim of reducing detrimental pro-inflammatory responses and promoting beneficial healing responses. In this article, we review recent literature on how biomaterial surface topography and chemistry can modulate APC populations towards distinct pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes with specific examples of how these properties can be used to control host response in vivo. Topographical and/or chemical design of biomaterial surfaces with respect to the APC responses can pave the way for a new generation of 'cell instructive' materials with immunomodulatory properties with a wide range of clinical applications.

  1. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  2. Antigen Presenting Properties of a Myeloid Dendritic-Like Cell in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-ying; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper distinguishes a rare subset of myeloid dendritic-like cells found in mouse spleen from conventional (c) dendritic cells (DC) in terms of phenotype, function and gene expression. These cells are tentatively named “L-DC” since they resemble dendritic-like cells produced in longterm cultures of spleen. L-DC can be distinguished on the basis of their unique phenotype as CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII-CD43+Ly6C-Ly6G-Siglec-F- cells. They demonstrate similar ability as cDC to uptake and retain complex antigens like mannan via mannose receptors, but much lower ability to endocytose and retain soluble antigen. While L-DC differ from cDC by their inability to activate CD4+ T cells, they are capable of antigen cross-presentation for activation of CD8+ T cells, although less effectively so than the cDC subsets. In terms of gene expression, CD8- cDC and CD8+ cDC are quite distinct from L-DC. CD8+ cDC are distinguishable from the other two subsets by expression of CD24a, Clec9a, Xcr1 and Tlr11, while CD8- cDC are distinguished by expression of Ccnd1 and H-2Eb2. L-DC are distinct from the two cDC subsets through upregulated expression of Clec4a3, Emr4, Itgam, Csf1r and CD300ld. The L-DC gene profile is quite distinct from that of cDC, confirming a myeloid cell type with distinct antigen presenting properties. PMID:27654936

  3. Chronic HIV Infection Enhances the Responsiveness of Antigen Presenting Cells to Commensal Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Lauren H.; Grishina, Irina; Macal, Monica; Hirao, Lauren A.; Hu, William K.; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Gaulke, Christopher A.; Pollard, Richard; Brown, Jennifer; Suni, Maria; Baumler, Andreas J.; Ghanekar, Smita; Marco, Maria L.; Dandekar, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Chronic immune activation despite long-term therapy poses an obstacle to immune recovery in HIV infection. The role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in chronic immune activation during HIV infection remains to be fully determined. APCs, the frontline of immune defense against pathogens, are capable of distinguishing between pathogens and non-pathogenic, commensal bacteria. We hypothesized that HIV infection induces dysfunction in APC immune recognition and response to some commensal bacteria and that this may promote chronic immune activation. Therefore we examined APC inflammatory cytokine responses to commensal lactobacilli. We found that APCs from HIV-infected patients produced an enhanced inflammatory response to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 as compared to APCs from healthy, HIV-negative controls. Increased APC expression of TLR2 and CD36, signaling through p38-MAPK, and decreased expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in HIV infection was associated with this heightened immune response. Our findings suggest that chronic HIV infection enhances the responsiveness of APCs to commensal lactobacilli, a mechanism that may partly contribute to chronic immune activation. PMID:24023646

  4. Human cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Marcus O.; Hirano, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Summary Adoptive T-cell therapy, where antitumor T cells are first prepared in vitro, is attractive since it facilitates the delivery of essential signals to selected subsets of antitumor T cells without unfavorable immunoregulatory issues that exist in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that antitumor adoptive T-cell therapy, i.e. infusion of tumor-specific T cells, can induce clinically relevant and sustained responses in patients with advanced cancer. The goal of adoptive cell therapy is to establish antitumor immunological memory, which can result in life-long rejection of tumor cells in patients. To achieve this goal, during the process of in vitro expansion, T-cell grafts used in adoptive T-cell therapy must to be appropriately educated and equipped with the capacity to accomplish multiple, essential tasks. Adoptively transferred T cells must be endowed, prior to infusion, with the ability to efficiently engraft, expand, persist, and traffic to tumor in vivo. As a strategy to consistently generate T-cell grafts with these capabilities, artificial antigen-presenting cells have been developed to deliver the proper signals necessary to T cells to enable optimal adoptive cell therapy. PMID:24329798

  5. Human cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Butler, Marcus O; Hirano, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy, where anti-tumor T cells are first prepared in vitro, is attractive since it facilitates the delivery of essential signals to selected subsets of anti-tumor T cells without unfavorable immunoregulatory issues that exist in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that anti-tumor adoptive T-cell therapy, i.e. infusion of tumor-specific T cells, can induce clinically relevant and sustained responses in patients with advanced cancer. The goal of adoptive cell therapy is to establish anti-tumor immunologic memory, which can result in life-long rejection of tumor cells in patients. To achieve this goal, during the process of in vitro expansion, T-cell grafts used in adoptive T-cell therapy must be appropriately educated and equipped with the capacity to accomplish multiple, essential tasks. Adoptively transferred T cells must be endowed, prior to infusion, with the ability to efficiently engraft, expand, persist, and traffic to tumor in vivo. As a strategy to consistently generate T-cell grafts with these capabilities, artificial antigen-presenting cells have been developed to deliver the proper signals necessary to T cells to enable optimal adoptive cell therapy. PMID:24329798

  6. "Danger" conditions increase sulfamethoxazole-protein adduct formation in human antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, S N; Wang, H; Callan, H E; Park, B K; Naisbitt, D J

    2009-11-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APC) are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced immune reactions. Various pathological factors can activate APC and therefore influence the immune equilibrium. It is interesting that several diseases have been associated with an increased rate of drug allergy. The aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of such "danger signals" on sulfamethoxazole (SMX) metabolism in human APC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Epstein-Barr virus-modified B lymphocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and two cell lines). APC were incubated with SMX (100 microM-2 mM; 5 min-24 h), in the presence of pathological factors: bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide and staphylococcal enterotoxin B), flu viral proteins, cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factor-alpha; interferon-gamma; and transforming growth factor-beta], inflammatory molecules (prostaglandin E2, human serum complement, and activated protein C), oxidants (buthionine sulfoximine and H(2)O(2)), and hyperthermia (37.5-39.5 degrees C). Adduct formation was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and confocal microscopy. SMX-protein adduct formation was time- and concentration-dependent for each cell type tested, in both physiological and danger conditions. A danger environment significantly increased the formation of SMX-protein adducts and significantly shortened the delay for their detection. An additive effect was observed with a combination of danger signals. Dimedone (chemical selectively binding cysteine sulfenic acid) and antioxidants decreased both baseline and danger-enhanced SMX-adduct formation. Various enzyme inhibitors were associated with a significant decrease in SMX-adduct levels, with a pattern varying depending on the cell type and the culture conditions. These results illustrate that danger signals enhance the formation of intracellular SMX-protein adducts in human APC. These findings might be relevant

  7. Two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell clones display heterogeneity in antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, M T; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1989-01-01

    Evidence from various antigen systems suggests that antigen processing can be one factor that determines the repertoire of immunogenic peptides. Thus, processing events may account for some of the disparity between the available and expressed helper T-cell repertoires. In this report, we demonstrate that the immunodominant T-cell determinant in ovalbumin [p323-339; ovalbumin-(323-339) heptadecapeptide] is processed differently by two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell lines, M12 and A20. The ovalbumin-specific T-cell-T-cell hybridomas, DO-11.10 and 3DO-54.8, were used to detect processed antigen. These T-T hybridomas have different fine specificities for the p323-339 determinant. A20 cells presented native ovalbumin well to both T-T hybridomas, whereas M12 cells presented native ovalbumin well to 3DO-54.8 but very inefficiently to DO-11.10. M12 and A20 cells effectively stimulated both T-T hybridomas with the same concentrations of the immunogenic synthetic peptide p323-339. Therefore, M12 cells and DO-11.10 can interact with each other, and both T-T hybridomas have similar sensitivities for the same immunogenic peptide. We conclude that genetically identical antigen-presenting cells can display heterogeneity in the fine processing of an immunodominant T-cell determinant, and synthetic model peptides that represent the minimal stimulatory sequence of a T-cell determinant are not necessarily identical to the structure of in vivo processed antigen. Heterogeneity in antigen processing by individual antigen-presenting cells would serve to increase the repertoire of immunogenic peptides that are presented to T cells. PMID:2470101

  8. Membrane water permeability related to antigen-presenting function of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G F; Dong, C L; Tang, G S; Shen, Q; Bai, C X

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is one of the water channel proteins which participate in a wide array of physiological processes and are primary determinants of membrane osmotic water permeability. The AQP5 gene is located in human chromosome 12q, the same region as the location of the major asthma susceptibility loci. In this study we try to determine whether the AQP5 knock-out has some effect on allergen-induced asthma. With a mouse asthma model induced by ovalbumin (OVA), we found that deletion of AQP5 reduced some major characteristic features of asthma, such as less inflammation cell infiltration in lung tissues, lower cytokine expression and fewer inflammation cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids compared with those from wild-type (WT) mice. Because it was found that mice injected intratracheally with OVA-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs), the AQP5 gene knock-out (AQP5−/−) ones presented fewer inflammation cells. Because DCs are major antigen-presenting cells that play an important role in antigen-induced asthma, we also probed into the possible effect of gene knock-out on DCs. Surprisingly, reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence activated cell sorter analysis showed high levels of AQP5 on the surface of DCs from in vivo or bone marrow monocyte-derived DCs (mDC) in vitro. Immature mDC from AQP5 knock-out mice (AQP5−/−) showed decreased expression of CD80 and CD86 and endocytosis ability compared with that from WT, but the difference disappeared after mDCs matured with lipopolysaccharide. AQP5-mediated water transmembrane may play some role in the function of DCs. However, the mechanism of the effect of AQP5 on the DCs' function needs to be investigated further. PMID:18647319

  9. Antigen presenting cell-selective drug delivery by glycan-decorated nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Theresa; Grabski, Elena; Durán, Verónica; Hozsa, Constantin; Stępczyńska, Anna; Furch, Marcus; Gieseler, Robert K; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems hold promise for selective provision of active compounds to distinct tissues or cell subsets. Thus, locally enhanced drug concentrations are obtained that would confer improved efficacy. As a consequence adverse effects should be diminished, as innocent bystander cells are less affected. Currently, several controlled drug delivery systems based on diverse materials are being developed. Some systems exhibit material-associated toxic effects and/or show low drug loading capacity. In contrast, liposomal nanocarriers are particularly favorable because they are well tolerated, poorly immunogenic, can be produced in defined sizes, and offer a reasonable payload capacity. Compared with other immune cells, professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) demonstrate enhanced liposome uptake mediated by macropinocytosis, phagocytosis and presumably also by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In order to further enhance the targeting efficacy toward APCs, receptor-mediated uptake appears advisable. Since APC subsets generally do not express single linage-specific receptors, members of the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) family are compelling targets. Examples of CLR expressed by APCs include DEC-205 (CD205) expressed by myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, the mannose receptor C type 1 (MR, CD206) expressed by DC, monocytes and macrophages, DC-SIGN (CD209) expressed by DC, and several others. These receptors bind glycans, which are typically displayed by pathogens and thus support pathogen uptake and endocytosis. Further research will elucidate whether glycan-decorated liposomes will not only enhance APCs targeting but also enable preferential delivery of their payload to discrete subcellular compartments. PMID:25701806

  10. Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a novel transport vehicle of functional DNA and mRNA into mammalian antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Schmitt, Manfred J; Breinig, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Vaccine vehicles based on recombinant yeasts have become promising candidates for the induction of cellular immune responses. In this study, we investigated the capacity of the fission yeast Sz. pombe for the delivery of functional nucleic acids into murine and human antigen-presenting cells. We demonstrate that Sz. pombe cells effectively induce maturation of human dendritic cells (DC), an important prerequisite for T-cell activation. Further, recombinant fission yeast efficiently delivers functional DNA and mRNA into murine macrophages and human DC resulting in the expression of the model antigen eGFP in these cells. Thus, Sz. pombe suggests itself as a promising candidate for a novel live vaccine.

  11. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  12. The effect of CpG-ODN on antigen presenting cells of the foal

    PubMed Central

    Flaminio, M Julia BF; Borges, Alexandre S; Nydam, Daryl V; Horohov, David W; Hecker, Rolf; Matychak, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    Background Cytosine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) has been used successfully to induce immune responses against viral and intracellular organisms in mammals. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of CpG-ODN on antigen presenting cells of young foals. Methods Peripheral blood monocytes of foals (n = 7) were isolated in the first day of life and monthly thereafter up to 3 months of life. Adult horse (n = 7) monocytes were isolated and tested once for comparison. Isolated monocytes were stimulated with IL-4 and GM-CSF (to obtain dendritic cells, DC) or not stimulated (to obtain macrophages). Macrophages and DCs were stimulated for 14–16 hours with either CpG-ODN, LPS or not stimulated. The stimulated and non-stimulated cells were tested for cell surface markers (CD86 and MHC class II) using flow cytometry, mRNA expression of cytokines (IL-12, IFNα, IL-10) and TLR-9 using real time quantitative RT-PCR, and for the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 using a chemiluminescence assay. Results The median fluorescence of the MHC class II molecule in non-stimulated foal macrophages and DCs at birth were 12.5 times and 11.2 times inferior, respectively, than adult horse cells (p = 0.009). That difference subsided at 3 months of life (p = 0.3). The expression of the CD86 co-stimulatory molecule was comparable in adult horse and foal macrophages and DCs, independent of treatment. CpG-ODN stimulation induced IL-12p40 (53 times) and IFNα (23 times) mRNA expression in CpG-ODN-treated adult horse DCs (p = 0.078), but not macrophages, in comparison to non-stimulated cells. In contrast, foal APCs did not respond to CpG-ODN stimulation with increased cytokine mRNA expression up to 3 months of age. TLR-9 mRNA expression and NF-kB activation (NF-kB p65) in foal DCs and macrophages were comparable (p > 0.05) to adult horse cells. Conclusion CpG-ODN treatment did not induce specific maturation and cytokine expression in foal

  13. Mannosylation of Virus-Like Particles Enhances Internalization by Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Barwani, Farah; Young, Sarah L.; Baird, Margaret A.; Larsen, David S.; Ward, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Internalization of peptides by antigen presenting cells is crucial for the initiation of the adaptive immune response. Mannosylation has been demonstrated to enhance antigen uptake through mannose receptors, leading to improved immune responses. In this study we test the effect of surface mannosylation of protein-based virus-like particles (VLP) derived from Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) on uptake by murine and human antigen presenting cells. A monomannoside and a novel dimannoside were synthesized and successfully conjugated to RHDV VLP capsid protein, providing approximately 270 mannose groups on the surface of each virus particle. VLP conjugated to the mannoside or dimannoside exhibited significantly enhanced binding and internalization by murine dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells as well as human dendritic cells and macrophages. This uptake was inhibited by the inclusion of mannan as a specific inhibitor of mannose specific uptake, demonstrating that mannosylation of VLP targets mannose receptor-based uptake. Consistent with mannose receptor-based uptake, partial retargeting of the intracellular processing of RHDV VLP was observed, confirming that mannosylation of VLP provides both enhanced uptake and modified processing of associated antigens. PMID:25122183

  14. Skin-Resident Antigen-Presenting Cells: Instruction Manual for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia M.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Unger, Wendy W. J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The induction of antigen-specific effector T cells is driven by proper antigen presentation and co-stimulation by dendritic cells (DCs). For this reason strategies have been developed to instruct DCs for the induction of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Since DCs are localized, amongst other locations, in peripheral tissues such as the skin, new vaccines are aiming at targeting antigens to DCs in situ. Optimal skin-DC targeting in combination with adequate adjuvant delivery facilitates DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes and enhances antigen cross-presentation and T cell priming. In this review we describe what DC subsets populate the human skin, as well as current vaccination strategies based on targeting strategies and alternative administration for the induction of robust long-lived anti-cancer effector T cells. PMID:23801994

  15. Mannan-decorated thiolated Eudragit microspheres for targeting antigen presenting cells via nasal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Shan; Singh, Bijay; Park, Tae-Eun; Hong, Zhong-Shan; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal vaccination of protein as an antigen requires appropriate delivery or adjuvant systems to deliver antigen to mucosal immune cells efficiently and generate valid immune responses. For successful nasal immunization, the obstacles imposed by the normal process of mucociliary clearance which limits residence time of applied antigens and low antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells (APCs) in nasal associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) need to be overcome for the efficient vaccination. Here, we prepared mucoadhesive and mannan-decorated thiolated Eudragit microspheres (Man-TEM) as a nasal vaccine carrier to overcome the limitations. Mucoadhesive thiolated Eudragit (TE) were decorated with mannan for targeting mannose receptors (MR) in antigen presenting cells (APCs) to obtain efficient immune responses. The potential adjuvant ability of Man-TEM for intranasal immunization was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In mechanistic study using APCs in vitro, we obtained that Man-TEM enhanced the receptor-mediated endocytosis by stimulating the MR receptors of APCs. The nasal vaccination of OVA-loaded Man-TEM in mice showed higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal sIgA than the soluble OVA group due to the specific recognition of MR of APCs by the mannan in the Man-TEM. These results suggest that mucoadhesive and Man-TEM may be a promising candidate for nasal vaccine delivery system to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity. PMID:26415829

  16. Mannan-decorated thiolated Eudragit microspheres for targeting antigen presenting cells via nasal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Shan; Singh, Bijay; Park, Tae-Eun; Hong, Zhong-Shan; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal vaccination of protein as an antigen requires appropriate delivery or adjuvant systems to deliver antigen to mucosal immune cells efficiently and generate valid immune responses. For successful nasal immunization, the obstacles imposed by the normal process of mucociliary clearance which limits residence time of applied antigens and low antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells (APCs) in nasal associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) need to be overcome for the efficient vaccination. Here, we prepared mucoadhesive and mannan-decorated thiolated Eudragit microspheres (Man-TEM) as a nasal vaccine carrier to overcome the limitations. Mucoadhesive thiolated Eudragit (TE) were decorated with mannan for targeting mannose receptors (MR) in antigen presenting cells (APCs) to obtain efficient immune responses. The potential adjuvant ability of Man-TEM for intranasal immunization was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In mechanistic study using APCs in vitro, we obtained that Man-TEM enhanced the receptor-mediated endocytosis by stimulating the MR receptors of APCs. The nasal vaccination of OVA-loaded Man-TEM in mice showed higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal sIgA than the soluble OVA group due to the specific recognition of MR of APCs by the mannan in the Man-TEM. These results suggest that mucoadhesive and Man-TEM may be a promising candidate for nasal vaccine delivery system to elicit systemic and mucosal immunity.

  17. Dietary fatty acids modulate antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease[S

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jing; Ma, Xiong; Webb, Tonya; Potter, James J.; Oelke, Mathias; Li, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids are major contributors to the development and progression of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Dietary fatty acids also alter hepatic NKT cells that are activated by antigens presented by CD1d. In the current study, we examine the mechanism of dietary fatty acid induced hepatic NKT cell deficiency and its causal relationship to insulin resistance and NAFLD. We discover that dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA) or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), but not polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), cause hepatic NKT cell depletion with increased apoptosis. Dietary SFA or MUFA also impair hepatocyte presentation of endogenous, but not exogenous, antigen to NKT cells, indicating alterations of the endogenous antigen processing or presenting pathway. In vitro treatment of normal hepatocytes with fatty acids also demonstrates impaired ability of CD1d to present endogenous antigen by dietary fatty acids. Furthermore, dietary SFA and MUFA activate the NFκB signaling pathway and lead to insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, both dietary SFA and MUFA alter endogenous antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells and contribute to NKT cell depletion, leading to further activation of inflammatory signaling, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. PMID:20185414

  18. The Level of Viral Antigen Presented by Hepatocytes Influences CD8 T-Cell Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Adam J.; Sun, Dianxing; Kennedy, Patrick T. F.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Lim, Seng Gee; Wasser, Shanthi; Selden, Clare; Maini, Mala K.; Davis, Dan M.; Nassal, Michael; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    CD8 T cells exert their antiviral function through cytokines and lysis of infected cells. Because hepatocytes are susceptible to noncytolytic mechanisms of viral clearance, CD8 T-cell antiviral efficiency against hepatotropic viruses has been linked to their capacity to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). On the other hand, intrahepatic cytokine production triggers the recruitment of mononuclear cells, which sustain acute and chronic liver damage. Using virus-specific CD8 T cells and human hepatocytes, we analyzed the modulation of virus-specific CD8 T-cell function after recognition peptide-pulsed or virally infected hepatocytes. We observed that hepatocyte antigen presentation was generally inefficient, and the quantity of viral antigen strongly influenced CD8 T-cell antiviral function. High levels of hepatitis B virus production induced robust IFN-γ and TNF-α production in virus-specific CD8 T cells, while limiting amounts of viral antigen, both in hepatocyte-like cells and naturally infected human hepatocytes, preferentially stimulated CD8 T-cell degranulation. Our data document a mechanism where virus-specific CD8 T-cell function is influenced by the quantity of virus produced within hepatocytes. PMID:17202217

  19. Analysis of antigen presentation by metabolically inactive accessory cells and their isolated membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Sullivan, K; Benacerraf, B; Mescher, M F; Rock, K L

    1985-01-01

    Several amino acid copolymers are potent immunogens under the control of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded Ir genes. We have further characterized their accessory-cell-dependent, MHC-restricted presentation to T lymphocytes. We initially characterized their processing requirements by investigating the ability of paraformaldehyde-fixed antigen-presenting cells (APC) to present these copolymers. Fixed APC can present poly(Glu56Lys35Phe9) and poly(Glu60Ala30Tyr10) provided that they have been incubated with antigen prior to fixation. The inability of these same fixed preparations to present soluble antigen indicates a fixation-sensitive antigen-processing step. In contrast, the antigens poly(Glu55Lys35Leu10) and poly(Glu55Lys35Tyr10) can be presented by APC fixed before antigen exposure. This differential requirement for antigen processing was exploited to analyze the events of antigen presentation in two related systems. First, the ability of isolated APC membranes to process and present antigen was assessed. APC membranes can present the antigens poly(GluLysLeu) and poly(GluLysTyr) in a specific and MHC-restricted manner. However, the isolated membranes fail to present either poly(GluLysPhe) or poly(GluAlaTyr), suggesting that such preparations can present but not process antigen. Second, the distinct properties of the various copolymers were used with fixed APC to test the effects of antigen processing on the phenomenon of antigen competition. APC that had processed poly(GluLysPhe) or poly(GluAlaTyr) were subsequently fixed and used to present antigen in the presence or absence of various antagonists. Under these conditions, poly(GluLysLeu) and poly(Glu50Tyr50) could effect specific inhibition, clearly indicating that antigen competition occurs distal to and does not require antigen processing. In contrast, native antigen with an absolute processing requirement is not capable of competing with preprocessed antigen on fixed APC. Taken together, these

  20. Unique Transcompartmental Bridge: Antigen-Presenting Cells Sampling across Endothelial and Mucosal Barriers.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frederick; Tong, Alexander A; Huang, Alex Y

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful pathogens can gain access to tissues and organ systems through body sites that are in direct contact with the outside environment, such as the skin, the gut, and the airway mucosa. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) represent a bridge between the innate and adaptive immunity, and their capacity for constant immune surveillance and rapid sampling of incoming pathogens and other potentially harmful antigens is central for mounting an effective and robust protective host response. The classical view is that APCs perform this task efficiently within the tissue to sense invading agents intra-compartmentally. However, recent data based on high resolution imaging support an additional transcompartmental surveillance behavior by APC by reaching across intact physical barriers. In this review, we summarize intravital microscopic evidences of APC to sample antigens transcompartmentally at the gut mucosa and other body sites. PMID:27375624

  1. Unique Transcompartmental Bridge: Antigen-Presenting Cells Sampling across Endothelial and Mucosal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Frederick; Tong, Alexander A.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful pathogens can gain access to tissues and organ systems through body sites that are in direct contact with the outside environment, such as the skin, the gut, and the airway mucosa. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) represent a bridge between the innate and adaptive immunity, and their capacity for constant immune surveillance and rapid sampling of incoming pathogens and other potentially harmful antigens is central for mounting an effective and robust protective host response. The classical view is that APCs perform this task efficiently within the tissue to sense invading agents intra-compartmentally. However, recent data based on high resolution imaging support an additional transcompartmental surveillance behavior by APC by reaching across intact physical barriers. In this review, we summarize intravital microscopic evidences of APC to sample antigens transcompartmentally at the gut mucosa and other body sites. PMID:27375624

  2. Network-based gene expression analysis of intracranial aneurysm tissue reveals role of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Krischek, B; Kasuya, H; Tajima, A; Akagawa, H; Sasaki, T; Yoneyama, T; Ujiie, H; Kubo, O; Bonin, M; Takakura, K; Hori, T; Inoue, I

    2008-07-17

    Little is known about the pathology and pathogenesis of the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracranial aneurysm (IA) formation we performed a gene expression analysis comparing ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue to a control artery. Tissue samples of six ruptured and four unruptured aneurysms, and four cerebral arteries serving as controls, were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene ontology classification of the differentially expressed genes was analyzed and regulatory functional networks and canonical pathways were identified with a network-based computational pathway analysis tool. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining were performed as confirmation. Analysis of aneurysmal and control tissue revealed 521 differentially expressed genes. The most significantly associated gene ontology term was antigen processing (P=1.64E-16). Further network-based analysis showed the top scoring regulatory functional network to be built around overexpressed major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and II complex related genes and confirmed the canonical pathway "Antigen Presentation" to have the highest upregulation in IA tissue (P=7.3E-10). Real time RT-PCR showed significant overexpression of MHC class II genes. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong positivity for MHC II molecule specific antibody (HLA II), for CD68 (macrophages, monocytes), for CD45RO (T-cells) and HLA I antibody. Our results offer strong evidence for MHC class II gene overexpression in human IA tissue and that antigen presenting cells (macrophages, monocytes) play a key role in IA formation. PMID:18538937

  3. Characterization of antigen-presenting properties of tumour cells using virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Spierings, D C; Agsteribbe, E; Wilschut, J; Huckriede, A

    2000-04-01

    Immunotherapy of tumours by induction of tumour-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) will only be effective for tumours with a functional antigen processing and presentation machinery. However, many tumours are known to down-regulate expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and/or to impair antigen processing. It is therefore desirable to evaluate the ability of a given tumour to present antigenic epitopes before developing an immunotherapy protocol. In this study we have used influenza virus as a tool to determine the antigen-presenting capacities of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 cell line NB41A3, a frequently used model for human neuroblastoma. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed low and moderate expression of MHC class I molecules Dd and Kk respectively. Nevertheless, infected NB41 A3 cells were lysed efficiently by influenza-specific CTLs. These results demonstrate that all steps of the antigen-processing pathway function properly in the NB tumour cells, and that the limited MHC class I expression suffices for efficient recognition by CTLs. In addition, lysis of the NB tumour cells shows that the cells are susceptible to CTL-induced apoptosis, a pathway that is often impaired in tumour cells. These characteristics make neuroblastoma a suitable target for immunotherapy. The presented assay allows evaluation of various immunological properties of tumour cells and, thus, represents a valuable tool to assess whether a given tumour will be susceptible to immunotherapy or not.

  4. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Omokoko, Tana A; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard (51)Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the (51)Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  5. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Omokoko, Tana A.; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  6. Targeting to porcine sialoadhesin receptor improves antigen presentation to T cells

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Concepción; Poderoso, Teresa; Martínez, Paloma; Álvarez, Belén; López-Fuertes, Laura; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Angel; Domínguez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-mediated targeting of antigen to specific antigen presenting cells (APC) receptors is an attractive strategy to enhance T cell immune responses to weak immunogenic antigens. Here, we describe the characterization of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against different epitopes of porcine sialoadhesin (Sn) and evaluate in vitro the potential of targeting this receptor for delivery of antigens to APC for T cell stimulation. The specificity of these mAb was determined by amino acid sequence analysis of peptides derived from the affinity purified antigen. Porcine Sn is expressed by macrophages present in the border between white and red pulp of the spleen and in the subcapsular sinus of lymph nodes, an appropriate location for trapping blood and lymph-borne antigens. It is also expressed by alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC). Blood monocytes are negative for this molecule, but its expression can be induced by treatment with IFN-a. MAb bound to Sn is rapidly endocytosed. MAb to sialoadhesin induced in vitro T cell proliferation at concentrations 100-fold lower than the non-targeting control mAb when using T lymphocytes from pigs immunized with mouse immunoglobulins as responder cells and IFN-a treated monocytes or MoDC as APC, suggesting a role of sialoadhesin in antigen uptake and/or delivery into the presentation pathway in APC. PMID:19081005

  7. Targeting to porcine sialoadhesin receptor improves antigen presentation to T cells.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Concepción; Poderoso, Teresa; Martínez, Paloma; Alvarez, Belén; López-Fuertes, Laura; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Angel; Domínguez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-mediated targeting of antigen to specific antigen presenting cells (APC) receptors is an attractive strategy to enhance T cell immune responses to weak immunogenic antigens. Here, we describe the characterization of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against different epitopes of porcine sialoadhesin (Sn) and evaluate in vitro the potential of targeting this receptor for delivery of antigens to APC for T cell stimulation. The specificity of these mAb was determined by amino acid sequence analysis of peptides derived from the affinity purified antigen. Porcine Sn is expressed by macrophages present in the border between white and red pulp of the spleen and in the subcapsular sinus of lymph nodes, an appropriate location for trapping blood and lymph-borne antigens. It is also expressed by alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC). Blood monocytes are negative for this molecule, but its expression can be induced by treatment with IFN-alpha. MAb bound to Sn is rapidly endocytosed. MAb to sialoadhesin induced in vitro T cell proliferation at concentrations 100-fold lower than the non-targeting control mAb when using T lymphocytes from pigs immunized with mouse immunoglobulins as responder cells and IFN-alpha treated monocytes or MoDC as APC, suggesting a role of sialoadhesin in antigen uptake and/or delivery into the presentation pathway in APC.

  8. Antibody-Functionalized Peptidic Membranes for Neutralization of Allogeneic Skin Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Liu, Wen; Bagia, Christina; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Janjic, Jelena M.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gawalt, Ellen S.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2014-01-01

    We report herein application of an in situ material strategy to attenuate allograft T cell responses in a skin transplant mouse model. Functionalized peptidic membranes were used to impede trafficking of donor antigen-presenting cells (dAPCs) from skin allografts in recipient mice. Membranes formed by self-assembling peptides (SAPs) presenting antibodies were found to remain underneath grafted skins for up to 6 days. At the host-graft interface, dAPCs were targeted by using a monoclonal antibody that binds to a class II MHC molecule (IAd) expressed exclusively by donor cells. Using a novel cell labeling near-infrared nanoemulsion, we found more dAPCs remained in allografts treated with membranes loaded with aI-Ad than without. In vitro, dAPCs released from skin explants were found adsorbed preferentially on aI-Ad membranes. Recipient T cells from these mice produced lower concentrations of interferon-gamma cultured ex vivo with donor cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the strategy has the potential to alter the natural course of rejection immune mechanisms in stringent allogeneic models. PMID:25117952

  9. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major.

    PubMed Central

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    In this study biopsies from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major were examined by immunohistochemistry, and by light and electron microscopy to identify the types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their location. APC, identified morphologically and by their expression of specific cell markers, included Langerhans cells, macrophages, follicular dendritic cells, and interdigitating reticulum cells of the paracortex of lymph nodes. These cells expressed MHC class II antigens and contained Leishmania antigen. Since some keratinocytes and endothelial cells also showed these characteristics, they may also act as APC. By examining tissue samples from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes it was possible to follow the probable route of trafficking of various inflammatory cells between the skin lesion and lymph nodes. Leishmania antigen containing Langerhans cells were found in the epidermis, dermis and the regional lymph nodes. We believe these cells translocate from the epidermis to the dermis, where they take up antigen and migrate to the paracortex of the regional lymph nodes. There they are intimately associated with cells of the paracortex, and could be involved in the generation of Leishmania-specific T memory cells. LFA-1-positive T cells of the CD45RO phenotype were found in the skin lesion. Venular endothelium in the skin lesions expressed intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the ligand for LFA-1. The migration of lymphocytes from the vascular lumen to the site of inflammation is possibly a result of the interaction of these two adhesion molecules. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7882568

  10. Universal artificial antigen presenting cells to selectively propagate T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor independent of specificity.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-05-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to nonviral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through coculture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed 1 ligand that could activate CAR T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated that CARL aAPC propagate CAR T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Using CARL enables 1 aAPC to numerically expand all CAR T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  11. Universal Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells to Selectively Propagate T Cells Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Independent of Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to non-viral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR+ T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through co-culture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed one ligand that could activate CAR+ T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated CARL+ aAPC propagate CAR+ T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Employing CARL enables one aAPC to numerically expand all CAR+ T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR+ T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  12. A comprehensive platform for ex vivo T-cell expansion based on biodegradable polymeric artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steenblock, Erin R; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2008-04-01

    Efficient T-cell stimulation and proliferation in response to specific antigens is a goal of immunotherapy against infectious disease and cancer. Manipulation of this response can be accomplished by adoptive immunotherapy involving the infusion of antigen-specific T-cell populations expanded ex vivo with antigen presenting cells. We mimicked physiological antigen presentation on a biodegradable microparticle constructed from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), a polymer system whose safety has been established for use in humans. These particles present a high density of adaptor elements for attaching both recognition ligands and co-stimulatory ligands to a biodegradable core encapsulating the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). We demonstrate the utility of this system in efficient polyclonal and antigen-specific T-cell stimulation and expansion, showing that sustained release of IL-2 in the vicinity of T-cell contacts dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of these acellular systems, as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. This results in a 45-fold enhancement in T-cell expansion. In addition, this mode of antigen presentation skews the expansion toward the CD8(+) T-cell phenotype. This comprehensive acellular platform, capable of delivering recognition, co-stimulatory, and cytokine signals, represents a promising new technology for artificial antigen presentation. PMID:18334990

  13. Selective Susceptibility of Human Skin Antigen Presenting Cells to Productive Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, Daniela; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Shin, Amanda; Bigliardi, Paul; Tan, Bien Keem; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Tan, Ern Yu; Ginhoux, Florent; Fink, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a growing global concern with 390 million people infected each year. Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted by mosquitoes, thus host cells in the skin are the first point of contact with the virus. Human skin contains several populations of antigen-presenting cells which could drive the immune response to DENV in vivo: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), three populations of dermal dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages. Using samples of normal human skin we detected productive infection of CD14+ and CD1c+ DCs, LCs and dermal macrophages, which was independent of DC-SIGN expression. LCs produced the highest viral titers and were less sensitive to IFN-β. Nanostring gene expression data showed significant up-regulation of IFN-β, STAT-1 and CCL5 upon viral exposure in susceptible DC populations. In mice infected intra-dermally with DENV we detected parallel populations of infected DCs originating from the dermis and migrating to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Therefore dermal DCs may simultaneously facilitate systemic spread of DENV and initiate the adaptive anti-viral immune response. PMID:25474532

  14. CD47 enhances in vivo functionality of artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Heiko; Bessell, Catherine; Varela, Juan Carlos; Haupt, Carl; Fang, Jerry; Pasemann, Shirin; Mackensen, Andreas; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Schütz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cells, aAPC, have successfully been used to stimulate antigen-specific T cell responses in vitro as well as in vivo. While aAPC compare favorable to autologous dendritic cells in vitro, their effect in vivo might be diminished through rapid clearance by macrophages. Therefore, to prevent uptake and minimize clearance of aAPC by macrophages, and thereby increasing in vivo functionality, we investigated the efficiency of “don’t eat me” three-signal aAPC compared to classical two-signal aAPC. Experimental Design To generate “don’t eat me” aAPC, CD47 was additionally immobilized onto classical aAPC (aAPCCD47+). aAPC and aAPCCD47+ were analyzed in in vitro human primary T cell and macrophage co-cultures. In vivo efficiency was compared in a NOD/SCID T cell proliferation and a B16-SIY melanoma model. Results This study demonstrates that aAPCCD47+ in co-culture with human macrophages show a CD47 concentration dependent inhibition of phagocytosis, while their ability to generate and expand antigen-specific T cells was not affected. Furthermore, aAPCCD47+ generated T cells displayed equivalent killing abilities and polyfunctionality when compared to aAPC generated T cells. In addition, in vivo studies demonstrated an enhanced stimulatory capacity and tumor inhibition of aAPCCD47+ over normal aAPC in conjunction with diverging bio-distribution in different organs. Conclusion Our data for the first time show that aAPC functionalized with CD47 maintain their stimulatory capacity in vitro and demonstrate enhanced in vivo efficiency. Thus this next generation aAPCCD47+ have a unique potential to enhance the application of the aAPC technology for future immunotherapy approaches. PMID:25593301

  15. Thrombospondin-1-dependent immune regulation by transforming growth factor-β2-exposed antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Mir, Fayaz Ahmad; Contreras-Ruiz, Laura; Masli, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    An important role of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in the development of regulatory T cells is well established. Although integrin-mediated activation of latent TGF-β1 is considered essential for the induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such an activation mechanism is not applicable to the TGF-β2 isoform, which lacks an integrin-binding RGD sequence in its latency-associated peptide. Mucosal and ocular tissues harbour TGF-β2-expressing APCs involved in Treg induction. The mechanisms that regulate TGF-β activation in such APCs remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that murine APCs exposed to TGF-β2 in the environment predominantly increase expression of TGF-β2. Such predominantly TGF-β2-expressing APCs use thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) as an integrin-independent mechanism to activate their newly synthesized latent TGF-β2 to induce Foxp3(+) Treg cells both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of Treg induction by TGF-β2-expressing APCs is supported by a TSP-1 receptor, CD36, which facilitates activation of latent TGF-β during antigen presentation. Our results suggest that APC-derived TSP-1 is essential for the development of an adaptive regulatory immune response induced by TGF-β2-expressing APCs similar to those located at mucosal and ocular sites. These findings introduce the integrin-independent mechanism of TGF-β activation as an integral part of peripheral immune tolerance associated with TGF-β2-expressing tissues.

  16. Localization of DNA damage and its role in altered antigen-presenting cell function in ultraviolet-irradiated mice

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Prior ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the site of application of hapten on murine skin reduces contact sensitization, impairs the ability of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes (DLN) to present antigen, and leads to development of hapten-specific suppressor T lymphocytes. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage plays a role in the impaired antigen-presenting activity of DLN cells. First, we assessed the location and persistence of cells containing DNA damage. A monoclonal antibody specific for cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers (CPD) was used to identify UV-damaged cells in the skin and DLN of C3H mice exposed to UV radiation. Cells containing CPD were present in the epidermis, dermis, and DLN and persisted, particularly in the dermis, for at least 4 d after UV irradiation. When fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was applied to UV-exposed skin, the DLN contained cells that were Ia+, FITC+, and CPD+; such cells from mice sensitized 3 d after UV irradiation exhibited reduced antigen-presenting function in vivo. We then assessed the role of DNA damage in UV-induced modulation of antigen-presenting cell (APC) function by using a novel method of increasing DNA repair in mouse skin in vivo. Liposomes containing T4 endonuclease V (T4N5) were applied to the site of UV exposure immediately after irradiation. This treatment prevented the impairment in APC function and reduced the number of CPD+ cells in the DLN of UV- irradiated mice. Treatment of unirradiated skin with T4N5 in liposomes or treatment of UV-irradiated skin with liposomes containing heat- inactivated T4N5 did not restore immune function. These studies demonstrate that cutaneous immune cells sustain DNA damage in vivo that persists for several days, and that FITC sensitization causes the migration of these to the DLN, which exhibits impaired APC function. Further, they support the hypothesis that DNA damage is an essential initiator of one or more of the steps involved in impaired APC function

  17. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  18. Heat shock protein derivatives for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Takemoto, Seiji; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2008-04-16

    Delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a key issue for developing effective cancer vaccines. Controlling the tissue distribution of antigens can increase antigen-specific immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) forms complexes with a variety of tumor-related antigens via its polypeptide-binding domain. Because Hsp70 is taken up by APCs through recognition by Hsp receptors, such as CD91 and LOX-1, its application to antigen delivery systems has been examined both in experimental and clinical settings. A tissue distribution study revealed that Hsp70 is mainly taken up by the liver, especially by hepatocytes, after intravenous injection in mice. A significant amount of Hsp70 was also delivered to regional lymph nodes when it was injected subcutaneously, supporting the hypothesis that Hsp70 is a natural targeting system for APCs. Model antigens were complexed with or conjugated to Hsp70, resulting in greater antigen-specific immune responses. Cytoplasmic delivery of Hsp70-antigen further increased the efficacy of the Hsp70-based vaccines. These findings indicate that effective cancer therapy can be achieved by developing Hsp70-based anticancer vaccines when their tissue and intracellular distribution is properly controlled. PMID:17980980

  19. Activation of the antigen presentation function of mononuclear phagocyte populations associated with the basilar membrane of the cochlea after acoustic overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiping; Vethanayagam, R. Robert; Dong, Youyi; Cai, Qunfeng; Hu, Bo Hua

    2015-01-01

    The immune response is an important component of the cochlear response to stress. As an important player in the cochlear immune system, the basilar membrane immune cells reside on the surface of the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. At present, the immune cell properties in this region and their responses to stress are not well understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of these immune cells in the immune response to acoustic overstimulation. This study reveals that tissue macrophages are present in the entire length of the basilar membrane under steady-state conditions. Notably, these cells in the apical and the basal sections of the basilar membrane display distinct morphologies and immune protein expression patterns. Following acoustic trauma, monocytes infiltrate into the region of the basilar membrane, and the infiltrated cells transform into macrophages. While monocyte infiltration and transformation occur in both the apical and the basal sections of the basilar membrane, only the basal monocytes and macrophages display a marked increase in the expression of MHC II and CIITA, a MHC II production cofactor, suggesting the site-dependent activation of antigen-presenting function. Consistent with the increased expression of the antigen-presenting proteins, CD4+ T cells, the antigen-presenting partner, infiltrate into the region of the basilar membrane where antigen-presenting proteins are upregulated. Further pathological analyses revealed that the basal section of the cochlea displays a greater level of sensory cell damage, which is spatially correlated with the region of antigen-presenting activity. Together, these results suggest that the antigen-presenting function of the mononuclear phagocyte population is activated in response to acoustic trauma, which could bridge the innate immune response to adaptive immunity. PMID:26102003

  20. Characterization of antigen-presenting cells from the porcine respiratory system.

    PubMed

    López-Robles, Guadalupe; Silva-Campa, Erika; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Hernández, Jesús

    2015-06-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are strategically placed in all anatomic sites with high antigen exposure such as the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to evaluate phenotypic and functional properties of APCs from the lung (L-Cs), mediastinal lymph node (LN-Cs) and bronchoalveolar lavage cells (BAL-Cs). The APCs were first analyzed based on forward scatter and side scatter profiles and the selection of MHC-II(high)CD172a(+) cells (referred to as APCs); then the expression of CD1a, CD163, CD206, CD16 and CD11R3 was evaluated in the APCs. The results showed that CD1a, CD163 and CD206 were differentially expressed among L-Cs, LN-Cs and BAL-Cs, suggesting the phenotype MHC-II(high)CD172a(+)CD1a(low/-)CD163(low)CD206(-) for L-Cs and MHC-II(high)CD172a(+)CD1a(+)CD163(low/-)CD206(+) for LN-Cs. BAL-Cs were MHC-II(high)CD172a(+)CD1a(-)CD163(high)CD206(+/-). The functional characteristics of L-Cs and LN-Cs were different from those of BAL-Cs, confirming that L-Cs and LN-Cs resemble specialized APCs. In conclusion, we present the characterization of APCs from L-Cs, LN-Cs and BAL-Cs of the porcine respiratory system.

  1. IL-4 abrogates TH17 cell-mediated inflammation by selective silencing of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Guenova, Emmanuella; Skabytska, Yuliya; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Weindl, Günther; Sauer, Karin; Tham, Manuela; Kim, Kyu-Won; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Seo, Ji Hae; Ignatova, Desislava; Cozzio, Antonio; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Volz, Thomas; Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Thomas, Peter; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Schäkel, Knut; Amarov, Boyko; Eichner, Martin; Schaller, Martin; Clark, Rachael A.; Röcken, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) can suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions (DTHRs), including organ-specific autoimmune diseases in mice and humans. Despite the broadly documented antiinflammatory effect of IL-4, the underlying mode of action remains incompletely understood, as IL-4 also promotes IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs) and IFN-γ–producing TH1 cells in vivo. Studying the impact of IL-4 on the polarization of human and mouse DCs, we found that IL-4 exerts opposing effects on the production of either IL-12 or IL-23. While promoting IL-12–producing capacity of DCs, IL-4 completely abrogates IL-23. Bone marrow chimeras proved that IL-4–mediated suppression of DTHRs relies on the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-dependent abrogation of IL-23 in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IL-4 therapy attenuated DTHRs by STAT6- and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-dependent suppression of the IL-23/TH17 responses despite simultaneous enhancement of IL-12/TH1 responses. As IL-4 therapy also improves psoriasis in humans and suppresses IL-23/TH17 responses without blocking IL-12/TH1, selective IL-4–mediated IL-23/TH17 silencing is promising as treatment against harmful inflammation, while sparing the IL-12–dependent TH1 responses. PMID:25646481

  2. Nano-clustering of ligands on surrogate antigen presenting cells modulates T cell membrane adhesion and organization.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Pierre; Pi, Fuwei; Lellouch, Annemarie C; Limozin, Laurent; Sengupta, Kheya

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the adhesion and molecular organization of the plasma membrane of T lymphocytes interacting with a surrogate antigen presenting cell comprising glass supported ordered arrays of antibody (α-CD3) nano-dots dispersed in a non-adhesive matrix of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The local membrane adhesion and topography, as well as the distribution of the T cell receptors (TCRs) and the kinase ZAP-70, are influenced by dot-geometry, whereas the cell spreading area is determined by the overall average density of the ligands rather than specific characteristics of the dots. TCR clusters are recruited preferentially to the nano-dots and the TCR cluster size distribution has a weak dot-size dependence. On the patterns, the clusters are larger, more numerous, and more enriched in TCRs, as compared to the homogeneously distributed ligands at comparable concentrations. These observations support the idea that non-ligated TCRs residing in the non-adhered parts of the proximal membrane are able to diffuse and enrich the existing clusters at the ligand dots. However, long distance transport is impaired and cluster centralization in the form of a central supramolecular cluster (cSMAC) is not observed. Time-lapse imaging of early cell-surface contacts indicates that the ZAP-70 microclusters are directly recruited to the site of the antibody dots and this process is concomitant with membrane adhesion. These results together point to a complex interplay of adhesion, molecular organization and activation in response to spatially modulated stimulation.

  3. Immune Tolerance Maintained by Cooperative Interactions between T Cells and Antigen Presenting Cells Shapes a Diverse TCR Repertoire.

    PubMed

    Best, Katharine; Chain, Benny; Watkins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates cooperative interactions between T cells of different specificities. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programing optimization problem that can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm, which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains repertoire diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire becomes heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire has stabilized. Our study combines the salient features of the "danger" model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping, which underlies tolerance in this model, suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation. PMID:26300880

  4. Dendritic type, accessory cells within the mammalian thymic microenvironment. Antigen presentation in the dendritic neuro-endocrine-immune cellular network.

    PubMed

    Bodey, B; Bodey, B; Kaiser, H E

    1997-01-01

    producing interleukin-6 (IL-6), and they have also been identified as the interferon-gamma responsive elements. FSCs also express lymphatic DC markers, such as DC specific aminopeptidase, leucyl-beta-naphthylaminidase, non-specific esterase, MHC class I and II molecules and various other lymphatic immunological determinants [platelet derived growth factor-alpha chain (PDGF-alpha chain), CD13, CD14 and L25 antigen]. There is strong evidence that such DCs in the AP, and similar ones in the developing thymus and peripheral lymphatic tissue are the components of a powerful "professional" antigen presenting DC network. These APCs contain a specialized late endocytic compartment, MIIC (MHC class II-enriched compartment), that harbors newly synthesized MHC class II antigens en route to the cell membrane. The limiting membrane of MIIC can fuse directly with the cell membrane, resulting in release of newly secreted intracellular MHC class II antigen containing vesicles (exosomes). DCs possess the ability to present foreign peptides complexed with the MHC molecules expressed on their surfaces to naive and resting T cells. There are a number of "molecular couples" that influence DC and T lymphocyte interaction during antigen presentation: CD/1/CD18 integrins, intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs), lymphocyte function associated antigen 3 (LFA-3). CD40, CD80/B7-1, CD86/B7-2, and heat-stable antigen. The "molecular couples" are involved in adhesive or co-stimulatory regulations, mediating an effective binding of DCs to T lymphocytes and the stimulation of specific intercellular communications. DCs also provide all of the known co-stimulatory signals required for activation of unprimed T lymphocytes. It has been shown that DCs initiate several immune responses, such as the sensitization of MHC-restricted T lymphocytes, resistance to infections and neoplasms, rejection of organ transplants, and the formation of T-dependent antibodies. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9292303

  5. Inflammatory environment and oxidized LDL convert circulating human proangiogenic cells into functional antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Luca; Chiesa, Mattia; Saporiti, Federica; Colombo, Gualtiero I; Pesce, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The function of human circulating PACs has been described extensively. However, little focus has been placed on understanding how these cells differ in their functions in the presence of microenvironments mimicking vascular inflammation. We hypothesized that exposure to proinflammatory cytokines or the oxLDL, an autoantigen abundant in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, converts PACs into immune-modulating/proinflammatory cells. Hence, we examined the effect of oxLDL and inflammatory stimuli on their phenotype by use of a functional genomics model based on secretome and whole genome transcriptome profiling. PACs obtained from culturing a PBMC fraction in angiogenic medium were primed with DC differentiation cytokines and then exposed to proinflammatory cytokines or oxLDL. Under these conditions, PACs converted into APCs, expressed maturation markers CD80 and CD83, and showed an increased up-regulation of CD86. APCcy and APCox induced a robust T cell BrdU incorporation. Despite a similar ability to induce lymphocyte proliferation, APCcy and APCox differed for the secretory pathway and mRNA expression. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes identified 4 gene "clusters," showing reciprocal modulation in APCcy vs. APCox, justifying, according to functional genomics analyses, a different putative function of the cells in antigen processing. Together, these data show that treatment with inflammatory cytokines or oxLDL converts human PAC phenotypes and functions into that of APCs with similar lymphocyte-activating ability but distinct maturation degree and paracrine functions.

  6. Antigen presentation by chemically modified splenocytes induces antigen- specific T cell unresponsiveness in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the antigen specificity and presentation requirements for inactivation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies revealed that splenocytes treated with the crosslinker 1-ethyl- 3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (ECDI) and soluble antigen fragments failed to stimulate significant proliferation by normal pigeon cytochrome c-specific T cell clones, suggesting that the chemical treatment inactivated full antigen presentation function. However, T cell clones exposed to ECDI-treated splenocytes and antigen in vitro were rendered unresponsive for at least 8 d to subsequent antigen stimulation with normal presenting cells. As predicted by the in vitro results, specific T cell unresponsiveness was also induced in vivo in B10.A mice injected intravenously with B10.A, but not B10.A(4R), splenocytes coupled with pigeon cytochrome c via ECDI. The antigen and MHC specificity of the induction of this T cell unresponsiveness in vitro and in vivo was identical to that required for T cell activation. These results suggest that nonmitogenic T cell recognition of antigen/MHC on ECDI-modified APCs results in the functional inactivation of T cell clones. PMID:3029267

  7. Killer Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (KaAPC) for Efficient In Vitro Depletion of Human Antigen-specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Oelke, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of T cell mediated autoimmune diseases relies mostly on strategies of global immunosuppression, which, in the long term, is accompanied by adverse side effects such as a reduced ability to control infections or malignancies. Therefore, new approaches need to be developed that target only the disease mediating cells and leave the remaining immune system intact. Over the past decade a variety of cell based immunotherapy strategies to modulate T cell mediated immune responses have been developed. Most of these approaches rely on tolerance-inducing antigen presenting cells (APC). However, in addition to being technically difficult and cumbersome, such cell-based approaches are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T cell responses, which limits their therapeutic capacity. Here we present a protocol for the generation of non-cellular killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC), which allows for the depletion of pathologic T cells while leaving the remaining immune system untouched and functional. KaAPC is an alternative solution to cellular immunotherapy which has potential for treating autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections by regulating undesirable T cell responses in an antigen specific fashion. PMID:25145915

  8. Killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC) for efficient in vitro depletion of human antigen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of T cell mediated autoimmune diseases relies mostly on strategies of global immunosuppression, which, in the long term, is accompanied by adverse side effects such as a reduced ability to control infections or malignancies. Therefore, new approaches need to be developed that target only the disease mediating cells and leave the remaining immune system intact. Over the past decade a variety of cell based immunotherapy strategies to modulate T cell mediated immune responses have been developed. Most of these approaches rely on tolerance-inducing antigen presenting cells (APC). However, in addition to being technically difficult and cumbersome, such cell-based approaches are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T cell responses, which limits their therapeutic capacity. Here we present a protocol for the generation of non-cellular killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC), which allows for the depletion of pathologic T cells while leaving the remaining immune system untouched and functional. KaAPC is an alternative solution to cellular immunotherapy which has potential for treating autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections by regulating undesirable T cell responses in an antigen specific fashion. PMID:25145915

  9. Immunomodulation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble factors on antigen-presenting cells of healthy blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Fiona Long Yan; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) cells have been shown to promote type-1 immune responsiveness; however knowledge of immunomodulation of soluble factors secreted by LGG is limited. This is the first study to investigate whether LGG soluble factors promote a comparable immune responsiveness as the bacterial cells. Both treatments − LGG conditioned medium with (CM + LGG) or without (CM) LGG cells, in this study increased expression of several toll-like receptors (TLRs) in all studied cell types and antigen presentation-associated receptor HLA-DR in macrophages and “intermediate” monocytes; but decreased that of activation markers on monocytes and macrophages and production of IL-10, IL-12 and TNFα in macrophages. In co-culture with mononuclear cells, CM increased Th1-type cytokine profile but not as pronounced as CM + LGG. This study suggests that LGG soluble factors exert similar immunomodulatory effects as the intact cells, but cells may be required for optimal type-1 immune responsiveness polarizing capacity of this probiotic strain. PMID:26961406

  10. Interleukin-10 Modulates Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells through Regulation of NLRP3 Inflammasome Assembly during Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Omosun, Yusuf; McKeithen, Danielle; Ryans, Khamia; Kibakaya, Caroline; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Li, Duo; Singh, Rajesh; Inoue, Koichi; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Eko, Francis; Black, Carolyn; Igietseme, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) has been implicated in susceptibility to genital chlamydial infection and the development of tubal pathologies. IL-10 limitation also resulted in the rapid elicitation of immune responses against Chlamydia, and decreased levels of IL-10 correlated with protective anti-Chlamydia immunity. To investigate the molecular basis for these effects, we compared the reproductive pathologies and fertility rates in Chlamydia-infected wild-type (WT) and IL-10-knockout (IL-10−/−) mice; we also analyzed the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily, IL-1β production, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation, and the immunostimulatory capacity and apoptotic predilection of Chlamydia-exposed dendritic cells (DCs) from WT and IL-10−/− mice. Our results revealed that, in addition to the rapid clearance of infection, genitally infected IL-10−/− mice were protected from tubal pathologies and infertility, whereas WT (IL-10+/+) mice were not. Chlamydia-pulsed IL-10−/− DCs expressed larger numbers of TLR4/IL-1R molecules and had enhanced IL-1β production. In addition, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly was suppressed in IL-10−/− DCs through the inhibition of the P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7) receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated ion channel, and a decrease in intracellular Ca2+ levels, which inhibited DC apoptosis. Thus, the potent immunostimulatory capacity of IL-10-deficient DCs is due, at least in part, to the suppression of the intracellular inflammasome assembly, which prevents DC apoptosis, allowing efficient antigen presentation. The results indicate that IL-10 deficiency enables efficient antigen presentation by DCs for rapid and enhanced immune activation against Chlamydia, which results in rapid microbial clearance, which prevents tubal pathologies during infection. Our finding has important implications for the induction of protective immunity against Chlamydia and other infectious and noninfectious

  11. Interleukin-10 modulates antigen presentation by dendritic cells through regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome assembly during Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Omosun, Yusuf; McKeithen, Danielle; Ryans, Khamia; Kibakaya, Caroline; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Li, Duo; Singh, Rajesh; Inoue, Koichi; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Eko, Francis; Black, Carolyn; Igietseme, Joseph; He, Qing

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) has been implicated in susceptibility to genital chlamydial infection and the development of tubal pathologies. IL-10 limitation also resulted in the rapid elicitation of immune responses against Chlamydia, and decreased levels of IL-10 correlated with protective anti-Chlamydia immunity. To investigate the molecular basis for these effects, we compared the reproductive pathologies and fertility rates in Chlamydia-infected wild-type (WT) and IL-10-knockout (IL-10(-/-)) mice; we also analyzed the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily, IL-1β production, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation, and the immunostimulatory capacity and apoptotic predilection of Chlamydia-exposed dendritic cells (DCs) from WT and IL-10(-/-) mice. Our results revealed that, in addition to the rapid clearance of infection, genitally infected IL-10(-/-) mice were protected from tubal pathologies and infertility, whereas WT (IL-10(+/+)) mice were not. Chlamydia-pulsed IL-10(-/-) DCs expressed larger numbers of TLR4/IL-1R molecules and had enhanced IL-1β production. In addition, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly was suppressed in IL-10(-/-) DCs through the inhibition of the P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7) receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated ion channel, and a decrease in intracellular Ca(2+) levels, which inhibited DC apoptosis. Thus, the potent immunostimulatory capacity of IL-10-deficient DCs is due, at least in part, to the suppression of the intracellular inflammasome assembly, which prevents DC apoptosis, allowing efficient antigen presentation. The results indicate that IL-10 deficiency enables efficient antigen presentation by DCs for rapid and enhanced immune activation against Chlamydia, which results in rapid microbial clearance, which prevents tubal pathologies during infection. Our finding has important implications for the induction of protective immunity against Chlamydia and other infectious and noninfectious diseases by

  12. Expression profile of novel cell surface molecules on different subsets of human peripheral blood antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Daniela; Andrés, Martín Pérez; van den Bossche, Wouter BL; Flores-Montero, Juan; de Bruin, Sandra; Teodosio, Cristina; van Dongen, Jacques JM; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Although major steps have been recently made in understanding the role of the distinct subsets of dendritic cells (DC)/antigen-presenting cells (APC), further studies are required to unravel their precise role, including in-depth immunophenotypic characterisation of these cells. Here, we used eight-colour flow cytometry to investigate the reactivity of a panel of 72 monoclonal antibodies (including those clustered in seven new Cluster of Differentiation, CD) on different subsets of APC in peripheral blood (PB) samples from five healthy adults. These experiments were performed in the context of the Tenth International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens (HLDA10). Plasmacytoid DC was the only cell population that expressed CD85g and CD195, whereas they lacked all of the other molecules investigated. In contrast, myeloid DC mostly expressed inhibitory C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and other inhibitory-associated molecules, whereas monocytes expressed both inhibitory and activating CLRs, together with other phagocytosis-associated receptors. Within monocytes, progressively lower levels of expression were generally observed from classical monocytes (cMo) to SLAN− and SLAN+ non-classical monocytes (ncMo) for most of the molecules expressed, except for the CD368 endocytic receptor. This molecule was found to be positive only in cMo, and the CD369 and CD371 modulating/signalling receptors. In addition, the CD101 inhibitory molecule was found to be expressed at higher levels in SLAN+ vs SLAN− ncMo. In summary, the pattern of expression of the different signalling molecules and receptors analysed in this work varies among the distinct subsets of PB APCs, with similar profiles for molecules within each functional group. These findings suggest unique pattern-recognition and signalling capabilities for distinct subpopulations of APCs, and therefore, diverse functional roles. PMID:27766148

  13. KIM-1-/TIM-1-mediated phagocytosis links ATG5-/ULK1-dependent clearance of apoptotic cells to antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Craig R; Yeung, Melissa Y; Brooks, Yang S; Chen, Hui; Ichimura, Takaharu; Henderson, Joel M; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-10-01

    Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by both professional and semi-professional phagocytes is required for resolution of organ damage and maintenance of immune tolerance. KIM-1/TIM-1 is a phosphatidylserine receptor that is expressed on epithelial cells and can transform the cells into phagocytes. Here, we demonstrate that KIM-1 phosphorylation and association with p85 results in encapsulation of phagosomes by lipidated LC3 in multi-membrane organelles. KIM-1-mediated phagocytosis is not associated with increased ROS production, and NOX inhibition does not block LC3 lipidation. Autophagy gene expression is required for efficient clearance of apoptotic cells and phagosome maturation. KIM-1-mediated phagocytosis leads to pro-tolerogenic antigen presentation, which suppresses CD4 T-cell proliferation and increases the percentage of regulatory T cells in an autophagy gene-dependent manner. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism of epithelial biology linking phagocytosis, autophagy and antigen presentation to regulation of the inflammatory response.

  14. Antigen Presenting Cells and Stromal Cells Trigger Human Natural Killer Lymphocytes to Autoreactivity: Evidence for the Involvement of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR) and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2006-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) lymphocytes should not damage autologous cells due to the engagement of inhibitory receptor superfamily (IRS) members by HLA-I. Nevertheless, NK cells kill self cells expressing low levels or lacking HLA-I, as it may occur during viral infections (missing-self hypothesis). Herein, we show that human NK cells can be activated upon binding with self antigen presenting cells or stromal cells despite the expression of HLA-I. Indeed, NK cells can kill and produce pro-inflammatory and regulating cytokines as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL10 during interaction with autologous dendritic cells or bone marrow stromal cells or skin fibroblasts. The killing of antigen presenting and stromal cells is dependent on LFA1/ICAM1 interaction. Further, the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30 and NKp46 are responsible for the delivery of lethal hit to DC, whereas NKG2D activating receptor, the ligand of the MHC-related molecule MIC-A and the UL16 binding protein, is involved in stromal cell killing. These findings indicate that different activating receptors are involved in cell to self cell interaction. Finally, NK cells can revert the veto effect of stromal cells on mixed lymphocyte reaction further supporting the idea that NK cells may alter the interaction between T lymphocytes and microenvironment leading to autoreactivity. PMID:17162374

  15. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  16. The Effect of the Nonionic Block Copolymer Pluronic P85 on Gene Expression in Mouse Muscle and Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaymalov, Zagit Z.; Yang, Zhihui; Pisarev, Vladimir M.; Alakhov, Valery Yu.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    DNA vaccines can be greatly improved by polymer agents that simultaneously increase transgene expression and activate immunity. We describe here Pluronic P85 (P85), a triblock copolymer of ethylene oxide (EO) and propylene oxide (PO) EO26-PO40-EO26,. Using a mouse model we demonstrate that co-administration of a bacterial plasmid DNA with P85 in a skeletal muscle greatly increases gene expression in the injection site and distant organs, especially the draining lymph nodes and spleen. The reporter expression colocalizes with the specific markers of myocytes and keratinocytes in the muscle, as well as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages in the muscle, lymph nodes and spleen. Furthermore, DNA/P85 and P85 alone increase the systemic expansion of CD11c+ (DC), and local expansion of CD11c+, CD14+ (macrophages) and CD49b+ (natural killer) cell populations. DNA/P85 (but not P85) also increases maturation of local DC (CD11c+CD86+, CD11c+CD80+, and CD11c+CD40+). We suggest that DNA/P85 promotes the activation and recruitment of the antigen-presenting cells, which further incorporate, express and carry the transgene to the immune system organs. PMID:19064283

  17. Seoul virus suppresses NF-kappaB-mediated inflammatory responses of antigen presenting cells from Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Au, Rebecca Y; Jedlicka, Anne E; Li, Wei; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra L

    2010-04-25

    Hantavirus infection reduces antiviral defenses, increases regulatory responses, and causes persistent infection in rodent hosts. To address whether hantaviruses alter the maturation and functional activity of antigen presenting cells (APCs), rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and macrophages (BMDMs) were generated and infected with Seoul virus (SEOV) or stimulated with TLR ligands. SEOV infected both DCs and macrophages, but copies of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious virus titers were higher in macrophages. The expression of MHCII and CD80, production of IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-alpha, and expression of Ifnbeta were attenuated in SEOV-infected APCs. Stimulation of APCs with poly I:C prior to SEOV infection increased the expression of activation markers and production of inflammatory cytokines and suppressed SEOV replication. Infection of APCs with SEOV suppressed LPS-induced activation and innate immune responses. Hantaviruses reduce the innate immune response potential of APCs derived from a natural host, which may influence persistence of these zoonotic viruses in the environment.

  18. Induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness by intrahepatic modulation of donor antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S W; Gorczynski, R M; Dziadkowiec, I; Levy, G A

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we examined the ability of varying populations of donor cells from B6 mice to induce hyporesponsiveness in T lymphocytes from C3H mice in vitro and in vivo. Small, resting B lymphocytes were inefficient stimulators of T-lymphocyte proliferation compared to splenic mononuclear cells (SMNC) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced B-cell blasts in vitro (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of SMNC with anti-B7-1 or anti-intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) monoclonal antibodies (mAb) similarly resulted in inefficient stimulation of T-cell proliferation in vitro (P < 0.05). However, in vivo, only intrahepatic, but not intravenous, injection of donor cells into C3H mice resulted in decreased T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to restimulation by alloantigen. This effect was most pronounced following intrahepatic injection of resting B lymphocytes or SMNC pretreated with anti-ICAM-1 mAb compared to uninjected or intravenously injected mice (P < 0.05). The hyporesponsiveness was associated with an increased production of interleukin-4 (IL-4) by the responder T lymphocytes and correlated with enhanced skin allograft survival. These data demonstrate that intrahepatic injection of donor-derived cells induces T-lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness. The mechanism appears to be modulated by an ICAM-1-mediated signal resulting in expansion of an IL-4-producing T-lymphocyte population. PMID:7558153

  19. In vivo maintenance of T-lymphocyte unresponsiveness induced by thymic medullary epithelium requires antigen presentation by radioresistant cells

    PubMed Central

    Hudrisier, Denis; Feau, Sonia; Bonnet, Véronique; Romagnoli, Paola; Van Meerwijk, Joost P M

    2003-01-01

    The T-cell repertoire developing in the thymus is rid of autospecific cells by the process of thymic negative selection. Recognition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)/self-peptide complexes expressed by thymic antigen-presenting cells (APC) of bone marrow origin leads to induction of apoptotic death of autospecific thymocytes. Induction of tolerance to self-antigens not presented by thymic APC is mediated by medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) which express a very wide range of proteins, e.g. inducible and tissue-specific proteins. The main type of tolerance induced by mTEC is non-deletional and the issue of how it is maintained outside the thymus is therefore of crucial interest. We have previously shown that the non-T-cell receptor (TCR) -transgenic T-cell repertoire developing in conditions in which tolerance to self-MHC/peptide ligands is exclusively induced by mTEC is tolerant to syngeneic targets in vivo but lyses such targets in vitro. Here we report that this non-deletional in vivo self-tolerance is not due to active tolerance assured by known naturally occurring regulatory or immune-modulating T lymphocytes. Importantly, we show that in vivo maintenance of this therefore probably anergic state requires continued interaction of autospecific T cells with self-MHC/peptide ligands expressed by radioresistant cells while APC are incapable of maintaining the tolerant state. Therefore, maintenance of non-deletional T-lymphocyte tolerance to the wide range of self-antigens expressed by mTEC depends on continued interaction with radioresistant cells that very probably express a much more limited repertoire of antigens. Our data may therefore have important consequences for tolerance to tissue-specific and inducible self-antigens. PMID:12519299

  20. Molecular basis of mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation by CD1c and its recognition by αβ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sobhan; Ly, Dalam; Li, Nan-Sheng; Altman, John D.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Moody, D. Branch; Adams, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    CD1c is a member of the group 1 CD1 family of proteins that are specialized for lipid antigen presentation. Despite high cell surface expression of CD1c on key antigen-presenting cells and the discovery of its mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation capability, the molecular basis of CD1c recognition by T cells is unknown. Here we present a comprehensive functional and molecular analysis of αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of CD1c presenting mycobacterial phosphomycoketide antigens. Our structure of CD1c with the mycobacterial phosphomycoketide (PM) shows similarities to that of CD1c-mannosyl-β1-phosphomycoketide in that the A' pocket accommodates the mycoketide alkyl chain; however, the phosphate head-group of PM is shifted ∼6 Å in relation to that of mannosyl-β1-PM. We also demonstrate a bona fide interaction between six human TCRs and CD1c-mycoketide complexes, measuring high to moderate affinities. The crystal structure of the DN6 TCR and mutagenic studies reveal a requirement of five complementarity determining region (CDR) loops for CD1c recognition. Furthermore, mutagenesis of CD1c reveals residues in both the α1 and α2 helices involved in TCR recognition, yet not entirely overlapping among the examined TCRs. Unlike patterns for MHC I, no archetypical binding footprint is predicted to be shared by CD1c-reactive TCRs, even when recognizing the same or similar antigens. PMID:25298532

  1. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuro-inflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis1

    PubMed Central

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R.; Archambault, Angela S.; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T.; Mikesell, Robert J.; Koni, Pandelakis A.; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H.; Wu, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in part due to the success of B cell depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). While B cell antigen presentation has been suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support antigen-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHCII, we previously reported that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole antigen presenting cell. Herein we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not addition of soluble MOG-specific antibody, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of antigen-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuro-inflammation at later stages of disease. PMID:25895531

  2. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  3. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD.

  4. Cytokines Regulate Proteolysis in Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II–Dependent Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Edda; Meraner, Paul; Weber, Ekkehard; Fang, I-Fei; Stingl, Georg; Ploegh, Hidde; Maurer, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    Endo/lysosomal proteases control two key events in antigen (Ag) presentation: the degradation of protein Ag and the generation of peptide-receptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Here we show that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin (IL)-1β rapidly increase the activity of cathepsin (cat) S and catB in human dendritic cells (DCs). As a consequence, a wave of MHC class II sodium dodecyl sulfate stable dimer formation ensues in a catS-dependent fashion. In contrast, the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 renders DCs incapable of upregulating catS and catB activity and in fact, attenuates the level of both enzymes. Suppressed catS and catB activity delays MHC class II sodium dodecyl sulfate stable dimer formation and impairs Ag degradation. In DCs exposed to tetanus toxoid, IL-10 accordingly reduces the number of MHC class II–peptide complexes accessible to tetanus toxoid–specific T cell receptors, as analyzed by measuring T cell receptor downregulation in Ag-specific T cell clones. Thus, the control of protease activity by pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines is an essential feature of the Ag presentation properties of DCs. PMID:11304549

  5. Artificial antigen presenting cells that express prevalent HLA alleles: A step towards the broad application of antigen-specific adoptive cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Aisha N; Selvakumar, Annamalai; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel W; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    The artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) described in this review were generated to facilitate the production of virus-specific T-cells for the treatment of infections in patients after bone marrow transplant. These AAPCs consist of murine 3T3 cells genetically modified to express critical human molecules needed for T-cell stimulation, such as the co-stimulatory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 and one of a series of 6 common HLA class I alleles. When T-cells were sensitized against cytomegalovirus (CMV) using AAPCs that express a shared HLA allele or using autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) loaded with the CMVpp65 antigen, they were activated and expanded to become HLA-restricted CMVpp65-specific T-cells. These T-cells demonstrated functional activity in vitro against CMV by producing IFN-gamma and inducing CMVpp65-specific cytotoxicity. T-cells sensitized with AAPCs recognized antigenic epitopes presented by each HLA allele known to be immunogenic in Man. Sensitization with AAPCs also permitted expansion of IFN-gamma+ cytotoxic T-cells against subdominant epitopes that were not effectively recognized by T-cells sensitized with autologous APCs. This panel of AAPCs provides a source of immediately accessible, standardizable, and replenishable "off the shelf" cellular reagents with the potential to make adoptive immunotherapy widely available for the treatment of lethal infections, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:20040272

  6. An artificial antigen-presenting cell with paracrine delivery of IL-2 impacts the magnitude and direction of the T cell response.

    PubMed

    Steenblock, Erin R; Fadel, Tarek; Labowsky, Michael; Pober, Jordan S; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2011-10-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) are an emerging technology to induce therapeutic cellular immunity without the need for autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs). To fully replace natural APCs, an optimized aAPC must present antigen (signal 1), provide costimulation (signal 2), and release cytokine (signal 3). Here we demonstrate that the spatial and temporal characteristics of paracrine release of IL-2 from biodegradable polymer aAPCs (now termed paAPCs) can significantly alter the balance in the activation and proliferation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Paracrine delivery of IL-2 upon T cell contact with paAPCs induces significant IL-2 accumulation in the synaptic contact region. This accumulation increases CD25 (the inducible IL-2 Rα chain) on responding T cells and increases proliferation of CD8+ T cells in vitro to levels 10 times that observed with equivalent amounts of bulk IL-2. These CD8+ T cell responses critically depend upon close contact of T cells and the paAPCs and require sustained release of low levels of IL-2. The same conditions promote activation-induced cell death in CD4+ T cells. These findings provide insight into the response of T cell subsets to paracrine IL-2. PMID:21849500

  7. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Matrix Protein Impairs CD1d-Mediated Antigen Presentation through Activation of the p38 MAPK Pathway▿

    PubMed Central

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J.; Khan, Masood A.; Shaji, Daniel; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are unique T lymphocytes that recognize CD1d-bound lipid antigens and play an important role in both innate and acquired immune responses against infectious diseases and tumors. We have already shown that a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection results in the rapid inhibition of murine CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells. In the present study, it was found that the VSV matrix (VSV-M) protein is an important element in this decrease in antigen presentation postinfection. The VSV-M protein altered the intracellular distribution of murine CD1d molecules, resulting in qualitative (but not quantitative) changes in cell surface CD1d expression. The M protein was distributed throughout the infected cell, and it was found to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 very early postinfection. Infection of CD1d+ cells with a temperature-sensitive VSV-M mutant at the nonpermissive temperature both substantially reversed the inhibition of antigen presentation by CD1d and delayed the activation of p38. Thus, the VSV-M protein plays an important role in permitting the virus to evade important components of the innate immune response by regulating specific MAPK pathways. PMID:18815300

  8. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

  9. Disruption of HLA class II antigen presentation in Burkitt lymphoma: implication of a 47,000 MW acid labile protein in CD4+ T-cell recognition.

    PubMed

    God, Jason M; Zhao, Dan; Cameron, Christine A; Amria, Shereen; Bethard, Jennifer R; Haque, Azizul

    2014-07-01

    While Burkitt lymphoma (BL) has a well-known defect in HLA class I-mediated antigen presentation, the exact role of BL-associated HLA class II in generating a poor CD4(+) T-cell response remains unresolved. Here, we found that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4(+) T cells via the HLA class II pathway. This defect in CD4(+) T-cell recognition was not associated with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules on BL cells, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to elicit CD4(+) T-cell activation by BL. Further, the defect was not caused by faulty antigen/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Interestingly, functional class II-peptide complexes were formed at acidic pH 5·5, which restored immune recognition. Acidic buffer (pH 5·5) eluate from BL cells contained molecules that impaired class II-mediated antigen presentation and CD4(+) T-cell recognition. Biochemical analysis showed that these molecules were greater than 30,000 molecular weight in size, and proteinaceous in nature. In addition, BL was found to have decreased expression of a 47,000 molecular weight enolase-like molecule that enhances class II-mediated antigen presentation in B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, but not in BL cells. These findings demonstrate that BL likely has multiple defects in HLA class II-mediated antigen presentation and immune recognition, which may be exploited for future immunotherapies.

  10. Ubiquitination by March-I prevents MHC class II recycling and promotes MHC class II turnover in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Jin; Walseng, Even; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A

    2015-08-18

    MHC class II (MHC-II)-dependent antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is carefully controlled to achieve specificity of immune responses; the regulated assembly and degradation of antigenic peptide-MHC-II complexes (pMHC-II) is one aspect of such control. In this study, we have examined the role of ubiquitination in regulating pMHC-II biosynthesis, endocytosis, recycling, and turnover in APCs. By using APCs obtained from MHC-II ubiquitination mutant mice, we find that whereas ubiquitination does not affect pMHC-II formation in dendritic cells (DCs), it does promote the subsequent degradation of newly synthesized pMHC-II. Acute activation of DCs or B cells terminates expression of the MHC-II E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I and prevents pMHC-II ubiquitination. Most importantly, this change results in very efficient pMHC-II recycling from the surface of DCs and B cells, thereby preventing targeting of internalized pMHC-II to lysosomes for degradation. Biochemical and functional assays confirmed that pMHC-II turnover is suppressed in MHC-II ubiquitin mutant DCs or by acute activation of wild-type DCs. These studies demonstrate that acute APC activation blocks the ubiquitin-dependent turnover of pMHC-II by promoting efficient pMHC-II recycling and preventing lysosomal targeting of internalized pMHC-II, thereby enhancing pMHC-II stability for efficient antigen presentation to CD4 T cells.

  11. The effects of chemotherapeutic drugs on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation and antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J; Kinn, J; Zirakzadeh, A A; Sherif, A; Norstedt, G; Wikström, A-C; Winqvist, O

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that chemotherapeutic agents may increase the anti-tumoral immune response. Based on the pivotal role of dendritic cells (DCs) in host tumour-specific immune responses, we investigated the effect of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs dexamethasone, doxorubicin, cisplatin and irinotecan and glucocorticoids on monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs). Dexamethasone displayed the strongest inhibitory effect on DC differentiation. The effect of cisplatin and irinotecan was moderate, while only weak effects were noticed for doxorubicin. Surprisingly, when the functional consequence of chemotherapy-treated CD14+ monocytes and their capacity to activate CD4+ T responders cells were investigated, cisplatin-treated monocytes gave rise to increased T cell proliferation. However, dexamethasone, doxorubicin and irinotecan-pretreated monocytes did not stimulate any increased T cell proliferation. Further investigation of this observation revealed that cisplatin treatment during DC differentiation up-regulated significantly the interferon (IFN)-β transcript. By contrast, no effect was evident on the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6 or IFN-α transcripts. Blocking IFN-β attenuated the cisplatin-enhanced T cell proliferation significantly. In conclusion, cisplatin treatment enhanced the immune stimulatory ability of human monocytes, a mechanism mediated mainly by the increased production of IFN-β. PMID:23600838

  12. Candida albicans Is Phagocytosed, Killed, and Processed for Antigen Presentation by Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Simon L.; Holly, Angela

    2001-01-01

    Candida albicans is a component of the normal flora of the alimentary tract and also is found on the mucocutaneous membranes of the healthy host. Candida is the leading cause of invasive fungal disease in premature infants, diabetics, and surgical patients, and of oropharyngeal disease in AIDS patients. As the induction of cell-mediated immunity to Candida is of critical importance in host defense, we sought to determine whether human dendritic cells (DC) could phagocytose and degrade Candida and subsequently present Candida antigens to T cells. Immature DC obtained by culture of human monocytes in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 phagocytosed unopsonized Candida in a time-dependent manner, and phagocytosis was not enhanced by opsonization of Candida in serum. Like macrophages (Mφ), DC recognized Candida by the mannose-fucose receptor. Upon ingestion, DC killed Candida as efficiently as human Mφ, and fungicidal activity was not enhanced by the presence of fresh serum. Although phagocytosis of Candida by DC stimulated the production of superoxide anion, inhibitors of the respiratory burst (or NO production) did not inhibit killing of Candida, even when phagocytosis was blocked by preincubation of DC with cytochalasin D. Further, although apparently only modest phagolysosomal fusion occurred upon DC phagocytosis of Candida, killing of Candida under anaerobic conditions was almost equivalent to killing under aerobic conditions. Finally, DC stimulated Candida-specific lymphocyte proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner after phagocytosis of both viable and heat-killed Candida cells. These data suggest that, in vivo, such interactions between DC and C. albicans may facilitate the induction of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:11598054

  13. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  14. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8(+) cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8(+) T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8(+) T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine. PMID:27251373

  15. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine. PMID:27251373

  16. Cholera Toxin Promotes Th17 Cell Differentiation by Modulating Expression of Polarizing Cytokines and the Antigen-Presenting Potential of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ok; Lee, Jee-Boong

    2016-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT), an exotoxin produced by Vibrio cholera, acts as a mucosal adjuvant. In a previous study, we showed that CT skews differentiation of CD4 T cells to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Here, we found that intranasal administration of CT induced migration of migratory dendritic cell (DC) populations, CD103+ DCs and CD11bhi DCs, to the lung draining mediastinal lymph nodes (medLN). Among those DC subsets, CD11bhi DCs that were relatively immature had a major role in Th17 cell differentiation after administration of CT. CT-treated BMDCs showed reduced expression of MHC class II and CD86, similar to CD11bhi DCs in medLN, and these BMDCs promoted Th17 cell differentiation more potently than other BMDCs expressing higher levels of MHC class II and CD86. By analyzing the expression of activation markers such as CD25 and CD69, proliferation and IL-2 production, we determined that CT-treated BMDCs showed diminished antigen-presenting potential to CD4+ T cells compared with normal BMDCs. We also found that CT-stimulated BMDCs promote activin A expression as well as IL-6 and IL-1β, and activin A had a synergic role with TGF-β1 in CT-mediated Th17 cell differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest that CT-stimulated DCs promote Th17 cell differentiation by not only modulating antigen-presenting potential but also inducing Th polarizing cytokines. PMID:27271559

  17. CD80 and CD86 Differentially Regulate Mechanical Interactions of T-Cells with Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells and B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tong Seng; Goh, James Kang Hao; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions. PMID:23024807

  18. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tong Seng; Goh, James Kang Hao; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hämmerling, Günter J; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions.

  19. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuroinflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R; Archambault, Angela S; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T; Mikesell, Robert J; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H; Wu, Gregory F

    2015-06-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, in part as a result of the success of B cell-depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the CNS have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis. Although B cell Ag presentation was suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support Ag-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHC class II, we reported previously that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole APC. In this study, we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not the addition of soluble MOG-specific Ab, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of Ag-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuroinflammation at later stages of disease.

  20. Mannose-based molecular patterns on stealth microspheres for receptor-specific targeting of human antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Wattendorf, Uta; Coullerez, Géraldine; Vörös, Janos; Textor, Marcus; Merkle, Hans P

    2008-10-21

    The targeting of antigen-presenting cells has recently gained strong attention for both targeted vaccine delivery and immunomodulation. We prepared surface-modified stealth microspheres that display various mannose-based ligands at graded ligand densities to target phagocytic C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) on human dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Decoration of microspheres with carbohydrate ligands was achieved (i) by electrostatic surface assembly of mannan onto previously formed adlayers of poly( l-lysine) (PLL) or a mix of PLL and poly( l-lysine)- graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-PEG), or (ii) through assembly of PLL-PEG equipped with small substructure mannoside ligands, such as mono- and trimannose, as terminal substitution of the PEG chains. Microspheres carrying mannoside ligands were also studied in combination with an integrin-targeting RGD peptide ligand. Because of the presence of a mannan or PEG corona, such microspheres were protected against protein adsorption and opsonization, thus allowing the formation of specific ligand-receptor interactions. Mannoside density was the major factor for the phagocytosis of mannoside-decorated microspheres, although with limited efficiency. This strengthens the recent hypothesis by other authors that the mannose receptor (MR) only acts as a phagocytic receptor when in conjunction with yet unidentified partner receptor(s). Analysis of DC surface markers for maturation revealed that neither surface-assembled mannan nor mannoside-modified surfaces on the microspheres could stimulate DC maturation. Thus, phagocytosis upon recognition by CLRs alone cannot trigger DC activation toward a T helper response. The microparticulate platform established in this work represents a promising tool for systematic investigations of specific ligand-receptor interactions upon phagocytosis, including the screening for potential ligands and ligand combinations in the context of vaccine delivery and immunomodulation.

  1. Development of an Antigen-driven Colitis Model to Study Presentation of Antigens by Antigen Presenting Cells to T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Valerio; Radulovic, Katarina; Riedel, Christian U; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation which affects the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). One of the best ways to study the immunological mechanisms involved during the disease is the T cell transfer model of colitis. In this model, immunodeficient mice (RAG(-/-) recipients) are reconstituted with naive CD4(+) T cells from healthy wild type hosts. This model allows examination of the earliest immunological events leading to disease and chronic inflammation, when the gut inflammation perpetuates but does not depend on a defined antigen. To study the potential role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the disease process, it is helpful to have an antigen-driven disease model, in which a defined commensal-derived antigen leads to colitis. An antigen driven-colitis model has hence been developed. In this model OT-II CD4(+) T cells, that can recognize only specific epitopes in the OVA protein, are transferred into RAG(-/-) hosts challenged with CFP-OVA-expressing E. coli. This model allows the examination of interactions between APCs and T cells in the lamina propria. PMID:27684040

  2. Increased generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells by manipulating antigen presentation in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiqiang; Yang, Lu; Silva, Hernandez Moura; Trzeciak, Alissa; Choi, Yongwon; Schwab, Susan R; Dustin, Michael L; Lafaille, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (Treg) selection in the thymus is essential to prevent autoimmune diseases. Although important rules for Treg selection have been established, there is controversy regarding the degree of self-reactivity displayed by T-cell receptors expressed by Treg cells. In this study we have developed a model of autoimmune skin inflammation, to determine key parameters in the generation of skin-reactive Treg cells in the thymus (tTreg). tTreg development is predominantly AIRE dependent, with an AIRE-independent component. Without the knowledge of antigen recognized by skin-reactive Treg cells, we are able to enhance skin-specific tTreg cell generation using three approaches. First, we increase medullary thymic epithelial cells by using mice lacking osteoprotegerin or by adding TRANCE (RANKL, Tnfsf11). Second, we inject intrathymically peripheral dendritic cells from skin-draining sites. Finally, we inject skin tissue lysates intrathymically. These findings have implications for enhancing the generation of organ-specific Treg cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923114

  3. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs.

  4. Regulation of Lipid Specific and Vitamin Specific Non-MHC Restricted T Cells by Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Since initial reports, more than 25 years ago, that T cells recognize lipids in the context on non-polymorphic CD1 molecules, our understanding of antigen presentation to non-peptide-specific T cell populations has deepened. It is now clear that αβ T cells bearing semi-invariant T cell receptor, as well as subsets of γδ T cells, recognize a variety of self and non-self lipids and contribute to shaping immune responses via cross talk with dendritic cells and B cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that small molecules derived from the microbial riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (vitamin B2) bind monomorphic MR1 molecules and activate mucosal-associated invariant T cells, another population of semi-invariant T cells. Novel insights in the biological relevance of non-peptide-specific T cells have emerged with the development of tetrameric CD1 and MR1 molecules, which has allowed accurate enumeration and functional analysis of CD1- and MR1-restricted T cells in humans and discovery of novel populations of semi-invariant T cells. The phenotype and function of non-peptide-specific T cells will be discussed in the context of the known distribution of CD1 and MR1 molecules by different subsets of antigen-presenting cells at steady state and following infection. Concurrent modulation of CD1 transcription and lipid biosynthetic pathways upon TLR stimulation, coupled with efficient lipid antigen processing, result in the increased cell surface expression of antigenic CD1–lipid complexes. Similarly, MR1 expression is almost undetectable in resting APC and it is upregulated following bacterial infection, likely due to stabilization of MR1 molecules by microbial antigens. The tight regulation of CD1 and MR1 expression at steady state and during infection may represent an important mechanism to limit autoreactivity, while promoting T cell responses to foreign antigens. PMID:26284072

  5. MyD88/CD40 Genetic Adjuvant Function in Cutaneous Atypical Antigen-Presenting Cells Contributes to DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Slawin, Kevin M.; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Spencer, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic DNA-based vaccines aim to prime an adaptive host immune response against tumor-associated antigens, eliminating cancer cells primarily through CD8+ cytotoxic T cell-mediated destruction. To be optimally effective, immunological adjuvants are required for the activation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells responses by DNA vaccination. Here, we describe enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of an in vivo electroporation-delivered DNA vaccine by inclusion of a genetically encoded chimeric MyD88/CD40 (MC) adjuvant, which integrates both innate and adaptive immune signaling pathways. When incorporated into a DNA vaccine, signaling by the MC adjuvant increased antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and promoted elimination of pre-established tumors. Interestingly, MC-enhanced vaccine efficacy did not require direct-expression of either antigen or adjuvant by local antigen-presenting cells, but rather our data supports a key role for MC function in “atypical” antigen-presenting cells of skin. In particular, MC adjuvant-modified keratinocytes increased inflammatory cytokine secretion, upregulated surface MHC class I, and were able to increase in vitro and in vivo priming of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, in the absence of critical CD8α+/CD103+ cross-priming dendritic cells, MC was still able to promote immune priming in vivo, albeit at a reduced level. Altogether, our data support a mechanism by which MC signaling activates an inflammatory phenotype in atypical antigen-presenting cells within the cutaneous vaccination site, leading to an enhanced CD8+ T cell response against DNA vaccine-encoded antigens, through both CD8α+/CD103+ dendritic cell-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:27741278

  6. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self and non-self antigens, even when there is a significant overlap between the affinity distribution of T cells to self and non-self antigens. Here, the number of regulatory T cells in the system acts as a global variable controlling the T cell population dynamics. The present study provides a basis for the development of a quantitative theory for self and non-self discrimination in the immune system and a possible strategy for its experimental verification. PMID:27668873

  7. Measuring antigen presentation in mouse brain endothelial cells ex vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that brain endothelial cells cross-present parasite antigen during mouse experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Here we describe a 2-d protocol to detect cross-presentation by isolating the brain microvessels and incubating them with a reporter cell line that expresses lacZ upon detection of the relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complex. After X-gal staining, a typical positive result consists of hundreds of blue spots, compared with fewer than 20 spots from a naive brain. The assay is generalizable to other disease contexts by using reporter cells that express appropriate specific T cell receptors. Also described is the protocol for culturing endothelial cells from brain microvessels isolated from naive mice. After 7-10 d, an in vitro cross-presentation assay can be performed by adding interferon-γ, antigen (e.g., Plasmodium berghei-infected red blood cells) and reporter cells in sequence over 3 d. This is useful for comparing different antigen forms or for probing the effects of various interventions.

  8. Artificial antigen-presenting cells as a tool to exploit the immune 'synapse'.

    PubMed

    Prakken, B; Wauben, M; Genini, D; Samodal, R; Barnett, J; Mendivil, A; Leoni, L; Albani, S

    2000-12-01

    Recent progress in molecular medicine has provided important tools to identify antigen-specific T cells. In most cases, the approach is based on oligomeric combinations of recombinant major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes fixed to various rigid supports available for binding by the T-cell receptor. These tools have greatly increased our insight into mechanisms of immune responses mediated by CD8+ T cells. Examples of the diverse fields of application for this technology include immunization, viral infections and oral tolerance induction. PMID:11100129

  9. Carbon monoxide impairs mitochondria-dependent endosomal maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Pogu, Julien; Anegon, Ignacio; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) prevents T cell-mediated inflammatory disease by producing carbon monoxide (CO) and impairing DC immunogenicity. However, the cellular mechanisms causing this inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that CO impairs mitochondrial function in DCs by reducing both the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, and resembling the effect of a nonlethal dose of a classical mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). Moreover, both CO and CCCP reduced cargo transport, endosome-to-lysosome fusion, and antigen processing, dampening the production of peptide-MHC complexes on the surface of DCs. As a result, the inhibition of naive CD4(+) T-cell priming was observed. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction in DCs also significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent type 1 diabetes onset in vivo. These results showed for the first time that CO interferes with T-cell priming by blocking an unknown mitochondria-dependent antigen-processing pathway in mature DC. Interestingly, other immune functions in DCs such as antigen capture, cytokine secretion, costimulation, and cell survival relied on glycolysis, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation might only play a key role for the maturation of antigen-containing endosomes. In conclusion, CO produced by HO-1 impairs antigen-dependent inflammation by regulating DC immunogenicity by a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. PMID:26461179

  10. Carbon monoxide impairs mitochondria-dependent endosomal maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Pogu, Julien; Anegon, Ignacio; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) prevents T cell-mediated inflammatory disease by producing carbon monoxide (CO) and impairing DC immunogenicity. However, the cellular mechanisms causing this inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that CO impairs mitochondrial function in DCs by reducing both the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, and resembling the effect of a nonlethal dose of a classical mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). Moreover, both CO and CCCP reduced cargo transport, endosome-to-lysosome fusion, and antigen processing, dampening the production of peptide-MHC complexes on the surface of DCs. As a result, the inhibition of naive CD4(+) T-cell priming was observed. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction in DCs also significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent type 1 diabetes onset in vivo. These results showed for the first time that CO interferes with T-cell priming by blocking an unknown mitochondria-dependent antigen-processing pathway in mature DC. Interestingly, other immune functions in DCs such as antigen capture, cytokine secretion, costimulation, and cell survival relied on glycolysis, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation might only play a key role for the maturation of antigen-containing endosomes. In conclusion, CO produced by HO-1 impairs antigen-dependent inflammation by regulating DC immunogenicity by a mitochondria-dependent mechanism.

  11. A functional recombinant single-chain T cell receptor fragment capable of selectively targeting antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Epel, Malka; Ellenhorn, Joshua D; Diamond, Don J; Reiter, Yoram

    2002-11-01

    Specificity in the immune system is dictated and regulated by specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) by the T cell receptor (TCR). Such peptide/MHC complexes are a desirable target for novel approaches in immunotherapy because of their highly restricted fine specificity. Recently a potent anti-human p53 CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response has been developed in HLA-A2 transgenic mice after immunization with peptides corresponding to HLA-A2 motifs from human p53. An alpha/beta T-cell receptor was cloned from such CTL which exhibited a moderately high affinity to the human p53(149-157) peptide. In this report, we investigated the possibility of using a recombinant tumor-specific TCR for antigen-specific elimination of cells that express the specific MHC-peptide complex. To this end, we constructed a functional single-chain Fv fragment from the cloned TCR and fused it to a very potent cytotoxic molecule, a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38). The p53 TCR scFv-P38 fusion protein was generated by in vitro refolding from bacterially-expressed inclusion bodies, and was found to be functional by its ability to bind antigen-presenting cells (APC) which express the specific p53-derived peptide. Moreover, we have shown that the p53-specific TCR scFv-PE38 molecule specifically kills APC in a peptide-dependent manner. These results represent the first time that a TCR-derived recombinant single-chain Fv fragment has been used as a targeting moiety to deliver a cytotoxic effector molecule to cells and has been able to mediate the efficient killing of the particular cell population that expresses the specific MHC/peptide complex. Similarly to antibody-based targeting approaches, TCR with tumor cell specificity represent attractive candidates for generating new, very specific targeting moieties for various modes of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12384808

  12. Latex bead-based artificial antigen-presenting cells induce tumor-specific CTL responses in the native T-cell repertoires and inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chuanlai; Cheng, Kai; Miao, Shenwei; Wang, Wei; He, Yong; Meng, Fanyan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2013-02-01

    Cell-free artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) were generated by coupling H-2K(b)/TRP2 tetramers together with anti-CD28 and anti-4-1BB antibodies onto cell-sized latex beads and injected intravenously and subcutaneously into naïve mice and antigen-primed mice (B6, H-2K(b)). Vigorous tumor antigen-specific CTL responses in the native T-cell repertoire in each mouse model were elicited as evaluated by measuring surface CD69 and CD25, intracellular IFN-γ, tetramer staining and cytolysis of melanoma cells. Furthermore, the aAPCs efficiently inhibited subcutaneous tumor growth and markedly delayed tumor progression in tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that bead-based aAPCs represent a potential strategy for the active immunotherapy of cancers or persistent infections. PMID:23328744

  13. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  14. Green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate treatment to mouse skin prevents UVB-induced infiltration of leukocytes, depletion of antigen-presenting cells, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Mukhtar, H

    2001-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced infiltrating leukocytes, depletion of antigen-presenting cells, and oxidative stress in the skin play an important role in the induction of immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis. Earlier we have shown that topical application of polyphenols from green tea or its major chemopreventive constituent (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) prevents UV-B-induced immunosuppression in mice. To define the mechanism of prevention, we found that topical application of EGCG (3 mg/mouse/3 cm(2) of skin area) to C3H/HeN mice before a single dose of UV-B (90 mJ/cm(2)) exposure inhibited UV-B-induced infiltration of leukocytes, specifically the CD11b+ cell type, and myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of tissue infiltration of leukocytes. EGCG treatment was also found to prevent UV-B-induced depletion in the number of antigen-presenting cells when immunohistochemically detected as class II MHC+ Ia+ cells. UV-B-induced infiltrating cell production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) was determined as a marker of oxidative stress. We found that pretreatment of EGCG decreased the number of UV-B-induced increases in H2O2-producing cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase-expressing cells and the production of H2O2 and NO in both epidermis and dermis at a UV-B-irradiated site. Together, these data suggest that prevention of UV-B-induced infiltrating leukocytes, antigen-presenting cells, and oxidative stress by EGCG treatment of mouse skin may be associated with the prevention of UV-B-induced immunosuppression and photocarcinogenesis.

  15. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus productively infects monocyte-derived dendritic cells and compromises their antigen-presenting ability.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Eaton, M; Mayer, M; Li, H; He, D; Nelson, E; Christopher-Hennings, J

    2007-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells that play an important role in inducing primary antigen-specific immune responses. However, some viruses have evolved to specifically target DC to circumvent the host's immune responses for their persistence in the host. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes a persistent infection in susceptible animals. Although it is generally believed that the existence of PRRSV quasispecies is partly responsible for the virus persistence, other mechanisms of immune evasion or immune suppression may also exist. Here, we studied the role of DC in PRRSV persistence and immune suppression. Our results showed that PRRSV underwent a productive replication in pig monocyte-derived DC (Mo-DC) as measured by both immunofluorescence staining of viral nucleocapsid protein and virus titration assays, leading to cell death via both apoptosis and necrosis mechanisms. Additionally, PRRSV infection of Mo-DC resulted in reduced expression of MHC class I, MHC class II, CD14 and CD11b/c. This was in agreement with the impaired mixed lymphocyte reaction of PRRSV-infected Mo-DC compared to that of mock-infected Mo-DC. We also examined the cytokine profiles of PRRSV-infected Mo-DC using a quantitative ELISA method. Results indicated that no apparent change in the levels of IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-gamma was detected. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PRRSV productively infects Mo-DC and impairs the normal antigen presentation ability of Mo-DC by inducing cell death, down-regulating the expression of MHC class I, MHC class II, CD11b/c and CD14 and by inducing minimal Th1 cytokines.

  16. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B and US3 Collaborate To Inhibit CD1d Antigen Presentation and NKT Cell Function ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ping; Pham, Hong Thanh; Kulkarni, Arpita; Yang, Yang; Liu, Xueqiao; Knipe, David M.; Cresswell, Peter; Yuan, Weiming

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are prevalent human pathogens that establish latency in human neuronal cells and efficiently evade the immune system. It has been a major medical challenge to eradicate them and, despite intensive efforts, an effective vaccine is not available. We previously showed that upon infection of antigen-presenting cells, HSV type 1 (HSV-1) rapidly and efficiently downregulates the major histocompatibility complex class I-like antigen-presenting molecule, CD1d, and potently inhibits its recognition by CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells. It suppresses CD1d expression primarily by inhibiting its recycling to the cell surface after endocytosis. We identify here the viral glycoprotein B (gB) as the predominant CD1d-interacting protein. gB initiates the interaction with CD1d in the endoplasmic reticulum and stably associates with it throughout CD1d trafficking. However, an additional HSV-1 component, the serine-threonine kinase US3, is required for optimal CD1d downregulation. US3 expression in infected cells leads to gB enrichment in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and enhances the relocalization of both gB and CD1d to this compartment, suggesting that following internalization CD1d is translocated from the endocytic pathway to the TGN by its association with gB. Importantly, both US3 and gB are required for efficient inhibition of CD1d antigen presentation and NKT cell activation. In summary, our results suggest that HSV-1 uses gB and US3 to rapidly inhibit NKT cell function in the initial antiviral response. PMID:21653669

  17. PI3Kδ promotes CD4+ T-cell interactions with antigen-presenting cells by increasing LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Garçon, Fabien; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by peptide/major histocompatibility complex on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involves dynamic contacts between the two cells, during which T cells undergo marked morphological changes. These interactions are facilitated by integrins. Activation of the T cells increases the binding of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed by T cells to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and ICAM-2 expressed by APCs. The signalling pathways that control integrin affinities are incompletely defined. The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) generate second-messenger signalling molecules that control cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking. Here we show that in T cells, PI3Kδ attenuates the activation of Rac1, but sustains the activation of Rap1. Consequently, PI3Kδ increases LFA-1-dependent adhesion to form stable conjugates with APCs. Increased Rap1 activity and LFA-1 adhesion were only in part mediated by the downstream kinase Akt, suggesting the involvement of additional phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3-binding proteins. These results establish a link between PI3K activity, cytoskeletal changes and integrin binding and help explain the impaired T-cell-dependent immune responses in PI3Kδ-deficient mice. PMID:26740009

  18. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C.; Anderson, Amy E.; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S. Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A.; Hutchinson, James A.; Isaacs, John D.; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W.; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application. PMID:27635311

  19. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C.; Anderson, Amy E.; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S. Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A.; Hutchinson, James A.; Isaacs, John D.; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W.; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application.

  20. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies.

    PubMed

    Lord, Phillip; Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C; Anderson, Amy E; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A; Hutchinson, James A; Isaacs, John D; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M; Hilkens, Catharien M U

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application. PMID:27635311

  1. The immunophenotype of antigen presenting cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system in normal human liver--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Otto; Dunbar, P Rod; Bartlett, Adam; Phillips, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    The mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), comprised of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, is essential in tissue homeostasis and in determining the balance of the immune response through its role in antigen presentation. It has been identified as a therapeutic target in infectious disease, cancer, autoimmune disease and transplant rejection. Here, we review the current understanding of the immunophenotype and function of the MPS in normal human liver. Using well-defined selection criteria, a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases identified 76 appropriate studies. The majority (n=67) described Kupffer cells (KCs), although the definition of KC differs between sources, and little data were available regarding their function. Only 10 papers looked at liver dendritic cells (DCs), and largely confirmed the presence of the major dendritic cell subsets identified in human blood. Monocytes were thoroughly characterized in four studies that utilized flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy and highlighted their prominent role in liver homeostasis and displayed subtle differences from circulating monocytes. There was some limited evidence that liver DCs are tolerogenic but neither liver dendritic cell subsets nor macrophages have been thoroughly characterized, using either multi-colour flow cytometry or multi-parameter fluorescence microscopy. The lobular distribution of different subsets of liver MPS cells was also poorly described, and the ability to distinguish between passenger leukocytes and tissue resident cells remains limited. It was apparent that further research, using modern immunological techniques, is now required to accurately characterize the cells of the MPS in human liver.

  2. The NF-κB regulator Bcl-3 governs dendritic cell antigen presentation functions in adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tassi, Ilaria; Claudio, Estefania; Wang, Hongshan; Tang, Wanhu; Ha, Hye-lin; Saret, Sun; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Siegel, Richard; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Bcl-3 is an atypical member of the IκB family and modulates gene expression via interaction with p50/NF-κB1 or p52/NF-κB2 homodimers. We report here that Bcl-3 is required in dendritic cells (DCs) to assure effective priming of CD4 and CD8 T cells. Lack of Bcl-3 in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) blunted their ability to expand and promote effector functions of T cells upon antigen/adjuvant challenge in vitro and after adoptive transfers in vivo. Importantly, the critical role of Bcl-3 for priming of T cells was exposed upon antigen/adjuvant challenge of mice specifically ablated of Bcl-3 in DCs. Furthermore, Bcl-3 in endogenous DCs was necessary for contact hypersensitivity responses. Bcl-3 modestly aided maturation of DCs, but most consequentially, Bcl-3 promoted their survival, partially inhibiting expression of several anti-apoptotic genes. Loss of Bcl-3 accelerated apoptosis of BMDCs during antigen presentation to T cells and DC survival was markedly impaired in the context of inflammatory conditions in mice specifically lacking Bcl-3 in these cells. Conversely, selective over-expression of Bcl-3 in DCs extended their lifespan in vitro and in vivo, correlating with increased capacity to prime T cells. These results expose a previously unidentified function for Bcl-3 in DCs survival and the generation of adaptive immunity. PMID:25246497

  3. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Infects Monocyte-Derived Bovine Dendritic Cells by an E2-Glycoprotein-Mediated Mechanism and Transiently Impairs Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Nancy; Franco-Mahecha, Olga Lucía; Czepluch, Wenzel; Quintana, María Eugenia; Malacari, Darío Amílcar; Trotta, Myrian Vanesa; Mansilla, Florencia Celeste; Capozzo, Alejandra Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Infection of professional antigen presenting cells by viruses can have a marked effect on these cells and important consequences for the generation of subsequent immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that different strains of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infect bovine dendritic cells differentiated from nonadherent peripheral monocytes (moDCs). BVDV did not cause apoptosis in these cells. Infection of moDC was prevented by incubating the virus with anti-E2 antibodies or by pretreating the cells with recombinant E2 protein before BVDV contact, suggesting that BVDV infects moDC through an E2-mediated mechanism. Virus entry was not reduced by incubating moDC with Mannan or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) before infection, suggesting that Ca(2+) and mannose receptor-dependent pathways are not mediating BVDV entry to moDC. Infected moDC did not completely upregulate maturation surface markers. Infection, but not treatment with inactivated virus, prevented moDC to present a third-party antigen to primed CD4(+) T cells within the first 24 hours postinfection (hpi). Antigen-presenting capacity was recovered when viral replication diminished at 48 hpi, suggesting that active infection may interfere with moDC maturation. Altogether, our results suggest an important role of infected DCs in BVDV-induced immunopathogenesis.

  4. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Infects Monocyte-Derived Bovine Dendritic Cells by an E2-Glycoprotein-Mediated Mechanism and Transiently Impairs Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Nancy; Franco-Mahecha, Olga Lucía; Czepluch, Wenzel; Quintana, María Eugenia; Malacari, Darío Amílcar; Trotta, Myrian Vanesa; Mansilla, Florencia Celeste; Capozzo, Alejandra Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Infection of professional antigen presenting cells by viruses can have a marked effect on these cells and important consequences for the generation of subsequent immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that different strains of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infect bovine dendritic cells differentiated from nonadherent peripheral monocytes (moDCs). BVDV did not cause apoptosis in these cells. Infection of moDC was prevented by incubating the virus with anti-E2 antibodies or by pretreating the cells with recombinant E2 protein before BVDV contact, suggesting that BVDV infects moDC through an E2-mediated mechanism. Virus entry was not reduced by incubating moDC with Mannan or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) before infection, suggesting that Ca(2+) and mannose receptor-dependent pathways are not mediating BVDV entry to moDC. Infected moDC did not completely upregulate maturation surface markers. Infection, but not treatment with inactivated virus, prevented moDC to present a third-party antigen to primed CD4(+) T cells within the first 24 hours postinfection (hpi). Antigen-presenting capacity was recovered when viral replication diminished at 48 hpi, suggesting that active infection may interfere with moDC maturation. Altogether, our results suggest an important role of infected DCs in BVDV-induced immunopathogenesis. PMID:27529119

  5. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ. PMID:25835957

  6. The receptor for interleukin-17E is induced by Th2 cytokines in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Gratchev, A; Kzhyshkowska, J; Duperrier, K; Utikal, J; Velten, F W; Goerdt, S

    2004-09-01

    Interleukin-17E (IL-17E) (IL-25) is a recently identified cytokine capable to induce Th2-associated cytokine production (IL-5 and IL-13) and T helper 2 (Th2)-type pathologies in animal models. The IL-17E-responsive cell population in vivo was described to be a further uncharacterized non-T-, non-B-splenic accessory cell. Despite the identification of IL-17BR as the receptor for IL-17E, the cell population expressing IL-17BR has hitherto not been identified. Here, we show that human monocyte-derived Th2-skewed antigen-presenting cells (APC2) express membrane-bound and soluble forms of IL-17BR on the mRNA and protein level upon stimulation with IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 or transforming growth factor-betain vitro. These results indicate that IL-17BR-expressing APC2s may mediate the development of the IL-17E-mediated immunological reaction patterns observed in vivo. PMID:15320879

  7. Peptide-β2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-β2-microglobulin–MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide–MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9·2 × 108 antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:17472719

  8. Peptide-beta2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-beta2-microglobulin-MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide-MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9.2 x 10(8) antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy.

  9. Selection of restriction specificities of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in the thymus: no evidence for a crucial role of antigen-presenting cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1982-12-01

    The proposal was tested that (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressed predominantly P1-restricted T cells because donor derived stem cells were exposed to recipient derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus. Because P1 recipient-derived antigen-presenting cells are replaced only slowly after 6-8 wk by (P1 X P2) donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus and because replenished pools of mature T cells may by then prevent substantial numbers of P2-restricted T cells to be generated, a large portion of thymus cells and mature T cells were eliminated using the following treatments of 12-20-wk-old (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras: (a) cortisone plus antilymphocyte serum, (b) Cytoxan, (c) three doses of sublethal irradiation (300 rad) 2d apart, and (d) lethal irradiation (850 rad) and reconstitution with T cell-depleted (P1 X P2) F1 stem cells. 12-20 wk after this second treatment, (P1 X P2) leads to P1 chimeras were infected with vaccinia-virus. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity was expressed by chimeric T cells of (P1 X P(2) F1 origin and was restricted predominantly to P1. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, therefore, do not seem to be selected to measurable extent by the immigrating donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus; their selection depends apparently from the recipient-derived radioresistant thymus cells.

  10. In vivo functional efficacy of tumor-specific T cells expanded using HLA-Ig based artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC).

    PubMed

    Durai, Malarvizhi; Krueger, Christine; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao; Mackensen, Andreas; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2009-02-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy for treatment of cancers and infectious diseases is often hampered by a high degree of variability in the final T cell product and in the limited in vivo function and survival of ex vivo expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL). This has stimulated interest in development of standardized artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) to reliably expand antigen specific CTL. However, for successful immunotherapy the aAPC ex vivo generated CTL must have anti-tumor activity in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that HLA-Ig based aAPC stimulated tumor-specific CTL from human peripheral blood T lymphocytes showed robust expansion and functional activity in a human/SCID mouse melanoma model. HLA-Ig based aAPC expanded CTL were detected in the peripheral blood up to 15 days after transfer. Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging of tumor bearing mice demonstrated antigen dependent localization of transferred CTL to the tumor site. Moreover, adoptive transfer of HLA-Ig based aAPC generated CTL inhibited the tumor growth both in prevention and treatment modes of therapy and was comparable to that achieved by dendritic cell expanded CTL. Thus, our data demonstrate potential therapeutic in vivo activity of HLA-Ig based aAPC expanded CTL to control tumor growth. PMID:18563409

  11. Dual stimulation of antigen presenting cells using carbon nanotube-based vaccine delivery system for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hatem A F M; Smyth, Lesley; Wang, Julie T-W; Costa, Pedro M; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Diebold, Sandra S; Lombardi, Giovanna; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2016-10-01

    Although anti-cancer immuno-based combinatorial therapeutic approaches have shown promising results, efficient tumour eradication demands further intensification of anti-tumour immune response. With the emerging field of nanovaccinology, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have manifested prominent potentials as tumour antigen nanocarriers. Nevertheless, the utilization of MWNTs in co-delivering antigen along with different types of immunoadjuvants to antigen presenting cells (APCs) has not been investigated yet. We hypothesized that harnessing MWNT for concurrent delivery of cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG) and anti-CD40 Ig (αCD40), as immunoadjuvants, along with the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) could potentiate immune response induced against OVA-expressing tumour cells. We initially investigated the effective method to co-deliver OVA and CpG using MWNT to the APC. Covalent conjugation of OVA and CpG prior to loading onto MWNTs markedly augmented the CpG-mediated adjuvanticity, as demonstrated by the significantly increased OVA-specific T cell responses in vitro and in C57BL/6 mice. αCD40 was then included as a second immunoadjuvant to further intensify the immune response. Immune response elicited in vitro and in vivo by OVA, CpG and αCD40 was significantly potentiated by their co-incorporation onto the MWNTs. Furthermore, MWNT remarkably improved the ability of co-loaded OVA, CpG and αCD40 in inhibiting the growth of OVA-expressing B16F10 melanoma cells in subcutaneous or lung pseudo-metastatic tumour models. Therefore, this study suggests that the utilization of MWNTs for the co-delivery of tumour-derived antigen, CpG and αCD40 could be a competent approach for efficient tumours eradication.

  12. Availability of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 to antigen presenting cells controls the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Louisa E.; Wood, Alice M.; Qureshi, Omar S; Hou, Tie Zheng; Gardner, David; Briggs, Zoe; Kaur, Satdip; Raza, Karim; Sansom, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the active form of vitamin D, exerts potent effects on several tissues including cells of the immune system, where it affects T cell activation, differentiation and migration. The circulating, inactive form of vitamin D, 25(OH)D3, is generally used as an indication of “vitamin D status”. However, utilization of this precursor depends on its uptake by cells and subsequent conversion by the enzyme 25(OH)D3-1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) into active 1,25(OH)2D3. Using human T cells, we now show that addition of inactive 25(OH)D3 is sufficient to alter T cell responses only when dendritic cells (DCs) are present. Mechanistically, CYP27B1 is induced in DCs upon maturation with LPS or upon T cell contact resulting in the generation and release of 1,25(OH)2D3 which subsequently affects T cell responses. In most tissues, vitamin D binding protein (DBP) acts as a carrier to enhance the utilization of vitamin D. However, we show that DBP modulates T cell responses by restricting the availability of inactive 25(OH)D3 to DC. These data indicate that the level of “free” 25(OH)D3 available to DCs determines the inflammatory/regulatory balance of ensuing T cell responses. PMID:23087405

  13. A Toll-like receptor 2 agonist-fused antigen enhanced antitumor immunity by increasing antigen presentation and the CD8 memory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiao-Chieh; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Leng, Chih-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    The induction of long-lived effector CD8+ T cells is key to the development of efficient cancer vaccines. In this study, we demonstrated that a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-fused antigen increased antigen presentation via TLR2 signaling and induced effector memory-like CD8+ T cells against cancer after immunization. The N-terminus of ovalbumin (OVA) was biologically fused with a bacterial lipid moiety TLR2 agonist to produce a recombinant lipidated ovalbumin (rlipo-OVA). We demonstrated that rlipo-OVA activated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) maturation and increased antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I via TLR2. After immunization, rlipo-OVA skewed the immune response towards T helper (Th) 1 and induced OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Moreover, immunization with rlipo-OVA induced higher numbers of effector memory (CD44+CD62L−) CD8+ T cells compared with recombinant ovalbumin (rOVA) alone or rOVA mixed with the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4. Accordingly, the CD27+CD43+ effector memory CD8+ T cells expressed high levels of the long-lived CD127 marker. The administration of rlipo-OVA could inhibit tumor growth, but the anti-tumor effects were lost after the depletion of CD8 or CD127 cells in vivo. These findings suggested that the TLR2 agonist-fused antigen induced long-lived memory CD8+ T cells for efficient cancer therapy. PMID:27127171

  14. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies.

  15. Mycobacterium-Specific γ9δ2 T Cells Mediate Both Pathogen-Inhibitory and CD40 Ligand-Dependent Antigen Presentation Effects Important for Tuberculosis Immunity.

    PubMed

    Abate, Getahun; Spencer, Charles T; Hamzabegovic, Fahreta; Blazevic, Azra; Xia, Mei; Hoft, Daniel F

    2016-02-01

    Numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can activate human γ9δ2 T cells to proliferate and express effector mechanisms. γ9δ2 T cells can directly inhibit the growth of intracellular mycobacteria and may also act as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Despite evidence for γδ T cells having the capacity to function as APC, the mechanisms involved and importance of these effects on overall tuberculosis (TB) immunity are unknown. We prepared M. tuberculosis-specific γ9δ2 T cell lines to study their direct protective effects and APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells. The direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria were measured, and the enhancing effects on proliferative and effector responses of αβ T cells assessed. Furthermore, the importance of cell-to-cell contact and soluble products for γ9δ2 T cell effector responses and APC functions were investigated. We demonstrate, in addition to direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria, the following: (i) γ9δ2 T cells enhance the expansion of M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells and increase the ability of αβ T cells to inhibit intracellular mycobacteria; (ii) although soluble mediators are critical for the direct inhibitory effects of γ9δ2 T cells, their APC functions do not require soluble mediators; (iii) the APC functions of γ9δ2 T cells involve cell-to-cell contact that is dependent on CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) interactions; and (iv) fully activated CD4(+) αβ T cells and γ9δ2 T cells provide similar immune enhancing/APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. These effector and helper effects of γ9δ2 T cells further indicate that these T cells should be considered important new targets for new TB vaccines.

  16. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing HLA class II molecules as an effective tool for amplifying human specific memory CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Anthony; Hamieh, Mohamad; Drouet, Aurélie; Leprince, Jérôme; Vivien, Denis; Frébourg, Thierry; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Toutirais, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Owing to their multiple immune functions, CD4(+) T cells are of major interest for immunotherapy in chronic viral infections and cancer, as well as for severe autoimmune diseases and transplantation. Therefore, standardized methods allowing rapid generation of a large number of CD4(+) T cells for adoptive immunotherapy are still awaited. We constructed stable artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) derived from mouse fibroblasts. They were genetically modified to express human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules and the human accessory molecules B7.1, Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-3 (LFA-3). AAPCs expressing HLA-DR1, HLA-DR15 or HLA-DR51 molecules and loaded with peptides derived from influenza hemagglutinin (HA), myelin basic protein (MBP) or factor VIII, respectively, activated specific CD4(+) T-cell clones more effectively than Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells. We also showed that AAPCs were able to take up and process whole Ag proteins, and present epitopes to specific T cells. In primary cultures, AAPCs loaded with HA peptide allowed generation of specific Th1 lymphocytes from healthy donors as demonstrated by tetramer and intracellular cytokine staining. Although AAPCs were less effective than autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to stimulate CD4(+) T cells in primary culture, AAPCs were more potent to reactivate and expand memory Th1 cells in a strictly Ag-dependent manner. As the availability of autologous APCs is limited, the AAPC system represents a stable and reliable tool to achieve clinically relevant numbers of CD4(+) T cells for adoptive immunotherapy. For fundamental research in immunology, AAPCs are also useful to decipher mechanisms involved in the development of human CD4 T-cell responses. PMID:26924643

  17. Suppressive effects of Bifidobacterium longum on the production of Th2-attracting chemokines induced with T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Noritoshi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2009-04-01

    In human trials, Bifidobacterium longum BB536 alleviates subjective symptoms of Japanese cedar pollinosis, an IgE-mediated type I allergy caused by exposure to Japanese cedar, and significantly suppresses the increase of plasma thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) associated with pollen dispersion. In the present study, we investigated the suppressive effects of BB536 on the production of T helper type 2 (Th2)-attracting chemokines, such as TARC and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), together with the mechanisms of their production. Murine splenocytes were cultured with heat-killed BB536, and the levels of Th2-attracting chemokines in the supernatants were measured. TARC and MDC were produced in cultures without stimulation, and the production was significantly suppressed by BB536. These chemokines were produced by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of splenocytes stimulated with an anti-CD40 antibody. Furthermore, TARC production was induced with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor that was produced by T cells and dendritic cells. BB536 suppressed MDC production induced with the anti-CD40 antibody by APCs from the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches, and it suppressed TARC production by APCs from the spleen and MLNs. These results indicate that BB536 suppresses the production of Th2-attracting chemokines induced by the T cell-APC interaction, suggesting a novel mechanism for alleviating symptoms of allergic disorders by probiotics.

  18. Mature dendritic cells generated from patient-derived peripheral blood monocytes in one-step culture using streptococcal preparation OK-432 exert an enhanced antigen-presenting capacity.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kei; Ueda, Yuji; Itoh, Tsuyoshi; Fuji, Nobuaki; Shimizu, Keiji; Yano, Yutaro; Yamamoto, Yoshiki; Imura, Kenichiro; Kohara, Junji; Iwamoto, Arihiro; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Tamai, Hidemasa; Shimizu, Takeshi; Mazda, Osam; Yamagishi, Hisakazu

    2006-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to be potent in inducing cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response leading to the efficient anti-tumor effect in active immunotherapy. Myeloid DCs are conventionally generated from human peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Streptococcal preparation OK-432, which is known to be a multiple cytokine inducer, has been extensively studied as to its maturation effects on immature DCs using an in vitro culture system. The purpose of this study was to examine whether it could be possible to generate mature DCs directly from peripheral monocytes using OK-432. We specifically focused on the possibility that recombinant cytokines, which are considered to be essential for in vitro DC generation, could be substituted by OK-432. Human peripheral monocytes, which were obtained from patients with advanced cancer, were cultured with IL-4 and OK-432 for 7 days. Cultured cells were compared with DCs generated in the presence of IL-4 and GM-CSF with or without OK-432 with regard to the surface phenotype as well as the antigen-presenting capacity. As a result, the culture of monocytes in the presence of IL-4 followed by the addition of OK-432 on day 4 (IL-4/OK-DC) induced cells with a fully mature DC phenotype. Functional assays also demonstrated that IL-4/OK-DCs had a strong antigen-presenting capacity determined by their enhanced antigen-specific CTL response and exerted a Th1-type T cell response which is critical for the induction of anti-tumor response. In conclusion, human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in the presence of IL-4 and OK-432 without exogenous GM-CSF demonstrated a fully mature DC phenotype and strong antigen-presenting capacity. This one-step culture protocol allows us to generate fully mature DCs directly from monocytes in 7 days and thus, this protocol can be applicable for DC-based anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  19. Artificial antigen-presenting cells engineered by recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing antigen, MHC class II, and costimulatory molecules elicit proliferation of CD4+ lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oertli, D; Marti, W R; Norton, J A; Tsung, K

    1997-10-01

    The current study was designed to test the ability of recombinant Vaccinia virus (rVV) encoding essential components of an artificial antigen-presenting cell to activate antigen-specific T cells in vitro. We have constructed a set of rVV encoding separately or in combination a CD4+ T cell-specific epitope (the 133-145 peptide of chicken conalbumin), the MHC class II molecule I-Ak, and costimulatory molecules (mB7-1 and mB7-2). Cultured cells infected with rVV encoding both the antigen and the presenting MHC, but not either one alone, could activate cloned CD4+ T cells specific for the virus-encoded epitope. Additional co-expression of mB7-1 and mB7-2 resulted in further enhancement of T cell response. Thus, our rVV vector expressing four different foreign gene products elicited the highest proliferation rates of antigen-specific cloned T cells. PMID:9353162

  20. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination. PMID:24384300

  1. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination.

  2. The role of a human antigen specific T8+ cell subset in antigen presentation, helper function and contrasuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Avery, J; Jones, T

    1985-01-01

    Regulation of the human immune response was studied by sequential separation of subsets of T cells, followed by assessment of their helper and suppressor functions in a series of reconstitution experiments. T8+ lymphocytes were separated by panning on streptococcal antigen (SA) coated plates into T8+ SA-adherent cells (T8+SA+) and T8+ SA-non-adherent cells (T8+SA-). The helper and suppressor functions of the T8+SA+ and T8+SA- cells, reconstituted with T4+ helper cells were then studied by a direct antibody forming cell assay. T4+ cells will not induce helper activity by 1000 ng SA alone but require the accessory function of monocytes (Mo). However, replacing Mo by T8+SA+ cells will elicit a similar helper activity by T4+ cells and SA as that induced by Mo. In addition to the antigen-specific presentation and induction of helper activity, the T8+SA+ subset displays the properties of antigen-specific contrasuppressor cells. Thus, reconstitution of T4+ cells and T8+SA- (suppressor cells) with T8+SA+ and 1000 ng SA induces helper and no suppressor activity. Substitution of Mo for the T8+SA+ cells converts the helper to a predominantly suppressor-cell function. T8+SA- cells elicit suppression with 1 ng SA in the absence of accessory cells and reconstitution with Mo, T8+SA+ or T4+ cells failed to affect the suppressor activity. Total reconstitution of the four principle subsets of T4+, T8+SA+, T8+SA- cells and Mo elicited similar antigen dose-dependent responses as those of the unseparated mononuclear cells. It seems that all four cell subsets are required for optimal immunoregulation. We suggest that the T8+SA+ can present antigen to T4+ helper cells and induce helper activity, but in addition these cells can prevent the suppressor subset of T8+ cells from inhibiting T4+ helper cells and function as contrasuppressor cells. The mechanism of these functions is not known but HLA class II antigens might play an essential role in antigen binding, presentation and

  3. Artificial antigen-presenting cells transduced with telomerase efficiently expand epitope-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Jakob; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Ma, Chia; Sadelain, Michel

    2005-06-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is overexpressed in most human tumors, making it a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. hTERT-derived CTL epitopes have been identified previously, including p865 (RLVDDFLLV) and p540 (ILAKFLHWL), which are restricted by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I A*0201 allele. However, it remains a major challenge to efficiently and consistently expand hTERT-specific CTLs from donor peripheral blood T lymphocytes. To bypass the need for generating conventional antigen-presenting cells (APC) on an autologous basis, we investigated the potential ability of fibroblast-derived artificial APCs (AAPC) to activate and expand HLA-A*0201-restricted CTLs. We show here that AAPCs stably expressing HLA-A*0201, human beta(2)-microglobulin, B7.1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and LFA-3, together with either p540 and p865 minigenes or the full-length hTERT, effectively stimulate tumoricidal, hTERT-specific CTLs. hTERT-expressing AAPCs stimulated both p540 and p865 CTLs as shown by peptide-specific cytolysis and tetramer staining, indicating that hTERT is processed by the AAPCs and that the two peptides are presented as codominant epitopes. The level of cytotoxic activity against a panel of tumors comprising hematologic and epithelial malignancies varied, correlating overall with the level of HLA-A2 and hTERT expression by the target cell. Starting from 100 mL blood, approximately 100 million hTERT-specific CTLs could be generated over the course of five sequential stimulations, representing an expansion of approximately 1 x 10(5). Our data show that AAPCs process hTERT antigen and efficiently stimulate hTERT-specific CTLs from human peripheral blood T lymphocytes and suggest that sufficient expansion could be achieved to be clinically useful for adoptive cell therapy.

  4. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8(+) and CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4(+) T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  5. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4+ T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8+ or CD4+ T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  6. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 on Antigen-presenting Cells Facilitates the Induction of Antigen-specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes: Application to Adoptive T-Cell Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsunori; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takagi, Erina; Miyao, Kotaro; Koyama, Daisuke; Sakemura, Reona; Hanajiri, Ryo; Watanabe, Keisuke; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Terakura, Seitaro; Murata, Makoto; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) binds to programmed death-1 (PD-1) on activated T cells and contributes to T-cell exhaustion. PD-L1 expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) could be thought to inhibit the induction of Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by transducing negative signal into T cells; however, the roles of PD-L1 on APCs have not yet been well examined. Therefore, we evaluated the roles of PD-L1 on APCs in the induction of Ag-specific CTLs. CD3 T cells isolated from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive healthy donors were stimulated with mature dendritic cells pulsed with CMV pp65-derived HLA-restricted peptides in the presence of anti-PD-L1 blocking antibody. Unexpectedly, PD-L1 blockade resulted in a less efficient induction of CMV-specific CTLs, suggesting that PD-L1 play a positive role in the induction of Ag-specific CTLs. For further evaluations and application to adoptive immunotherapy, we generated K562-based artificial APCs, which were retrovirally transduced with HLA class I molecules and various combinations of CD80/86 and PD-L1. K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells produced significantly higher induction of CMV-specific CTLs than K562/HLA or K562/HLA+CD80/86 cells without causing excessive differentiation or functional exhaustion of the induced CTLs, whereas PD-L1 itself did not have a stimulatory effect. Furthermore, only K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells pulsed with HLA-A*24:02-restricted Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide clearly expanded WT1-specific CTLs from healthy donors. Our findings presumed that PD-L1 expressed on APCs along with CD80/86 enhanced the induction of Ag-specific CTLs probably depending on fine-tuning excessive stimulation of CD80/86, and that K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells has therapeutic potential as a novel type of artificial APCs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27548033

  7. Privileged Antigen Presentation in Splenic B Cell Follicles Maximizes T Cell Responses in Prime-Boost Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bridle, Byram W; Nguyen, Andrew; Salem, Omar; Zhang, Liang; Koshy, Sandeep; Clouthier, Derek; Chen, Lan; Pol, Jonathan; Swift, Stephanie L; Bowdish, Dawn M E; Lichty, Brian D; Bramson, Jonathan L; Wan, Yonghong

    2016-06-01

    Effector T cells (TEFF) are a barrier to booster vaccination because they can rapidly kill Ag-bearing APCs before memory T cells are engaged. We report in this study that i.v. delivery of rhabdoviral vectors leads to direct infection of follicular B cells in the spleen, where the earliest evidence of secondary T cell responses was observed. This allows booster immunizations to rapidly expand CD8(+) central memory T cells (TCM) during the acute phase of the primary response that is dominated by TEFF Interestingly, although the ablation of B cells before boosting with rhabdoviral vectors diminishes the expansion of memory T cells, B cells do not present Ags directly. Instead, depletion of CD11c(+) dendritic cells abrogates secondary T cell expansion, suggesting that virus-infected follicular B cells may function as an Ag source for local DCs to subsequently capture and present the Ag. Because TCM are located within B cell follicles in the spleen whereas TEFF cannot traffic through follicular regions, Ag production and presentation by follicular APCs represent a unique mechanism to secure engagement of TCM during an ongoing effector response. Our data offer insights into novel strategies for rapid expansion of CD8(+) T cells using prime-boost vaccines by targeting privileged sites for Ag presentation. PMID:27183620

  8. Induction of antigen-presenting capacity in tumor cells upon infection with non-replicating recombinant vaccinia virus encoding murine MHC class II and costimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Marti, W R; Oertli, D; Meko, J B; Norton, J A; Tsung, K

    1997-01-15

    The possibility of inducing antigen-presenting capacity in cells normally lacking such capacity, currently represents a major goal in vaccine research. To address this issue we attempted to generate 'artificial' APC able to stimulate CD4+ T cell responses when tumor cells were infected with a single, recombinant, vaccinia virus (rVV) containing the two genes encoding murine MHC class II I-Ak and a third gene encoding the murine B7-1 (mB7-1) costimulatory molecule. To minimize the cytopathic effect and to improve safety, in view of possible in vivo applications, we made this rVV replication incompetent by Psoralen and long wave UV treatment. Tumor cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak alone, pulsed with hen egg white lysozyme peptide (HEL46-61), induced IL-2 secretion by an antigen-specific T hybridoma. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding mB7-1 provided costimulation for activating resting CD4+ T cells in the presence of ConA. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding I-Ak and mB7-1, and pulsed with chicken ovotransferrin peptide (conalbumin133-145), induced a significantly higher response in a specific Th2 cell clone (D10.G4.1) as compared to cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak molecules only. Thus, this replication incompetent rVV represents a safe, multiple gene, vector system able to confer in one single infection step effective APC capacity to non-professional APCs.

  9. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2016-08-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-K(b) complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  10. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan

    2016-01-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-Kb complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  11. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A.; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease. PMID:27191161

  12. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B; Janosko, Krisztina B; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease. PMID:27191161

  13. The NS1 protein of influenza A virus suppresses interferon-regulated activation of antigen-presentation and immune-proteasome pathways.

    PubMed

    Tisoncik, Jennifer R; Billharz, Rosalind; Burmakina, Svetlana; Belisle, Sarah E; Proll, Sean C; Korth, Marcus J; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Garcíia-Sastre, Adolfo; Katze, Michael G

    2011-09-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza virus counters host antiviral defences primarily by antagonizing the type I interferon (IFN) response. Both the N-terminal dsRNA-binding domain and the C-terminal effector domain are required for optimal suppression of host responses during infection. To better understand the regulatory role of the NS1 effector domain, we used an NS1-truncated mutant virus derived from human H1N1 influenza isolate A/Texas/36/91 (Tx/91) and assessed global transcriptional profiles from two independent human lung cell-culture models. Relative to the wild-type Tx/91-induced gene expression, the NS1 mutant virus induced enhanced expression of innate immune genes, specifically NF-κB signalling-pathway genes and IFN-α and -β target genes. We queried an experimentally derived IFN gene set to gauge the proportion of IFN-responsive genes that are suppressed specifically by NS1. We show that the C-terminally truncated NS1 mutant virus is less efficient at suppressing IFN-regulated gene expression associated with activation of antigen-presentation and immune-proteasome pathways. This is the first report integrating genomic analysis from two independent human culture systems, including primary lung cells, using genetically similar H1N1 influenza viruses that differ only in the length of the NS1 protein.

  14. The NS1 protein of influenza A virus suppresses interferon-regulated activation of antigen-presentation and immune-proteasome pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tisoncik, Jennifer R.; Billharz, Rosalind; Burmakina, Svetlana; Belisle, Sarah E.; Proll, Sean C.; Korth, Marcus J.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza virus counters host antiviral defences primarily by antagonizing the type I interferon (IFN) response. Both the N-terminal dsRNA-binding domain and the C-terminal effector domain are required for optimal suppression of host responses during infection. To better understand the regulatory role of the NS1 effector domain, we used an NS1-truncated mutant virus derived from human H1N1 influenza isolate A/Texas/36/91 (Tx/91) and assessed global transcriptional profiles from two independent human lung cell-culture models. Relative to the wild-type Tx/91-induced gene expression, the NS1 mutant virus induced enhanced expression of innate immune genes, specifically NF-κB signalling-pathway genes and IFN-α and -β target genes. We queried an experimentally derived IFN gene set to gauge the proportion of IFN-responsive genes that are suppressed specifically by NS1. We show that the C-terminally truncated NS1 mutant virus is less efficient at suppressing IFN-regulated gene expression associated with activation of antigen-presentation and immune-proteasome pathways. This is the first report integrating genomic analysis from two independent human culture systems, including primary lung cells, using genetically similar H1N1 influenza viruses that differ only in the length of the NS1 protein. PMID:21593271

  15. In vivo anti-melanoma efficacy of allo-restricted CTLs specific for melanoma expanded by artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-ling; Jiang, Xiao-bing; Liu, Ru-en; Zhang, Sheng-min; Liang, Z-h

    2009-04-01

    Cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells are key effectors in the immunotherapy of malignant and viral diseases. However, autologous T cell responses to tumor antigens presented by self-MHC are usually weak and ineffective. Allo-restricted T cells represent a potent source of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy. This study reports in vivo anti-melanoma efficacy of the pTRP2-specific allo-restricted CTLs expanded from the BALB/c splenocytes by multiple stimulations with aAPCs made by coating H-2K(b)-Ig/pTRP2 dimeric complexes, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL molecules and CD83 molecules to cell-sized latex beads. The induced allo-restricted CTLs exhibited specific lysis against RMA-S cells pulsed with the peptide pTRP2 and H-2K(b+) melanoma cells expressing TRP2, while a murine Lewis lung carcinoma cell line 3LL could not be recognized by the CTLs. The peptide-specific activity was inhibited by anti-H-2K(b) monoclonal antibody Y3. Adoptive transfer of the allo-restricted CTLs specific for malignant melanoma expanded by the aAPCs can mediate effective anti-melanoma response in vivo. These results suggested that the specific allo-restricted CTLs expanded by aAPCs coated with an MHC-Ig/peptide complex, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL and CD83 could be a potential option of specific immunotherapy for patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:18682943

  16. Delivery of Large Heterologous Polypeptides across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Bordetella RTX Hemolysin Moiety Lacking the Adenylyl Cyclase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Holubova, Jana; Jelinek, Jiri; Tomala, Jakub; Masin, Jiri; Kosova, Martina; Stanek, Ondrej; Bumba, Ladislav; Michalek, Jaroslav; Kovar, Marek; Sebo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA; also called ACT or AC-Hly) targets CD11b-expressing phagocytes and translocates into their cytosol an adenylyl cyclase (AC) that hijacks cellular signaling by conversion of ATP to cyclic AMP (cAMP). Intriguingly, insertion of large passenger peptides removes the enzymatic activity but not the cell-invasive capacity of the AC domain. This has repeatedly been exploited for delivery of heterologous antigens into the cytosolic pathway of CD11b-expressing dendritic cells by CyaA/AC− toxoids, thus enabling their processing and presentation on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs). We produced a set of toxoids with overlapping deletions within the first 371 residues of CyaA and showed that the structure of the AC enzyme does not contain any sequences indispensable for its translocation across target cell membrane. Moreover, replacement of the AC domain (residues 1 to 371) with heterologous polypeptides of 40, 146, or 203 residues yielded CyaAΔAC constructs that delivered passenger CTL epitopes into antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induced strong antigen-specific CD8+ CTL responses in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. This shows that the RTX (repeats in toxin) hemolysin moiety, consisting of residues 374 to 1706 of CyaA, harbors all structural information involved in translocation of the N-terminal AC domain across target cell membranes. These results decipher the extraordinary capacity of the AC domain of CyaA to transport large heterologous cargo polypeptides into the cytosol of CD11b+ target cells and pave the way for the construction of CyaAΔAC-based polyvalent immunotherapeutic T cell vaccines. PMID:22215742

  17. Virus-triggered acquired immunodeficiency by cytotoxic T-cell-dependent destruction of antigen-presenting cells and lymph follicle structure.

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, B; Eppler, M; Leist, T P; Hengartner, H; Zinkernagel, R M

    1991-01-01

    Virus-induced acquired immune suppression in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is shown here to be caused by the CD8+-T-cell-dependent elimination of macrophages/antigen-presenting cells. Surprisingly, this is associated with severe destruction of the follicular organization of lymphoid organs, indicating a crucial role for dendritic cells and marginal zone macrophages in maintaining follicular structure. Once established, this immunopathology cannot be readily reversed by the elimination of CD8+ effector cells. Such a T-cell-mediated pathogenesis may play a pivotal role in acquired virus-induced immunosuppression and may represent one strategy by which virus escapes immune surveillance and establishes persistent infections in initially immunocompetent hosts. Images PMID:1910175

  18. Nanoparticle-based targeting of vaccine compounds to skin antigen-presenting cells by hair follicles and their transport in mice.

    PubMed

    Mahe, Brice; Vogt, Annika; Liard, Christelle; Duffy, Darragh; Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Sterry, Wolfram; Verrier, Bernard; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Combadiere, Behazine

    2009-05-01

    Particle-based drug delivery systems target active compounds to the hair follicle and may result in a better penetration and higher efficiency of compound uptake by skin resident cells. As previously proposed, such delivery systems could be important tools for vaccine delivery. In this study, we investigated the penetration of solid fluorescent 40 or 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) as well as virus particles in murine skin to further investigate the efficacy of transcutaneously (TC) applied particulate vaccine delivery route. We demonstrated that 40 and 200 nm NPs and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing the green-fluorescent protein penetrated deeply into hair follicles and were internalized by perifollicular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fibered-based confocal microscopy analyses allowed visualizing in vivo particle penetration along the follicular duct, diffusion into the surrounding tissue, uptake by APCs and transport to the draining lymph nodes. The application of small particles, such as ovalbumin coding DNA or MVA, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, TC applied MVA induced protection against vaccinia virus challenge. Our results strengthen the concept of TC targeting of cutaneous APCs by hair follicles and will contribute to the development of advanced vaccination protocols using NPs or viral vectors. PMID:19052565

  19. Nanoparticle-based targeting of vaccine compounds to skin antigen-presenting cells by hair follicles and their transport in mice.

    PubMed

    Mahe, Brice; Vogt, Annika; Liard, Christelle; Duffy, Darragh; Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Sterry, Wolfram; Verrier, Bernard; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Combadiere, Behazine

    2009-05-01

    Particle-based drug delivery systems target active compounds to the hair follicle and may result in a better penetration and higher efficiency of compound uptake by skin resident cells. As previously proposed, such delivery systems could be important tools for vaccine delivery. In this study, we investigated the penetration of solid fluorescent 40 or 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) as well as virus particles in murine skin to further investigate the efficacy of transcutaneously (TC) applied particulate vaccine delivery route. We demonstrated that 40 and 200 nm NPs and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing the green-fluorescent protein penetrated deeply into hair follicles and were internalized by perifollicular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fibered-based confocal microscopy analyses allowed visualizing in vivo particle penetration along the follicular duct, diffusion into the surrounding tissue, uptake by APCs and transport to the draining lymph nodes. The application of small particles, such as ovalbumin coding DNA or MVA, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, TC applied MVA induced protection against vaccinia virus challenge. Our results strengthen the concept of TC targeting of cutaneous APCs by hair follicles and will contribute to the development of advanced vaccination protocols using NPs or viral vectors.

  20. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  1. Characterization of direct radiation-induced immune function and molecular signaling changes in an antigen presenting cell line

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jennifer J.; Jones, Jennifer C.; Strober, Samuel; Knox, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment and pre-transplantation conditioning regimen that has the potential to influence anti-tumor and post-transplantation immune responses. Although conventionally fractionated radiation doses can suppress immune responses by depleting lymphocytes, single high doses of local tumor radiation can enhance immune responses. Using phospho-flow cytometry analysis of a human monocytic cell line, we identified novel radiation-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of NFκB family members known in other cell types to maintain and regulate immune function. These phosphorylation changes were p53 independent, but were strongly dependent upon ATM activation due to DNA damage. We found that radiation promotes the activation and APC functional maturation through phosphorylation of NFκB Essential Modulator (NEMO). Our results and the analytic methods are especially well suited to the study of functional changes in APC when radiation is used for immune modulation in clinical protocols. PMID:23649044

  2. Microbial Induction of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Associated Gene TL1A (TNFSF15) in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, David Q.; Kwan, Lola Y.; Chavez, Valerie; Cohavy, Offer; Gonsky, Rivkah; Chang, Elmer Y.; Chang, Christopher; Elson, Charles O.; Targan, Stephan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary TL1A is a member of the TNF superfamily and its expression is increased in the mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Neutralizing anti-mouse TL1A Ab attenuates chronic colitis in two T cell driven murine models, suggesting that TL1A is a central modulator of gut mucosal inflammation in IBD. We showed previously that TL1A is induced by immune complexes (IC) via the FcγR signaling pathway. In this study, we report that multiple bacteria, including gram negative organisms (E. coli, E. coli Nissle 1917, S. typhimurium), gram positive organisms (L. monocytogenes, S. epidermidis), partial anaerobes (C. jejuni), and obligate anaerobes (B. thetaiotaomicron, B. breve, Clostridium A4) activate TL1A expression in human APC, including monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Bacterially induced TL1A mRNA expression correlates with the detection of TL1A protein levels. TL1A induced by bacteria is mediated in part by the TLR signaling pathway and inhibited by downstream blockade of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation. Microbial induction of TL1A production by human APC potentiated CD4+ T cell effector function by augmenting IFN-γ production. Our findings suggest a role for TL1A in pro-inflammatory APC-T cell interactions and implicate TL1A in host responses to enteric microorganisms. PMID:19839006

  3. Microbial induction of inflammatory bowel disease associated gene TL1A (TNFSF15) in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, David Q; Kwan, Lola Y; Chavez, Valerie; Cohavy, Offer; Gonsky, Rivkah; Chang, Elmer Y; Chang, Christopher; Elson, Charles O; Targan, Stephan R

    2009-11-01

    TL1A is a member of the TNF superfamily and its expression is increased in the mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Neutralizing anti-mouse TL1A Ab attenuates chronic colitis in two T-cell driven murine models, suggesting that TL1A is a central modulator of gut mucosal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We showed previously that TL1A is induced by immune complexes via the Fc gamma R signaling pathway. In this study, we report that multiple bacteria, including gram negative organisms (E. coli, E. coli Nissle 1917, Salmonella typhimurium), gram positive organisms (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis), partial anaerobes (Campylobacter jejuni), and obligate anaerobes (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bifidobacterium breve, Clostridium A4) activate TL1A expression in human APC, including monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Bacterially induced TL1A mRNA expression correlates with the detection of TL1A protein levels. TL1A induced by bacteria is mediated in part by the TLR signaling pathway and inhibited by downstream blockade of p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB activation. Microbial induction of TL1A production by human APC potentiated CD4(+) T-cell effector function by augmenting IFN-gamma production. Our findings suggest a role for TL1A in pro-inflammatory APC-T cell interactions and implicate TL1A in host responses to enteric microorganisms.

  4. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Varani, Stefania; Gelsomino, Francesco; Bartoletti, Michele; Viale, Pierluigi; Mastroianni, Antonio; Briganti, Elisabetta; Ortolani, Patrizia; Albertini, Francesco; Calzetti, Carlo; Prati, Francesca; Cenni, Patrizia; Castellani, Gastone; Morini, Silvia; Rossini, Giada; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2015-11-11

    Toscana virus (TOSV) is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS) cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS.

  5. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Stefania; Gelsomino, Francesco; Bartoletti, Michele; Viale, Pierluigi; Mastroianni, Antonio; Briganti, Elisabetta; Ortolani, Patrizia; Albertini, Francesco; Calzetti, Carlo; Prati, Francesca; Cenni, Patrizia; Castellani, Gastone; Morini, Silvia; Rossini, Giada; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV) is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS) cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS. PMID:26569288

  6. Identification of the major T-cell antigens present in the Brucella melitensis B115 protein preparation, Brucellergene OCB.

    PubMed

    Denoel, P A; Vo, T K; Weynants, V E; Tibor, A; Gilson, D; Zygmunt, M S; Limet, J N; Letesson, J J

    1997-09-01

    Brucellergene is a commercial allergen prepared from Brucella melitensis strain B115 and containing at least 20 cytoplasmic proteins. These proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. The unstained gel was divided into 18 fractions and proteins were eluted from the gel fractions. The capacity of the separated proteins to elicit delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in infected guinea-pigs or to induce the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by blood cells from infected cattle was evaluated. The biological activity of the corresponding protein fractions blotted on to nitrocellulose was measured in a lymphocyte blastogenesis assay. Among the 18 fractions tested, two-spanning the mol. wt ranges 17-22 (fraction 8) and 35-42-kDa (fraction 17)-showed the maximum biological activity in the three tests. These fractions contain two antigens, the Brucella bacterioferritin (BFR) and P39 proteins. Both proteins are good candidates for the detection of cellular immunity to Brucella. PMID:9291893

  7. The ABCs of artificial antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyun V; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2004-04-01

    Artificial antigen presentation aims to accelerate the establishment of therapeutic cellular immunity. Artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) and their cell-free substitutes are designed to stimulate the expansion and acquisition of optimal therapeutic features of T cells before therapeutic infusion, without the need for autologous antigen-presenting cells. Compelling recent advances include fibroblast AAPCs that process antigens, magnetic beads that are antigen specific, novel T-cell costimulatory combinations, the augmentation of therapeutic potency of adoptively transferred T lymphocytes by interleukin-15, and the safe use of dendritic cell-derived exosomes pulsed with tumor antigen. Whereas the safety and potency of the various systems warrant further preclinical and clinical studies, these emerging technologies are poised to have a major impact on adoptive T-cell therapy and the investigation of T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:15060556

  8. CD80 and CD86 Costimulatory Molecules Differentially Regulate OT-II CD4+ T Lymphocyte Proliferation and Cytokine Response in Cocultures with Antigen-Presenting Cells Derived from Pregnant and Pseudopregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maj, Tomasz; Slawek, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Immune phenomena during the preimplantation period of pregnancy are poorly understood. The aim of our study was to assess the capacity for antigen presentation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice in in vitro conditions. Therefore, sorted CD11c+ dendritic cells and macrophages F4/80+ and CD11b+ presenting ovalbumin (OVA) were cocultured with CD4+ T cells derived from OT-II mice's (C57BL6/J-Tg(TcraTcrb)1100Mjb/J) spleen. After 132 hours of cell culture, proliferation of lymphocytes (ELISA-BrdU), activation of these cells (flow cytometry), cytokine profile (ELISA), and influence of costimulatory molecules blocking on these parameters were measured. We did not detect any differences in regulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. CD86 seems to be the main costimulatory molecule involved in the proliferation response but CD80 is the main costimulatory molecule influencing cytokine secretion in pregnant mice. In conclusion, this study showed that CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules regulate OT-II CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine response in cocultures with antigen-presenting cells derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. The implications of these changes still remain unclear. PMID:24771983

  9. Lipid antigen presentation through CD1d pathway in mouse lung epithelial cells, macrophages and dendritic cells and its suppression by poly-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Zaigham Abbas; Puri, Niti; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2015-09-01

    Effect of poly-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs) was examined on lipid antigen presentation through CD1d pathway on three cell lines, LA4, MHS, and JAWSII used as prototype antigen presenting cells (APCs). CD1d molecule was expressed on 80-90% MHS (prototype macrophages) and JAWSII (prototype dendritic cells) cells whereas <5% LA4 cells (lung epithelial cells, non-classical APCs) expressed CD1d. Treatment with AF-SWCNTs but not with pristine SWCNTs resulted in a significant decline in the level of CD1d mRNA as well as mRNA levels of some other intracellular proteins involved in lipid antigen presentation pathway (MTP, ApoE, prosaposin, SR-BI and LDLr). Lipid antigen presentation was assessed by first incubating the cells with a prototype lipid antigen (α-Glactosylceramide or αGC) and then staining with L363 monoclonal antibody that detects αGC bound to CD1d molecule. While 100% MHS and JAWSII cells presented αGC, only 20% LA4 cells presented the CD1d antigen. Treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a 30-40% decrease in αGC antigen presentation in all three cell lines. These results show that AF-SWCNT treatment down regulated the lipid antigen presentation pathway in all three cell lines and significantly lowered the ability of these cell lines to present αGC antigen.

  10. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade CD19-Specific T Cells Stably Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Using Sleeping Beauty System and Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J.; Dawson, Margaret J.; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E.; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼1010 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  11. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10) T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  12. Modulation of antigen presentation by autoreactive B cell clones specific for GAD65 from a type I diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    BANGA, J P; MOORE, J K; DUHINDAN, N; MADEC, A M; VAN ENDERT, P M; ORGIAZZI, J; ENDL, J

    2004-01-01

    We used a GAD65-specific human B–T cell line cognate system in vitro to investigate the modulation of GAD65 presentation by autoantibody, assessed in a proliferation assay. Generally, if the T cell determinant overlaps or resides within the antibody epitope, effects of presentation are blunted while if they are distant can lead to potent presentation. For three different autoreactive B–T cell line cognate pairs, the modulation of GAD65 presentation followed the mode of overlapping or distant epitopes with resultant potent or undetectable presentation. However, other cognate pairs elicited variability in this pattern of presentation. Notably, one B cell line, DPC, whose antibody epitope did not overlap with the T cell determinants, was consistently poor in presenting GAD65. Using the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 conjugated to GAD65 to study receptor-mediated antigen endocytosis showed that all the antigen-specific B cell clones were efficient in intracellular accumulation of the antigen. Additionally, multicolour immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the internalized GAD65/surface IgG complexes were rapidly targeted to a perinuclear compartment in all GAD-specific B cell clones. This analysis also demonstrated that HLA-DM expression was reduced strongly in DPC compared to the stimulatory B cell clones. Thus the capability of antigen-specific B cells to capture and present antigen to human T cell lines is dependent on the spatial relationship of B and T cell epitopes as well other factors which contribute to the efficiency of presentation. PMID:14678267

  13. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish.

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages.

  14. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish

    PubMed Central

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G.; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J.; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages. PMID:27003360

  15. Effector and regulatory T-cell function is differentially regulated by RelB within antigen-presenting cells during GVHD.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kelli P A; Kuns, Rachel D; Rowe, Vanessa; Morris, Edward S; Banovic, Tatjana; Bofinger, Helen; O'Sullivan, Brendan; Markey, Kate A; Don, Alistair L; Thomas, Ranjeny; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2007-06-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are critical for the initiation of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), although the responsible APC subset and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Because dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent APCs and the NF-kB/Rel family member RelB is associated with DC maturation and potent APC function, we examined their role in GVHD. Within 4 hours of total body irradiation, RelB nuclear translocation was increased and restricted to CD11c(hi) DCs within the host APC compartment. Furthermore, the transient depletion of CD11c(hi) donor DCs that reconstitute in the second week after transplantation resulted in a transient decrease in GVHD severity. By using RelB(-/-) bone marrow chimeras as transplant recipients or RelB(-/-) donor bone marrow, we demonstrate that the induction and maintenance of GVHD is critically dependent on this transcription factor within both host and donor APCs. Critically, RelB within APCs was required for the expansion of donor helper T cell type 1 (Th1) effectors and subsequent alloreactivity, but not the peripheral expansion or function of donor FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. These data suggest that the targeted inhibition of nuclear RelB translocation within APCs represents an attractive therapeutic strategy to dissociate effector and regulatory T-cell function in settings of Th1-mediated tissue injury.

  16. Interleukin-10 receptor-1 expression in monocyte-derived antigen-presenting cell populations: dendritic cells partially escape from IL-10's inhibitory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    von Haehling, S; von Lanzenauer, S H; Wolk, K; Höflich, C; Kunz, S; Grünberg, B H; Döcke, W-D; Reineke, U; Asadullah, K; Sterry, W; Volk, H-D; Sabat, R

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine that mediates its effects via a transmembrane receptor complex consisting of two different chains, IL-10R1 and IL-10R2. While IL-10R2 is ubiquitously expressed and does not bind IL-10 primarily, the expression of IL-10R1 determines cellular responsiveness. However, the current knowledge about the expression and regulation of IL-10R1 is still limited. Here we analyzed the expression of IL-10R1 on monocytic cells and demonstrated that human blood monocytes carried about 720 IL-10-binding sites on their surface. Compared with lymphocytes and various tissue cells and tissues, blood monocytes expressed the highest IL-10R1 levels. The in vitro differentiation of these cells into macrophages provoked a further increase of IL-10R1 surface expression. In contrast, their differentiation into myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) resulted in reduced surface IL-10R1 levels. The different IL-10R1 levels expressed by monocyte-derived antigen-presenting cell populations were reflected in their different responsiveness toward IL-10. Importantly, also in vivo developed immature macrophages and mDCs showed different IL-10 sensitivity. These data suggest that, compared with monocytes and macrophages, mDCs partially escape from IL-10's inhibitory mechanisms by downregulating IL-10R1. PMID:25472783

  17. Ly6C hi monocytes in the inflamed colon give rise to proinflammatory effector cells and migratory antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Ehud; Varol, Chen; Farache, Julia; Elmaliah, Elinor; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Friedlander, Gilgi; Mack, Matthias; Shpigel, Nahum; Boneca, Ivo G; Murphy, Kenneth M; Shakhar, Guy; Halpern, Zamir; Jung, Steffen

    2012-12-14

    Ly6C(hi) monocytes seed the healthy intestinal lamina propria to give rise to resident CX(3)CR1(+) macrophages that contribute to the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Here we report on two alternative monocyte fates in the inflamed colon. We showed that CCR2 expression is essential to the recruitment of Ly6C(hi) monocytes to the inflamed gut to become the dominant mononuclear cell type in the lamina propria during settings of acute colitis. In the inflammatory microenvironment, monocytes upregulated TLR2 and NOD2, rendering them responsive to bacterial products to become proinflammatory effector cells. Ablation of Ly6C(hi) monocytes ameliorated acute gut inflammation. With time, monocytes differentiated into migratory antigen-presenting cells capable of priming naive T cells, thus acquiring hallmarks reminiscent of dendritic cells. Collectively, our results highlight cellular dynamics in the inflamed colon and the plasticity of Ly6C(hi) monocytes, marking them as potential targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) therapy.

  18. Enhanced antigen-presenting capacity of cultured Langerhans' cells is associated with markedly increased expression of Ia antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, S.; Caughman, S.W.; Sharrow, S.O.; Stephany, D.; Katz, S.I.

    1987-10-15

    Recent studies indicate that when epidermal Langerhans' cells (LC) are cultured for 2 to 3 days they, in comparison to freshly prepared LC, exhibit markedly enhanced ability to stimulate T cell proliferative responses in oxidative mitogenesis and in the mixed epidermal-leukocyte reaction. In this study, we determined whether cultured LC enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, and whether such enhanced stimulatory capacity correlates with the level of Ia antigen expressed on LC. We used C3H/He (Iak) epidermal cells as stimulators and, as responder cells, both the trinitrophenyl-specific clones D8 and SE4, which were assayed for (/sup 3/H)dThd incorporation, and the pigeon cytochrome c specific hybridoma 2C2, which was assayed for interleukin 2 production. Cultured LC induced 10 to 100 times greater proliferation or interleukin 2 production by responder cells than did freshly prepared LC. The intensity of I-Ak and I-Ek, expressed on cultured LC as assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, was found to be 10 to 36 times greater on a per cell basis than that on freshly prepared LC. Depletion of LC from fresh epidermal cell suspensions by anti-Iak and complement or treatment with 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ medium range ultraviolet light or cycloheximide before culture abrogated both the increase in Ia expression and antigen-specific clonal proliferation. The results suggest that when LC are removed from their usual epidermal milieu, they express increased amounts of Ia and become more potent stimulators of T cell responses.

  19. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Expressed by Recombinant Respiratory Syncytial Virus Attenuates Viral Replication and Increases the Level of Pulmonary Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukreyev, Alexander; Belyakov, Igor M.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.

    2001-01-01

    An obstacle to developing a vaccine against human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is that natural infection typically does not confer solid immunity to reinfection. To investigate methods to augment the immune response, recombinant RSV (rRSV) was constructed that expresses murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from a transcription cassette inserted into the G-F intergenic region. Replication of rRSV/mGM-CSF in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of BALB/c mice was reduced 23- to 74- and 5- to 588-fold, respectively, compared to that of the parental rRSV. Despite this strong attenuation of replication, the level of RSV-specific serum antibodies induced by rRSV/mGM-CSF was comparable to, or marginally higher than, that of the parental rRSV. The induction of RSV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was moderately reduced during the initial infection, which might be a consequence of reduced antigen expression. Mice infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF had elevated levels of pulmonary mRNA for gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin 12 (IL-12) p40 compared to animals infected by wild-type rRSV. Elevated synthesis of IFN-γ could account for the restriction of RSV replication, as was observed previously with an IFN-γ-expressing rRSV. The accumulation of total pulmonary mononuclear cells and total CD4+ T lymphocytes was accelerated in animals infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF compared to that in animals infected with the control virus, and the level of IFN-γ-positive or IL-4-positive pulmonary CD4+ cells was elevated approximately twofold. The number of pulmonary lymphoid and myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages was increased up to fourfold in mice infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF compared to those infected with the parental rRSV, and the mean expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, a marker of activation, was significantly increased in the two subsets of dendritic cells. Enhanced antigen presentation likely accounts for the

  20. Cathepsin B in Antigen-Presenting Cells Controls Mediators of the Th1 Immune Response during Leishmania major Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Leal, Iris J.; Röger, Bianca; Schwarz, Angela; Schirmeister, Tanja; Reinheckel, Thomas; Lutz, Manfred B.; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb) and L (Ctsl) play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM) from Ctsb−/− and Ctsl−/− mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb−/− BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT) and Ctsl−/− BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb−/− mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb−/− BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl−/− counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression. PMID:25255101

  1. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen T.; Carrero, Javier A.; Mohan, James F.; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Unanue, Emil R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) population. By four weeks of age, CD4+ T cells entered islets coincident with an increase of CD103+ DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103+ DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103+ DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103+ DCs were essential for autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:25367577

  2. Saposins modulate human invariant Natural Killer T cells self-reactivity and facilitate lipid exchange with CD1d molecules during antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Ghadbane, Hemza; Dushek, Omer; Shepherd, Dawn; Cypen, Jeremy; Gileadi, Uzi; Aichinger, Michael C.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Qi, Xiaoyang; van der Merwe, P. Anton; Wojno, Justyna; Veerapen, Natacha; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Yuan, Weiming; Cresswell, Peter; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins, such as molecules of the saposin family, facilitate extraction of lipids from biological membranes for their loading onto CD1d molecules. Although it has been shown that prosaposin-deficient mice fail to positively select invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, it remains unclear whether saposins can facilitate loading of endogenous iNKT cell agonists in the periphery during inflammatory responses. In addition, it is unclear whether saposins, in addition to loading, also promote dissociation of lipids bound to CD1d molecules. To address these questions, we used a combination of cellular assays and demonstrated that saposins influence CD1d-restricted presentation to human iNKT cells not only of exogenous lipids but also of endogenous ligands, such as the self-glycosphingolipid β-glucopyranosylceramide, up-regulated by antigen-presenting cells following bacterial infection. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in human myeloid cells CD1d-loading of endogenous lipids after bacterial infection, but not at steady state, requires trafficking of CD1d molecules through an endo-lysosomal compartment. Finally, using BIAcore assays we demonstrated that lipid-loaded saposin B increases the off-rate of lipids bound to CD1d molecules, providing important insights into the mechanisms by which it acts as a “lipid editor,” capable of fine-tuning loading and unloading of CD1d molecules. These results have important implications in understanding how to optimize lipid-loading onto antigen-presenting cells, to better harness iNKT cells central role at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:24248359

  3. A mouse aminopeptidase N is a marker for antigen-presenting cells and appears to be co-expressed with major histocompatibility complex class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A S; Norén, O; Sjöström, H; Werdelin, O

    1993-09-01

    To analyze the expression of mouse aminopeptidase N (APN) on the cells of the immune system a panel of rat monoclonal antibodies against mouse intestinal APN was generated. These antibodies were used to affinity purify functional mouse APN from both intestine and kidney, and by flow cytometry to examine the APN expression of the cells of the mouse immune system. An APN closely related, perhaps identical, to the intestinal APN was expressed on a subpopulation of spleen cells and stimulated peritoneal exudate cells, primarily representing antigen-presenting cells, such as B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and veiled cells. In contrast this APN expression could not be detected on thymocytes or spleen T cells. As a corollary, APN was expressed on monocyte, macrophage, and B lymphoma cell lines, but not on T hybridoma or thymoma cell lines. The expression of APN showed a striking correlation with the MHC class II expression in all the cell populations studied. This apparent co-expression suggests a role for APN in antigen processing.

  4. Potent costimulation of human CD8 T cells by anti-4-1BB and anti-CD28 on synthetic artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Despina; Silberzahn, Tobias; Walter, Steffen; Maurer, Dominik; Engelhard, Johanna; Wernet, Dorothee; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Jung, Gundram; Kwon, Byoung S; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2008-02-01

    The in vitro generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for anticancer immunotherapy is a promising approach to take patient-specific therapy from the bench to the bedside. Two criteria must be met by protocols for the expansion of CTLs: high yield of functional cells and suitability for good manufacturing practice (GMP). The antigen presenting cells (APCs) used to expand the CTLs are the key to achieving both targets but they pose a challenge: Unspecific stimulation is not feasible because only memory T cells are expanded and not rare naïve CTL precursors; in addition, antigen-specific stimulation by cell-based APCs is cumbersome and problematic in a clinical setting. However, synthetic artificial APCs which can be loaded reproducibly with MHC-peptide monomers and antibodies specific for costimulatory molecules could resolve these problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of complex synthetic artificial APCs in triggering the costimulatory molecules CD28 and 4-1BB on the T cell. Anti-4-1BB antibodies were added to an established system of microbeads coated with MHC-peptide monomers and anti-CD28. Triggering via CD28 and 4-1BB resulted in strong costimulatory synergy. The quantitative ratio between these signals determined the outcome of the stimulation with optimal results when anti-4-1BB and anti-CD28 were applied in a 3:1 ratio. Functional CTLs of an effector memory subtype (CD45RA(-) CCR7(-)) were generated in high numbers. We present a highly defined APC platform using off-the-shelf reagents for the convenient generation of large numbers of antigen-specific CTLs. PMID:17657490

  5. Origin and Role of a Subset of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Antigen-Presenting Cell Features in Early-Stage Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S; O'Brien, Shaun; Moon, Edmund K; Garfall, Alfred L; Rao, Abhishek S; Quatromoni, Jon G; Stephen, Tom Li; Litzky, Leslie; Deshpande, Charuhas; Feldman, Michael D; Hancock, Wayne W; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2016-07-11

    Based on studies in mouse tumor models, granulocytes appear to play a tumor-promoting role. However, there are limited data about the phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans. Here, we identify a subset of TANs that exhibited characteristics of both neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early-stage human lung cancer. These APC-like "hybrid neutrophils," which originate from CD11b(+)CD15(hi)CD10(-)CD16(low) immature progenitors, are able to cross-present antigens, as well as trigger and augment anti-tumor T cell responses. Interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are requisite factors in the tumor that, working through the Ikaros transcription factor, synergistically exert their APC-promoting effects on the progenitors. Overall, these data demonstrate the existence of a specialized TAN subset with anti-tumor capabilities in human cancer.

  6. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing CD80, CD70, and 4-1BB ligand efficiently expand functional T cells specific to tumor-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wanyong; Su, Mei; Anderson, Karen S; Sasada, Tetsuro

    2014-08-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), notably dendritic cells (DCs), are the most potent for expanding antigen-specific T cells ex vivo. However, the labor-intensive and expensive procedure for customized preparation of autologous APCs has hampered their broad clinical application. Artificial APC (aAPC) systems, which can be readily prepared from off-the-shelf components, have been proposed as a promising alternative to custom-made professional APCs. Here, in order to develop a novel aAPC system, we established K562 erythroleukemia cells expressing different combinations of co-stimulatory molecule ligands, CD80, CD70, and/or 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL). When nucleofected with in vitro-generated mRNA encoding a tumor-associated antigen, MART-1, the K562 cells expressing all of CD80, CD70, and 4-1BBL were the most efficient for expansion of functional T cells specific to an HLA-A2-restricted immunodominant epitope, MART-126-35. In addition, only the K562 cells expressing all three of these co-stimulatory molecule ligands could clearly expand T cells specific to other less immunogenic antigen epitopes, gp100154-162 and Cyp1B1239-247, through transfection with in vitro generated gp100 and Cyp1B1 mRNA, respectively. These results indicated that non-redundant and synergistic effects of co-stimulation via CD28/CD80, CD27/CD70, and 4-1BB/4-1BBL might be critical for eliciting efficient expansion of T cells; co-stimulation via the 4-1BB/4-1BBL interaction might expand antigen-specific T cells by preventing apoptotic cell death triggered by specific antigens in the presence of the CD28/CD80 and CD27/CD70 signaling. Taken together, our findings suggested that this K562-based aAPC system expressing CD80, CD70, and 4-1BBL would be useful for efficiently stimulating functional antigen-specific T cells ex vivo, in particular when detailed information on the epitope specificities is unavailable. PMID:24713579

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Human Steady State CD14+ and CD1a+ Antigen Presenting Cells and Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia. M.; Bruijns, Sven C. M.; Sotthewes, Brigit N.; Kalay, Hakan; Schaffer, Lana; Head, Steven R.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critical for the induction and regulation of skin immune responses. The human skin contains phenotypically and functionally distinct APCs subsets that are present at two separated locations. While CD1ahigh LCs form a dense network in the epidermis, the CD14+ and CD1a+ APCs reside in the dermal compartment. A better understanding of the biology of human skin APC subsets is necessary for the improvement of vaccine strategies that use the skin as administration route. In particular, progress in the characterization of uptake and activatory receptors will certainly improve APC-targeting strategies in vaccination. Here we performed a detailed analysis of the expression and function of glycan-binding and pattern-recognition receptors in skin APC subsets. The results demonstrate that under steady state conditions human CD1a+ dermal dendritic cells (DCs) were phenotypically most mature as measured by the expression of CD83 and CD86, whereas the CD14+ cells showed a higher expression of the CLRs DC-SIGN, mannose receptor and DCIR and had potent antigen uptake capacity. Furthermore, steady state LCs showed superior antigen cross-presentation as compared to the dermal APC subsets. Our results also demonstrate that the TLR3 ligand polyribosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (pI:C) was the most potent stimulator of cytokine production by both LCs and dDCs. These studies warrant further exploration of human CD1a+ dDCs and LCs as target cells for cancer vaccination to induce anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:26605924

  8. Enhancement of antigen-presenting ability of B lymphoma cells by partial inhibition of protein synthesis through inducing B7-1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Aoi, T; Nakano, H; Tanaka, Y; Kakiuchi, T

    1997-01-01

    During the investigation of the role of protein synthesis in antigen-presenting cell (APC) function of A20-HL B lymphoma cells, we found that partial inhibition of protein synthesis enhanced their APC function. The treatment of A20-HL cells with 0.313-2.5 microM emetine, an irreversible inhibitor of protein synthesis, decreased protein synthesis by 60-70%, and enhanced their APC function to stimulate I-Ad/OVA323-339-specific T cells to produce interleukin-2 in response to ovalbumin (OVA). The emetine-treated and paraformaldehyde-fixed A20-HL cells required only 20 nM OVA323-339 peptide to stimulate the T cells, whereas those untreated and fixed required 200 nM peptide. This enhancement of APC function was mostly because of the induction of B7-1 expression on A20-HL cells by the emetine treatment, since B7-1 molecules were detected on the emetine-treated A20-HL cells, but only negligibly, if at all, on the untreated cells, and an anti-B7-1 monoclonal antibody, 1G10, inhibited the enhanced APC function of the emetine-treated A20-HL cells. The emetine-treatment also increased B7-1 mRNA expression in A20-HL cells, suggesting that the induction of B7-1 expression was due to the increase in the accumulation of mRNA and the translation with residual ability to synthesize protein. Thus, partial inhibition of protein synthesis in A20-HL cells increases B7-1 mRNA accumulation and its expression on the cell surface, which results in the enhancement of their APC function. Images Figure 5 PMID:9227319

  9. Stat6-Dependent Inhibition of Mincle Expression in Mouse and Human Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Th2 Cytokine IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Hupfer, Thomas; Schick, Judith; Jozefowski, Katrin; Voehringer, David; Ostrop, Jenny; Lang, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) Mincle, Mcl, and Dectin-2 bind mycobacterial and fungal cell wall glycolipids and carbohydrates. Recently, we described that expression of these CLR is downregulated during differentiation of human monocytes to dendritic cells (DC) in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. Here, we demonstrate that the Th2 cytokine IL-4 specifically inhibits expression of Mincle, Mcl, and Dectin-2 in human antigen-presenting cells (APC). This inhibitory effect of IL-4 was observed across species, as murine macrophages and DC treated with IL-4 also downregulated these receptors. IL-4 blocked upregulation of Mincle and Mcl mRNA expression and cell surface protein by murine macrophages in response to the Mincle ligand Trehalose-6,6-dibehenate (TDB), whereas the TLR4 ligand LPS overcame inhibition by IL-4. Functionally, downregulation of Mincle expression by IL-4 was accompanied by reduced cytokine production upon stimulation with TDB. These inhibitory effects of IL-4 were dependent on the transcription factor Stat6. Together, our results show that the key Th2 cytokine IL-4 exerts a negative effect on the expression of Mincle and other Dectin-2 cluster CLR in mouse and human macrophages and DC, which may render these sentinel cells less vigilant for sensing mycobacterial and fungal ligands. PMID:27790218

  10. A cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cell coated with anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies enables rapid expansion and long-term growth of CD4 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anna K; Maus, Marcela V; Shalaby, Waleed S; June, Carl H; Riley, James L

    2002-12-01

    We compared the ability of two genetically modified myeloid cells, K562 and U937, to serve as artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). Both aAPC were stably transfected with the low-affinity Fcgamma receptor CD32 (K32/U32 cells). K32 cells loaded with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 Ab (K32/CD3/28) induced more rapid CD4 T-cell expansion than CD3/28-coated beads. In contrast, U32/CD3/28 induced high levels of CD4 T-cell thymidine uptake but were unable to sustain long-term T-cell expansion. K32 cells, but not U32 cells, loaded with anti-CD3 alone also stimulated CD4 T-cell growth and IL-2 secretion, indicating the expression of additional costimulatory molecules on K32 cells. We found constitutive expression of B7-H3 and a strong upregulation of mRNA encoding for IL-15, PD-L1, and PD-L2 after coculture with CD4 T cells activated by K32/CD3/28 but not U32/CD3/28. We conclude that K32 aAPCs are a robust system for clinical scale ex vivo expansion of CD4 T cells. PMID:12498807

  11. Tumour immunogenicity, antigen presentation and immunological barriers in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20(th) century, scientists have tried to stimulate the anti-tumour activities of the immune system to fight against cancer. However, the scientific effort devoted on the development of cancer immunotherapy has not been translated into the expected clinical success. On the contrary, classical anti-neoplastic treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the first line of treatment. Nevertheless, there is compelling evidence on the immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the capacity of the immune system to expand cancer-specific effector cytotoxic T cells. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses strongly depends on efficient tumour antigen presentation from professional antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Several strategies have been used to boost DC antigen presenting functions, but at the end cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as would be expected according to preclinical models. In this review we comment on these discrepancies, focusing our attention on the contribution of regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to the lack of therapeutic success of DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634791

  12. Tumour immunogenicity, antigen presentation and immunological barriers in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, scientists have tried to stimulate the anti-tumour activities of the immune system to fight against cancer. However, the scientific effort devoted on the development of cancer immunotherapy has not been translated into the expected clinical success. On the contrary, classical anti-neoplastic treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the first line of treatment. Nevertheless, there is compelling evidence on the immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the capacity of the immune system to expand cancer-specific effector cytotoxic T cells. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses strongly depends on efficient tumour antigen presentation from professional antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Several strategies have been used to boost DC antigen presenting functions, but at the end cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as would be expected according to preclinical models. In this review we comment on these discrepancies, focusing our attention on the contribution of regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to the lack of therapeutic success of DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634791

  13. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  14. NK cell-mediated lysis of autologous antigen-presenting cells is triggered by the engagement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase upon ligation of the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30 and NKp46.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, G M; Carosio, R; Pende, D; Marcenaro, S; Rivera, P; Zocchi, M R; Moretta, L; Poggi, A

    2001-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated polyclonal or clonal NK cells lysed autologous antigen presenting cells (APC) through the engagement of the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30 and NKp46. NK cell-mediated cytolysis of APC correlated with the surface density of these NCR. Indeed, NK cell clones bearing low amounts of NKp30 and NKp46 did not lyse autologous APC, whereas NK cell clones with bright expression of these NCR efficiently killed autologous APC. Upon masking of NKp30 or NKp46 by specific monoclonal antibodies a strong reduction (by 50%) of APC lysis could be detected and the complete inhibition was achieved by the simultaneous masking of these NCR. Interestingly, NK cell-mediated APC lysis was impaired by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3 K) inhibitors LY294002 or wortmannin. Similarly, these drugs strongly reduced NK cell activation triggered by NKp30 or NKp46 in a re-directed killing assay as well as the activation of Akt/PKB, substrate of PI-3 K, induced by the engagement of these receptors. Altogether, these findings strongly suggest that NCR are responsible for the killing of autologous APC through the activation of PI-3 K.

  15. Clinical application of Sleeping Beauty and artificial antigen presenting cells to genetically modify T cells from peripheral and umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Huls, M Helen; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Kebriaei, Partow; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Singh, Harjeet; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    The potency of clinical-grade T cells can be improved by combining gene therapy with immunotherapy to engineer a biologic product with the potential for superior (i) recognition of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), (ii) persistence after infusion, (iii) potential for migration to tumor sites, and (iv) ability to recycle effector functions within the tumor microenvironment. Most approaches to genetic manipulation of T cells engineered for human application have used retrovirus and lentivirus for the stable expression of CAR(1-3). This approach, although compliant with current good manufacturing practice (GMP), can be expensive as it relies on the manufacture and release of clinical-grade recombinant virus from a limited number of production facilities. The electro-transfer of nonviral plasmids is an appealing alternative to transduction since DNA species can be produced to clinical grade at approximately 1/10(th) the cost of recombinant GMP-grade virus. To improve the efficiency of integration we adapted Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon and transposase for human application(4-8). Our SB system uses two DNA plasmids that consist of a transposon coding for a gene of interest (e.g. 2(nd) generation CD19-specific CAR transgene, designated CD19RCD28) and a transposase (e.g. SB11) which inserts the transgene into TA dinucleotide repeats(9-11). To generate clinically-sufficient numbers of genetically modified T cells we use K562-derived artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) (clone #4) modified to express a TAA (e.g. CD19) as well as the T cell costimulatory molecules CD86, CD137L, a membrane-bound version of interleukin (IL)-15 (peptide fused to modified IgG4 Fc region) and CD64 (Fc-γ receptor 1) for the loading of monoclonal antibodies (mAb)(12). In this report, we demonstrate the procedures that can be undertaken in compliance with cGMP to generate CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells suitable for human application. This was achieved by the synchronous electro-transfer of

  16. Clinical application of Sleeping Beauty and artificial antigen presenting cells to genetically modify T cells from peripheral and umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Huls, M Helen; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Kebriaei, Partow; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Singh, Harjeet; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-02-01

    The potency of clinical-grade T cells can be improved by combining gene therapy with immunotherapy to engineer a biologic product with the potential for superior (i) recognition of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), (ii) persistence after infusion, (iii) potential for migration to tumor sites, and (iv) ability to recycle effector functions within the tumor microenvironment. Most approaches to genetic manipulation of T cells engineered for human application have used retrovirus and lentivirus for the stable expression of CAR(1-3). This approach, although compliant with current good manufacturing practice (GMP), can be expensive as it relies on the manufacture and release of clinical-grade recombinant virus from a limited number of production facilities. The electro-transfer of nonviral plasmids is an appealing alternative to transduction since DNA species can be produced to clinical grade at approximately 1/10(th) the cost of recombinant GMP-grade virus. To improve the efficiency of integration we adapted Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon and transposase for human application(4-8). Our SB system uses two DNA plasmids that consist of a transposon coding for a gene of interest (e.g. 2(nd) generation CD19-specific CAR transgene, designated CD19RCD28) and a transposase (e.g. SB11) which inserts the transgene into TA dinucleotide repeats(9-11). To generate clinically-sufficient numbers of genetically modified T cells we use K562-derived artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) (clone #4) modified to express a TAA (e.g. CD19) as well as the T cell costimulatory molecules CD86, CD137L, a membrane-bound version of interleukin (IL)-15 (peptide fused to modified IgG4 Fc region) and CD64 (Fc-γ receptor 1) for the loading of monoclonal antibodies (mAb)(12). In this report, we demonstrate the procedures that can be undertaken in compliance with cGMP to generate CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells suitable for human application. This was achieved by the synchronous electro-transfer of

  17. Recruitment of Antigen-Presenting Cells to the Site of Inoculation and Augmentation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity by In Vivo Electroporation▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyan; Kjeken, Rune; Mathiesen, Iacob; Barouch, Dan H.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to augment the immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines, but its mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. In this study, we show that in vivo EP augmented cellular and humoral immune responses to a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Env DNA vaccine in mice and allowed a 10-fold reduction in vaccine dose. This enhancement was durable for over 6 months, and re-exposure to antigen resulted in anamnestic effector and central memory CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses. Interestingly, in vivo EP also recruited large mixed cellular inflammatory infiltrates to the site of inoculation. These infiltrates contained 45-fold-increased numbers of macrophages and 77-fold-increased numbers of dendritic cells as well as 2- to 6-fold-increased numbers of B and T lymphocytes compared to infiltrates following DNA vaccination alone. These data suggest that recruiting inflammatory cells, including antigen-presenting cells (APCs), to the site of antigen production substantially improves the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. Combining in vivo EP with plasmid chemokine adjuvants that similarly recruited APCs to the injection site, however, did not result in synergy. PMID:18353952

  18. Targeting of Nasal Mucosa-Associated Antigen-Presenting Cells In Vivo with an Outer Membrane Protein A Derived from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Goetsch, Liliane; Gonzalez, Alexandra; Plotnicky-Gilquin, Hélène; Haeuw, Jean François; Aubry, Jean Pierre; Beck, Alain; Bonnefoy, Jean Yves; Corvaïa, Nathalie

    2001-01-01

    Administration of vaccines by the nasal route has recently proven to be one of the most efficient ways for inducing both mucosal and systemic antibody responses in experimental animals. Our results demonstrate that P40, a well-defined outer membrane protein A from Klebsiella pneumoniae, is indeed a carrier molecule suitable for nasal immunization. Using fragments from the respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A (RSV-A) G protein as antigen models, it has been shown that P40 is able to induce both systemic and mucosal immunity when fused or coupled to a protein or a peptide and administered intranasally (i.n.) to naive or K. pneumoniae-primed mice. Confocal analyses of nasal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue after i.n. instillation of P40 showed that this molecule is able to cross the nasal epithelium and target CD11c-positive cells likely to be murine dendritic cells or macrophages. More importantly, this targeting of antigen-presenting cells following i.n. immunization with a subunit of the RSV-A molecule in the absence of any mucosal adjuvant results in both upper and lower respiratory tract protection against RSV-A infection. PMID:11553588

  19. An experimental subunit vaccine based on Bluetongue virus 4 VP2 protein fused to an antigen-presenting cells single chain antibody elicits cellular and humoral immune responses in cattle, guinea pigs and IFNAR(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Legisa, D M; Perez Aguirreburualde, M S; Gonzalez, F N; Marin-Lopez, A; Ruiz, V; Wigdorovitz, A; Martinez-Escribano, J A; Ortego, J; Dus Santos, M J

    2015-05-21

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), the causative agent of bluetongue disease (BT) in domestic and wild ruminants, is worldwide distributed. A total of 27 serotypes have been described so far, and several outbreaks have been reported. Vaccination is critical for controlling the spread of BTV. In the last years, subunit vaccines, viral vector vaccines and reverse genetic-based vaccines have emerged as new alternatives to conventional ones. In this study, we developed an experimental subunit vaccine against BTV4, with the benefit of targeting the recombinant protein to antigen-presenting cells. The VP2 protein from an Argentine BTV4 isolate was expressed alone or fused to the antigen presenting cell homing (APCH) molecule, in the baculovirus insect cell expression system. The immunogenicity of both proteins was evaluated in guinea pigs and cattle. Titers of specific neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs and cattle immunized with VP2 or APCH-VP2 were high and similar to those induced by a conventional inactivated vaccine. The immunogenicity of recombinant proteins was further studied in the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model where the fusion of VP2 to APCH enhanced the cellular immune response and the neutralizing activity induced by VP2.

  20. Efficient presentation of naturally processed HLA class I peptides by artificial antigen-presenting cells for the generation of effective antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Naoto; Butler, Marcus O; Xia, Zhinan; Berezovskaya, Alla; Murray, Andrew P; Ansén, Sascha; Nadler, Lee M

    2006-05-15

    Appropriate presentation of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) by antigen-presenting cells (APC) is required for the development of clinically relevant antitumor T-cell responses. One common approach, which uses APC pulsed with synthetic peptides, can sometimes generate ineffective immune responses. This failure may, in part, be attributed to the formation of HLA/synthetic pulsed peptide complexes that possess different conformations compared with those of endogenously presented peptides. In addition, endogenous peptides may undergo post-translational modifications, which do not occur with synthetic peptides. Because our goal is to induce immunity that can recognize TAA that are endogenously presented by tumors, we designed an APC that would not only express the required immunoaccessory molecules but also naturally process and present target antigenic peptides. In this study, we generated an artificial APC (aAPC) that can endogenously present any chosen HLA-A*0201 (A2)-restricted peptide by processing a fusion protein that contains a unique "LTK" sequence linked to the antigenic peptide. Proteasome-dependent processing is so effective that the presented peptide can be directly eluted from the cell surface and identified by biochemical methods. Furthermore, we found that aAPC, engineered to endogenously present peptide derived from the melanoma antigen MART1, can be used to prime and expand antitumor CTL that target MART1-expressing tumor cells in a HLA-A2-restricted manner. Our engineered aAPC could serve as an "off-the-shelf" APC designed to constitutively express class I-restricted TAA peptides and could be used to generate effective T-cell responses to treat human disease. PMID:16707591

  1. A nonimmunogenic sarcoma transduced with the cDNA for interferon gamma elicits CD8+ T cells against the wild-type tumor: correlation with antigen presentation capability

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    To be recognized by CD8+ T lymphocytes, target cells must process and present peptide antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. The nonimmunogenic, low class I- expressing, methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced murine sarcoma cell line, MCA 101, is a poor presenter of endogenously generated viral antigens to specific CD8+ T lymphocytes and cannot be used to generate tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Since interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has been shown to upregulate three sets of molecules important for antigen processing and presentation, we retrovirally transduced wild-type MCA 101 (101.WT) tumor with the mIFN-gamma cDNA to create the 101.NAT cell line. Unlike 101.WT, some clones of retrovirally transduced 101.NAT tumor expressed high levels of class I, and could be used to generate CD8+ TIL. More importantly, these TIL were therapeutic in vivo against established pulmonary metastases from the wild-type tumor. Although not uniformly cytotoxic amongst several separate cultures, these TIL did specifically release cytokines (IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor- alpha) in response to 101.WT targets. 101.WT's antigen presentation deficit was also reversed by gene modification with mIFN-gamma cDNA. 101.NAT had a greatly improved capacity to present viral antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These findings show that a nonimmunogenic tumor, incapable of generating a CD8+ T cell immune response, could be gene-modified to generate a therapeutically useful immune response against the wild-type tumor. This strategy may be useful in developing treatments for tumor histologies not thought to be susceptible to T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:1588273

  2. Properties of glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, William; Smith, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Presentation of antigen to T cells represents one of the central events in the engagement of the immune system toward the defense of the host against pathogens. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms by which antigen presentation occurs is critical toward our understanding the properties of host defense against foreign antigen, as well as insight into other features of the immune system, such as autoimmune disease. The entire antigen-presentation event is complex, and many features of it remain poorly understood. However, recent studies have provided evidence showing that glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts are important for efficient antigen presentation; the studies suggest that one such function of rafts is trafficking of antigen-MHC II complexes to the presentation site on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. Here, we present a critical discussion of rafts and their proposed functions in antigen presentation. Emerging topics of rafts and antigen presentation that warrant further investigation are also highlighted.

  3. Development of an enhanced bovine viral diarrhea virus subunit vaccine based on E2 glycoprotein fused to a single chain antibody which targets to antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Pecora, Andrea; Malacari, Darío A; Pérez Aguirreburualde, María S; Bellido, Demian; Escribano, José M; Dus Santos, María J; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important cause of economic losses worldwide. E2 is an immunodominant protein and a promising candidate to develop subunit vaccines. To improve its immunogenicity, a truncated E2 (tE2) was fused to a single chain antibody named APCH, which targets to antigen-presenting cells. APCH-tE2 and tE2 proteins were expressed in the baculovirus system and their immunogenicity was firstly compared in guinea pigs. APCH-tE2 vaccine was the best one to evoke a humoral response, and for this reason, it was selected for a cattle vaccination experiment. All the bovines immunized with 1.5 μg of APCH-tE2 developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against BVDV up to a year post-immunization, demonstrating its significant potential as a subunit vaccine. This novel vaccine is undergoing scale-up and was transferred to the private sector. Nowadays, it is being evaluated for registration as the first Argentinean subunit vaccine for cattle. PMID:25697468

  4. Development of an enhanced bovine viral diarrhea virus subunit vaccine based on E2 glycoprotein fused to a single chain antibody which targets to antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Pecora, Andrea; Malacari, Darío A; Pérez Aguirreburualde, María S; Bellido, Demian; Escribano, José M; Dus Santos, María J; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important cause of economic losses worldwide. E2 is an immunodominant protein and a promising candidate to develop subunit vaccines. To improve its immunogenicity, a truncated E2 (tE2) was fused to a single chain antibody named APCH, which targets to antigen-presenting cells. APCH-tE2 and tE2 proteins were expressed in the baculovirus system and their immunogenicity was firstly compared in guinea pigs. APCH-tE2 vaccine was the best one to evoke a humoral response, and for this reason, it was selected for a cattle vaccination experiment. All the bovines immunized with 1.5 μg of APCH-tE2 developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against BVDV up to a year post-immunization, demonstrating its significant potential as a subunit vaccine. This novel vaccine is undergoing scale-up and was transferred to the private sector. Nowadays, it is being evaluated for registration as the first Argentinean subunit vaccine for cattle.

  5. Induction of the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes using human leukocyte antigen tetramer-based artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ling; Liang, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Cai-E; Lu, Sheng-Jun; Weng, Xiu-Fang; Wu, Xiong-Wen

    2006-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) antigen are important reagents for the treatment of some EBV-associated malignancies, such as EBV-positive Hodgkin's disease and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. However, the therapeutic amount of CTLs is often hampered by the limited supply of antigen-presenting cells. To address this issue, an artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) was made by coating a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-pLMP2 tetrameric complex, anti-CD28 antibody and CD54 molecule to a cell-sized latex bead, which provided the dual signals required for T cell activation. By co-culture of the HLA-A2-LMP2 bearing aAPC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HLA-A2 positive healthy donors, LMP2 antigen-specific CTLs were induced and expanded in vitro. The specificity of the aAPC-induced CTLs was demonstrated by both HLA-A2-LMP2 tetramer staining and cytotoxicity against HLA-A2-LMP2 bearing T2 cell, the cytotoxicity was inhibited by the anti-HLA class I antibody (W6/32). These results showed that LMP2 antigen-specific CTLs could be induced and expanded in vitro by the HLA-A2-LMP2-bearing aAPC. Thus, aAPCs coated with an HLA-pLMP2 complex, anti-CD28 and CD54 might be promising tools for the enrichment of LMP2-specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:16518539

  6. Limited Density of an Antigen Presented by RMA-S Cells Requires B7-1/CD28 Signaling to Enhance T-Cell Immunity at the Effector Phase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Lin; Sluijter, Marjolein; Doorduijn, Elien M.; Kale, Shubha P.; McFerrin, Harris; Liu, Yong-Yu; Li, Yan; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Yao, Xin; Du, Fengkun; Gu, Baihan; Hoang, Kim; Nguyen, Yen H.; Taylor, Nichelle; Stephens, Chelsea R.; van Hall, Thorbald; Zhang, Qian-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The association of B7-1/CD28 between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T-cells provides a second signal to proliferate and activate T-cell immunity at the induction phase. Many reports indicate that tumor cells transfected with B7-1 induced augmented antitumor immunity at the induction phase by mimicking APC function; however, the function of B7-1 on antitumor immunity at the effector phase is unknown. Here, we report direct evidence of enhanced T-cell antitumor immunity at the effector phase by the B7-1 molecule. Our experiments in vivo and in vitro indicated that reactivity of antigen-specific monoclonal and polyclonal T-cell effectors against a Lass5 epitope presented by RMA-S cells is increased when the cells expressed B7-1. Use of either anti-B7-1 or anti-CD28 antibodies to block the B7-1/CD28 association reduced reactivity of the T effectors against B7-1 positive RMA-S cells. Transfection of Lass5 cDNA into or pulse of Lass5 peptide onto B7-1 positive RMA-S cells overcomes the requirement of the B7-1/CD28 signal for T effector response. To our knowledge, the data offers, for the first time, strong evidence that supports the requirement of B7-1/CD28 secondary signal at the effector phase of antitumor T-cell immunity being dependent on the density of an antigenic peptide. PMID:25383875

  7. Ex vivo induction and expansion of Natural Killer T cells by CD1d1-Ig coated artificial antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tonya J.; Bieler, Joan G.; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Oelke, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play a pivotal role in maintaining immune homostasis. They recognize lipid antigen in the context of CD1d molecules and subsequently produce cytokines that activate cells of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Many studies examining patients with autoimmune disease or cancer have shown that there is a reduction in both NKT cell number and function. Due to the complexities of manipulating NKT cells in vivo, ex vivo expanded effector NKT cells would be an excellent therapeutic modality. To date, immunotherapy utilizing the NKT/CD1d system has been dependent on the use of autologous DC in the presence or absence of a synthetic glycolipid, α-galactocylceramide. Here we report a novel technique that facilitates the growth and analysis of NKT cells through the use of CD1d-expressing aAPC. CD1d-based aAPC can effectively propagate both canonical (iNKT cells) and noncanonical (Vα14−) NKT cells. Importantly, CD1d-Ig aAPC can expand NKT cells from cancer patients. Thus, CD1d-expressing aAPC will enhance our knowledge of NKT cell biology and could potentially be used as a novel tool in adoptive immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:19446558

  8. Ex vivo induction and expansion of natural killer T cells by CD1d1-Ig coated artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Webb, Tonya J; Bieler, Joan G; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2009-07-31

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play a pivotal role in maintaining immune homostasis. They recognize lipid antigen in the context of CD1d molecules and subsequently produce cytokines that activate cells of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Many studies examining patients with autoimmune disease or cancer have shown that there is a reduction in both NKT cell number and function. Due to the complexities of manipulating NKT cells in vivo, ex vivo expanded effector NKT cells would be an excellent therapeutic modality. To date, immunotherapy utilizing the NKT/CD1d system has been dependent on the use of autologous DC in the presence or absence of a synthetic glycolipid, alpha-galactocylceramide. Here we report a novel technique that facilitates the growth and analysis of NKT cells through the use of CD1d-expressing aAPC. CD1d-based aAPC can effectively propagate both canonical (iNKT cells) and noncanonical (Valpha14(-)) NKT cells. Importantly, CD1d-Ig aAPC can expand NKT cells from cancer patients. Thus, CD1d-expressing aAPC will enhance our knowledge of NKT cell biology and could potentially be used as a novel tool in adoptive immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:19446558

  9. ICSBP/IRF-8 differentially regulates antigen uptake during dendritic-cell development and affects antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Fabrizio; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Borghi, Paola; Venditti, Massimo; Canini, Irene; Sestili, Paola; Pietraforte, Immacolata; Morse, Herbert C; Ramoni, Carlo; Belardelli, Filippo; Gabriele, Lucia

    2006-07-15

    Interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP)/interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF-8) is a transcription factor that plays critical roles in the differentiation of defined dendritic-cell (DC) populations and in the immune response to many pathogens. In this study, we show that splenic DCs (s-DCs) from ICSBP(-/-) mice are markedly defective in their ability to capture and to present exogenous antigens (Ags) to naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We found that CD8alpha(+) DCs and, to a lesser extent, CD8alpha(-) DCs from ICSBP(-/-) mice are impaired at internalizing Ags, either through a receptor-mediated pathway or by macropinocytosis, in spite of having a more immature phenotype than their wild-type (WT) counterparts. These features reflected a greatly impaired ability of ICSBP(-/-) s-DCs to present injected soluble ovalbumin (OVA) to OVA-specific CD4(+) T cells in vivo. Conversely, bone marrow (BM)-derived DCs from ICSBP(-/-) mice, in keeping with their immature phenotype, exhibited higher endocytic activity than WT cells. However, Ag-loaded ICSBP(-/-) BM-DCs were defective in priming Ag-specific CD4(+) T lymphocytes and failed to induce a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response when injected into competent WT hosts. Together, these results indicate that, throughout the developmental program of DCs, ICSBP differentially controls Ag uptake and MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation affecting both functions only in differentiated peripheral DCs. PMID:16569763

  10. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4+ T cell responses requires antigen presentation by CD8α− conventional dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhoujie; Dahlin, Joakim S.; Xu, Hui; Heyman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    IgE, forming an immune complex with small proteins, can enhance the specific antibody and CD4+ T cell responses in vivo. The effects require the presence of CD23 (Fcε-receptor II)+ B cells, which capture IgE-complexed antigens (Ag) in the circulation and transport them to splenic B cell follicles. In addition, also CD11c+ cells, which do not express CD23, are required for IgE-mediated enhancement of T cell responses. This suggests that some type of dendritic cell obtains IgE-Ag complexes from B cells and presents antigenic peptides to T cells. To elucidate the nature of this dendritic cell, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE and OVA, and different populations of CD11c+ cells, obtained from the spleens four hours after immunization, were tested for their ability to present OVA. CD8α− conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) were much more efficient in inducing specific CD4+ T cell proliferation ex vivo than were CD8α+ cDCs or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Thus, IgE-Ag complexes administered intravenously are rapidly transported to the spleen by recirculating B cells where they are delivered to CD8α− cDCs which induce proliferation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:27306570

  11. CD40-induced aggregation of MHC class II and CD80 on the cell surface leads to an early enhancement in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Clatza, Abigail; Bonifaz, Laura C; Vignali, Dario A A; Moreno, José

    2003-12-15

    Ligation of CD40 on B cells increases their ability to present Ag and to activate MHC class II (MHC-II)-restricted T cells. How this occurs is not entirely clear. In this study we demonstrate that CD40 ligation on Ag-presenting B cells (APC) for a short period between 30 min and 3 h has a rapid, augmenting effect on the ability of a B cell line and normal B cells to activate T cells. This is not due to alterations in Ag processing or to an increase in surface expression of CD80, CD86, ICAM-1, or MHC-II. This effect is particularly evident with naive, resting T lymphocytes and appears to be more pronounced under limiting Ag concentrations. Shortly after CD40 ligation on a B cell line, MHC-II and CD80 progressively accumulated in cholesterol-enriched microdomains on the cell surface, which correlated with an initial enhancement in their Ag presentation ability. Moreover, CD40 ligation induced a second, late, more sustained enhancement of Ag presentation, which correlates with a significant increase in CD80 expression by APC. Thus, CD40 signaling enhances the efficiency with which APC activate T cells by at least two related, but distinct, mechanisms: an early stage characterized by aggregation of MHC-II and CD80 clusters, and a late stage in which a significant increase in CD80 expression is observed. These results raise the possibility that one important role of CD40 is to contribute to the formation of the immunological synapse on the APC side.

  12. Murine Melanoma-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells Are Defective in Antigen Presenting Function Regardless of the Presence of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ataera, Haley; Hyde, Evelyn; Price, Kylie M.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Ronchese, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells are often ineffective at presenting tumor-derived antigen in vivo, a defect usually ascribed to the suppressive tumor environment. We investigated the effects of depleting CD4+CD25+ “natural” regulatory T cells (Treg) on the frequency, phenotype and function of total dendritic cell populations in B16.OVA tumors and in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Intraperitoneal injection of the anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody PC61 reduced Treg frequency in blood and tumors, but did not affect the frequency of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells, or their expression of CD40, CD86 and MHCII. Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells from PC61-treated or untreated mice induced the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, but could not induce proliferation of OVA-specific OTI and OTII T cells unless specific peptide antigen was added in culture. Some proliferation of naïve, OVA-specific OTI T cells, but not OTII T cells, was observed in the tumor-draining LN of mice carrying B16.OVA tumors, however, this was not improved by PC61 treatment. Experiments using RAG1−/− hosts adoptively transferred with OTI and CD25-depleted OTII cells also failed to show improved OTI and OTII T cell proliferation in vivo compared to C57BL/6 hosts. We conclude that the defective presentation of B16.OVA tumor antigen by tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells and in the tumor-draining lymph node is not due to the presence of “natural” CD4+CD25+ Treg. PMID:21390236

  13. Selectively Reduced Intracellular Proliferation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium within APCs Limits Antigen Presentation and Development of a Rapid CD8 T Cell Response1

    PubMed Central

    Albaghdadi, Homam; Robinson, Nirmal; Finlay, Brett; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Sad, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Ag presentation to CD8+ T cells commences immediately after infection, which facilitates their rapid expansion and control of pathogen. This paradigm is not followed during infection with virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST), an intracellular bacterium that causes mortality in susceptible C57BL/6J mice within 7 days and a chronic infection in resistant mice (129 × 1SvJ). Infection of mice with OVA-expressing ST results in the development of a CD8+ T cell response that is detectable only after the second week of infection despite the early detectable bacterial burden. The mechanism behind the delayed CD8+ T cell activation was evaluated, and it was found that dendritic cells/macrophages or mice infected with ST-OVA failed to present Ag to OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. Lack of early Ag presentation was not rescued when mice or dendritic cells/macrophages were infected with an attenuated aroA mutant of ST or with mutants having defective Salmonella pathogenicity island I/II genes. Although extracellular ST proliferated extensively, the replication of ST was highly muted once inside macrophages. This muted intracellular proliferation of ST resulted in the generation of poor levels of intracellular Ag and peptide-MHC complex on the surface of dendritic cells. Additional experiments revealed that ST did not actively inhibit Ag presentation, rather it inhibited the uptake of another intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, thereby causing inhibition of Ag presentation against L. monocytogenes. Taken together, this study reveals a dichotomy in the proliferation of ST and indicates that selectively reduced intra-cellular proliferation of virulent pathogens may be an important mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:19692639

  14. Modulation of T cell responses to recall antigens presented by Langerhans cells in HIV-discordant identical twins by anti-interleukin (IL)-10 antibodies and IL-12.

    PubMed Central

    Blauvelt, A; Chougnet, C; Shearer, G M; Katz, S I

    1996-01-01

    Decreased antigen (Ag)-specific T cell (TC) proliferation and IL-2 production are detected in all stages of HIV disease. To determine whether dendritic cell dysfunction and/or abnormal cytokine production contribute to HIV-induced immune dysregulation, we studies TC responses to recall Ags (influenza virus and tetanus toxoid) presented by Langerhans cells (LC) in six pairs of HIV-discordant identical twins, and the modulation of these responses by anti-IL-10 (alphaIL-10) mAbs and IL-12. LC from HIV+ twins induced IL-2 comparable to normal LC in cultures containing TC from uninfected twins. In contrast, IL-2 production was markedly decreased in cultures containing TC from HIV+ twins. IL-12 enhanced Ag-specific IL-2 production by TC from two patients with CD4+ counts > 600. In contrast, alphaIL-10 mAbs enhanced IL-2 production in influenza virus-stimulated cultures containing TC from two patients with CD4+ counts < 20. Thus, these findings suggest that immunologic dysfunction of dendritic cells does not contribute to impaired secondary immune responses in HIV+ individuals. Although few patients were studied, partial immune reconstitution in vitro, as demonstrated here, may help to predict those individuals who might benefit from cytokines or antibodies against cytokines as immunotherapy for HIV disease. PMID:8617889

  15. Bone marrow transplantation alters lung antigen-presenting cells to promote TH17 response and the development of pneumonitis and fibrosis following gammaherpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Loomis-King, H; Gurczynski, S J; Wilke, C A; Konopka, K E; Ptaschinski, C; Coomes, S M; Iwakura, Y; van Dyk, L F; Lukacs, N W; Moore, B B

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) efficacy is limited by numerous pulmonary complications. We developed a model of syngeneic bone marrow transplantion (BMT) followed by infection with murine gamma herpesvirus-68 that results in pneumonitis and fibrosis and mimics human "noninfectious" HSCT complications. BMT mice experience increased early lytic replication, but establish viral latency by 21 days post infection. CD4 T cells in BMT mice are skewed toward interleukin (IL)-17A rather than interferon (IFN)-γ production. Transplantation of bone marrow from Il-17a(-/-) donors or treatment with anti-IL-17A neutralization antibodies at late stages attenuates pneumonitis and fibrosis in infected BMT mice, suggesting that hematopoietic-derived IL-17A is essential for development of pathology. IL-17A directly influences activation and extracellular matrix production by lung mesenchymal cells. Lung CD11c+ cells of BMT mice secrete more transforming growth factor beta-β1, and pro-TH17 mRNAs for IL-23 and IL-6, and less TH1-promoting cytokine mRNA for IFN-γ but slightly more IL-12 mRNA in response to viral infection. Adoptive transfer of non-BMT lung CD11c-enriched cells restores robust TH1 response and suppresses aberrant TH17 response in BMT mice to improve lung pathology. Our data suggest that "noninfectious" HSCT lung complications may reflect preceding viral infections and demonstrate that IL-17A neutralization may offer therapeutic advantage even after disease onset. PMID:26376362

  16. Bone marrow transplantation alters lung antigen presenting cells to promote TH17 response and the development of pneumonitis and fibrosis following gammaherpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Loomis-King, Hillary; Gurczynski, Stephen J.; Wilke, Carol A.; Konopka, Kristine E.; Ptaschinski, Catherine; Coomes, Stephanie M; Iwakura, Yoichiro; van Dyk, Linda F.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Moore, Bethany B.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) efficacy is limited by numerous pulmonary complications. We developed a model of syngeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) followed by infection with murine gamma herpesvirus (γHV-68) that results in pneumonitis and fibrosis and mimics human “non-infectious” HSCT complications. BMT mice experience increased early lytic replication, but establish viral latency by 21 days post infection (dpi). CD4 T cells in BMT mice are skewed towards IL-17A rather than IFN-γ production. Transplantation of bone marrow from Il-17a−/− donors or treatment with anti-IL-17A neutralization antibodies at late stages attenuates pneumonitis and fibrosis in infected BMT mice, suggesting that hematopoietic-derived IL-17A is essential for development of pathology. IL-17A directly influences activation and extracellular matrix production by lung mesenchymal cells. Lung CD11c+ cells of BMT mice secrete more TGF-β1, and pro-TH17 mRNAs for IL-23 and IL-6, and less TH1-promoting cytokine mRNA for IFN-γ but slightly more IL-12 mRNA in response to viral infection. Adoptive transfer of non-BMT lung CD11c-enriched cells restores robust TH1 response and suppresses aberrant TH17 response in BMT mice to improve lung pathology. Our data suggest “non-infectious” HSCT lung complications may reflect preceding viral infections and demonstrate that IL-17A neutralization may offer therapeutic advantage even after disease onset. PMID:26376362

  17. Viral immune evasion: Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    van de Weijer, Michael L; Luteijn, Rutger D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-03-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface. In the course of evolution, many viruses have acquired inhibitors that target essential stages of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Studies on these immune evasion proteins reveal fascinating strategies used by viruses to elude the immune system. Viral immunoevasins also constitute great research tools that facilitate functional studies on the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway, allowing the investigation of less well understood routes, such as TAP-independent antigen presentation and cross-presentation of exogenous proteins. Viral immunoevasins have also helped to unravel more general cellular processes. For instance, basic principles of ER-associated protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been resolved using virus-induced degradation of MHC class I as a model. This review highlights how viral immunoevasins have increased our understanding of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation.

  18. Parkinson's Disease-Related Proteins PINK1 and Parkin Repress Mitochondrial Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Matheoud, Diana; Sugiura, Ayumu; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angélique; Laplante, Annie; Rondeau, Christiane; Chemali, Magali; Fazel, Ali; Bergeron, John J; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Burelle, Yan; Gagnon, Etienne; McBride, Heidi M; Desjardins, Michel

    2016-07-14

    Antigen presentation is essential for establishing immune tolerance and for immune responses against infectious disease and cancer. Although antigen presentation can be mediated by autophagy, here we demonstrate a pathway for mitochondrial antigen presentation (MitAP) that relies on the generation and trafficking of mitochondrial-derived vesicles (MDVs) rather than on autophagy/mitophagy. We find that PINK1 and Parkin, two mitochondrial proteins linked to Parkinson's disease (PD), actively inhibit MDV formation and MitAP. In absence of PINK1 or Parkin, inflammatory conditions trigger MitAP in immune cells, both in vitro and in vivo. MitAP and the formation of MDVs require Rab9 and Sorting nexin 9, whose recruitment to mitochondria is inhibited by Parkin. The identification of PINK1 and Parkin as suppressors of an immune-response-eliciting pathway provoked by inflammation suggests new insights into PD pathology. PMID:27345367

  19. Lack of B7-1/BB1 and B7-2/B70 expression on thyrocytes of patients with Graves' disease. Delivery of costimulatory signals from bystander professional antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, N; Eguchi, K; Kawakami, A; Tsuboi, M; Nakamura, H; Kimura, H; Ishikawa, N; Ito, K; Nagataki, S

    1996-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that thyrocytes from patients with Graves' disease induce autologous peripheral blood T cell proliferation in response to soluble antigens, and a synergistic augmentation of T cell response by adding suboptimal numbers of monocytes. In the present study, we examined the role of costimulatory molecules, expressed on the surface of thyrocytes and intrathyroidal mononuclear cells, in antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Intercellular associated molecule (ICAM)-1 and lymphocyte function associated antigen-3 were constitutively expressed on the surface of both normal and Graves' thyrocytes. However, ICAM-2, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, B7-1, and B7-2 were not detected and induced by cytokines. B7-1, was expressed on intrathyroidal monocytes only, while B7-2 was present on intrathyroidal lymphocytes, peripheral blood monocytes, and intrathyroidal monocytes. Furthermore, the density of B7-2 was higher on intrathyroidal monocytes than on peripheral blood monocytes. The intensity of CD28 expression on intrathyroidal CD8bright+ cells was less than that on peripheral blood CD8bright+ cells. The antigen-specific T cell response induced by thyrocytes was blocked completely by anti-human leukocyte antigen-DR monoclonal antibody (mAb) and partially by anti-ICAM-1 mAb and anti-lymphocyte function associated antigen-3 mAb. Furthermore, the synergistic augmentation of T cell response, induced by the addition of suboptimal number of monocytes, was suppressed completely by combining anti-B7-1 mAb and anti-B7-2 mAb, to a level equivalent to that observed when thyrocytes were used alone as antigen-presenting cells. Our results suggest that T cell proliferation was induced by cooperation of thyrocytes and infiltrating professional antigen-presenting cells.

  20. Interleukin-19: A Constituent of the Regulome That Controls Antigen Presenting Cells in the Lungs and Airway Responses to Microbial Products

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Carol; Park, Sung-Hyun; Daley, Eleen; Emson, Claire; Louten, Jennifer; Sisco, Maureen; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Grunig, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-19 has been reported to enhance chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma but the in vivo mechanism is incompletely understood. Because IL-19 is produced by and regulates cells of the monocyte lineage, our studies focused on in vivo responses of CD11c positive (CD11c+) alveolar macrophages and lung dendritic cells. Methodology/Principal Findings IL-19-deficient (IL-19-/-) mice were studied at baseline (naïve) and following intranasal challenge with microbial products, or recombinant cytokines. Naïve IL-19-/- mixed background mice had a decreased percentage of CD11c+ cells in the bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) due to the deficiency in IL-19 and a trait inherited from the 129-mouse strain. BAL CD11c+ cells from fully backcrossed IL-19-/- BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice expressed significantly less Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII) in response to intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide, Aspergillus antigen, or IL-13, a pro-allergic cytokine. Neurogenic-locus-notch-homolog-protein-2 (Notch2) expression by lung monocytes, the precursors of BAL CD11c+ cells, was dysregulated: extracellular Notch2 was significantly decreased, transmembrane/intracellular Notch2 was significantly increased in IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Instillation of recombinant IL-19 increased extracellular Notch2 expression and dendritic cells cultured from bone marrow cells in the presence of IL-19 showed upregulated extracellular Notch2. The CD205 positive subset among the CD11c+ cells was 3-5-fold decreased in the airways and lungs of naïve IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Airway inflammation and histological changes in the lungs were ameliorated in IL-19-/- mice challenged with Aspergillus antigen that induces T lymphocyte-dependent allergic inflammation but not in IL-19-/- mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide or IL-13. Conclusions/Significance Because MHCII is the molecular platform that displays peptides to T lymphocytes and Notch2

  1. Development of an artificial-antigen-presenting-cell-based assay for the detection of low-frequency virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in whole blood, with application for measles virus.

    PubMed

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Angenendt, Monika; Heckel, Diana; Schneck, Jonathan P; Griffin, Diane E; Oelke, Mathias

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of the immune responses induced by childhood vaccines requires measurement of T-cell, as well as antibody, responses. However, cellular immune responses are often not analyzed because of technical hurdles and the volume of blood required. Therefore, a sensitive and specific assay for antigen-specific T cells that utilizes a small volume of blood would facilitate new vaccine evaluation. We developed a novel assay for quantifying virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that combines the use of HLA-A2 immunoglobulin-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) for stimulation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in whole blood with quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to detect gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) mRNA. This assay was optimized using a well-established cytomegalovirus (CMV) CD8(+) T-cell system. The aAPC-qRT-PCR assay had comparable sensitivity to intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in detecting CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells with a detection limit of less than 0.004%. The assay was applied to the detection of low-frequency measles virus (MV)-specific CD8(+) T cells by stimulating blood from five MV-immune HLA-A*0201 donors with four different MV-specific peptides (MV peptide aAPCs). Stimulation with three of the MV peptide aAPCs resulted in significant increases in IFN-gamma mRNA ranging from 3.3- to 13.5-fold. Our results show that the aAPC-qRT-PCR assay is highly sensitive and specific and can be standardized for screening MV-specific CD8(+) T cells in vaccine trials. The technology should be transferable to analysis of CD8(+) T-cell responses to other antigens. PMID:19494085

  2. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  3. Mechanistic analysis of the immunomodulatory effects of a catalytic antioxidant on antigen-presenting cells: implication for their use in targeting oxidation-reduction reactions in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Tse, Hubert M; Milton, Martha J; Piganelli, Jon D

    2004-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have an indispensable role in controlling the growth of pathogens. Recent evidence also suggests that they can function as second messengers and modulators of the immune system. The identification of many redox-sensitive signal transduction pathways that are necessary for initiating the innate proinflammatory immune response suggests that modulation of these oxidation-reduction reactions may provide a means of therapeutic benefit for controlling inflammatory-mediated diseases. In order to test this hypothesis we employed two catalytic antioxidants (AEOL 10113 and 10150) for the determination of the role of oxidation-reduction reactions in innate immune system activation. Catalytic antioxidants prevented the initiation of the innate immune response in LPS-stimulated macrophages as evidenced by the suppression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta) and ROS (NO2- and O2-). The suppression of proinflammatory cytokine and ROS production correlated with the inhibition of NF-kappaB DNA binding, without any effects on the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Catalytic antioxidants prevented NF-kappaB from binding DNA by an oxidation mechanism that was reversible with the addition of DTT. Although the primary use of these agents was to reduce and scavenge ROS, surprisingly, we also observed the ability of these compounds to exhibit oxidoreductase activity and oxidize redox-sensitive transcription factors such as NF-kappaB. Catalytic antioxidants exhibit antioxidant and pro-oxidant activities and our data further demonstrate the importance of redox balance for the initiation of proinflammation. The coupling of the innate with the adaptive immune response is dependent on TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, NO2-, and O2- generation; therefore, agents like catalytic antioxidants that decrease proinflammatory cytokines and ROS may provide protective effects in diseases in which chronic inflammation plays a pathogenic role.

  4. Inhibition of antigen-induced proliferation of T cells from radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras by a monoclonal antibody directed against an Ia determinant on the antigen-presenting cell.

    PubMed Central

    Longo, D L; Schwartz, R H

    1981-01-01

    Chimeric B10.A T cells that had matured in a (B10.A X B10.Q)F1 environment acquired the ability to respond to poly(Glu56Lys35Phe9) (GL pi), an antigen to which the B10.A mouse is a nonresponder. The response of the chimeric B10.A T cells was initiated by GL phi on responder B10.Q antigen-presenting cells (APC) but not by GL phi on nonresponder B10.A APC. Similarly, chimeric B10.Q T cells that had matured in a (B10.A X B10.Q)F1 environment acquired the ability to respond to poly(Glu60Ala30Tyr10) (GAT) when the antigen was presented on responder B10.A APC, but not when GAT was presented on nonresponder B10.Q APC. No syngeneic haplotype preference was observed for either antigen. These interactions between H-2 nonidentical T cells and APC were inhibited by anti-H-2 antisera and a monoclonal anti-Ia antibody directed against the APC but not by such antibodies when they were directed against the T cell. These data suggest that, when they develop in a responder chimeric environment, genotypic nonresponder T cells become responders by acquiring receptors that allow them to recognize responder I region products on the surface of APC. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that the site of action of the blocking effects of the anti-Ia antibodies is the APC, thus providing strong evidence in support of the idea that Ia antigens on APC are the Ir gene products. PMID:6165995

  5. Gene complementation in the T-lymphocyte proliferative response to poly (Glu55Lys36Phe9)n. A demonstration that both immune response gene products must be expressed in the same antigen-presenting cell

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    The immune response (Ir) to the random copolymer GLphi depends upon the function of two Ir genes, Ir-GLphi-beta[beta] and Ir-GLphi- alpha[alpha], mapped to the I-A and I-E/C subregions of the major histocompatibility complex, respectively. In this paper, the site(s) of expression of the products of these two Ir genes was examined by evaluating T-lymphocyte proliferative responses of bone marrow radiation chimeras. Chimeras were created in [alpha+beta- X alpha- beta+]F1 responder mice by lethal irradiation and reconstitution with a mixture of bone marrow cells from both parental strains. These chimeras failed to respond to GLphi, although they were capable or responding to the much weaker antigens, (T,G)-A--L, TEPC-15, pigeon cytochrome c, and (H,G)-A--L. This failure to respond to GLphi was shown not to be the result of a cryptic mixed lymphocyte reaction, as similar chimeras created in (alpha+beta+ X alpha-beta+)F1 mice responded well to GLphi, although they possessed almost the same potential histoincompatibility. Furthermore, the lack of response to GLphi could not be attributed to a general failure of the two parental cell types in the chimeras to collaboratc with each other, as each chimeric parental cell type could respond to dinitrophenyl conjugated ovalbumin presented on nonimmune spleen cells from the other parent. Thus, the failure of low responder parental into F1 high responder chimeras to generate an immune response to GLphi suggests that immune competence for this antigen requires at least one cell type in the immune system to express gene products of both the Ir-glphi-alpha and -beta genes, i.e. one cell must be of high responder genotype. The the antigen-presenting cell is one such cell type was shown by experiments in which GLphi-primed T lymphocytes from responder F1 mice were stimulated with antigen bound to nonimmune spleen cells. Only spleen cells from responder F1 and recombinant mice could present GLphi. Neither of the two complementing

  6. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-03-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of approx. =72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation.

  7. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B.; Merkel, Sarah C.; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K.; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N.; Suhoski, Megan M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; June, Carl H.; Riley, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)–coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  8. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Hippen, Keli L; Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B; Merkel, Sarah C; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N; Suhoski, Megan M; Miller, Jeffrey S; Wagner, John E; June, Carl H; Riley, James L; Blazar, Bruce R

    2008-10-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)-coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  9. MHC structure and function – antigen presentation. Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The setting for the occurrence of an immune response is that of the need to cope with a vast array of different antigens from both pathogenic and non-pathogenic sources. When the first barriers against infection and innate defense fail, adaptive immune response enters the stage for recognition of the antigens by means of extremely variable molecules, namely immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors. The latter recognize the antigen exposed on cell surfaces, in the form of peptides presented by the HLA molecule. The first part of this review details the central role played by these molecules, establishing the close connection existing between their structure and their antigen presenting function. PMID:25807245

  10. Recombinant Nonstructural 3 Protein, rNS3, of Hepatitis C Virus Along With Recombinant GP96 Induce IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Mokarram, Pooneh; Kamali sarvestani, Eskandar; Bolhassani, Azam; Mostafavi Pour, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the main cause of chronic liver disease and to date there has been no vaccine development to prevent this infection. Among non-structural HCV proteins, NS3 protein is an excellent goal for a therapeutic vaccine, due to its large size and less variation in conserved regions. The immunogenic properties of heat shock proteins (HSPs) for instance GP96 have prompted investigations into their function as strong adjuvant to improve innate and adaptive immunity. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine additive effects of recombinant GP96 (rGP96) fragments accompanied by rNS3 on expression levels of α5integrin and pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12 and TNFα, in Antigen Presenting Cells (APCs). Materials and Methods Recombinant viral proteins (rNS3 and rRGD-NS3), N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of GP96 were produced and purified from E. coli in order to treat the cells; mouse spleen Dendritic Cells (DCs) and THP-1 macrophages. Results Our results showed that rNT-GP96 alone significantly increases the expression level of IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin in THP-1 macrophages and DCs, while IL-12 and TNFα expression levels were unaffected by either rNS3 or rRGD-NS3. Interestingly, the co-addition of these recombinant proteins with rNT-GP96 increased IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin expression. Pearson Correlation showed a direct association between α5integrin with IL-12 and TNF-α expression. Conclusions we have highlighted the role of rNS3 plus rNT-GP96 mediated by α5integrin in producing IL-12 and TNFα. It can be suggested that rNT-GP96 could enhance immunity characteristic of rNS3 protein via production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24032046

  11. MHC class I antigen presentation: learning from viral evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ted H; Bouvier, Marlene

    2009-07-01

    The cell surface display of peptides by MHC class I molecules to lymphocytes provides the host with an important surveillance mechanism to protect against invading pathogens. However, in turn, viruses have evolved elegant strategies to inhibit various stages of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway and prevent the display of viral peptides. This Review highlights how the elucidation of mechanisms of viral immune evasion is important for advancing our understanding of virus-host interactions and can further our knowledge of the MHC class I presentation pathway as well as other cellular pathways.

  12. MHC structure and function − antigen presentation. Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this review deals with the molecules and processes involved in the processing and presentation of the antigenic fragments to the T-cell receptor. Though the nature of the antigens presented varies, the most significant class of antigens is proteins, processed within the cell to be then recognized in the form of peptides, a mechanism that confers an extraordinary degree of precision to this mode of immune response. The efficiency and accuracy of this system is also the result of the myriad of mechanisms involved in the processing of proteins and production of peptides, in addition to the capture and recycling of alternative sources aiming to generate further diversity in the presentation to T-cells. PMID:25807243

  13. Murine CD8 lymphocyte expansion in vitro by artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing CD137L (4-1BBL) is superior to CD28, and CD137L expressed on neuroblastoma expands CD8 tumour-reactive effector cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Johnson, Bryon D; Orentas, Rimas J

    2004-01-01

    The ability to expand tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes in vitro has been greatly enhanced by the use of antigen-independent mechanisms of immune cell costimulation. We have produced human, using the K562 cell line, and murine, using YAC-1 cells, artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) and demonstrate that these cell types stimulate murine lymphocyte populations in distinct ways. Using aAPC that have been transfected with CD137L (4-1BBL) and CD32 (FcRγII), as a means to bind anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibody, we found that CD4 cells preferentially expanded in vitro with K562 aAPC, while CD8 cells expanded with both K562 and YAC-1 aAPC. Co-stimulation mediated by CD137L on aAPC was superior to that mediated by anti-CD28 antibody. This was seen in both long and short-term expansion assays, and by the rapid induction of a CD8+ DX5+ population. DX5 serves, under these in vitro conditions, as a general marker for lymphocyte activation. In vivo, the superiority of CD137L was demonstrated by the induction of T helper 1 effectors seen in freshly isolated splenocytes from mice immunized with CD137L-expressing neuroblastoma tumour vaccines. The ability to stimulate a strong CD8 CTL response in vivo correlated with the induction of a DX5+ cell population in splenocytes with a memory-effector phenotype. The presence of this unique DX5+ cell population, phenotypically distinct with regards to CD69 and CD62L expression from DX5+ cells induced by aAPC in vitro, may be associated with the ability of CD137L to induce strong anti-tumour immunity. PMID:15096190

  14. Isolation of a peptide binding protein and its role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.; Pierce, S.K.; Margoliash, E.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse T cell hybrid, TPc9.1, recognizes pigeon cytochrome c (Pc) as processed and presented by histocompatible antigen presenting cells (APC). When paraformaldehyde fixed APC are employed, only a peptide fragment of Pc, Pc 81-104, and not the native Pc, is capable of stimulating TPc9.1 cells. Pc 81-104 appears to associate tightly with the APC surface since paraformaldehyde fixed APC which have been incubated with Pc 81-104 remain stimulatory following extensive washing. When APC are surface labeled with /sup 125/I, solubilized and affinity purified on Pc 81-104-Sepharose 4B columns, two predominant polypeptides of approximately 72 and 74 kd are isolated. Little or no immunoglobulin, Class I or Class II proteins are obtained under these conditions. Antisera from rabbits immunized with the affinity purified material, but not preimmune sera, block the activation of TPc 9.1 cells by Pc as well as Pc 81-104 when presented by live APC. Furthermore, these antisera are even more effective in blocking the activation of TPc9.1 cells by either APC which had been pulsed with Pc and then paraformaldehyde fixed, or by Pc 81-104 when added to paraformaldehyde fixed APC, suggesting that these antisera were not affecting antigen processing. Thus, these peptide binding proteins may play a role in antigen presentation, and they are being further characterized.

  15. The Cellular Redox Environment Alters Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Jonathan A.; Croft, Nathan P.; Dudek, Nadine L.; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Theodossis, Alex; Webb, Andrew I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Illing, Patricia T.; Butler, Noah S.; Fett, Craig; Tscharke, David C.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Perlman, Stanley; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine-containing peptides represent an important class of T cell epitopes, yet their prevalence remains underestimated. We have established and interrogated a database of around 70,000 naturally processed MHC-bound peptides and demonstrate that cysteine-containing peptides are presented on the surface of cells in an MHC allomorph-dependent manner and comprise on average 5–10% of the immunopeptidome. A significant proportion of these peptides are oxidatively modified, most commonly through covalent linkage with the antioxidant glutathione. Unlike some of the previously reported cysteine-based modifications, this represents a true physiological alteration of cysteine residues. Furthermore, our results suggest that alterations in the cellular redox state induced by viral infection are communicated to the immune system through the presentation of S-glutathionylated viral peptides, resulting in altered T cell recognition. Our data provide a structural basis for how the glutathione modification alters recognition by virus-specific T cells. Collectively, these results suggest that oxidative stress represents a mechanism for modulating the virus-specific T cell response. PMID:25135637

  16. Blood coagulation protein fibrinogen promotes autoimmunity and demyelination via chemokine release and antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jae Kyu; Petersen, Mark A.; Murray, Sara G.; Baeten, Kim M.; Meyer-Franke, Anke; Chan, Justin P.; Vagena, Eirini; Bedard, Catherine; Machado, Michael R.; Coronado, Pamela E. Rios; Prod'homme, Thomas; Charo, Israel F.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Zamvil, Scott S.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity and macrophage recruitment into the central nervous system (CNS) are critical determinants of neuroinflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms that drive immunological responses targeted to the CNS remain largely unknown. Here we show that fibrinogen, a central blood coagulation protein deposited in the CNS after blood–brain barrier disruption, induces encephalitogenic adaptive immune responses and peripheral macrophage recruitment into the CNS leading to demyelination. Fibrinogen stimulates a unique transcriptional signature in CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells inducing the recruitment and local CNS activation of myelin antigen-specific Th1 cells. Fibrinogen depletion reduces Th1 cells in the multiple sclerosis model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II-dependent antigen presentation, CXCL10- and CCL2-mediated recruitment of T cells and macrophages, respectively, are required for fibrinogen-induced encephalomyelitis. Inhibition of the fibrinogen receptor CD11b/CD18 protects from all immune and neuropathologic effects. Our results show that the final product of the coagulation cascade is a key determinant of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26353940

  17. Boosting the MHC Class II-Restricted Tumor Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Helper Cells: A Critical Issue for Triggering Protective Immunity and Re-Orienting the Tumor Microenvironment Toward an Anti-Tumor State.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Roberto S; Lombardo, Letizia; Abdallah, Rawan; Raval, Goutham; Forlani, Greta; Tosi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Although the existence of an immune response against tumor cells is well documented, the fact that tumors take off in cancer patients indicates that neoplastic cells can circumvent this response. Over the years many investigators have described strategies to rescue the anti-tumor immune response with the aim of creating specific and long-lasting protection against the disease. When exported to human clinical settings, these strategies have revealed in most cases a very limited, if any, positive outcome. We believe that the failure is mostly due to the inadequate triggering of the CD4+ T helper (TH) cell arm of the adaptive immunity, as TH cells are necessary to trigger all the immune effector mechanisms required to eliminate tumor cells. In this review, we focus on novel strategies that by stimulating MHC class II-restricted activation of TH cells generate a specific and persistent adaptive immunity against the tumor. This point is of critical importance for both preventive and therapeutic anti-tumor vaccination protocols, because adaptive immunity with its capacity to produce specific, long-lasting protection and memory responses is indeed the final goal of vaccination. We will discuss data from our as well as other laboratories which strongly suggest that triggering a specific and persistent anti-tumor CD4+ TH cell response stably modify not only the tumor microenvironment but also tumor-dependent extratumor microenvironments by eliminating and/or reducing the blood-derived tumor infiltrating cells that may have a pro-tumor growth function such as regulatory CD4+/CD25+ T cells and myeloid-derived-suppressor cells. Within this frame, therefore, we believe that the establishment of a pro-tumor environment is not the cause but simply the consequence of the tumor strategy to primarily counteract components of the adaptive cellular immunity, particularly TH lymphocytes.

  18. Boosting the MHC Class II-Restricted Tumor Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Helper Cells: A Critical Issue for Triggering Protective Immunity and Re-Orienting the Tumor Microenvironment Toward an Anti-Tumor State

    PubMed Central

    Accolla, Roberto S.; Lombardo, Letizia; Abdallah, Rawan; Raval, Goutham; Forlani, Greta; Tosi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Although the existence of an immune response against tumor cells is well documented, the fact that tumors take off in cancer patients indicates that neoplastic cells can circumvent this response. Over the years many investigators have described strategies to rescue the anti-tumor immune response with the aim of creating specific and long-lasting protection against the disease. When exported to human clinical settings, these strategies have revealed in most cases a very limited, if any, positive outcome. We believe that the failure is mostly due to the inadequate triggering of the CD4+ T helper (TH) cell arm of the adaptive immunity, as TH cells are necessary to trigger all the immune effector mechanisms required to eliminate tumor cells. In this review, we focus on novel strategies that by stimulating MHC class II-restricted activation of TH cells generate a specific and persistent adaptive immunity against the tumor. This point is of critical importance for both preventive and therapeutic anti-tumor vaccination protocols, because adaptive immunity with its capacity to produce specific, long-lasting protection and memory responses is indeed the final goal of vaccination. We will discuss data from our as well as other laboratories which strongly suggest that triggering a specific and persistent anti-tumor CD4+ TH cell response stably modify not only the tumor microenvironment but also tumor-dependent extratumor microenvironments by eliminating and/or reducing the blood-derived tumor infiltrating cells that may have a pro-tumor growth function such as regulatory CD4+/CD25+ T cells and myeloid-derived-suppressor cells. Within this frame, therefore, we believe that the establishment of a pro-tumor environment is not the cause but simply the consequence of the tumor strategy to primarily counteract components of the adaptive cellular immunity, particularly TH lymphocytes. PMID:24600588

  19. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erik D.; Simmons, Ryan S.; Palmer, Amy L.; Hildebrand, William H.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8+ T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8+ killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. PMID:26597986

  20. Efficient Targeting of Protein Antigen to the Dendritic Cell Receptor DEC-205 in the Steady State Leads to Antigen Presentation on Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Products and Peripheral CD8+ T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal αDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c− cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When αDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4–48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of αDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4–7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with αDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic αCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon γ, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation. PMID:12486105

  1. Efficient targeting of protein antigen to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 in the steady state leads to antigen presentation on major histocompatibility complex class I products and peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2002-12-16

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal alphaDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c- cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When alphaDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4-48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of alphaDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4-7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with alphaDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic alphaCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation.

  2. A clinical-scale selective allodepletion approach for the treatment of HLA-mismatched and matched donor-recipient pairs using expanded T lymphocytes as antigen-presenting cells and a TH9402-based photodepletion technique

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Raquel; Rezvani, Katayoun; Fellowes, Vicki S.; Venne, Annie; Solomon, Scott R.; Fan, Yong; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Scotto, Christian; Read, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John

    2008-01-01

    Selective allodepletion is a strategy to eliminate host-reactive donor T cells from hematopoietic stem cell allografts to prevent graft-versus-host disease while conserving useful donor immune functions. To overcome fluctuations in activation-based surface marker expression and achieve a more consistent and effective allodepletion, we investigated a photodepletion process targeting activation-based changes in p-glycoprotein that result in an altered efflux of the photosensitizer TH9402. Expanded lymphocytes, generated using anti-CD3 and IL-2, were cocultured with responder cells from HLA-matched or -mismatched donors. Optimal results were achieved when cocultured cells were incubated with 7.5 μM TH9402, followed by dye extrusion and exposure to 5 Joule/cm2 light energy at 5 × 106 cells/mL. In mismatched stimulator-responder pairs, the median reduction of alloreactivity was 474-fold (range, 43-fold to 864-fold) compared with the unmanipulated responder. Third-party responses were maintained with a median 1.4-fold (range, 0.9-fold to 3.3-fold) reduction. In matched pairs, alloreactive helper T-lymphocyte precursors were reduced to lower than 1:100 000, while third-party responses remained higher than 1:10 000. This establishes a clinical-scale process capable of highly efficient, reproducible, selective removal of alloreactive lymphocytes from lymphocyte transplant products performed under current Good Manufacturing Practice. This procedure is currently being investigated in a clinical trial of allotransplantation. PMID:17878399

  3. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama . E-mail: nirupama@icgeb.res.in

    2006-12-22

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine.

  4. A fully synthetic glycopeptide antitumor vaccine based on multiple antigen presentation on a hyperbranched polymer.

    PubMed

    Glaffig, Markus; Palitzsch, Björn; Hartmann, Sebastian; Schüll, Christoph; Nuhn, Lutz; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Frey, Holger; Kunz, Horst

    2014-04-01

    For antitumor vaccines both the selected tumor-associated antigen, as well as the mode of its presentation, affect the immune response. According to the principle of multiple antigen presentation, a tumor-associated MUC1 glycopeptide combined with the immunostimulating T-cell epitope P2 from tetanus toxoid was coupled to a multi-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerol by "click chemistry". This globular polymeric carrier has a flexible dendrimer-like structure, which allows optimal antigen presentation to the immune system. The resulting fully synthetic vaccine induced strong immune responses in mice and IgG antibodies recognizing human breast-cancer cells.

  5. Current status of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: Application of organic and inorganic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many studies are currently investigating the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent various infectious diseases. Multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems have been developed to avoid the adverse effects associated with conventional vaccines (i.e., live-attenuated, killed or inactivated pathogens), carrier proteins and cytotoxic adjuvants. Recently, two main approaches have been used to develop multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: (1) the addition of functional components, e.g., T-cell epitopes, cell-penetrating peptides, and lipophilic moieties; and (2) synthetic approaches using size-defined nanomaterials, e.g., self-assembling peptides, non-peptidic dendrimers, and gold nanoparticles, as antigen-displaying platforms. This review summarizes the recent experimental studies directed to the development of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems. PMID:21861904

  6. Antigen presentation by liposomes bearing class II MHC and membrane IL-1.

    PubMed Central

    Bakouche, O.; Lachman, L. B.

    1990-01-01

    Liposomes containing membrane IL-1, Iak, and the antigen conalbumin were evaluated as "synthetic antigen presenting cells." The role of these three molecules in macrophage-T cell interaction was studied by testing their ability to induce the proliferation of a T-cell clone specific to conalbumin (the D10 cell line) or immune spleen cells sensitized three times in vivo with conalbumin. In the latter case, splenic macrophages were eliminated by adherence and a lysomotropic agent. The antigen conalbumin was presented on the surface of the liposomes as native undigested protein. When the liposomes presented native conalbumin, Iak, and membrane IL-1, significant proliferation occurred, but if the liposomes lacked membrane IL-1, the proliferation of the T-cell clone and the spleen cells reached only about 60 percent of the previous signal. Native conalbumin and class II antigen alone were required for T-cell activation, while membrane IL-1 only amplified the response. When the liposomes were made with only Iak and membrane IL-1, lacking conalbumin, there was no proliferation of antigen-specific target cells. These results indicated that in this synthetic system, membrane IL-1 increases the magnitude of the response but is not essential for the proliferative response of antigen-specific T cells. PMID:2399741

  7. Self-adjuvanted nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy: Role of lysosomal rupture-induced ROS in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ce; Li, Ping; Liu, Lanlan; Pan, Hong; Li, Hongchang; Cai, Lintao; Ma, Yifan

    2016-02-01

    MHC class I (MHC I) antigen presentation of exogenous antigens (so called "cross presentation") is a central mechanism of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses essential for successful vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. The present study constructed amphiphilic pH-sensitive galactosyl dextran-retinal (GDR) nanogels for cancer vaccine delivery, in which dextran was conjugated with all-trans retinal (a metabolite of vitamin A) through a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond, followed by galactosylation to acquire dendritic cell (DC)-targeting ability. Our results showed that pH-sensitive GDR nanogel was a self-adjuvanted vaccine carrier that not only promoted DC maturation through activating retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling, but also facilitated antigen uptake and cytosolic antigen release in DCs. Furthermore, pH-sensitive GDR nanogel effectively augmented MHC I antigen presentation and evoked potent anti-cancer immune responses in vivo. More importantly, we first reported that nanoparticle-triggered lysosome rupture could directly induce ROS production in DCs, which was found to be essential for augmenting proteasome activity and downstream MHC I antigen presentation. Hence, DC-targeted pH-sensitive GDR nanogels could be a potent delivery system for cancer vaccine development. Triggering lyososomal rupture in DCs with pH-sensitive nanoparticles might be a plausible strategy to elevate intracellular ROS production for promoting antigen cross presentation, thereby improving cancer vaccine efficacy. PMID:26702587

  8. Self-adjuvanted nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy: Role of lysosomal rupture-induced ROS in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ce; Li, Ping; Liu, Lanlan; Pan, Hong; Li, Hongchang; Cai, Lintao; Ma, Yifan

    2016-02-01

    MHC class I (MHC I) antigen presentation of exogenous antigens (so called "cross presentation") is a central mechanism of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses essential for successful vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. The present study constructed amphiphilic pH-sensitive galactosyl dextran-retinal (GDR) nanogels for cancer vaccine delivery, in which dextran was conjugated with all-trans retinal (a metabolite of vitamin A) through a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond, followed by galactosylation to acquire dendritic cell (DC)-targeting ability. Our results showed that pH-sensitive GDR nanogel was a self-adjuvanted vaccine carrier that not only promoted DC maturation through activating retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling, but also facilitated antigen uptake and cytosolic antigen release in DCs. Furthermore, pH-sensitive GDR nanogel effectively augmented MHC I antigen presentation and evoked potent anti-cancer immune responses in vivo. More importantly, we first reported that nanoparticle-triggered lysosome rupture could directly induce ROS production in DCs, which was found to be essential for augmenting proteasome activity and downstream MHC I antigen presentation. Hence, DC-targeted pH-sensitive GDR nanogels could be a potent delivery system for cancer vaccine development. Triggering lyososomal rupture in DCs with pH-sensitive nanoparticles might be a plausible strategy to elevate intracellular ROS production for promoting antigen cross presentation, thereby improving cancer vaccine efficacy.

  9. Inhibition by chloroquine of the class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted presentation of endogenous antigens varies according to the cellular origin of the antigen-presenting cells, the nature of the T-cell epitope, and the responding T cell.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard-Platlet, S; Bertolino, P; Deng, H; Gerlier, D; Rabourdin-Combe, C

    1993-01-01

    Chloroquine treatment of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was explored as a tool to investigate the processing pathway for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted presentation of the endogenous secreted hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and transmembrane measles virus haemagglutinin (HA). A 72-hr pretreatment of the APC with 25 microM chloroquine blocked the presentation of the HEL(52-61) T-cell epitope generated from endogenous HEL to the I-Ak-restricted 3A9 T-cell hybridoma by MHC class II-transfected L cells expressing the invariant chain (Ii). The presentation of exogenously added HEL peptides was not affected. Under the same conditions, no inhibition of the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the I-Ed-restricted G28 high-avidity T-cell hybridoma, nor of HA when synthesized by L cells, was observed. When B-lymphoid APC were used, inhibition was observed in every case with a low number of B APC pretreated for 48 hr with chloroquine prior to the T-cell stimulation test. Moreover, addition of chloroquine to untreated B APC during the T-cell stimulation assay was sufficient to inhibit completely the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the B10.D24.42 low avidity T-cell hybridoma. Altogether these studies suggest that an apparent resistance of endogenous Ag presentation to chloroquine inhibition may not necessarily indicate the existence of a non-endosomal pathway but may be due to the nature of the T-cell epitope, to the use of 'non-professional' APC such as L cells, to the use of T cells of high avidity, and to high amounts of pre-existing MHC class II-peptide complexes expressed by the APC. We demonstrate here that, at least in conventional APC such as B cells, class II-restricted presentation of both endogenous secreted HEL and transmembrane HA involves an endosomal pathway. PMID:7508420

  10. Normal adult ramified microglia separated from other central nervous system macrophages by flow cytometric sorting: Phenotypic differences defined and direct ex vivo antigen presentation to myelin basic protein-reactive CD4{sup +} T cells compared

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, A.L.; Goodsall, A.L.; Sedgwick, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    Ramified microglia in the adult central nervous system (CNS) are the principal glial element up-regulating MHC class I and II expression in response to inflammatory events or neuronal damage. A proportion of these cells also express MHC class II constitutively in the normal CNS. The role of microglia as APCs for CD4{sup +} cells extravasating into the CNS remains undefined. In this study, using irradiation bone marrow chimeras in CD45-congenic rats, the phenotype CD45{sup low}CD11b/c{sup +} is shown to identify microglial cells specifically within the CNS. Highly purified populations of microglia and nonmicroglial but CNS-associated macrophages (CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +}) have been obtained directly from the adult CNS, by using flow cytometric sorting. Morphologically, freshly isolated microglia vs other CNS macrophages are quite distinct. Of the two populations recovered from the normal CNS, it is the minority CD45{sup high}CD11 b/c{sup +} transitional macrophage population, and not microglia, that is the effective APC for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-inducing CD4{sup +} myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive T cells. CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +} CNS macrophages also stimulate MBP-reactive T cells without addition of MBP to culture suggesting presentation of endogenous Ag. This is the first study in which microglia vs other CNS macrophages have been analyzed for APC ability directly from the CNS, with substantial cross-contamination between the two populations eliminated. The heterogeneity of these populations in terms of APC function is clearly demonstrated. Evidence is still lacking that adult CNS microglia have the capacity to interact with and stimulate CD4{sup +} T cells to proliferate or secrete IL-2. 60 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Suppression of autophagy and antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS47.

    PubMed

    Saini, Neeraj K; Baena, Andres; Ng, Tony W; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kennedy, Steven C; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-08-15

    Suppression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen presentation is believed to be among the major mechanisms used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to escape protective host immune responses. Through a genome-wide screen for the genetic loci of M. tuberculosis that inhibit MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by mycobacteria-infected dendritic cells, we identified the PE_PGRS47 protein as one of the responsible factors. Targeted disruption of the PE_PGRS47 (Rv2741) gene led to attenuated growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro and in vivo, and a PE_PGRS47 mutant showed enhanced MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation during in vivo infection of mice. Analysis of the effects of deletion or over-expression of PE_PGRS47 implicated this protein in the inhibition of autophagy in infected host phagocytes. Our findings identify PE_PGRS47 as a functionally relevant, non-redundant bacterial factor in the modulation of innate and adaptive immunity by M. tuberculosis, suggesting strategies for improving antigen presentation and the generation of protective immunity during vaccination or infection.

  12. Suppression of autophagy and antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS47.

    PubMed

    Saini, Neeraj K; Baena, Andres; Ng, Tony W; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kennedy, Steven C; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Suppression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen presentation is believed to be among the major mechanisms used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to escape protective host immune responses. Through a genome-wide screen for the genetic loci of M. tuberculosis that inhibit MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by mycobacteria-infected dendritic cells, we identified the PE_PGRS47 protein as one of the responsible factors. Targeted disruption of the PE_PGRS47 (Rv2741) gene led to attenuated growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro and in vivo, and a PE_PGRS47 mutant showed enhanced MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation during in vivo infection of mice. Analysis of the effects of deletion or over-expression of PE_PGRS47 implicated this protein in the inhibition of autophagy in infected host phagocytes. Our findings identify PE_PGRS47 as a functionally relevant, non-redundant bacterial factor in the modulation of innate and adaptive immunity by M. tuberculosis, suggesting strategies for improving antigen presentation and the generation of protective immunity during vaccination or infection. PMID:27562263

  13. Antigen Presentation, Autoantigens, and Immune Regulation in Multiple Sclerosis and Other Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Riedhammer, Christine; Weissert, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is in the center of the immune system, both in host defense against pathogens, but also when the system is unbalanced and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) develop. It is not just by chance that a major histocompatibility complex gene is the major genetic susceptibility locus in MS; a feature that MS shares with other autoimmune diseases. The exact etiology of the disease, however, has not been fully understood yet. T cells are regarded as the major players in the disease, but most probably a complex interplay of altered central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms, T-cell and B-cell functions, characteristics of putative autoantigens, and a possible interference of environmental factors like microorganisms are at work. In this review, new data on all these different aspects of antigen presentation and their role in MS will be discussed, probable autoantigens will be summarized, and comparisons to other autoimmune diseases will be drawn. PMID:26136751

  14. Comparative Analysis of Gingival Tissue Antigen Presentation Pathways in Aging and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, O.A.; Novak, M.J.; Kirakodu, S.; Orraca, L.; Chen, K.C.; Strom-berg, A.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Gingival tissues of periodontitis lesions contribute to local elevations in mediators, including both specific T cell and antibody immune responses to oral bacterial antigens. Thus, antigen processing and presentation activities must exist in these tissues to link antigen-presenting cells with adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that alterations in the transcriptome of antigen processing and presentation genes occur in aging gingival tissues and that periodontitis enhances these differences reflecting tissues less capable of immune resistance to oral pathogens. Materials and Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=34) from 3–23 years of age were examined. A buccal gingival sample from healthy or periodontitis sites were obtained, total RNA isolated, and microarray analysis was used to describe the transcriptome. Results The results demonstrated increased transcription of genes related to the MHC class II and negative regulation of NK cells with aging in healthy gingival tissues. In contrast, both adult and aging periodontitis tissues showed decreased transcription of genes for MHC class II antigens, coincident with up-regulation of MHC class I-associated genes. Conclusion These transcriptional changes suggest a response of healthy aging tissues through the class II pathway (i.e., endocytosed antigens) and altered responses in periodontitis that could reflect host-associated self-antigens or targeting cytosolic intra-cellular microbial pathogens. PMID:24304139

  15. The handling of Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: the search for an immunogenic molecule in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Allen, P M; Beller, D I; Braun, J; Unanue, E R

    1984-01-01

    The activation of T lymphocytes for immunity to the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes requires that Ia-positive macrophages ingest the bacteria. The subsequent handling of Listeria by macrophages was examined in this report and related to antigen presentation to T cells. Macrophages pulsed with radiolabeled Listeria, besides releasing acid-soluble radioactivity--an indication of extensive catabolism of the Listeria-derived proteins--were also found to release acid-insoluble peptides. The rate of release of the peptides was not markedly affected by treatment with chloroquine, ammonia, or monensin and was independent of the state of activation and the level of Ia expression of the macrophage. The peptides were not associated with fragments of membranes and were represented by several molecular species. Listeria-derived peptides were also found associated with the macrophage plasma membrane. The membrane-associated peptides behaved like integral membrane proteins and could be released by proteases or detergents. Their expression was independent of the dose of Listeria and the level of Ia expression of the macrophage, and their presence could not be inhibited by protease inhibitors or chloroquine. The Listeria peptides released by the macrophages were very weakly immunogenic in a T cell proliferation assay. Purified plasma membranes from Listeria-pulsed macrophages, which contained membrane-associated Listeria peptides, were not immunogenic by themselves but could be reprocessed by additional macrophages to subsequently stimulate T cells. Trypsin treatment of Listeria-pulsed macrophages did not cause a significant reduction in their ability to stimulate T cells. No association was found between Ia molecules and either the membrane-associated or the released peptides with the use of several technical approaches. Hence, after internalization of Listeria, potentially immunogenic material can be found at the cell surface as well as in the culture fluid. The

  16. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  17. Vaccinia Virus A35R Inhibits MHC Class II Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Kristina E.; Connor, Ramsey F.; Jones, Gwendolyn J.B.; Yimbu, Kenneth; Roper, Rachel L.

    2009-01-01

    The Vaccinia virus gene A35R (Copenhagen designation) is highly conserved in mammalian-tropic poxviruses and is an important virulence factor, but its function was unknown. We show herein that A35 does not affect viral infectivity, apoptosis induction, or replication; however, we found that A35 significantly inhibited MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation, immune priming of T lymphocytes, and subsequent chemokine and cytokine synthesis. A35 localized to endosomes and reduced the amount of a model antigenic peptide displayed in the cleft of class II MHC. In addition, A35 decreased VV specific T cell responses in vivo. Thus, this is the first report identifying a function for the A35 protein in virulence as well as the first report identifying a VV gene that inhibits peptide antigen presentation. PMID:19954808

  18. Antigen presentation events during the initiation of autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Stephen T; Carrero, Javier A; Unanue, Emil R

    2016-07-01

    This is a brief summary of our studies of NOD autoimmune diabetes examining the events during the initial stage of the process. Our focus has been on antigen presentation events and the antigen presenting cells (APC) inside islets. Islets of non-diabetic mice contain resident macrophages that are developmentally distinct from those in the inter-acinar stroma. The autoimmune process starts with the entrance of CD4+ T cells together with a burst of a subset of dendritic cells (DC) bearing CD103. The CD103+ DC develop under the influence of the Batf3 transcription factor. Batf3 deficient mice do not develop diabetes and their islets are uninfiltrated throughout life. Thus, the CD103+ DC are necessary for the progression of autoimmune diabetes. The major CD4+ T cell response in NOD are the T cells directed to insulin. In particular, the non-conventional 12-20 segment of the insulin B chain is presented by the class II MHC molecule I-A(g7) and elicits pathogenic CD4+ T cells. We discuss that the diabetic process requires the CD103+ DC, the CD4+ T cells to insulin peptides, and NOD specific I-Ag(7) MHC-II allele. Finally, our initial studies indicate that beta cells transfer insulin containing vesicles to the local APC in a contact-dependent reaction. Live images of beta cells interactions with the APC and electron micrographs of islet APCs also show the transfer of granules. PMID:27021276

  19. The intracellular pathway for the presentation of vitamin B-related antigens by the antigen-presenting molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Eckle, Sidonia B G; Theodossis, Alex; Liu, Ligong; Chen, Zhenjun; Wubben, Jacinta M; Fairlie, David P; Strugnell, Richard A; Mintern, Justine D; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Villadangos, Jose A

    2016-05-01

    The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 presents vitamin B-related antigens (VitB antigens) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells through an uncharacterized pathway. We show that MR1, unlike other antigen-presenting molecules, does not constitutively present self-ligands. In the steady state it accumulates in a ligand-receptive conformation within the endoplasmic reticulum. VitB antigens reach this location and form a Schiff base with MR1, triggering a 'molecular switch' that allows MR1-VitB antigen complexes to traffic to the plasma membrane. These complexes are endocytosed with kinetics independent of the affinity of the MR1-ligand interaction and are degraded intracellularly, although some MR1 molecules acquire new ligands during passage through endosomes and recycle back to the surface. MR1 antigen presentation is characterized by a rapid 'off-on-off' mechanism that is strictly dependent on antigen availability. PMID:27043408

  20. Effect of multiple genetic polymorphisms on antigen presentation and susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Stewart T; Linderman, Jennifer J; Kirschner, Denise E

    2008-07-01

    Several molecules related to antigen presentation, including gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are encoded by polymorphic genes. Some polymorphisms were found to affect susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) when they were considered singly in epidemiological studies, but how multiple polymorphisms interact to determine susceptibility to TB in an individual remains an open question. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in some genes may counteract or intensify the effects of polymorphisms in other genes. For example, an increase in IFN-gamma expression may counteract the weak binding that a particular MHC variant displays for a peptide from Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish the same T-cell response as another, more strongly binding MHC variant. To test this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model of antigen presentation based on experimental data for the known effects of genetic polymorphisms and simulated time courses when multiple polymorphisms were present. We found that polymorphisms in different genes could affect antigen presentation to the same extent and therefore compensate for each other. Furthermore, we defined the conditions under which such relationships could exist. For example, increased IFN-gamma expression compensated for decreased peptide-MHC affinity in the model only above a certain threshold of expression. Below this threshold, changes in IFN-gamma expression were ineffectual compared to changes in peptide-MHC affinity. The finding that polymorphisms exhibit such relationships could explain discrepancies in the epidemiological literature, where some polymorphisms have been inconsistently associated with susceptibility to TB. Furthermore, the model allows polymorphisms to be ranked by effect, providing a new tool for designing association studies.

  1. Antigen presentation by hapten-specific B lymphocytes. II. Specificity and properties of antigen-presenting B lymphocytes, and function of immunoglobulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, A.K.; Haber, S.; Rock, K.L.

    1985-09-01

    Studies were designed to examine the ability of hapten-binding murine B lymphocytes to present hapten-protein conjugates to protein antigen-specific, Ia-restricted T cell hybridomas. BALB/c B cells specific for TNP or FITC presented hapten-modified proteins (TNP-G1 phi, TNP-OVA, or FITC-OVA) to the relevant T cell hybridomas at concentrations below 0.1 microgram/ml. Effective presentation of the same antigens by B lymphocyte-depleted splenocytes, and of unmodified proteins by either hapten-binding B cells or Ig spleen cells, required about 10(3)-to 10(4)-fold higher concentrations of antigen. The use of two different haptens and two carrier proteins showed that this extremely efficient presentation of antigen was highly specific, with hapten specificity being a property of the B cells and carrier specificity of the responding T cells. The presentation of hapten-proteins by hapten-binding B lymphocytes was radiosensitive and was not affected by the depletion of plastic-adherent cells, suggesting that conventional APCs (macrophages or dendritic cells) are not required in this phenomenon. Antigen-pulsing and antibody-blocking experiments showed that this hapten-specific antigen presentation required initial binding of antigen to surface Ig receptors. Moreover, linked recognition of hapten and carrier determinants was required, but these recognition events could be temporally separated. Finally, an antigen-processing step was found to be necessary, and this step was disrupted by ionizing radiation. These data suggest a role for B cell surface Ig in providing a specific high-affinity receptor to allow efficient uptake or focusing of antigen for its subsequent processing and presentation to T lymphocytes.

  2. Cross-dressing: an alternative mechanism for antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-12-01

    Cross-dressing involves the transfer of preformed functional peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of donor cells to recipient cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). These cross-dressed cells might eventually present the intact, unprocessed peptide-MHC complexes to T lymphocytes. In this review we will discuss some recent findings concerning the intercellular transfer of preformed MHC complexes and the possible mechanisms by which the transfer may occur. We will report evidences showing that both MHC class I and MHC class II functional complexes might be transferred, highlighting the physiological relevance of these cross-dressed cells for the presentation of exogenous antigens to both cytotoxic and helper T lymphocytes.

  3. Osteosarcoma is characterised by reduced expression of markers of osteoclastogenesis and antigen presentation compared with normal bone

    PubMed Central

    Endo-Munoz, L; Cumming, A; Sommerville, S; Dickinson, I; Saunders, N A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents. Patients who respond poorly to chemotherapy have a higher risk of metastatic disease and 5-year survival rates of only 10–20%. Therefore, identifying molecular targets that are specific for OS, or more specifically, metastatic OS, will be critical to the development of new treatment strategies to improve patient outcomes. Methods: We performed a transcriptomic analysis of chemo-naive OS biopsies and non-malignant bone biopsies to identify differentially expressed genes specific to OS, which could provide insight into OS biology and chemoresistance. Results: Statistical analysis of the OS transcriptomes found differential expression of several metallothionein family members, as well as deregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation. Tumours also exhibited significantly increased expression of ID1 and profound down-regulation of S100A8, highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets for OS. Finally, we found a significant correlation between OS and impaired osteoclastogenesis and antigen-presenting activity. The reduced osteoclastogenesis and antigen-presenting activity were more profound in the chemoresistant OS samples. Conclusion: Our results indicate that OS displays gene signatures consistent with decreased antigen-presenting activity, enhanced chemoresistance, and impaired osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, these alterations are more pronounced in chemoresistant OS tumour samples. PMID:20551950

  4. Uptake of HLA Alloantigens via CD89 and CD206 Does Not Enhance Antigen Presentation by Indirect Allorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Breman, Eytan; Ruben, Jurjen M.; Franken, Kees L.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Roelen, Dave L.; Claas, Frans H.

    2016-01-01

    In organ transplantation, alloantigens are taken up by antigen presenting cells and presented via the indirect pathway to T-cells which in turn can induce allograft rejection. Monitoring of these T-cells is of major importance; however no reliable assay is available to routinely monitor indirect allorecognition. Recently we showed that HLA monomers can be successfully used to monitor indirect allorecognition. Targeting antigens to endocytic receptors on antigen presenting cells may further enhance the presentation of antigens via HLA class II and improve the efficiency of this assay. In the current study we explored targeting of HLA monomers to either CD89 expressing monocytes or mannose receptor expressing dendritic cells. Monomer-antibody complexes were generated using biotin-labeled monomers and avidin labeling of the antibodies. We demonstrate that targeting the complexes to these receptors resulted in a dose-dependent HLA class II mediated presentation to a T-cell clone. The immune-complexes were efficiently taken up and presented to T-cells. However, the level of T-cell reactivity was similar to that when only exogenous antigen was added. We conclude that HLA-A2 monomers targeted for presentation through CD89 on monocytes or mannose receptor on dendritic cells lead to proper antigen presentation but do not enhance indirect allorecognition via HLA-DR. PMID:27413760

  5. Saposins utilize two strategies for lipid transfer and CD1 antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    León, Luis; Tatituri, Raju V V; Grenha, Rosa; Sun, Ying; Barral, Duarte C; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Bhowruth, Veemal; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Kasmar, Anne; Peng, Wei; Moody, D Branch; Grabowski, Gregory A; Brenner, Michael B

    2012-03-20

    Transferring lipid antigens from membranes into CD1 antigen-presenting proteins represents a major molecular hurdle necessary for T-cell recognition. Saposins facilitate this process, but the mechanisms used are not well understood. We found that saposin B forms soluble saposin protein-lipid complexes detected by native gel electrophoresis that can directly load CD1 proteins. Because saposin B must bind lipids directly to function, we found it could not accommodate long acyl chain containing lipids. In contrast, saposin C facilitates CD1 lipid loading in a different way. It uses a stable, membrane-associated topology and was capable of loading lipid antigens without forming soluble saposin-lipid antigen complexes. These findings reveal how saposins use different strategies to facilitate transfer of structurally diverse lipid antigens.

  6. CD1 antigen presentation and autoreactivity in the pregnant human uterus

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Leigh; Wu, Vernon; Houser, Brandy; Tilburgs, Tamara; de Jong, Annemieke; Moody, D. Branch; Strominger, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    Problem CD11cHI human decidual macrophages express several isoforms of CD1 molecules. Their expression pattern and function required investigation. Method of Study CD11cHI macrophages were isolated from decidua. Expression of CD1 isoforms and their ability to present lipid antigens to T cells was studied. Results CD1a, CD1c, and CD1d were all expressed on CD11cHI dMϕ, a pattern differing from those previously observed. Exposure of peripheral monocytes and dendritic cells to lipid isolates from decidua led to increased surface CD1a levels only. The CD1a and CD1c on dMϕ were able to present the appropriate lipid antigens to lipid antigen-specific T cells. Finally, autoreactivity of decidual T cells to CD1a was observed. Conclusion The unique pattern of expression of CD1 isoforms on CD11cHI dMϕ is consistent with organ-specific roles of CD1 in human T cell responses. dMϕ are able to present lipid antigens to both peripheral and decidual T cells and are major antigen presenting cells in human de-cidua. PMID:25739697

  7. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Eiko . E-mail: ekoike@nies.go.jp; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-12-15

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP, organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP.

  8. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:157–171. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1262 PMID:25264139

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  10. TLR and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor signals differentially regulate exogenous antigen-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Claudia S.; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effect of dendritic cell (DC) maturation on MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation is well studied, but less is known about the effects of DC maturation on MHC class I-restricted cross-presentation. We investigated the ability of mature DCs to present antigens from cells infected with Herpes simplex virus-1. Pre-treatment with pure LPS increased cross-presentation, in a manner dependent on both MyD88 and TRIF, while a similar dose of a less pure LPS preparation inhibited cross-presentation. The difference could not be attributed to differences in uptake or phenotypic maturation. The likely contaminant responsible for shutting down cross-presentation is peptidoglycan. Addition of peptidoglycan to pure LPS abrogated its ability to enhance cross-presentation. Direct activation of DCs with peptidoglycan inhibited cross-presentation through nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (Nod)-like receptor signaling. These results demonstrate that different maturation stimuli can have opposite impacts on the ability of DCs to cross-present viral antigens. PMID:22156493

  11. Pheophorbide a-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy Triggers HLA Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Patrick Ming-Kuen; Bui-Xuan, Ngoc-Ha; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Fong, Wing-Ping; Fung, Kwok-Pui

    2010-01-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been reported in several photosensitizers. Pheophorbide a (Pa), a chlorophyll derivative, shows antitumor effects on a number of human cancers in a PDT approach (Pa-PDT); however, the potential effect of Pa-PDT on the anticancer immunity has never been studied. In the present work, the underlying action mechanism of Pa-PDT was systemically investigated with a human hepatoma cell line HepG2. We found that Pa-PDT significantly inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells with a half maximal inhibitory concentration/endoplasmic reticulum of 0.35 µM at 24 hours by the induction of apoptosis, as shown by externalization of phosphatidylserine, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and activation of the caspases cascade in the treated cells. Interestingly, using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, a 57-kDa disulfide-isomerase-like ER resident protein (ERp57) that belongs to the HLA class I-restricted antigen-processing machinery was found to be mediated during the Pa-PDT treatment. This activation of antigen presentation was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunostaining. Furthermore, a cross-presentation of antigen with HLA class I proteins and 70-kDa heat shock protein was found in Pa-PDT-treated cells, as shown by the confocal microscopic observation and immunoprecipitation assay. Nevertheless, the immunogenicity of HepG2 cells was increased by Pa-PDT treatment that triggered phagocytic capture by human macrophages. Our findings provide the first evidence that Pa-PDT can trigger both apoptosis and cancer immunity in the tumor host. PMID:20360936

  12. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Culina, Slobodan; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands.

  13. No Major Role for Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Antigen Presentation by MHC Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands. PMID:24516642

  14. Checking the garbage bin for problems in the house, or how autophagy assists in antigen presentation to the immune system.

    PubMed

    Romao, Susana; Gannage, Monique; Münz, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Macroautophagy was originally discovered as a nutrient salvage pathway during starvation. By now it has not only become clear that degradation of cytoplasmic constituents via transport by autophagosomes to lysosomes can be used for innate and adaptive immunity, but that the core machinery assists antigen presentation to the immune system by a variety of vesicular transport pathways. All of these rely on the presentation of small protein waste fragments, which are generated by a variety of catabolic pathways, including macroautophagy, on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. In this review, we will point out how classical macroautophagy, as well as phagocytosis and exocytosis, which both benefit from the core autophagic machinery, assist in antigen presentation on MHC class I and II molecules to CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, respectively. Finally to high-light that macroautophagy is always intimately interconnected with cell death in addition to the various supported vesicular transport function, its role in lymphocyte, especially T cell, development and function will be discussed. From this body of work a picture is emerging that the core machinery of macroautophagy can be used for a variety of vesicular transport pathways and to modulate cell survival, besides its classical role in delivering intracellular material for lysosomal degradation.

  15. Checking the garbage bin for problems in the house, or how autophagy assists in antigen presentation to the immune system.

    PubMed

    Romao, Susana; Gannage, Monique; Münz, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Macroautophagy was originally discovered as a nutrient salvage pathway during starvation. By now it has not only become clear that degradation of cytoplasmic constituents via transport by autophagosomes to lysosomes can be used for innate and adaptive immunity, but that the core machinery assists antigen presentation to the immune system by a variety of vesicular transport pathways. All of these rely on the presentation of small protein waste fragments, which are generated by a variety of catabolic pathways, including macroautophagy, on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. In this review, we will point out how classical macroautophagy, as well as phagocytosis and exocytosis, which both benefit from the core autophagic machinery, assist in antigen presentation on MHC class I and II molecules to CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, respectively. Finally to high-light that macroautophagy is always intimately interconnected with cell death in addition to the various supported vesicular transport function, its role in lymphocyte, especially T cell, development and function will be discussed. From this body of work a picture is emerging that the core machinery of macroautophagy can be used for a variety of vesicular transport pathways and to modulate cell survival, besides its classical role in delivering intracellular material for lysosomal degradation. PMID:23541679

  16. Effective Inhibition of Kb- and Db-Restricted Antigen Presentation in Primary Macrophages by Murine Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    LoPiccolo, Diane M.; Gold, Marielle C.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Wagner, Markus; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.; Hill, Ann B.

    2003-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection in vivo, both in disseminating infection and in harboring latent virus. MCMV encodes three immune evasion genes (m4, m6, and m152) that interfere with the ability of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) to detect virus-infected fibroblasts, but the efficacy of immune evasion in macrophages has been controversial. Here we show that MCMV immune evasion genes function in H-2b primary bone marrow macrophages (BMMφ) in the same way that they do in fibroblasts. Metabolic labeling experiments showed that class I is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by MCMV infection and associates with m4/gp34 to a similar extent in fibroblasts and BMMφ. We tested a series of Kb- and Db-restricted CTL clones specific for MCMV early genes against a panel of MCMV wild-type virus and mutants lacking m152, m4, or m6. MCMV immune evasion genes effectively inhibited antigen presentation. m152 appeared sufficient to abolish Db-restricted presentation in infected macrophages, as has been previously observed in infected fibroblasts. However, for inhibition of recognition of infected macrophages by Kb-restricted CTL, m4, m6, and m152 were all required. The contribution of m4 to inhibition of recognition appeared much more important in macrophages than in fibroblasts. Thus, MCMV immune evasion genes function effectively in primary macrophages to prevent CTL recognition of early antigens and show the same pattern of major histocompatibility complex class I allele discrimination as is seen in fibroblasts. Furthermore, for inhibition of Kb-restricted presentation, a strong synergistic effect was noted among m152, m4, and m6. PMID:12477835

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis vaccine therapies: perspectives and lessons from therapeutic ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccines for models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Kenneth S; Mikecz, Katalin; Steiner, Harold L; Glant, Tibor T; Finnegan, Alison; Carambula, Roy E; Zimmerman, Daniel H

    2015-06-01

    The current status of therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases is reviewed with rheumatoid arthritis as the focus. Therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases must regulate or subdue responses to common self-antigens. Ideally, such a vaccine would initiate an antigen-specific modulation of the T-cell immune response that drives the inflammatory disease. Appropriate animal models and types of T helper cells and signature cytokine responses that drive autoimmune disease are also discussed. Interpretation of these animal models must be done cautiously because the means of initiation, autoantigens, and even the signature cytokine and T helper cell (Th1 or Th17) responses that are involved in the disease may differ significantly from those in humans. We describe ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccine modulation of T-cell autoimmune responses as a strategy for the design of therapeutic vaccines for rheumatoid arthritis, which may also be effective in other autoimmune conditions.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis vaccine therapies: perspectives and lessons from therapeutic ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccines for models of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Kenneth S.; Mikecz, Katalin; Steiner, Harold L.; Glant, Tibor T.; Finnegan, Alison; Carambula, Roy E.; Zimmerman, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The current status of therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases is reviewed with rheumatoid arthritis as the focus. Therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases must regulate or subdue responses to common self-antigens. Ideally, such a vaccine would initiate an antigen-specific modulation of the T-cell immune response that drives the inflammatory disease. Appropriate animal models and types of T helper cells and signature cytokine responses that drive autoimmune disease are also discussed. Interpretation of these animal models must be done cautiously because the means of initiation, autoantigens, and even the signature cytokine and T helper cell (Th1 or Th17) responses that are involved in the disease may differ significantly from those in humans. We describe ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccine modulation of T-cell autoimmune responses as a strategy for the design of therapeutic vaccines for rheumatoid arthritis, which may also be effective in other autoimmune conditions. PMID:25787143

  19. A yeast surface display system for the discovery of ligands that trigger cell activation.

    PubMed

    Cho, B K; Kieke, M C; Boder, E T; Wittrup, K D; Kranz, D M

    1998-11-01

    Opposing cells often communicate signalling events using multivalent interactions between receptors present on their cell surface. For example, T cells are typically activated when the T cell receptor (TCR) and its associated costimulatory molecules are multivalently engaged by the appropriate ligands present on an antigen presenting cell. In this report, yeast expressing high cell-surface levels of a TCR ligand (a recombinant antibody to the TCR Vbeta domain) were shown to act as 'pseudo' antigen presenting cells and induce T cell activation as monitored by increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and by downregulation of cell surface TCR. Similar levels of T cell activation could occur even when a 30-fold excess of irrelevant yeast was present, suggesting that such a yeast display system, by virtue of its ability to present ligands multivalently, may be used in highly sensitive procedures to identify novel polypeptides that interact multivalently with cell surface receptors and thereby trigger specific cellular responses.

  20. Salt bridge residues between I-Ak dimer of dimers alpha-chains modulate antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Yadati, S; Nydam, T; Demian, D; Wade, T K; Gabriel, J L; Barisas, B G; Wade, W F

    1999-03-15

    Class II dimers of dimers are predicted to have functional significance in antigen presentation. The putative contact amino acids of the I-Ak class II dimer of dimers have been identified by molecular modeling based on the DR1 crystal structure (Nydam et al., Int. Immunol. 10, 1237,1998). We have previously reported the role in antigen presentation of dimer of dimers contact amino acids located in the C-terminal domains of the alpha- and beta-chains of class II. Our calculations show that residues Ealpha89 and Ralpha145 in the alpha2-domain form an inter alpha-chain salt bridge between pairs of alphabeta-heterodimers. Other residues, Qalpha92 and Nalpha115, may be involved in close association in that part of the alpha-chain. We investigated the role of these amino acids on class II expression and antigen presentation. Class II composed of an Ealpha89K substituted alpha-chain paired with a wt beta-chain exhibited inhibited antigen presentation and expression of alpha-chain serologic epitopes. In contrast, mutation of Ralpha145E had less affect on antigen presentation and did not affect I-Ak serologic epitopes. Interchanging charges of the salt bridge residues by expressing both Ralpha145E and Ealpha89K on the same chain obviated the large negative effect of the Ealpha89K mutation on antigen presentation but not on the serologic epitopes. Our results are similar for those reported for mutation of DR3's inter-chain salt bridge with the exception that double mutants did not moderate the DR3 defect. Interestingly, the amino acids differences between I-A and DR change the location of the inter-chain salt bridges. In DR1 these residues are located at positions Ealpha88 and Kalpha111; in I-Ak these residues are located at position Ealpha89 and Ralpha145. Inter alpha-chain salt bridges are thus maintained in various class II molecules by amino acids located in different parts of the alpha2-domain. This conservation of structure suggests that considerable functional

  1. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  2. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  3. MHC class I antigen presentation of DRiP-derived peptides from a model antigen is not dependent on the AAA ATPase p97.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Amy L; Dolan, Brian P

    2013-01-01

    CD8(+) T cells are responsible for killing cells of the body that have become infected or oncogenically transformed. In order to do so, effector CD8(+) T cells must recognize their cognate antigenic peptide bound to a MHC class I molecule that has been directly presented by the target cell. Due to the rapid nature of antigen presentation, it is believed that antigenic peptides are derived from a subset of newly synthesized proteins which are degraded almost immediately following synthesis and termed Defective Ribosomal Products or DRiPs. We have recently reported on a bioassay which can distinguish antigen presentation of DRiP substrates from other forms of rapidly degraded proteins and found that poly-ubiquitin chain disassembly may be necessary for efficient DRiP presentation. The AAA ATPase p97 protein is necessary for efficient cross-presentation of antigens on MHC class I molecules and plays an important role in extracting mis-folded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we find that genetic ablation or chemical inhibition of p97 does not diminish DRiP antigen presentation to any great extent nor does it alter the levels of MHC class I molecules on the cell surface, despite our observations that p97 inhibition increased the levels of poly-ubiquitinated proteins in the cell. These data demonstrate that inhibiting poly-ubiquitin chain disassembly alone is insufficient to abolish DRiP presentation.

  4. Ascites Specific Inhibition of CD1d-Mediated Activation of NKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tonya J.; Giuntoli, Robert L.; Rogers, Ophelia; Schneck, Jonathan; Oelke, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigen presented by CD1 molecules. NKT cells can both directly, through cytotoxicity, and indirectly, through activation of other effector cells, mediate anti-tumor immunity. However, it has been shown that tumor associated lipids are frequently shed into the tumor microenvironment, which can mediate immunosuppressive activity. Given that ovarian cancer associated ascites has been reported to have increased levels of gangliosides, we examined the effect of tumor associated and other ascites on CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells. Experimental Design To investigate the effects of ascites on NKT cell activation, we pretreated CD1d-expressing cells with the ascites and measured their ability to stimulate cytokine production in NKT cells. To determine whether antigen processing or editing was necessary, CD1d-Ig-based artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (aAPC) were also incubated with ascites. In addition, to examine specificity, we analyzed whether ascites fluid could influence the activation of classical CD8+ T cells. Results Pretreatment of CD1d-expressing cells with ascites from the majority of patients inhibited the cells’ ability to stimulate/activate NKT cells in a dose-dependent manner. Ascites treatment also partially blocked the ability of α-GalCer loaded CD1d-Ig-based artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (aAPC) to activate NKT cells. In addition, our data demonstrate that treatment with ascites does not inhibit HLA-A2 mediated activation of classical CD8+ T cells. Conclusions Together, these data suggest that ovarian and other cancers may have developed immune evasion mechanisms specifically targeting the CD1/NKT cell system. PMID:19047090

  5. Susceptibility to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease correlates with astrocyte class II induction and antigen presentation.

    PubMed Central

    Borrow, P; Nash, A A

    1992-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is a picornavirus which induces a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in certain susceptible mouse strains. Demyelination has been shown to result from immunopathological responses mediated by CD4+, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T cells. As little or no class II is expressed in the normal mouse CNS, the ability of astrocytes to express these proteins and present antigen to T cells from TMEV-infected mice was investigated here. It is shown that astrocytes are capable of presenting TMEV to virus-specific T cells in vitro, and that this ability is dependent on prior induction of MHC class II by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment. Unlike other viruses such as murine hepatitis virus-JHM (a coronavirus) and measles, TMEV is not capable of inducing class II on astrocytes directly. There is a correlation between the ease of class II induction on astrocytes from different mouse strains by IFN-gamma and mouse strain susceptibility to TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. These results suggest that following viral infection and initial T-cell infiltration into the CNS, class II induction on astrocytes is a key step allowing local antigen presentation and amplification of immunopathological responses within the CNS and hence the development of demyelinating disease. PMID:1628891

  6. Susceptibility to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease correlates with astrocyte class II induction and antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Borrow, P; Nash, A A

    1992-05-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is a picornavirus which induces a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in certain susceptible mouse strains. Demyelination has been shown to result from immunopathological responses mediated by CD4+, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T cells. As little or no class II is expressed in the normal mouse CNS, the ability of astrocytes to express these proteins and present antigen to T cells from TMEV-infected mice was investigated here. It is shown that astrocytes are capable of presenting TMEV to virus-specific T cells in vitro, and that this ability is dependent on prior induction of MHC class II by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment. Unlike other viruses such as murine hepatitis virus-JHM (a coronavirus) and measles, TMEV is not capable of inducing class II on astrocytes directly. There is a correlation between the ease of class II induction on astrocytes from different mouse strains by IFN-gamma and mouse strain susceptibility to TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. These results suggest that following viral infection and initial T-cell infiltration into the CNS, class II induction on astrocytes is a key step allowing local antigen presentation and amplification of immunopathological responses within the CNS and hence the development of demyelinating disease.

  7. The Critical Role of Antigen-Presentation-Induced Cytokine Crosstalk in the Central Nervous System in Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that has been extensively studied using the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). It is believed that CD4+ T lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease by mediating the demyelination of neuronal axons via secretion of proinflammatory cytokines resulting in the clinical manifestations. Although a great deal of information has been gained in the last several decades about the cells involved in the inflammatory and disease mediating process, important questions have remained unanswered. It has long been held that initial neuroantigen presentation and T cell activation events occur in the immune periphery and then translocate to the CNS. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that antigen (Ag) presentation might initiate within the CNS itself. Importantly, it has remained unresolved which antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the CNS are the first to acquire and present neuroantigens during EAE/MS to T cells, and what the conditions are under which this takes place, ie, whether this occurs in the healthy CNS or only during inflammatory conditions and what the related cytokine microenvironment is comprised of. In particular, the central role of interferon-γ as a primary mediator of CNS pathology during EAE has been challenged by the emergence of Th17 cells producing interleukin-17. This review describes our current understanding of potential APCs in the CNS and the contribution of these and other CNS-resident cells to disease pathology. Additionally, we discuss the question of where Ag presentation is initiated and under what conditions neuroantigens are made available to APCs with special emphasis on which cytokines may be important in this process. PMID:21919736

  8. Identification of immunogenic hot spots within plum pox potyvirus capsid protein for efficient antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, M Rosario; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Roncal, Fernando; Domínguez, Elvira; García, Juan Antonio

    2002-12-01

    PEPSCAN analysis has been used to characterize the immunogenic regions of the capsid protein (CP) in virions of plum pox potyvirus (PPV). In addition to the well-known highly immunogenic N- and C-terminal domains of CP, regions within the core domain of the protein have also shown high immunogenicity. Moreover, the N terminus of CP is not homogeneously immunogenic, alternatively showing regions frequently recognized by antibodies and others that are not recognized at all. These results have helped us to design efficient antigen presentation vectors based on PPV. As predicted by PEPSCAN analysis, a small displacement of the insertion site in a previously constructed vector, PPV-gamma, turned the derived chimeras into efficient immunogens. Vectors expressing foreign peptides at different positions within a highly immunogenic region (amino acids 43 to 52) in the N-terminal domain of CP were the most effective at inducing specific antibody responses against the foreign sequence.

  9. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  10. Kinetic Discrimination in T-Cell Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Beeson, Craig; Lyons, Daniel S.; Davis, Mark M.; McConnell, Harden M.

    1996-02-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model.

  11. The transcription factor TFEB acts as a molecular switch that regulates exogenous antigen-presentation pathways.

    PubMed

    Samie, Mohammad; Cresswell, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can initiate immune responses by presenting exogenous antigens to T cells via both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathways and MHC class II pathways. Lysosomal activity has an important role in modulating the balance between these two pathways. The transcription factor TFEB regulates lysosomal function by inducing lysosomal activation. Here we report that TFEB expression inhibited the presentation of exogenous antigen by MHC class I while enhancing presentation via MHC class II. TFEB promoted phagosomal acidification and protein degradation. Furthermore, we found that the activation of TFEB was regulated during DC maturation and that phagosomal acidification was impaired in DCs in which the gene encoding TFEB was silenced. Our data indicate that TFEB is a key participant in the differential regulation of the presentation of exogenous antigens by DCs.

  12. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  13. PD-L1/PD-1 Co-Stimulation, a Brake for T cell Activation and a T cell Differentiation Signal.

    PubMed

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Dufait, Ines; Bricogne, Christopher; Lanna, Alessio; Pen, Joeri; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2012-10-30

    For T cell activation, three signals have to be provided from the antigen presenting cell; Signal 1 (antigen recognition), signal 2 (co-stimulation) and signal 3 (cytokine priming). Blocking negative co-stimulation during antigen presentation to T cells is becoming a promising therapeutic strategy to enhance cancer immunotherapy. Here we will focus on interference with PD-1/PD-L1 negative co-stimulation during antigen presentation to T cells as a therapeutic approach. We will discuss the potential mechanisms and the therapeutic consequences by which interference/inhibition with this interaction results in anti-tumour immunity. Particularly, we will comment on whether blocking negative co-stimulation provides differentiation signals to T cells undergoing antigen presentation. A major dogma in immunology states that T cell differentiation signals are given by cytokines and chemokines (signal 3) rather than co-stimulation (signal 2). We will discuss whether this is the case when blocking PD-L1/PD-1 negative co-stimulation.

  14. Association of Polymorphisms in HLA Antigen Presentation-Related Genes with the Outcomes of HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaomei; Xu, Yin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Rongbin; Su, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presentation genes play a vital role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. However, the relationship of variants of these genes with spontaneous outcomes of HCV infection has not been fully investigated. To explore novel loci in the Chinese population, 34 tagging-SNPs in 9 candidate genes were genotyped for their associations with the outcomes of HCV infection. The distributions of different genotypes and haplotypes were compared among 773 HCV-negative controls, 246 subjects with HCV natural clearance, and 218 HCV persistent carriers recruited from hemodialysis patients and intravenous drug users. Our study implicated that TAP2, HLA-DOA, HLA-DOB, and tapasin loci were novel candidate regions for susceptibility to HCV infection and viral clearance in the Chinese population. Logistic regression analyses showed that TAP2 rs1800454 A (OR = 1.48, P = 0.002) and HLA-DOB rs2071469 G (OR = 1.23, P = 0.048) were significantly associated with increased susceptibility to establishment of HCV infection. However, high-risk behavior exposure and age were stronger predictors of HCV infection. Mutation of tapasin rs9277972 T (OR = 1.57, P =0.043) increased the risk of HCV chronicity, and HLA-DOA rs3128935 C (OR = 0.62, P = 0.019) increased the chance of viral resolution. With regards to the effect of rs3128925, interactions were found with high-risk behavior (P = 0.013) and age (P = 0.035). The risk effect of rs3128925 T for persistent HCV infection was higher in injecting drug users (vs. dialysis patients) and in subjects ≥ 40 years old (vs. < 40 years old). PMID:25874709

  15. The ESAT-6 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis interacts with beta-2-microglobulin (β2M) affecting antigen presentation function of macrophage.

    PubMed

    Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Ahmed, Asma; Parveen, Nazia; Jha, Vishwanath; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2014-10-01

    ESAT-6, an abundantly secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is an important virulence factor, inactivation of which leads to reduced virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 alone, or in complex with its chaperone CFP-10 (ESAT-6:CFP-10), is known to modulate host immune responses; however, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. The structure of ESAT-6 or ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex does not suggest presence of enzymatic or DNA-binding activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that the crucial role played by ESAT-6 in the virulence of mycobacteria could be due to its interaction with some host cellular factors. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified that ESAT-6 interacts with the host protein beta-2-microglobulin (β2M), which was further confirmed by other assays, like GST pull down, co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. The C-terminal six amino acid residues (90-95) of ESAT-6 were found to be essential for this interaction. ESAT-6, in complex with CFP-10, also interacts with β2M. We found that ESAT-6/ESAT-6:CFP-10 can enter into the endoplasmic reticulum where it sequesters β2M to inhibit cell surface expression of MHC-I-β2M complexes, resulting in downregulation of class I-mediated antigen presentation. Interestingly, the ESAT-6:β2M complex could be detected in pleural biopsies of individuals suffering from pleural tuberculosis. Our data highlight a novel mechanism by which M. tuberculosis may undermine the host adaptive immune responses to establish a successful infection. Identification of such novel interactions may help us in designing small molecule inhibitors as well as effective vaccine design against tuberculosis. PMID:25356553

  16. The ESAT-6 Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Interacts with Beta-2-Microglobulin (β2M) Affecting Antigen Presentation Function of Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Nazia; Jha, Vishwanath; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2014-01-01

    ESAT-6, an abundantly secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is an important virulence factor, inactivation of which leads to reduced virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 alone, or in complex with its chaperone CFP-10 (ESAT-6:CFP-10), is known to modulate host immune responses; however, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. The structure of ESAT-6 or ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex does not suggest presence of enzymatic or DNA-binding activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that the crucial role played by ESAT-6 in the virulence of mycobacteria could be due to its interaction with some host cellular factors. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified that ESAT-6 interacts with the host protein beta-2-microglobulin (β2M), which was further confirmed by other assays, like GST pull down, co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. The C-terminal six amino acid residues (90–95) of ESAT-6 were found to be essential for this interaction. ESAT-6, in complex with CFP-10, also interacts with β2M. We found that ESAT-6/ESAT-6:CFP-10 can enter into the endoplasmic reticulum where it sequesters β2M to inhibit cell surface expression of MHC-I-β2M complexes, resulting in downregulation of class I-mediated antigen presentation. Interestingly, the ESAT-6:β2M complex could be detected in pleural biopsies of individuals suffering from pleural tuberculosis. Our data highlight a novel mechanism by which M. tuberculosis may undermine the host adaptive immune responses to establish a successful infection. Identification of such novel interactions may help us in designing small molecule inhibitors as well as effective vaccine design against tuberculosis. PMID:25356553

  17. MHC class II antigen presentation pathway in murine tumours: tumour evasion from immunosurveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Walter, W; Lingnau, K; Schmitt, E; Loos, M; Maeurer, M J

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative differences in the MHC class II antigen processing and presentation pathway may be instrumental in shaping the CD4+ T cell response directed against tumour cells. Efficient loading of many MHC class II alleles with peptides requires the assistance of H2-M, a heterodimeric MHC class II-like molecule. In contrast to the HLA-DM region in humans, the β-chain locus is duplicated in mouse, with the H2-Mb1 (Mb1β-chain distal to H2-Mb2 (Mb2) and the H2-Ma (Ma) α-chain gene). Here, we show that murine MHC class II and H2-M genes are coordinately regulated in murine tumour cell lines by T helper cell 1 (IFN-γ) and T helper cell 2 (IL-4 or IL-10) cytokines in the presence of the MHC class II-specific transactivator CIITA as determined by mRNA expression and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, Mαβ1 and Mαβ2 heterodimers are differentially expressed in murine tumour cell lines of different histology. Both H2-M isoforms promote equally processing and presentation of native protein antigens to H2-Ad- and H2-Ed-restricted CD4+ T cells. Murine tumour cell lines could be divided into three groups: constitutive MHC class II and CIITA expression; inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression upon IFN-γ-treatment; and lack of constitutive and IFN-γ-inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression. These differences may impact on CD4+ T cell recognition of cancer cells in murine tumour models. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027433

  18. Evaluation of RNA Amplification Methods to Improve DC Immunotherapy Antigen Presentation and Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G; Raney, Alexa; Lewis, Whitney E; DeBenedette, Mark A; Nicolette, Charles A; Tcherepanova, Irina Y

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with total amplified tumor cell RNA have the potential to induce broad antitumor immune responses. However, analytical methods required for quantitatively assessing the integrity, fidelity, and functionality of the amplified RNA are lacking. We have developed a series of assays including gel electrophoresis, northern blot, capping efficiency, and microarray analysis to determine integrity and fidelity and a model system to assess functionality after transfection into human DCs. We employed these tools to demonstrate that modifications to our previously reported total cellular RNA amplification process including the use of the Fast Start High Fidelity (FSHF) PCR enzyme, T7 Powerswitch primer, post-transcriptional capping and incorporation of a type 1 cap result in amplification of longer transcripts, greater translational competence, and a higher fidelity representation of the starting total RNA population. To study the properties of amplified RNA after transfection into human DCs, we measured protein expression levels of defined antigens coamplified with the starting total RNA populations and measured antigen-specific T cell expansion in autologous DC-T cell co-cultured in vitro. We conclude from these analyses that the improved RNA amplification process results in superior protein expression levels and a greater capacity of the transfected DCs to induce multifunctional antigen-specific memory T cells. PMID:23653155

  19. Molecular Pathways: Activating T Cells after Cancer Cell Phagocytosis from Blockade of CD47 "Don't Eat Me" Signals.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Melissa N; Cha, Adriel C; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-08-15

    Recent advances with immunotherapy agents for the treatment of cancer have provided remarkable, and in some cases, curative results. Our laboratory has identified CD47 as an important "don't eat me" signal expressed on malignant cells. Blockade of the CD47:SIRP-α axis between tumor cells and innate immune cells (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells) increases tumor cell phagocytosis in both solid tumors (including, but not limited to, bladder, breast, colon, lung, and pancreatic) and hematologic malignancies. These phagocytic innate cells are also professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), providing a link from innate to adaptive antitumor immunity. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that APCs present antigens from phagocytosed tumor cells, causing T-cell activation. Therefore, agents that block the CD47:SIRP-α engagement are attractive therapeutic targets as a monotherapy or in combination with additional immune-modulating agents for activating antitumor T cells in vivo.

  20. Virulent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium evades adaptive immunity by preventing dendritic cells from activating T cells.

    PubMed

    Tobar, Jaime A; Carreño, Leandro J; Bueno, Susan M; González, Pablo A; Mora, Jorge E; Quezada, Sergio A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2006-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the link between innate and adaptive immunity by directly recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in bacteria and by presenting bacterial antigens to T cells. Recognition of PAMPs renders DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and initiate adaptive immunity against bacteria. Therefore, interfering with DC function would promote bacterial survival and dissemination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that have evolved in virulent bacteria to evade activation of adaptive immunity requires the characterization of virulence factors that interfere with DC function. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the causative agent of typhoid-like disease in the mouse, can prevent antigen presentation to T cells by avoiding lysosomal degradation in DCs. Here, we show that this feature of virulent Salmonella applies in vivo to prevent activation of adaptive immunity. In addition, this attribute of virulent Salmonella requires functional expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS) and effector proteins encoded within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In contrast to wild-type virulent Salmonella, mutant strains carrying specific deletions of SPI-2 genes encoding TTSS components or effectors proteins are targeted to lysosomes and are no longer able to prevent DCs from activating T cells in vitro or in vivo. SPI-2 mutant strains are attenuated in vivo, showing reduced tissue colonization and enhanced T-cell activation, which confers protection against a challenge with wild-type virulent Salmonella. Our data suggest that impairment of DC function by the activity of SPI-2 gene products is crucial for Salmonella pathogenesis.

  1. Aldehyde-mannan antigen complexes target the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, V; Pietersz, G A; Gordon, S; Martinez-Pomares, L; McKenzie, I F

    2000-06-01

    Antigens such as MUC1 coupled to oxidized mannan lead to rapid and efficient MHC class I presentation to CD8+ cells and a preferential T1 response; after reduction there is class II presentation and a T2 immune response. We now show that the selective advantage of the oxidized mannan-MUC1 is due to the presence of aldehydes and not Schiff bases, and that oxidized mannan-MUC1 binds to the mannose and not scavenger receptors and is internalized and presented by MHC class I molecules 1,000 times more efficiently than when reduced. After internalization there is rapid access to the class I pathway via endosomes but not lysosomes, proteasomal processing and transport to the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and cell surface. Aldehydes cause rapid entry into the class I pathway, and can therefore direct the subsequent immune response.

  2. Emerging roles for antigen presentation in establishing host-microbiome symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bessman, Nicholas J; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2016-07-01

    Trillions of beneficial bacteria inhabit the intestinal tract of healthy mammals from birth. Accordingly, mammalian hosts have evolved a series of complementary and redundant pathways to limit pathologic immune responses against these bacteria, while simultaneously protecting against enteric pathogen invasion. These pathways can be generically responsive to the presence of any commensal bacteria and innate in nature, as for IL-22-related pathways. Alternatively, specific bacterial antigens can drive a distinct set of adaptive immune cell responses, including IgA affinity maturation and secretion, and a recently described pathway of intestinal selection whereby MHCII(+) ILC3 deletes commensal bacteria-reactive CD4 T cells. These pathways can either promote or inhibit colonization by specific subsets of commensal bacteria, and cooperatively maintain intestinal homeostasis. In this review, we will highlight recent developments in understanding how these diverse pathways complement each other to cooperatively shape the symbiotic relationship between commensal bacteria and mammalian hosts. PMID:27319348

  3. Selective immunosuppression by administration of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-binding peptides. I. Evidence for in vivo MHC blockade preventing T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Draining lymph node cells (LNC) from mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) display at their surface antigen-MHC complexes able to stimulate, in the absence of any further antigen addition, HEL peptide- specific, class II-restricted T cell hybridomas. Chloroquine addition to these LNC cultures fails to inhibit antigen presentation, indicating that antigenic complexes of class II molecules and HEL peptides are formed in vivo. MHC class II restriction of antigen presentation by LNC from HEL-primed mice was verified by the use of anti-class II monoclonal antibodies. Coinjection of HEL and the I-Ak-binding peptide HEL 112-129 in mice of H-2k haplotype inhibits the ability of LNC to stimulate I-Ak-restricted, HEL 46-61-specific T cell hybridomas. Similar results are obtained in mice coinjected with the HEL peptides 46-61 and 112-129. Inhibition of T hybridoma activation can also be observed using as antigen-presenting cells irradiated, T cell-depleted LNC from mice coinjected with HEL 46-61 and HEL 112-129, ruling out the possible role of either specific or nonspecific suppressor T cells. Inhibition of T cell proliferation is associated with MHC-specific inhibition of antigen presentation and with occupancy by the competitor of class II binding sites, as measured by activation of peptide- specific T cell hybridomas. These results demonstrate that administration of MHC class II binding peptide competitors selectively inhibits antigen presentation to class II-restricted T cells, indicating competitive blockade of class II molecules in vivo. PMID:1569402

  4. The first step of peptide selection in antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules

    PubMed Central

    Garstka, Malgorzata A.; Fish, Alexander; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Janssen, George M. C.; Berlin, Ilana; Hoppes, Rieuwert; Stadnik, Magda; Janssen, Lennert; Ovaa, Huib; van Veelen, Peter A.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Neefjes, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I molecules present a variable but limited repertoire of antigenic peptides for T-cell recognition. Understanding how peptide selection is achieved requires mechanistic insights into the interactions between the MHC I and candidate peptides. We find that, at first encounter, MHC I H-2Kb considers a wide range of peptides, including those with expanded N termini and unfitting anchor residues. Discrimination occurs in the second step, when noncanonical peptides dissociate with faster exchange rates. This second step exhibits remarkable temperature sensitivity, as illustrated by numerous noncanonical peptides presented by H-2Kb in cells cultured at 26 °C relative to 37 °C. Crystallographic analyses of H-2Kb–peptide complexes suggest that a conformational adaptation of H-2Kb drives the decisive step in peptide selection. We propose that MHC class I molecules consider initially a large peptide pool, subsequently refined by a temperature-sensitive induced-fit mechanism to retain the canonical peptide repertoire. PMID:25605945

  5. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate B cell activity in pre-clinical models: Implications for the immune response to infections.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jarrett; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2016-08-15

    B cell antigen presentation, cytokine production, and antibody production are targets of pharmacological intervention in inflammatory and infectious diseases. Here we review recent pre-clinical evidence demonstrating that pharmacologically relevant levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from marine fish oils influence key aspects of B cell function through multiple mechanisms. N-3 PUFAs modestly diminish B cell mediated stimulation of classically defined naïve CD4(+) Th1 cells through the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II pathway. This is consistent with existing data showing that n-3 PUFAs suppress the activation of Th1/Th17 cells through direct effects on helper T cells and indirect effects on antigen presenting cells. Mechanistically, n-3 PUFAs lower antigen presentation and T cell signaling by disrupting the formation of lipid microdomains within the immunological synapse. We then review data to show that n-3 PUFAs boost B cell activation and antibody production in the absence and presence of antigen stimulation. This has potential benefits for several clinical populations such as the aged and obese that have poor humoral immunity. The mode of action by which n-3 PUFA boost B cell activation and antibody production remains unclear, but may involve Th2 cytokines, enhanced production of specialized proresolving lipid mediators, and targeting of protein lateral organization in lipid microdomains. Finally, we highlight evidence to show that different n-3 PUFAs are not biologically equivalent, which has implications for the development of future interventions to target B cell activity.

  6. Receptor-independent, direct membrane binding leads to cell surface lipid sorting and Syk kinase activation in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Gilbert; Sharma, Karan; Ward, Sandra M.; Desrosiers, Melanie D.; Stephens, Leslie A.; Schoel, W. Michael; Li, Tonglei; Lowell, Clifford A.; Ling, Chang-Chun; Amrein, Matthias W.; Shi, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Binding of particulate antigens by antigen presenting cells (APC) is a critical step in immune activation. Previously, we demonstrated that uric acid crystals are potent adjuvants, initiating a robust adaptive immune response. However, the mechanisms of activation are unknown. Using atomic force microscopy as a tool for real time single cell activation analysis, we report that uric acid crystals can directly engage cellular membranes, particularly the cholesterol components, with a force substantially stronger than protein based cellular contacts. Binding of particulate substances activates Syk kinase-dependent signaling in dendritic cells (DCs). These observations suggest a mechanism whereby immune cell activation can be triggered by solid structures via membrane lipid alteration without the requirement for specific cell surface receptors, and a testable hypothesis for crystal-associated arthropathies, inflammation and adjuvanticity. PMID:18993083

  7. A KALA-modified lipid nanoparticle containing CpG-free plasmid DNA as a potential DNA vaccine carrier for antigen presentation and as an immune-stimulative adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoya; Shaheen, Sharif M.; Akita, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Technologies that delivery antigen-encoded plasmid DNA (pDNA) to antigen presenting cell and their immune-activation are required for the success of DNA vaccines. Here we report on an artificial nanoparticle that can achieve these; a multifunctional envelope-type nanodevice modified with KALA, a peptide that forms α-helical structure at physiological pH (KALA-MEND). KALA modification and the removal of the CpG-motifs from the pDNA synergistically boosted transfection efficacy. In parallel, transfection with the KALA-MEND enhances the production of multiple cytokines and chemokines and co-stimulatory molecules via the Toll-like receptor 9-independent manner. Endosome-fusogenic lipid envelops and a long length of pDNA are essential for this immune stimulation. Furthermore, cytoplasmic dsDNA sensors that are related to the STING/TBK1 pathway and inflammasome are involved in IFN-β and IL-1β production, respectively. Consequently, the robust induction of antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphoma activity and the resulting prophylactic and therapeutic anti-tumor effect was observed in mice that had been immunized with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells ex vivo transfected with antigen-encoding pDNA. Collectively, the KALA-MEND possesses dual functions; gene transfection system and immune-stimulative adjuvant, those are both necessary for the successful DNA vaccine. PMID:25605799

  8. Defective antigen presentation by monocytes in ESRD patients not responding to hepatitis B vaccination: impaired HBsAg internalization and expression of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia molecules

    PubMed Central

    Barth, C.; Pollok, M.; Michałkiewicz, J.; Madaliński, K.; Maciejewski, J.; Baldamis, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the monocyte function of uraemic non-responders to hepatitis B vaccination. Therefore, some parameters concerning antigen processing by monocytes (Mo) as antigen presenting cells (APC) were analysed. It was found that in uraemic non-responders, (1) the internalization of HBsAg by monocytes was significantly decreasjed—HBsAg complexed with specific IgG or as immune complex isolated from patients is better internalized compared with free HBsAg; (2) during antigen presentation the expression of adhesion (ICAM-1) and accessory (HLA-DR/Ia) molecules was significantly decreased in uraemic patients, especially in non-responders; and (3) impaired internalization of HBsAg as well as a decrease in ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia expression, correlated well with the blunted proliferation of CD4+ T cells stimulated by autologous monocytes induced by HBsAg. PMID:18475616

  9. Cytotoxic activity of interferon alpha induced dendritic cells as a biomarker of glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishinov, S. V.; Stupak, V. V.; Tyrinova, T. V.; Leplina, O. Yu.; Ostanin, A. A.; Chernykh, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells that can play direct role in anti-tumor immune response as killer cells. DC tumoricidal activity can be stimulated greatly by type I IFN (IFNα and IFNβ). In the present study, we examined cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of monocyte-derived IFNα-induced DCs generated from patients with brain glioma and evaluated the potential use of these parameters in diagnostics of high-grade gliomas. Herein, we demonstrated that patient DCs do not possess the ability to inhibit the growth of tumor HEp-2 cell line but low-grade and high-grade glioma patients do not differ significantly in DC cytostatic activity. However, glioma patient DCs are characterized by reduced cytotoxic activity against HEp-2 cells. The impairment of DC cytotoxic function is observed mainly in glioblastoma patients. The cytotoxic activity of DCs against HEp-2 cells below 9% is an informative marker for glioblastomas.

  10. Human MAIT-cell responses to Escherichia coli: activation, cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana; Sobkowiak, Michał J.; Sandberg, Johan K.; Leeansyah, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T cells are a large and relatively recently described innate-like antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. These cells recognize riboflavin metabolites from a range of microbes presented by evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex, class I-related molecules. Given the innate-like characteristics of mucosa-associated invariant T cells and the novel type of antigens they recognize, new methodology must be developed and existing methods refined to allow comprehensive studies of their role in human immune defense against microbial infection. In this study, we established protocols to examine a range of mucosa-associated invariant T-cell functions as they respond to antigen produced by Escherichia coli. These improved and dose- and time-optimized experimental protocols allow detailed studies of MR1-dependent mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to Escherichia coli pulsed antigen-presenting cells, as assessed by expression of activation markers and cytokines, by proliferation, and by induction of apoptosis and death in major histocompatibility complex, class I-related–expressing target cells. The novel and optimized protocols establish a framework of methods and open new possibilities to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell immunobiology, using Escherichia coli as a model antigen. Furthermore, we propose that these robust experimental systems can also be adapted to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to other microbes and types of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27034405

  11. Regulation of T cell-dendritic cell interactions by IL-7 governs T-cell activation and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Manoj; Pearson, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) plays a central role in the homeostasis of the T-cell compartment by regulating T-cell survival and proliferation. Whether IL-7 can influence T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling in T cells remains controversial. Here, using IL-7–deficient hosts and TCR-transgenic T cells that conditionally express IL-7R, we examined antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo to viral infection and lymphopenia to determine whether IL-7 signaling influences TCR-triggered cell division events. In vitro, we could find no evidence that IL-7 signaling could costimulate T-cell activation over a broad range of conditions, suggesting that IL-7 does not directly tune TCR signaling. In vivo, however, we found an acute requirement for IL-7 signaling for efficiently triggering T-cell responses to influenza A virus challenge. Furthermore, we found that IL-7 was required for the enhanced homeostatic TCR signaling that drives lymphopenia-induced proliferation by a mechanism involving efficient contacts of T cells with dendritic cells. Consistent with this, saturating antigen-presenting capacity in vivo overcame the triggering defect in response to cognate peptide. Thus, we demonstrate a novel role for IL-7 in regulating T cell–dendritic cell interactions that is essential for both T-cell homeostasis and activation in vivo. PMID:19357399

  12. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P < 0.05), and the highest amount of antigen was detected in flounders immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P < 0.05) compared with the spleen, kidney and liver. Antigen uptake in the gill and skin both peaked at 30 min post immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P < 0.05), and then quickly declined. In contrast, antigen uptake in the spleen, kidney and liver gradually increased 3 h post immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P < 0.05). In the mucosal-associated tissues, the expression of MHC Iα and CD8α genes peaked at 24 hpi, while the expression of MHC IIα and CD4-1 genes showed up-regulation in the gill and skin

  13. Natural Killer T Cell Activation Protects Mice Against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Avneesh K.; Wilson, Michael T.; Hong, Seokmann; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Du, Caigan; Stanic, Aleksandar K.; Joyce, Sebastian; Sriram, Subramaniam; Koezuka, Yasuhiko; Van Kaer, Luc

    2001-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) serves as a prototypic model for T cell–mediated autoimmunity. Vα14 natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I–like protein CD1d. Here, we show that activation of Vα14 NKT cells by the glycosphingolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) protects susceptible mice against EAE. β-GalCer, which binds CD1d but is not recognized by NKT cells, failed to protect mice against EAE. Furthermore, α-GalCer was unable to protect CD1d knockout (KO) mice against EAE, indicating the requirement for an intact CD1d antigen presentation pathway. Protection of disease conferred by α-GalCer correlated with its ability to suppress myelin antigen-specific Th1 responses and/or to promote myelin antigen-specific Th2 cell responses. α-GalCer was unable to protect IL-4 KO and IL-10 KO mice against EAE, indicating a critical role for both of these cytokines. Because recognition of α-GalCer by NKT cells is phylogenetically conserved, our findings have identified NKT cells as novel target cells for treatment of inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:11748281

  14. Molecular analysis of human papillomavirus virus-like particle activated Langerhans cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Andrew W; Raff, Adam B; Da Silva, Diane M; Kast, W Martin

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) are the resident antigen-presenting cells in human epithelium, and are therefore responsible for initiating immune responses against human papillomaviruses (HPV) entering the epithelial and mucosal layers in vivo. Upon proper pathogenic stimulation, LC become activated causing an internal signaling cascade that results in the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and the release of inflammatory cytokines. Activated LC then migrate to lymph nodes where they interact with antigen-specific T cells and initiate an adaptive T-cell response. However, HPV manipulates LC in a suppressive manner that alters these normal maturation responses. Here, in vitro LC activation assays for the detection of phosphorylated signaling intermediates, the up-regulation of activation-associated surface markers, and the release of inflammatory cytokines in response to HPV particles are described.

  15. Immunostimulatory Activity of the Cytokine-Based Biologic, IRX-2, on Human Papillomavirus-Exposed Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Diane M.; Woodham, Andrew W.; Naylor, Paul H.; Egan, James E.; Berinstein, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the antigen-presenting cells of the epithelial layer and are responsible for initiating immune responses against skin and mucosa-invading viruses. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated suppression of LC function is a crucial mechanism of HPV immune evasion, which can lead to persistent infection and development of several human cancers, including cervical, anal, and head and neck cancers. The cell-derived cytokine-based biologic, IRX-2, consists of multiple well-defined cytokines and is broadly active on various immune cell subsets. In this study, we investigated primary human LC activation after exposure to HPV16, followed by treatment with IRX-2 in vitro, and evaluated their subsequent ability to induce HPV16-specific T cells. In contrast to its activity on dendritic cells, HPV16 alone is not sufficient to induce phenotypic and functional activation of LCs. However, IRX-2 induces a significant upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory molecules, T helper 1 (Th1)-associated cytokine release, and chemokine-directed migration of LCs pre-exposed to HPV16. Furthermore, LCs treated with IRX-2 after HPV16 exposure induced CD8+ T-cell responses against specific HLA-A*0201-binding HPV16 T-cell epitopes. The present study suggests that IRX-2 is an attractive immunomodulator for assisting the immune response in eradication of HPV-infected cells, thereby potentially preventing HPV-induced cancers. PMID:26653678

  16. Identification of an H2-M3-Restricted Listeria Epitope: Implications for Antigen Presentation by M3

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Laurel L.; Dere, Beverley; Bevan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Using expression cloning, we have identified an H2-M3-restricted epitope of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Picomolar concentrations of an amino-terminal N-formylated hexapeptide, fMIGWII, targeted cells for lysis by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, while the nonformylated peptide was approximately 100-fold less active. The sequence of the 185 aa protein source of this epitope predicts a transmembrane protein that retains its N terminus and assumes an Nout–Cin topology. This membrane orientation offers an explanation for the protection of the epitope from deformylases present in the bacterial cell and suggests an explanation for the ability of phagocytes to present H2-M3-restricted bacterial epitopes via a vacuolar TAP-independent mechanism. PMID:8758895

  17. Influence of molecular weight upon mannosylated bio-synthetic hybrids for targeted antigen presenting cell gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles H; Gollakota, Akhila; Chen, Mingfu; Chung, Tai-Chun; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Zhang, Guojian; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-07-01

    Given the rise of antibiotic resistant microbes, genetic vaccination is a promising prophylactic strategy that enables rapid design and manufacture. Facilitating this process is the choice of vector, which is often situationally-specific and limited in engineering capacity. Furthermore, these shortcomings are usually tied to an incomplete understanding of the structure-function relationships driving vector-mediated gene delivery. Building upon our initial report of a hybrid bacterial-biomaterial gene delivery vector, a comprehensive structure-function assessment was completed using a class of mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters). Through a top-down screening methodology, an ideal polymer was selected on the basis of gene delivery efficacy and then used for the synthesis of a stratified molecular weight polymer library. By eliminating contributions of polymer chemical background, we were able to complete an in-depth assessment of gene delivery as a function of (1) polymer molecular weight, (2) relative mannose content, (3) polymer-membrane biophysical properties, (4) APC uptake specificity, and (5) serum inhibition. In summary, the flexibility and potential of the hybrid design featured in this work highlights the ability to systematically probe vector-associated properties for the development of translational gene delivery candidates.

  18. White button mushroom enhances maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells and their antigen presenting function in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mushrooms have been shown to enhance immune response, which contributes to their anti-tumor property. White button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) (WBM) constitute 90 percent of the total mushrooms consumed in the United States; however, the health benefit of this strain in general is not well studied...

  19. Impaired Tumor Antigen Processing by Immunoproteasome-expressing CD40-Activated B cells and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Zeng, Wanyong; Sasada, Tetsuro; Su, Mei; Choi, Jaewon; Drakoulakos, Donna; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Brusic, Vladimir; Wu, Catherine; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2012-01-01

    Professional APCs, such as dendritic cells, are routinely used in vitro for the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for tumor antigens. In addition to dendritic cells, CD40-activated B cells and variant K562 leukemic cells can be readily transfected with nucleic acids for in vitro and in vivo antigen presentation. However, the expression of immunoproteasome components in dendritic cells may preclude display of tumor antigens such as Mart1/MelanA. Here, we use three target epitopes, two derived from tumor antigens [Mart126–34 (M26) and Cyp1B1239–247 (Cyp239)] and one derived from the Influenza A viral antigen [FluM158–66 (FluM58)], to demonstrate that CD40-activated B cells, like dendritic cells, have a limited capability to process certain tumor antigens. In contrast, the K562 HLA-A*0201 transfectant efficiently processes and presents M26 and Cyp239 as well as the influenza FluM58 epitopes to T cells. These results demonstrate that the choice of target APC for gene transfer of tumor antigens may be limited by the relative efficacy of proteasome components to process certain tumor epitopes. Importantly, K562 can be exploited as an artificial APC, efficient in processing both M26 and Cyp239 epitopes and presumably, by extension, other relevant tumor antigens. PMID:21400024

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinases in the Regulation of T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Porciello, Nicla; Kunkl, Martina; Viola, Antonella; Tuosto, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate kinases (PIP5Ks) are critical regulators of T cell activation being the main enzymes involved in the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2). PIP2 is indeed a pivotal regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, thus controlling T cell polarization and migration, stable adhesion to antigen-presenting cells, spatial organization of the immunological synapse, and co-stimulation. Moreover, PIP2 also serves as a precursor for the second messengers inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, which are essential for the activation of signaling pathways regulating cytokine production, cell cycle progression, survival, metabolism, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the impact of PIP5Ks on several T lymphocyte functions with a specific focus on the role of CD28 co-stimulation in PIP5K compartimentalization and activation. PMID:27242793

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinases in the Regulation of T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Porciello, Nicla; Kunkl, Martina; Viola, Antonella; Tuosto, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate kinases (PIP5Ks) are critical regulators of T cell activation being the main enzymes involved in the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2). PIP2 is indeed a pivotal regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, thus controlling T cell polarization and migration, stable adhesion to antigen-presenting cells, spatial organization of the immunological synapse, and co-stimulation. Moreover, PIP2 also serves as a precursor for the second messengers inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, which are essential for the activation of signaling pathways regulating cytokine production, cell cycle progression, survival, metabolism, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the impact of PIP5Ks on several T lymphocyte functions with a specific focus on the role of CD28 co-stimulation in PIP5K compartimentalization and activation.

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinases in the Regulation of T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Porciello, Nicla; Kunkl, Martina; Viola, Antonella; Tuosto, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate kinases (PIP5Ks) are critical regulators of T cell activation being the main enzymes involved in the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2). PIP2 is indeed a pivotal regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, thus controlling T cell polarization and migration, stable adhesion to antigen-presenting cells, spatial organization of the immunological synapse, and co-stimulation. Moreover, PIP2 also serves as a precursor for the second messengers inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, which are essential for the activation of signaling pathways regulating cytokine production, cell cycle progression, survival, metabolism, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the impact of PIP5Ks on several T lymphocyte functions with a specific focus on the role of CD28 co-stimulation in PIP5K compartimentalization and activation. PMID:27242793

  3. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    PubMed

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules.

  4. Human B cells have an active phagocytic capability and undergo immune activation upon phagocytosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qi; Zhang, Min; Shi, Ming; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Wenjing; Zhang, Guangyun; Yang, Longxiu; Zhi, Jin; Zhang, Lin; Hu, Gengyao; Chen, Pin; Yang, Yining; Dai, Wen; Liu, Tingting; He, Ying; Feng, Guodong; Zhao, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The paradigm that B cells are nonphagocytic was taken for granted for a long time until phagocytic B cells were found in early vertebrate animals. Thereafter, limited evidence has shown that human B cells may also internalize bacteria. However, whether human B cells can actively phagocytose bacteria has been less extensively investigated; in particular, the mechanisms and significance of the phagocytosis require clarification. Here, we show that the human Raji B cell line can phagocytose both live and dead Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and the phagocytosed Mtb in turn affects the immune functions of the B cells. After incubation of Raji cells with Mtb, our confocal microscopy, electron microscopy and flow cytometry data showed that Raji cells effectively engulfed Mtb as well as latex beads. The phagocytic rate was proportional to the incubation time and the amount of Mtb or beads added. Additionally, we found that normal human serum could enhance the ability of Raji cells to phagocytose Mtb, while heat-inactivated serum reversed this promoting effect. The phagocytic process of B cells could partially be inhibited by cytochalasin B, an actin inhibitor. Importantly, the phagocytosed Mtb could regulate B cell immune functions, such as stimulating IgM production and upregulating the expression of the antigen-presenting costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Therefore, our results provide the first evidence that human B cells can phagocytose Mtb in an active manner that is independent of bacterial viability, and phagocytosed Mtb can in turn regulate the immune activation of B cells.

  5. Crystal structure of c5321: a protective antigen present in uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains displaying an SLR fold

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens led, among other efforts, to the application of subtractive reverse vaccinology for the identification of antigens present in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains but absent or variable in non-pathogenic strains, in a quest for a broadly protective Escherichia coli vaccine. The protein coded by locus c5321 from CFT073 E. coli was identified as one of nine potential vaccine candidates against ExPEC and was able to confer protection with an efficacy of 33% in a mouse model of sepsis. c5321 (known also as EsiB) lacks functional annotation and structurally belongs to the Sel1-like repeat (SLR) family. Herein, as part of the general characterization of this potential antigen, we have focused on its structural properties. Results We report the 1.74 Å-resolution crystal structure of c5321 from CFT073 E. coli determined by Se-Met SAD phasing. The structure is composed of 11 SLR units in a topological organisation that highly resembles that found in HcpC from Helicobacter pylori, with the main difference residing in how the super-helical fold is stabilised. The stabilising effect of disulfide bridges in HcpC is replaced in c5321 by a strengthening of the inter-repeat hydrophobic core. A metal-ion binding site, uncharacteristic of SLR proteins, is detected between SLR units 3 and 4 in the region of the inter-repeat hydrophobic core. Crystal contacts are observed between the C-terminal tail of one molecule and the C-terminal amphipathic groove of a neighbouring one, resembling interactions between ligand and proteins containing tetratricopeptide-like repeats. Conclusions The structure of antigen c5321 presents a mode of stabilization of the SLR fold different from that observed in close homologs of known structure. The location of the metal-ion binding site and the observed crystal contacts suggest a potential role in regulation of conformational flexibility and interaction with yet

  6. Metabolic maintenance of cell asymmetry following division in activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Verbist, Katherine C; Guy, Cliff S; Milasta, Sandra; Liedmann, Swantje; Kamiński, Marcin M; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R

    2016-04-21

    Asymmetric cell division, the partitioning of cellular components in response to polarizing cues during mitosis, has roles in differentiation and development. It is important for the self-renewal of fertilized zygotes in Caenorhabditis elegans and neuroblasts in Drosophila, and in the development of mammalian nervous and digestive systems. T lymphocytes, upon activation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), can undergo asymmetric cell division, wherein the daughter cell proximal to the APC is more likely to differentiate into an effector-like T cell and the distal daughter is more likely to differentiate into a memory-like T cell. Upon activation and before cell division, expression of the transcription factor c-Myc drives metabolic reprogramming, necessary for the subsequent proliferative burst. Here we find that during the first division of an activated T cell in mice, c-Myc can sort asymmetrically. Asymmetric distribution of amino acid transporters, amino acid content, and activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is correlated with c-Myc expression, and both amino acids and mTORC1 activity sustain the differences in c-Myc expression in one daughter cell compared to the other. Asymmetric c-Myc levels in daughter T cells affect proliferation, metabolism, and differentiation, and these effects are altered by experimental manipulation of mTORC1 activity or c-Myc expression. Therefore, metabolic signalling pathways cooperate with transcription programs to maintain differential cell fates following asymmetric T-cell division.

  7. Activated T cells induce expression of B7/BB1 on normal or leukemic B cells through a CD40-dependent signal

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Cognate interactions between antigen-presenting B and T cells play crucial roles in immunologic responses. T cells that have been activated via the crosslinking of CD3 are able to induce B cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion in a major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted and contact-dependent manner. We find that such activated human CD4+ T cells, but not control Ig- treated T cells, may induce normal or leukemic B cells to express B7/BB1 and significantly higher levels of CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 via a process that also requires direct cell-cell contact. To discern what cell surface molecule(s) may be responsible for signalling B cells to express B7/BB1, we added various monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for T or B cell accessory molecules or control mAbs to cocultures of alpha-CD3-activated T cells and resting B cells. We find that only alpha-CD40 mAbs can significantly inhibit the increased expression of B7/BB1, suggesting that the ligand for CD40 expressed on activated T cells may be an important inducer of B7/BB1 expression. Subsequent experiments in fact demonstrate that alpha-CD40 mAbs, but not control mAbs, induce changes in B cell phenotype similar to those induced by activated T cells when the mAbs are presented on Fc gamma RII (CDw32)-expressing L cells. These phenotypic changes have significant effects on B cell function. Whereas chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells normally are very poor stimulators in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), CLL-B cells preactivated via CD40 crosslinking are significantly better presenters of alloantigen, affecting up to 30-fold-greater stimulation of T cell proliferation than that induced by control treated or nontreated CLL-B cells. Similarly, the MLR of T cells stimulated by allogeneic nonleukemic B cells can be enhanced significantly if the stimulator B cells are preactivated via CD40 crosslinking. The enhanced MLR generated by such preactivated B cells may be inhibited

  8. The crystal structure of a TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} complex at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution : implications for modulation of T cell activation and memory.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xiong, Y.; Naidenko, O. V.; Liu, J.-H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Kronenberg, M.; Cheroutre, H.; Reinherz, E. L.; Wang, J.-H.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; La Jolla Inst. of Allergy and Immunology

    2003-02-01

    TL is a nonclassical MHC class I molecule that modulates T cell activation through relatively high-affinity interaction with CD8{alpha}{alpha}. To investigate how the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} interaction influences TCR signaling, we characterized the structure of the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} complex using X-ray crystallography. Unlike antigen-presenting molecules, the TL antigen-binding groove is occluded by specific conformational changes. This feature eliminates antigen presentation, severely hampers direct TCR recognition, and prevents TL from participating in the TCR activation complex. At the same time, the TL/CD8{alpha}{alpha} interaction is strengthened through subtle structure changes in the TL {alpha}3 domain. Thus, TL functions to sequester and redirect CD8{alpha}{alpha} away from the TCR, modifying lck-dependent signaling.

  9. Regulatory dendritic cells: there is more than just immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne V.; Nino-Castro, Andrea C.; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system exists in a delicate equilibrium between inflammatory responses and tolerance. This unique feature allows the immune system to recognize and respond to potential threats in a controlled but normally limited fashion thereby preventing a destructive overreaction against healthy tissues. While the adaptive immune system was the major research focus concerning activation vs. tolerance in the immune system more recent findings suggest that cells of the innate immune system are important players in the decision between effective immunity and induction of tolerance or immune inhibition. Among immune cells of the innate immune system dendritic cells (DCs) have a special function linking innate immune functions with the induction of adaptive immunity. DCs are the primary professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) initiating adaptive immune responses. They belong to the hematopoietic system and arise from CD34+ stem cells in the bone marrow. Particularly in the murine system two major subgroups of DCs, namely myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) can be distinguished. DCs are important mediators of innate and adaptive immunity mostly due to their remarkable capacity to present processed antigens via major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) to T cells and B cells in secondary lymphoid organs. A large body of literature has been accumulated during the last two decades describing which role DCs play during activation of T cell responses but also during the establishment and maintenance of central tolerance (Steinman et al., 2003). While the concept of peripheral tolerance has been clearly established during the last years, the role of different sets of DCs and their particular molecular mechanisms of immune deviation has not yet fully been appreciated. In this review we summarize accumulating evidence about the role of regulatory DCs in situations where the balance between tolerance and immunogenicity has been altered leading to pathologic

  10. Effect of gamma radiation on resting B lymphocytes. II. Functional characterization of the antigen-presentation defect

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwell, J.D.; Jenkins, M.K.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1988-10-15

    The effect of radiation on three discrete Ag-presentation functions in resting B cells was examined: 1) Ag uptake and processing, 2) expression of processed Ag in the context of functional class II molecules, and 3) provision of necessary co-stimulatory, or second, signals. Analysis of radiation's effect on B cell presentation of intact vs fragmented Ag or its effect on presentation by Ag-pulsed B cells indicated that damage to Ag uptake and processing could not account for the bulk of the radiation-induced Ag-presentation defect. Experiments with phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis as an indirect measure of TCR occupancy suggested that irradiation caused a fairly rapid (within 1 to 2 h) decrease in the ability of the B cell APC to display a stimulatory combination of Ag and class II molecule. Ag dose-response analyses demonstrated that when presenting a fragment of the Ag pigeon cytochrome c to a T cell clone, 3000 rad-treated B cell APC were able to stimulate approximately 50% as much phosphatidylinositol turnover as unirradiated B cells. It was also found that, in contrast to their inability to initiate T cell proliferation, and similarly to chemically cross-linked splenocytes, heavily irradiated resting B cells plus Ag induced a state of Ag hyporesponsiveness in T cell clones. This effect on T cells had the same Ag- and MHC-specificity as did receptor occupancy required for proliferation, indicating that heavily irradiated resting B cells bear functional class II molecules. Co-culture of T cells with allogeneic B cells and syngeneic heavily irradiated B cells or chemically cross-linked splenic APC plus Ag resulted in T cell proliferation and interfered with the induction of the hyporesponsive state. This co-stimulatory function was radiosensitive in resting allogeneic B cells.

  11. In vitro T-cell activation of monocyte-derived macrophages by soluble messengers or cell-to-cell contact in bovine tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Liébana, E; Aranaz, A; Welsh, M; Neill, S D; Pollock, J M

    2000-01-01

    The macrophage plays a dual role in tuberculosis, promoting not only protection against mycobacteria, but also survival of the pathogen. Macrophages inhibit multiplication of mycobacteria but also act in concert with lymphocytes through presentation of antigens to T cells. Studies in animal and human infections have suggested a correlation of in vitro growth rates of mycobacteria with in vivo virulence, using uracil uptake to assess mycobacterial metabolism. This study found that blood-derived, non-activated bovine macrophages were capable of controlling Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin growth for up to 96 hr, but were permissive to intracellular growth of virulent M. bovis. The present investigation compared the in vitro modulation of these macrophage activities by cytokine-rich T-cell supernatants or cell-to-cell contact. On the one hand, treatment of cultured monocytes with mitogen-produced T-cell supernatants promoted morphological changes suggestive of an activation status, enhanced the antigen presentation capabilities of monocytes and up-regulated major histocompatibility complex class II expression. However, this activation was not associated with enhanced anti-M. bovis activity. On the other hand, incubation of infected monocytes with T-cell populations resulted in proportionally increased inhibition of M. bovis uracil uptake. This inhibition was also seen using cells from uninfected animals and indicated the necessity for cell-to-cell contact to promote antimycobacterial capability. PMID:10886395

  12. T helper 1 immunity requires complement-driven NLRP3 inflammasome activity in CD4⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Arbore, Giuseppina; West, Erin E; Spolski, Rosanne; Robertson, Avril A B; Klos, Andreas; Rheinheimer, Claudia; Dutow, Pavel; Woodruff, Trent M; Yu, Zu Xi; O'Neill, Luke A; Coll, Rebecca C; Sher, Alan; Leonard, Warren J; Köhl, Jörg; Monk, Pete; Cooper, Matthew A; Arno, Matthew; Afzali, Behdad; Lachmann, Helen J; Cope, Andrew P; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-06-17

    The NLRP3 inflammasome controls interleukin-1β maturation in antigen-presenting cells, but a direct role for NLRP3 in human adaptive immune cells has not been described. We found that the NLRP3 inflammasome assembles in human CD4(+) T cells and initiates caspase-1-dependent interleukin-1β secretion, thereby promoting interferon-γ production and T helper 1 (T(H)1) differentiation in an autocrine fashion. NLRP3 assembly requires intracellular C5 activation and stimulation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1), which is negatively regulated by surface-expressed C5aR2. Aberrant NLRP3 activity in T cells affects inflammatory responses in human autoinflammatory disease and in mouse models of inflammation and infection. Our results demonstrate that NLRP3 inflammasome activity is not confined to "innate immune cells" but is an integral component of normal adaptive T(H)1 responses. PMID:27313051

  13. Activated human B lymphocytes express three CTLA-4 counterreceptors that costimulate T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Boussiotis, V A; Freeman, G J; Gribben, J G; Daley, J; Gray, G; Nadler, L M

    1993-01-01

    Signaling via the T-cell receptor complex is necessary but not sufficient to induce antigen-specific T lymphocytes to expand clonally. To proliferate, T cells must receive one or more costimulatory signals provided by antigen presenting cells (APCs). One such critical costimulatory signal is delivered by the CD28/CTLA-4 counterreceptor, B7, expressed on APCs. B7 costimulation induces CD28 signaling, resulting in interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, T-cell receptor signaling in the absence of B7 costimulation results in induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we show that activated human B lymphocytes express two additional CTLA-4 counterreceptors also capable of providing T-cell costimulation. At 24 hr postactivation, B cells express a CTLA-4 counterreceptor not recognized by anti-B7 or -BB-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which induces detectable IL-2 secretion and T-cell proliferation. At 48 and 72 hr postactivation, B cells express both B7 and a third CTLA-4 counterreceptor identified by the anti-BB-1 mAb. BB-1 appears to be a molecule distinct from B7 by its expression on B7- cells and its capacity to induce T cells to proliferate without significant accumulation of IL-2. As observed for B7, costimulatory signals mediated by these alternative CTLA-4/CD28 counterreceptors are likely to be essential for generation of an immune response and their absence may result in antigen-specific tolerance. We propose the following terminology for these CTLA-4 counterreceptors: (i) B7, B7-1; (ii) early CTLA-4 binding counterreceptor, B7-2; and (iii) BB-1, B7-3. PMID:7504293

  14. Plasmodium falciparum Infection of Human Volunteers Activates Monocytes and CD16+ Dendritic Cells and Induces Upregulation of CD16 and CD1c Expression

    PubMed Central

    Teirlinck, Anne C.; Roestenberg, Meta; Bijker, Else M.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key players in the induction and regulation of immune responses. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, determination of which cells and pathways are activated in the network of APCs remains elusive. We therefore investigated the effects of a controlled human malaria infection in healthy, malaria-naive volunteers on the subset composition and activation status of dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes. While subsets of monocytes increased in frequency during blood-stage infection, DC frequencies remained largely stable. Activation markers classically associated with peptide presentation to and priming of αβT cells, HLA-DR and CD86, were upregulated in monocytes and inflammatory CD16 myeloid DCs (mDCs) but not in the classical CD1c, BDCA2, or BDCA3 DC subsets. In addition, these activated APC subsets showed increased expression of CD1c, which is involved in glycolipid antigen presentation, and of the immune complex binding Fcγ receptor III (CD16). Our data show that P. falciparum asexual parasites do not activate classical DC subsets but instead activate mainly monocytes and inflammatory CD16 mDCs and appear to prime alternative activation pathways via induction of CD16 and/or CD1c. Changes in expression of these surface molecules might increase antigen capture and enhance glycolipid antigen presentation in addition to the classical major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) peptide presentation and thereby contribute to the initiation of T-cell responses in malaria. (This study has been registered at Clinicaltrials.gov under registration no. NCT01086917.) PMID:26169270

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Glycoprotein Quality Control Regulates CD1d Assembly and CD1d-mediated Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunte, Amit; Zhang, Wei; Paduraru, Crina; Veerapen, Natacha; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) homologue CD1d presents lipid antigens to innate-like lymphocytes called natural-killer T (NKT) cells. These cells, by virtue of their broad cytokine repertoire, shape innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we have assessed the role of endoplasmic reticulum glycoprotein quality control in CD1d assembly and function, specifically the role of a key component of the quality control machinery, the enzyme UDP glucose glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGT1). We observe that in UGT1-deficient cells, CD1d associates prematurely with β2-microglobulin (β2m) and is able to rapidly exit the endoplasmic reticulum. At least some of these CD1d-β2m heterodimers are shorter-lived and can be rescued by provision of a defined exogenous antigen, α-galactosylceramide. Importantly, we show that in UGT1-deficient cells the CD1d-β2m heterodimers have altered antigenicity despite the fact that their cell surface levels are unchanged. We propose that UGT1 serves as a quality control checkpoint during CD1d assembly and further suggest that UGT1-mediated quality control can shape the lipid repertoire of newly synthesized CD1d. The quality control process may play a role in ensuring stability of exported CD1d-β2m complexes, in facilitating presentation of low abundance high affinity antigens, or in preventing deleterious responses to self lipids. PMID:23615906

  16. Regulatory Activity of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in T-Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wooki; Khan, Naim A.; McMurray, David N.; Prior, Ian A.; Wang, Naisyin; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are considered to be authentic immunosuppressors and appear to exert beneficial effects with respect to certain immune-mediated diseases. In addition to promoting T-helper 1 (Th1) cell to T-helper 2 (Th2) cell effector T-cell differentiation, n-3 PUFA may also exert anti-inflammatory actions by inducing apoptosis in Th1 cells. With respect to mechanisms of action, effects range from the modulation of membrane receptors to gene transcription via perturbation of a number of second messenger cascades. In this review, the putative targets of anti-inflammatory n-3 PUFA, activated during early and late events of T-cell activation will be discussed. Studies have demonstrated that these fatty acids alter plasma membrane micro-organization (lipid rafts) at the immunological synapse, the site where T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APC) form a physical contact for antigen initiated T-cell signaling. In addition, the production of diacylglycerol and the activation of different isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), calcium signaling, and nuclear translocation/activation of transcriptional factors, can be modulated by n-3 PUFA. Advantages and limitations of diverse methodologies to study the membrane lipid raft hypothesis, as well as apparent contradictions regarding the effect of n-3 PUFA on lipid rafts will be critically presented. PMID:20176053

  17. IFT20 controls LAT recruitment to the immune synapse and T-cell activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Omar I; Masi, Giulia; Carpier, Jean-Marie; Magalhaes, Joao G; Galgano, Donatella; Pazour, Gregory J; Amigorena, Sebastian; Hivroz, Claire; Baldari, Cosima T

    2016-01-12

    Biogenesis of the immune synapse at the interface between antigen-presenting cells and T cells assembles and organizes a large number of membrane proteins required for effective signaling through the T-cell receptor. We showed previously that the intraflagellar transport protein 20 (IFT20), a component of the intraflagellar transport system, controls polarized traffic during immune synapse assembly. To investigate the role of IFT20 in primary CD4(+) T cells in vitro and in vivo, we generated mice bearing a conditional defect of IFT20 expression in T cells. We show that in the absence of IFT20, although cell spreading and the polarization of the centrosome were unaffected, T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling and recruitment of the signaling adaptor LAT (linker for activation of T cells) at the immune synapse were reduced. As a consequence, CD4(+) T-cell activation and proliferation were also defective. In vivo, conditional IFT20-deficient mice failed to mount effective antigen-specific T-cell responses, and their T cells failed to induce colitis after adoptive transfer to Rag(-/-) mice. IFT20 is therefore required for the delivery of the intracellular pool of LAT to the immune synapse in naive primary T lymphocytes and for effective T-cell responses in vivo. PMID:26715756

  18. IFT20 controls LAT recruitment to the immune synapse and T-cell activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vivar, Omar I.; Masi, Giulia; Carpier, Jean-Marie; Magalhaes, Joao G.; Galgano, Donatella; Pazour, Gregory J.; Amigorena, Sebastian; Hivroz, Claire; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the immune synapse at the interface between antigen-presenting cells and T cells assembles and organizes a large number of membrane proteins required for effective signaling through the T-cell receptor. We showed previously that the intraflagellar transport protein 20 (IFT20), a component of the intraflagellar transport system, controls polarized traffic during immune synapse assembly. To investigate the role of IFT20 in primary CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, we generated mice bearing a conditional defect of IFT20 expression in T cells. We show that in the absence of IFT20, although cell spreading and the polarization of the centrosome were unaffected, T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling and recruitment of the signaling adaptor LAT (linker for activation of T cells) at the immune synapse were reduced. As a consequence, CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation were also defective. In vivo, conditional IFT20-deficient mice failed to mount effective antigen-specific T-cell responses, and their T cells failed to induce colitis after adoptive transfer to Rag−/− mice. IFT20 is therefore required for the delivery of the intracellular pool of LAT to the immune synapse in naive primary T lymphocytes and for effective T-cell responses in vivo. PMID:26715756

  19. Soluble, but not immobilized, anti-IgM antibody inhibits post-activation events leading to T-cell-dependent B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, J; Rivas, D; Gayo, A; Mozo, L; Gutiérrez, C

    1995-01-01

    The potential for surface immunoglobulin-binding ligands to modify B-cell differentiation responses induced by activated T cells has been investigated. Activated T cells in human splenic mononuclear cells cultured on anti-CD3-coated plates induced B cells to produce large amounts of IgM and IgG. In this experimental system, cross-linking of B-cell antigen receptors by soluble, bivalent monoclonal or polyclonal anti-IgM antibodies completely inhibited IgM production, and greatly diminished IgG production, in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were obtained using a F(ab')2 fragment of a goat anti-IgM antibody. Inhibition of B-cell differentiation by bivalent cross-linking reagents did not require the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC), as comparable results were obtained in co-cultures of purified T and B cells. In contrast, enhanced immunoglobulin secretion was seen when surface IgM was cross-linked using anti-IgM antibody immobilized on the culture plate. Interestingly, activated T cells induced similar levels of expression on B cells of the activation antigens CD23, CD25 and CD71, and of class II molecules, irrespective of any treatment with soluble or immobilized anti-IgM antibody. This indicates that soluble anti-IgM specifically inhibits B-cell differentiation without altering initial events of T-cell-dependent B-cell activation. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7642212

  20. Type I interferons produced by dendritic cells promote their phenotypic and functional activation.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Maria; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Mattei, Fabrizio; Gresser, Ion; Belardelli, Filippo; Borrow, Persephone; Tough, David F

    2002-05-01

    Resting dendritic cells (DCs) are resident in most tissues and can be activated by environmental stimuli to mature into potent antigen-presenting cells. One important stimulus for DC activation is infection; DCs can be triggered through receptors that recognize microbial components directly or by contact with infection-induced cytokines. We show here that murine DCs undergo phenotypic maturation upon exposure to type I interferons (type I IFNs) in vivo or in vitro. Moreover, DCs either derived from bone marrow cells in vitro or isolated from the spleens of normal animals express IFN-alpha and IFN-beta, suggesting that type I IFNs can act in an autocrine manner to activate DCs. Consistent with this idea, the ability to respond to type I IFN was required for the generation of fully activated DCs from bone marrow precursors, as DCs derived from the bone marrow of mice lacking a functional receptor for type I IFN had reduced expression of costimulatory and adhesion molecules and a diminished ability to stimulate naive T-cell proliferation compared with DCs derived from control bone marrow. Furthermore, the addition of neutralizing anti-IFN-alpha/beta antibody to purified splenic DCs in vitro partially blocked the "spontaneous" activation of these cells, inhibiting the up-regulation of costimulatory molecules, secretion of IFN-gamma, and T-cell stimulatory activity. These results show that DCs both secrete and respond to type I IFN, identifying type I interferons as autocrine DC activators. PMID:11964292

  1. Identification of putative cathepsin S in mangrove red snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus and its role in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Li, Lei; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a key enzyme employed in the histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted antigens, which are presented by processing class II-associated invariant chains and loaded antigen peptides into class II molecules. To date, little is known about the character and function of CTSS in fish. In the present study, we screened and identified a CTSS cDNA sequence from the mangrove red snapper head kidney cDNA library. The full-length CTSS cDNA contained 1339-bp nucleotide acids encoding 337 amino acids. The sequence shared high identity and similarity with other known cathepsins, especially CTSS (about 56-78% and 79-89%, respectively). Like other cathepsins, the deduced peptide consisted of regions with N-terminal signal peptides, propeptides, and mature peptides. A typical ERWNIN motif in L-like cathepsins and three conservative catalytic activity sites forming a catalytic triad active center were respectively identified in the pro-peptide and mature peptide regions of CTSS. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that mangrove red snapper CTSS was located in the CTSS clade belonging to the L-like cathepsin group, and evolved from the same ancestry. To further characterize the biological activity of the putative CTSS of mangrove snapper, CTSS was expressed in Escherichia coli M15 strains. Like other mammalian CTSS, the recombinant CTSS (rCTSS) had autocatalytic activation properties, can remove pro-peptides, and can release active mature peptides. Active CTSS had the ability to catalyze Z-Phe-Arg-AMC substrates in acidic conditions (pH 5.0) and weak alkaline environments (pH 7.5); this activity could be blocked by the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64. Active CTSS can process recombinant Ii chains (invariant chains) in a stepwise manner in vitro. The results indicate that mangrove red snapper CTSS is a lysosomal cysteine protease family member with a key role in antigen processing in fish.

  2. Early Activation of Teleost B Cells in Response to Rhabdovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J.; Barreda, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, the response of teleost B cells to specific pathogens has been only scarcely addressed. In this work, we have demonstrated that viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus, has the capacity to infect rainbow trout spleen IgM-positive (IgM+) cells, although the infection is not productive. Consequently, we have studied the effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell functionality, comparing these effects to those elicited by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, poly(I·C). We found that poly(I·C) and VHSV significantly upregulated TLR3 and type I interferon (IFN) transcription in spleen and blood IgM+ cells. Further effects included the upregulated transcription of the CK5B chemokine. The significant inhibition of some of these effects in the presence of bafilomycin A1 (BAF), an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, suggests the involvement of an intracellular TLR in these responses. In the case of VHSV, these transcriptional effects were dependent on viral entry into B cells and the initiation of viral transcription. VHSV also provoked the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) cell surface expression on IgM+ cells, which, along with the increased transcription of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 and CD83, pointed to VHSV-induced IgM+ cell activation toward an antigen-presenting profile. Finally, despite the moderate effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell proliferation, a consistent effect on IgM+ cell survival was detected. IMPORTANCE Innate immune responses to pathogens established through their recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been traditionally ascribed to innate cells. However, recent evidence in mammals has revealed that innate pathogen recognition by B lymphocytes is a crucial factor in shaping the type of immune response that is mounted. In teleosts, these immediate effects of viral encounter on B lymphocytes have not been addressed to date. In our study, we

  3. Assessment of immunosuppressive activity of human mesenchymal stem cells using murine antigen specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunosuppressive activity. They do not induce allospecific T cell responses, making them promising tools for reducing the severity of graft versus host disease (GVHD) as well as treating various immune diseases. Currently, there is a need in the MSC field to develop a robust in vitro bioassay which can characterize the immunosuppressive function of MSCs. Methods Murine clonal CD4 and CD8 T cells were stimulated with cognate peptide antigen and antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the absence or presence of human MSCs, different aspects of T cell activation were monitored and analyzed using flow cytometery, real time RT-PCR and cytokine measurement. Results Human MSCs (hMSCs) can alter multiple aspects of murine T cell activation induced by stimulation with specific antigen, including: reduced proliferation, inhibited or stimulated cell surface marker expression (CD25, CD69, CD44 and CD62L), inhibited mRNA expression of transcription factors (T-bet and GATA-3) and decreased cytokine expression (interferon-gamma, interleukin-10). Disappearance of activation-induced cluster formation and decreased apoptosis of CD8 T cells were also observed. Moreover, the effects are specific to MSCs; incubating the T cells with non-MSC control cell lines had no effect on T cell proliferation and activation. Conclusions Clonal murine T cells can be used to measure, characterize, and quantify the in vitro immunosuppressive activity of human MSCs, representing a promising approach to improve bioassays for immunosuppression. PMID:24406271

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M

    2016-03-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin (I) as stimuli. We were also interested to examine the importance of new protein synthesis in regulating the expression of genes involved in T cell activation. Thus we have pre-treated mouse EL4 T cells with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, and left the cells unstimulated or stimulated with PMA/I for 4 h. We performed microarray expression profiling of these cells to correlate the gene expression with chromatin state of T cells upon T cell activation [1]. Here, we detail further information and analysis of the microarray data, which shows that T cell activation leads to differential expression of genes and inducible genes can be further classified as primary and secondary response genes based on their protein synthesis dependency. The data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE13278. PMID:26981393

  5. Micro-adhesion rings surrounding TCR microclusters are essential for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Sakuma, Machie; Ike, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Kimura, Yayoi; Ohara, Osamu; Saito, Takashi

    2016-07-25

    The immunological synapse (IS) formed at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells represents a hallmark of initiation of acquired immunity. T cell activation is initiated at T cell receptor (TCR) microclusters (MCs), in which TCRs and signaling molecules assemble at the interface before IS formation. We found that each TCR-MC was transiently bordered by a ring structure made of integrin and focal adhesion molecules in the early phase of activation, which is similar in structure to the IS in microscale. The micro-adhesion ring is composed of LFA-1, focal adhesion molecules paxillin and Pyk2, and myosin II (MyoII) and is supported by F-actin core and MyoII activity through LFA-1 outside-in signals. The formation of the micro-adhesion ring was transient but especially sustained upon weak TCR stimulation to recruit linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and SLP76. Perturbation of the micro-adhesion ring induced impairment of TCR-MC development and resulted in impaired cellular signaling and cell functions. Thus, the synapse-like structure composed of the core TCR-MC and surrounding micro-adhesion ring is a critical structure for initial T cell activation through integrin outside-in signals.

  6. Cell sedimentation with gravity activation.

    PubMed

    Czerlinski, G; Goldman-Leikin, R; Reid, D

    1988-12-01

    Murine monoclonal antibody T101 has been coupled to thinly polymer-coated heavy alloy particles (LaMn2Ge2). These conjugates are coupled to cultured cells of the human T-cell leukemia line RPMI 8402 (T8402). The sedimentation velocities of cells, of particles, and of cells with particles attached are measured. After determining the mean radii of cells, of particles, and of cells with particles attached, one may compute a mean number of 33 particles attached to a cell. Independently one may compute a mean number of 144 particles/cell for surface saturation. The Appendix handles the underlying theory in three parts: number of particles/cell, saturation number of particles/cell, and resolution for gravity activation. Regarding the latter, cell radii from 4 to 10 microns and particle radii from 0.01 to 1 micron are considered.

  7. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  8. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  9. Increased Caspase Activity Primes Human Lyme Arthritis Synovial γδ T cells for Proliferation and Death

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Phan T.; Collins, Cheryl C.; Fortner, Karen A.; Koenig, Andreas; Hayes, Sandra M.; Budd, Ralph C.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells function between the innate and adaptive immune responses, promoting antigen-presenting cell function, and manifesting cytolytic activity. Their numbers often increase during infections, such as HIV, and at sites of chronic inflammation. However, the turnover dynamics of human γδ T cells are poorly understood. Here we find that despite more rapid proliferation in vitro by human Lyme arthritis synovial γδ T cells of the Vδ1 subset, they have reduced surviving cell numbers compared to αβ T cells due to increased cell death by the γδ T cells. Because caspases are involved in cell proliferation and death, and signaling is more efficient through TCR-γδ than TCR-αβ, we examined the levels of active caspases during cell cycling and following TCR restimulation. We observed higher overall caspase activity in Borrelia-reactive γδ T cells than comparable αβ T cells. This was paralleled by greater spontaneous cell death and TCR restimulation-induced cell death of the γδ T cells, which was caspase dependent. Our current findings thus are consistent with a model where human γδ T cells evolved to function quickly and transiently, in an innate fashion. PMID:21983117

  10. Direct activation of human dendritic cells by particle-bound but not soluble MHC class II ligand.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Dähne, Lars; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key activators of cellular immune responses through their capacity to induce naïve T cells and sustained effector T cell responses. This capacity is a function of their superior efficiency of antigen presentation via MHC class I and class II molecules, and the expression of co-stimulatory cell surface molecules and cytokines. Maturation of DCs is induced by microbial factors via pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, pro-inflammatory cytokines or cognate interaction with CD4(+) T cells. Here we show that, unexpectedly, the PanDR helper T cell epitope PADRE, a generic T helper cell antigen presented by a large fraction of HLA-DR alleles, when delivered in particle-bound form induced maturation of human DCs. The DCs that received the particle-bound PADRE displayed all features of fully mature DCs, such as high expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, CD83, the MHC-II molecule HLA-DR, secretion of high levels of the biologically active IL-12 (IL-12p70) and induction of vigorous proliferation of naïve CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the maturation of DCs induced by particle-bound PADRE was shown to involve sphingosine kinase, calcium signaling from internal sources and downstream signaling through the MAP kinase and the p72syk pathways, and finally activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Based on our findings, we propose that particle-bound PADRE may be used as a DC activator in DC-based vaccines.

  11. Turned on by danger: activation of CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Victoria

    2012-09-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells bear characteristics of innate and adaptive lymphocytes, which allow them to bridge the two halves of the immune response and play roles in many disease settings. Recent work has characterized precisely how their activation is initiated and regulated. Novel antigens from important pathogens have been identified, as has an abundant self-antigen, β-glucopyranosylcaramide, capable of mediating an iNKT-cell response. Studies of the iNKT T-cell receptor (TCR)-antigen-CD1d complex show how docking between CD1d-antigen and iNKT TCR is highly conserved, and how small sequence differences in the TCR establish intrinsic variation in iNKT TCR affinity. The sequence of the TCR CDR3β loop determines iNKT TCR affinity for ligand-CD1d, independent of ligand identity. CD1d ligands can promote T helper type 1 (Th1) or Th2 biased cytokine responses, depending on the composition of their lipid tails. Ligands loaded into CD1d on the cell surface promote Th2 responses, whereas ligands with long hydrophobic tails are loaded endosomally and promote Th1 responses. This information is informing the design of synthetic iNKT-cell antigens. The iNKT cells may be activated by exogenous antigen, or by a combination of dendritic cell-derived interleukin-12 and iNKT TCR-self-antigen-CD1d engagement. The iNKT-cell activation is further modulated by recent foreign or self-antigen encounter. Activation of dendritic cells through pattern recognition receptors alters their antigen presentation and cytokine production, strongly influencing iNKT-cell activation. In a range of bacterial infections, dendritic cell-dependent innate activation of iNKT cells through interleukin-12 is the dominant influence on their activity.

  12. Activation of spleen cells by ArtinM may account for its immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Aparecido da; Souza, Maria Aparecida de; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2014-09-01

    ArtinM is a D-mannose-binding lectin extracted from Artocarpus heterophyllus that promotes interleukin-12 production by macrophages and dendritic cells. This property is considered responsible for T helper 1 immunity induced in vivo after ArtinM administration. In this study, we investigated the effect of native (jArtinM) and recombinant (rArtinM) forms of lectin on murine spleen cells and isolated T lymphocytes. We found that ArtinM binds to the surface of spleen cells. This interaction, which was blocked by D-mannose, induced cell activation, as manifested by increased mitochondrial activity, interleukin-2 production, and cell proliferation. We verified that a 30-times higher concentration of rArtinM was required to trigger optimal activation of spleen cells compared with that needed with jArtinM, although these proteins have identical sugar recognition properties and use the same signaling molecules to trigger cell activation. Because the distinction between native and recombinant is restricted to their tertiary structure (tetrameric and monomeric, respectively), we postulated that the multi-valence of jArtinM accounts for its superiority in promoting clustering of cell surface glycoreceptors and activation. The jArtinM and rArtinM activation effect exerted on spleen cells was reproduced on purified CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest that ArtinM interaction with T cells leads to responses that may act in concert with the interleukin-12 produced by antigen-presenting cells to modulate immunity toward the T helper 1 axis. Further studies are necessary to dissect ArtinM/T-cell interactions to more fully understand the immunomodulation induced by carbohydrate recognition. PMID:24842046

  13. Activation of spleen cells by ArtinM may account for its immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Aparecido da; Souza, Maria Aparecida de; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2014-09-01

    ArtinM is a D-mannose-binding lectin extracted from Artocarpus heterophyllus that promotes interleukin-12 production by macrophages and dendritic cells. This property is considered responsible for T helper 1 immunity induced in vivo after ArtinM administration. In this study, we investigated the effect of native (jArtinM) and recombinant (rArtinM) forms of lectin on murine spleen cells and isolated T lymphocytes. We found that ArtinM binds to the surface of spleen cells. This interaction, which was blocked by D-mannose, induced cell activation, as manifested by increased mitochondrial activity, interleukin-2 production, and cell proliferation. We verified that a 30-times higher concentration of rArtinM was required to trigger optimal activation of spleen cells compared with that needed with jArtinM, although these proteins have identical sugar recognition properties and use the same signaling molecules to trigger cell activation. Because the distinction between native and recombinant is restricted to their tertiary structure (tetrameric and monomeric, respectively), we postulated that the multi-valence of jArtinM accounts for its superiority in promoting clustering of cell surface glycoreceptors and activation. The jArtinM and rArtinM activation effect exerted on spleen cells was reproduced on purified CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest that ArtinM interaction with T cells leads to responses that may act in concert with the interleukin-12 produced by antigen-presenting cells to modulate immunity toward the T helper 1 axis. Further studies are necessary to dissect ArtinM/T-cell interactions to more fully understand the immunomodulation induced by carbohydrate recognition.

  14. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  15. Foal Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Become Activated upon Rhodococcus equi Infection▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Flaminio, M. Julia B. F.; Nydam, Daryl V.; Marquis, Hélène; Matychak, Mary Beth; Giguère, Steeve

    2009-01-01

    Susceptibility of foals to Rhodococcus equi pneumonia is exclusive to the first few months of life. The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate immunologic response of foal and adult horse antigen-presenting cells (APCs) upon infection with R. equi. We measured the activation of the antigen-presenting major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule, costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86, the cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12), and the transcriptional factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in monocyte-derived macrophages (mMOs) and dendritic cells (mDCs) of adult horses and foals of different ages (from birth to 3 months of age) infected with virulent R. equi or its avirulent, plasmid-cured derivative. Infection with virulent or avirulent R. equi induced (P ≤ 0.01) the expression of IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 mRNAs in foal mMOs and mDCs at different ages. This response was likely mediated by the higher (P = 0.008) expression of IRF-1 in foal mDCs at birth than in adult horse mDCs. R. equi infection promoted comparable expression of costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40 in foal and adult horse cells. The cytokine and costimulatory response by foal mDCs was not accompanied by robust MHC class II molecule expression. These data suggest that foal APCs detect the presence of R. equi and respond with the expression of the Th1-inducing cytokine IL-12. Nevertheless, there seems to be a limitation to MHC class II molecule expression which we hypothesize may compromise the efficient priming of naïve effector cells in early life. PMID:19109450

  16. NK Cells Respond to Haptens by the Activation of Calcium Permeable Plasma Membrane Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grandclément, Camille; Pick, Horst; Vogel, Horst; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells mediate innate immunity to infected and transformed cells. Yet, NK cells can also mount hapten-specific recall responses thereby contributing to contact hypersensitivity (CHS). However, since NK cells lack antigen receptors that are used by the adaptive immune system to recognize haptens, it is not clear if NK cells respond directly to haptens and, if so, what mediates these responses. Here we show that among four haptens the two that are known to induce NK cell-dependent CHS trigger the rapid influx of extracellular Ca2+ into NK cells and lymphocyte cell lines. Thus lymphocytes can respond to haptens independent of antigen presentation and antigen receptors. We identify the Ca2+-permeable cation channel TRPC3 as a component of the lymphocyte response to one of these haptens. These data suggest that the response to the second hapten is based on a distinct mechanism, consistent with the capacity of NK cells to discriminate haptens. These findings raise the possibility that antigen-receptor independent activation of immune cells contributes to CHS. PMID:26963818

  17. G1-4A, a polysaccharide from Tinospora cordifolia induces peroxynitrite dependent killer dendritic cell (KDC) activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vipul K; Amin, Prayag J; Shankar, Bhavani S

    2014-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the development of an adaptive immune response against tumor. In addition to its role in antigen presentation, DC also possesses cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. We have earlier shown phenotypic and functional maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) by G1-4A, an arabinogalactan derived from Tinospora cordifolia. In this study, we have investigated the killer phenotype of BMDC matured in the presence of G1-4A, [mBMDC (G1-4A)] on tumor cells. We have observed several fold increase in killing of tumor cells by mBMDC (G1-4A). The tumoricidal activity was not specific to syngeneic tumors cells but could kill xenogenic tumors also. Nitric oxide released by mBMDC (G1-4A) generates peroxynitrite in tumor cells and is responsible for killing of target cells. This killing was completely abrogated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor 1400W and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocyanin. The killed target cells are phagocytosed by BMDC which further activate syngeneic cytotoxic T cells. These results thus show that G1-4A treated mBMDC acquire killer phenotype along with maturation which plays an important role in activation of cytotoxic T cells. PMID:25278461

  18. T-cell activation or tolerization: the Yin and Yang of bacterial superantigens

    PubMed Central

    Sähr, Aline; Förmer, Sandra; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Heeg, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens (SAg) are exotoxins from pathogens which interact with innate and adaptive immune cells. The paradox that SAgs cause activation and inactivation/anergy of T-cells was soon recognized. The structural and molecular events following SAg binding to antigen presenting cells (APCs) followed by crosslinking of T-cell receptors were characterized in detail. Activation, cytokine burst and T-cell anergy have been described in vitro and in vivo. Later it became clear that SAg-induced T-cell anergy is in part caused by SAg-dependent activation of T-regulatory cells (Tregs). Although the main focus of analyses was laid on T-cells, it was also shown that SAg binding to MHC class II molecules on APCs induces a signal, which leads to activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly APCs are mandatory for T-cell activation. So far it is not known, whether APCs play a role during SAg-triggered activation of Tregs. We therefore tested whether in SAg (Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A) -treated APCs an anti-inflammatory program is triggered in addition. We show here that not only the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the co-inhibitory surface molecule PD-L1 (CD274) but also inhibitory effector systems like indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) or intracellular negative feedback loops (suppressor of cytokine signaling molecules, SOCS) are induced by SAgs. Moreover, cyclosporine A completely prevented induction of this program. We therefore propose that APCs triggered by SAgs play a key role in T-cell activation as well as inactivation and induction of Treg cells. PMID:26539181

  19. Activation of decidual invariant natural killer T cells promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Yao; Tu, Jiaoqin; Schust, Danny J

    2015-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are crucial for host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens, but the underlying mechanisms of iNKT cells activation by microbes are not fully explained. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of iNKT cell activation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated preterm birth using an adoptive transfer system and diverse neutralizing antibodies (Abs) and inhibitors. We found that adoptive transfer of decidual iNKT cells to LPS-stimulated iNKT cell deficient Jα18(-/-) mice that lack invariant Vα14Jα281T cell receptor (TCR) expression significantly decreased the time to delivery and increased the percentage of decidual iNKT cells. Neutralizing Abs against Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), CD1d, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18, and inhibitors blocking the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly reduced in vivo percentages of decidual iNKT cells, their intracellular interferon (IFN)-γ production and surface CD69 expression. In vitro, in the presence of the same Abs and inhibitors used as in vivo, decidual iNKT cells co-cultured with LPS-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) showed significantly decreased extracellular and intracellular IFN-γ secretion and surface CD69 expression. Our data demonstrate that the activation of decidual iNKT cells plays an important role in inflammation-induced preterm birth. Activation of decidual iNKT cells also requires TLR4-mediated NF-κB, MAPK p38 and ERK pathways, the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18, and endogenous glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d.

  20. Acute GVHD in patients receiving IL-15/4-1BBL activated NK cells following T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirali N; Baird, Kristin; Delbrook, Cynthia P; Fleisher, Thomas A; Kohler, Mark E; Rampertaap, Shakuntala; Lemberg, Kimberly; Hurley, Carolyn K; Kleiner, David E; Merchant, Melinda S; Pittaluga, Stefania; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F; Wayne, Alan S; Zhang, Hua; Fry, Terry J; Mackall, Crystal L

    2015-01-29

    Natural killer (NK) cells can enhance engraftment and mediate graft-versus-leukemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but the potency of graft-versus-leukemia mediated by naturally reconstituting NK cells following HSCT is limited. Preclinical studies demonstrate that activation of NK cells using interleukin-15 (IL-15) plus 4-1BBL upregulates activating receptor expression and augments killing capacity. In an effort to amplify the beneficial effects of NK cells post-HSCT, we conducted a first-in-human trial of adoptive transfer of donor-derived IL-15/4-1BBL-activated NK cells (aNK-DLI) following HLA-matched, T-cell-depleted (1-2 × 10(4) T cells/kg) nonmyeloablative peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with ultra-high-risk solid tumors. aNK-DLI were CD3(+)-depleted, CD56(+)-selected lymphocytes, cultured for 9 to 11 days with recombinant human IL-15 plus 4-1BBL(+)IL-15Rα(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells. aNK-DLI demonstrated potent killing capacity and displayed high levels of activating receptor expression. Five of 9 transplant recipients experienced acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following aNK-DLI, with grade 4 GVHD observed in 3 subjects. GVHD was more common in matched unrelated donor vs matched sibling donor recipients and was associated with higher donor CD3 chimerism. Given that the T-cell dose was below the threshold required for GVHD in this setting, we conclude that aNK-DLI contributed to the acute GVHD observed, likely by augmenting underlying T-cell alloreactivity. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01287104. PMID:25452614

  1. Acute GVHD in patients receiving IL-15/4-1BBL activated NK cells following T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirali N; Baird, Kristin; Delbrook, Cynthia P; Fleisher, Thomas A; Kohler, Mark E; Rampertaap, Shakuntala; Lemberg, Kimberly; Hurley, Carolyn K; Kleiner, David E; Merchant, Melinda S; Pittaluga, Stefania; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F; Wayne, Alan S; Zhang, Hua; Fry, Terry J; Mackall, Crystal L

    2015-01-29

    Natural killer (NK) cells can enhance engraftment and mediate graft-versus-leukemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but the potency of graft-versus-leukemia mediated by naturally reconstituting NK cells following HSCT is limited. Preclinical studies demonstrate that activation of NK cells using interleukin-15 (IL-15) plus 4-1BBL upregulates activating receptor expression and augments killing capacity. In an effort to amplify the beneficial effects of NK cells post-HSCT, we conducted a first-in-human trial of adoptive transfer of donor-derived IL-15/4-1BBL-activated NK cells (aNK-DLI) following HLA-matched, T-cell-depleted (1-2 × 10(4) T cells/kg) nonmyeloablative peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with ultra-high-risk solid tumors. aNK-DLI were CD3(+)-depleted, CD56(+)-selected lymphocytes, cultured for 9 to 11 days with recombinant human IL-15 plus 4-1BBL(+)IL-15Rα(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells. aNK-DLI demonstrated potent killing capacity and displayed high levels of activating receptor expression. Five of 9 transplant recipients experienced acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following aNK-DLI, with grade 4 GVHD observed in 3 subjects. GVHD was more common in matched unrelated donor vs matched sibling donor recipients and was associated with higher donor CD3 chimerism. Given that the T-cell dose was below the threshold required for GVHD in this setting, we conclude that aNK-DLI contributed to the acute GVHD observed, likely by augmenting underlying T-cell alloreactivity. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01287104.

  2. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression. PMID:27679683

  3. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-09-26

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression. PMID:27679683

  4. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression.

  5. Acoustofluidic F