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Sample records for activated aromatic dihalides

  1. New aromatic activated dihalides and bisphenol monomers for the preparation of novel poly(arylene ethers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research program was to synthesize a series of unique monomers of type I to be utilized at NASA-Langley in the preparation of new poly(arylene ether ketones), poly(arylene ether ketosulfones), and poly(arylene ether ketophosphine oxides). These A-A and A-B monomer systems, which possess activated aryl halide and/or phenolic end groups, are accessible via condensation reactions of appropriately substituted aryl acetonitrile carbanions with activated aryl dihalides followed by oxidative decyanation.

  2. Polybenzimidazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers were prepared from phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate and aromatic bis(o-diamine)s. These monomers were used in the synthesis of soluble polybenzimidazoles. The reaction involved the aromatic nucleophilic displacement of various di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds in the presence of an alkali metal base. These polymers exhibited lower glass transition temperatures, improved solubility, and better compression moldability over their commercial counterparts.

  3. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (Pl) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethylacetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrroldinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperature under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl)imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight Pl of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  4. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (PI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethyl acetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrrolidinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl) imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxphenyl) imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PI of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  5. Polyphenylquinoxalines via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Polyphenylquinoxalines are prepared by the nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)quinoxaline monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents using alkali metal bases at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)quinoxaline monomers are prepared either by reacting stoichiometric quantities of aromatic bis(o-diamines) with a hydroxybenzil or by reacting o-phenylenediamine with a dihydroxybenzil or bis(hydroxyphenylglyoxylyl)benzene.

  6. Polyphenylquinoxalines via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyphenylquinoxalines are prepared by the nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)quinoxaline monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents during alkali metal bases at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)quinoxaline monomers are prepared either by reacting stoichiometric quantities of aromatic bis(o-diamines) with a hydroxybenzil or by reacting o-phenylenediamine with a dihydroxybenzil or bis(hydroxyphenylglyoxylyl)benzene.

  7. Poly(1,3,4-oxadiazoles) via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Wolf, Peter (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Poly(1,3,4-oxadiazoles) (POX) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) 1,3,4-oxadiazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as sulfolane or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) 1,3,4-oxadiazole monomers are synthesized by reacting 4-hydroxybenzoic hydrazide with phenyl 4-hydrobenzoate in the melt and also by reacting aromatic dihydrazides with two moles of phenyl 4-hydroxybenzoate in the melt. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight POX of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the large variety of activated aromatic dihalides which are available.

  8. Reduction of Viologen Bisphosphonate Dihalide with Aluminum Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeta Iyere, Peter

    1996-05-01

    An elegant undergraduate experiment similar to the popular "Iodine Clock Reaction" employs the reduction of methyl viologen by hydroxide ion. A major problem with the hydroxide reduction demonstration is that the mechanism is complicated by the existence of competing reaction pathways. It has been suggested that layered metal viologen phosphonates could be used in the design and construction of molecular materials. The active unit in the reversible photocoloration of these layered materials is the viologen bisphosphonate dihalide (VPX). During our study of these phoshponate systems, we discovered the reduction of viologen bisphosphonate dihalide by aluminum foil, mossy zinc, or magnesium turnings in dilute aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution. When we demonstrated this phenomenon with aluminum foil and VPBr in the classroom, the response of our students was enthusiastic. This demonstration can be used as prelaboratory discussion for an undergraduate kinetic experiment based on the same phenomenon.

  9. Polyphenylquinoxalines via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.; Connell, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Polyphenylquinoxalines are produced by an aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction involving an activated aromatic dihalide with an appropriate quinoxaline monomer. Polyphenylquinoxalines are high temperature thermoplastics used as adhesives, coatings, films and composite matrices. The novelty of this invention is threefold: (1) some of the quinoxaline monomers are new compositions of matter; (2) the phenylquinoxaline polymers which are the end products of the invention are new compositions of matter; and (3) the method of forming the polymers is novel, replacing a more costly prior art process, which is also limited in the kinds of products prepared therefrom.

  10. Polybenzimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl benzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazoles are synthesizedby reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  11. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergerrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenylbenzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  12. Poly(N-arylenebenzimidazole)s via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Novel poly(N-arylenebenzimidazole)s (PNABls) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of novel di(hydroxyphenyl-N-arylene benzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl-N-arylenebenzimidazole) monomers are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with bis(2-aminoanilino)arylenes in diphenylsulfone. Moderate molecular weight PNABIs of new chemical structures were prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties. The use of the novel di(hydroxyphenyI-N-arylenebenzimidazole)s permits a more economical and easier way to prepare PNABIs than previous routes.

  13. Poly(N-arylenbenzimidazoles) via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel poly(N-arylenebenzimidazole)s (PNABIs) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of novel di(hydroxyphenyl-N-arylene benzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl N-arylenebenzimidazole) monomers are synthesized by reacting phenyl 4-hydroxybenzoate with bis(2-aminoanilino) arylenes in diphenylsulfone. Moderate molecular weight PNABIs of new chemical structures were prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties. The use of the novel di(hydroxyphenyl N-arylenebenzimidazole)s permits a more economical and easier way to prepare PNABIs than previous routes.

  14. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, Appavu; Deepa, Mohan; Govindaraju, Munisamy

    2016-02-26

    While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”.

  15. Energetics, molecular electronic structure, and spectroscopy of forming Group IIA dihalide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, T. C.; Gole, J. L.

    1999-02-01

    Multiple-collision relaxed (helium) chemiluminescence and laser-induced fluorescent spectroscopy have been used to demonstrate the highly efficient collisional stabilization of electronically excited Group IIA dihalide collision complexes formed in M (Ca,Sr)+X 2 (XY) (Cl 2, Br 2, ICl, IBr, I 2) reactive encounters. The first discrete emission spectra for the CaCl 2, CaBr 2, SrCl 2, SrBr 2, and SrICl dihalides are observed and evaluated; however, the low-pressure `continuous' chemiluminescent emission observed for forming barium dihalide (BaX 2) complexes is quenched under these experimental conditions. The reactions of the Group IIA metals with molecular fluorine do not readily produce the corresponding dihalide. While the lowest-lying observed dihalide visible transition is, as predicted, found to result in an extended progression in a dihalide complex bending mode (SrCl 2), the observed progression suggests the presence of a residual halogen (Cl-Cl) bond. Two higher-lying transitions are dominated by a vibrational mode structure corresponding to progressions in the symmetric stretching mode or, for nominally forbidden electronic transitions, odd quanta of the asymmetric stretching mode. Some evidence for sequence structure associated with the dihalide bending mode is also obtained. These observations are consistent with complex formation as it is coupled with a modified valence electron structure (correlation diagram) associated with the highly ionic nature of the dihalides. The bonding in the Group IIA dihalides (and their complexes), whose atomization energies are more than twice the metal monohalide bond energy, strongly influences the evaluation of energetics and the determination of monohalide bond energies from chemiluminescent processes. Discrepancies between those bond strengths determined by mass spectrometry and chemiluminescence are discussed with a focus on energy partitioning in dihalide complex formation and its influence on chemical vapor

  16. Praziquantel derivatives with antischistosomal activity: aromatic ring modification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-xia; Chen, Jing-lei; Qiao, Chunhua

    2013-08-01

    A series of aromatic ring-modified praziquantel derivatives were prepared and evaluated against juvenile and adult stage of Schistosoma japonicumin. Several analogs comparable in activity to the drug praziquantel have been identified based on in vitro and in vivo japonuicum schistosomes worm viability assay. Structure and activity relationship of these praziquantel aromatic ring-modified compounds was revealed. Specifically, a compound in which a bromine has been introduced in the aromatic ring of praziquantel demonstrated close antischistosomal activity to praziquantel in vivo.

  17. Constitutive Activation of the Aromatic Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Yi; Puga, Alvaro

    1998-01-01

    The ligand-activated aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) dimerizes with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) to form a functional complex that transactivates expression of the cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 gene and other genes in the dioxin-inducible [Ah] gene battery. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the activity of the CYP1A1 enzyme negatively regulates this process. To study the relationship between CYP1A1 activity and Ah receptor activation we used CYP1A1-deficient mouse hepatoma c37 cells and CYP1A1- and AHR-deficient African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Using gel mobility shift and luciferase reporter gene expression assays, we found that c37 cells that had not been exposed to exogenous Ah receptor ligands already contained transcriptionally active AHR-ARNT complexes, a finding that we also observed in wild-type Hepa-1 cells treated with Ellipticine, a CYP1A1 inhibitor. In CV-1 cells, transient expression of AHR and ARNT leads to high levels of AHR–ARNT-dependent luciferase gene expression even in the absence of an agonist. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged AHR, we showed that elevated reporter gene expression correlates with constitutive nuclear localization of the AHR. Transcriptional activation of the luciferase reporter gene observed in CV-1 cells is significantly decreased by (i) expression of a functional CYP1A1 enzyme, (ii) competition with chimeric or truncated AHR proteins containing the AHR ligand-binding domain, and (iii) treatment with the AHR antagonist α-naphthoflavone. These results suggest that a CYP1A1 substrate, which accumulates in cells lacking CYP1A1 enzymatic activity, is an AHR ligand responsible for endogenous activation of the Ah receptor. PMID:9418899

  18. Flexibility of active-site gorge aromatic residues and non-gorge aromatic residues in acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an unusually large number of aromatic residues in the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase has been a topic of great interest. Flexibility of these residues has been suspected to be a key player in controlling ligand traversal in the gorge. This raises the question of whether the over representation of aromatic residues in the gorge implies higher than normal flexibility of those residues. The current study suggests that it does not. Large changes in the hydrophobic cross sectional area due to dihedral oscillations are probably the reason behind their presence in the gorge.

  19. Facile Formation of Redox-Active Totally Organic Nanoparticles in Water by In Situ Reduction of Organic Precursors Stabilized through Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions by Aromatic Polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Mario E; Garcés-Jerez, Pablo; Fernández, Daniel; Aros-Perez, Gustavo; González-Cabrera, Diego; Álvarez, Eduardo; Cañas, Ignacio; Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe; Moreno-Villoslada, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    The formation of redox-active, totally organic nanoparticles in water is achieved following a strategy similar to that used to form metal nanoparticles. It is based on two fundamental concepts: i) complexation through aromatic-aromatic interactions of a water-soluble precursor aromatic molecule with polyelectrolytes bearing complementary charged aromatic rings, and ii) reduction of the precursor molecule to achieve stabilized nanoparticles. Thus, formazan nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction of a tetrazolium salt with ascorbic acid using polyelectrolytes bearing benzene sulfonate residues of high linear aromatic density, but cannot be formed in the presence of nonaromatic polyelectrolytes. The red colored nanoparticles are efficiently encapsulated in calcium alginate beads, showing macroscopic homogeneity. Bleaching kinetics with chlorine show linear rates on the order of tenths of milli-meters per minute. A linear behavior of the dependence of the rate of bleaching on the chlorine concentration is found, showing the potential of the nanoparticles for chlorine sensing.

  20. Xenoestrogenic gene expression: structural features of active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T Wayne; Sinks, Glendon D

    2002-04-01

    Estrogenicity was assessed using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based Lac-Z reporter assay and was reported as the logarithm of the inverse of the 50% molar beta-galactosidase activity (log[EC50(-1)]). In an effort to quantify the relationship between molecular structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and estrogenic gene expression, a series of PAHs were evaluated. With noted exceptions, the results of these studies indicate that the initial two-dimensional structural warning for estrogenicity, the superpositioning of a hydroxylated aromatic system on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol, can be extended to the PAHs. This two-dimensional-alignment criterion correctly identified estrogenicity of 22 of the 29 PAHs evaluated. Moreover, the estrogenic potency of these compounds was directly related to the size of the hydrophobic backbone. The seven compounds classified incorrectly by this structural feature were either dihydroxylated naphthalenes or aromatic nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds; all such compounds were false positives. Results with dihydroxylated naphthalenes reveal derivatives that were nonestrogenic when superimposed on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol had the second hydroxyl group in the position of the C-ring or were catechol-like in structure. Structural alerts for nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds must take into account the position of the hydroxyl group and the in-ring nitrogen atom; compounds with the hydroxyl group and nitrogen atom involved with the same ring were observed to be nonactive.

  1. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogenic aromatic and heterocyclic amines.

    PubMed

    Gorlewska-Roberts, Katarzyna M; Teitel, Candee H; Lay, Jackson O; Roberts, Dean W; Kadlubar, Fred F

    2004-12-01

    Lactoperoxidase, an enzyme secreted from the human mammary gland, plays a host defensive role through antimicrobial activity. It has been implicated in mutagenic and carcinogenic activation in the human mammary gland. The potential role of heterocyclic and aromatic amines in the etiology of breast cancer led us to examination of the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of the most commonly studied arylamine carcinogens: 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]-pyridine (PhIP), benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx). In vitro activation was performed with lactoperoxidase (partially purified from bovine milk or human milk) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and calf thymus DNA. Products formed during enzymatic activation were monitored by HPLC with ultraviolet and radiometric detection. Two of these products were characterized as hydrazo and azo derivatives by means of mass spectrometry. The DNA binding level of 3H- and 14C-radiolabeled amines after peroxidase-catalyzed activation was dependent on the hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the highest levels of carcinogen binding to DNA were observed at 100 microM H2O2. Carcinogen activation and the level of binding to DNA were in the order of benzidine > ABP > IQ > MeIQx > PhIP. One of the ABP adducts was identified, and the level at which it is formed was estimated to be six adducts/10(5) nucleotides. The susceptibility of aromatic and heterocyclic amines for lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation and the binding levels of activated products to DNA suggest a potential role of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed activation of carcinogens in the etiology of breast cancer.

  2. AQUEOUS N-HETEROCYCLIZATION OF PRIMARY AMINES AND HYDRAZINES WITH DIHALIDES: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESES OF N-AZACYCLOALKANES, ISOINDOLE, PYRAZOLE, PYRAZOLIDINE AND PHTHALAZINE DERIVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocycles from alkyl dihalides (ditosylates) and primary amines and hydrazines via a simple and efficient cyclocondensation in alkaline aqueous medium that occurs under microwave irradiation is described. This improved greener synthetic met...

  3. Mild and Efficient Palladium-Catalyzed Direct Trifluoroethylation of Aromatic Systems by C-H Activation.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs L; Kovács, Szabolcs; Sályi, Gergő; Novák, Zoltán

    2016-02-05

    The introduction of trifluoroalkyl groups into aromatic molecules is an important transformation in the field of organic and medicinal chemistry. However, the direct installation of fluoroalkyl groups onto aromatic molecules still represents a challenging and highly demanding synthetic task. Herein, a simple trifluoroethylation process that relies on the palladium-catalyzed C-H activation of aromatic compounds is described. With the utilization of a highly active trifluoroethyl(mesityl)iodonium salt, the developed catalytic method enables the first highly efficient and selective trifluoroethylation of aromatic compounds. The robust catalytic procedure provides the desired products in up to 95 % yield at 25 °C in 1.5 to 3 hours and tolerates a broad range of functional groups. The utilization of hypervalent reagents opens new synthetic possibilities for direct alkylations and fluoroalkylations in the field of transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activation.

  4. Annulation of Aromatic Imines via Directed C-H BondActivation

    SciTech Connect

    Thalji, Reema K.; Ahrendt, Kateri A.; Bergman, Robert G.; Ellman,Jonathan A.

    2005-04-14

    A directed C-H bond activation approach to the synthesis of indans, tetralins, dihydrofurans, dihydroindoles, and other polycyclic aromatic compounds is presented. Cyclization of aromatic ketimines and aldimines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using (PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}RhCl (Wilkinson's catalyst). The cyclization of a range of aromatic ketimines and aldimines provides bi- and tricyclic ring systems with good regioselectivity. Different ring sizes and substitution patterns can be accessed through the coupling of monosubstituted, 1,1- or 1,2-disubstituted, and trisubstituted alkenes bearing both electron-rich and electron-deficient functionality.

  5. Catalytic activity of in situ synthesized MoWNi sulfides in hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolyuk, Yu. A.; Maksimov, A. L.; Kolyagin, Yu. G.

    2017-02-01

    MoWNi-sulfide catalysts were obtained in situ by thermal decomposition of metal-polymer precursors based on the copolymers of polymaleic anhydride in a hydrocarbon raw material. The activity of the synthesized catalysts in hydrogenation of bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was studied, and the composition and structure of active phase nanoparticles were determined.

  6. Biochemical Evaluation of the Decarboxylation and Decarboxylation-Deamination Activities of Plant Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P.; Liu, Pingyang; Ding, Haizhen; Harich, Kim; Gillaspy, Glenda; Li, Jianyong

    2013-01-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) enzymes are capable of catalyzing either decarboxylation or decarboxylation-deamination on various combinations of aromatic amino acid substrates. These two different activities result in the production of arylalkylamines and the formation of aromatic acetaldehydes, respectively. Variations in product formation enable individual enzymes to play different physiological functions. Despite these catalytic variations, arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs are indistinguishable without protein expression and characterization. In this study, extensive biochemical characterization of plant AAADs was performed to identify residues responsible for differentiating decarboxylation AAADs from aldehyde synthase AAADs. Results demonstrated that a tyrosine residue located on a catalytic loop proximal to the active site of plant AAADs is primarily responsible for dictating typical decarboxylase activity, whereas a phenylalanine at the same position is primarily liable for aldehyde synthase activity. Mutagenesis of the active site phenylalanine to tyrosine in Arabidopsis thaliana and Petroselinum crispum aromatic acetaldehyde synthases primarily converts the enzymes activity from decarboxylation-deamination to decarboxylation. The mutation of the active site tyrosine to phenylalanine in the Catharanthus roseus and Papaver somniferum aromatic amino acid decarboxylases changes the enzymes decarboxylation activity to a primarily decarboxylation-deamination activity. Generation of these mutant enzymes enables the production of unusual AAAD enzyme products including indole-3-acetaldehyde, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethylamine. Our data indicates that the tyrosine and phenylalanine in the catalytic loop region could serve as a signature residue to reliably distinguish plant arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs. Additionally, the resulting data enables further insights into the mechanistic roles of active site

  7. Induction of aromatic catabolic activity in Sphingomonas aromaticivorans strain F199.

    PubMed

    Romine, M F; Fredrickson, J K; Li, S-M W

    1999-10-01

    Enzyme induction studies with Sphingomonas aromaticivorans F199 demonstrated that both toluene and naphthalene induced expression of both naphthalene and toluene catabolic enzymes. However, neither aromatic compound induced expression of all the enzymes required for complete mineralization of either naphthalene or toluene. Activity measurements in combination with gene sequence analyses indicate that growth on either aromatic substrate in the absence of the other is, therefore, sub-optimal and is predicted to lead to the build-up of metabolites due to imbalance in toluene or naphthalene catabolic enzyme activities. Growth on toluene may be further inhibited by the co-expression of two toluene catabolic pathways, as predicted from gene sequence analyses. One of these pathways may potentially result in the formation of a dead-end intermediate, possibly benzaldehyde. In contrast, either p-cresol or benzoate can support high levels of growth. Analyses of promoter region sequences on the F199 aromatic catabolic plasmid, pNL1, suggest that additional regulatory events are modulated through the interaction of BphR with Sigma54 type promoters and through the binding of a regulator upstream of p-cresol catabolic genes and xylM. We hypothesize that the unusual gene clustering in strain F199 is optimized for simultaneous degradation of multiple aromatic compound classes, possibly in response to the heterogeneous composition of aromatic structures in the fossil organic matter present in the deep Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments from which this bacterium was isolated.

  8. Mosquito repellent activity of volatile oils from selected aromatic plants.

    PubMed

    Lalthazuali; Mathew, Nisha

    2017-02-01

    Essential oils from fresh leaves of four aromatic plants viz., Ocimum sanctum, Mentha piperita, Eucalyptus globulus and Plectranthus amboinicus were extracted by hydrodistillation. The test solutions were prepared as 20% essential oil in ethanol and positive control as 20% DEET in ethanol. Essential oil blend was prepared as 5% concentration. Nulliparous, 3-5-day-old female adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were used for repellency screening as per ICMR protocol. The study showed that the repellency of 20% essential oil of O. sanctum, M. piperita and P. amboinicus were comparable with that of the standard DEET (20%) as no mosquito landing on the test was observed up to 6 h. The E. globulus oil exhibited mosquito repellency only upto 1½ h. Considerable mosquito landing and feeding was displayed in negative control. In the case of the oil blend, no landing of mosquitoes was seen up to 6 h as that of positive control. The results showed that the essential oil blend from O. sanctum, M. piperita, E. globulus and P. amboinicus could repel Ae. aegypti mosquitoes or prevent from feeding as in the case of DEET even at a lower concentration of 5%. This study demonstrates the potential of essential oils from O. sanctum, M. piperita, E. globulus and P. amboinicus and their blend as mosquito repellents against Ae. aegypti, the vector of dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever.

  9. Copper-catalyzed thiolation annulations of 1,4-dihalides with sulfides leading to 2-trifluoromethyl benzothiophenes and benzothiazoles.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Lin; Zhang, Xing-Guo; Tang, Ri-Yuan; Zhong, Ping; Li, Jin-Heng

    2010-10-15

    Copper-catalyzed double thiolation reaction of 1,4-dihalides with sulfides has been developed for selectively synthesizing 2-trifluoromethyl benzothiophenes and benzothiazoles. In the presence of CuI, a variety of 2-halo-1-(2-haloaryl)-3,3,3-trifluoropropylenes smoothly underwent the thiolation annulation with Na(2)S to afford 2-trifluoromethyl benzothiophenes in moderate to good yields. Moreover, the conditions are compatible with N-(2-haloaryl)trifluoroacetimidoyl chlorides in the presence of NaHS and K(3)PO(4), leading to 2-trifluoromethyl benzothiazoles.

  10. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED CYCLOCONDENSATION OF HYDRAZINE DERIVATIVES WITH ALKYL DIHALIDES OR DITOSYLATES IN AQUEOUS MEDIA: SYNTHESES OF PYRAZOLE, PYRAZOLIDINE AND PHTHALAZINE DERIVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct synthesis of 4,5-dihydro-pyrazole, pyrazolidine, and 1,2-dihydro-phthalazine derivatives via double alkylation of hydrazines by alkyl dihalides or ditosylates were accomplished in aqueous media under microwave irradiation conditions; the environmentally friendlier chemical...

  11. Estrogenic Activity of Mineral Oil Aromatic Hydrocarbons Used in Printing Inks

    PubMed Central

    Tarnow, Patrick; Hutzler, Christoph; Grabiger, Stefan; Schön, Karsten; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The majority of printing inks are based on mineral oils (MOs) which contain complex mixtures of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons. Consumer exposure to these oils occurs either through direct skin contacts or, more frequently, as a result of MO migration into the contents of food packaging that was made from recycled newspaper. Despite this ubiquitous and frequent exposure little is known about the potential toxicological effects, particularly with regard to the aromatic MO fractions. From a toxicological point of view the huge amount of alkylated and unsubstituted compounds therein is reason for concern as they can harbor genotoxicants as well as potential endocrine disruptors. The aim of this study was to assess both the genotoxic and estrogenic potential of MOs used in printing inks. Mineral oils with various aromatic hydrocarbon contents were tested using a battery of in vitro assays selected to address various endpoints such as estrogen-dependent cell proliferation, activation of estrogen receptor α or transcriptional induction of estrogenic target genes. In addition, the comet assay has been applied to test for genotoxicity. Out of 15 MOs tested, 10 were found to potentially act as xenoestrogens. For most of the oils the effects were clearly triggered by constituents of the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction. From 5 oils tested in the comet assay, 2 showed slight genotoxicity. Altogether it appears that MOs used in printing inks are potential endocrine disruptors and should thus be assessed carefully to what extent they might contribute to the total estrogenic burden in humans. PMID:26771904

  12. Estrogenic Activity of Mineral Oil Aromatic Hydrocarbons Used in Printing Inks.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Patrick; Hutzler, Christoph; Grabiger, Stefan; Schön, Karsten; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The majority of printing inks are based on mineral oils (MOs) which contain complex mixtures of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons. Consumer exposure to these oils occurs either through direct skin contacts or, more frequently, as a result of MO migration into the contents of food packaging that was made from recycled newspaper. Despite this ubiquitous and frequent exposure little is known about the potential toxicological effects, particularly with regard to the aromatic MO fractions. From a toxicological point of view the huge amount of alkylated and unsubstituted compounds therein is reason for concern as they can harbor genotoxicants as well as potential endocrine disruptors. The aim of this study was to assess both the genotoxic and estrogenic potential of MOs used in printing inks. Mineral oils with various aromatic hydrocarbon contents were tested using a battery of in vitro assays selected to address various endpoints such as estrogen-dependent cell proliferation, activation of estrogen receptor α or transcriptional induction of estrogenic target genes. In addition, the comet assay has been applied to test for genotoxicity. Out of 15 MOs tested, 10 were found to potentially act as xenoestrogens. For most of the oils the effects were clearly triggered by constituents of the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction. From 5 oils tested in the comet assay, 2 showed slight genotoxicity. Altogether it appears that MOs used in printing inks are potential endocrine disruptors and should thus be assessed carefully to what extent they might contribute to the total estrogenic burden in humans.

  13. Asymmetric Intramolecular Alkylation of Chiral Aromatic Imines via Catalytic C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Watzke, Anja; Wilson, Rebecca; O'Malley, Steven; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-04-16

    The asymmetric intramolecular alkylation of chiral aromatic aldimines, in which differentially substituted alkenes are tethered meta to the imine, was investigated. High enantioselectivities were obtained for imines prepared from aminoindane derivatives, which function as directing groups for the rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Initial demonstration of catalytic asymmetric intramolecular alkylation also was achieved by employing a sterically hindered achiral imine substrate and catalytic amounts of a chiral amine.

  14. Plant activation of aromatic amines mediated by cytochromes P450 and flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Chiapella, C; Radovan, R D; Moreno, J A; Casares, L; Barbé, J; Llagostera, M

    2000-10-31

    To know the mechanisms involved in the activation of promutagenic aromatic amines mediated by plants, we used Persea americana S117 system (S117) for the activation of 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) and m-phenylenediamine (m-PDA) in Ames assays. In these assays, the effect of the diphenylene iodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), of the 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT), an inhibitor of cytochromes P450 (cyt-P450s) and of the methimazole, a high-affinity substrate for FMOs, was studied. The efficacy of both inhibitors and of the methimazole was verified to find that they did partially inhibit the mutagenesis of both aromatic amines, activated with rat liver S9. Similarly, both inhibitors and methimazole did produce a significant decrease in 2-AF and m-PDA mutagenesis, when the activation system was S117, indicating that, similar to what occurs in mammalian systems, plant FMOs and cyt-P450s can metabolize aromatic amines to mutagenic product(s). However, the affinity of both FMOs and cyt-P450s of plant for 2-AF and m-PDA was different. Data obtained indicate that the activities of plant FMOs must be the main enzymatic system of m-PDA activation while, in 2-AF activation, plant cyt-P450s have the most relevant activities. In addition, peroxidases of the S117 system must contribute to 2-AF activation and some isoforms of FMOs and/or cyt-P450s of the S117 system, uninhibited by the inhibitors used, must be the responsible for a partial activation of m-PDA.

  15. Aromatic nitrogen mustard-based prodrugs: activity, selectivity, and the mechanism of DNA cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbing; Han, Yanyan; Peng, Xiaohua

    2014-06-10

    Three novel H2O2-activated aromatic nitrogen mustard prodrugs (6-8) are reported. These compounds contain a DNA alkylating agent connected to a H2O2-responsive trigger by different electron-withdrawing linkers so that they are inactive towards DNA but can be triggered by H2O2 to release active species. The activity and selectivity of these compounds towards DNA were investigated by measuring DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) formation in the presence or absence of H2O2. An electron-withdrawing linker unit, such as a quaternary ammonia salt (6), a carboxyamide (7), and a carbonate group (8), is sufficient to deactivate the aromatic nitrogen mustard resulting in less than 1.5 % cross-linking formation. However, H2O2 can restore the activity of the effectors by converting a withdrawing group to a donating group, therefore increasing the cross-linking efficiency (>20 %). The stability and reaction sites of the ICL products were determined, which revealed that alkylation induced by 7 and 8 not only occurred at the purine sites but also at the pyrimidine site. For the first time, we isolated and characterized the monomer adducts formed between the canonical nucleosides and the aromatic nitrogen mustard (15) which supported that nitrogen mustards reacted with dG, dA, and dC. The activation mechanism was studied by NMR spectroscopic analysis. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that compound 7 with a carboxyamide linker dramatically inhibited the growth of various cancer cells with a GI50 of less than 1 μM, whereas compound 6 with a charged linker did not show any obvious toxicity in all cell lines tested. These data indicated that a neutral carboxyamide linker is preferable for developing nitrogen mustard prodrugs. Our results showed that 7 is a potent anticancer prodrug that can serve as a model compound for further development. We believe these novel aromatic nitrogen mustards will inspire further and effective applications.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants against several foodborne and spoilage bacteria.

    PubMed

    Silva, Nuno; Alves, Sofia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Amaral, Joana S; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of essential oils extracted from a variety of aromatic plants, often used in the Portuguese gastronomy was studied in vitro by the agar diffusion method. The essential oils of thyme, oregano, rosemary, verbena, basil, peppermint, pennyroyal and mint were tested against Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative strains (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). For most essential oils examined, S. aureus, was the most susceptible bacteria, while P. aeruginosa showed, in general, least susceptibility. Among the eight essential oils evaluated, thyme, oregano and pennyroyal oils showed the greatest antimicrobial activity, followed by rosemary, peppermint and verbena, while basil and mint showed the weakest antimicrobial activity. Most of the essential oils considered in this study exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. Thyme oil showed a promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, thus revealing its potential as a natural preservative in food products against several causal agents of foodborne diseases and food spoilage. In general, the results demonstrate that, besides flavoring the food, the use of aromatic herbs in gastronomy can also contribute to a bacteriostatic effect against pathogens.

  17. Antitumor and antiparasitic activity of novel ruthenium compounds with polycyclic aromatic ligands.

    PubMed

    Miserachs, Helena Guiset; Cipriani, Micaella; Grau, Jordi; Vilaseca, Marta; Lorenzo, Julia; Medeiros, Andrea; Comini, Marcelo A; Gambino, Dinorah; Otero, Lucía; Moreno, Virtudes

    2015-09-01

    Five novel ruthenium(II)-arene complexes with polycyclic aromatic ligands were synthesized, comprising three compounds of the formula [RuCl(η(6)-p-cym)(L)][PF6], where p-cym = 1-isopropyl-4-methylbenzene and L are the bidentate aromatic ligands 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione, 1, 5-amine-1,10-phenanthroline, 4, or 5,6-epoxy-5,6-dihydro-phenanthroline, 5. In the other two complexes [RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)(L')], the metal is coordinated to a monodentate ligand L', where L' is phenanthridine, 2, or 9-carbonylanthracene, 3. All compounds were fully characterized by mass spectrometry and elemental analysis, as well as NMR and IR spectroscopic techniques. Obtained ruthenium compounds as well as their respective ligands were tested for their antiparasitic and antitumoral activities. Even though all compounds showed lower Trypanosoma brucei activity than the free ligands, they also resulted less toxic on mammalian cells. Cytotoxicity assays on HL60 cells showed a moderate antitumoral activity for all ruthenium compounds. Compound 1 was the most potent antitumoral (IC50 = 1.26±0.78 μM) and antiparasitic (IC50 = 0.19 ± 0.05 μM) agent, showing high selectivity towards the parasites (selectivity index >100). As complex 1 was the most promising antitumoral compound, its interaction with ubiquitin as potential target was also studied. In addition, obtained ruthenium compounds were found to bind DNA, and they are thought to interact with this macromolecule mainly through intercalation of the aromatic ligand.

  18. Antifertility activity and toxicity of alpha-chlorohydrin aromatic ketal analogues in male rats.

    PubMed

    Brown-Woodman, P D; White, I G; Ridley, D D

    1986-01-01

    The antifertility activity and toxicity of alpha-chlorohydrin and seven aromatic ketal derivatives were investigated in male rats. At a dose of 5 mg/kg injected intraperitoneally each day for 14 days, alpha-chlorohydrin and the methoxy benzaldehyde derivative (compound 2) produced complete infertility. The benzaldehyde derivative (compound 1) was 89% effective and the other five compounds 71-25% effective. All compounds except the least effective antifertility agent, the methylbenzaldehyde derivative (compound 3), reduced the motility of sperm recovered from the epididymis. None of the compounds caused a decrease in body or testes weight but some increased adrenal weight.

  19. Aromatic glycosyl disulfide derivatives: evaluation of their inhibitory activities against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Bessy; Muñoz, Christian; Osorio, Luis; Fehér, Krisztina; Illyés, Tünde-Zita; Papp, Zsuzsa; Kumar, Ambati Ashok; Kövér, Katalin E; Sagua, Hernán; Araya, Jorge E; Morales, Patricio; Szilágyi, László; González, Jorge

    2013-06-15

    Aromatic oligovalent glycosyl disulfides and some diglycosyl disulfides were tested against three different Trypanosoma cruzi strains. Di-(β-D-galactopyranosyl-dithiomethylene) benzenes 2b and 4b proved to be the most active derivatives against all three strains of cell culture-derived trypomastigotes with IC50 values ranging from 4 to 11 μM at 37 °C. The inhibitory activities were maintained, although somewhat lowered, at a temperature of 4 °C as well. Three further derivatives displayed similar activities against at least one of the three strains. Low cytotoxicities of the active compounds, tested on confluent HeLa, Vero and peritoneal macrophage cell cultures, resulted in significantly higher selectivity indices (SI) than that of the reference drug benznidazole. Remarkably, several molecules of the tested panel strongly inhibited the parasite release from T. cruzi infected HeLa cell cultures suggesting an effect against the intracellular development of T. cruzi amastigotes as well.

  20. Design, synthesis and biological activity of aromatic diketone derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liming; Li, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhanyang; Liu, Gengxin; He, Xianzhuo; Wang, Xiaoli; Zeng, Chengchu

    2015-01-01

    A series of aromatic diketone derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors and evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit the strand transfer process of HIV-1 integrase. The results indicate that (Z)-1-(3-acetyl-2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(substituted)phenylprop-2-en-1-one (5a-5d) can moderately inhibit HIV-1 integrase. The cyclization and condensation products (6a-6c and 7e-7f) of compounds 5a-5d show poor inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase. The molecular docking results indicate that the different types of compounds act on HIV-1 integrase in different ways, and these results can explain the differences in the inhibitory activities.

  1. Virucidal activity of essential oils from aromatic plants of San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    García, C C; Talarico, L; Almeida, N; Colombres, S; Duschatzky, C; Damonte, E B

    2003-11-01

    Essential oils obtained from eight aromatic plants of San Luis Province, Argentina, were screened for virucidal activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Junin virus (JUNV) and dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2). The most potent inhibition was observed with the essential oil of Lippia junelliana and Lippia turbinata against JUNV with virucidal concentration 50% (VC(50)) values in the range 14-20 ppm, whereas Aloysia gratissima, Heterotheca latifolia and Tessaria absinthioides inhibited JUNV in the range 52-90 ppm. The virucidal activity was time- and temperature-dependent. The essential oils of A. gratissima, Artemisia douglasiana, Eupatorium patens and T. absinthioides inactivated HSV-1 at 65-125 ppm. However, only A. douglasiana and E. patens had any discernible effect on DEN-2 infectivity with VC(50) values of 60 and 150 ppm, respectively.

  2. Reaction of active uranium and thorium with aromatic carbonyls and pinacols in hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, B.E.; Rieke, R.D.

    1988-02-01

    Highly reactive uranium and thorium metal powders have been prepared by reduction of the anhydrous metal(IV) chlorides in hydrocarbon solvents. The reduction employs the crystalline hydrocarbon-soluble reducing agent ((TMEDA)Li)/sub 2/(Nap) (TMEDA = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine, Nap = naphthalene). The resulting active metal powders have been shown to be extremely reactive with oxygen-containing compounds and have been used in the reductive coupling of aromatic ketones giving tetra-arylethylenes. Reactions with pinacols have given some mechanistic insight into the ketone coupling reaction. These finely divided metal powders activate very weakly acidic C-H bonds forming metal hydrides, which can be transferred to organic substrates.

  3. Effect of different solvent on the photocatalytic activity of ZnIn2S4 for selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to aromatic aldehydes under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li; Ye, Xiangju; Meng, Sugang; Fu, Xianliang; Chen, Shifu

    2016-10-01

    A series of ternary chalcogenides, zinc indium sulphide (ZnIn2S4), were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method with different solvents. The structure, textural, and optical properties of the resulting materials were thoroughly characterized by several techniques. The as-prepared ZnIn2S4 samples could all be employed as excellent photocatalysts to activate O2 for selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to aromatic aldehydes under visible light illumination. The results showed that ZnIn2S4 prepared in ethanol solvent (ZIS-EtOH) exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity among the screened samples. The differences of photocatalytic performance for ZnIn2S4 samples prepared in different media were mainly attributed to the different levels of exposed {0001} special facets caused by the exposure extent of the basic crystal plane. In addition, rad O2- and positive holes were proved to be the main active species during the photocatalytic process. Combined with the previous reports, a possible photocatalytic mechanism for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde over ZnIn2S4 sample was proposed.

  4. Passive dosing of soil invertebrates with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: limited chemical activity explains toxicity cutoff.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Philipp; Holmstrup, Martin

    2008-10-01

    The partitioning of organic soil pollutants into soil organisms is driven by their chemical activity, which normally does not exceed that of the pure pollutant. Passive dosing with the silicone poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was used to initiate and maintain the maximum chemical activity of 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in toxicity tests with the springtail Folsomia candida. The test animals could move freely on the PDMS saturated with PAHs, resulting in direct contact and exposure to saturated air. After 7 days, springtail lethality correlated neither with the octanol-water partition coefficients of the PAHs nor with their molecular size, but with their melting point All low-melting PAHs (T(M) < or = 110 degrees C) caused 100% lethality, whereas all high-melting PAHs (TM > or = 180 degrees C) caused no significant lethality. The lethality was successfully fitted to one chemical activity response curve for all PAHs tested, with effective chemical activity causing 50% lethality (Ea-50) of 0.058. It was also fitted to the PAH concentration in the PDMS, resulting in an EC(PDMS)-50 of 8.7 mM. Finally, the combined exposure to anthracene and pyrene was described by the sum of chemical activities causing lethality, in good agreement with the chemical activity-response curve obtained.

  5. Depth heterogeneity of fully aromatic polyamide active layers in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2011-05-15

    We studied the depth heterogeneity of fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layers in commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes by quantifying near-surface (i.e., top 6 nm) and volume-averaged properties of the active layers using X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), respectively. Some membranes (e.g., ESPA3 RO) had active layers that were depth homogeneous with respect to the concentration and pK(a) distribution of carboxylic groups, degree of polymer cross-linking, concentration of barium ion probe that associated with ionized carboxylic groups, and steric effects experienced by barium ion. Other membranes (e.g., NF90 NF) had active layers that were depth heterogeneous with respect to the same properties. Our results therefore support the existence of both depth-homogeneous and depth-heterogeneous active layers. It remains to be assessed whether the depth heterogeneity consists of gradually changing properties throughout the active layer depth or of distinct sublayers with different properties.

  6. [Assessment of exposure to cancerogenic aromatic hydrocarbon during controlled-access highways management activities].

    PubMed

    Martinotti, I; Cirla, A M; Cottica, D; Cirla, P E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was an integrated assessment of exposure to benzene and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in 29 workers employed to manage a controlled-access highways. A campaign was performed in summertime by environmental monitoring (active and passive airborne personal sampler), as well as by biological monitoring (urine samples of the beginning and of the end of daily shift, baseline after two days of vacation). The measured environmental levels did not differ from background environmental concentrations found in a metropolitan area (i.e. benzo[a]pyrene < 1 ng/m3; benzene < 5 mcg/m3), and the results of biological monitoring were in agreement and were compatible with extra-professional habits of the investigated subjects (1-hydroxipyrene 50-990 ng/g creatinine; unmetabolized benzene 15-2010 ng/I; t-t muconic acid < 4-222 mcg/g creatinine).

  7. Antioxidant activity of a new aromatic geranyl derivative of the resinous exudates from Heliotropium glutinosum Phil.

    PubMed

    Modak, Brenda; Rojas, Macarena; Torres, René; Rodilla, Jesús; Luebert, Federico

    2007-05-21

    Heliotropium glutinosum Phil. (Heliotropiceae) is a resinous bush that grows at a height of 2000 m in Chañaral, Chile. From the resinous exudates of Heliotropium glutinosum Phil. a new aromatic geranyl derivative: 4-methoxy-3-[(2)-7'-methyl-3'-hydroxymethyl-2',6'-octadienyl] phenol (1) and three flavonoids: 5,3'-dihydroxy-7,4'-dimethoxyflavanone (2), 5,4'-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (3) and 4'-acetyl-5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (4) were isolated and their structures were determined. Their antioxidant activity were evaluated using the bleaching of ABTS and DPPH derived cation radical methods and expressed in terms of FRE (fast reacting equivalents) and TRE (total reacting equivalents), where FRE is a good measure of the quick protection of a given compound against oxidants and TRE measures the degree of long-term protection of the antioxidant, or how effective it is against a strong oxidative stress.

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from the edible aromatic plant Aristolochia delavayi.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Jian; Njateng, Guy S S; He, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Gu, Jian-Long; Chen, Shan-Na; Du, Zhi-Zhi

    2013-11-01

    The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Aristolochia delavayi Franch. (Aristolochiaceae), a unique edible aromatic plant consumed by the Nakhi (Naxi) people in Yunnan, China, was investigated using GC/MS analysis. In total, 95 components, representing more than 95% of the oil composition, were identified, and the main constituents found were (E)-dec-2-enal (52.0%), (E)-dodec-2-enal (6.8%), dodecanal (3.35%), heptanal (2.88%), and decanal (2.63%). The essential oil showed strong inhibitory activity (96% reduction) of the production of bacterial volatile sulfide compounds (VSC) by Klebsiella pneumoniae, an effect that was comparable with that of the reference compound citral (91% reduction). Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil and the isolated major compound against eight bacterial and six fungal strains were evaluated. The essential oil showed significant antibacterial activity against Providencia stuartii and Escherichia coli, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 3.9 to 62.5 μg/ml. The oil also showed strong inhibitory activity against the fungal strains Trichophyton ajelloi, Trichophyton terrestre, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, and Cryptococcus neoformans, with MIC values ranging from 3.9 to 31.25 μg/ml, while (E)-dec-2-enal presented a lower antifungal activity than the essential oil.

  9. Interspecies quantitative structure-activity-activity relationships (QSAARs) for prediction of acute aquatic toxicity of aromatic amines and phenols.

    PubMed

    Furuhama, A; Hasunuma, K; Aoki, Y

    2015-01-01

    We propose interspecies quantitative structure-activity-activity relationships (QSAARs), that is, QSARs with descriptors, to estimate species-specific acute aquatic toxicity. Using training datasets consisting of more than 100 aromatic amines and phenols, we found that the descriptors that predicted acute toxicities to fish (Oryzias latipes) and algae were daphnia toxicity, molecular weight (an indicator of molecular size and uptake) and selected indicator variables that discriminated between the absence or presence of various substructures. Molecular weight and the selected indicator variables improved the goodness-of-fit of the fish and algae toxicity prediction models. External validations of the QSAARs proved that algae toxicity could be predicted within 1.0 log unit and revealed structural profiles of outlier chemicals with respect to fish toxicity. In addition, applicability domains based on leverage values provided structural alerts for the predicted fish toxicity of chemicals with more than one hydroxyl or amino group attached to an aromatic ring, but not for fluoroanilines, which were not included in the training dataset. Although these simple QSAARs have limitations, their applicability is defined so clearly that they may be practical for screening chemicals with molecular weights of ≤364.9.

  10. Complete σ* intramolecular aromatic hydroxylation mechanism through O2 activation by a Schiff base macrocyclic dicopper(I) complex.

    PubMed

    Poater, Albert; Solà, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    In this work we analyze the whole molecular mechanism for intramolecular aromatic hydroxylation through O2 activation by a Schiff hexaazamacrocyclic dicopper(I) complex, [Cu(I) 2(bsH2m)](2+). Assisted by DFT calculations, we unravel the reaction pathway for the overall intramolecular aromatic hydroxylation, i.e., from the initial O2 reaction with the dicopper(I) species to first form a Cu(I)Cu(II)-superoxo species, the subsequent reaction with the second Cu(I) center to form a μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxo-Cu(II) 2 intermediate, the concerted peroxide O-O bond cleavage and C-O bond formation, followed finally by a proton transfer to an alpha aromatic carbon that immediately yields the product [Cu(II) 2(bsH2m-O)(μ-OH)](2+).

  11. Carbon-hydrogen bond activation of aromatic imines by (Cp{sup *}{sub 2}SmH){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, N.S.; Buchwald, S.L.; Scott, B.; Burns, C.J.

    1996-09-17

    Treatment of (Cp{sup *}{sub 2}SmH){sub 2} with 2-phenyl-1-pyrroline forms product 1, via ortho-metalation. Complex 1 was characterized spectroscopically and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The C-H bond activation reaction also occurs for acyclic aromatic ketimines and aldimines. 30 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Sorption kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal using granular activated carbon: intraparticle diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, C; Gamisans, X; de las Heras, X; Farrán, A; Cortina, J L

    2008-09-15

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) was evaluated as a suitable sorbent for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) removal from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, kinetic measurements on the extraction of a family of six PAHs were taken. A morphology study was performed by means of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of GAC samples. Analyses of the batch rate data for each PAH were carried out using two kinetic models: the homogenous particle diffusion model (HPDM) and the shell progressive model (SPM). The process was controlled by diffusion rate the solutes (PAHs) that penetrated the reacted layer at PAH concentrations in the range of 0.2-10 mg L(-1). The effective particle diffusion coefficients (D(eff)) derived from the two models were determined from the batch rate data. The Weber and Morris intraparticle diffusion model made a double contribution to the surface and pore diffusivities in the sorption process. The D(eff) values derived from both the HPMD and SPM equations varied from 1.1 x 10(-13) to 6.0 x 10(-14) m(2) s(-1). The simplest model, the pore diffusion model, was applied first for data analysis. The model of the next level of complexity, the surface diffusion model, was applied in order to gain a deeper understanding of the diffusion process. This model is able to explain the data, and the apparent surface diffusivities are in the same order of magnitude as the values for the sorption of functionalized aromatic hydrocarbons (phenols and sulphonates) that are described in the literature.

  13. Theoretical studies of chemical reactivity of metabolically activated forms of aromatic amines toward DNA.

    PubMed

    Shamovsky, Igor; Ripa, Lena; Blomberg, Niklas; Eriksson, Leif A; Hansen, Peter; Mee, Christine; Tyrchan, Christian; O'Donovan, Mike; Sjö, Peter

    2012-10-15

    The metabolism of aromatic and heteroaromatic amines (ArNH₂) results in nitrenium ions (ArNH⁺) that modify nucleobases of DNA, primarily deoxyguanosine (dG), by forming dG-C8 adducts. The activated amine nitrogen in ArNH⁺ reacts with the C8 of dG, which gives rise to mutations in DNA. For the most mutagenic ArNH₂, including the majority of known genotoxic carcinogens, the stability of ArNH⁺ is of intermediate magnitude. To understand the origin of this observation as well as the specificity of reactions of ArNH⁺ with guanines in DNA, we investigated the chemical reactivity of the metabolically activated forms of ArNH₂, that is, ArNHOH and ArNHOAc, toward 9-methylguanine by DFT calculations. The chemical reactivity of these forms is determined by the rate constants of two consecutive reactions leading to cationic guanine intermediates. The formation of ArNH⁺ accelerates with resonance stabilization of ArNH⁺, whereas the formed ArNH⁺ reacts with guanine derivatives with the constant diffusion-limited rate until the reaction slows down when ArNH⁺ is about 20 kcal/mol more stable than PhNH⁺. At this point, ArNHOH and ArNHOAc show maximum reactivity. The lowest activation energy of the reaction of ArNH⁺ with 9-methylguanine corresponds to the charge-transfer π-stacked transition state (π-TS) that leads to the direct formation of the C8 intermediate. The predicted activation barriers of this reaction match the observed absolute rate constants for a number of ArNH⁺. We demonstrate that the mutagenic potency of ArNH₂ correlates with the rate of formation and the chemical reactivity of the metabolically activated forms toward the C8 atom of dG. On the basis of geometric consideration of the π-TS complex made of genotoxic compounds with long aromatic systems, we propose that precovalent intercalation in DNA is not an essential step in the genotoxicity pathway of ArNH₂. The mechanism-based reasoning suggests rational design strategies to

  14. Structure-activity relationships for vitamin D3-based aromatic a-ring analogues as hedgehog pathway inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Deberardinis, Albert M; Madden, Daniel J; Banerjee, Upasana; Sail, Vibhavari; Raccuia, Daniel S; De Carlo, Daniel; Lemieux, Steven M; Meares, Adam; Hadden, M Kyle

    2014-05-08

    A structure-activity relationship study for a series of vitamin D3-based (VD3) analogues that incorporate aromatic A-ring mimics with varying functionality has provided key insight into scaffold features that result in potent, selective Hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibition. Three analogue subclasses containing (1) a single substitution at the ortho or para position of the aromatic A-ring, (2) a heteroaryl or biaryl moiety, or (3) multiple substituents on the aromatic A-ring were prepared and evaluated. Aromatic A-ring mimics incorporating either single or multiple hydrophilic moieties on a six-membered ring inhibited the Hh pathway in both Hh-dependent mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cultured cancer cells (IC50 values 0.74-10 μM). Preliminary studies were conducted to probe the cellular mechanisms through which VD3 and 5, the most active analogue, inhibit Hh signaling. These studies suggested that the anti-Hh activity of VD3 is primarily attributed to the vitamin D receptor, whereas 5 affects Hh inhibition through a separate mechanism.

  15. Aromatic lipoxin A4 and lipoxin B4 analogues display potent biological activities.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P; Vallin, Karl S A; Shah, Syed Tasadaque Ali; Fakhry, Jérôme; Maderna, Paola; Scannell, Michael; Sampaio, Andre L F; Perretti, Mauro; Godson, Catherine; Guiry, Patrick J

    2007-11-29

    Lipoxins are a group of biologically active eicosanoids typically formed by transcellular lipoxygenase activity. Lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and Lipoxin B4 (LXB4) biosynthesis has been detected in a variety of inflammatory conditions. The native lipoxins LXA4 and LXB4 demonstrate potent antiinflammatory and proresolution bioactions. However, their therapeutic potential is compromised by rapid metabolic inactivation by PG dehydrogenase-mediated oxidation and reduction. Here we report on the stereoselective synthesis of aromatic LXA4 and LXB4 analogues by employing Sharpless epoxidation, Pd-mediated Heck coupling, and diastereoselective reduction as the key transformations. Subsequent biological testing has shown that these analogues display potent biological activities. Phagocytic clearance of apoptotic leukocytes plays a critical role in the resolution of inflammation. Both LXA4 analogues (1R)-3a and (1S)-3a were found to stimulate a significant increase in phagocytosis of apoptotic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) by macrophages, with comparable efficacy to the effect of native LXA4, albeit greater potency, while the LXB4 analogue also stimulated phagocytosis with a maximum effect observed at 10-11 M. LX-stimulated phagocytosis was associated with rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton consistent with that reported for native lipoxins. Using zymosan-induced peritonitis as a murine model of acute inflammation (1R)-3a significantly reduced PMN accumulation.

  16. Antioxidant and Anti-Osteoporotic Activities of Aromatic Compounds and Sterols from Hericium erinaceum.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Lee, Sang Hyun; Jang, Hae Dong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Young Ho

    2017-01-11

    Hericium erinaceum, commonly called lion's mane mushroom, is a traditional edible mushroom widely used in culinary applications and herbal medicines in East Asian countries. In this study, a new sterol, cerevisterol 6-cinnamate (6), was isolated from the fruiting bodies of H. erinaceum together with five aromatic compounds 1-5 and five sterols 7-11. The chemical structures of these compounds were elucidated using chemical and physical methods and comparison of HRESIMS, ¹D-NMR (¹H, (13)C, and DEPT) and 2D-NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY) spectra with previously reported data. The antioxidant and anti-osteoporotic activities of extracts and the isolated compounds 1-11 were investigated. All compounds exhibited peroxyl radical-scavenging capacity but only compounds 1, 3, and 4 showed potent reducing capacity. Moreover, compounds 1, 2, 4, and 5 showed moderate effects on cellular antioxidant activity and inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. These results suggested that H. erinaceum could be utilized in the development of natural antioxidant and anti-osteoporotic nutraceuticals and functional foods.

  17. Antitumor and antimicrobial activities of some hetero aromatic benzofurans derived from naturally occurring visnagin.

    PubMed

    El-Nakkady, Sally S; Roaiah, Hanaa F; El-Serwy, Weam S; Soliman, Abdel Mohsen; El-Moez, Sherein I Abd; Abdel-Rahman, Adel A H

    2012-01-01

    Bromination of visnaginone (1) yielded the dibromo derivative (2), which upon methylation with methyl iodide gave 1-(2,7-dibromo-4,6-dimethoxybenzofuran-5-yl) ethanone (3). Compound (3) reacted with dimethylformamide dimethylacetal to give (4). The reaction of (3) with aromatic aldehydes namely (vanillin, benzaldehyde and 3-anisaldehyde) in ammonium acetate, malononitrile and/or butyric cyanoanhydride gave the 2-amino substituted nicotinonitriles (5a-c) and the 2-hydroxyl substituted nicotinonitriles (7a-c), respectively, while in piperidine gave (E)-1-(2,7-dibromo-4,6-dimethoxybenzofuran-5-yl)-3-(substituted)prop-2-en-l-one (11a-c). (5a) was hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid on cold to give the nicotinic acid derivative (6a). When compound (3) reacted with hydrazines and aromatic amines, it gave the Schiff bases (8a,b) and (10a,b), respectively. (8b) reacted with thioglycolic acid to give the thiazolidin-4-one (9b). When (11a-c) reacted with thiourea, it gave the pyrimidine derivatives (12a-c). (11a,b) also reacted with butyric cyanoanhydride and hydroxylamine hydrochloride to give (13a,b) and (15a,b), respectively. When the carboxylate (13a) was treated with 2,4-dinitroaniline, it gave the carboxamide (14a). Compounds (11b,c) reacted with hydrazine derivatives (hydrazine hydrate and phenylhydrazine) yielding the substituted pyrazole derivatives (16b,c) and (17b,c), respectively. All the structures of the synthesized compounds were elucidated by elemental analyses and spectral data. The newly synthesized benzofuran compounds showed a strong to moderate cytotoxicity against liver HEPG2 cancer cell line compared to 5-fluorouracil and doxorubicin (the anticancer agents). Compounds (2, 6a, 13a, 14a, 16c and 17b) were the most active compounds in descending order. The synthesized compounds were also tested for their antimicrobial activity. Compound (10b) showed the highest activity against all the tested strains followed by 6, 10a, 5a, 8b and 7a in descending order.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Seven Essential Oils From Iranian Aromatic Plants Against Common Causes of Oral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Ghadiri, Pooria; Saharkhiz, Mohammad Jamal; Moein, Mohammad Reza; Mehriar, Peiman; Bahrani, Farideh; Golzar, Tahereh; Pakshir, Keyvan; Fani, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the past two decades, there has been a growing trend in using oral hygienic products originating from natural resources such as essential oils (EOs) and plant extracts. Seven aromatic plants used in this study are among popular traditional Iranian medicinal plants with potential application in modern medicine as anti-oral infectious diseases. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of essential oils from seven medicinal plants against pathogens causing oral infections. Materials and Methods: The chemical compositions of EOs distilled from seven plants were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These plants included Satureja khuzestanica, S. bachtiarica, Ocimum sanctum, Artemisia sieberi, Zataria multiflora, Carum copticum and Oliveria decumbens. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was evaluated by broth micro-dilution in 96 well plates as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. Results: The tested EOs inhibited the growth of examined oral pathogens at concentrations of 0.015-16 µL/mL. Among the examined oral pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis had the highest Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) and Minimum Microbicidal Concentrations (MMCs). Of the examined EOs, S. khuzestanica, Z. multiflora and S. bachtiarica, showed the highest antimicrobial activities, respectively, while Artemisia sieberi exhibited the lowest antimicrobial activity. Conclusions: The excellent antimicrobial activities of the tested EOs might be due to their major phenolic or alcoholic monoterpenes with known antimicrobial activities. Hence, these EOs can be possibly used as an antimicrobial agent in treatment and control of oral pathogens. PMID:25793100

  19. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; Smith, Holly; Peterson, Darren J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCA decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.

  20. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; ...

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCAmore » decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.« less

  1. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN 3.3 {mu}m POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Jong-Hak; Park, Dawoo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2012-02-15

    We investigate the connection between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by comparing 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission with AGN properties. Utilizing the slitless spectroscopic capability of the AKARI space telescope, we observe a moderate-luminosity Type I AGN at z {approx} 0.4 to measure global starburst activity. The 3.3 {mu}m PAH emissions are detected for 7 out of 26 target galaxies. We find no strong correlation between the 3.3 {mu}m PAH emission and AGN luminosity in the limited range of the observed AGN luminosity, suggesting that global star formation may not be closely related to AGN activity. Combining our measurements with previous 3.3 {mu}m measurements of low-redshift Type I AGNs in the literature, we investigate the connection between nuclear starburst and AGN activity. In contrast to global star formation, the 3.3 {mu}m PAH luminosity measured from the central part of galaxies correlates with AGN luminosity, implying that starburst activity and AGN activity are directly connected in the nuclear region.

  2. Effect of aromatic cedar mulch on Argentine ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) foraging activity and nest establishment.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Heike E; Silverman, Jules

    2003-06-01

    In the laboratory, Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), mortality was positively correlated to the length of an aromatic cedar mulch section that had to be crossed before food could be reached. When ants could access food without crossing the mulch, mortality was not correlated to mulch section length. In the field, Argentine ants showed a tendency to avoid aromatic cedar mulch as a nesting substrate. In plant beds alongside buildings the number of ant nests (pockets containing brood) found was not significantly different between aromatic cedar and cypress mulch. However, when pine straw mulch around oak trees was replaced with aromatic cedar or cypress mulch, a similar number of ant nests was found in the cypress mulch as in the original pine straw, whereas numbers in aromatic cedar mulch were significantly lower. Also, fewer ants were trailing on the trees surrounded by aromatic cedar mulch compared with cypress mulch or the original pine straw. The number of ants attracted to apple jelly baits placed alongside the buildings did not differ between mulch types; neither did the number of ant trails crossing the mulch beds around the buildings. We suggest that aromatic cedar mulch may help control Argentine ants and reduce insecticide input when applied in combination with conventional control methods.

  3. Heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons show estrogenic activity upon metabolization in a recombinant transactivation assay.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Markus; Maletz, Sibylle; Krauss, Martin; Bluhm, Kerstin; Schiwy, Sabrina; Kuckelkorn, Jochen; Tiehm, Andreas; Brack, Werner; Hollert, Henner

    2014-05-20

    Heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (hetero-PAHs) are increasingly studied at contaminated sites; especially at former industrial facilities where coal tar-oil was handled, e.g., wood treatment plants, high concentrations of hetero-PAHs are frequently detected in groundwater plumes. In previous studies, fractions of groundwater with high estrogenic activity contained hetero-PAHs and their hydroxylated metabolites. To evaluate this preliminary evidence, selected hetero-PAHs were screened for their estrogenic activity in lyticase yeast estrogen screen (LYES) and ER CALUX. All tested substances were inactive in the LYES. Hetero-PAHs such as acridine, xanthene, indole, 2-methylbenzofuran, 2,3-dimethylbenzofuran, dibenzofuran, dibenzothiophene, quinoline, and 6-methylquinoline were positive in the ER CALUX, with estradiol equivalence factors (EEFs) from 2.85 × 10(-7) to 3.18 × 10(-5). The EEF values of these substances were comparable to those of other xenoestrogens (e.g., alkylphenols or bisphenol A) that are sometimes found in surface water. Chemical analyses revealed that T47Dluc cells could metabolize most of the substances. Among the metabolites (tentatively) identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were hydroxides and their keto tautomers, sulfates, sulfoxides, and N-oxides. Because of their high concentrations measured in groundwater, we conclude that hetero-PAHs and metabolites may be a potential risk and should be the subject of further research.

  4. Aqueous N-heterocyclization of primary amines and hydrazines with dihalides: microwave-assisted syntheses of N-azacycloalkanes, isoindole, pyrazole, pyrazolidine, and phthalazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yuhong; Varma, Rajender S

    2006-01-06

    [reactions: see text] The synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocycles from alkyl dihalides (ditosylates) and primary amines and hydrazines via a simple and efficient cyclocondensation in an alkaline aqueous medium that occurs under microwave irradiation is described. This improved greener synthetic methodology provides a simple and straightforward one-pot approach to the synthesis of a variety of heterocycles, such as substituted azetidines, pyrrolidines, piperidines, azepanes, N-substituted 2,3-dihydro-1H-isoindoles, 4,5-dihydropyrazoles, pyrazolidines, and 1,2-dihydrophthalazines.

  5. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases and the Metabolic Activation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1–AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  6. Analogues of capsaicin with agonist activity as novel analgesic agents; structure-activity studies. 1. The aromatic "A-region".

    PubMed

    Walpole, C S; Wrigglesworth, R; Bevan, S; Campbell, E A; Dray, A; James, I F; Perkins, M N; Reid, D J; Winter, J

    1993-08-06

    A series of analogues of capsaicin, the pungent principle of chilli peppers, was synthesized and tested in assays for capsaicin-like agonism in vitro. The results of these assays were compared with activities in an acute nociceptive model and a correlation was observed which established that the results of these in vitro assays were predictive of analgesia. Using a modular approach the structure-activity profile of specific regions of capsaicin congeners was established using an in vitro assay measuring 45Ca2+ uptake into neonatal rat dorsal root ganglia neurones. Substituted benzylnonanamides 2a-z and N-octyl-substituted phenylacetamides 4a-v were made to test the requirements for activity in the aromatic "A-region" of the molecule. Compounds with the natural substitution pattern (2b and 4c) and the corresponding catechols (2i and 4g) were the most potent, although the catechols were less potent in vivo. Other substitution patterns have reduced activity. These results have established stringent structural requirements for capsaicin-like activity in this part of the molecule.

  7. Targeting of arenavirus RNA synthesis by a carboxamide-derivatized aromatic disulfide with virucidal activity.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Claudia S; García, Cybele C; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M; López, Nora; Damonte, Elsa B

    2013-01-01

    Several arenaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans, representing a public health threat in endemic areas of Africa and South America. The present study characterizes the potent virucidal activity of the carboxamide-derivatized aromatic disulfide NSC4492, an antiretroviral zinc finger-reactive compound, against Junín virus (JUNV), the causative agent of Argentine HF. The compound was able to inactivate JUNV in a time and temperature-dependent manner, producing more than 99 % reduction in virus titer upon incubation with virions at 37 °C for 90 min. The ability of NSC4492-treated JUNV to go through different steps of the multiplication cycle was then evaluated. Inactivated virions were able to bind and enter into the host cell with similar efficiency as control infectious particles. In contrast, treatment with NSC4492 impaired the capacity of JUNV to drive viral RNA synthesis, as measured by quantitative RT-PCR, and blocked viral protein expression, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the disulfide NSC4492 targets on the arenavirus replication complex leading to impairment in viral RNA synthesis. Additionally, analysis of VLP produced in NSC4492-treated cells expressing JUNV matrix Z protein revealed that the compound may interact with Z resulting in an altered aggregation behavior of this protein, but without affecting its intrinsic self-budding properties. The potential perspectives of NSC4492 as an inactivating vaccinal compound for pathogenic arenaviruses are discussed.

  8. Targeting of Arenavirus RNA Synthesis by a Carboxamide-Derivatized Aromatic Disulfide with Virucidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Claudia S.; García, Cybele C.; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M.

    2013-01-01

    Several arenaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans, representing a public health threat in endemic areas of Africa and South America. The present study characterizes the potent virucidal activity of the carboxamide-derivatized aromatic disulfide NSC4492, an antiretroviral zinc finger-reactive compound, against Junín virus (JUNV), the causative agent of Argentine HF. The compound was able to inactivate JUNV in a time and temperature-dependent manner, producing more than 99 % reduction in virus titer upon incubation with virions at 37°C for 90 min. The ability of NSC4492-treated JUNV to go through different steps of the multiplication cycle was then evaluated. Inactivated virions were able to bind and enter into the host cell with similar efficiency as control infectious particles. In contrast, treatment with NSC4492 impaired the capacity of JUNV to drive viral RNA synthesis, as measured by quantitative RT-PCR, and blocked viral protein expression, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the disulfide NSC4492 targets on the arenavirus replication complex leading to impairment in viral RNA synthesis. Additionally, analysis of VLP produced in NSC4492-treated cells expressing JUNV matrix Z protein revealed that the compound may interact with Z resulting in an altered aggregation behavior of this protein, but without affecting its intrinsic self-budding properties. The potential perspectives of NSC4492 as an inactivating vaccinal compound for pathogenic arenaviruses are discussed. PMID:24278404

  9. Mineralisation and primary biodegradation of aromatic organophosphorus flame retardants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Sharona S; Helmus, Rick; Waaijers, Susanne L; Uittenbogaard, Dirk; Dunnebier, Dorien; Vleugel, Melissa; Kraak, Michiel H S; de Voogt, Pim; Parsons, John R

    2014-09-01

    Halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs), such as the aromatic organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), resorcinol bis(diphenylphosphate) (PBDPP) and bisphenol A bis(diphenylphosphate) (BPA-BDPP) have been proposed as potential replacements for brominated flame retardants in polymers and textiles. Although these OPFRs are already marketed, their environmental fate and effects are poorly characterised. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the mineralisation and primary biodegradation of these OPFRs by activated sludge. Mineralisation was monitored by measuring CO2 production by means of GC analysis, whereas primary biodegradation was monitored by LC-MS/MS analysis of the OPFRs and their potential metabolites. TPHP was biodegraded and mineralised most rapidly and achieved the requirement for ready biodegradability (60% of theoretical maximum mineralisation). Primary biodegradation was also rapid for PBDPP, but 60% mineralisation was not achieved within the time of the test, suggesting that transformation products of PBDPP may accumulate. Primary degradation of BPA-BDPP was very slow and very low CO2 production was also observed. Based on these results, TPHP and to a lesser extent PBDPP appear to be suitable replacements for the more environmentally persistent brominated flame retardants.

  10. Extraction of sediment-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rakowska, M I; Kupryianchyk, D; Grotenhuis, T; Rijnaarts, H H M; Koelmans, A A

    2013-02-01

    Addition of activated carbon (AC) to sediments has been proposed as a method to reduce ecotoxicological risks of sediment-bound contaminants. The present study explores the effectiveness of granular AC (GAC) in extracting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) from highly contaminated sediments. Four candidate GAC materials were screened in terms of PAH extraction efficiency using single-step 24-h GAC extractions, with traditional 24-h Tenax extraction as a reference. Subsequently, sorption of native PAHs to the best performing GAC 1240W (0.45-1.70 mm) was studied for sediment only and for GAC-sediment mixtures at different GAC-sediment weight ratios, using 76-µm polyoxymethylene (POM) passive samplers. Granular AC sorption parameters for PAHs were determined by subtracting the contribution of PAH sorption to sediment from PAH sorption to the GAC-sediment mixture. It appears that the binding of PAHs and the effectiveness of GAC to reduce sediment porewater concentrations were highly dependent on the GAC-sediment mixing ratio and hydrophobicity of the PAH. Despite the considerable fouling of GAC by organic matter and oil, 50 to 90% of the most available PAH was extracted by the GAC during a 28-d contact time, at a dose as low as 4%, which also is a feasible dose in field-scale applications aimed at cleaning the sediment by GAC addition and removal.

  11. The Unexpected Reactivity of the Carbon Sites on the Nanostructured Carbon Catalysts towards the C-H Bond Activation from the Analysis of the Aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, DangSheng

    2016-06-06

    It is believed that the oxygen groups on the carbon catalysts are responsible for the observed reactivity for C-H bond activations. On the other hand, the oxygen groups also reduce the aromaticity of the host. The loss of the aromaticity increases reactivities of the carbon atoms and they become the active sites for the C-H bond activation. The newly identified C-C site exhibits the comparable catalytic performance in the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane compared with the conventional oxygen groups like quinone and ketone. A series of calculations indicate that the aromaticity might be a useful descriptor for the carbon catalysts.

  12. Thiolates Chemically Induce Redox Activation of BTZ043 and Related Potent Nitro Aromatic Anti-Tuberculosis Agents

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rohit; Moraski, Garrett C.; Krchňák, Viktor; Miller, Patricia A.; Colon-Martinez, Mariangelli; Herrero, Eliza; Oliver, Allen G.; Miller, Marvin J.

    2013-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) forms of tuberculosis (TB) has stimulated research efforts globally to expand the new drug pipeline. Nitro aromatic compounds, including 1, 3-Benzothiazin-4-ones (BTZs) and related agents, are a promising new class for the treatment of TB. Research has shown that the nitroso intermediates of BTZs that are generated in vivo cause suicide inhibition of decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose 2′ oxidase (DprE1), which is responsible for cell wall arabinogalactan biosynthesis. We have designed and synthesized novel anti-TB agents inspired from BTZs and other nitroaromatic compounds. Computational studies indicated that the unsubstituted aromatic carbons of BTZ043 and related nitroaromatic compounds are the most electron deficient and might be prone to nucleophilic attack. Our chemical studies on BTZ043 and the additional nitro aromatic compounds synthesized by us and the others confirmed the postulated reactivity. The results indicate that nucleophiles such as thiolates, cyanide and hydride induce non-enzymatic reduction of the nitro groups present in these compounds to the corresponding nitroso intermediates by addition at the unsubstituted electron deficient aromatic carbon present in these compounds. Furthermore we demonstrate here that these compounds are good candidates for the classical von Richter reaction. These chemical studies offer an alternate hypotheses for the mechanism of action of nitro aromatic anti-TB agents in that the cysteine thiol(ate) or a hydride source at the active site of DprE1 may trigger the reduction of the nitro groups in a manner similar to the von Richter reaction to the nitroso intermediates, to initiate the inhibition of DprE1. PMID:23402278

  13. Heterolytic Activation of Hydrogen Promoted by Ruthenium Nanoparticles immobilized on Basic Supports and Hydrogenation of Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Minfeng

    Despite the aggressive development and deployment of new renewable and nuclear technologies, petroleum-derived transportation fuels---gasoline, diesel and jet fuels---will continue to dominate the markets for decades. Environmental legislation imposes severe limits on the tolerable proportion of aromatics, sulfur and nitrogen contents in transportation fuels, which is difficult to achieve with current refining technologies. Catalytic hydrogenation plays an important role in the production of cleaner fuels, both as a direct means to reduce the aromatics and as a key step in the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) processes. However, conventional catalysts require drastic conditions and/or are easily poisoned by S or N aromatics. Therefore, there is still a need for new efficient catalysts for hydrogenation reactions relevant to the production of cleaner fossil fuels. Our catalyst design involves metallic nanoparticles intimately associated with a basic support, with the aim of creating a nanostructure capable of promoting the heterolytic activation of hydrogen and ionic hydrogenation mechanisms, as a strategy to avoid catalyst poisoning and enhance catalytic activity. We have designed and prepared a new nanostructured catalytic material composed of RuNPs immobilized on the basic polymer P4VPy. We have demonstrated that the Ru/P4VPy catalyst can promote heterolytic hydrogen activation and a unique surface ionic hydrogenation mechanism for the efficient hydrogenation of N-aromatics. This is the first time these ionic hydrogenation pathways have been demonstrated on solid surfaces. For the RuNPs surfaces without basic sites in close proximity, the conventional homolytic H2 splitting is otherwise involved. Using the mechanistic concepts from Ru/P4VPy, we have designed and prepared the Ru/MgO catalyst, with the aim to improve the catalytic efficiency for the hydrogenation of heteroatom aromatics operating by the ionic hydrogenation mechanism. The Ru

  14. Activation of the cnidarian oxidative stress response by ultraviolet radiation, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and crude oil

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, A. M.; Reitzel, A. M.; Kwok, C. K.; Jenny, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms are continuously exposed to reactive chemicals capable of causing oxidative stress and cellular damage. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases, are present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes and provide an important means of neutralizing such oxidants. Studies in cnidarians have previously documented the occurrence of antioxidant enzymes (transcript expression, protein expression and/or enzymatic activity), but most of these studies have not been conducted in species with sequenced genomes or included phylogenetic analyses, making it difficult to compare results across species due to uncertainties in the relationships between genes. Through searches of the genome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis Stephenson, one catalase gene and six SOD family members were identified, including three copper/zinc-containing SODs (CuZnSODs), two manganese-containing SODs (MnSODs) and one copper chaperone of SOD (CCS). In 24 h acute toxicity tests, juvenile N. vectensis showed enhanced sensitivity to combinations of ultraviolet radiation (UV) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, specifically pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and fluoranthene) relative to either stressor alone. Adult N. vectensis exhibited little or no mortality following UV, benzo[a]pyrene or crude oil exposure but exhibited changes in gene expression. Antioxidant enzyme transcripts were both upregulated and downregulated following UV and/or chemical exposure. Expression patterns were most strongly affected by UV exposure but varied between experiments, suggesting that responses vary according to the intensity and duration of exposure. These experiments provide a basis for comparison with other cnidarian taxa and for further studies of the oxidative stress response in N. vectensis. PMID:24436378

  15. Aromatic plants essential oils activity on Fusarium verticillioides Fumonisin B(1) production in corn grain.

    PubMed

    López, A G; Theumer, M G; Zygadlo, J A; Rubinstein, H R

    2004-10-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Origanum vulgare, Aloysia triphylla, Aloysia polystachya and Mentha piperita essential oils (EOs) against Fusarium verticillioides M 7075 (F. moniliforme, Sheldon) were assessed, using the semisolid agar antifungal susceptibility (SAAS) technique. O. vulgare, A. triphylla, A. polystachya and M. piperita EOs were evaluated at final concentrations of 10, 20, 40, 50, 100, 200, 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 epsilonl per litre (epsilonl/l) of culture medium. A. triphylla and O. vulgare EOs showed the highest inhibitory effects on F. verticillioides mycelial development. This inhibition was observed at 250 and 500 epsilonl/l for EOs coming from Aloysia triphylla and O. vulgare, respectively. Thus, the effects of EOs on FB(1) production were evaluated using corn grain (Zea mays) as substrate. The EOs were inserted on the 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th day of maize postinoculation with a conidia suspension of F. verticillioides. O. vulgare and A. triphylla were applied to give final concentrations of 30 ppm and 45 ppm, respectively. Different effects were observed in the toxicogenicity at the 20th day treatment. The O. vulgare EO decreased the production level of FB(1) (P < 0.01) while A. triphyla EO increased it (P < 0.001) with respect to those obtained in the inoculated maize, not EOs treated. Results obtained in the present work indicate that fumonisin production could be inhibited or stimulated by some constituents of EOs coming from aromatic plants. Further studies should be performed to identify the components of EOs with modulatory activity on the growth and fumonisins production of Fusarium verticillioides.

  16. Adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbonaceous adsorbents: a comparative study on granular activated carbon, activated carbon fiber, and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Kose, H Selcen; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-08-15

    Adsorption of three aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) by four types of carbonaceous adsorbents [a granular activated carbon (HD4000), an activated carbon fiber (ACF10), two single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT, SWNT-HT), and a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT)] with different structural characteristics but similar surface polarities was examined in aqueous solutions. Isotherm results demonstrated the importance of molecular sieving and micropore effects in the adsorption of AOCs by carbonaceous porous adsorbents. In the absence of the molecular sieving effect, a linear relationship was found between the adsorption capacities of AOCs and the surface areas of adsorbents, independent of the type of adsorbent. On the other hand, the pore volume occupancies of the adsorbents followed the order of ACF10 > HD4000 > SWNT > MWNT, indicating that the availability of adsorption site was related to the pore size distributions of the adsorbents. ACF10 and HD4000 with higher microporous volumes exhibited higher adsorption affinities to low molecular weight AOCs than SWNT and MWNT with higher mesopore and macropore volumes. Due to their larger pore sizes, SWNTs and MWNTs are expected to be more efficient in adsorption of large size molecules. Removal of surface oxygen-containing functional groups from the SWNT enhanced adsorption of AOCs.

  17. GC-MS-olfactometric characterization of the most aroma-active components in a representative aromatic extract from Iranian saffron (Crocus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Amanpour, Asghar; Sonmezdag, A Salih; Kelebek, Hasim; Selli, Serkan

    2015-09-01

    Aroma and aroma-active compounds of Iranian saffron (Crocus sativus L.) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry. The saffron aromatic extracts were obtained by four different extraction techniques including solvent-assisted flavour evaporation (SAFE), liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), solid phase extraction (SPE), and simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) and compared to achieve a representative aromatic extract from saffron. According to sensory analysis, the aromatic extract obtained by SAFE was the most representative of saffron odour. A total of 28 aroma compounds were identified in saffron. Ketones were quantitatively the most dominant volatiles in saffron, followed by aldehydes and acids. Aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) was used for the determination of aroma-active compounds of saffron. A total of nine aroma-active compounds were detected in the aromatic extract. On the basis of the flavour dilution (FD) factor, the most powerful aroma active compounds were safranal (FD = 512), 4-ketoisophorone (FD = 256) and dihydrooxophorone (FD = 128).

  18. Synthesis of high specific activity (+)- and (-)-6-( sup 18 F)fluoronorepinephrine via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S.J.; Dewey, S.L.; Wolf, A.P. )

    1991-02-01

    The first example of a no-carrier-added {sup 18}F-labeled catecholamine, 6-({sup 18}F)fluoronorepinephrine (6-({sup 18}F)FNE), has been synthesized via nucleophilic aromatic substitution. The racemic mixture was resolved on a chiral HPLC column to obtain pure samples of (-)-6-({sup 18}F)FNE and (+)6-({sup 18}F)FNE. Radiochemical yields of 20% at the end of bombardment (EOB) for the racemic mixture (synthesis time 93 min), 6% for each enantiomer (synthesis time 128 min) with a specific activity of 2-5 Ci/mumol at EOB were obtained. Chiral HPLC peak assignment for the resolved enantiomers was achieved by using two independent methods: polarimetric determination and reaction with dopamine beta-hydroxylase. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies with racemic 6-({sup 18}F)FNE show high uptake and retention in the baboon heart. This work demonstrates that nucleophilic aromatic substitution by ({sup 18}F)fluoride ion is applicable to systems having electron-rich aromatic rings, leading to high specific activity radiopharmaceuticals. Furthermore, the suitably protected dihydroxynitrobenzaldehyde 1 may serve as a useful synthetic precursor for the radiosynthesis of other complex {sup 18}F-labeled radiotracers.

  19. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON AND EMISSION LINE RATIOS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, Dinalva A.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Riffel, R. E-mail: pastoriza@ufrgs.b

    2010-12-10

    We study the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, ionic emission lines, and mid-infrared continuum properties in a sample of 171 emission line galaxies taken from the literature plus 15 new active galactic nucleus (AGN) Spitzer spectra. We normalize the spectra at {lambda} = 23 {mu}m and grouped them according to the type of nuclear activity. The continuum shape steeply rises for longer wavelengths and can be fitted with a warm blackbody distribution of T {approx} 150-300 K. The brightest PAH spectral bands (6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 {mu}m) and the forbidden emission lines of [Si II] 34.8 {mu}m, [Ar II] 6.9 {mu}m, [S III] 18.7 and 33.4 {mu}m were detected in all the starbursts and in {approx}80% of the Seyfert 2. Taking under consideration only the PAH bands at 7.7 {mu}m, 11.3 {mu}m, and 12.7 {mu}m, we find that they are present in {approx}80% of the Seyfert 1, while only half of this type of activity show the 6.2 {mu}m and 8.6 {mu}m PAH bands. The observed intensity ratios for neutral and ionized PAHs (6.2 {mu}m/7.7 {mu}m x 11.3 {mu}m/7.7 {mu}m) were compared to theoretical intensity ratios, showing that AGNs have higher ionization fraction and larger PAH molecules ({>=}180 carbon atoms) than SB galaxies. The ratio between the ionized (7.7 {mu}m) and the neutral PAH bands (8.6 {mu}m and 11.3 {mu}m) are distributed over different ranges for AGNs and SB galaxies, suggesting that these ratios could depend on the ionization fraction, as well as on the hardness of the radiation field. The ratio between the 7.7 {mu}m and 11.3 {mu}m bands is nearly constant with the increase of [Ne III]15.5 {mu}m/[Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m, indicating that the fraction of ionized to neutral PAH bands does not depend on the hardness of the radiation field. The equivalent width of both PAH features show the same dependence (strongly decreasing) with [Ne III]/[Ne II], suggesting that the PAH molecules, emitting either ionized (7.7 {mu}m) or neutral (11.3 {mu}m) bands, may be destroyed

  20. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic compounds in diesel exhaust particulate extract responsible for aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soontjens, Carol D.; Holmberg, Kristina; Westerholm, Roger N.; Rafter, Joseph J.

    Chemical fractions of a model diesel exhaust particulate extract, notably the fraction containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (Fraction II), mono-nitro PAH (Fraction III), and dinitro-PAH (Fraction IV) have been shown to displace binding of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro[1,6-[ 3H

  1. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avila, Walter B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is a microscale organic chemistry experiment which demonstrates one feasible route in preparing ortho-substituted benzoic acids and provides an example of nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry. Experimental procedures and instructor notes for this activity are provided. (CW)

  2. Structure-activity relationships of 2alpha-substituted androstenedione analogs as aromatase inhibitors and their aromatization reactions.

    PubMed

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Handa, Wakako; Hasegawa, Chie; Takahashi, Madoka

    2005-12-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione (1a, AD) to estrone through three sequential oxygenations of the 19-methyl group. To gain insight into the spatial nature of the AD binding (active) site of aromatase in relation to the catalytic function of the enzyme, we tested for the ability of 2alpha-substituted (halogeno, alkyl, hydroxy, and alkoxy) ADs (1b-1i) to inhibit aromatase in human placental microsomes as well as their ability to serve as a substrate for the enzyme. All of the steroids inhibited the enzyme in a competitive manner with the apparent K(i)'s ranging from 45 to 1150 nM. 2alpha-Halogeno (F, Cl, and Br) and 2alpha-alkyl (CH3 and CH2CH3) steroids 1b-1f were powerful to good inhibitors (Ki=45-171 nM) whereas steroids 1g-1i, having an oxygen function (hydroxy or alkoxy) at C-2alpha, were poor inhibitors (Ki=670-1150 nM). Aromatization of some of the steroids with placental microsomes was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, indicating that the aromatization rate of the bromide 1d was about two-fold that of the natural substrate AD and that of 2alpha-methoxide 1h was similar to that of AD. Kinetic analysis of the aromatization of androgens revealed that a good substrate was not essentially a good inhibitor for aromatase.

  3. In vitro and in vivo activities of T4 endonuclease V mutants altered in the C-terminal aromatic region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Kanamori, Y.; Hori, N.; Inaoka, T.; Ohtsuka, E. )

    1990-04-24

    Genes encoding mutants of the thymine photodimer repair enzyme from bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) having an amino acid substitution (T127M, W128A, W128S, Y129A, K130L, Y131A, Y132A) were constructed by use of a previously obtained synthetic gene and expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the E. coli tryptophan promoter. An in vitro assay of partially fractionated mutant proteins for glycosylase activity was performed with chemically synthesized substrates containing a thymine photodimer. T127M and K130L showed almost the same activity as the wild-type protein. Although W128S, Y131A, and Y132A were slightly active, W128A and Y129A lost activity. The results indicated that the aromatic amino acids around position 130 may be important for the glycosylase activity. Mutant T127M was purified, and the Km value was found to be of the same order as that of the wild type (10(-8) M). In vivo activities for all mutants were characterized with UV-sensitive E. coli. The results showed that substitution of Thr-127 with Met or Lys-130 with Leu did not have an effect on the survival of the bacteria but substitution of aromatic amino acids (128-132) had various effects on survival.

  4. Synthesis and antifungal activity of C-21 steroids with an aromatic D ring.

    PubMed

    Sonego, Juan M; Cirigliano, Adriana M; Cabrera, Gabriela M; Burton, Gerardo; Veleiro, Adriana S

    2013-07-01

    Six analogues of salpichrolides with a simplified side chain (6-11) were synthesized using a new methodology to obtain steroids with an aromatic D-ring. The key step was the elimination of HBr in a vicinal dibromo D-homosteroid by treatment with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO). All new compounds were completely characterized by 2D NMR techniques and tested on two fungal pathogenic species, Fusarium virguliforme and Fusarium solani.

  5. Mo and W dihalide complexes with uncommon trigonal-prismatic geometry imposed by the linear tetraphosphine ancillary ligand and their reactivities toward diazoalkanes.

    PubMed

    Seino, Hidetake; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Takeshi; Arita, Chirima; Mizobe, Yasushi

    2007-06-11

    New Mo and W tetraphosphine-dihalide complexes [MX2(kappa4-P4)] (2, MX=MoCl, MoBr, WBr; P4=meso-o-C6H4(PPhCH2CH2PPh2)2) with uncommon trigonal-prismatic geometries have been prepared. Treatment of ethyl diazoacetate with 2 (MX=MoCl) resulted in catalytic carbenoid-group coupling to give diethyl maleate and fumarate, whereas reactions of 2 with trimethylsilyldiazoalkane formed the diazoalkane complexes trans-[MX(NN=CHSiMe3)-(kappa4-P4)]+ (3+) and cis,mer-[MoCl2(NN=CHSiMe3)(kappa3-P4)]. The molecular structures of 2 (MX=MoCl) and 3[PF6] (MX=WBr) were crystallographically determined.

  6. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mutagenicity by classification methods based on holistic theoretical molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester; Marrocchi, Assunta; Minuti, Lucio; Taticchi, Aldo

    2007-03-01

    Various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are recognized mutagens and carcinogens. A homogeneous set of mutagenicity data (TA98 and TA100,+S9) for 32 benzocyclopentaphenanthrenes/chrysenes was modeled by the quantitative structure-activity relationship classification methods k-nearest neighbor and classification and regression tree, using theoretical holistic molecular descriptors. Genetic algorithm provided the selection of the best subset of variables for modeling mutagenicity. The models were validated by leave-one-out and leave-50%-out approaches and have good performance, with sensitivity and specificity ranges of 90-100%. Mutagenicity assessment for these PAHs requires only a few theoretical descriptors of their molecular structure.

  7. Activation of Aromatic C-C Bonds of 2,2'-Bipyridine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Fombona, Sergio; Espinal-Viguri, Maialen; Huertos, Miguel A; Díaz, Jesús; López, Ramón; Menéndez, M Isabel; Pérez, Julio; Riera, Lucía

    2016-11-21

    4,4'-Disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridine ligands coordinated to Mo(II) and Re(I) cationic fragments become dearomatized by an intramolecular nucleophilic attack from a deprotonated N-alkylimidazole ligand in cis disposition. The subsequent protonation of these neutral complexes takes place on a pyridine carbon atom rather than at nitrogen, weakening an aromatic C-C bond and affording a dihydropyridyl moiety. Computational calculations allowed for the rationalization of the formation of the experimentally obtained products over other plausible alternatives.

  8. Seawater Polluted with Highly Concentrated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Suppresses Osteoblastic Activity in the Scales of Goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuo; Sato, Masayuki; Nassar, Hossam F; Abdel-Gawad, Fagr Kh; Bassem, Samah M; Yachiguchi, Koji; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Endo, Masato; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Urata, Makoto; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Mishima, Hiroyuki; Shimasaki, Youhei; Oshima, Yuji; Hong, Chun-Sang; Makino, Fumiya; Tang, Ning; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-08-01

    We have developed an original in vitro bioassay using teleost scale, that has osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and bone matrix as each marker: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) for osteoblasts and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) for osteoclasts. Using this scale in vitro bioassay, we examined the effects of seawater polluted with highly concentrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) on osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities in the present study. Polluted seawater was collected from two sites (the Alexandria site on the Mediterranean Sea and the Suez Canal site on the Red Sea). Total levels of PAHs in the seawater from the Alexandria and Suez Canal sites were 1364.59 and 992.56 ng/l, respectively. We were able to detect NPAHs in both seawater samples. Total levels of NPAHs were detected in the seawater of the Alexandria site (12.749 ng/l) and the Suez Canal site (3.914 ng/l). Each sample of polluted seawater was added to culture medium at dilution rates of 50, 100, and 500, and incubated with the goldfish scales for 6 hrs. Thereafter, ALP and TRAP activities were measured. ALP activity was significantly suppressed by both polluted seawater samples diluted at least 500 times, but TRAP activity did not change. In addition, mRNA expressions of osteoblastic markers (ALP, osteocalcin, and the receptor activator of the NF-κB ligand) decreased significantly, as did the ALP enzyme activity. In fact, ALP activity decreased on treatment with PAHs and NPAHs. We conclude that seawater polluted with highly concentrated PAHs and NPAHs influences bone metabolism in teleosts.

  9. Subsite-specific contributions of different aromatic residues in the active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase family 12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Xiuyun; Liu, Shijia; Li, Dandan; Xu, Hao; Gao, Peiji; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2015-01-01

    The active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase (GH) is a contiguous subregion of the enzyme constituted by residues clustered in the three-dimensional space, recognizing the monomeric unit of ligand through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Mutations of the key residues in the active site architecture of the GH12 family exerted different impacts on catalytic efficiency. Binding affinities between the aromatic amino acids and carbohydrate rings were quantitatively determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the quantum mechanical (QM) method, showing that the binding capacity order of Tyr>Trp>His (and Phe) was determined by their side-chain properties. The results also revealed that the binding constant of a certain residue remained unchanged when altering its location, while the catalytic efficiency changed dramatically. Increased binding affinity at a relatively distant subsite, such as the mutant of W7Y at the −4 subsite, resulted in a marked increase in the intermediate product of cellotetraose and enhanced the reactivity of endoglucanase by 144%; while tighter binding near the catalytic center, i.e. W22Y at the −2 subsite, enabled the enzyme to bind and hydrolyze smaller oligosaccharides. Clarification of the specific roles of the aromatics at different subsites may pave the way for a more rational design of GHs. PMID:26670009

  10. Involvement of a surface-active high molecular weight factor in degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas marginalis.

    PubMed

    Burd, G; Ward, O P

    1996-08-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas marginalis PD-14B, isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil, produced an extracellular surface-active factor of high molecular weight containing protein and lipopolysaccharide. A crude preparation of the factor, obtained from the culture both of cells grown in mineral salts (MS) medium with succinate and yeast extract, affected the extent of PAH degradation by the bacterial cells and prevented flocculation of PAHs in an aqueous suspension. A washed suspension of P. marginalis cells also prevented flocculation of PAH suspensions and emulsified liquid hydrocarbons. Incubation of the factor and the factor-producing strain in the presence of different PAHs resulted in gradual increase of turbidity of the PAH dispersions. The factor markedly stimulated rate and extent of turbidity generation by bacterial cells. The surface-active factor may promote infection of lettuce and other plants by this known pathogen and may also have application in bioremediation.

  11. Effect of torrefaction on the properties of rice straw high temperature pyrolysis char: Pore structure, aromaticity and gasification activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Handing; Chen, Xueli; Qin, Yueqiang; Wei, Juntao; Liu, Haifeng

    2017-03-01

    The influence of torrefaction on the physicochemical characteristics of char during raw and water washed rice straw pyrolysis at 800-1200°C is investigated. Pore structure, aromaticity and gasification activity of pyrolysis chars are compared between raw and torrefied samples. For raw straw, BET specific surface area decreases with the increased torrefaction temperature at the same pyrolysis temperature and it approximately increases linearly with weight loss during pyrolysis. The different pore structure evolutions relate to the different volatile matters and pore structures between raw and torrefied straw. Torrefaction at higher temperature would bring about a lower graphitization degree of char during pyrolysis of raw straw. Pore structure and carbon crystalline structure evolutions of raw and torrefied water washed straw are different from these of raw straw during pyrolysis. For both raw and water washed straw, CO2 gasification activities of pyrolysis chars are different between raw and torrefied samples.

  12. Effect of Polarity of Activated Carbon Surface, Solvent and Adsorbate on Adsorption of Aromatic Compounds from Liquid Phase.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsuru; Amano, Yoshimasa; Machida, Motoi; Imazeki, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, introduction of acidic functional groups onto a carbon surface and their removal were carried out through two oxidation methods and outgassing to investigate the adsorption mechanism of aromatic compounds which have different polarity (benzene and nitrobenzene). Adsorption experiments for these aromatics in aqueous solution and n-hexane solution were conducted in order to obtain the adsorption isotherms for commercial activated carbon (BAC) as a starting material, its two types of oxidized BAC samples (OXs), and their outgassed samples at 900 °C (OGs). Adsorption and desorption kinetics of nitrobenzene for the BAC, OXs and OGs in aqueous solution were also examined. The results showed that the adsorption of benzene molecules was significantly hindered by abundant acidic functional groups in aqueous solution, whereas the adsorbed amount of nitrobenzene on OXs gradually increased as the solution concentration increased, indicating that nitrobenzene can adsorb favourably on a hydrophilic surface due to its high dipole moment, in contrast to benzene. In n-hexane solution, it was difficult for benzene to adsorb on any sample owing to the high affinity between benzene and n-hexane solvent. On the other hand, adsorbed amounts of nitrobenzene on OXs were larger than those of OGs in n-hexane solution, implying that nitrobenzene can adsorb two adsorption sites, graphene layers and surface acidic functional groups. The observed adsorption and desorption rate constants of nitrobenzene on the OXs were lower than those on the BAC due to disturbance of diffusion by the acidic functional groups.

  13. Mosquito repellent activity of essential oils of aromatic plants growing in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gillij, Y G; Gleiser, R M; Zygadlo, J A

    2008-05-01

    Mosquitoes are important vectors of diseases and nuisance pests. Repellents minimize contact with mosquitoes. Repellents based on essential oils (EO) are being developed as an alternative to DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-methylbenzamide), an effective compound that has disadvantages including toxic reactions, and damage to plastic and synthetic fabric. This work evaluated the repellency against Aedes aegypti of EO from aromatic plants that grow in Argentina: Acantholippia seriphioides, Achyrocline satureioides, Aloysia citriodora, Anemia tomentosa, Baccharis spartioides, Chenopodium ambrosioides, Eucalyptus saligna, Hyptis mutabilis, Minthostachys mollis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Tagetes minuta and Tagetes pusilla. Most EO were effective. Variations depending on geographic origin of the plant were detected. At a 90% EO concentration, A. satureoides and T. pusilla were the least repellent. At concentrations of 12.5% B. spartioides, R. officinalis and A. citriodora showed the longest repellency times. Comparisons of the principal components of each EO suggest that limonene and camphor were the main components responsible for the repellent effects.

  14. The Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase Enzymatic Activity for the Biosynthesis of Aromatic Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Notomista, Eugenio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Cristo, Carlo; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Monocyclic phenols and catechols are important antioxidant compounds for the food and pharmaceutic industries; their production through biotransformation of low-added value starting compounds is of major biotechnological interest. The toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) that is able to hydroxylate a wide array of aromatic compounds and has already proven to be a versatile biochemical tool to produce mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives of aromatic compounds. The molecular determinants of its regioselectivity and substrate specificity have been thoroughly investigated, and a computational strategy has been developed which allows designing mutants able to hydroxylate non-natural substrates of this enzyme to obtain high-added value compounds of commercial interest. In this work, we have investigated the use of recombinant ToMO, expressed in cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109, for the biotransformation of non-natural substrates of this enzyme such as 2-phenoxyethanol, phthalan and 2-indanol to produce six hydroxylated derivatives. The hydroxylated products obtained were identified, isolated and their antioxidant potential was assessed both in vitro, using the DPPH assay, and on the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Incubation of H9c2 cells with the hydroxylated compounds obtained from ToMO-catalyzed biotransformation induced a differential protective effect towards a mild oxidative stress induced by the presence of sodium arsenite. The results obtained confirm once again the versatility of the ToMO system for oxyfunctionalization reactions of biotechnological importance. Moreover, the hydroxylated derivatives obtained possess an interesting antioxidant potential that encourages the use of the enzyme for further functionalization reactions and their possible use as scaffolds to design novel bioactive molecules. PMID:25915063

  15. The Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase Enzymatic Activity for the Biosynthesis of Aromatic Antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Giuliana; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Pizzo, Elio; Notomista, Eugenio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Cristo, Carlo; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Monocyclic phenols and catechols are important antioxidant compounds for the food and pharmaceutic industries; their production through biotransformation of low-added value starting compounds is of major biotechnological interest. The toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) that is able to hydroxylate a wide array of aromatic compounds and has already proven to be a versatile biochemical tool to produce mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives of aromatic compounds. The molecular determinants of its regioselectivity and substrate specificity have been thoroughly investigated, and a computational strategy has been developed which allows designing mutants able to hydroxylate non-natural substrates of this enzyme to obtain high-added value compounds of commercial interest. In this work, we have investigated the use of recombinant ToMO, expressed in cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109, for the biotransformation of non-natural substrates of this enzyme such as 2-phenoxyethanol, phthalan and 2-indanol to produce six hydroxylated derivatives. The hydroxylated products obtained were identified, isolated and their antioxidant potential was assessed both in vitro, using the DPPH assay, and on the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Incubation of H9c2 cells with the hydroxylated compounds obtained from ToMO-catalyzed biotransformation induced a differential protective effect towards a mild oxidative stress induced by the presence of sodium arsenite. The results obtained confirm once again the versatility of the ToMO system for oxyfunctionalization reactions of biotechnological importance. Moreover, the hydroxylated derivatives obtained possess an interesting antioxidant potential that encourages the use of the enzyme for further functionalization reactions and their possible use as scaffolds to design novel bioactive molecules.

  16. Poly(arylene ether)s That Resist Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Novel poly(arylene ether)s containing phosphine oxide (PAEPO's) made via aromatic nucleophilic displacement reactions of activated aromatic dihalides (or, in some cases, activated aromatic dinitro compounds) with new bisphenol monomers containing phosphine oxide. Exhibited favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties and resistance to monatomic oxygen in oxygen plasma environment. Useful as adhesives, coatings, films, membranes, moldings, and composite matrices.

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Galaxies at z ~ 0.1: The Effect of Star Formation and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Schiminovich, David; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Treyer, Marie A.; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Charlot, S.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Martins, Lucimara P.; Seibert, Mark; van der Hulst, J. M.

    2009-11-01

    We present the analysis of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) spectra of a sample of 92 typical star-forming galaxies at 0.03 < z < 0.2 observed with the Spitzer intensified Reticon spectrograph (IRS). We compare the relative strengths of PAH emission features with Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical diagnostics to probe the relationship between PAH grain properties and star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) activity. Short-to-long wavelength PAH ratios, and in particular the 7.7 μm-to-11.3 μm feature ratio, are strongly correlated with the star formation diagnostics Dn (4000) and Hα equivalent width, increasing with younger stellar populations. This ratio also shows a significant difference between active and non-active galaxies, with the active galaxies exhibiting weaker 7.7 μm emission. A hard radiation field as measured by [O III]/Hβ and [Ne III]_{15.6 μm}/[Ne II]_{12.8 μm} effects PAH ratios differently depending on whether this field results from starburst activity or an AGN. Our results are consistent with a picture in which larger PAH molecules grow more efficiently in richer media and in which smaller PAH molecules are preferentially destroyed by the AGN.

  18. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN GALAXIES AT z approx 0.1: THE EFFECT OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Schiminovich, David; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Treyer, Marie A.; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Charlot, S.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Martins, Lucimara P.; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2009-11-01

    We present the analysis of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) spectra of a sample of 92 typical star-forming galaxies at 0.03 < z < 0.2 observed with the Spitzer intensified Reticon spectrograph (IRS). We compare the relative strengths of PAH emission features with Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical diagnostics to probe the relationship between PAH grain properties and star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) activity. Short-to-long wavelength PAH ratios, and in particular the 7.7 mum-to-11.3 mum feature ratio, are strongly correlated with the star formation diagnostics D{sub n} (4000) and Halpha equivalent width, increasing with younger stellar populations. This ratio also shows a significant difference between active and non-active galaxies, with the active galaxies exhibiting weaker 7.7 mum emission. A hard radiation field as measured by [O{sub III}]/Hbeta and [Ne{sub III}]{sub 15.6m}u{sub m}/[Ne{sub II}]{sub 12.8m}u{sub m} effects PAH ratios differently depending on whether this field results from starburst activity or an AGN. Our results are consistent with a picture in which larger PAH molecules grow more efficiently in richer media and in which smaller PAH molecules are preferentially destroyed by the AGN.

  19. Seasonal changes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in response to hydrology and anthropogenic activities in the Pearl River estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Niu, Lixia; Chen, Hui; Li, Ping; Tian, Feng; Yang, Qingshu

    2017-02-07

    The behaviours of PAHs (containing 2-6 aromatic rings) in the Pearl River estuary were examined each month in 2011. This study was designed to investigate the abundance of 16 priority PAHs and their response to the seasonal dynamics of anthropogenic activities and hydrological cycles. Monthly mean concentrations of ∑16PAHs in water and suspended particulate matter (SPM) were 88.31ng/L and 252.31ng/L respectively, with higher concentrations in the wet season (April to September). Heavy precipitation in the wet season resulted in relatively increased PAH input via riverine discharges and atmospheric deposition. Seasonal variations in suspended sediment concentration (SSC), temperature and salinity have considerably affected the PAH phase association. Higher SSC in the wet season contributed to higher concentration of the PAHs in SPM, and higher temperature and lower salinity facilitated desorption from SPM. The PAH sources were largely attributed to vehicular emissions, coal combustion and coke ovens.

  20. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds in hetero-complexes of biologically active aromatic molecules probed by the methods of vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Semenov, M A; Blyzniuk, Iu N; Bolbukh, T V; Shestopalova, A V; Evstigneev, M P; Maleev, V Ya

    2012-09-01

    By the methods of vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared and Raman) the investigation of the hetero-association of biologically active aromatic compounds: flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), ethidium bromide (EB) and proflavine (PRF) was performed in aqueous solutions. It was shown that between the functional groups (CO and NH(2)) the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in the hetero-complexes FMN-EB and FMN-PRF, additionally stabilizing these structures. An estimation of the enthalpy of Н-bonding obtained from experimental shifts of carbonyl vibrational frequencies has shown that the H-bonds do not dominate in the magnitude of experimentally measured total enthalpy of the hetero-association reactions. The main stabilization is likely due to intermolecular interactions of the molecules in these complexes and their interaction with water environment.

  1. Function and the biosynthesis of unusual corrinoids by a novel activation mechanism of aromatic compounds in anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupperich, E.; Eisinger, H. J.

    A corrinoid screening of several phylogenetically diverse ``archaebacteria'' revealed vitamin B12-like corrinoids. This indicates an optimized structure and function relationship of the corrinoids under different bacterial growth conditions during the early evolution of live. Some of these corrinoids have been substituted by modified corrinoids in growing cells without affecting the generation times of the bacteria. In this respect, the discovery of the unique para-cresolyl cobamide from the eubacterium Sporomusa ovata attracted attention. The unusual structure of this corrinoid was achieved by a biosynthesis proceeding via a novel and stereospecific activation mechanism of aromatic compounds. The corrinoid was detected both in the membrane fraction and in the soluble fraction of the cells. Methyltransfer is one of the probable functions of the para-cresolyl cobamide in Sporomusa.

  2. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds in hetero-complexes of biologically active aromatic molecules probed by the methods of vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, M. A.; Blyzniuk, Iu. N.; Bolbukh, T. V.; Shestopalova, A. V.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Maleev, V. Ya.

    2012-09-01

    By the methods of vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared and Raman) the investigation of the hetero-association of biologically active aromatic compounds: flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), ethidium bromide (EB) and proflavine (PRF) was performed in aqueous solutions. It was shown that between the functional groups (Cdbnd O and NH2) the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in the hetero-complexes FMN-EB and FMN-PRF, additionally stabilizing these structures. An estimation of the enthalpy of Н-bonding obtained from experimental shifts of carbonyl vibrational frequencies has shown that the H-bonds do not dominate in the magnitude of experimentally measured total enthalpy of the hetero-association reactions. The main stabilization is likely due to intermolecular interactions of the molecules in these complexes and their interaction with water environment.

  3. [Studies by means of 1H NMR spectroscopy of complex formation of aromatic biologically active compounds with antibiotic topotecan].

    PubMed

    Mosunov, A A; Kostiukov, V V; Evstigneev, M P

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of heteroassociation of antibiotic topotecan (TPT) with aromatic biologically active compounds (BAC): caffeine, mutagens ethidium bromide and proflavine, antibiotic daunomycin, vitamins flavin-mononucleotide and nicotinamide, has been carried out in the work using 1H NMR spectroscopy data. The equilibrium constants of heteroassociation and induced chemical shifts of the protons have been obtained in the complexes with BAC. It is found that the complex formation TPT-BAC has the nature of stacking of the chromophores, additionally stabilized in the case of proflavine by intermolecular hydrogen bond. Calculation of the basic components of the Gibbs free energy of the complexation reactions is carried out, and the factors which stabilize and destabilize the heterocomplexes of molecules are revealed.

  4. Simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas using activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Li, Wen-Kai; Hung, Ming-Jui

    2014-09-01

    Incineration flue gas contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The effects of SO2 concentration (0, 350, 750, and 1000 ppm), reaction temperature (160, 200, and 280 degrees C), and the type of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on the removal of SO2 and PAHs by ACFs were examined in this study. A fluidized bed incinerator was used to simulate practical incineration flue gas. It was found that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas could drastically decrease removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. The effect of rise in the reaction temperature from 160 to 280 degrees C on removal of PAHs was greater than that on SO2 removal at an SO2 concentration of 750 ppm. Among the three ACFs studied, ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and the tightest structure, was the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs when these gases coexisted in the incineration flue gas. Implications: Simultaneous adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incineration flue gas onto activated carbon fibers (ACFs) meant to devise a new technique showed that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas leads to a drastic decrease in removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. Reaction temperature had a greater influence on PAHs removal than on SO2 removal. ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and tightest structure among the three studied ACFs, was found to be the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs.

  5. DEPENDENCY OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIOACCUMULATION IN MYA ARENARIA ON BOTH WATER COLUMN AND SEDIMENT BED CHEMICAL ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by the filter-feeding soft-shell clam Mya arenaria was evaluated at three sites near Boston (MA, USA) by assessing the chemical activities of those hydrophobic organic compounds (H...

  6. Species difference among experimental rodents in the activity and induction of cytochrome P-450 isozymes for mutagenic activation of carcinogenic aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Degawa, M; Agatsuma, T; Hashimoto, Y

    1990-12-01

    The expressions of hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 isozymes in male rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs were studied comparatively with or without an ip injection of a cytochrome P-450 inducer. The activity and quantity of microsomal cytochrome P-450 isozymes were determined respectively by a bacterial mutation assay with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and immunochemical assays using monoclonal antibodies against rat cytochrome P-450 isozymes. 3-Methoxy-4-aminoazobenzene (3-MeO-AAB), 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole acetate (MeA alpha C) and 3-methylcholanthrene were used as cytochrome P-450 inducers, and 7 carcinogenic aromatic amines including 3-MeO-AAB and MeA alpha C were used as substrates for the mutation assay. By means of these assays, we examined the species differences among rodents in the activity and induction rate of hepatic cytochrome P-450 isozymes responsible for the mutagenic activation of carcinogenic aromatic amines.

  7. Activation of octopaminergic receptors by essential oil constituents isolated from aromatic plants: possible mode of action against insect pests.

    PubMed

    Kostyukovsky, Moshe; Rafaeli, Ada; Gileadi, Carina; Demchenko, Nataly; Shaaya, Eli

    2002-11-01

    As a result of screening a large number of essential oils from Israeli aromatic plants and their biologically active constituents, we isolated two oils with high activity against several stored-product insects. In this study the effect of these compounds on the acetylcholinesterase and the octopamine systems in insects was studied in order to elucidate their mode of action. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro was evident only at high concentrations (10(-3) M) and could not account effectively for the low-dose mortality for some stored-product insects observed in vivo. However, the essential oil constituents were found to cause a significant increase in the levels of the intracellular messenger, cyclic AMP of abdominal epidermal tissue in the model insect, Helicoverpa armigera Hübn. The effect was significant even at low, physiological concentrations (10(-8) M) when tested directly on abdominal epidermal tissue preparations in vitro. This intracellular response was found to resemble closely the significant increases in the levels of the cyclic AMP of abdominal epidermal tissue due to treatment with the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, octopamine. Subsequent treatment with the octopaminergic antagonist, phentolamine, effectively inhibited the cyclic AMP levels induced by essential oil treatment, indicating possible competitive activation of octopaminergic receptors by essential oil constituents.

  8. Activation of group IVC phospholipase A2 by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induces apoptosis of human coronary artery endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Sean M.; Elgayyar, Mona A.; Menn, Fu-Minn; Vulava, Vijay M.; McKay, Larry; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary; Tucker, Dawn E.; Leslie, Christina C.; Lu, Kim P.; Ramos, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in coal tar mixtures and tobacco sources, is considered a significant risk factor for the development of heart disease in humans. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of PAHs present at a Superfund site on human coronary artery endothelial cell (HCAEC) phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity and apoptosis. Extremely high levels of 12 out of 15 EPA high-priority PAHs were present in both the streambed and floodplain sediments at a site where an urban creek and its adjacent floodplain were extensively contaminated by PAHs and other coal tar compounds. Nine of the 12 compounds and a coal tar mixture (SRM 1597A) activated group IVC PLA2 in HCAECs, and activation of this enzyme was associated with histone fragmentation and poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Genetic silencing of group IVC PLA2 inhibited both 3H-fatty acid release and histone fragmentation by PAHs and SRM 1597A, indicating that individual PAHs and a coal tar mixture induce apoptosis of HCAECs via a mechanism that involves group IVC PLA2. Western blot analysis of aortas isolated from feral mice (Peromyscus leucopus) inhabiting the Superfund site showed increased PARP and caspase-3 cleavage when compared to reference mice. These data suggest that PAHs induce apoptosis of HCAECs via activation of group IVC PLA2. PMID:21132278

  9. Subway construction activity influence on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fine particles: Comparison with a background mountainous site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Li, Xuxu; Li, Qi; Yin, Yan; Li, Li; Chen, Kui; Liu, Dantong; Yuan, Liang; Pang, Xiaobing

    2015-07-01

    Intensive construction activities worsened the surrounding atmospheric environment in China. Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine particles (PM2.5) were collected at a subway construction site (SC) of Nanjing and compared with a regional background mountainous site (BM) to examine the influence of anthropogenic activities on concentrations, sources and health risks of PAHs. Average PAH concentrations at SC were higher than BM at a factor of about 5.9. All PAH species at SC were higher than BM, with the SC/BM ratios ranging from 1.3 (NaP) to 10.3 (BaP). PAH profiles differed for the two sites. The SC site had higher mass fractions of PAHs from coal combustion and vehicle emission, while the BM site held higher mass percentages of PAHs from long-range transported wood combustion and industrial activities. Lower temperature at BM may lead to the higher mass percentages of low ring PAHs. Coal combustion, traffic emissions and biomass burning were the common sources for PAHs at both SC and BM. Construction workers were exposed to higher BaPeq concentrations, nearly ten times of the background site and their lifetime cancer risk reached to 0.6 per 1,000,000 exposed worker, owing to the influence of coal combustion, vehicle emission and industrial activities at the surroundings of SC.

  10. Uptake and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in terrestrial springtails--studying bioconcentration kinetics and linking toxicity to chemical activity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Smith, Kilian Eric Christopher; Holmstrup, Martin; Mayer, Philipp

    2013-02-01

    Passive dosing applies a polymer loaded with test compound(s) to establish and maintain constant exposure in laboratory experiments. Passive dosing with the silicone poly(dimethylsiloxane) was used to control exposure of the terrestrial springtail Folsomia candida to six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bioconcentration and toxicity experiments. Folsomia candida could move freely on the PAH-loaded silicone, resulting in exposure via air and direct contact. The bioconcentration kinetics indicated efficient uptake of naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene through air and (near) equilibrium partitioning of these PAHs to lipids and possibly the waxy layer of the springtail cuticle. Toxicities of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene were related to chemical activity, which quantifies the energetic level and drives spontaneous processes including diffusive biouptake. Chemical activity-response relationships yielded effective lethal chemical activities (La50s) well within the expected range for baseline toxicity (0.01-0.1). Effective lethal body burdens for naphthalene and pyrene exceeded the expected range of 2 to 8 mmol kg(-1) fresh weight, which again indicated the waxy layer to be a sorbing phase. Finally, chemical activities were converted into equilibrium partitioning concentrations in lipids yielding effective lethal concentrations for naphthalene and phenanthrene in good correspondence with the lethal membrane burden for baseline toxicity (40-160 mmol kg(-1) lipid). Passive dosing was a practical approach for tightly controlling PAH exposure, which in turn provided new experimental possibilities and findings.

  11. The Luminous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features: Applications to High Redshift Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Heath; Papovich, Casey

    2015-08-01

    We provide a new robust star-formation rate (SFR) calibration using the luminosity from polycyclic aromatic hydrogen (PAH) molecules. The PAH features emit strongly in the mid-infrared (mid-IR; 3-19μm), mitigating dust extinction, and they are very luminous, containing 5-10% of the total IR luminosity in galaxies. We derive the calibration of the PAH luminosity as a SFR indicator using a sample of 105 star-forming galaxies covering a range of total IR luminosity, LIR = L(8-1000μm) = 109 - 1012 L⊙ and redshift 0 < z < 0.6. The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the dust-corrected Hα luminosity (using the sum of the Hα and rest-frame 24μm luminosity from Kennicutt et al. 2009), with tight scatter of ~0.15 dex, comparable to the scatter in the dust-corrected Hα SFRs and Paα SFRs. We show this relation is sensitive to galaxy metallicity, where the PAH luminosity of galaxies with Z < 0.7 Z⊙ departs from the linear SFR relationship but in a behaved manor. We derive for this a correction to galaxies below solar metallicity. As a case study for observations with JWST, we apply the PAH SFR calibration to a sample of lensed galaxies at 1 < z < 3 with Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) data, and we demonstrate the utility of PAHs to derive SFRs as accurate as those available from any other indicator. This new SFR indicator will be useful for probing the peak of the SFR density of the universe (1 < z < 3) and for studying the coevolution of star-formation and supermassive blackhole accretion contemporaneously in a galaxy.

  12. Therapeutic agents with dramatic antiretroviral activity and little toxicity at effective doses: aromatic polycyclic diones hypericin and pseudohypericin.

    PubMed Central

    Meruelo, D; Lavie, G; Lavie, D

    1988-01-01

    Two aromatic polycyclic diones hypericin and pseudohypericin have potent antiretroviral activity; these substances occur in plants of the Hypericum family. Both compounds are highly effective in preventing viral-induced manifestations that follow infections with a variety of retroviruses in vivo and in vitro. Pseudohypericin and hypericin probably interfere with viral infection and/or spread by direct inactivation of the virus or by preventing virus shedding, budding, or assembly at the cell membrane. These compounds have no apparent activity against the transcription, translation, or transport of viral proteins to the cell membrane and also no direct effect on the polymerase. This property distinguishes their mode of action from that of the major antiretro-virus group of nucleoside analogues. Hypericin and pseudohypericin have low in vitro cytotoxic activity at concentrations sufficient to produce dramatic antiviral effects in murine tissue culture model systems that use radiation leukemia and Friend viruses. Administration of these compounds to mice at the low doses sufficient to prevent retroviral-induced disease appears devoid of undesirable side effects. This lack of toxicity at therapeutic doses extends to humans, as these compounds have been tested in patients as antidepressants with apparent salutary effects. Our observations to date suggest that pseudohypericin and hypericin could become therapeutic tools against retroviral-induced diseases such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Images PMID:2839837

  13. Crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal via clay-microbe-oil interactions: Effect of acid activated clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Fialips, Claire I

    2017-03-09

    Acid treatment of clay minerals is known to modify their properties such as increase their surface area and surface acidity, making them suitable as catalysts in many chemical processes. However, the role of these surface properties during biodegradation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is only known for mild acid (0.5 M Hydrochloric acid) treated clays. Four different clay minerals were used for this study: a montmorillonite, a saponite, a palygorskite and a kaolinite. They were treated with 3 M hydrochloric acid to produce acid activated clay minerals. The role of the acid activated montmorillonite, saponite, palygorskite and kaolinite in comparison with the unmodified clay minerals in the removal of PAHs during biodegradation was investigated in microcosm experiments. The microcosm experiments contained micro-organisms, oil, and clays in aqueous medium with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community predominantly composed of Alcanivorax spp. Obtained results indicated that acid activated clays and unmodified kaolinite did not enhance the biodegradation of the PAHs whereas unmodified montmorillonite, palygorskite and saponite enhanced their biodegradation. In addition, unmodified palygorskite adsorbed the PAHs significantly due to its unique channel structure.

  14. The Luminous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features: Applications to High Redshift Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Heath V.

    2016-01-01

    For decades, significant work has been applied to calibrating emission from the ultra-violet, nebular emission lines, far-infrared, X-ray and radio as tracers of the star-formation rate (SFR) in distant galaxies. Understanding the exact rate of star-formation and how it evolves with time and galaxy mass has deep implications for how galaxies form. The co-evolution of star-formation and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion is one of the key problems in galaxy formation theory. But, many of these SFR indicators are influenced by SMBH accretion in galaxies and result in unreliable SFRs. Utilizing the luminous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, I provide a new robust SFR calibration using the luminosity emitted from the PAHs at 6.2μm, 7.7μm and 11.3μm to solve this. The PAH features emit strongly in the mid-infrared (mid-IR; 5-25μm) mitigating dust extinction, containing on average 5-10% of the total IR luminosity in galaxies. I use a sample of 105 star-forming galaxies covering a range of total IR luminosity, LIR = L(8-1000μm) = 109 - 1012 L⊙ and redshift 0 < z < 0.4, with mid-IR spectroscopy from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), and data covering other SFR indicators (Hα emission and rest-frame 24μm continuum emission). The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the Hα luminosity (corrected for attenuation using the mono-chromatic rest-frame 24μm emission), with a tight scatter of <0.15 dex. The scatter is comparable to that between SFRs derived from the Paα and dust-corrected Hα emission lines. We present a case study in advance of JWST, which will be capable of measuring SFRs (from 8μm rest-frame photometry, i.e. PAHs) in distant galaxies (z ≤ 2) with JWST/MIRI to SFRs as low as ~10 M⊙yr-1, because the PAH features are so bright. We use Spitzer/IRS observations of PAH features in lensed star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 3 to demonstrate the utility of the PAHs to derive SFRs that agree with

  15. A critical evaluation of magnetic activated carbon's potential for the remediation of sediment impacted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhantao; Sani, Badruddeen; Akkanen, Jarkko; Abel, Sebastian; Nybom, Inna; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Werner, David

    2015-04-09

    Addition of activated carbon (AC) or biochar (BC) to sediment to reduce the chemical and biological availability of organic contaminants is a promising in-situ remediation technology. But concerns about leaving the adsorbed pollutants in place motivate research into sorbent recovery methods. This study explores the use of magnetic sorbents. A coal-based magnetic activated carbon (MAC) was identified as the strongest of four AC and BC derived magnetic sorbents for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remediation. An 8.1% MAC amendment (w/w, equal to 5% AC content) was found to be as effective as 5% (w/w) pristine AC in reducing aqueous PAHs within three months by 98%. MAC recovery from sediment after three months was 77%, and incomplete MAC recovery had both, positive and negative effects. A slight rebound of aqueous PAH concentrations was observed following the MAC recovery, but aqueous PAH concentrations then dropped again after six months, likely due to the presence of the 23% unrecovered MAC. On the other hand, the 77% recovery of the 8.1% MAC dose was insufficient to reduce ecotoxic effects of fine grained AC or MAC amendment on the egestion rate, growth and reproduction of the AC sensitive species Lumbriculus variegatus.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced CYP1B1 activity is suppressed by perillyl alcohol in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Nelson L.S.; Wang Huan; Wang Yun; Leung, H.Y.; Leung, Lai K. . E-mail: laikleung@yahoo.com

    2006-06-01

    Perillyl alcohol (POH) is a dietary monoterpene with potential applications in chemoprevention and chemotherapy. Although clinical trials are under way, POH's physiological and pharmacological properties are still unclear. In the present study, the effect of POH on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced genotoxicity, and the related expression were examined in MCF-7 cells. Exposure to environmental toxicant increases the risk of cancer. Many of these compounds are pro-carcinogens and are biotransformed into their ultimate genotoxic structures by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. CYP1A1 and 1B1 are enzymes that catalyze the biotransformation of dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Our data revealed that 0.5 {mu}M of POH was effective in blocking DMBA-DNA binding. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay indicated that the administration of POH inhibited the DMBA-induced enzyme activity in MCF-7 cells. Enzyme kinetic analysis revealed that POH inhibited CYP1B1 but not CYP1A1 activity. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay also demonstrated that the monoterpene reduced CYP1B1 mRNA abundance induced by DMBA. The present study illustrated that POH might inhibit and downregulate CYP1B1, which could protect against PAH-induced carcinogenesis.

  17. Metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Jian-Yuan

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this research was to use metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers (ACFs) to remove 16 species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incineration flue gas. We tested three different metal loadings (0.11 wt%, 0.29 wt%, and 0.34 wt%) and metals (Pt, Pd, and Cu), and two different pretreatment solutions (HNO(3) and NaOH). The results demonstrated that the ACF-supported metal catalysts removed the PAHs through adsorption and catalysis. Among the three metals, Pt was most easily adsorbed on the ACFs and was the most active in oxidation of PAHs. The mesopore volumes and density of new functional groups increased significantly after the ACFs were pretreated with either solutions, and this increased the measured metal loading in HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. These data confirm that improved PAH removal can be achieved with HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs.

  18. Enantio-selective optrode for optical isomers of biologically active amines using a new lipophilic aromatic carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huarui; Uray, Georg; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    1991-09-01

    This paper presents a method for optically sensing enantiomers (optical isomers) of biological amines such as norephedrine, and drugs such as the (Beta) -blocker propranolol. It is based on the use of a new lipophilic aromatic ammonium ion carrier (DODD) and a highly fluorescent lipophilic proton carrier (DZ 49) dissolved in a pvc membrane. Recognition of one of the enantiomers is accomplished by specific interaction of the amine with the optically active lipophilic substrate in a pvc membrane. The amine, which is present as an ammonium ion at physiological pH, is carried into the pvc membranes. Simultaneously, a proton is released from the proton carrier (a lipophilic xanthene dye) that thereby undergoes a change in both color and fluorescence intensity. The sensors respond to three analytes in the concentration range from 0.01 to 10 mM for propranolol, 0.3 to 100 mM for norephedrine, and 1 to 100 mM for 1-phenylethylamine. The selectivity coefficients (Kopt) are 0.8, 0.7, and 0.8 for propranolol, norephedrine,a nd 1-phenylethylamine, respectively. It is of potential utility for specifically recognizing one out of several isomers, in particular bioactive amines, where one form usually is active only. The carrier showed stronger affinity for compounds which contain naphthyl rather than phenyl substituents.

  19. Mutagenic activation of aromatic amines by molluscs as a biomarker of marine pollution.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Méndez, F M; Rodríguez-Ariza, A; Usero-García, J; Pueyo, C; López-Barea, J

    1998-01-01

    Mutagenic activation of arylamines by mollusc S9 fractions was evaluated as a biomarker for marine pollution. Two bivalve species were used as bioindicators, the common mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the striped venus (Chameleo gallina). A strain of Salmonella typhimurium overproducing O-acetyltransferase was used as indicator of mutagenicity. Mussels from an area of the North Atlantic Spanish zone that was exposed to an accidental crude oil spill were compared to bivalves from a reference area. C. gallina samples were from low polluted and highly polluted areas of the South Atlantic Spanish littoral. The promutagen 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) was activated to mutagenic derivative(s) by S9 fractions from both C. gallina and M. edulis. Animals from contaminated sites showed higher arylamine activation capabilities than reference animals. This was further correlated with the mutagenic activities of corresponding cyclopentone-dichloromethane animal extracts. 2-AA activation by mollusc S9 was potentiated by alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), known to inhibit PAH-inducible CYP1A cytochromes from vertebrates, but inhibited by methimazole (MZ), a substrate of the flavin monooxygenase (FMO) system. 2-AA-activating enzymes were mainly cytosolic; this localization clearly suggests that such activity could be attributed to soluble enzymes, different from the CYP1A or FMO systems. In conclusion, mutagenic activation of arylamines by mollusc S9, using as indicator a strain of Salmonella typhimurium that overproduces O-acetyltransferase, could be a reliable biomarker for marine pollution.

  20. Aromatic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  1. Spectral Response and Diagnostics of Biological Activity of Hydroxyl-Containing Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Mayer, G. V.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.

    2016-08-01

    Using IR Fourier spectra and employing quantum-chemical calculations of electronic structure, spectra, and proton-acceptor properties, synthetic derivatives of aminophenol exhibiting biological activity in the suppression of herpes, influenza, and HIV viruses have been investigated from a new perspective, with the aim of establishing the spectral response of biological activity of the molecules. It has been experimentally established that the participation of the aminophenol hydroxyl group in intramolecular hydrogen bonds is characteristic of structures with antiviral properties. A quantum-chemical calculation of the proton-acceptor ability of the investigated aminophenol derivatives has shown that biologically active structures are characterized by a high proton-acceptor ability of oxygen of the hydroxyl group. A correlation that has been obtained among the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond, high proton-acceptor ability, and antiviral activity of substituted aminophenols enables us to predict the pharmacological properties of new medical preparations of the given class of compounds.

  2. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    Sharopov, Farukh; Braun, Markus Santhosh; Gulmurodov, Isomiddin; Khalifaev, Davlat; Isupov, Salomiddin; Wink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oils of 18 plant species from Tajikistan (Central Asia) were investigated. The essential oil of Origanum tyttanthum showed a strong antibacterial activity with both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 312.5 µg/mL for E. coli, 625 µg/mL (MIC) and 1250 µg/mL (MBC) for MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), respectively. The essential oil of Galagania fragrantissima was highly active against MRSA at concentrations as low as 39.1 µg/mL and 78.2 µg/mL for MIC and MBC, respectively. Origanum tyttanthum essential oil showed the highest antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 0.12 mg/mL for ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and 0.28 mg/mL for DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). Galagania fragrantissima and Origanum tyttanthum essential oils showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity; IC50 values of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibition were 7.34 and 14.78 µg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, essential oils of Origanum tyttanthum and Galagania fragrantissima exhibit substantial antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. They are interesting candidates in phytotherapy. PMID:28231227

  3. Volatile profiling of aromatic traditional medicinal plant, Polygonum minus in different tissues and its biological activities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rafidah; Baharum, Syarul Nataqain; Bunawan, Hamidun; Lee, Minki; Mohd Noor, Normah; Rohani, Emelda Roseleena; Ilias, Norashikin; Zin, Noraziah Mohamad

    2014-11-20

    The aim of this research was to identify the volatile metabolites produced in different organs (leaves, stem and roots) of Polygonum minus, an important essential oil producing crop in Malaysia. Two methods of extraction have been applied: Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) and hydrodistillation coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Approximately, 77 metabolites have been identified and aliphatic compounds contribute significantly towards the aroma and flavour of this plant. Two main aliphatic compounds: decanal and dodecanal were found to be the major contributor. Terpenoid metabolites were identified abundantly in leaves but not in the stem and root of this plant. Further studies on antioxidant, total phenolic content, anticholinesterase and antimicrobial activities were determined in the essential oil and five different extracts. The plant showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity in polar (ethanol) extract for all the tissues tested. For anti-acetylcholinesterase activity, leaf in aqueous extract and methanol extract showed the best acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities. However, in microbial activity, the non-polar extracts (n-hexane) showed high antimicrobial activity against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) compared to polar extracts. This study could provide the first step in the phytochemical profiles of volatile compounds and explore the additional value of pharmacology properties of this essential oil producing crop Polygonum minus.

  4. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong-Su; Keum, Young-Soo; Li, Qing X.

    2009-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms. PMID:19440284

  5. The bioflavonoid galangin blocks aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced pre-B cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Quadri, S A; Qadri, A N; Hahn, M E; Mann, K K; Sherr, D H

    2000-09-01

    Bioflavonoids are plant compounds touted for their potential to treat or prevent several diseases including cancers induced by common environmental chemicals. Much of the biologic activity of one such class of pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), is mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor/transcription factor (AhR). For example, the AhR regulates PAH immunotoxicity that manifests as pre-B cell apoptosis in models of B cell development. Because bioflavonoids block PAH-induced cell transformation and are structurally similar to AhR ligands, it was postulated that some of them would suppress PAH-induced, AhR-dependent immunotoxicity, possibly through a direct AhR blockade. This hypothesis was tested using a model of B cell development in which pre-B cells are cultured with and are dependent on bone marrow stromal or hepatic parenchymal cell monolayers. Of seven bioflavonoids screened, galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone) blocked PAH-induced but not C(2)-ceramide- or H(2)O(2)-induced pre-B cell apoptosis. Because galangin blocked AhR-dependent reporter gene expression, AhR complex-DNA binding, and AhR nuclear translocation, inhibition of a relatively early step in AhR signaling was implicated. This hypothesis was supported by the ability of galangin to bind the AhR and stabilize AhR-90-kDa heat shock protein complexes in the presence of AhR agonists. These studies demonstrate the utility of pre-B cell culture systems in identifying compounds capable of blocking PAH immunotoxicity, define at least one mechanism of galangin activity (i.e., repression of AhR activation), and motivate the use of this and similar dietary bioflavonoids as relatively nontoxic inhibitors of AhR agonist activity and as pharmacologic agents with which to dissect AhR signaling pathways.

  6. A family 13 thioesterase isolated from an activated sludge metagenome: Insights into aromatic compounds metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyez, Ayixon; Batista-García, Ramón Alberto; Valdés-García, Gilberto; Ortiz, Ernesto; Perezgasga, Lucía; Zárate-Romero, Andrés; Pastor, Nina; Folch-Mallol, Jorge Luis

    2017-03-09

    Activated sludge is produced during the treatment of sewage and industrial wastewaters. Its diverse chemical composition allows growth of a large collection of microbial phylotypes with very different physiologic and metabolic profiles. Thus, activated sludge is considered as an excellent environment to discover novel enzymes through functional metagenomics, especially activities related with degradation of environmental pollutants. Metagenomic DNA was isolated and purified from an activated sludge sample. Metagenomic libraries were subsequently constructed in Escherichia coli. Using tributyrin hydrolysis, a screening by functional analysis was conducted and a clone that showed esterase activity was isolated. Blastx analysis of the sequence of the cloned DNA revealed, among others, an ORF that encodes a putative thioesterase with 47-64% identity to GenBank CDS reported genes, similar to those in the hotdog fold thioesterase superfamily. On the basis of its amino acid similarity and its homology-modelled structure we deduced that this gene encodes an enzyme (ThYest_ar) that belongs to family TE13, with a preference for aryl-CoA substrates and a novel catalytic residue constellation. Plasmid retransformation in E. coli confirmed the clone's phenotype, and functional complementation of a paaI E. coli mutant showed preference for phenylacetate over chlorobenzene as a carbon source. This work suggests a role for TE13 family thioesterases in swimming and degradation approaches for phenyl acetic acid. Proteins 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated microbial activity in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingming; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Zhengao; Teng, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a widespread environmental problem and the remediation of PAHs from these areas has been a major concern. The effectiveness of many in situ bioremediation systems may be constrained by low contaminant bioavailability due to limited aqueous solubility or a large magnitude of sorption. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) on bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 of an aged PAH-contaminated soil. When 10% (W/W) MCD amendment was combined with bioaugmentation by the PAH-degrading bacterium Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2, the percentage degradation of total PAHs was significantly enhanced up to 34.8%. Higher counts of culturable PAH-degrading bacteria and higher soil dehydrogenase and soil polyphenol oxidase activities were observed in 10% (W/W) MCD-assisted bioaugmentation soil. This MCD-assisted bioaugmentation strategy showed significant increases (p < 0.05) in the average well color development (AWCD) obtained by the BIOLOG Eco plate assay, Shannon-Weaver index (H) and Simpson index (lambda) compared with the controls, implying that this strategy at least partially restored the microbiological functioning of the PAH-contaminated soil. The results suggest that MCD-aided bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2 may be a promising practical bioremediation strategy for aged PAH-contaminated soils.

  8. Prenatal Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon, Adiposity, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) γ Methylation in Offspring, Grand-Offspring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhonghai; Zhang, Hanjie; Maher, Christina; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio; Champagne, Frances A.; Wu, Licheng; McDonald, Jacob D.; Yan, Beizhan; Schwartz, Gary J.; Miller, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Greater levels of prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) have been associated with childhood obesity in epidemiological studies. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Objectives We hypothesized that prenatal PAH over-exposure during gestation would lead to weight gain and increased fat mass in offspring and grand-offspring mice. Further, we hypothesized that altered adipose gene expression and DNA methylation in genes important to adipocyte differentiation would be affected. Materials and Methods Pregnant dams were exposed to a nebulized PAH mixture versus negative control aerosol 5 days a week, for 3 weeks. Body weight was recorded from postnatal day (PND) 21 through PND60. Body composition, adipose cell size, gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) α, cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and adiponectin, and DNA methylation of PPAR γ, were assayed in both the offspring and grand-offspring adipose tissue. Findings Offspring of dams exposed to greater PAH during gestation had increased weight, fat mass, as well as higher gene expression of PPAR γ, C/EBP α, Cox2, FAS and adiponectin and lower DNA methylation of PPAR γ. Similar differences in phenotype and DNA methylation extended through the grand-offspring mice. Conclusions Greater prenatal PAH exposure was associated with increased weight, fat mass, adipose gene expression and epigenetic changes in progeny. PMID:25347678

  9. Aromatic amino acid mutagenesis at the substrate binding pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Lip2 affects its activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guilong; Liu, Zimin; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2014-01-01

    The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2) is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100) with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F) were created. The enzymatic properties of the mutant lipases were detected and compared with the wild-type. The activities of mutant enzymes dropped to some extent towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPC16) and their optimum temperature was 35°C, which was 5°C lower than that of the wild-type. However, the thermostability of I100F increased 22.44% after incubation for 1 h at 40°C and its optimum substrate shifted from p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNPC12) to p-nitrophenyl caprate (pNPC10). The above results demonstrated that the two substituted amino acid residuals have close relationship with such enzymatic properties as thermostability and substrate selectivity.

  10. Purification of Pseudomonas putida acyl coenzyme A ligase active with a range of aliphatic and aromatic substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valverde, M; Reglero, A; Martinez-Blanco, H; Luengo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) ligase (acyl-CoA synthetase [ACoAS]) from Pseudomonas putida U was purified to homogeneity (252-fold) after this bacterium was grown in a chemically defined medium containing octanoic acid as the sole carbon source. The enzyme, which has a mass of 67 kDa, showed maximal activity at 40 degrees C in 10 mM K2PO4H-NaPO4H2 buffer (pH 7.0) containing 20% (wt/vol) glycerol. Under these conditions, ACoAS showed hyperbolic behavior against acetate, CoA, and ATP; the Kms calculated for these substrates were 4.0, 0.7, and 5.2 mM, respectively. Acyl-CoA ligase recognizes several aliphatic molecules (acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, hexanoic, heptanoic, and octanoic acids) as substrates, as well as some aromatic compounds (phenylacetic and phenoxyacetic acids). The broad substrate specificity of ACoAS from P. putida was confirmed by coupling it with acyl-CoA:6-aminopenicillanic acid acyltransferase from Penicillium chrysogenum to study the formation of several penicillins. Images PMID:8476289

  11. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  12. Activation of Ca2+ uptake and inhibition of reversal of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump by aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Petretski, J H; Wolosker, H; de Meis, L

    1989-12-05

    The effects of aromatic compounds in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase were investigated. The solubility of the drugs in various organic solvents and water was measured. The ratio between the solubility in organic solvents and that in water (distribution coefficient) was used as an index of their hydrophobicity. The order found was triphenylphosphine greater than diphenylamine greater than 3-nitrophenol greater than 4-nitrophenol greater than 1,3-dihydroxybenzene. The effects observed on the Ca2+-ATPase were correlated with hydrophobicity of the drugs, activation and inhibition being obtained at a lower concentration the greater the distribution coefficient of the drug into organic solvent. In leaky vesicles, the effects of each compound on the ATPase activity varied depending on the Ca2+ concentration in the medium: it inhibited in the presence of 5 microM Ca2+ and activated when the Ca2+ concentration was raised to 2 mM. In intact vesicles, 3- and 4-nitrophenol, diphenylamine, and triphenylphosphine enhanced both the rate of ATP hydrolysis and the amount of Ca2+ accumulated by the vesicles. These four drugs inhibited Ca2+ uptake when ITP was used as substrate. 1,3-Dihydroxybenzene enhanced the amount of Ca2+ accumulated by the vesicles regardless of whether ATP or ITP was the substrate. All five compounds inhibited the phosphorylation of the enzyme by Pi, the efflux of Ca2+, and the synthesis of ATP measured during the reversal of the Ca2+ pump. The results indicate that the hydrophobic character of various organic compounds determines their access to sensitive domains of the membrane-bound calcium pump. Additional specific effects are then produced, depending on the structure of each compound.

  13. Exploring the Influence of the Aromaticity on the Anticancer and Antivascular Activities of Organoplatinum(II) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Ana; Pérez, Sergio A; Rothemund, Matthias; Rodríguez, Venancio; Schobert, Rainer; Janiak, Christoph; Ruiz, José

    2017-03-09

    A series of new organometallic Pt(II) complexes of the type [Pt(C^N)Cl(DMSO)] (C^N=N,N-dimethyl-1-(2-aryl)methanamine-κ(2) C2,N; aryl=phenyl 2 a, biphenyl 2 b, p-terphenyl 2 c, naphthyl 2 d, anthracenyl 2 e, or pyrenyl 2 f) have been synthesized to explore the influence of the aromaticity on their anticancer activity. The best performers, 2 b and d, are more active than cisplatin (CDDP) in epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells A2780, with 2 d having a higher selectivity factor than CDDP in all the tested cell lines. In addition, all the new compounds overcome the acquired resistance in A2780cisR cells and interestingly, show low micromolar IC50 values towards the triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the highly metastatic 518A2 melanoma cells. This study shows that the hydrophobicity, accumulation into cells, and metal levels on nuclear DNA for the complexes are consistent with their cytotoxicity. Complexes 2 b and d induce apoptosis in a caspase-independent manner and suppress the intracellular ROS generation without modifying the mitochondria membrane potential. In addition, 2 a-f effectively inhibit angiogenesis in the endothelial cell line EA.hy926 at sub-cytotoxic concentrations and 2 b and d show in vivo antivascular effects on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of fertilized SPF-eggs (SPF=specific-pathogen-free). Inhibition of tubulin polymerization and degeneration of cytoskeleton organization in 518A2 melanoma cells are presented as a preliminary mechanism of its antimetastatic activity.

  14. Enhanced Activity of Supported Ni Catalysts Promoted by Pt for Rapid Reduction of Aromatic Nitro Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huishan; Pan, Kecheng; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Bing; Xiang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    To improve the activities of non-noble metal catalysts is highly desirable and valuable to the reduced use of noble metal resources. In this work, the supported nickel (Ni) and nickel-platinum (NiPt) nanocatalysts were derived from a layered double hydroxide/carbon composite precursor. The catalysts were characterized and the role of Pt was analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The Ni2+ was reduced to metallic Ni0 via a self-reduction way utilizing the carbon as a reducing agent. The average sizes of the Ni particles in the NiPt catalysts were smaller than that in the supported Ni catalyst. The electronic structure of Ni was affected by the incorporation of Pt. The optimal NiPt catalysts exhibited remarkably improved activity toward the reduction of nitrophenol, which has an apparent rate constant (Ka) of 18.82 × 10−3 s−1, 6.2 times larger than that of Ni catalyst and also larger than most of the reported values of noble-metal and bimetallic catalysts. The enhanced activity could be ascribed to the modification to the electronic structure of Ni by Pt and the effect of exposed crystal planes. PMID:28335231

  15. Adsorption of aromatic organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets: comparison with carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Apul, Onur Guven; Wang, Qiliang; Zhou, Yang; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-03-15

    Adsorption of two synthetic organic compounds (SOCs; phenanthrene and biphenyl) by two pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and one graphene oxide (GO) was examined and compared with those of a coal base activated carbon (HD4000), a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), and a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in distilled and deionized water and in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). Graphenes exhibited comparable or better adsorption capacities than carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and granular activated carbon (GAC) in the presence of NOM. The presence of NOM reduced the SOC uptake of all adsorbents. However, the impact of NOM on the SOC adsorption was smaller on graphenes than CNTs and activated carbons. Furthermore, the SOC with its flexible molecular structure was less impacted from NOM preloading than the SOC with planar and rigid molecular structure. The results indicated that graphenes can serve as alternative adsorbents for removing SOCs from water. However, they will also, if released to environment, adsorb organic contaminants influencing their fate and impact in the environment.

  16. Enhanced Activity of Supported Ni Catalysts Promoted by Pt for Rapid Reduction of Aromatic Nitro Compounds.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huishan; Pan, Kecheng; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Bing; Xiang, Xu

    2016-06-04

    To improve the activities of non-noble metal catalysts is highly desirable and valuable to the reduced use of noble metal resources. In this work, the supported nickel (Ni) and nickel-platinum (NiPt) nanocatalysts were derived from a layered double hydroxide/carbon composite precursor. The catalysts were characterized and the role of Pt was analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The Ni(2+) was reduced to metallic Ni⁰ via a self-reduction way utilizing the carbon as a reducing agent. The average sizes of the Ni particles in the NiPt catalysts were smaller than that in the supported Ni catalyst. The electronic structure of Ni was affected by the incorporation of Pt. The optimal NiPt catalysts exhibited remarkably improved activity toward the reduction of nitrophenol, which has an apparent rate constant (Ka) of 18.82 × 10(-3) s(-1), 6.2 times larger than that of Ni catalyst and also larger than most of the reported values of noble-metal and bimetallic catalysts. The enhanced activity could be ascribed to the modification to the electronic structure of Ni by Pt and the effect of exposed crystal planes.

  17. Anti-plasmodial and insecticidal activities of the essential oils of aromatic plants growing in the Mediterranean area

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sardinia is a Mediterranean area endemic for malaria up to the last century. During a screening study to evaluate the anti-plasmodial activity of some aromatic plants traditionally used in Sardinia, Myrtus communis (myrtle, Myrtaceae), Satureja thymbra (savory, Lamiaceae), and Thymus herba-barona (caraway thyme, Lamiaceae) were collected in three vegetative periods: before, during and after flowering. Methods The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation, fractionated by silica gel column chromatography and analysed by GC-FID-MS. Total oil and three main fractions were tested on D10 and W2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. Larvicidal and adulticidal activities were tested on Anopheles gambiae susceptible strains. Results The essential oil of savory, rich in thymol, was the most effective against P. falciparum with an inhibitory activity independent from the time of collection (IC50 17–26 μg/ml on D10 and 9–11 μg/ml on W2). Upon fractionation, fraction 1 was enriched in mono-sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbons; fraction 2 in thymol (73-83%); and fraction 3 contained thymol, carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol, with a different composition depending on the time of collection. Thymol-enriched fractions were the most active on both strains (IC50 20–22 μg/ml on D10 and 8–10 μg/ml on W2) and thymol was confirmed as mainly responsible for this activity (IC50 19.7± 3.0 and 10.6 ± 2.0 μg/ml on D10 and W2, respectively). The essential oil of S. thymbra L. showed also larvicidal and adulticidal activities. The larvicidal activity, expressed as LC50, was 0.15 ± 0.002; 0.21 ± 0.13; and 0.15 ± 0.09 μg/ml (mean ± sd) depending on the time of collection: before, during and after flowering, respectively. Conclusions This study provides evidence for the use of essential oils for treating malaria and fighting the vector at both the larval and adult stages. These findings open the possibility for further investigation aimed at

  18. Antimicrobial Activity and Chemical Composition of Three Essential Oils Extracted from Mediterranean Aromatic Plants.

    PubMed

    Elshafie, Hazem S; Sakr, Shimaa; Mang, Stefania M; Belviso, Sandra; De Feo, Vincenzo; Camele, Ippolito

    2016-11-01

    There is a growing interest in essential oils (EOs) as possible alternatives for traditional chemical pesticides. This study was carried out to characterize the chemical composition of the three EOs extracted from Verbena officinalis, Majorana hortensis, and Salvia officinalis using gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and to evaluate in vitro their efficacy against some phyto or human pathogens. The antifungal activity was investigated against Colletotrichum acutatum and Botrytis cinerea in comparison with Azoxystrobin as a large spectrum fungicide. Antibacterial activity was evaluated against Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus mojavensis, and Clavibacter michiganensis (G+ve) and Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas campestris, Pseudomonas savastanoi, and P. syringae pv. phaseolicola (G-ve) compared to a synthetic antibiotic tetracycline. Minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated against the above tested fungi using 96-well microplate method. Results showed that the chemical structure of the three studied EOs was mainly composed of monoterpene compounds and all oils belong to the chemotype carvacrol/thymol. Results of GC analysis identified 64 compounds, which were identified based on their mass to charge ratio. Furthermore, the different concentrations of studied EOs inhibited the growth of tested microorganism in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. Effect of cyclic aromatics on sodium active transport in frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Blankemeyer, J.T.; Bowerman, M.C. )

    1993-01-01

    A modified glass Ussing-chamber was used to mount the skin. The electrical potential difference (PD) was measured by two 3% agar-frog Ringer's bridges. Current (i.e. short-circuit current, or ISC) was passed by Ag-AgCl electrodes placed so that current density was uniform across the skin. Ringer's solution, bathing each side of the frog skin, was stirred and aerated by gas-lift pumps. The effect of toxicants on the ISC was determined by using the 15 min prior to toxicant administration as a control period, then calculating the change in ISC during the toxicant period as a percent of the control ISC. Phenol and benzene are components of crude oil and crude oil waste. These hydrocarbons and phenanthrene were tested for their effect on frog skin. The results show that the effect of organics on sodium active transport of an epithelium is to alter the active transport of sodium ions. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using Bacillus subtilis CotA with high laccase activity and copper independence.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jun; Zhu, Qinghe; Wu, Yucheng; Lin, Xiangui

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial laccase CueO from Escherichia coli can oxidize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); however, its application in the remediation of PAH-contaminated soil mainly suffers from a low oxidation rate and copper dependence. It was reported that a laccase with a higher redox potential tended to have a higher oxidation rate; thus, the present study investigated the oxidation of PAHs using another bacterial laccase CotA from Bacillus subtilis with a higher redox potential (525 mV) than CueO (440 mV). Recombinant CotA was overexpressed in E. coli and partially purified, exhibiting a higher laccase-specific activity than CueO over a broad pH and temperature range. CotA exhibited moderate thermostability at high temperatures. CotA oxidized PAHs in the absence of exogenous copper. Thereby, secondary heavy metal pollution can be avoided, another advantage of CotA over CueO. Moreover, this study also evaluated some unexplained phenomena in our previous study. It was observed that the oxidation of PAHs with bacterial laccases can be promoted by copper. The partially purified bacterial laccase oxidized only two of the 15 tested PAHs, i.e., anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene, indicating the presence of natural redox mediators in crude cell extracts. Overall, the recombinant CotA oxidizes PAHs with high laccase activity and copper independence, indicating that CotA is a better candidate for the remediation of PAHs than CueO. Besides, the findings here provide a better understanding of the oxidation of PAHs using bacterial laccases.

  1. Phytochemical profiles and antimicrobial activity of aromatic Malaysian herb extracts against food-borne pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Aziman, Nurain; Abdullah, Noriham; Noor, Zainon Mohd; Kamarudin, Wan Saidatul Syida Wan; Zulkifli, Khairusy Syakirah

    2014-04-01

    Preliminary phytochemical and flavonoid compounds of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of 6 aromatic Malaysian herbs were screened and quantified using Reverse-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC). The herbal extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against 10 food-borne pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms using disk diffusion assay. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)/minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of herbal extracts were determined. In the phytochemical screening process, both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. hydropiper exhibited presence of all 7 tested phytochemical compounds. Among all herbal extracts, the aqueous P. hydropiper and E. elatior extracts demonstrated the highest antibacterial activity against 7 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with diameter ranging from 7.0 to 18.5 mm and 6.5 to 19 mm, respectively. The MIC values for aqueous and ethanolic extracts ranged from 18.75 to 175 mg/mL and 0.391 to 200 mg/mL, respectively while the MBC/MFC values for aqueous and ethanolic extracts ranged from 25 to 200 mg/mL and 3.125 to 50 mg/mL, respectively. Major types of bioactive compounds in aqueous P. hydropiper and E. elatior extracts were identified using RP-HPLC instrument. Flavonoids found in these plants were epi-catechin, quercetin, and kaempferol. The ability of aqueous Persicaria hydropiper (L.) H. Gross and Etlingera elatior (Jack) R.M. Sm. extracts to inhibit the growth of bacteria is an indication of its broad spectrum antimicrobial potential. Hence these herbal extracts may be used as natural preservative to improve the safety and shelf-life of food and pharmaceutical products.

  2. Evaluation of the mutagenic activity of chrysin, a flavonoid inhibitor of the aromatization process.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, G A R; Ferraz, E R A; Souza, A O; Lourenço, R A; Oliveira, D P; Dorta, D J

    2012-01-01

    Chrysin is one of the natural flavonoids present in plants, and large amounts are present in honey and propolis. In addition to anticancer, antioxidation, and anti-inflammatory activities, chrysin has also been reported to be an inhibitor of aromatase, an enzyme converting testosterone into estrogen. The present study evaluated the mutagenicity of this flavonoid using micronucleus (MN) with HepG2 cells and Salmonella. Cell survival after exposure to different concentrations of chrysin was also determined using sulforhodamine B (SRB) colorimetric assay in HepG2 cells and the influence of this flavonoid on growth of cells in relation to the cell cycle and apoptosis. The MN test showed that from 1 to 15 μM of this flavonoid mutagenic activity was noted in HepG2 cells. The Salmonella assay demonstrated a positive response to the TA100 Salmonella strain in the presence or absence of S9, suggesting that this compound acted on DNA, inducing base pair substitution before or after metabolism via cytochrome P-450. The SRB assay illustrated that chrysin promoted growth inhibition of HepG2 cells in both periods studied (24 and 48 h). After 24 h of exposure it was noted that the most significant results were obtained with a concentration of 50 μM, resulting in 83% inhibition and SubG0 percentage of 12%. After 48 h of incubation cell proliferation inhibition rates (97% at 50 μM) were significantly higher. Our results showed that chrysin is a mutagenic and cytotoxic compound in cultured human HepG2 cells and Salmonella typhimurium. Although it is widely accepted that flavonoids are substances beneficial to health, one must evaluate the risk versus benefit relationship and concentrations of these substances to which an individual may be exposed.

  3. Treatment of soil eluate containing nitro aromatic compounds by adsorption on activated coke (AC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiping; Jiang, Zhenming; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Su, Hongping; Gao, Xuewen; Ye, Zhengfang

    2016-01-01

    Soil washing is a kind of physical method to remove organic matters from contaminated soil. However, its eluate after washing may result in secondary pollution to the environment. In this study, activated coke (AC) was used to remove organic pollutants from contaminated soil eluate. The effect of temperature, initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) and AC dosage on COD removal efficiency was investigated. The results showed that the organic matter can be removed in the eluate because the COD dropped a lot. When the AC dosage was 20 g·L(-1), 88.92% of COD decreased after 480 min of adsorption at 50 °C. The process of adsorption can be described by the Redlich-Peterson isotherm. The adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. The pseudo-second-order model can be used to describe the adsorption process. After adsorption, the acute toxicity of the eluate was reduced by 76%, and the water qualities were in agreement with Chinese discharge standard GB 14470.1-2002, which means the eluate could be discharged to the environment.

  4. In vitro antimicrobial activity of essential oils from aromatic plants against selected foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rota, C; Carramiñana, J J; Burillo, J; Herrera, A

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of growth and survival of pathogenic microorganisms of significant importance in food hygiene and to determine whether the antimicrobial effect was due to the major compounds of the oils. MIC and MBC were determined by the tube dilution method. Essential oils from Thymus vulgaris from Spain and France, Salvia sclarea, Salvia officinalis, Salvia lavandulifolia, Lavandula latifolia, Lavandula angustifolia, three hybrids of Lavandula latifolia x Lavandula angustifolia (Lavandin 'Super', Lavandin 'Abrialis', and Lavandin 'Grosso'), Rosmarinus officinalis, Hissopus officinalis, and Satureja montana were evaluated. Inhibition ranged from the strong activity of Satureja montana and Thymus vulgaris (France) to no inhibition with Salvia sclarea and Hissopus officinalis for each of the test strains: Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Yersinia enterocolitica, Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b, and Staphylococcus aureus. Because some of the essential oils were highly inhibitory in small quantities to selected pathogenic microorganisms, they may provide alternatives to conventional antimicrobial additives in foods.

  5. Visible-Light-Induced Olefin Activation Using 3D Aromatic Boron-Rich Cluster Photooxidants.

    PubMed

    Messina, Marco S; Axtell, Jonathan C; Wang, Yiqun; Chong, Paul; Wixtrom, Alex I; Kirlikovali, Kent O; Upton, Brianna M; Hunter, Bryan M; Shafaat, Oliver S; Khan, Saeed I; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Maynard, Heather D; Spokoyny, Alexander M

    2016-06-08

    We report a discovery that perfunctionalized icosahedral dodecaborate clusters of the type B12(OCH2Ar)12 (Ar = Ph or C6F5) can undergo photo-excitation with visible light, leading to a new class of metal-free photooxidants. Excitation in these species occurs as a result of the charge transfer between low-lying orbitals located on the benzyl substituents and an unoccupied orbital delocalized throughout the boron cluster core. Here we show how these species, photo-excited with a benchtop blue LED source, can exhibit excited-state reduction potentials as high as 3 V and can participate in electron-transfer processes with a broad range of styrene monomers, initiating their polymerization. Initiation is observed in cases of both electron-rich and electron-deficient styrene monomers at cluster loadings as low as 0.005 mol%. Furthermore, photo-excitation of B12(OCH2C6F5)12 in the presence of a less activated olefin such as isobutylene results in the production of highly branched poly(isobutylene). This work introduces a new class of air-stable, metal-free photo-redox reagents capable of mediating chemical transformations.

  6. Limiting activity coefficients of some aromatic and aliphatic nitro compounds in water

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, M.; Dohnal, V.

    1999-09-01

    Limiting activity coefficients of nine nitroaromatic compounds and four nitroalkanes in water were determined in the range of environmentally related temperatures by measuring suitable phase equilibria. For liquid and solid nitroaromatics (nitrobenzene, 2-nitrotoluene, 3-nitrotoluene, 4-nitrotoluene, 2-nitrophenol, 3-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 1-chloro-2-nitrobenzene, and 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene) the aqueous solubilities were measured by a conventional batch contacting method with UV spectrophotometric analysis, while for nitroalkanes (nitromethane, nitroethane, 1-nitropropane, and 2-nitropropane) the air-water partitioning (Henry`s law constant H{sub 12} or air-water partition coefficient K{sub aw}) was determined by the inert gas stripping method employing gas chromatography. Whenever possible, results were compared to literature values. Calculation of H{sub 12} or K{sub aw} for nitroaromatics from the measured solubilities is hindered by the lack of reliable vapor pressure data. On the basis of the temperature dependences of the solubilities measured, the enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution for the nitroaromatics in water were evaluated.

  7. 1H NMR analysis of complexation of hydrotropic agents nicotinamide and caffeine with aromatic biologically active molecules in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantushenko, Anastasia O.; Mukhina, Yulia V.; Veselkov, Kyrill A.; Davies, David B.; Veselkov, Alexei N.

    2004-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the molecular mechanism of solubilization action of hydrotropic agents nicotinamide (NA) and caffeine (CAF). Hetero-association of NA with riboflavine-mononucleotide (FMN) and CAF with low soluble in aqueous solution synthetic analogue of antibiotic actinomycin D, actinocyl-bis-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) amine (Actill), has been investigated by 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. Concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts have been analysed in terms of a statistical-thermodynamic model of indefinite self- and heteroassociation of aromatic molecules. The obtained results enable to conclude that NA-FMN and CAF-Actill intermolecular complexes are mainly stabilized by the stacking interactions of the aromatic chromophores. Hetero-association of the investigated molecules plays an important role in solubilization of aromatic drugs by hydrotropic agents nicotinamide and caffeine.

  8. Manganese peroxidase mRNA and enzyme activity levels during bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil with Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Bogan, B W; Schoenike, B; Lamar, R T; Cullen, D

    1996-01-01

    mRNA extraction from soil and quantitation by competitive reverse transcription-PCR were combined to study the expression of three manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes during removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium grown in presterilized soil. Periods of high mnp transcript levels and extractable MnP enzyme activity were temporally correlated, although separated by a short (1- to 2-day) lag period. This time frame also coincided with maximal rates of fluorene oxidation and chrysene disappearance in soil cultures, supporting the hypothesis that high ionization potential polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are oxidized in soil via MnP-dependent mechanisms. The patterns of transcript abundance over time in soil-grown P. chrysosporium were similar for all three of the mnp mRNAs studied, indicating that transcription of this gene family may be coordinately regulated under these growth conditions. PMID:8779576

  9. Structure-activity study on the spatial arrangement of the third aromatic ring of endomorphins 1 and 2 using an atypical constrained C terminus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ye; Shao, Xuan; Cui, Yun; Liu, Hong-mei; Wang, Chang-ling; Fan, Ying-zhe; Liu, Jing; Dong, Shou-liang; Cui, Yu-xing; Wang, Rui

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of endomorphins (EMs) has opened the possibility of searching for new analgesics. However, the design of peptide analgesics has proven to be very difficult as a result of their conformational flexibility and a lack of clarity in structure-activity relationships (SAR). In EMs, the amino acid side chains exhibit considerable conformational flexibility, especially in the third aromatic ring, which is free to adopt a bioactive conformation. To resolve these problems, a series of C terminus EM analogues, [Xaa(4)-R]EMs, modified through the substitution of Phe(4) with nonaromatic residues and termination with benzyl groups, were designed to generate conformational constrains of the third aromatic ring by amide bond and torsion angles (phi(4) and psi(4)) of Xaa(4). Introduction of (S)-alpha-methyl or (S)/(R)-alpha-carboxamide on the methylene unit of the benzyl group was designed to produce an atypical topographical constraint (phi(5)) of the third aromatic ring rotation. Interestingly, some EM derivatives, with elimination of the C-terminal carboxamide group and significant changes in the address sequence (Phe(4)-NH(2)), still exhibited higher mu-opioid receptor (MOR) affinity than unmodified EMs. In contrast, some analogues with incorrectly constrained C termini displayed very low affinity and pharmacological activities. Thus, our results indicate that these EM analogues, with atypical constrained C termini, provide model compounds with potent MOR agonism. They also give evidence that the proper spatial orientation and conformational restriction of the third aromatic ring are crucial for the interaction of EMs with MOR.

  10. Anti-prion activity of a panel of aromatic chemical compounds: in vitro and in silico approaches.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Natalia C; Marques, Icaro A; Conceição, Wesley A; Macedo, Bruno; Machado, Clarice S; Mascarello, Alessandra; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Hughson, Andrew G; Raymond, Lynne D; Pascutti, Pedro G; Caughey, Byron; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) is implicated in the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), which comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and other mammals. Conversion of cellular PrP (PrP(C)) into the scrapie form (PrP(Sc)) is the hallmark of TSEs. Once formed, PrP(Sc) aggregates and catalyzes PrP(C) misfolding into new PrP(Sc) molecules. Although many compounds have been shown to inhibit the conversion process, so far there is no effective therapy for TSEs. Besides, most of the previously evaluated compounds failed in vivo due to poor pharmacokinetic profiles. In this work we propose a combined in vitro/in silico approach to screen for active anti-prion compounds presenting acceptable drugability and pharmacokinetic parameters. A diverse panel of aromatic compounds was screened in neuroblastoma cells persistently infected with PrP(Sc) (ScN2a) for their ability to inhibit PK-resistant PrP (PrP(Res)) accumulation. From ∼200 compounds, 47 were effective in decreasing the accumulation of PrP(Res) in ScN2a cells. Pharmacokinetic and physicochemical properties were predicted in silico, allowing us to obtain estimates of relative blood brain barrier permeation and mutagenicity. MTT reduction assays showed that most of the active compounds were non cytotoxic. Compounds that cleared PrP(Res) from ScN2a cells, were non-toxic in the MTT assay, and presented a good pharmacokinetic profile were investigated for their ability to inhibit aggregation of an amyloidogenic PrP peptide fragment (PrP(109-149)). Molecular docking results provided structural models and binding affinities for the interaction between PrP and the most promising compounds. In summary, using this combined in vitro/in silico approach we have identified new small organic anti-scrapie compounds that decrease the accumulation of PrP(Res) in ScN2a cells, inhibit the aggregation of a PrP peptide, and possess pharmacokinetic characteristics that support their drugability. These

  11. Anti-Prion Activity of a Panel of Aromatic Chemical Compounds: In Vitro and In Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Natalia C.; Marques, Icaro A.; Conceição, Wesley A.; Macedo, Bruno; Machado, Clarice S.; Mascarello, Alessandra; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Hughson, Andrew G.; Raymond, Lynne D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Caughey, Byron; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) is implicated in the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), which comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and other mammals. Conversion of cellular PrP (PrPC) into the scrapie form (PrPSc) is the hallmark of TSEs. Once formed, PrPSc aggregates and catalyzes PrPC misfolding into new PrPSc molecules. Although many compounds have been shown to inhibit the conversion process, so far there is no effective therapy for TSEs. Besides, most of the previously evaluated compounds failed in vivo due to poor pharmacokinetic profiles. In this work we propose a combined in vitro/in silico approach to screen for active anti-prion compounds presenting acceptable drugability and pharmacokinetic parameters. A diverse panel of aromatic compounds was screened in neuroblastoma cells persistently infected with PrPSc (ScN2a) for their ability to inhibit PK-resistant PrP (PrPRes) accumulation. From ∼200 compounds, 47 were effective in decreasing the accumulation of PrPRes in ScN2a cells. Pharmacokinetic and physicochemical properties were predicted in silico, allowing us to obtain estimates of relative blood brain barrier permeation and mutagenicity. MTT reduction assays showed that most of the active compounds were non cytotoxic. Compounds that cleared PrPRes from ScN2a cells, were non-toxic in the MTT assay, and presented a good pharmacokinetic profile were investigated for their ability to inhibit aggregation of an amyloidogenic PrP peptide fragment (PrP109–149). Molecular docking results provided structural models and binding affinities for the interaction between PrP and the most promising compounds. In summary, using this combined in vitro/in silico approach we have identified new small organic anti-scrapie compounds that decrease the accumulation of PrPRes in ScN2a cells, inhibit the aggregation of a PrP peptide, and possess pharmacokinetic characteristics that support their drugability. These compounds are

  12. Removal of Intermediate Aromatic Halogenated DBPs by Activated Carbon Adsorption: A New Approach to Controlling Halogenated DBPs in Chlorinated Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingyi; Zhang, Xiangru; Zhu, Xiaohu; Li, Yu

    2017-03-21

    During chlorine disinfection of drinking water, chlorine may react with natural organic matter (NOM) and bromide ion in raw water to generate halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). To mitigate adverse effects from DBP exposure, granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption has been considered as one of the best available technologies for removing NOM (DBP precursor) in drinking water treatment. Recently, we have found that many aromatic halogenated DBPs form in chlorination, and they act as intermediate DBPs to decompose and form commonly known DBPs including trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. In this work, we proposed a new approach to controlling drinking water halogenated DBPs by GAC adsorption of intermediate aromatic halogenated DBPs during chlorination, rather than by GAC adsorption of NOM prior to chlorination (i.e., traditional approach). Rapid small-scale column tests were used to simulate GAC adsorption in the new and traditional approaches. Significant reductions of aromatic halogenated DBPs were observed in the effluents with the new approach; the removals of total organic halogen, trihalomethanes, and haloacetic acids by the new approach always exceeded those by the traditional approach; and the effluents with the new approach were considerably less developmentally toxic than those with the traditional approach. Our findings indicate that the new approach is substantially more effective in controlling halogenated DBPs than the traditional approach.

  13. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Affects Acetic Acid Production during Anaerobic Fermentation of Waste Activated Sludge by Altering Activity and Viability of Acetogen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jingyang; Chen, Yinguang; Feng, Leiyu

    2016-07-05

    Till now, almost all the studies on anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for bioproducts generation focused on the influences of operating conditions, pretreatment methods and sludge characteristics, and few considered those of widespread persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in sludge, for example, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Herein, phenanthrene, which was a typical PAH and widespread in WAS, was selected as a model compound to investigate its effect on WAS anaerobic fermentation for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) accumulation. Experimental results showed that the concentration of SCFAs derived from WAS was increased in the presence of phenanthrene during anaerobic fermentation. The yield of acetic acid which was the predominant SCFA in the fermentation reactor with the concentration of 100 mg/kg dry sludge was 1.8 fold of that in the control. Mechanism exploration revealed that the present phenanthrene mainly affected the acidification process of anaerobic fermentation and caused the shift of the microbial community to benefit the accumulation of acetic acid. Further investigation showed that both the activities of key enzymes (phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase) involved in acetic acid production and the quantities of their corresponding encoding genes were enhanced in the presence of phenanthrene. Viability tests by determining the adenosine 5'-triphosphate content and membrane potential confirmed that the acetogens were more viable in anaerobic fermentation systems with phenanthrene, which resulted in the increased production of acetic acid.

  14. Inhibition of peripheral aromatization in baboons by an enzyme-activated aromatase inhibitor (MDL 18,962)

    SciTech Connect

    Longcope, C.; Femino, A.; Johnston, J.O.

    1988-05-01

    The peripheral aromatization ((rho)BM) of androstenedione (A) and testosterone (T) was measured before and after administration of the aromatase inhibitor 10-(2 propynyl)estr-4-ene-3,17-dione (MDL-18,962) to five mature female baboons, Papio annubis. The measurements were made by infusing (3H)androstenedione/(14C)estrone or (3H)testosterone/(14C)estradiol for 3.5 h and collecting blood samples during the infusions and all urine for 96 h from the start of the infusion. Blood samples were analyzed for radioactivity as infused and product steroids, and the data were used to calculate MCRs. An aliquot of the pooled urine was analyzed for the glucuronides of estrone and estradiol and used to calculate the (rho)BM. MDL-18,962 was administered as a pulse in polyethylene glycol-400 (1-5 ml) either iv or via gastric tube 30 min before administration of the radiolabeled steroids. Control studies were done with and without polyethylene glycol-400 administration. When MDL-18,962 was given iv at 4 mg/kg, the aromatization of A was decreased 91.8 +/- 0.9% from the control value of 1.23 +/- 0.13% to 0.11 +/- 0.01%. At the same dose, aromatization of T was decreased 82.0 +/- 7.1%, from a control value of 0.20 +/- 0.03% to 0.037 +/- 0.018%. When MDL-18,962 was given iv at doses of 0.4, 0.1, 0.04, and 0.01 mg/kg, the values for aromatization of A were 0.16 +/- 0.03%, 0.18 +/- 0.06%, 0.37 +/- 11%, and 0.65 +/- 0.09%, respectively. The administration of MDL-18,962 via gastric tube at 4 mg/kg as a pulse decreased the aromatization of A from 1.35 +/- 0.06% to 0.43 +/- 0.12%, an inhibition of 67.2 +/- 10.7%. When administered via gastric tube daily for 5 days at 4 mg/kg, the aromatization of A fell from 1.35 +/- 0.06% to 0.063 +/- 0.003%, an inhibition of 84.4 +/- 0.5%.

  15. Di(hydroxyphenyl)- benzimidazole monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers were prepared from phenyl-hydroxybenzoate and aromatic bis(o-diamine)s. These monomers were used in the synthesis of soluble polybenzimidazoles. The reaction involved the aromatic nucleophilic displacement of various di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds in the presence of an alkali metal base. These polymers exhibited lower glass transition temperatures, improved solubility, and better compression moldability over their commercial counterparts.

  16. Factors that Affect Oxygen Activation and Coupling of the Two Redox Cycles in the Aromatization Reaction Catalyzed by NikD, an Unusual Amino Acid Oxidase†‡

    PubMed Central

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Bruckner, Robert C.; Ferreira, Patricia; Carrell, Christopher J.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2009-01-01

    NikD is a flavoprotein oxidase that catalyzes the oxidation of piperideine-2-carboxylate (P2C) to picolinate in a remarkable aromatization reaction comprising two redox cycles and at least one isomerization step. Tyr258 forms part of an "aromatic cage" that surrounds the ring in picolinate and its precursors. Mutation of Tyr258 to Phe does not perturb the structure of nikD but does affect the coupling of the two redox cycles and causes a 10-fold decrease in turnover rate. Tyr258Phe catalyzes a quantitative 2-electron oxidation of P2C but only 60% of the resulting dihydropicolinate intermediate undergoes a second redox cycle to produce picolinate. The mutation does not affect product yield with an alternate substrate (3,4-dehydro-L-proline) that is aromatized in a single 2-electron oxidation step. Wild-type and mutant enzyme exhibit identical rate constants for P2C oxidation to dihydropicolinate and isomerization of a reduced enzyme•dihydropicolinate complex. The observed rates are 200- and 10-fold faster, respectively, than the mutant turnover rate. Picolinate release from Tyr258Phe is 100-fold faster than turnover. The presence of bound substrate or product is a key factor in oxygen activation by wild-type nikD, as judged by the 10- to 75-fold faster rates observed for complexes of the reduced enzyme with picolinate, benzoate or 1-cyclohexenoate, a 1-deaza P2C analog. The reduced Tyr258Phe•1-cyclohexenoate complex is 25-fold less reactive with oxygen than the wild-type complex. We postulate that mutation of Tyr258 causes subtle changes in active site dynamics that promote release of the reactive dihydropicolinate intermediate and disrupt the efficient synchronization of oxygen activation observed with wild-type nikD. PMID:19702312

  17. Studies on the Simultaneous Formation of Aroma-Active and Toxicologically Relevant Vinyl Aromatics from Free Phenolic Acids during Wheat Beer Brewing.

    PubMed

    Langos, Daniel; Granvogl, Michael

    2016-03-23

    During the brewing process of wheat beer, the desired aroma-active vinyl aromatics 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylphenol as well as the undesired and toxicologically relevant styrene are formed from their respective precursors, free ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and cinnamic acid, deriving from the malts. Analysis of eight commercial wheat beers revealed high concentrations of 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylphenol always in parallel with high concentrations of styrene or low concentrations of the odorants in parallel with low styrene concentrations, suggesting a similar pathway. To better understand the formation of these vinyl aromatics, each process step of wheat beer brewing and the use of different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated. During wort boiling, only a moderate decarboxylation of free phenolic acids and formation of desired and undesired vinyl aromatics were monitored due to the thermal treatment. In contrast, this reaction mainly occurred enzymatically catalyzed during fermentation with S. cerevisiae strain W68 with normal Pof(+) activity (phenolic off-flavor) resulting in a wheat beer eliciting the typical aroma requested by consumers due to high concentrations of 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol (1790 μg/L) and 4-vinylphenol (937 μg/L). Unfortunately, also a high concentration of undesired styrene (28.3 μg/L) was observed. Using a special S. cerevisiae strain without Pof(+) activity resulted in a significant styrene reduction (

  18. Graphene stabilized ultra-small CuNi nanocomposite with high activity and recyclability toward catalysing the reduction of aromatic nitro-compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hao; Wen, Ming; Chen, Hanxing; Wu, Qingsheng; Li, Weiying

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, it is of great significance and a challenge to design a noble-metal-free catalyst with high activity and a long lifetime for the reduction of aromatic nitro-compounds. Here, a 2D structured nanocomposite catalyst with graphene supported CuNi alloy nanoparticles (NPs) is prepared, and is promising for meeting the requirements of green chemistry. In this graphene/CuNi nanocomposite, the ultra-small CuNi nanoparticles (~2 nm) are evenly anchored on graphene sheets, which is not only a breakthrough in the structures, but also brings about an outstanding performance in activity and stability. Combined with a precise optimization of the alloy ratios, the reaction rate constant of graphene/Cu61Ni39 reached a high level of 0.13685 s-1, with a desirable selectivity as high as 99% for various aromatic nitro-compounds. What's more, the catalyst exhibited a unprecedented long lifetime because it could be recycled over 25 times without obvious performance decay or even a morphology change. This work showed the promise and great potential of noble-metal-free catalysts in green chemistry.Nowadays, it is of great significance and a challenge to design a noble-metal-free catalyst with high activity and a long lifetime for the reduction of aromatic nitro-compounds. Here, a 2D structured nanocomposite catalyst with graphene supported CuNi alloy nanoparticles (NPs) is prepared, and is promising for meeting the requirements of green chemistry. In this graphene/CuNi nanocomposite, the ultra-small CuNi nanoparticles (~2 nm) are evenly anchored on graphene sheets, which is not only a breakthrough in the structures, but also brings about an outstanding performance in activity and stability. Combined with a precise optimization of the alloy ratios, the reaction rate constant of graphene/Cu61Ni39 reached a high level of 0.13685 s-1, with a desirable selectivity as high as 99% for various aromatic nitro-compounds. What's more, the catalyst exhibited a unprecedented long lifetime

  19. SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED REACTIONS OF AROMATIC AMINES: QSAR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the common occurrence of the aromatic amine functional group in environmental contaminants, few quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have been developed to predict sorption kinetics for aromatic amines in natural soils and sediments. Towards the goal of d...

  20. SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds induce RISC-mediated antisense strand selection and strong gene-silencing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Takanori; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Takei, Yoshifumi; Mihara, Keichiro; Sato, Yuichiro; Seyama, Toshio

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds (Ar-siRNAs) at 5 Prime -sense strand were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs increased resistance against nuclease degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs were thermodynamically stable compared with the unmodified siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High levels of cellular uptake and cytoplasmic localization were found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong gene-silencing efficacy was exhibited in the Ar-siRNAs. -- Abstract: Short interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells. In this study, we focused on the development of siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds in order to improve the potency of RNAi and thus to overcome several problems with siRNAs, such as cellular delivery and nuclease stability. The siRNAs conjugated with phenyl, hydroxyphenyl, naphthyl, and pyrenyl derivatives showed strong resistance to nuclease degradation, and were thermodynamically stable compared with unmodified siRNA. A high level of membrane permeability in HeLa cells was also observed. Moreover, these siRNAs exhibited enhanced RNAi efficacy, which exceeded that of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified siRNAs, against exogenous Renilla luciferase in HeLa cells. In particular, abundant cytoplasmic localization and strong gene-silencing efficacy were found in the siRNAs conjugated with phenyl and hydroxyphenyl derivatives. The novel siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds are promising candidates for a new generation of modified siRNAs that can solve many of the problems associated with RNAi technology.

  1. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Huang, Meng; Penning, Trevor M

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, trace elements and monooxygenase activity in birds nesting on the North Platte River, Casper, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Dickerson, K.; Allen, K.; Melancon, M.J.; Schmidt, L.J.

    2001-01-01

    Tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) and house wren (Troglodytes aedon) eggs and chicks were collected near a refinery site on the North Platte River, Casper, Wyoming, USA and at a reference site 10 km upstream. Total polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in swallow and wren chicks were higher at the refinery site than at the reference site. Polycylic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediment and chick dietary samples were consistent with these findings. The general lack of methylated PAHs in sediment, diet, and bird carcasses suggested that the PAHs were derived from combustion and not from petroleum. The predominance of odd numbered aliphatic hydrocarbons and the low ratios (≤ 0.25) of pristane: n-C17 and phytane: n-C18 in chick and diet samples also suggested that swallow and wren chicks were not being chronically exposed to petroleum. Mean ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase and benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activities in tree swallow livers averaged nine times higher at the refinery site than at the reference site and were probably induced by exposure to PAHs. Trace element concentrations in eggs and livers of swallows and wrens were similar or greater at the reference site than at the refinery site. Selenium, strontium, and boron concentrations were elevated in eggs and livers of swallows and wrens at both the refinery and reference sites.

  3. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble polybenzimidazoles (PBI's) synthesized by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)-benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic difluoride compounds in presence of anhydrous potassium carbonate. These polymers exhibit good thermal, thermo-oxidative, and chemical stability, and high mechanical properties. Using benzimidazole monomers, more economical, and new PBI's processed more easily than commercial PBI, without loss of desirable physical properties.

  4. Binuclear Phthalocyanines with Aromatic Bridges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    successful. (Scheme 2) Synthesis of Binuclear Phthalocyanines Covalently Bridged by Anthracene The coupling reaction of aromatic halides using elemental...available (16), it Is not active enough to undergo the desired cross coupling reaction . Less electropositive arylzinc derivatives can tolerate various electro...philic functional groups such as nitriles and esters (17). These organo- metallic reagents readily undergo cross coupling reaction with aryl halides

  5. Contorted polycyclic aromatics.

    PubMed

    Ball, Melissa; Zhong, Yu; Wu, Ying; Schenck, Christine; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael; Xiao, Shengxiong; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account describes a body of research in the design, synthesis, and assembly of molecular materials made from strained polycyclic aromatic molecules. The strain in the molecular subunits severely distorts the aromatic molecules away from planarity. We coined the term "contorted aromatics" to describe this class of molecules. Using these molecules, we demonstrate that the curved pi-surfaces are useful as subunits to make self-assembled electronic materials. We have created and continue to study two broad classes of these "contorted aromatics": discs and ribbons. The figure that accompanies this conspectus displays the three-dimensional surfaces of a selection of these "contorted aromatics". The disc-shaped contorted molecules have well-defined conformations that create concave pi-surfaces. When these disc-shaped molecules are substituted with hydrocarbon side chains, they self-assemble into columnar superstructures. Depending on the hydrocarbon substitution, they form either liquid crystalline films or macroscopic cables. In both cases, the columnar structures are photoconductive and form p-type, hole- transporting materials in field effect transistor devices. This columnar motif is robust, allowing us to form monolayers of these columns attached to the surface of dielectrics such as silicon oxide. We use ultrathin point contacts made from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes that are separated by a few nanometers to probe the electronic properties of short stacks of a few contorted discs. We find that these materials have high mobility and can sense electron-deficient aromatic molecules. The concave surfaces of these disc-shaped contorted molecules form ideal receptors for the molecular recognition and assembly with spherical molecules such as fullerenes. These interfaces resemble ball-and-socket joints, where the fullerene nests itself in the concave surface of the contorted disc. The tightness of the binding between the two partners can be

  6. Heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Alexander

    2011-11-18

    Sulfur aromatic compounds, such as mono-, di-, tri-, and tetraalkyl-substituted thiophene, benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, are the molecular components of many fossils (petroleum, oil shale, tar sands, bitumen). Structural units of natural, cross-linked heteroaromatic polymers present in brown coals, turf, and soil are similar to those of sulfur aromatic compounds. Many sulfur aromatic compounds are found in the streams of petroleum refining and upgrading (naphthas, gas oils) and in the consumer products (gasoline, diesel, jet fuels, heating fuels). Besides fossils, the structural fragments of sulfur aromatic compounds are present in molecules of certain organic semiconductors, pesticides, small molecule drugs, and in certain biomolecules present in human body (pheomelanin pigments). Photocatalysis is the frontier area of physical chemistry that studies chemical reactions initiated by absorption of photons by photocatalysts, that is, upon electronic rather than thermal activation, under "green" ambient conditions. This review provides systematization and critical review of the fundamental chemical and physicochemical information on heterogeneous photocatalysis of sulfur aromatic compounds accumulated in the last 20-30 years. Specifically, the following topics are covered: physicochemical properties of sulfur aromatic compounds, major classes of heterogeneous photocatalysts, mechanisms and reactive intermediates of photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds, and the selectivity of these reactions. Quantum chemical calculations of properties and structures of sulfur aromatic compounds, their reactive intermediates, and the structure of adsorption complexes formed on the surface of the photocatalysts are also discussed.

  7. Extreme Modulation Properties of Aromatic Fluorine

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, Michael N; Gakh, Andrei A

    2011-01-01

    Thorough examination of the current literature as well as publicly available databases allowed us to qualify aromatic fluorine as a unique modulator of biological properties of organic compounds. In some rare cases, introduction of fluorine increased biological activity 100,000 times and even higher. We have also identified several examples where aromatic fluorine substantially reduced biological activity. Selected individual cases of extreme modulation are presented and discussed in the paper.

  8. A NOVEL METABOLIC ACTIVATION PATHWAY FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES-MEDIATED DNA DAMAGE AND MORPHOLOGICAL CELL TRANSFORMATION IN MOUSE EMBRYO CELLS BY K-REGION DIOL METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[ a ]pyrene (BP) is a well-studied polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) .Many
    mechanisms have been suggested to explain its carcinogenic activity, yet many questions still
    remain. K-region dihydrodiols (diols) ofPAHs are common metabolites and some are genotoxic. W...

  9. Development of highly potent phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors with anti-neuroinflammation potential: Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship study of catecholamides bearing aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Zhen; Ge, Bing-Chen; Zhong, Qiu-Ping; Huang, Chang; Cheng, Yu-Fang; Yang, Xue-Mei; Wang, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping

    2016-11-29

    In this study, catecholamides (7a-l) bearing different aromatic rings (such as pyridine-2-yl, pyridine-3-yl, phenyl, and 2-chlorophenyl groups) were synthesized as potent phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitors. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were evaluated against the core catalytic domains of human PDE4 (PDE4CAT), full-length PDE4A4, PDE4B1, PDE4C1, and PDE4D7 enzymes, and other PDE family members. Eight of the synthesized compounds were identified as having submicromolar IC50 values in the mid-to low-nanomolar range. Careful analysis on the structure-activity relationship of compounds 7a-l revealed that the replacement of the 4-methoxy group with the difluoromethoxy group improved inhibitory activities. More interesting, 4-difluoromethoxybenzamides 7i and 7j exhibited preference for PDE4 with higher selectivities of about 3333 and 1111-fold over other PDEs, respectively. In addition, compound 7j with wonderful PDE4D7 inhibitory activities inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α production in microglia.

  10. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Ong, Irene M.; McIlwain, Sean; Morales, Eduardo H.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Tremaine, Mary; Bothfeld, William; Higbee, Alan; Ulbrich, Arne; Balloon, Allison J.; Westphall, Michael S.; Aldrich, Josh; Lipton, Mary S.; Kim, Joonhoon; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Coon, Joshua J.; Kiley, Patricia J.; Bates, Donna M.; Landick, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass), phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(P)H, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation, whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts. PMID:25177315

  11. Eaton's reagent-mediated domino π-cationic arylations of aromatic carboxylic acids to Iasi-red polymethoxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: products with unprecedented biological activities as tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ghinet, Alina; Gautret, Philippe; Hijfte, Nathalie Van; Ledé, Bertrand; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Bîcu, Elena; Darbost, Ulrich; Rigo, Benoît; Daïch, Adam

    2014-08-04

    A rapid domino π-cationic arylation of aromatic carboxylic acids, mediated by Eaton's reagent, has been developed for the synthesis of Iasi-red polymethoxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This route is currently the easiest method to obtain such popular PAH compounds, which bear in addition numerous methoxy groups. The domino process was generalized, the structure of the obtained red products and the mechanism of their formations were elucidated, and some of their photophysical properties were determined. Newly synthesized polymethoxylated-PAHs were tested for their interaction with tubulin polymerization as well as for their cytotoxicity on a panel of NCI-60 human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, one of these rubicene derivatives exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro, including inhibition of leukemia, colon, melanoma, CNS, and ovarian cancer cell lines with GI50 values in the low nanomolar range (GI50 < 10 nM).

  12. Activation of ERK1/2 and p38 kinases by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rat liver epithelial cells is associated with induction of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Andrysik, Zdenek; Machala, Miroslav; Chramostova, Katerina; Hofmanova, Jirina; Kozubik, Alois; Vondracek, Jan . E-mail: vondracek@ibp.cz

    2006-03-15

    Deregulation of various signaling pathways, linked either to induction of cell proliferation or to modulation of cellular differentiation and apoptosis, has been proposed to contribute to carcinogenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the present study, we investigated effects of the PAHs previously shown to induce cell proliferation and/or apoptosis in contact-inhibited rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells, with an aim to define the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in both events. We found that only strong genotoxin dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBalP) activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 kinase, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), at concentrations inducing both apoptosis and phosphorylation of p53 tumor suppressor at serine 15 residue. In contrast, the PAHs stimulating cell proliferation in WB-F344 cell line had no effect on activation of ERK1/2, p38 or JNKs. Synthetic inhibitors of ERK1/2 activation (U0126) or p38 kinase activity (SB203580) prevented both apoptosis and induction of p53 phosphorylation by DBalP. Pifithrin-{alpha}, inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity, prevented induction of apoptosis and activation of ERK1/2 and p38. Taken together, our data suggest that both ERK1/2 and p38 are activated in response to DBalP and that they might be involved in regulation of cellular response to DNA damage induced by DBalP, while neither kinase is involved in the release from contact inhibition induced by PAHs.

  13. In vitro and in vivo characterization of opioid activities of endomorphins analogs with novel constrained C-terminus: evidence for the important role of proper spatial disposition of the third aromatic ring.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ye; Shao, Xuan; Wang, Chang-Lin; Liu, Hong-Mei; Cui, Yun; Fan, Ying-Zhe; Liu, Jing; Wang, Rui

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, the C-terminus of endomorphin (Tyr(1)-Pro(2)-Trp/Phe(3)-Phe(4)-NH(2), EMs) analogs [Xaa(4)-R]EMs, modified by substitution of a non-aromatic residue for Phe(4) and ending up with -NH-benzyl, were designed to generate an atypical conformationally constrained peptide set. We investigated the effects of these analogs on the opioid receptors affinity, guinea pig ileum (GPI) and mouse vas deferens (MVD) activity, system arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), antinociception and colonic motility. Analogs 5 ([D-V(4)-Bzl]EM1) and 10 ([D-V(4)-Bzl]EM2), which exhibit appropriate spatial orientations of the third aromatic ring, were about 3-4 times more potent than their parents both in vivo and in vitro. However, a drastic loss of activity was found in analogs 2 ([A(4)-Bzl]EM1) and 7 ([A(4)-Bzl]EM2), which possess improper spatial orientations of the third aromatic ring. Interestingly, analog 7 or 3 ([G(4)-Bzl]EM1), when injected intravenously (i.v.), produced significantly different changes in SAP from their parents. Surprisingly, analog 4 displayed relatively higher vasodepressor activity but significantly less potent colonic contractile activity than analog 5. This may be elicited by the differences in the spatial disposition of the third aromatic ring, which were verified by molecular modeling. Our results indicate that the proper spatial disposition of the third aromatic ring plays an important role in the regulation of pharmacological activities of EMs.

  14. Quantitative structure-activity relationship investigation of the role of hydrophobicity in regulating mutagenicity in the Ames test: 2. Mutagenicity of aromatic and heteroaromatic nitro compounds in Salmonella typhimurium TA100

    SciTech Connect

    Debnath, A.K.; Hansch, C. ); Shusterman, A.J. ); Lopez de Compadre, R.L. )

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) has been derived for the mutagenic activity of 117 aromatic and heteroaromatic nitro compounds acting on Salmonella typhimurium TA100. Relative mutagenic activity is bilinearly dependent on hydrophobicity, with an optimal log P of 5.44, and is linearly dependent on the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the nitro compound. The dependence of mutagenic activity on hydrophobicity and electronic effects is very similar for TA98 and TA100. Mutagenic activity in TA100 does not depend on the size of the aromatic ring system, as it does in TA98. The effect of the choice of assay organism, TA98 versus TA100, on nitroarene QSAR is seen to be similar to the effect previously found for aminoarenes. Lateral verification of QSARs is presented as a tool for establishing the significance of a new QSAR.

  15. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated and estrogenic activities of oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and azaarenes originally identified in extracts of river sediments.

    PubMed

    Machala, M; Ciganek, M; Bláha, L; Minksová, K; Vondráck, J

    2001-12-01

    Reproductive dysfunction in wildlife populations can be a result of environmental contaminants binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or estrogenic receptors. Signaling by both types of receptors can be affected by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are potential endocrine disruptors. However, our knowledge regarding the effects of oxygenated (oxy)-PAHs and azaarenes on AhR-mediated and estrogenic activities is incomplete. In the present study, we have identified 9-fluorenone, anthrone, anthraquinone, benzanthrone, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, benz[c]acridine, and dibenz[a,h]acridine as prevalent oxy-PAHs and azaarenes found in river sediments. Their concentrations in sediment samples ranged from 2.1 to 165.2 ng g(-1) for oxy-PAHs and up to 27.3 ng g(-1) for azaarenes. Their relative AhR-inducing and estrogenic potencies were quantified in vitro using two cell lines that were stably transfected with a luciferase reporter gene system and expressed as induction equivalency factors (IEFs). The only oxy-PAHs with detectable levels of in vitro AhR-mediated activity were benzanthrone and benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione. However, their IEFs were approximately three to four orders of magnitude lower than those of benzo[a]pyrene. On the other hand, azaarenes showed a strong AhR-mediated activity, with dibenzo[a,h]acridine being a far more potent inducer of activity than benzo[a]pyrene. Benzanthrone, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, anthraquinone, and benz[a]acridine were weak inducers of in vitro estrogenic activity, with IEFs similar to that of benzo[a]pyrene. Based on concentrations and relative potencies, our results suggest that dibenzo[a,h]acridine can significantly contribute to the overall AhR-mediated activity in river sediments, whereas the remaining compounds do not. No studied compound was found to contribute significantly to estrogen receptor-mediated activity in vitro.

  16. Exposure to Solute Stress Affects Genome-Wide Expression but Not the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Activity of Sphingomonas sp. Strain LH128 in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Breugelmans, Philip; Lavigne, Rob; Coronado, Edith; Johnson, David R.; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Mayer, Antonia P.; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Hofkens, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Members of the genus Sphingomonas are important catalysts for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, but their activity can be affected by various stress factors. This study examines the physiological and genome-wide transcription response of the phenanthrene-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain LH128 in biofilms to solute stress (invoked by 450 mM NaCl solution), either as an acute (4-h) or a chronic (3-day) exposure. The degree of membrane fatty acid saturation was increased as a response to chronic stress. Oxygen consumption in the biofilms and phenanthrene mineralization activities of biofilm cells were, however, not significantly affected after imposing either acute or chronic stress. This finding was in agreement with the transcriptomic data, since genes involved in PAH degradation were not differentially expressed in stressed conditions compared to nonstressed conditions. The transcriptomic data suggest that LH128 adapts to NaCl stress by (i) increasing the expression of genes coping with osmolytic and ionic stress such as biosynthesis of compatible solutes and regulation of ion homeostasis, (ii) increasing the expression of genes involved in general stress response, (iii) changing the expression of general and specific regulatory functions, and (iv) decreasing the expression of protein synthesis such as proteins involved in motility. Differences in gene expression between cells under acute and chronic stress suggest that LH128 goes through changes in genome-wide expression to fully adapt to NaCl stress, without significantly changing phenanthrene degrading activity. PMID:23001650

  17. Passive dosing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures to terrestrial springtails: linking mixture toxicity to chemical activities, equilibrium lipid concentrations, and toxic units.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stine N; Holmstrup, Martin; Smith, Kilian E C; Mayer, Philipp

    2013-07-02

    A 7-day mixture toxicity experiment with the terrestrial springtail Folsomia candida was conducted, and the effects were linked to three different mixture exposure parameters. Passive dosing from silicone was applied to tightly control exposure levels and compositions of 12 mixture treatments, containing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Springtail lethality was then linked to sum chemical activities (∑a), sum equilibrium lipid concentrations (∑C(lipid eq.)), and sum toxic units (∑TU). In each case, the effects of all 12 mixture treatments could be fitted to one sigmoidal exposure-response relationship. The effective lethal chemical activity (La50) of 0.027 was well within the expected range for baseline toxicity of 0.01-0.1. Linking the effects to the lipid-based exposure parameter yielded an effective lethal concentration (LC(lipid eq 50)) of 133 mmol kg(-1) lipid in good correspondence with the lethal membrane burden for baseline toxicity (40-160 mmol kg(-1) lipid). Finally, the effective lethal toxic unit (LTU50) of 1.20 was rather close to the expected value of 1. Altogether, passive dosing provided tightly controlled mixture exposure in terms of both level and composition, while ∑a, ∑C(lipid eq.), and ∑TU allowed baseline toxicity to be linked to mixture exposure.

  18. Influence of urban activities on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in precipitation: distribution, sources and depositional flux in a developing metropolis, Fortaleza, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Rivelino M; Sousa, Francisco W; Nascimento, Ronaldo F; Silveira, Edilberto R; Viana, Rommel B

    2012-01-01

    We measured polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bulk precipitation in the Fortaleza metropolitan area, Ceará, Brazil, for the first time. Because little information is available concerning PAHs in tropical climatic regions, we assessed their spatial distribution and possible sources and the influence of urban activities on the depositional fluxes of PAHs in bulk precipitation. The concentrations of individual and total PAHs (Σ(PAHs)) in bulk precipitation ranged from undetectable to 133.9 ng.L(-1) and from 202.6 to 674.8 ng.L(-1), respectively. The plume of highest concentrations was most intense in a zone with heavy automobile traffic and favorable topography for the concentration of emitted pollutants. The depositional fluxes of PAHs in bulk precipitation calculated in this study (undetectable to 0.87 μg.m(-2).month(-1)) are 4 to 27 times smaller than those reported from tourist sites and industrial and urban areas in the Northern Hemisphere. Diagnostic ratio analyses of PAH samples showed that the major source of emissions is gasoline exhaust, with a small percentage originating from diesel fuel. Contributions from coal and wood combustion were also found. Major economic activities appear to contribute to pollutant emissions.

  19. Highly Active and Specific Tyrosine Ammonia-Lyases from Diverse Origins Enable Enhanced Production of Aromatic Compounds in Bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Li, Mingji; Gaspar, Paula; Siedler, Solvej; Förster, Jochen; Maury, Jérôme; Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2015-07-01

    Phenylalanine and tyrosine ammonia-lyases form cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, which are precursors of a wide range of aromatic compounds of biotechnological interest. Lack of highly active and specific tyrosine ammonia-lyases has previously been a limitation in metabolic engineering approaches. We therefore identified 22 sequences in silico using synteny information and aiming for sequence divergence. We performed a comparative in vivo study, expressing the genes intracellularly in bacteria and yeast. When produced heterologously, some enzymes resulted in significantly higher production of p-coumaric acid in several different industrially important production organisms. Three novel enzymes were found to have activity exclusively for phenylalanine, including an enzyme from the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Brevibacillus laterosporus, a bacterial-type enzyme from the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, and a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from the moss Physcomitrella patens (producing 230 μM cinnamic acid per unit of optical density at 600 nm [OD600]) in the medium using Escherichia coli as the heterologous host). Novel tyrosine ammonia-lyases having higher reported substrate specificity than previously characterized enzymes were also identified. Enzymes from Herpetosiphon aurantiacus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae resulted in high production of p-coumaric acid in Escherichia coli (producing 440 μM p-coumaric acid OD600 unit(-1) in the medium) and in Lactococcus lactis. The enzymes were also efficient in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where p-coumaric acid accumulation was improved 5-fold over that in strains expressing previously characterized tyrosine ammonia-lyases.

  20. Assessment and management of human health risk from toxic metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban stormwater arising from anthropogenic activities and traffic congestion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yukun; Liu, An; Egodawatta, Prasanna; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2017-02-01

    Toxic metals (TMs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban stormwater pose risk to human health, thereby constraining its reuse potential. Based on the hypothesis that stormwater quality is primarily influenced by anthropogenic activities and traffic congestion, the primary focus of the research study was to analyse the impacts on human health risk from TMs and PAHs in urban stormwater and thereby develop a quantitative risk assessment model. The study found that anthropogenic activities and traffic congestion exert influence on the risk posed by TMs and PAHs in stormwater from commercial and residential areas. Motor vehicle related businesses (FVS) and traffic congestion (TC) were identified as two parameters which need to be included as independent variables to improve the model. Based on the study outcomes, approaches for mitigating the risk associated with TMs and PAHs in urban stormwater are discussed. Additionally, a roadmap is presented for the assessment and management of the risk arising from these pollutants. The study outcomes are expected to contribute to reducing the human health risk associated urban stormwater pollution and thereby enhance its reuse potential.

  1. Iridium(I)-catalyzed regioselective C-H activation and hydrogen-isotope exchange of non-aromatic unsaturated functionality.

    PubMed

    Kerr, William J; Mudd, Richard J; Paterson, Laura C; Brown, Jack A

    2014-11-03

    Isotopic labelling is a key technology of increasing importance for the investigation of new CH activation and functionalization techniques, as well as in the construction of labelled molecules for use within both organic synthesis and drug discovery. Herein, we report for the first time selective iridium-catalyzed CH activation and hydrogen-isotope exchange at the β-position of unsaturated organic compounds. The use of our highly active [Ir(cod)(IMes)(PPh3 )][PF6 ] (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) catalyst, under mild reaction conditions, allows the regioselective β-activation and labelling of a range of α,β-unsaturated compounds with differing steric and electronic properties. This new process delivers high levels of isotope incorporation over short reaction times by using low levels of catalyst loading.

  2. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  3. Biodegradation of aromatic compounds by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Díaz, E; Ferrández, A; Prieto, M A; García, J L

    2001-12-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mediate transcriptional activation of the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6 gene via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-09-14

    Liver is endowed with a mechanism to induce hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYP450s) in response to therapeutic drugs and environmental contaminants, leading to increased detoxification and elimination of the xenobiotics. Each CYP450 is composed of an apoprotein moiety and a heme prosthetic group, which is required for CYP450 activity. Thus, under conditions of CYP450 induction, there is a coordinate increase in heme biosynthesis to compensate for the increased expression of CYP450s. ABCB6, a mitochondrial ATP binding cassette transporter, which regulates coproporphyrinogen transport from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria to complete heme biosynthesis, represents a previously unrecognized rate-limiting step in heme biosynthesis. However, it is not known if exposure to drugs and environmental contaminants induces ABCB6 expression, to assure an adequate and apparently coordinated supply of heme for the generation of functional cytochrome holoprotein. In the present study, we demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the widely distributed environmental toxicants shown to induce porphyrin accumulation causing hepatic porphyria, up-regulate ABCB6 expression in both mice and humans. Using siRNA technology and Abcb6 knock-out mice, we demonstrate that PAH-mediated increase in hepatic porphyrins is compromised in the absence of ABCB6. Moreover, in vivo studies in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knock-out mice demonstrate that PAH induction of ABCB6 is mediated by AhR. Promoter activation studies combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrate direct interactions between the AhR binding sites in the ABCB6 promoter and the AhR receptor, implicating drug activation mechanisms for ABCB6 similar to those found in inducible cytochrome P450s. These studies are the first to describe direct transcriptional activation of both mouse and human ABCB6 by xenobiotics.

  5. Nematicidal activity of essential oils and volatiles derived from Portuguese aromatic flora against the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, P.; Lima, A. S.; Vieira, P.; Dias, L. S.; Tinoco, M. T.; Barroso, J. G.; Pedro, L. G.; Figueiredo, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty seven essential oils, isolated from plants representing 11 families of Portuguese flora, were screened for their nematicidal activity against the pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and the volatiles by distillation-extraction, and both were analysed by GC and GC-MS. High nematicidal activity was achieved with essential oils from Chamaespartium tridentatum, Origanum vulgare, Satureja montana, Thymbra capitata, and Thymus caespititius. All of these essential oils had an estimated minimum inhibitory concentration ranging between 0.097 and 0.374 mg/ml and a lethal concentration necessary to kill 100% of the population (LC100) between 0.858 and 1.984 mg/ml. Good nematicidal activity was also obtained with the essential oil from Cymbopogon citratus. The dominant components of the effective oils were 1–octen-3-ol (9%), n–nonanal, and linalool (both 7%) in C. tridentatum, geranial (43%), neral (29%), and β-myrcene (25%) in C. citratus, carvacrol (36% and 39%), γ-terpinene (24% and 40%), and p-cymene (14% and 7%) in O. vulgare and S. montana, respectively, and carvacrol (75% and 65%, respectively) in T. capitata and T. caespititius. The other essential oils obtained from Portuguese flora yielded weak or no activity. Five essential oils with nematicidal activity against PWN are reported for the first time. PMID:22736831

  6. Nematicidal activity of essential oils and volatiles derived from Portuguese aromatic flora against the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, P; Lima, A S; Vieira, P; Dias, L S; Tinoco, M T; Barroso, J G; Pedro, L G; Figueiredo, A C; Mota, M

    2010-03-01

    Twenty seven essential oils, isolated from plants representing 11 families of Portuguese flora, were screened for their nematicidal activity against the pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The essential oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and the volatiles by distillation-extraction, and both were analysed by GC and GC-MS. High nematicidal activity was achieved with essential oils from Chamaespartium tridentatum, Origanum vulgare, Satureja montana, Thymbra capitata, and Thymus caespititius. All of these essential oils had an estimated minimum inhibitory concentration ranging between 0.097 and 0.374 mg/ml and a lethal concentration necessary to kill 100% of the population (LC(100)) between 0.858 and 1.984 mg/ml. Good nematicidal activity was also obtained with the essential oil from Cymbopogon citratus. The dominant components of the effective oils were 1-octen-3-ol (9%), n-nonanal, and linalool (both 7%) in C. tridentatum, geranial (43%), neral (29%), and β-myrcene (25%) in C. citratus, carvacrol (36% and 39%), γ-terpinene (24% and 40%), and p-cymene (14% and 7%) in O. vulgare and S. montana, respectively, and carvacrol (75% and 65%, respectively) in T. capitata and T. caespititius. The other essential oils obtained from Portuguese flora yielded weak or no activity. Five essential oils with nematicidal activity against PWN are reported for the first time.

  7. Fruits and vegetables protect against the genotoxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines activated by human xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes expressed in immortal mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Platt, K L; Edenharder, R; Aderhold, S; Muckel, E; Glatt, H

    2010-12-21

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) can be formed during the cooking of meat and fish at elevated temperatures and are associated with an increased risk for cancer. On the other hand, epidemiological findings suggest that foods rich in fruits and vegetables can protect against cancer. In the present study three teas, two wines, and the juices of 15 fruits and 11 vegetables were investigated for their protective effect against the genotoxic effects of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). To closely mimic the enzymatic activation of these HAAs in humans, genetically engineered V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts were employed that express human cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase (hCYP) 1A2 (responsible for the first step of enzymatic activation) and human N(O)-acetyltransferase (hNAT) 2*4 or human sulfotransferase (hSULT)1A1*1 (responsible for the second step of enzymatic activation): V79-hCYP1A2-hNAT2*4 for IQ activation and V79-hCYP1A2-hSULT1A1*1 for PhIP activation. HAA genotoxicity was determined by use of the comet assay. Black, green and rooibos tea moderately reduced the genotoxicity of IQ (IC(50)=0.8-0.9%), whereas red and white wine were less active. From the fruit juices, sweet cherry juice exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on IQ genotoxicity (IC(50)=0.17%), followed by juices from kiwi fruit, plum and blueberry (IC(50)=0.48-0.71%). The juices from watermelon, blackberry, strawberry, black currant, and Red delicious apple showed moderate suppression, whereas sour cherry, grapefruit, red currant, and pineapple juices were only weakly active. Granny Smith apple juice and orange juice proved inactive. Of the vegetable juices, strong inhibition of IQ genotoxicity was only seen with spinach and onion juices (IC(50)=0.42-0.54%). Broccoli, cauliflower, beetroot, sweet pepper, tomato, chard, and red-cabbage juices suppressed IQ genotoxicity only moderately, whereas cucumber juice was

  8. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  9. Activation of electrophilicity of stable Y-delocalized carbamate cations in intramolecular aromatic substitution reaction: evidence for formation of diprotonated carbamates leading to generation of isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Kurouchi, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Hiromichi; Nakamura, Satoshi; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2012-10-19

    Although cations with three heteroatoms, such as monoprotonated guanidine and urea, are stabilized by Y-shaped conjugation and such Y-conjugated cations are sufficiently basic to be further protonated (or protosolvated) to dications in strongly acid media, only O-monoprotonated species have been detected in the case of carbamates even in magic acid. We found that the trifluoromethanesulfonic acid-catalyzed cyclization of arylethylcarbamates proceeds to afford dihydroisoquinolones in high yield. In strong acids, methyl carbamates are fully O-monoprotonated, and these monocations do not undergo cyclization even under heating. But, as the acidity of the reaction medium is further increased, the cyclization reaction of methyl phenethylcarbamates starts to proceed as a first-order reaction, with a linear relationship between rate and acidity. The sign and magnitude of the entropy of activation ΔS(‡) were found to be similar to those of other A(Ac)1 reactions. These results strongly support the idea that further protonation of the O-protonated carbamates is involved in the cyclization, but the concentration of the dications is very low and suggests that the rate-determining step is dissociation of methanol from the diprotonated carbamate to generate protonated isocyanate, which reacts with the aromatic ring. Therefore, O-protonated carbamates are weak bases in sharp contrast to other Y-shaped monocations.

  10. Removal of Aromatic Pollutant Surrogate from Water by Recyclable Magnetite-Activated Carbon Nanocomposite: An Experiment for General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlan, Ping Y.; Melcer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment using readily available chemicals is described to introduce college students to an exciting class of nanocomposite materials. In a one-step room temperature synthetic process, magnetite nanoparticles are embedded onto activated carbon matrix. The resultant nanocomposite has been shown to combine the…

  11. Assessment of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a human cell-based reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Vondráček, Jan; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Neča, Jiří; Ciganek, Miroslav; Grycová, Aneta; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Machala, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity is one of key events in toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although various classes of AhR ligands may differentially activate human and rodent AhR, there is presently a lack of data on the human AhR-inducing relative potencies (REPs) of PAHs. Here, we focused on estimation of the AhR-mediated activities of a large set of environmental PAHs in human gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, with an aim to develop the human AhR-based REP values with potential implications for risk assessment of PAHs. The previously identified weakly active PAHs mostly failed to activate the AhR in human cells. The order for REPs of individual PAHs in human cells largely corresponded with the available data from rodent-based experimental systems; nevertheless, we identified differences up to one order of magnitude in REP values of PAHs between human and rodent cells. Higher REP values were found in human cells for some important environmental contaminants or suspected carcinogens, such as indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, benz[a]anthracene or benzo[b]fluoranthene, while lower REP values were determined for methyl-substituted PAHs. Our results also indicate that a different rate of metabolism for individual PAHs in human vs. rodent cells may affect estimation of REP values in human cell-based assay, and potentially alter toxicity of some compounds, such as benzofluoranthenes, in humans. We applied the AZ-AhR assay to evaluation of the AhR-mediated activity of complex mixtures of organic compounds associated with diesel exhaust particles, and we identified the polar compounds present in these mixtures as being particularly highly active in human cells, as compared with rodent cells. The present data suggest that differences may exist between the AhR-mediated potencies of PAHs in human and rodent cells, and that the AhR-mediated effects of polar PAH derivatives and metabolites in human cell models deserve further

  12. Activation of Ca sup 2+ uptake and inhibition of reversal of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca sup 2+ pump by aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Petretski, J.H.; Wolosker, H.; de Meis, L. )

    1989-12-05

    The effects of aromatic compounds in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase were investigated. The solubility of the drugs in various organic solvents and water was measured. The ratio between the solubility in organic solvents and that in water (distribution coefficient) was used as an index of their hydrophobicity. The order found was triphenylphosphine greater than diphenylamine greater than 3-nitrophenol greater than 4-nitrophenol greater than 1,3-dihydroxybenzene. The effects observed on the Ca2+-ATPase were correlated with hydrophobicity of the drugs, activation and inhibition being obtained at a lower concentration the greater the distribution coefficient of the drug into organic solvent. In leaky vesicles, the effects of each compound on the ATPase activity varied depending on the Ca2+ concentration in the medium: it inhibited in the presence of 5 microM Ca2+ and activated when the Ca2+ concentration was raised to 2 mM. In intact vesicles, 3- and 4-nitrophenol, diphenylamine, and triphenylphosphine enhanced both the rate of ATP hydrolysis and the amount of Ca2+ accumulated by the vesicles. These four drugs inhibited Ca2+ uptake when ITP was used as substrate. 1,3-Dihydroxybenzene enhanced the amount of Ca2+ accumulated by the vesicles regardless of whether ATP or ITP was the substrate. All five compounds inhibited the phosphorylation of the enzyme by Pi, the efflux of Ca2+, and the synthesis of ATP measured during the reversal of the Ca2+ pump. The results indicate that the hydrophobic character of various organic compounds determines their access to sensitive domains of the membrane-bound calcium pump. Additional specific effects are then produced, depending on the structure of each compound.

  13. Comparative Study of Composition, Antioxidant, and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Balkan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Stanković, Nemanja; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana; Zlatković, Bojan; Matejić, Jelena; Stankov Jovanović, Vesna; Kocić, Branislava; Čomić, Ljiljana

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study to perform a comparative analysis of the chemical composition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities of the essential oils of plant species Hyssopus officinalis, Achillea grandifolia, Achillea crithmifolia, Tanacetum parthenium, Laserpitium latifolium, and Artemisia absinthium from Balkan Peninsula. The chemical analysis of essential oils was performed by using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Monoterpenes were dominant among the recorded components, with camphor in T. parthenium, A. grandifolia, and A. crithmifolia (51.4, 45.4, and 25.4 %, respectively), 1,8-cineole in H. officinalis, A. grandifolia, and A. crithmifolia (49.1, 16.4, and 14.8 %, respectively), and sabinene in L. latifolium and A. absinthium (47.8 and 21.5 %). The antiradical and antioxidant activities were determined by using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods. The essential oil of A. grandifolia has shown the highest antioxidant activity [IC50 of 33.575 ± 0.069 mg/mL for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2.510 ± 0.036 mg vitamin C/g for the 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) assay]. The antimicrobial activity against 16 multiresistant pathogenic bacteria isolated from human source material was tested by the broth microdilution assay. The resulting minimum inhibitory concentration/minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 4.72 to 93.2 mg/mL. Therefore, the essential oils of the plant species included in this study may be considered to be prospective natural sources of antimicrobial substances, and may contribute as effective agents in the battle against bacterial multiresistance.

  14. Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Myrcia (Myrtaceae): A Review of an Aromatic and Medicinal Group of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cascaes, Márcia Moraes; Guilhon, Giselle Maria Skelding Pinheiro; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Zoghbi, Maria das Graças Bichara; Santos, Lourivaldo da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Myrcia is one of the largest genera of the economically important family Myrtaceae. Some of the species are used in folk medicine, such as a group known as “pedra-hume-caá” or “pedra-ume-caá” or “insulina vegetal” (insulin plant) that it is used for the treatment of diabetes. The species are an important source of essential oils, and most of the chemical studies on Myrcia describe the chemical composition of the essential oils, in which mono- and sesquiterpenes are predominant. The non-volatile compounds isolated from Myrcia are usually flavonoids, tannins, acetophenone derivatives and triterpenes. Anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antioxidant, antimicrobial activities have been described to Myrcia essential oils, while hypoglycemic, anti-hemorrhagic and antioxidant activities were attributed to the extracts. Flavonoid glucosides and acetophenone derivatives showed aldose reductase and α-glucosidase inhibition, and could explain the traditional use of Myrcia species to treat diabetes. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory are some of the activities observed for other isolated compounds from Myrcia. PMID:26473832

  15. The role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in regulation of enzymes involved in metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a model of rat liver progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Vondrácek, Jan; Krcmár, Pavel; Procházková, Jirina; Trilecová, Lenka; Gavelová, Martina; Skálová, Lenka; Szotáková, Barbora; Buncek, Martin; Radilová, Hana; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2009-07-15

    In contrast to hepatocytes, there is only limited information about the expression and activities of enzymes participating in metabolic activation of environmental mutagens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in liver progenitor cells. In rat liver "stem-like" WB-F344 cell line, sharing many characteristics with rat liver progenitor cells, PAHs are efficiently activated to their ultimate genotoxic metabolites forming DNA adducts. The present study aimed to characterize expression/activities of enzymes of two major pathways involved in the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP): cytochrome P450 (CYP) family 1 enzymes and cytosolic aldo-keto reductases (AKRs). We report here that, apart from induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and the corresponding enzymatic activity, both BaP and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced rat 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (AKR1C9) expression and activity. In contrast, the aldehyde reductase AKR1A1 was not induced by either treatment. Thus, both CYP1 and AKR metabolic pathways were inducible in the model of liver progenitor cells. BaP and TCDD were efficient inducers of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression and activity in WB-F344 cells, a principal enzyme of cellular antioxidant defense. Both compounds also induced expression of transcription factor NRF2, involved in control of enzymes protecting cells from oxidative stress. However, although BaP induced a significant formation of reactive oxygen species, it did not induce expression of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting that induction of oxidative stress by BaP was limited. Using shRNA against the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), we found that similar to CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, the AKR1C9 induction was AhR-dependent. Moreover, constitutive AKR1C9 levels in AhR-deficient rat BP8 hepatoma cells were significantly lower than in their AhR-positive 5L variant, thus supporting possible role of AhR in regulation of AKR1C9 expression. Taken together, both

  16. Trimerization of aromatic nitriles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Triazine compounds and cross-linked polymer compositions were made by heating aromatic nitriles to a temperature in the range of about 100 C to about 700 C, in the presence of a catalyst or mixture of catalysts. Aromatic nitrile-modified (terminated and/or appended) imide, benzimidazole, imidazopyrrolone, quinoxaline, and other condensation type prepolymers or their precopolymers were made which were trimerized with or without a filler by the aforementioned catalytic trimerization process.

  17. Molten salt-supported polycondensation of optically active diacid monomers with an aromatic thiazole-bearing diamine using microwave irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Zadehnazari, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Microwave heating was used to prepare optically active thiazole-bearing poly(amide-imide)s. Polymerization reactions were carried out in the molten tetrabutylammonium bromide as a green molten salt medium and triphenyl phosphite as the homogenizer. Structural elucidation of the compounds was performed by Fourier transform infrared and NMR spectroscopic data and elemental analysis results. The polymeric samples were readily soluble in various organic solvents, forming low-colored and flexible thin films via solution casting. They showed high thermal stability with decomposition temperature being above 360 °C. They were assembled randomly in a nanoscale size. PMID:25685498

  18. Aromatic Polyimide Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A mechanically undensified aromatic polyimide foam is made from an aromatic polyimide precursor solid residuum and has the following combination of properties: a density according to ASTM D-3574A of about 0.5 pounds/cu.ft to about 20 pounds/cu.ft; a compression strength according to ASTM D-3574C of about 1.5 psi to about 1500 psi; and a limiting oxygen index according to ASTM D-2863 of about 35% oxygen to about 75% oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The aromatic polyimide foam has no appreciable solid inorganic contaminants which are residues of inorganic blowing agents. The aromatic polyimide which constitutes the aromatic polyimide foam has a glass transition temperature (Tg) by differential scanning calorimetry of about 235 C to about 400 C; and a thermal stability of 0 to about 1% weight loss at 204 C as determined by thermogravinietric analysis (TGA). The aromatic polyimide foam has utility as foam insulation and as structural foam, for example, for aeronautical, aerospace and maritime applications.

  19. Highly Active and Specific Tyrosine Ammonia-Lyases from Diverse Origins Enable Enhanced Production of Aromatic Compounds in Bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Li, Mingji; Gaspar, Paula; Siedler, Solvej; Förster, Jochen; Maury, Jérôme; Borodina, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Phenylalanine and tyrosine ammonia-lyases form cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, which are precursors of a wide range of aromatic compounds of biotechnological interest. Lack of highly active and specific tyrosine ammonia-lyases has previously been a limitation in metabolic engineering approaches. We therefore identified 22 sequences in silico using synteny information and aiming for sequence divergence. We performed a comparative in vivo study, expressing the genes intracellularly in bacteria and yeast. When produced heterologously, some enzymes resulted in significantly higher production of p-coumaric acid in several different industrially important production organisms. Three novel enzymes were found to have activity exclusively for phenylalanine, including an enzyme from the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Brevibacillus laterosporus, a bacterial-type enzyme from the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, and a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from the moss Physcomitrella patens (producing 230 μM cinnamic acid per unit of optical density at 600 nm [OD600]) in the medium using Escherichia coli as the heterologous host). Novel tyrosine ammonia-lyases having higher reported substrate specificity than previously characterized enzymes were also identified. Enzymes from Herpetosiphon aurantiacus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae resulted in high production of p-coumaric acid in Escherichia coli (producing 440 μM p-coumaric acid OD600 unit−1 in the medium) and in Lactococcus lactis. The enzymes were also efficient in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where p-coumaric acid accumulation was improved 5-fold over that in strains expressing previously characterized tyrosine ammonia-lyases. PMID:25911487

  20. Ultrahigh gas storage both at low and high pressures in KOH-activated carbonized porous aromatic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqiang; Ben, Teng; Zhang, Bingyao; Fu, Yao; Qiu, Shilun

    2013-01-01

    The carbonized PAF-1 derivatives formed by high-temperature KOH activation showed a unique bimodal microporous structure located at 0.6 nm and 1.2 nm and high surface area. These robust micropores were confirmed by nitrogen sorption experiment and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sorption experiments indicated that these novel porous carbon materials have significant gas sorption abilities in both low-pressure and high-pressure environments. Moreover the methane storage ability of K-PAF-1-750 is among the best at 35 bars, and its low-pressure gas adsorption abilities are also comparable to the best porous materials in the world. Combined with excellent physicochemical stability, these materials are very promising for industrial applications such as carbon dioxide capture and high-density clean energy storage.

  1. Diversity of organotrophic bacteria, activity of dehydrogenases and urease as well as seed germination and root growth Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum and Sinapis alba under the influence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Lipińska, Aneta; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga; Kucharski, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are organic compounds with highly toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties, which adversely affect the basic biological parameters of the soil, including the count of microorganisms, and the enzymatic activity. In addition to disturbances to the biological activity of the soil, PAHs may also exhibit toxic effects on plants. In view of the above, the study involved testing aimed at the determination of the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a form of naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene and pyrene on the count, colony development (CD) index, ecophysiological (EP) diversity index of organotrophic bacteria, and the activity of soil dehydrogenases and soil urease. Moreover, an attempt was made to determine the soil's resistance based on the activity of the above-listed enzymes, and the effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on seed germination and root growth was assessed by Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum, and Sinapis alba. In addition, the species of bacteria found in a soil subjected to strong pressure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were isolated. The experiment was performed in a laboratory on samples of loamy sand. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were introduced into the soil in an amount of 0, 1000, 2000, and 4000 mg kg(-1) of soil dry matter. Germination and growth of cress (L. sativum), white mustard (S. alba), and sweet sorghum (S. saccharatum) were determined using Phytotoxkit tests. It was found that the tested PAHs increased the average colony counts of organotrophic soil bacteria; pyrene did so to the greatest extent (2.2-fold relative to non-contaminated soil), phenanthrene to the smallest extent (1.4-fold relative to non-contaminated soil). None of the PAHs changed the value of the bacterial colony development (CD) index, while anthracene and pyrene increased the value of the eco-physiological (EP) diversity indicator. PAHs lowered the activity of the tested enzymes. The activity of

  2. Equilibrium adsorption studies of some aromatic pollutants from dilute aqueous solutions on activated carbon at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.R.; Ataullah, R.; Al-Haddad, A.

    1997-10-01

    Aqueous solutions of phenol, p-chlorophenol, and p-nitrophenol have been used to determine the adsorption isotherm for single solute systems on activated carbon at different temperatures. The experimental program has been conducted to investigate the influence of concentration and temperature. All the reported equilibrium isotherm equations have been tried on present and published experimental data. A generalized isotherm equation which was proposed by Khan et al. and tested for bi-solute adsorption data has been modified for single-solute system. The temperature dependency has also been incorporated into a generalized equation. It has been noticed that the Radke and Prausnitz and generalized isotherm equations could represent the entire data with a minimum average percentage error. The influence of different adsorbents, sorbate concentrations, and pH of aqueous solutions has also been discussed in detail. The temperature dependency has been investigated using both the Dubinin-Astakov and the modified generalized equation. The generalized equation describes the experimental and published data adequately and provides a single value of differential molar heat of adsorption, {Delta}H{sub ads}, for a single solute adsorption system. The Dubinin-Astakov isotherm equation has shown an increasing trend of {Delta}H{sub ads} as the loading of adsorbent has increased.

  3. Simultaneous monitoring method of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organic pollutants in the atmosphere using activated carbon fiber filter paper.

    PubMed

    Yagoh, Hiroaki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Tominaga, Yasuko; Shibuya, Nobuo; Masuda, Yoshio

    2006-04-01

    In order to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of PAHs and POPs in the atmosphere, an activated carbon fiber filter paper (ACFP) was used as the adsorbing material in this study. The pressurized liquid extraction method (PLE method) was used to extract PAHs and POPs collected on the ACFP. Toluene was an effective solvent to extract them from ACFP using the PLE method, but some of PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, were hardly extracted. These PAHs were adsorbed on the particulate matter in the atmosphere. In general, these forms of particulate matter could be collected using a quartz fiber paper (QFP); these PAHs were efficiently extracted from the QFP using the PLE method with toluene. In this study, the collecting method of the PAHs was modified by using QFP overlapped in front of the ACFP. Atmospheric monitoring of PAHs and POPs in Niigata area was performed using this method, and most of the target compounds were detected. However, some of the POPs, such as aldrin, endrin, mirex, could not be detected. The POPs, such as hexachlorobenzene, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and chlordanes, and most of the PAHs were detected from all of the samples collected throughout the monitoring period. It was confirmed that these methods were effective to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of the PAHs and POPs in the atmosphere.

  4. Purification of aromatic hydrocarbons via fibrous activated carbon/photocatalytic composite coupled with UV light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wan-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the applicability of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to a fibrous activated carbon (FAC)/titania (TiO2) composite used for the purification of gas-phase benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene was evaluated. The surface and morphological properties of the FAC and prepared FAC/TiO2 composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The study protocol included two different tests, comparison of FAC and the FAC/TiO2 composite for BTEX removal efficiency and evaluation of the FAC/TiO2 composite for benzene and toluene removal efficiency under differing operation conditions. The time-series ratios obtained with the FAC/TiO2 composite showed longer removal times for all target compounds when compared to those of FAC alone. For both benzene and toluene, the breakthrough time decreased with the stream flow rate, whereas it increased with increasing light intensity under the experimental conditions employed in this study. The breakthrough time of benzene and toluene increased as increasing amounts of TiO2 were coated onto the surface of FAC between 11 and 229 mg-TiO2 (g-FAC)(-1), but decreased as the amount of TiO2 increased to 451 mg (g-FAC)(-1). These findings indicate that the optimal TiO2 weight for the removal process of benzene and toluene via the FAC/TiO2 composite is between 229 and 451 mg-TiO2 (g-FAC)(-1).

  5. Research on Aromatic Poly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiebooms, Rafael Hugo Ludo

    1995-11-01

    A detailed analysis of the literature indicated that substituents can only be used at the level of improving properties during processing, that end groups are only important for those polymers where the energy difference between the aromatic and quinoid structure is very small, and that stability of pi delocalisation is the most important tool for the design of low bandgap polymers. From our research it appeared that, based on a detailed NMR and FT-Raman analysis of oligomers and model compounds, the low band gap of PITN could be associated with the quinoid structure. However, a theoretical analysis of the UV-vis data of a series of aromatic isothianaphthene oligomers indicates that a substantial lowering of the band gap can be obtained in planar aromatic isothianaphthene systems. A parallel investigation of PTFITN, a soluble isothianaphthene analogue, gave some indications that this polymer should possess an aromatic structure. The aromatic structure makes it possible that the fluorines probably induce non planarity such that inter ring pi -conjugation is lowered to a considerable extent. This could explain the increased band gap of 2.1eV observed by Swann et al.^{[1] }. Analysis of a series of aza-analogues of PITN revealed that in these materials it should be possible to combine a planar aromatic geometry with enhanced processability. The 4,5-diaza and 4,7-diaza isothianaphthene polymers can therefore be considered as very promising low band gap materials. Finally, we showed that it is possible to combine the aromatic isothianaphthene ring system with another heterocycle such as thiophene in a formal copolymer. Through the development of a highly specific and efficient synthesis route to 1,3-dithienylisothianaphthene (DTI, 4), we established the basis for the further synthesis and study of formal copolymers with tailor-made electronic properties. ftn ^{[1]}M. J. Swann, G. Brooke, D. Bloor. Synth.Met., 55-57, 281-286, (1993).

  6. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Meng; Li Danzhen; Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi

    2012-06-15

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  7. Illumina MiSeq Sequencing Reveals Diverse Microbial Communities of Activated Sludge Systems Stimulated by Different Aromatics for Indigo Biosynthesis from Indole

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuwang; Qu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiao; Zhang, Zhaojing; Li, Duanxing; Wang, Jingwei; Shen, Wenli; Shen, E; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    Indole, as a typical N-heteroaromatic compound existed in coking wastewater, can be used for bio-indigo production. The microbial production of indigo from indole has been widely reported during the last decades using culture-dependent methods, but few studies have been carried out by microbial communities. Herein, three activated sludge systems stimulated by different aromatics, i.e. naphthalene plus indole (G1), phenol plus indole (G2) and indole only (G3), were constructed for indigo production from indole. During the operation, G1 produced the highest indigo yield in the early stage, but it switched to G3 in the late stage. Based on LC-MS analysis, indigo was the major product in G1 and G3, while the purple product 2-(7-oxo-1H-indol-6(7H)-ylidene) indolin-3-one was dominant in G2. Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was applied to analyze the microbial community structure and composition. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity tests showed that the overall community structures of three groups changed significantly during the operation (P<0.05). Nevertheless, the bacteria assigned to phylum Proteobacteria, family Comamonadaceae, and genera Diaphorobacter, Comamonas and Aquamicrobium were commonly shared dominant populations. Pearson correlations were calculated to discern the relationship between microbial communities and indigo yields. The typical indigo-producing populations Comamonas and Pseudomonas showed no positive correlations with indigo yields, while there emerged many other genera that exhibited positive relationships, such as Aquamicrobium, Truepera and Pusillimonas, which had not been reported for indigo production previously. The present study should provide new insights into indigo bio-production by microbial communities from indole. PMID:25928424

  8. Application of toxicity-based fractionation techniques and structure-activity relationship models for the identification of phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Kosian, P.A.; Makynen, E.A.; Monson, P.D.; Mount, D.R.; Ankley, G.T.; Spacie, A.; Mekenyan, O.G.

    1998-06-01

    Recent studies conducted at their laboratory have shown that sediments contaminated with complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can exhibit enhanced toxicity (lethality) to a variety of aquatic species when the samples are tested under ultraviolet (UV) light designed to mimic the wavelengths present in sunlight. However, because these contaminated sediments can contain literally thousands of chemicals, it is difficult to use conventional analytical techniques to identify those compounds responsible for photo-induced toxicity. The purpose of this study was to adapt existing toxicity identification evaluation methods to attempt to identify those compounds contributing to the phototoxicity observed in their sediment samples. Pore water obtained from sediments collected near an oil refinery discharge was toxic to Lumbriculus variegatus following exposure to UV light, while organisms exposed to the same pore water, but without subsequent UV treatment, showed no toxic effect. Solid-phase extraction disks and high-performance liquid chromatography were used, in conjunction with toxicity tests with L. variegatus, to extract and fractionate phototoxic chemicals from the pore water. Phototoxic fractions analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of a number of aliphatic hydrocarbons, substituted PAHs, and PAHs containing heteroatoms. Chemicals were screened for their phototoxic potential based on empirical data and predictive models. A refined list of PAHs was then evaluated on the basis of their phototoxic potency as defined by a recently developed quantitative structure-activity relationship model and estimates of their bioaccumulation potential. Based on the model predictions of potency and bioaccumulation, nine likely phototoxic chemicals were identified.

  9. The aromatic ene reaction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene having an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (i) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (ii) intramolecular aromatic ene, and (iii) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multi-stage, reagent- and byproduct-free, single-pot transformations. PMID:24345944

  10. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Kambe, Takashi; Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L. T.; Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-07-01

    'Aromatic hydrocarbon' implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc's) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors, suggesting behavior not explained by the standard BCS picture of superconductivity. In this article, we describe the present status of this research field, and discuss its future prospects.

  11. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: correlation between molecular connectivity, physico-chemical properties, bioconcentration and toxicity in Daphnia pulex

    SciTech Connect

    Govers, H.; Ruepert, C.; Aiking, H.

    1984-01-01

    High correlation coefficients were calculated for the linear one-parameter correlation between molecular weight, molecular connectivity indices, HPLC and TLC retention indices, partition coefficients between n-octanol or sediment and water, and bioconcentration factors or lethal concentrations in Daphnia Pulex of unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  12. Two novel ternary dicopper(II) μ-guanazole complexes with aromatic amines strongly activated by quantum dots for DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gil, Javier; Ferrer, Sacramento; Castiñeiras, Alfonso; Liu-González, Malva; Lloret, Francesc; Ribes, Angela; Coga, Lucija; Bernecker, Anja; Mareque-Rivas, Juan C

    2014-01-06

    Two novel (μ-guanazole)-bridged binuclear copper(II) complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), [Cu2(μ-N2,N4-Hdatrz)(phen)2(H2O)(NO3)4] (1) and [Cu2(μ-N1,N2-datrz)2(μ-OH2)(bipy)2](ClO4)2 (2) (Hdatrz = 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole = guanazole), have been prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, and susceptibility measurements. Compounds 1 and 2 differ in the aromatic amine, which acts as a coligand, and in the Cu···Cu'-bridging system. Compound 1, which contains two mono-bridged copper ions, represents the first example of a discrete Cu-(NCN-trz)-Cu' complex. Compound 2, with two triply bridged copper ions, is one of the few compounds featuring a Cu-[(NN-trz)2 + (O-aquo)]-Cu' unit. Both compounds display antiferromagnetic coupling but of different magnitude: J (μ2,4-triazole) = -52 cm(-1) for 1 and J (μ1,2-triazolate) = -115 cm(-1) for 2. The DNA binding and cleavage properties of the two compounds have been investigated. Fluorescence, viscosimetry, and thermal denaturation studies reveal that both complexes have high affinity for DNA (1 > 2) and that only 1 acts as an intercalator. In the presence of a reducing agent like 3-mercaptopropionic acid, 1 produces significant oxidative DNA cleavage, whereas 2 is inactive. However, in the presence of very small quantities of micelles filled with core-shell CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (15 nM), 1 and 2 are considerably more active and become highly efficient nucleases as a result of the different possible mechanisms for promoting cooperative catalysis (metal-metal, metal-hydrogen bonding, metal-intercalation, and metal-nanoparticle). Electrophoresis DNA-cleavage inhibition experiments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies, and fluorescence ethidium bromide displacement assays reveal that in these novel nucleases the QDs act as redox-active protein-like nanoparticle structures that bind to the DNA and deliver electrons to the copper(II) centers for the generation of Cu

  13. Sorption and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, bisphenol A and phthalates in landfill leachate using sand, activated carbon and peat filters.

    PubMed

    Kalmykova, Yuliya; Moona, Nashita; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Björklund, Karin

    2014-06-01

    Landfill leachates are repeatedly found contaminated with organic pollutants, such as alkylphenols (APs), phthalates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at levels exceeding water quality standards. It has been shown that these pollutants may be present in the colloidal and truly dissolved phase in contaminated water, making particle separation an inefficient removal method. The aim of this study was to investigate sorption and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), selected APs, bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates and PAHs from landfill leachate using sand, granulated activated carbon (GAC) and peat moss filters. A pilot plant was installed at an inactive landfill with mixed industrial and household waste and samples were collected before and after each filter during two years. Leachate pre-treated in oil separator and sedimentation pond failed to meet water quality standards in most samples and little improvement was seen after the sand filter. These techniques are based on particle removal, whereas the analysed pollutants are found, to varying degrees, bound to colloids or dissolved. However, even highly hydrophobic compounds expected to be particle-bound, such as the PHCs and high-molecular weight PAHs, were poorly removed in the sand filter. The APs and BPA were completely removed by the GAC filter, while mass balance calculations indicate that 50-80% of the investigated phenols were removed in the peat filter. Results suggest possible AP degradation in peat filters. No evidence of phthalate degradation in the landfill, pond or the filters was found. The PHCs were completely removed in 50% and 35% of the measured occasions in the GAC and peat filters, respectively. The opposite trend was seen for removal of PAHs in GAC (50%) and peat (63%). Oxygenated PAHs with high toxicity were found in the leachates but not in the pond sediment. These compounds are likely formed in the pond water, which is alarming because sedimentation ponds are commonly used

  14. Biological activity of ionene polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Ionene polymers are polyammonium salts with positive nitrogens in the backbone, resulting from the polycondensation of diamines with dihalides or from the polycondensation of halo amines. The mechanism of formation of ionene polymers of different structures and their biological activity is reviewed. The antimicrobial and antifungal properties are compared with low molecular weight ammonium salts. Ionenes were found to combine with DNA by means of ionic bonds to yield similar complexes to those obtained with polyamines (spermine and spermidine). They also combine with nerve cell receptors and exercise a more powerful and longer duration ganglionic blocking action than their monomeric analogs. The antiheparin activity of ionenes and the thromboresistance of elastomeric ionene heparin coatings is described. The enhanced biological activity of ionenes as compared with low molecular weight compounds is attributed to a cooperative effect of a large number of positive charges on the polymeric chains.

  15. Discovering Chemical Aromaticity Using Fragrant Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Tanya L.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory organic chemistry is often perceived as inaccessible by students. This article describes a method used to link organic chemistry to everyday experience, asking students to explore whether fragrant molecules are also aromatic in the chemical sense. Students were engaged in this activity, excited about their results, and performed well…

  16. Possible Mechanism of Liver Necrosis Caused by Aromatic Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Bernard B.; Reid, Watson D.; Cho, Arthur K.; Sipes, Glenn; Krishna, Gopal; Gillette, James R.

    1971-01-01

    Treatment of rats with phenobarbital, which stimulates the activity of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver, potentiates hepatic necrosis elicited by bromobenzene and a number of other chemically inert halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. Radioautographic studies indicate that [14C]bromobenzene is covalently bound at the sites of necrosis. From these results, it is inferred that the hepatotoxic effects of the halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons are mediated by chemically active metabolites formed in hepatocytes. In accord with this view, a number of aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons are converted by microsomes in vitro to active intermediates which form covalent complexes with glutathione (GSH). Images PMID:4395686

  17. Cr(Salen)-catalyzed addition of 1,3-dichloropropene to aromatic aldehydes. A simple access to optically active vinyl epoxides.

    PubMed

    Bandini, M; Cozzi, P G; Melchiorre, P; Morganti, S; Umani-Ronchi, A

    2001-04-19

    [reaction: see text]. Chiral Cr(Salen) complex (1) prepared in situ from CrCl3 promotes the enantioselective addition of 1,3-dichloropropene to aromatic aldehydes in the presence of Mn as the stoichiometric reductant and Me3SiCl as a scavenger. The resulting 1,2-chlorohydrins obtained in good enantiomeric and diastereoisomeric excesses can be easily transformed into the corresponding chiral vinyl epoxides.

  18. Integrated reforming/aromatization process

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-06-26

    This patent describes an integrated process for increasing the gasoline yield from a catalytic reforming process. It comprises: charging a naphtha boiling range feedstream to a catalytic reforming reaction zone under reforming conversion conditions; withdrawing a reactor effluent stream from the reforming reaction zone; separating the reactor effluent stream into a hydrogen-rich gas stream and an unstabilized reformate stream; further separating the unstabilized reformate in a fractionator into an overhead stream containing C{sub 4} - components and a bottom stream containing C{sub 6} + components; charging the fractionator overhead stream to a catalytic aromatization zone under aromatization conversion conditions; withdrawing an aromatization zone effluent stream from the aromatization zone; cooling the aromatization zone effluent stream; separating the cooled aromatization zone effluent steam into a C{sub 4} - stream and a C{sub 5} + stream; and refluxing the C{sub 5} + aromatic gasoline stream to the fractionation zone.

  19. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. Birds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present throughout the global environment and are produced naturally and by activities of humans. Effects of PAH on birds have been determined by studies employing egg injection, egg immersion, egg shell application, single and multiple oral doses, subcutaneous injection, and chemical analysis of field-collected eggs and tissue. The four-to six-ring aromatic compounds are the most toxic to embryos, young birds, and adult birds. For embryos, effects include death, developmental abnormalities, and a variety of cellular and biochemical responses. For adult and young birds, effects include reduced egg production and hatching, increased clutch or brood abandonment, reduced growth, increased organweights, and a variety of biochemical responses. Trophic level accumulation is unlikely. Environmental exposure to PAH in areas of high human population or habitats affected by recent petroleum spills might be sufficient to adversely affect reproduction. Evidence of long-term effects of elevated concentrations of environmental PAH on bird populations is very limited and the mechanisms of effect are unclear.

  1. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor is the major toxic mode of action of an organic extract of a reference urban dust particulate matter mixture: the role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Andrysík, Zdeněk; Vondráček, Jan; Marvanová, Soňa; Ciganek, Miroslav; Neča, Jiří; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Mahadevan, Brinda; Topinka, Jan; Baird, William M; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2011-09-01

    Many of the toxic and carcinogenic effects of urban air pollution have been linked to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to airborne particulate matter (PM). The carcinogenic properties of PAHs in complex organic mixtures derived from PM have been chiefly attributed to their mutagenicity. Nevertheless, PAHs are also potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which may contribute to their nongenotoxic effects, including tumor promotion. As the genotoxicity of carcinogenic PAHs in complex mixtures derived from urban PM is often inhibited by other mixture constituents, the AhR-mediated activity of urban PM extracts might significantly contribute to the carcinogenic activity of such mixtures. In the present study, we used an organic extract of the urban dust standard reference material, SRM1649a, as a model mixture to study a range of toxic effects related to DNA damage and AhR activation. Both the organic extract and its neutral aromatic fraction formed a low number of DNA adducts per nucleotide in the liver epithelial WB-F344 cells model, without inducing DNA damage response, such as tumor suppressor p53 activation and apoptosis. In contrast, we found that this extract, as well as its neutral and polar fractions, were potent inducers of a range of AhR-mediated responses, including induction of the AhR-mediated transcription, such as cytochrome P450 1A1/1B1 expression, and the AhR-dependent cell proliferation. Importantly, these toxic events occurred at doses one order of magnitude lower than DNA damage. The AhR-mediated activity of the neutral fraction was linked to PAHs and their derivatives, as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyls were only minor contributors to the overall AhR-mediated activity. Taken together, our data suggest that more attention should be paid to the AhR-dependent nongenotoxic events elicited by urban PM constituents, especially PAHs and their derivatives.

  2. Peptide aromatic interactions modulated by fluorinated residues: Synthesis, structure and biological activity of Somatostatin analogs containing 3-(3′,5′difluorophenyl)-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Rol, Álvaro; Todorovski, Toni; Aragón, Eric; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; Vallès Miret, Mariona; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J.; Riera, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin is a 14-residue peptide hormone that regulates the endocrine system by binding to five G-protein-coupled receptors (SSTR1–5). We have designed six new Somatostatin analogs with L-3-(3′,5′-difluorophenyl)-alanine (Dfp) as a substitute of Phe and studied the effect of an electron-poor aromatic ring in the network of aromatic interactions present in Somatostatin. Replacement of each of the Phe residues (positions 6, 7 and 11) by Dfp and use of a D-Trp8 yielded peptides whose main conformations could be characterized in aqueous solution by NMR. Receptor binding studies revealed that the analog with Dfp at position 7 displayed a remarkable affinity to SSTR2 and SSTR3. Analogs with Dfp at positions 6 or 11 displayed a π-π interaction with the Phe present at 11 or 6, respectively. Interestingly, these analogs, particularly [D-Trp8,L-Dfp11]-SRIF, showed high selectivity towards SSTR2, with a higher value than that of Octreotide and a similar one to that of native Somatostatin. PMID:27271737

  3. Fluorinated aromatic diamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); O'Rell, Michael K. (Inventor); Hom, Jim M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a novel aromatic diamine and more particularly to the use of said diamine for the preparation of thermally stable high-molecular weight polymers including, for example, polyamides, polyamideimides, polyimides, and the like. This diamine is obtained by reacting a stoichometric amount of a disodium salt of 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane with 4-chloronitrobenzene to obtain an intermediate, 2,2-bis[4-(4-nitrophenoxy)phenyl] hexafluoropropane, which is reduced to the corresponding 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl] hexafluoropropane.

  4. Aromatization of Ethanol Over Desilicated ZSM-5 Zeolites: Effect of Pore Size in the Mesoporous Region.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jong Won; Hasan, Zubair; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-05-01

    Mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolites were obtained from microporous ZSM-5 by desilication using aqueous NaOH solutions, and their catalytic activity in the aromatization of ethanol was investigated in order to understand the effects of pore size, in the mesoporous region, on the product distribution and stability of the catalysts. Mesopores generally enhanced the selectivities towards aromatics and stability for aromatization. Mesopores with a maximum pore diameter of around 13 nm were the most effective in the aromatization process (especially for benzene and toluene), suggesting that pore-diameter optimization is necessary for efficient catalysis such as aromatization.

  5. Cross-Coupling Reactions of Aromatic and Heteroaromatic Silanolates with Aromatic and Heteroaromatic Halides

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Smith, Russell C.; Chang, Wen-Tau T.; Muhuhi, Joseck M.

    2009-01-01

    The alkali-metal salts (potassium and sodium) of a large number of aryl- and heteroarylsilanols undergo efficient cross coupling with a wide range of aromatic bromides and chlorides under mild conditions to form polysubstituted biaryls. The critical feature for the success of these coupling reactions and their considerable scope is the use of bis(tri-tert-butylphosphine)palladium. Under the optimized conditions, electron-rich, electron-poor, and sterically hindered arylsilanolates afford cross-coupling products in good yields. Many functional groups are compatible with the coupling conditions such as esters, ketones, acetals, ethers, silyl ethers, and dimethylamino groups. Two particularly challenging substrates, (2-benzofuranyl)dimethylsilanolate and (2,6-dichlorophenyl)dimethylsilanolate prepared as their sodium salts showed excellent activity in the coupling reactions, in the former case also with aromatic chlorides. General methods for the efficient synthesis of a wide range of aromatic silanols are also described. PMID:19199785

  6. "Carbo-aromaticity" and novel carbo-aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cocq, Kévin; Lepetit, Christine; Maraval, Valérie; Chauvin, Remi

    2015-09-21

    While the concept of aromaticity is being more and more precisely delineated, the category of "aromatic compounds" is being more and more expanded. This is illustrated by an introductory highlight of the various types of "aromaticity" previously invoked, and by a focus on the recently proposed "aromatic character" of the "two-membered rings" of the acetylene and butatriene molecules. This serves as a general foundation for the definition of "carbo-aromaticity", the relevance of which is surveyed through recent results in the synthetic, physical, and theoretical chemistry of carbo-mers and in particular macrocyclic-polycyclic representatives constituting a natural family of "novel aromatic compounds". With respect to their parent molecules, carbo-mers are constitutionally defined as "carbon-enriched", and can also be functionally regarded as "π-electron-enriched". This is exemplified by recent experimental and theoretical results on functional, aromatic, rigid, σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-benzene archetypes of various substitution patterns, with emphasis on the quadrupolar pattern. For the purpose of comparison, several types of non-aromatic references of carbo-benzenes are then considered, i.e. freely rotating σ,π-acyclic carbo-n-butadienes and flexible σ-cyclic, π-acyclic carbo-cyclohexadienes, and to "pro-aromatic" congeners, i.e. rigid σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-quinoids. It is shown that functional carbo-mers are entering the field of "molecular materials" for properties such as linear or nonlinear optical properties (e.g. dichromism and two-photon absorption) and single molecule conductivity. Since total or partial carbo-mers of aromatic carbon-allotropes of infinite size such as graphene (graphynes and graphdiynes) and graphite ("graphitynes") have long been addressed at the theoretical or conceptual level, recent predictive advances on the electrical, optical and mechanical properties of such carbo-materials are surveyed. Very preliminary experimental results

  7. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  8. Overview of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAC)

    PubMed Central

    Achten, Christine; Andersson, Jan T.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical group of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), including the better-known subgroup of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the heterocyclic aromatic compounds (NSO-PAC, heterocycles), comprise several thousand individual compounds. It is hard to find a comprehensive overview in the literature of these PACs that includes a substantial amount of relevant properties. Here an attempt is made to summarize the most studied but also some less well-known PACs. In addition to basic data such as recommended names, abbreviations, CAS numbers, molecular formulas, chemical structures, and exact mono-isotopic molecular weights, physico-chemical properties taken from the literature like boiling points, vapor pressures, water solubilities, Henry's Law constants, n-octanol-water partition coefficients (log KOW), and pKa are summarized. Selected toxicological data are listed indicating carcinogenic and mutagenic activity or effects on different organisms. PAC nomenclature is a complex topic, so suggestions for practical use are made. Regarding available data, estimated (instead of measured) values should be used with caution because considerable deviations from experimentally determined values can occur. For an enhanced understanding of the behavior of single PACs in comparison with each other, some of the properties mentioned above are plotted vs. the number of rings or the degree of alkylation. Also, some physico-chemical data are correlated with different functional groups as substituents of the PAHs. This article reveals that rather little is known about the less common PACs, e.g., higher molecular weight compounds, alkylated or otherwise substituted aromatics, for instance, keto-, oxo-, amino-, nitro-, cyano-PAHs, or some heterocyclic aromatic compounds, including their derivatives. It mirrors the limited state of knowledge about the variety of PACs that do not belong to the 16 EPA PAHs. PMID:26823644

  9. Overview of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAC).

    PubMed

    Achten, Christine; Andersson, Jan T

    2015-03-15

    The chemical group of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), including the better-known subgroup of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the heterocyclic aromatic compounds (NSO-PAC, heterocycles), comprise several thousand individual compounds. It is hard to find a comprehensive overview in the literature of these PACs that includes a substantial amount of relevant properties. Here an attempt is made to summarize the most studied but also some less well-known PACs. In addition to basic data such as recommended names, abbreviations, CAS numbers, molecular formulas, chemical structures, and exact mono-isotopic molecular weights, physico-chemical properties taken from the literature like boiling points, vapor pressures, water solubilities, Henry's Law constants, n-octanol-water partition coefficients (log KOW), and pKa are summarized. Selected toxicological data are listed indicating carcinogenic and mutagenic activity or effects on different organisms. PAC nomenclature is a complex topic, so suggestions for practical use are made. Regarding available data, estimated (instead of measured) values should be used with caution because considerable deviations from experimentally determined values can occur. For an enhanced understanding of the behavior of single PACs in comparison with each other, some of the properties mentioned above are plotted vs. the number of rings or the degree of alkylation. Also, some physico-chemical data are correlated with different functional groups as substituents of the PAHs. This article reveals that rather little is known about the less common PACs, e.g., higher molecular weight compounds, alkylated or otherwise substituted aromatics, for instance, keto-, oxo-, amino-, nitro-, cyano-PAHs, or some heterocyclic aromatic compounds, including their derivatives. It mirrors the limited state of knowledge about the variety of PACs that do not belong to the 16 EPA PAHs.

  10. Transport of Aromatic Amino Acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1971-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the transport of aromatic amino acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed the existence of two high-affinity transport systems which recognized the three aromatic amino acids. From competition data and studies on the exchange of preformed aromatic amino acid pools, the first transport system was found to be functional with phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan (in order of decreasing activity), whereas the second system was active with tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The two systems also transported a number of aromatic amino acid analogues but not other amino acids. Mutants defective in each of the two and in both transport systems were isolated and described. When the amino acids were added at low external concentrations to cells growing logarithmically in glucose minimal medium, the tryptophan pool very quickly became saturated. Under identical conditions, phenylalanine and tyrosine each accumulated in the intracellular pool of P. aeruginosa at a concentration which was 10 times greater than that of tryptophan. PMID:4994029

  11. Structural Basis of Substrate Conversion in a New Aromatic Peroxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Piontek, Klaus; Strittmatter, Eric; Ullrich, René; Gröbe, Glenn; Pecyna, Marek J.; Kluge, Martin; Scheibner, Katrin; Hofrichter, Martin; Plattner, Dietmar A.

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic peroxygenases (APOs) represent a unique oxidoreductase sub-subclass of heme proteins with peroxygenase and peroxidase activity and were thus recently assigned a distinct EC classification (EC 1.11.2.1). They catalyze, inter alia, oxyfunctionalization reactions of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with remarkable regio- and stereoselectivities. When compared with cytochrome P450, APOs appear to be the choice enzymes for oxyfunctionalizations in organic synthesis due to their independence from a cellular environment and their greater chemical versatility. Here, the first two crystal structures of a heavily glycosylated fungal aromatic peroxygenase (AaeAPO) are described. They reveal different pH-dependent ligand binding modes. We model the fitting of various substrates in AaeAPO, illustrating the way the enzyme oxygenates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Spatial restrictions by a phenylalanine pentad in the active-site environment govern substrate specificity in AaeAPO. PMID:24126915

  12. Aromatics saturation over hydrotreating catalysts: Reactivity and susceptibility to poisons

    SciTech Connect

    Kokayeff, P.

    1994-12-31

    Aromatics saturation over hydrotreating catalysts has been investigated by processing a synthetic feedstock to which naphthalene, biphenyl, tetralin, and cyclohexylbenzene have been added as model aromatic compounds. The saturation reactions were successfully correlated with a kinetic model of consecutive first order reactions. The rates of saturation of the di-aromatics, naphthalene and biphenyl, were approximately 5--40 times faster than the rate of saturation of the mono-aromatics, tetralin and cyclohexylbenzene. The nature of the di-aromatic is a significant determinant of its reactivity for saturation. The rate of saturation of naphthalene is 10--20 times faster than the rate of saturation of biphenyl. The two mono-aromatics, tetralin and cyclohexylbenzene, exhibited nearly identical reactivities for saturation. An investigation of the effect of organo-nitrogen compounds on saturation activity revealed a very severe poisoning and attenuation of saturation activity. Since activity was recoverable upon the removal of the poisoning agent the chemical effect was conjectured to be due to adsorption of the poison on the active sites of the catalyst. The adsorption constants were determined for three model nitrogen compounds--quinoline, indole, and tert-butylamine. The poisoning action of an organo-nitrogen compound was found to be dependent on both basicity and chemical structure.

  13. Metabolism and Biomarkers of Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Molecular Epidemiology Studies: Lessons Learned from Aromatic Amines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic amines and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are structurally related classes of carcinogens that are formed during the combustion of tobacco or during the high-temperature cooking of meats. Both classes of procarcinogens undergo metabolic activation by N-hydroxylation of the exocyclic amine group, to produce a common proposed intermediate, the arylnitrenium ion, which is the critical metabolite implicated in toxicity and DNA damage. However, the biochemistry and chemical properties of these compounds are distinct and different biomarkers of aromatic amines and HAAs have been developed for human biomonitoring studies. Hemoglobin adducts have been extensively used as biomarkers to monitor occupational and environmental exposures to a number of aromatic amines; however, HAAs do not form hemoglobin adducts at appreciable levels and other biomarkers have been sought. A number of epidemiologic studies that have investigated dietary consumption of well-done meat in relation to various tumor sites reported a positive association between cancer risk and well-done meat consumption, although some studies have shown no associations between well-done meat and cancer risk. A major limiting factor in most epidemiological studies is the uncertainty in quantitative estimates of chronic exposure to HAAs and, thus, the association of HAAs formed in cooked meat and cancer risk has been difficult to establish. There is a critical need to establish long-term biomarkers of HAAs that can be implemented in molecular epidemioIogy studies. In this review article, we highlight and contrast the biochemistry of several prototypical carcinogenic aromatic amines and HAAs to which humans are chronically exposed. The biochemical properties and the impact of polymorphisms of the major xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes on the biological effects of these chemicals are examined. Lastly, the analytical approaches that have been successfully employed to biomonitor aromatic amines and HAAs, and

  14. Hepatocarcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amines that induce cytochrome P-448 isozymes, mainly cytochrome P-448H (P-450IA2), responsible for mutagenic activation of the carcinogens in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Degawa, M; Tanimura, S; Agatsuma, T; Hashimoto, Y

    1989-06-01

    Male F344 rats were treated with hepatocarcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amines such as amino acid- and protein-pyrolysate components (Trp P-1, Trp P-2, Glu P-1, Glu P-2, A alpha C, MeA alpha C, IQ and MeIQx) and changes in microsomal cytochrome P-450 isozymes in the livers were examined by means of immuno-Western blotting using anti-rat cytochrome P-450 monoclonal antibodies. The results suggested that all chemicals tested induce cytochrome P-448 isozymes, particularly cytochrome P-448H (P-450IA2), which efficiently mediate mutagenic activation of the carcinogens. This was substantiated by the enzymatic analyses with the substrates showing different characters to rat cytochrome P-450 isozyme-mediated mutagenesis.

  15. Colorless, Transparent, Aromatic Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Ezzell, K. S.; Ely, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    New process yields aromatic condensation polyimide films essentially colorless. Films between 90- and 100-percent transparent at visible wavelength of 500 nm. Optically transparent polyimide films made from variety of aromatic condensation polyimides. Range from very pale in color to colorless, compared to bright yellow color of conventional/ commercial aromatic polyimide film. Increased transparency achieved at no sacrifice in thermal stability, flexibility, toughness, or mechanical properties. These features extremely attractive as films or coating materials for aerospace applications or for any other applications where high optical transparency or thermal stability is required.

  16. Synthesis of aromatic secondary diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. F.; Greenwood, T. D.; Kahley, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A series of N-methyl substituted aromatic polyamides derived from the secondary aromatic diamines, 4,4'-bis(methylamino)diphenylmethane, 3,3'-bis(methylamino) diphenylmethane, 4,4'-bis(methylamino)benzophenone or 3,3'-bis(methylamino)benzophenone and isophthaloyl dichloride, terphthaloyl dichloride or 3,3'diphenylmethane dicarboxylic acid dichloride was prepared by high temperature solution polymerization in s-tetrachloroethane. Compared to analogous unsubstituted and partially N-methylated aromatic polyamides, the full N-methylated polyamides exhibited significantly lower glass transition temperatures, reduced crystallinity, improved thermal stability and good solubility in chlorinated solvents.

  17. Molecular-Weight-Controlled, End-Capped Polybenzimidazoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Novel molecular-weight-controlled end-capped poly(arylene ether benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's) prepared by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides. Polymers prepared at various molecular weights by upsetting stoichiometry of monomers and end-capped with monohydroxybenzimidazole. Exhibit favorable physical and mechanical properties, improved solubility in polar aprotic solvents and better compression moldability. Potential applications as adhesives, coatings, films, fibers, membranes, moldings, and composite matrix resins.

  18. Three-dimensional aromatic networks.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Shinji; Iwanaga, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of aromatic units and linkers are reviewed from various aspects. To understand principles for the construction of such compounds, we generalize the roles of building units, the synthetic approaches, and the classification of networks. As fundamental compounds, cyclophanes with large aromatic units and aromatic macrocycles with linear acetylene linkers are highlighted in terms of transannular interactions between aromatic units, conformational preference, and resolution of chiral derivatives. Polycyclic cage compounds are constructed from building units by linkages via covalent bonds, metal-coordination bonds, or hydrogen bonds. Large cage networks often include a wide range of guest species in their cavity to afford novel inclusion compounds. Topological isomers consisting of two or more macrocycles are formed by cyclization of preorganized species. Some complicated topological networks are constructed by self-assembly of simple building units.

  19. Investigating the quantitative structure-activity relationships for antibody recognition of two immunoassays for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by multiple regression methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Li; Gao, Zhi-Xian; Dai, Shu-Gui

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous contaminants found in the environment. Immunoassays represent useful analytical methods to complement traditional analytical procedures for PAHs. Cross-reactivity (CR) is a very useful character to evaluate the extent of cross-reaction of a cross-reactant in immunoreactions and immunoassays. The quantitative relationships between the molecular properties and the CR of PAHs were established by stepwise multiple linear regression, principal component regression and partial least square regression, using the data of two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The objective is to find the most important molecular properties that affect the CR, and predict the CR by multiple regression methods. The results show that the physicochemical, electronic and topological properties of the PAH molecules have an integrated effect on the CR properties for the two ELISAs, among which molar solubility (S(m)) and valence molecular connectivity index ((3)χ(v)) are the most important factors. The obtained regression equations for Ris(C) kit are all statistically significant (p < 0.005) and show satisfactory ability for predicting CR values, while equations for RaPID kit are all not significant (p > 0.05) and not suitable for predicting. It is probably because that the Ris(C) immunoassay employs a monoclonal antibody, while the RaPID kit is based on polyclonal antibody. Considering the important effect of solubility on the CR values, cross-reaction potential (CRP) is calculated and used as a complement of CR for evaluation of cross-reactions in immunoassays. Only the compounds with both high CR and high CRP can cause intense cross-reactions in immunoassays.

  20. Polybenzoxazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Polybenzoxazoles (PBO) are heterocyclic macromolecules which were first synthesized in a two-step process by the initial formation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s through solution condensation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s followed by thermal cyclodehydration. Since then several methods were utilized in their synthesis. The most common synthetic method for PBO involves a polycondensation of bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid diphenyl esters. Another preparative route involves the solution polycondensation of the hydrochloride salts of bis(o-amino phenol)s with aromatic diacids in polyphosphoric acid. Another synthetic method involves the initial formation of poly(o-hydroxy amide)s from silylated bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid chlorides followed by thermal cyclodehydration to PBO. A recent preparative route involves the reaction of aromatic bisphenols with bis(fluorophenyl) benzoxazoles by the displacement reaction to form PBO. The novelty of the present invention is that high molecular weight PBO of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  1. Gallium Zeolites for Light Paraffin Aromatization

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G.L.; Dooley, K.M.

    1999-02-10

    The primary original goal of this project was to investigate the active state of gallium-containing MFI catalysts for light paraffin aromatization, in particular the state of gallium in the active material. Our original hypothesis was that the most active and selective materials were those which contained gallium zeolitic cations, and that previously reported conditions for the activation of gallium-containing catalysts served to create these active centers. We believed that in high silica materials such as MFI, ion-exchange is most effectively accomplished with metals in their 1+ oxidation state, both because of the sparsity of the anionic ion-exchange sites associated with the zeolite, and because the large hydration shells associated with aqueous 3+ cations hinder transport. Metals such as Ga which commonly exist in higher oxidation states need to be reduced to promote ion-exchange and this is the reason that reduction of gallium-containing catalysts for light paraffin aromatization often yields a dramatic enhancement in catalytic activity. We have effectively combined reduction with ion-exchange and we term this combined process ''reductive solid-state ion-exchange''. Our hypothesis has largely been proven true, and a number of the papers we have published directly address this hypothesis.

  2. Bio-Based Aromatic Epoxy Monomers for Thermoset Materials.

    PubMed

    Ng, Feifei; Couture, Guillaume; Philippe, Coralie; Boutevin, Bernard; Caillol, Sylvain

    2017-01-18

    The synthesis of polymers from renewable resources is a burning issue that is actively investigated. Polyepoxide networks constitute a major class of thermosetting polymers and are extensively used as coatings, electronic materials, adhesives. Owing to their outstanding mechanical and electrical properties, chemical resistance, adhesion, and minimal shrinkage after curing, they are used in structural applications as well. Most of these thermosets are industrially manufactured from bisphenol A (BPA), a substance that was initially synthesized as a chemical estrogen. The awareness on BPA toxicity combined with the limited availability and volatile cost of fossil resources and the non-recyclability of thermosets implies necessary changes in the field of epoxy networks. Thus, substitution of BPA has witnessed an increasing number of studies both from the academic and industrial sides. This review proposes to give an overview of the reported aromatic multifunctional epoxide building blocks synthesized from biomass or from molecules that could be obtained from transformed biomass. After a reminder of the main glycidylation routes and mechanisms and the recent knowledge on BPA toxicity and legal issues, this review will provide a brief description of the main natural sources of aromatic molecules. The different epoxy prepolymers will then be organized from simple, mono-aromatic di-epoxy, to mono-aromatic poly-epoxy, to di-aromatic di-epoxy compounds, and finally to derivatives possessing numerous aromatic rings and epoxy groups.

  3. Oxidation of aromatic contaminants coupled to microbial iron reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Baedecker, M.J.; Lonergan, D.J.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Siegel, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    THE contamination of sub-surface water supplies with aromatic compounds is a significant environmental concern1,2. As these contaminated sub-surface environments are generally anaerobic, the microbial oxidation of aromatic compounds coupled to nitrate reduction, sulphate reduction and methane production has been studied intensively1-7. In addition, geochemical evidence suggests that Fe(III) can be an important electron acceptor for the oxidation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic groundwater. Until now, only abiological mechanisms for the oxidation of aromatic compounds with Fe(III) have been reported8-12. Here we show that in aquatic sediments, microbial activity is necessary for the oxidation of model aromatic compounds coupled to Fe(III) reduction. Furthermore, a pure culture of the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium GS-15 can obtain energy for growth by oxidizing benzoate, toluene, phenol or p-cresol with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. These results extend the known physiological capabilities of Fe(III)-reducing organisms and provide the first example of an organism of any type which can oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon anaerobically. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Catalytic co-aromatization of ethanol and methane

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Aiguo; He, Peng; Yung, Matthew; ...

    2016-06-06

    This study demonstrates the technical feasibility of simultaneously converting ethanol and methane into liquid hydrocarbons at mild reaction conditions (400 °C and 1 atm) over silver and/or zinc modified zeolite catalysts. After GC-MS analysis, it is worth noting that aromatics are the major compounds contained in the liquid product collected from the run when 1%Ag/ZSM-5, particularly after H2 pretreatment, is charged. Compared to the performance exhibited from the run with pure HZSM-5 support engaged, Ag addition into the HZSM-5 framework favors aromatics formation, which might be closely associated with better Ag dispersion and more abundance of strong surface acidic sitesmore » where aromatization might take place while Zn loading exerts a detrimental effect on the production of aromatics but promotes the ether generation possibly through dehydration reaction. Referred to that from its N2 counterpart, the increased aromatics formation of the collected liquid product when methane is present indicates that methane existence might facilitate ethanol aromatization. Moreover, combined with the increased carbon number in the formed aromatics from CH4 run when H2 run is referred and zero liquid formation from CH4-alone test as well as more prominent endothermic feature of methane run and more importantly the notably increased 13C signals in 13C NMR spectra of the liquid product collected during ethanol conversion under 13CH4 environment, all the observations suggest that methane might be activated nonoxidatively and converted into higher hydrocarbons, preferentially into aromatics if suitable catalyst is charged under the assistance of co-existing oxygenated hydrocarbon. Lastly, the reported synergetic effect could potentially lead to the more economic utilization of abundant natural gas and cellulosic ethanol.« less

  5. Catalytic co-aromatization of ethanol and methane

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Aiguo; He, Peng; Yung, Matthew; Zeng, Hongbo; Qian, Hui; Song, Hua

    2016-06-06

    This study demonstrates the technical feasibility of simultaneously converting ethanol and methane into liquid hydrocarbons at mild reaction conditions (400 °C and 1 atm) over silver and/or zinc modified zeolite catalysts. After GC-MS analysis, it is worth noting that aromatics are the major compounds contained in the liquid product collected from the run when 1%Ag/ZSM-5, particularly after H2 pretreatment, is charged. Compared to the performance exhibited from the run with pure HZSM-5 support engaged, Ag addition into the HZSM-5 framework favors aromatics formation, which might be closely associated with better Ag dispersion and more abundance of strong surface acidic sites where aromatization might take place while Zn loading exerts a detrimental effect on the production of aromatics but promotes the ether generation possibly through dehydration reaction. Referred to that from its N2 counterpart, the increased aromatics formation of the collected liquid product when methane is present indicates that methane existence might facilitate ethanol aromatization. Moreover, combined with the increased carbon number in the formed aromatics from CH4 run when H2 run is referred and zero liquid formation from CH4-alone test as well as more prominent endothermic feature of methane run and more importantly the notably increased 13C signals in 13C NMR spectra of the liquid product collected during ethanol conversion under 13CH4 environment, all the observations suggest that methane might be activated nonoxidatively and converted into higher hydrocarbons, preferentially into aromatics if suitable catalyst is charged under the assistance of co-existing oxygenated hydrocarbon. Lastly, the reported synergetic effect could potentially lead to the more economic utilization of abundant natural gas and cellulosic ethanol.

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  7. Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Essential Oils from Wild Growing Aromatic Plant Species of Skimmia laureola and Juniperus macropoda from Western Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Stappen, Iris; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Ali, Abbas; Wedge, David E; Wanner, Jürgen; Kaul, Vijay K; Lal, Brij; Jaitak, Vikas; Gochev, Velizar K; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold

    2015-06-01

    The Himalayan region is very rich in a great variety of medicinal plants. In this investigation the essential oils of two selected species are described for their antimicrobial and larvicidal as well as biting deterrent activities. Additionally, the odors are characterized. Analyzed by simultaneous GC-MS and GC-FID, the essential oils' chemical compositions are given. The main components of Skimmia laureola oil were linalool and linalyl acetate whereas sabinene was found as the main compound for Juniperus macropoda essential oil. Antibacterial testing by agar dilution assay revealed highest activity of S. laureola oil against all tested bacteria, followed by J. macropoda oil. Antifungal activity was evaluated against the strawberry anthracnose causing plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae and C. gloeosporioides. Juniperus macropoda essential oil indicated higher antifungal activity against all three pathogens than S. laureola oil. Both essential oils showed biting deterrent activity above solvent control but low larvicidal activity.

  8. Aromatic fluorine compounds. VII. Replacement of aromatic -Cl and -NO2 groups by -F

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finger, G.C.; Kruse, C.W.

    1956-01-01

    Replacement of -Cl by -F in aryl chlorides with potassium fluoride has been extended from 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene to less activated halides by the use of non-aqueous solvents, especially dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also replacement of -NO2 by -F in substituted nitrobenzenes was studied in DMF. As a direct result of this study, many aromatic fluorine compounds can now be obtained by a relatively simple synthetic route.

  9. Bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj K

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic amines are an important group of industrial chemicals, which are widely used for manufacturing of dyes, pesticides, drugs, pigments, and other industrial products. These compounds have been considered highly toxic to human beings due to their carcinogenic nature. Three groups of aromatic amines have been recognized: monocyclic, polycyclic, and heterocyclic aromatic amines. Bacterial degradation of several monocyclic aromatic amines has been studied in a variety of bacteria, which utilizes monocyclic aromatic amines as their sole source of carbon and energy. Several degradation pathways have been proposed and the related enzymes and genes have also been characterized. Many reviews have been reviewed toxicity of monocyclic aromatic amines; however, there is lack of review on biodegradation of monocyclic aromatic amines. The aim of this review is to summarize bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines. This review will increase our current understanding of biochemical and molecular basis of bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines.

  10. Potential Metabolic Activation of a Representative C2-Alkylated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon 6-Ethylchrysene Associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the major human health hazard associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. C2-Chrysenes are representative PAHs present in crude oil and could contaminate the food chain. We describe the metabolism of a C2-chrysene regioisomer, 6-ethylchrysene (6-EC), in human HepG2 cells. The structures of the metabolites were identified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence detection and LC-MS/MS. 6-EC-tetraol isomers were identified as signature metabolites of the diol-epoxide pathway. O-Monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-6-EC-catechol, its monohydroxy products, and N-acetyl-l-cysteine(NAC)-6-EC-ortho-quinone were discovered as signature metabolites of the ortho-quinone pathway. Potential dual metabolic activation of 6-EC involving the formation of bis-electrophiles, i.e., a mono-diol-epoxide and a mono-ortho-quinone within the same structure, bis-diol-epoxides, and bis-ortho-quinones was observed as well. The identification of 6-EC-tetraol, O-monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-6-EC-catechol, its monohydroxy products, and NAC-6-EC-ortho-quinone supports potential metabolic activation of 6-EC by P450 and AKR enzymes followed by metabolic detoxification of the ortho-quinone through interception of its redox cycling capability by catechol-O-methyltransferase and sulfotransferase enzymes. The tetraols and catechol conjugates could be used as biomarkers of human exposure to 6-EC resulting from oil spills. PMID:27054409

  11. Inhibition of coal fly ash polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals induced mixed-function oxidase activity in rat lung and liver by vitamin A and citrate.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, S S; Srivastava, P K; Srivastava, V K; Kumar, V; Misra, U K

    1986-01-01

    Administration of benzene-soluble fraction (FAE) and benzene-insoluble fraction (FAR) of fly ash for 3 consecutive days to rats significantly raised cytochrome P-450 levels, aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity, and glutathione S-transferase activity in liver. This treatment also significantly increased pulmonary AHH and glutathione S-transferase activity. Intratracheal administration of FAR (5 mg/100 g body weight) alone for 6 consecutive days also significantly increased hepatic cytochrome P-450 levels and the activity of glutathione S-transferase. Intragastric administration of retinyl palmitate (5000 IU/100 g body weight), along with intratracheal FAE and FAR administration, significantly reduced P-450 levels, activity of glutathione S-transferase in liver, and activity of AHH and glutathione S-transferase in lung of rats. Intraperitoneal administration of citrate (40 mg/100 g body weight) along with FAR significantly reduced FAR-induced increase in hepatic cytochrome P-450 levels and glutathione S-transferase activity. The activity of AHH was not affected by these treatments.

  12. Effects of low molecular-weight organic acids and dehydrogenase activity in rhizosphere sediments of mangrove plants on phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Fang, Ling; Lin, Li; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2014-03-01

    This work evaluated the roles of the low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) from root exudates and the dehydrogenase activity in the rhizosphere sediments of three mangrove plant species on the removal of mixed PAHs. The results showed that the concentrations of LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity changed species-specifically with the levels of PAH contamination. In all plant species, the concentration of citric acid was the highest, followed by succinic acid. For these acids, succinic acid was positively related to the removal of all the PAHs except Chr. Positive correlations were also found between the removal percentages of 4-and 5-ring PAHs and all LMWOAs, except citric acid. LMWOAs enhanced dehydrogenase activity, which positively related to PAH removal percentages. These findings suggested that LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity promoted the removal of PAHs. Among three mangrove plants, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, the plant with the highest root biomass, dehydrogenase activity and concentrations of LMWOAs, was most efficient in removing PAHs.

  13. Transformations of aromatic compounds by nitrosomonas europaea

    SciTech Connect

    Keener, W.K.; Arp, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    The soil bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea is an obligate autotroph which uses O2 as an electron acceptor and ammonia as its sole natural energy source. The ubiquity of nitrifying bacteria may facilitate their use in bioremediation applications, but such applications will require a thorough knowledge of the substrate range of Ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) (catalyzing the oxidation of ammonia). This study extends the know substrate range of N. europaea to include alkylbenzenes, halobenzenes, and various N- and O-containing aromatics. Evidence is also presented that oxidation of p-cresol and ring-substituted benzylic alcohols to corresponding aldehydes joccures even in the absence of AMO activity. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  15. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  16. Antibacterial activity of water extracts and essential oils of various aromatic plants against Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American Foulbrood.

    PubMed

    González, M J; Marioli, J M

    2010-07-01

    Vegetal water extracts, namely the water remaining after hydro-distillation and decoctions, and essential oils of 10 plant species were tested as inhibitors for the growth of Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American Foulbrood. Achyrocline satureioides, Chenopodium ambrosioide, Eucalyptus cinerea, Gnaphalium gaudichaudianum, Lippia turbinata, Marrubium vulgare,Minthostachys verticillata, Origanum vulgare, Tagetes minuta and Thymus vulgaris were included in the study. The water remaining after hydro-distillation showed the highest antibacterial activities, the growth of almost all the P. larvae strains tested was inhibited by these extracts. Regarding the plants tested, E. cinerea and M. verticillata were the plant species with the highest biological activity with 100% efficacy (all its extracts inhibited the growth of all P. larvae strains). Essential oils were less active for the inhibition of P. larvae growth.

  17. Coordinating activation strategy for C(sp3)–H/C(sp3)–H cross-coupling to access β-aromatic α-amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaizhi; Wu, Qian; Lan, Jingbo; You, Jingsong

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed significant advances in C–H bond functionalizations with the discovery of new mechanisms. Non-precious transition-metal-catalysed radical oxidative coupling for C(sp3)–H bond transformations is an appealing strategy for C–C bond formations. The radical oxidative C(sp3)–H/C(sp3)–H cross-coupling reactions of α-C(sp3)–H bonds of amines with free radicals represent a conceptual and practical challenge. We herein develop the coordinating activation strategy to illustrate the nickel-catalysed radical oxidative cross-coupling between C(sp3)–H bonds and (hetero)arylmethyl free radicals. The protocol can tolerate a rich variety of α-amino acids and (hetero)arylmethanes as well as arylmethylenes and arylmethines, affording a large library of α-tertiary and α-quaternary β-aromatic α-amino acids. This process also features low-cost metal catalyst, readily handled and easily removable coordinating group, synthetic simplicity and gram-scale production, which would enable the potential for economical production at commercial scale in the future. PMID:26415985

  18. THE PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to be interested in developing methods for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in the environment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are common contaminants in our environment. Being major product...

  19. A Comprehensive Review on the Phytochemical Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Pogostemon cablin Benth.: An Aromatic Medicinal Plant of Industrial Importance.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Sinniah, Uma Rani

    2015-05-12

    Pogostemon cablin Benth. (patchouli) is an important herb which possesses many therapeutic properties and is widely used in the fragrance industries. In traditional medicinal practices, it is used to treat colds, headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, insect and snake bites. In aromatherapy, patchouli oil is used to relieve depression, stress, calm nerves, control appetite and to improve sexual interest. Till now more than 140 compounds, including terpenoids, phytosterols, flavonoids, organic acids, lignins, alkaloids, glycosides, alcohols, aldehydes have been isolated and identified from patchouli. The main phytochemical compounds are patchouli alcohol, α-patchoulene, β-patchoulene, α-bulnesene, seychellene, norpatchoulenol, pogostone, eugenol and pogostol. Modern studies have revealed several biological activities such as antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antithrombotic, aphrodisiac, antidepressant, antimutagenic, antiemetic, fibrinolytic and cytotoxic activities. However, some of the traditional uses need to be verified and may require standardizing and authenticating the bioactivity of purified compounds through scientific methods. The aim of the present review is to provide comprehensive knowledge on the phytochemistry and pharmacological activities of essential oil and different plant extracts of patchouli based on the available scientific literature. This information will provide a potential guide in exploring the use of main active compounds of patchouli in various medical fields.

  20. Phytochemical Profile and Evaluation of the Biological Activities of Essential Oils Derived from the Greek Aromatic Plant Species Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Pimpinella anisum and Fortunella margarita.

    PubMed

    Fitsiou, Eleni; Mitropoulou, Gregoria; Spyridopoulou, Katerina; Tiptiri-Kourpeti, Angeliki; Vamvakias, Manolis; Bardouki, Haido; Panayiotidis, Mihalis Ι; Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Chlichlia, Katerina; Pappa, Aglaia

    2016-08-16

    Natural products, known for their medicinal properties since antiquity, are continuously being studied for their biological properties. In the present study, we analyzed the composition of the volatile preparations of essential oils of the Greek plants Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil), Mentha spicata (spearmint), Pimpinella anisum (anise) and Fortunella margarita (kumquat). GC/MS analyses revealed that the major components in the essential oil fractions, were carvone (85.4%) in spearmint, methyl chavicol (74.9%) in sweet basil, trans-anethole (88.1%) in anise, and limonene (93.8%) in kumquat. We further explored their biological potential by studying their antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. Only the essential oils from spearmint and sweet basil demonstrated cytotoxicity against common foodborne bacteria, while all preparations were active against the fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger. Antioxidant evaluation by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity assays revealed a variable degree of antioxidant potency. Finally, their antiproliferative potential was tested against a panel of human cancer cell lines and evaluated by using the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. All essential oil preparations exhibited a variable degree of antiproliferative activity, depending on the cancer model used, with the most potent one being sweet basil against an in vitro model of human colon carcinoma.

  1. β-Glucuronidase and β-glucosidase activity and human fecal water genotoxicity in the presence of probiotic lactobacilli and the heterocyclic aromatic amine IQ in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Adriana; Śliżewska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the genotoxicity of fecal water (FW) and the activity of fecal enzymes (β-glucuronidase and β-glucosidase) after incubation with 2-amino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and probiotic lactobacilli: Lb. casei 0900, Lb. casei 0908, and Lb. paracasei 0919. Our results show that the carcinogen IQ greatly increased FW genotoxicity (up to 16.92 ± 3.03 U/mg) and the activity of fecal enzymes (up to even 1.4 ± 0.16 U/mg) in 15 individuals (children, adults and elderly). After incubation with IQ, the activity of β-glucuronidase was reduced by Lactobacillus bacteria by 76.0% (Lb. paracasei 0908) in the FW of children, and by 82.0% (Lb. paracasei 0919) in the elderly; while that of β-glucosidase was reduced by 55.0% in children (Lb. casei 0908) and 90.0% (Lb. paracasei 0919) in elderly subjects. Lactobacilli decreased the genotoxicity of FW after incubation with IQ to the greatest extent in adults (by 64.5%). Probiotic lactobacilli, in the presence of IQ, efficiently inhibits activity of fecal enzymes to the level of control. Genotoxicity inhibition depends on the person's age, its individual microbiota and diet.

  2. Chemical composition and biological activity of essential oils from wild growing aromatic plant species of Skimmia laureola and Juniperus macropoda from Western Himalaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Himalayan region is very rich in a great variety of medicinal plants. In this investigation the essential oils of two selected species are described for their antimicrobial and larvicidal as well as biting deterrent activities. Additionally, the odors are characterized. Analyzed by simultaneous ...

  3. The influence of Lactobacillus casei DN 114 001 on the activity of faecal enzymes and genotoxicity of faecal water in the presence of heterocyclic aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Adriana; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Błasiak, Janusz; Libudzisz, Zdzisława

    2014-12-01

    High activity of bacterial enzymes in human colon and genotoxicity of faecal water (FW) are biomarkers of the harmful action of microbiota. The aim of the present study was to assess the activity of β-glucuronidase and β-glucosidase and the genotoxicity of FW in vitro after incubation with 2-amino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) or 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN 114 001 (Actimel). Our results indicate, that IQ and PhIP greatly increased the activity of faecal enzymes (it was up to four times higher, as measured by spectrophotometric methods) and the genotoxicity of FW (% DNA in the tail was up to 3.2 times higher, as evaluated by the comet assay on Caco-2 cells) in 15 individuals from three age-dependent groups (breast-fed children, adults aged 30-40 years, elderly aged 75-85 years). Lb. casei DN 114 001 decreased the activity of faecal enzymes and the genotoxicity of FW exposed to PhIP and IQ mostly to control values. The activity of faecal enzymes after incubation with IQ was reduced by 71.8% in the FW of children, 37.5% in adults and 64.2% in elderly (β-glucuronidase); as well as by 59.9% in children and 87.9% in elderly (β-glucosidase). For PhIP the reduction was by 59.0% in the FW of children, 50.0% in adults and 81.2% in elderly (β-glucuronidase) and by 20.2% in children, 20.7% in adults and 84.1% in elderly (β-glucosidase). Lb. casei DN 114 001 also decreased the genotoxicity of FW to the greatest extent in adults after incubation with IQ (by 65.4%) and PhIP (by 69.6%) and it was found to correlate positively with the decrease in faecal enzymes activity. In conclusion, Lb. casei DN 114 001 may exert the protective effects against genotoxic and possibly pro-carcinogenic effects of food processing-derived chemicals present in faecal water.

  4. The Aromaticity of Pericyclic Reaction Transition States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    2007-01-01

    An approach is presented that starts from two fundamental concepts in organic chemistry, chirality and aromaticity, and combines them into a simple rule for stating selection rules for pericyclic reactions in terms of achiral Huckel-aromatic and chiral Mobius-aromatic transition states. This is illustrated using an example that leads to apparent…

  5. QSAR trout toxicity models on aromatic pesticides.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav; Gini, Giuseppina; Benfenati, Emilio

    2008-11-01

    The pesticides originally designed to kill target organisms are dangerous for many other wild species. Since they are applied directly to the environment, they can easily reach the water basins and the topsoil. A dataset of 125 aromatic pesticides with well-expressed aquatic toxicity towards trout was subjected to quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) analysis aimed to establish the relationship between their molecular structure and biological activity. A literature data for LC50 concentration killing 50% of fish was used. In addition to the standard 2D-QSAR analysis, a comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) analysis considering the electrostatic and steric properties of the molecules was also performed. The CoMFA analysis helped the recognition of the steric interactions as playing an important role for aquatic toxicity. In addition, the transport properties and the stability of the compounds studied were also identified as important for their biological activity.

  6. The mutagenic potential of high flash aromatic naphtha.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, C A; Edwards, D A; McKee, R H; Swanson, M; Wong, Z A; Schmitt, S; Beatty, P

    1989-06-01

    Catalytic reforming is a refining process that converts naphthenes to aromatics by dehydrogenation to make higher octane gasoline blending components. A portion of this wide boiling range hydrocarbon stream can be separated by distillation and used for other purposes. One such application is a mixture of predominantly 9-carbon aromatic molecules (C9 aromatics, primarily isomers of ethyltoluene and trimethylbenzene), which is removed and used as a solvent--high-flash aromatic naphtha. A program was initiated to assess the toxicological properties of high-flash aromatic naphtha since there may be human exposure through inhalation or external body contact. The current study was conducted partly to assess the potential for mutagenic activity and also to assist in an assessment of carcinogenic potential. The specific tests utilized included the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay, the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) forward mutation assay in CHO cells, in vitro chromosome aberration and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays in CHO cells, and an in vivo chromosome aberration assay in rat bone marrow.

  7. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated activities in road dust from a metropolitan area, Hanoi-Vietnam: contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Tuyen, Le Huu; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Suzuki, Go; Misaki, Kentaro; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-09-01

    Dioxin-Responsive Chemical-Activated LUciferase gene eXpression assay (DR-CALUX) was applied to assess the total toxic activity of the mixture of PAHs and related compounds as well as dioxin-related compounds in road dust from urban areas of Hanoi, Vietnam. Road dust from Hanoi contained significantly higher DR-CALUX activities (3 to 39, mean 20 ng CALUX-TEQ/g dw) than those from a rural site (2 to 13, mean 5 ng CALUX-TEQ/g dw). The total concentrations of 24 major PAHs (Σ24PAHs) in urban road dust (0.1 to 5.5, mean 2.5 μg/g dw) were also 6 times higher than those in rural road dust (0.08 to 1.5, mean 0.4 μg/g dw). Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated vehicular engine combustion as the major PAH emission source in both sites. PAHs accounted for 0.8 to 60% (mean 10%) and 2 to 76% (mean 20%) of the measured CALUX-TEQs in road dust for Hanoi the rural site, respectively. Benzo[b]-/benzo[k]fluoranthenes were the major TEQ contributors among PAHs, whereas DRCs contributed <0.1% to CALUX-TEQs for both rural and urban sites. These results suggest TEQ contribution of other aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists in road dust. Significant PAH concentrations in urban dust indicated high mutagenic and carcinogenic potencies. Estimated results of incremental life time cancer risk (ILCR) indicated that Vietnamese populations, especially those in urban areas such as Hanoi, are potentially exposed to high cancer risk via both dust ingestion and dermal contact. This is the first study on the exposure risk of AhR agonists, including PAHs and DRCs, in urban road dust from a developing country using a combined bio-chemical analytical approach.

  8. Bioaccumulation of organochlorine contaminants and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in southern California round stingrays (Urobatis halleri) exposed to planar aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Kady; Lavado, Ramon; Schlenk, Daniel; Lowe, Christopher G

    2014-06-01

    While contaminant concentrations have been reported for elasmobranchs around the world, no studies have examined bioaccumulation patterns across male and female age classes. The round stingray (Urobatis halleri) is a local benthic species that forages near areas of high organochlorine contamination and represents a good elasmobranch model. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, and chlordanes were measured in juvenile and adult male and female stingrays from areas in southern California, USA (n = 208), and a nearby offshore island, Santa Catalina (n = 34). Both mainland juvenile male and female stingrays showed a significant dilution effect. After maturity, summed contaminant concentrations significantly increased with size for adult males (median 11.1 µg/g lipid wt) and females (5.2 µg/g lipid wt). However, the rate of bioaccumulation was substantially greater in male stingrays than in females, likely a result of the females' ability to offload contaminants to offspring during pregnancy. In addition, males and females showed significant differences in their contaminant profiles, suggesting differential habitat use. Male and female stingrays collected from Santa Catalina Island had significantly lower concentrations (0.51 µg/g and 0.66 µg/g lipid wt, respectively), approximately 5 times less than those of mainland animals. Potential toxicity effects mediated through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor were explored through ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity assays. Mainland male stingrays exhibited significantly greater EROD activities than Catalina males (481 pmol/min/mg protein and 55 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively); however, activity levels in female stingrays from both locations were comparable (297 pmol/min/mg protein and 234 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively) and lower than those in mainland males. The results suggest that PCBs and/or other structurally related contaminants may be inducing a biological response

  9. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa2O4 with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Meng; Li, Danzhen; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chen, Zhixin; Huang, Hanjie; Li, Wenjuan; He, Yunhui; Fu, Xianzhi

    2012-06-01

    ZnGa2O4 was synthesized from Ga(NO3)3 and ZnCl2 via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa2O4 were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa2O4 had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa2O4 has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa2O4 (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa2O4 was also proposed.

  10. The role of cytochrome P4501A activity inhibition in three- to five-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons embryotoxicity of marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma).

    PubMed

    Mu, Jing-li; Wang, Xin-hong; Jin, Fei; Wang, Ju-ying; Hong, Hua-sheng

    2012-07-01

    The mode of action of PAHs that causes fish developmental malformations is unclear. The embryotoxicity of marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) was investigated after individual exposure to three- to five-ring PAHs Phe, Py, and BaP or co-exposure with α-ANF for 18 days. We found that the relationships between EROD induction and developmental deformities of embryos showed a various pattern under different exposure scenarios of Phe, Py, and BaP, which suggested possibly different modes of action in determining the developmental toxicities. As for co-exposure scenarios of each PAH combined with ANF, it showed potentially synergistic effects. The inhibited CYP1A mediated enzyme activity by ANF after co-exposure did not effectively alleviate developmental toxicity of embryo. It showed potentially synergistic effects after co-exposure of marine fish embryos to CYP1A inhibitors and PAH-type CYP1A inducers. Heart deformities in the early life stages of marine medaka were recommended as a biomarker for indicating the extent of PAH pollution.

  11. Multicomponent Reactions of Acetoacetanilide Derivatives with Aromatic Aldehydes and Cyanomethylene Reagents to Produce 4H-Pyran and 1,4-Dihydropyridine Derivatives with Antitumor Activities.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Rasha Abdallah; Mohareb, Rafat Milad

    2015-01-01

    The multi-component reaction of either acetoacetanilide derivative 1a or b with any of the aldehyde derivatives 2a-d and malononitrile 3 in the presence of triethylamine as a catalyst gave the 4H-pyran derivatives 4a-g, respectively. Carrying the same reaction but using a catalytic amount of ammonium acetate gave the 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives 5a-f, respectively. The use of ethyl cyanoacetate instead of malononitrile in the presence of a catalytic amount of triethylamine gave the 4H-pyran derivatives 7a-d, respectively. Compound 4e was used to synthesize 1,4-dihydropyridine 9a-c and arylhydraone 11a-e derivatives were synthesized from 4a and e. The anti-tumor evaluations of the newly synthesized products were tested against six human cancer and normal cell lines. The results showed that compounds 4a, b, f, 5d, f, 9 and 11a-d had optimal cytotoxic effect against cancer cell lines with IC50<550 nM. The toxicity of the most active compounds was further measured against shrimp larvae.

  12. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  13. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  14. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  15. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  16. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  17. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  18. Evaluation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) adduct levels and DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with or without animal metabolic activation.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Rodríguez-Romero María; Sandra, Gómez-Arroyo; Rafael, Villalobos-Pietrini; Carmen, Martínez-Valenzuela; Josefina, Cortés-Eslava; del Carmen, Calderón-Ezquerro María; Rocío, García-Martínez; Francisco, Arenas-Huertero; Elena, Calderón-Segura María

    2012-04-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, benzo(ghi)perylene, benzo(b)fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene have been identified in urban air from Mexico City and some of them are classified as human carcinogens. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of PAHs with (+S9) or without (-S9) metabolic activation. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of each PAH were examined with an alkaline comet assay and trypan blue dye exclusion, and oxidative DNA damage was determined via the detection of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OhdG) adduct levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The DNA damage was evaluated with two genotoxicity parameters: the frequency of comets and the comet tail length. Concentrations of 20, 40, 80, 160 and 320 µM DB(a,h)A-S9; 20, 40, 80, 160 and 240 µM B(ghi)P-S9; 20, 30, 40, 60 and 80 µM B(b)F-S9; and 80 µM B(a)P-S9 for 24 h induced a small but significant increase in the means of comet frequency, in the tail length and in the 8-oHDg levels in relation to the control (0.5% DMSO-S9). However, all PAHs+S9 produced a more significant increase in DNA strand breaks and the level of 8-OHdG compared with the control (0.5% DMSO+S9), with a concentration-effect relationship. The viability of lymphocytes exposed to all PAHs-S9 and PAHs+S9 was not modified compared with the control. The results of this study demonstrate that the comet and ELISA are rapid, suitable and sensitive methods to detect in vitro PAH-induced DNA damage in human peripheral lymphocytes.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-mediated upregulation of hepatic microRNA-181 family promotes cancer cell migration by targeting MAPK phosphatase-5, regulating the activation of p38 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Park, Yong-Keun; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2013-11-15

    Growing evidence indicates that changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression in cancer induced by chemical carcinogens play an important role in cancer development and progression by regulating related genes. However, the mechanisms underlying miRNA involvement in hepatocarcinogenesis induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remain unclear. Thus, the identification of aberrant miRNA expression during PAH-induced cancer cell migration will lead to a better understanding of the substantial role of miRNAs in cancer progression. In the present study, miRNA expression profiling showed significant upregulation of miR-181a, -181b, and -181d in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 line) exposed to benzo[a]anthracene (BA) and benzo[k]fluoranthene (BF). MAPK phosphatase-5 (MKP-5), a validated miR-181 target that deactivates MAPKs, was markedly suppressed while phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was increased after BA and BF exposure. The migration of HepG2 cells, observed using the scratch wound-healing assay, also increased in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of miR-181 family members by miRNA inhibitors enhanced the expression of MKP-5 and suppressed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Furthermore, the depletion of the miR-181 family inhibited cancer cell migration. Based on these results, we conclude that the miR-181 family plays a critical role in PAH-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by targeting MKP-5, resulting in the regulation of p38 MAPK activation. - Highlights: • We found significant upregulation of miR-181 family in HCC exposed to BA and BF. • We identified the MKP-5 as a putative target of miR-181 family. • MKP-5 was suppressed while p-P38 was increased after BA and BF exposure. • The migration of HepG2 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner.

  20. Hybrid Ionosilica containing aromatic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thach, U. D.; Prelot, B.; Hesemann, P.

    2015-07-01

    Ionosilicas are defined as mesostructured silica based materials bearing covalently bound ionic groups. These materials, situated at the interface of ionic liquids and structured silica mesophases, are usually synthesized following template directed hydrolysis-polycondensation procedures starting from silylated ionic compounds. Here, we report new ammonium type hybrid ionosilicas containing aromatic groups which can serve as a new platform for the design of functional materials, for applications in the areas of ion exchange reactions, drug delivery or wastewater treatment.

  1. Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  2. The direct aromatization of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.; Oukaci, R.; Migone, R.A.; Kazi, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    The thermal decomposition of methane shows significant potential as a process for the production of higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of the reaction is limited. Thermodynamic calculations have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds can significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon and heavier (C{sub 10+}) materials. Much work remains to be done in optimizing the quenching process and this is one of the goals of this program. Means to lower the temperature of the reaction are being studied as this result in a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts will be investigated as a means of lowering the reaction temperature thus allowing faster quenching. It is highly likely that such studies will lead to a successful direct methane to higher hydrocarbon process.

  3. A Facile Solid-Phase Route to Renewable Aromatic Chemicals from Biobased Furanics.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Shanmugam; Genuino, Homer C; van der Waal, Jan C; de Jong, Ed; Weckhuysen, Bert M; van Haveren, Jacco; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; van Es, Daan S

    2016-01-22

    Renewable aromatics can be conveniently synthesized from furanics by introducing an intermediate hydrogenation step in the Diels-Alder (DA) aromatization route, to effectively block retro-DA activity. Aromatization of the hydrogenated DA adducts requires tandem catalysis, using a metal-based dehydrogenation catalyst and solid acid dehydration catalyst in toluene. Herein it is demonstrated that the hydrogenated DA adducts can instead be conveniently converted into renewable aromatics with up to 80% selectivity in a solid-phase reaction with shorter reaction times using only an acidic zeolite, that is, without solvent or dehydrogenation catalyst. Hydrogenated adducts from diene/dienophile combinations of (methylated) furans with maleic anhydride are efficiently converted into renewable aromatics with this new route. The zeolite H-Y was found to perform the best and can be easily reused after calcination.

  4. Reactivity of Tp(Me2) -supported yttrium alkyl complexes toward aromatic N-heterocycles: ring-opening or C-C bond formation directed by C-H activation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Weiyin; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Shujian; Weng, Linhong; Zhou, Xigeng

    2014-01-13

    Unusual chemical transformations such as three-component combination and ring-opening of N-heterocycles or formation of a carbon-carbon double bond through multiple C-H activation were observed in the reactions of Tp(Me2) -supported yttrium alkyl complexes with aromatic N-heterocycles. The scorpionate-anchored yttrium dialkyl complex [Tp(Me2) Y(CH2 Ph)2 (THF)] reacted with 1-methylimidazole in 1:2 molar ratio to give a rare hexanuclear 24-membered rare-earth metallomacrocyclic compound [Tp(Me2) Y(μ-N,C-Im)(η(2) -N,C-Im)]6 (1; Im=1-methylimidazolyl) through two kinds of C-H activations at the C2- and C5-positions of the imidazole ring. However, [Tp(Me2) Y(CH2 Ph)2 (THF)] reacted with two equivalents of 1-methylbenzimidazole to afford a C-C coupling/ring-opening/C-C coupling product [Tp(Me2) Y{η(3) -(N,N,N)-N(CH3 )C6 H4 NHCHC(Ph)CN(CH3 )C6 H4 NH}] (2). Further investigations indicated that [Tp(Me2) Y(CH2 Ph)2 (THF)] reacted with benzothiazole in 1:1 or 1:2 molar ratio to produce a C-C coupling/ring-opening product {(Tp(Me2) )Y[μ-η(2) :η(1) -SC6 H4 N(CHCHPh)](THF)}2 (3). Moreover, the mixed Tp(Me2) /Cp yttrium monoalkyl complex [(Tp(Me2) )CpYCH2 Ph(THF)] reacted with two equivalents of 1-methylimidazole in THF at room temperature to afford a trinuclear yttrium complex [Tp(Me2) CpY(μ-N,C-Im)]3 (5), whereas when the above reaction was carried out at 55 °C for two days, two structurally characterized metal complexes [Tp(Me2) Y(Im-Tp(Me2) )] (7; Im-Tp(Me2) =1-methyl-imidazolyl-Tp(Me2) ) and [Cp3 Y(HIm)] (8; HIm=1-methylimidazole) were obtained in 26 and 17 % isolated yields, respectively, accompanied by some unidentified materials. The formation of 7 reveals an uncommon example of construction of a CC bond through multiple C-H activations.

  5. Noncomparative scaling of aromaticity through electron itinerancy

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Satadal; Goswami, Tamal; Misra, Anirban

    2015-10-15

    Aromaticity is a multidimensional concept and not a directly observable. These facts have always stood in the way of developing an appropriate theoretical framework for scaling of aromaticity. In the present work, a quantitative account of aromaticity is developed on the basis of cyclic delocalization of π-electrons, which is the phenomenon leading to unique features of aromatic molecules. The stabilization in molecular energy, caused by delocalization of π-electrons is obtained as a second order perturbation energy for archetypal aromatic systems. The final expression parameterizes the aromatic stabilization energy in terms of atom to atom charge transfer integral, onsite repulsion energy and the population of spin orbitals at each site in the delocalized π-electrons. An appropriate computational platform is framed to compute each and individual parameter in the derived equation. The numerical values of aromatic stabilization energies obtained for various aromatic molecules are found to be in close agreement with available theoretical and experimental reports. Thus the reliable estimate of aromaticity through the proposed formalism renders it as a useful tool for the direct assessment of aromaticity, which has been a long standing problem in chemistry.

  6. Influence of carbonization methods on the aromaticity of pyrogenic dissolved organic carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) components of soil amendments such as biochar will influence the fundamental soil chemistry including the metal speciation, nutrient availability, and microbial activity. Quantitative correlation is necessary between (i) pyrogenic DOC components of varying aromaticity...

  7. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Methods for Studying the Interaction between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Biological Macromolecules .

    The mechanisms for the processes that result in significant biological activity of PAHs depend on the interaction of these molecules or their metabol...

  8. Entropy versus aromaticity in the conformational dynamics of aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Shishkin, Oleg V; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Omelchenko, Irina V; Gorb, Leonid; Latajka, Zdzislaw; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-10-01

    Comparison of the results of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations of isolated benzene, pyrimidine and 1,2,4-triazine molecules reveals that the unusually low population of planar geometry of the benzene ring is caused by entropy effects despite its high aromaticity. The decrease in symmetry of the molecule results in smaller changes in entropy and Gibbs free energy due to out-of-plane deformations of the ring, leading to an increase in the population of planar geometry of the ring. This leads to differences in the topology of potential energy and Gibbs free energy surfaces.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic compounds as anticancer agents: synthesis and biological evaluation of methoxy dibenzofluorene derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Frederick F.; Banik, Bimal K.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of a new methoxy dibenzofluorene through alkylation, cyclodehydration and aromatization in a one-pot operation is achieved for the first time. Using this hydrocarbon, a few derivatives are prepared through aromatic nitration, catalytic hydrogenation, coupling reaction with a side chain and reduction. The benzylic position of this hydrocarbon with the side chain is oxidized and reduced. Some of these derivatives have demonstrated excellent antitumor activities in vitro. This study confirms antitumor activity depends on the structures of the molecules. PMID:25136549

  10. Compactness Aromaticity of Atoms in Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2010-01-01

    A new aromaticity definition is advanced as the compactness formulation through the ratio between atoms-in-molecule and orbital molecular facets of the same chemical reactivity property around the pre- and post-bonding stabilization limit, respectively. Geometrical reactivity index of polarizability was assumed as providing the benchmark aromaticity scale, since due to its observable character; with this occasion new Hydrogenic polarizability quantum formula that recovers the exact value of 4.5 a03 for Hydrogen is provided, where a0 is the Bohr radius; a polarizability based–aromaticity scale enables the introduction of five referential aromatic rules (Aroma 1 to 5 Rules). With the help of these aromatic rules, the aromaticity scales based on energetic reactivity indices of electronegativity and chemical hardness were computed and analyzed within the major semi-empirical and ab initio quantum chemical methods. Results show that chemical hardness based-aromaticity is in better agreement with polarizability based-aromaticity than the electronegativity-based aromaticity scale, while the most favorable computational environment appears to be the quantum semi-empirical for the first and quantum ab initio for the last of them, respectively. PMID:20480020

  11. [Efficient synthesis of multisubstituted aromatic compounds from phenol derivatives].

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Phenols are abundant in nature and diverse phenols are readily available commercially at low cost. Thus, phenols can be used as the raw materials for the synthesis of valuable multisubstituted aromatic compounds by the direct activation of phenolic hydroxyl groups (C-O bond activation), followed by substitutions with other substituents. Although the derivatization of phenolic hydroxyl groups to sulfonates, such as triflates, nonaflates, tosylates and mesylates, followed by the transition-metal-catalyzed coupling reactions has been extensively investigated for this purpose, the direct C-O bond activation of phenols for subsequent functional group transformation has been a long-standing challenge in modern organic synthesis. In this review, I have summarized my recent studies on the formal direct C-O bond activation of phenols using nonafluorobutanesulfonyl fluoride (NfF) for the synthesis of multisubstituted aromatics. I have focused on the dual use of NfF, a less expensive commercially available reagent, including the tentative formation of highly reactive nonaflates from phenols and the use of the liberated fluoride ion as a nucleophile to promote the reactions of nonaflates. The following four topics are discussed: 1) palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions of phenols, 2) novel preparation of benzynes from 2-silylphenols, 3) synthesis of fluorinated aromatic compounds via the formation of benzynes, and 4) Hiyama coupling of (tert-butyldimethylsilyl)arenes activated by internal phenolic hydroxyl groups.

  12. A neurotoxicity assessment of high flash aromatic naphtha.

    PubMed

    Douglas, J F; McKee, R H; Cagen, S Z; Schmitt, S L; Beatty, P W; Swanson, M S; Schreiner, C A; Ulrich, C E; Cockrell, B Y

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic reforming is a refining process that converts naphthenes to aromatics by dehydrogenation to make higher octane gasoline blending components. A portion of this wide-boiling range hydrocarbon stream can be separated by distillation and used for other purposes. One such application is a mixture of predominantly 9-carbon aromatic molecules (C9 Aromatics, primarily isomers of ethyltoluene and trimethylbenzene), which is removed and used as a solvent also known as High Flash Aromatic Naphtha (HFAN). A program was initiated to assess the toxicological properties of HFAN since there may be human exposure, especially in the workplace. The current study was conducted to assess the potential for neurotoxicity in the rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats of approximately 300 grams body weight, in groups of twenty, were exposed by inhalation to HFAN for 90 days at concentrations of 0, 100, 500, and 1500 ppm. During this period the animals were tested monthly for motor activity and in a functional observation battery. After three months of exposure, for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, 10 animals/group/sex were sacrificed and selected nervous system tissue was examined histopathologically. No signs of neurotoxicity were seen in any of the evaluated parameters, nor was there evidence of pathologic changes in any of the examined tissues.

  13. Biodegradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Extremely Acidic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Raymond D.; Savage, Dwayne C.; Sayler, Gary S.; Stacey, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons was evaluated in soil samples recovered along gradients of both contaminant levels and pH values existing downstream of a long-term coal pile storage basin. pH values for areas greatly impacted by runoff from the storage basin were 2.0. Even at such a reduced pH, the indigenous microbial community was metabolically active, showing the ability to oxidize more than 40% of the parent hydrocarbons, naphthalene and toluene, to carbon dioxide and water. Treatment of the soil samples with cycloheximide inhibited mineralization of the aromatic substrates. DNA hybridization analysis indicated that whole-community nucleic acids recovered from these samples did not hybridize with genes, such as nahA, nahG, nahH, todC1C2, and tomA, that encode common enzymes from neutrophilic bacteria. Since these data suggested that the degradation of aromatic compounds may involve a microbial consortium instead of individual acidophilic bacteria, experiments using microorganisms isolated from these samples were initiated. While no defined mixed cultures were able to evolve 14CO2 from labeled substrates in these mineralization experiments, an undefined mixed culture including a fungus, a yeast, and several bacteria successfully metabolized approximately 27% of supplied naphthalene after 1 week. This study shows that biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons can occur in environments with extremely low pH values. PMID:9797263

  14. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory properties of some aromatic and heterocyclic aromatic curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Akram; El-Khatib, Riyad; Rainsford, K D; Whitehouse, M W

    2012-02-01

    A variety of novel aromatic and heterocyclic aromatic curcuminoids were synthesised, characterised and their anti-inflammatory activities (AIA) determined in vivo. Some of these compounds also were tested for inflammatory mediator production. The AIA of the main representatives of these compounds were assessed by oral administration to female Wistar rats using (a) acute carrageenan-induced paw oedema, (b) chronic adjuvant arthritis (therapeutic mode), and (c) anti-pyretic activity assessed in the yeast pyrexia. Gastric ulceration was determined in pre-inflamed rats. Natural curcumin showed modest aspirin-like anti-inflammatory activity which was enhanced when co-administered with the PGE(1) analogue misoprostol as a synergist. In contrast, four novel curcuminoids (RK-97, RK-103, RK-104 and RK-106) in which the bis-methoxy-phenyl group of curcumin was replaced with bis-dimethoxybutenolidyl-(ascorbate), bis-naphthyl, and bis-furanyl derivatives, respectively, had potent activity in the anti-arthritic assay with little gastric or systemic toxicity, compared with the vehicle-treated controls. Of the curcuminoids the furan RK-106 was the only compound to inhibit production of TNFα and IL-1β in a monocytic cell-line THP-1 in vitro. The inactivity of RK-106 on the production of PGE(2) may be related to its absence of gastrotoxicity. None of the curcuminoids exhibited anti-pyretic activity and this may also be related to its insensitivity to PGE(2). Thus, these novel curcuminoids, such as RK-106, may warrant the development of new low gastro-toxic anti-inflammatory agents with selective inhibitory activity of cytokine inflammatory mediators.

  15. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for

  16. Synthesis Of Benzoxazole Monomers And Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Di(hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazoles synthesized, then polymerized with aromatic dihalides. In comparison with previous routes to synthesis of polybenzoxazoles, this is simpler and more economical. New polybenzoxazoles may prove useful as adhesives, coatings, films, membranes, molding compounds, and composite matrices.

  17. Aromatic Polyimides With Group VI Linkages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Ely, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    New polymer system combines thermal and solvent resistant properties of aromatic polyimides with processability of PPX polymers. PPX polymers include polyphenylene oxide, polyphenylene sulfide, and polyphenylene sulfone classes. Generally more processable by hot melt or thermoplastic techniques than aromatic polyimides. PPX systems more susceptible to attack by solvents and have lower glass transition temperatures than PI group.

  18. Metabolic Pathways for Degradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ladino-Orjuela, Guillermo; Gomes, Eleni; da Silva, Roberto; Salt, Christopher; Parsons, John R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to build an updated collection of information focused on the mechanisms and elements involved in metabolic pathways of aromatic hydrocarbons by bacteria. Enzymes as an expression of the genetic load and the type of electron acceptor available, as an environmental factor, were highlighted. In general, the review showed that both aerobic routes and anaerobic routes for the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons are divided into two pathways. The first, named the upper pathways, entails the route from the original compound to central intermediate compounds still containing the aromatic ring but with the benzene nucleus chemically destabilized. The second, named the lower pathway, begins with ring de-aromatization and subsequent cleavage, resulting in metabolites that can be used by bacteria in the production of biomass. Under anaerobic conditions the five mechanisms of activation of the benzene ring described show the diversity of chemical reactions that can take place. Obtaining carbon and energy from an aromatic hydrocarbon molecule is a process that exhibits the high complexity level of the metabolic apparatus of anaerobic microorganisms. The ability of these bacteria to express enzymes that catalyze reactions, known only in non-biological conditions, using final electron acceptors with a low redox potential, is a most interesting topic. The discovery of phylogenetic and functional characteristics of cultivable and noncultivable hydrocarbon degrading bacteria has been made possible by improvements in molecular research techniques such as SIP (stable isotope probing) tracing the incorporation of (13)C, (15)N and (18)O into nucleic acids and proteins. Since many metabolic pathways in which enzyme and metabolite participants are still unknown, much new research is required. Therefore, it will surely allow enhancing the known and future applications in practice.

  19. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of research on the development of new catalytic pathways for the hydrogenation of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons and the hydrotreating of coal liquids at The University of Chicago under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91056. The work, which is described in three parts, is primarily concerned with the research on the development of new catalytic systems for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen. Part A discusses the activation of dihydrogen by very basic molecular reagents to form adducts that can facilitate the reduction of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons. Part B examines the hydrotreating of coal liquids catalyzed by the same base-activated dihydrogen complexes. Part C concerns studies of molecular organometallic catalysts for the hydrogenation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under mild conditions.

  20. Process for producing high purity aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, W.W.

    1980-05-20

    High-purity C7 and/or C8 aromatic hydrocarbons are produced by reforming a C7 or C8 full boiling carbon number naphtha feed fraction or combinations thereof under reforming conditions of sufficient severity to convert essentially all of the nonaromatic portion of the naphtha feed boiling in the C7 to C8 aromatic boiling range to C7 and/or C8 aromatics, and then separating the reformate by fractional distillation into highpurity fractions of C7 and/or C8 aromatic hydrocarbons. Preferably, the C7 and/or C8 full boiling carbon number naphtha feed fraction is reformed in a plurality of reformer reaction stages with increasingly more severe conditions in order to maximize the yield of the C7 and C8 aromatics.

  1. Structural basis for the promiscuous biosynthetic prenylation of aromatic natural products

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Noel, Joseph P.; Richard, Stéphane B.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-oxidant naphterpin is a natural product containing a polyketide-based aromatic core with an attached 10-carbon geranyl group derived from isoprenoid (terpene) metabolism1–3. Hybrid natural products such as naphterpin that contain 5-carbon (dimethylallyl), 10-carbon (geranyl) or 15-carbon (farnesyl) isoprenoid chains possess biological activities distinct from their non-prenylated aromatic precursors4. These hybrid natural products represent new anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral and anti-cancer compounds. A small number of aromatic prenyltransferases (PTases) responsible for prenyl group attachment have only recently been isolated and characterized5,6. Here we report the gene identification, biochemical characterization and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of an architecturally novel aromatic PTase, Orf2 from Streptomyces sp. strain CL190, with substrates and substrate analogues bound. In vivo, Orf2 attaches a geranyl group to a 1,3,6,8-tetra-hydroxynaphthalene-derived polyketide during naphterpin biosynthesis. In vitro, Orf2 catalyses carbon–carbon-based and carbon–oxygen-based prenylation of a diverse collection of hydroxyl-containing aromatic acceptors of synthetic, microbial and plant origin. These crystal structures, coupled with in vitro assays, provide a basis for understanding and potentially manipulating the regio-specific prenylation of aromatic small molecules using this structurally unique family of aromatic PTases. PMID:15959519

  2. Measurement and prediction of aromatic solute distribution coefficients for aqueous-organic solvent systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental and modeling activities were performed to assess techniques for measurement and prediction of distribution coefficients for aromatic solutes between water and immiscible organic solvents. Experiments were performed to measure distribution coefficients in both clean water and wastewater systems, and to assess treatment of a wastewater by solvent extraction. The theoretical portions of this investigation were directed towards development of techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Experiments were performed to assess treatment of a phenolic-laden coal conversion wastewater by solvent extraction. The results showed that solvent extraction for recovery of phenolic material offered several wastewater processing advantages. Distribution coefficients were measured in clean water and wastewater systems for aromatic solutes of varying functionality with different solvent types. It was found that distribution coefficients for these compounds in clean water systems were not statistically different from distribution coefficients determined in a complex coal conversion process wastewater. These and other aromatic solute distribution coefficient data were employed for evaluation of modeling techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Eight solvents were selected in order to represent various chemical classes: toluene and benzene (aromatics), hexane and heptane (alkanes), n-octanol (alcohols), n-butyl acetate (esters), diisopropyl ether (ethers), and methylisobutyl ketone (ketones). The aromatic solutes included: nonpolar compounds such as benzene, toluene and naphthalene, phenolic compounds such as phenol, cresol and catechol, nitrogenous aromatics such as aniline, pyridine and aminonaphthalene, and other aromatic solutes such as naphthol, quinolinol and halogenated compounds. 100 references, 20 figures, 34 tables.

  3. Aromatization of n-hexane over ZnO/H-ZSM-5 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, J.; Kawata, N. )

    1988-12-01

    The mechanism of transformation of n-hexane into aromatics over ZnO/H-ZSM-5 catalyst has been investigated. The yields of aromatics in the transformation of n-hexane over H-ZSM-5 are enhanced by mechanical mixing of ZnO as well as by ion exchange or impregnation of zinc cation. It is concluded that aromatization of n-hexane over ZnO/H-ZSM-5 is a bifunctional reaction, and that ZnO as well as H-ZSM-5 takes part both in the activation of n-hexane and in the aromatization of lower olefins. By contrasting the conversion of n-hexane with that of 1-hexane, it is found that aromatization of n-hexane over ZnO/H-ZSM-5 involves both the dehydrogenation of n-hexane into hexene and that of the oligomerized products into aromatics. It is proposed that ZnO catalyzes the dehydrogenation of n-hexane into hexene and of the oligomerized products into aromatics.

  4. Supramolecular chemistry: from aromatic foldamers to solution-phase supramolecular organic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary This mini-review covers the growth, education, career, and research activities of the author. In particular, the developments of various folded, helical and extended secondary structures from aromatic backbones driven by different noncovalent forces (including hydrogen bonding, donor–acceptor, solvophobicity, and dimerization of conjugated radical cations) and solution-phase supramolecular organic frameworks driven by hydrophobically initiated aromatic stacking in the cavity of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) are highlighted. PMID:26664626

  5. Understanding crystallinity in aromatic polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celarier, Edward A.

    1992-01-01

    Aromatic polyimides are a class of polymers that show remarkable thermal stability, strength, and toughness. These properties make them attractive candidates for use in high-performance carbon fiber composites for airborne and spaceborne structural components. Our research centered on the development of an understanding of the underlying process of crystallite formation in a particular class of aryl polyimides for which there are some x-ray crystallographic data available. The ultimate aim of the project is to be able to develop a model sufficiently flexible to be able, on the basis of the chemical structure of a polymer in this class, to predict: (1) whether it will be prone to form crystallites; (2) crystallographic features of the crystallites; and (3) synthesis and/or processing conditions that will be favorable or unfavorable to crystallite formation. This will provide guidance to the laboratory chemists in their choice of candidate polymers and processing methods.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Warshawsky, D

    1999-01-01

    A symposium on "Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Carcinogenesis" was presented at the third International Congress of Pathophysiology held in Lathi, Finland, 28 June-3 July 1998. The congress was also sponsored by the International Union of Biological Sciences and the International Society of Free Radical Research. Institutional support for the symposium included the Electric Power Research Institute, National Center for Toxicological Research, and EPA/National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The symposium focused on the sources, carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and risk assessment of individual and mixtures of PAHs that are found in solid wastes, Superfund sites, and other hazardous waste sites. Based on the occurrence of PAHs at numerous Superfund sites and the significant data gaps on the toxic potential of certain PAHs, the information developed during this symposium would be of value in assessing health risks of these chemicals at Superfund and other hazardous waste sites. PMID:10090712

  7. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  8. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  9. PRACTICAL SYNTHESIS OF AROMATIC DITHIOCARBAMATES

    PubMed Central

    Padungros, Panuwat; Wei, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT Oxidation-sensitive N,N-diaryl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are synthesized in good yields by the generation of metal amide salts from N-benzoyl precursors, followed by addition of CS2. para-Substituted diphenylamines are prepared by electrophilic aromatic substitution of diphenylbenzamide and saponification. Deacylation of electron-rich species such as bis(p-dimethylaminophenyl)benzamide is challenging because of the oxidative sensitivity of the anionic intermediate but could be achieved in good yield by using n-BuLi to generate a hemiaminal adduct, prior to acidification. The N,N-diaryl DTCs are stable as alkali salts and can be used to produce densely packed monolayers on gold surfaces. PMID:25999616

  10. Synthesis of perfluoroalkylene aromatic diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Nakahara, J. H.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Analogues of methylene dianilines were synthesized, in which the methylene group between the two aromatic nuclei was replaced by various perfluoroalkylene linkage. The hydrolytic thermal, and thermal oxidative stabilities of PMR Polyimides derived from these diamines were determined. Three types of PMR Polyimide discs were fabricated from the dimethyl ester of 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, the methyl ester of 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, and one of the following three diamines: methyl dianiline, 1,3-bis(4-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane, and 2,2-bis(4-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane. The polyimide based on 2,2-bis(4-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane exhibited the best hydrolytic, thermal, and thermal oxidative stability as determined by moisture uptake and thermogravimetric analysis.

  11. Tough soluble aromatic thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. Alternatively, these copolyimides may be prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydiisocyanate. Also, the copolyimide may be prepared by reacting the corresponding tetra acid and ester precursors of 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride and 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride with 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  12. Fusing porphyrins with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocycles for optoelectronic applications

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Mark E.; Diev, Viacheslav; Hanson, Kenneth; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-08-18

    A compound that can be used as a donor material in organic photovoltaic devices comprising a non-activated porphyrin fused with one or more non-activated polycyclic aromatic rings or one or more non-activated heterocyclic rings can be obtained by a thermal fusion process. The compounds can include structures of Formula I: ##STR00001## By heating the reaction mixture of non-activated porphyrins with non-activated polycyclic aromatic rings or heterocyclic rings to a fusion temperature and holding for a predetermined time, fusion of one or more polycyclic rings or heterocyclic rings to the non-activated porphyrin core in meso,.beta. fashion is achieved resulting in hybrid structures containing a distorted porphyrin ring with annulated aromatic rings. The porphyrin core can be olygoporphyrins.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Paraffin Aromatization over Zeolites: A Design Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhan, Aditya; Katare, Santhoji; Caruthers, James; Lauterbach, Jochen; Venkatasubramanian, Venkat; Delgass, Nicholas

    2002-03-01

    A generic framework for catalyst design involving the solution of a forward predictive problem using hybrid models and the inverse problem using evolutionary algorithms has been proposed. In that context, we investigate the aromatization of light paraffins over HZSM-5 to obtain the catalyst descriptors and associated kinetic parameters that predict performance. A detailed kinetic model that can fundamentally quantify the catalytic properties of acid sites in terms of intrinsic parameters such as rate constants and activation energies of elementary steps is developed on the basis of the following types of reactions: adsorption/desorption, oligomerization/ beta-scission, hydride transfer, protolysis and aromatization. The reaction network so generated has been grouped under various reaction families taking into account the different stabilities and reactivities of the adsorbed carbenium/carbonium ions. The detailed parameterization of each reaction type, optimizing fits to data, linking catalyst descriptors to performance, and means of improving the robustness of the model will be presented.

  14. Complexation of C60 fullerene with aromatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Evstigneev, Maxim P; Buchelnikov, Anatoly S; Voronin, Dmitry P; Rubin, Yuriy V; Belous, Leonid F; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I; Ritter, Uwe

    2013-02-25

    The contributions of various physical factors to the energetics of complexation of aromatic drug molecules with C(60) fullerene are investigated in terms of the calculated magnitudes of equilibrium complexation constants and the components of the net Gibbs free energy. Models of complexation are developed taking into account the polydisperse nature of fullerene solutions in terms of the continuous or discrete (fractal) aggregation of C(60) molecules. Analysis of the energetics has shown that stabilization of the ligand-fullerene complexes in aqueous solution is mainly determined by intermolecular van der Waals interactions and, to lesser extent, by hydrophobic interactions. The results provide a physicochemical basis for a potentially new biotechnological application of fullerenes as modulators of biological activity of aromatic drugs.

  15. Kinetic modeling of propane aromatization reaction over HZSM-5 and GaHZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, D.B.; Gnep, N.S.; Guisnet, M.R. . Catalyse en Chimie Organique)

    1995-02-01

    A detailed kinetic model for a propane aromatization reaction over HZSM-5 and GaHZSM-5 is developed. Kinetic modeling results show that propane transformation over HZSM-5 occurs via protolytic cracking and hydrogen transfer routes. The contributions of both routes in propane conversion are established. Rate constants of propane transformation steps are found to be at least 1,000 times lower than the rate constants of diene formation steps, which, in turn, are the slowest among the acid-catalyzed olefin aromatization steps. Gallium introduced into ZSM-5 catalyst is active in dehydrogenation of propane into propene, of olefins into dienes, and of naphthenes into aromatics. At the same time, gallium species catalyze propane transformation into methane and ethene hydrogenation into ethane. Both latter reactions appear to be the main reasons for the limit to aromatics selectivity over GaHZSM-5 catalysts.

  16. Di(hydroxyphenyl)- 1,2,4-triazole monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Wolf, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The di(hydroxyphenyl)- 1,2,4-triazole monomers were first synthesized by reacting bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) hydrazide with aniline hydrochloride at 250 C in the melt and also by reacting 1,3 or 1,4-bis- (4-hydroxyphenyl)- phenylene- dihydrazide with 2 moles of aniline hydrochloride in the melt. Purification of the di(hydroxyphenyl)- 1,2,4-triazole monomers was accomplished by recrystallization. Poly (1,2,4-triazoles) (PT) were prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)- 1,2,4-triazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions were carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as sulfolane or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PT of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides.

  17. Sediment-Associated Reactions of Aromatic Amines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of aromatic amines to sediments and soils can occur by both reversible physical processes and irreversible chemical processes. To elucidate the significance of these sorption pathways, the sorption kinetics of aniline and pyridine were studied in resaturated pond sedimen...

  18. Production of aromatic compounds in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gosset, Guillermo

    2009-12-01

    The aromatic class of chemicals includes a large number of industrially important products. In bacteria and plants, the shikimate pathway and related biosynthetic pathways are a source of aromatic compounds having commercial value. Bacterial strains for the production of aromatic compounds from simple carbon sources as raw material have been generated by applying metabolic engineering and random/combinatorial strategies that modify central metabolism, aromatic biosynthetic pathways, transport, and regulatory functions. These strategies are complemented with heterologous gene expression and protein engineering. Engineered Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida strains are enabling the development of sustainable processes for the manufacture of 2-phenylethanol, p-hydroxycinnamic acid, p-hydroxystyrene, p-hydroxybenzoate, anthranilate, and cyclohexadiene-transdiols, among other useful chemicals.

  19. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  20. Reduction of Aromatic and Heterocyclic Aromatic N-Hydroxylamines by Human Cytochrome P450 2S1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Many aromatic amines and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are known carcinogens for animals and there is also strong evidence for some in human cancer. The activation of these compounds, including some arylamine drugs, involves N-hydroxylation, usually by cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450) in Family 1 (1A2, 1A1, and 1B1). We previously demonstrated that the bioactivation product of the anti-cancer agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203), an N-hydroxylamine, can be reduced by P450 2S1 to its amine precursor under anaerobic conditions and, to a lesser extent, under aerobic conditions (Wang, K., and Guengerich, F. P. (2012) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 25, 1740–1751). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that P450 2S1 is involved in the reductive biotransformation of known carcinogenic aromatic amines and HAAs. The N-hydroxylamines of 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), 2-naphthylamine (2-NA), and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) were synthesized and found to be reduced by P450 2S1 under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The formation of amines due to P450 2S1 reduction also occurred under aerobic conditions but was less apparent because the competitive disproportionation reactions (of the N-hydroxylamines) also yielded amines. Further, some nitroso and nitro derivatives of the arylamines could also be reduced by P450 2S1. None of the amines tested were oxidized by P450 2S1. These results suggest that P450 2S1 may be involved in the reductive detoxication of several of the activated products of carcinogenic aromatic amines and HAAs. PMID:23682735

  1. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH{sup +}s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 {mu}m interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH{sup +}s have a band near 6.2 {mu}m, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH{sup +}s still have emission near 6.2 {mu}m, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 {mu}m overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 {mu}m, so that the 6.2 {mu}m band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH{sup +}s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 {mu}m (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 {mu}m Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  2. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berné, O.; Joblin, C.; Mulas, G.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Thanks to high sensitivity, high angular resolution and broad spectral coverage, SPICA will offer a unique opportunity to better characterize the nature of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs), to better use them as probes of astrophysical environments. The angular resolution will enable to probe the chemical frontiers in the evolution process from VSGs to neutral PAHs, to ionized PAHs and to "Grand-PAHs" in photodissotiation regions and HII regions, as a function of G0 /n (UV radiation field / density). High sensitivity will favor the detection of the far-IR skeletal emission bands of PAHs, which provide specific fingerprints and could lead to the identification of individual PAHs. This overall characterization will allow to use PAH and VSG populations as tracers of physical conditions in spatially resolved protoplanetary disks and nearby galaxies (using mid-IR instruments), and in high redshift galaxies (using the far-IR instrument), thanks to the broad spectral coverage SPICA provides. Based on our previous experience with ISO and Spitzer we discuss how these goals can be reached.

  3. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  4. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  5. An Aromatic Inventory of the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, A. R.; Engelbracht, C. W.; van Zee, L.; Dale, D. A.; Smith, J. D. T.; Gordon, K. D.; Wu, Y.; Lee, J. C.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Skillman, E. D.; Johnson, L. C.; Block, M.; Calzetti, D.; Cohen, S. A.; Lee, H.; Schuster, M. D.

    2010-05-01

    Using infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we perform the first inventory of aromatic feature emission (also commonly referred to as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission) for a statistically complete sample of star-forming galaxies in the local volume. The photometric methodology involved is calibrated and demonstrated to recover the aromatic fraction of the Infrared Array Camera 8 μm flux with a standard deviation of 6% for a training set of 40 SINGS galaxies (ranging from stellar to dust dominated) with both suitable mid-infrared Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra and equivalent photometry. A potential factor of 2 improvement could be realized with suitable 5.5 μm and 10 μm photometry, such as what may be provided in the future by the James Webb Space Telescope. The resulting technique is then applied to mid-infrared photometry for the 258 galaxies from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey, a large sample dominated in number by low-luminosity dwarf galaxies for which obtaining comparable mid-infrared spectroscopy is not feasible. We find the total LVL luminosity due to five strong aromatic features in the 8 μm complex to be 2.47 × 1010 L sun with a mean volume density of 8.8 × 106 L sun Mpc-3. Twenty-four of the LVL galaxies, corresponding to a luminosity cut at MB = -18.22, account for 90% of the aromatic luminosity. Using oxygen abundances compiled from the literature for 129 of the 258 LVL galaxies, we find a correlation between metallicity and the aromatic-to-total infrared emission ratio but not the aromatic-to-total 8 μm dust emission ratio. A possible explanation is that metallicity plays a role in the abundance of aromatic molecules relative to the total dust content, but other factors, such as star formation and/or the local radiation field, affect the excitation of those molecules.

  6. Aromatic Polyimides Containing Meta-Biphenoxy Moieties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L.; Whitley, Karen S.; Pratt, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of two novel monomers and subsequent incorporation into aromatic polyimides yields polyimides containing meta-biphenoxy moieties exhibiting stability at high temperatures and having glass-transition temperatures lower than state-of-the-art polyimides containing para-biphenoxy moieties. Because of outstanding thermal stability, low density, resistance to radiation, electrical-insulating capability, toughness, and flexibility, linear aromatic polyimides used increasingly for applications in aerospace and electronics industries and possibly in others.

  7. (Anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds by phototrophic bacteria: Biochemical aspects)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.

    1989-01-01

    Two aspects of the work proposed have received major emphasis during the period since the grant was activated: isolation and characterization of transposon insertion mutants of Rhodopseudomonas palusrtis defective in phototrophic growth on aromatic compounds, and attempts to purify and characterize the Coenzyme A ligase enzyme involved in activating 4-hydroxybenzoate. The HPLC apparatus was installed in August, and calibration of columns both for metabolite and for protein separations has been initiated. A start has also been made on synthesis of Coenzyme A thioesters of compounds that are potential intermediates in the anaerobic degradation pathways. 1 tab.

  8. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  9. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the water environment*

    PubMed Central

    Andelman, Julian B.; Suess, Michael J.

    1970-01-01

    Many polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are known to be carcinogenic to animals and probably to man. This review is concerned with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic PAH in the water environment, with emphasis on 3,4-benzpyrene (BP) because it is ubiquitous, is one of the most potent of the carcinogenic PAH and has been widely studied. Although PAH are formed in combustion and other high-temperature processes, there is also evidence for their endogenous formation in plants, which may explain their ubiquity therein. Although the solubility of these compounds in pure water is very low, they may be solubilized by such materials as detergents, or they may otherwise occur in aqueous solution associated with or adsorbed on to a variety of colloidal materials or biota, and thereby be transported through the water environment. A notable characteristic of PAH is their sensitivity to light. PAH have been found in industrial and municipal waste effluents, and occur in soils, ground waters and surface waters, and their sediments and biota. With the exception of filtration or sorption by activated carbon, conventional water treatment processes do not efficiently remove them, and they have been found in domestic water supplies. Because of the ubiquity of PAH in the environment, it is impossible to prevent completely man's exposure to them; nevertheless their surveillance should be continued and their concentrations in the environment should be reduced where practicable. PMID:4100719

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biogeochemical markers in marine sediments of the Mediterranean Sea and of the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Parlanti, E.; Garrigues, P.; Bellocq, J.; Ewald, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) have been mainly considered as anthropogenic pollutant compounds introduced in the ocean by industrial activity. However, unlike other pollutant compounds which are only produced by industrial activity (such as pesticides or polychlorobiphenyls), diagenetic pathways in the sedimentary environment could give rise to the same aromatic compounds as found in anthropogenic inputs. Thus, differentiation among the different sources of PAH is of importance for identification of the modes of transport and transformation of these compounds in the environment. In the presented studies, different deep sea sediment samples cored in Mediterranean and Atlantic margins have been examined for the determination of specific aromatic markers of petrogenic/pyrolytic/biogenic origin.

  11. A hydroxycinnamoyltransferase responsible for synthesizing suberin aromatics in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Jin-Ying; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Suberin, a polyester polymer in the cell wall of terrestrial plants, controls the transport of water and nutrients and protects plant from pathogenic infections and environmental stresses. Structurally, suberin consists of aliphatic and aromatic domains; p-hydroxycinnamates, such as ferulate, p-coumarate, and/or sinapate, are the major phenolic constituents of the latter. By analyzing the “wall-bound” phenolics of mutant lines of Arabidopsis deficient in a family of acyl-CoA dependent acyltransferase (BAHD) genes, we discovered that the formation of aromatic suberin in Arabidopsis, primarily in seed and root tissues, depends on a member of the BAHD superfamily of enzymes encoded by At5g41040. This enzyme exhibits an ω-hydroxyacid hydroxycinnamoyltransferase activity with an in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl-CoA and 16-hydroxypalmitic acid. Knocking down or knocking out the At5g41040 gene in Arabidopsis reduces specifically the quantity of ferulate in suberin, but does not affect the accumulation of p-coumarate or sinapate. The loss of the suberin phenolic differentially affects the aliphatic monomer loads and alters the permeability and sensitivity of seeds and roots to salt stress. This highlights the importance of suberin aromatics in the polymer's function. PMID:19846769

  12. [The treatment of respiratory ailments with essential oils of some aromatic medicinal plants].

    PubMed

    Rakover, Yoseph; Ben-Arye, Eran; Goldstein, Lee H

    2008-10-01

    In-vitro and clinical studies suggest the therapeutic potential of aromatic herbs in the treatment of respiratory ailments. The pharmacological and clinical activity of Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, Salvia fruticosa and Rosmarinus officinalis, include anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-viral activities. Some of these herbs have direct activity on the respiratory tract, the coughing reflex and the airflow in the nasal tract. This article reviews the evidence on the efficacy and safety of aromatic trees and herbs which grow in Israel, in the scope of the field of otorhinolaryngology.

  13. Synthesis of tetra- and octa-aurated heteroaryl complexes towards probing aromatic indoliums

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jun; Sun, Tingting; He, Xin; An, Ke; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Polymetalated aromatic compounds are particularly challenging synthetic goals because of the limited thermodynamic stability of polyanionic species arising from strong electrostatic repulsion between adjacent carbanionic sites. Here we describe a facile synthesis of two polyaurated complexes including a tetra-aurated indole and an octa-aurated benzodipyrrole. The imido trinuclear gold(I) moiety exhibits nucleophilicity and undergoes an intramolecular attack on a gold(I)-activated ethynyl to generate polyanionic heteroaryl species. Their computed magnetic properties reveal the aromatic character in the five-membered ring. The incorporation of the aurated substituents at the nitrogen atom can convert non-aromaticity in the parent indolium into aromaticity in the aurated one because of hyperconjugation. Thus, the concept of hyperconjugative aromaticity is extended to heterocycles with transition metal substituents. More importantly, further analysis indicates that the aurated substituents can perform better than traditional main-group substituents. This work highlights the difference in aromaticity between polymetalated aryls and their organic prototypes. PMID:27186982

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and their Ions. 6; Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattioda, A. L.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Rosi, M.; Allamandola, L. J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The matrix-isolation technique has been employed to measure the mid-infrared spectra of several polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles in both neutral and cationic forms. The species studied include: 7,8 benzoquinoline (C13H9N); 2-azapyrene (C15H9N); 1- and 2-azabenz(a)anthracene (C17H11N); and 1-, 2-, and 4-azachrysene (also C17H11N). The experimentally measured band frequencies and intensities for each molecule are tabulated and compared with their theoretically calculated values computed using density functional theory at the B3LYP/4-31G level. The overall agreement between experiment and theory is quite good, in keeping with previous investigations involving the parent aromatic hydrocarbons. Several interesting spectroscopic trends are found to accompany nitrogen substitution into the aromatic framework of these compounds. First, for the neutral species, the nitrogen atom produces a significant increase in the total integrated infrared intensity across the 1600 - 1100/cm region and plays an essential role in the molecular vibration that underlies an uncharacteristically intense, discrete feature that is observed near 1400/cm in the spectra of 7,8 benzoquinoline, 1-azabenz(a)anthracene, and 4-azachrysene. The origin of this enhanced infrared activity and the nature of the new 1400/cm vibrational mode are explored. Finally, in contrast to the parent hydrocarbon species, these aromatic nitrogen heterocycles possess a significant permanent dipole moment. Consequently, these dipole moments and the rotational constants are reported for these species in their neutral and ionized forms.

  15. Catalysts for polyimide foams from aromatic isocyanates and aromatic dianhydrides. [flame retardant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Sawko, P. M.; Estrella, C. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Polyimide foam products having greatly improved burn-through and flame-spread resistance are prepared by the reaction of aromatic polyisocyanates with aromatic dianhydrides in the presence of metallic salts of octoic acid. The salts, for example stannous octoate, ferric octoate and aluminum octoate, favor the formation of imide linkages at the expense of other possible reactions.

  16. Rhodium‐Catalyzed Decarbonylative Borylation of Aromatic Thioesters for Facile Diversification of Aromatic Carboxylic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Hidenori; Uetake, Yuta

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Transformation of aromatic thioesters into arylboronic esters was achieved efficiently using a rhodium catalyst. The broad functional‐group tolerance and mild conditions of the method have allowed for the two‐step decarboxylative borylation of a wide range of aromatic carboxylic acids, including commercially available drugs. PMID:28124826

  17. Aromatic metabolism of filamentous fungi in relation to the presence of aromatic compounds in plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Marinović, Mila; Nousiainen, Paula; Liwanag, April J M; Benoit, Isabelle; Sipilä, Jussi; Hatakka, Annele; de Vries, Ronald P; Hildén, Kristiina S

    2015-01-01

    The biological conversion of plant lignocellulose plays an essential role not only in carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems but also is an important part of the production of second generation biofuels and biochemicals. The presence of the recalcitrant aromatic polymer lignin is one of the major obstacles in the biofuel/biochemical production process and therefore microbial degradation of lignin is receiving a great deal of attention. Fungi are the main degraders of plant biomass, and in particular the basidiomycete white rot fungi are of major importance in converting plant aromatics due to their ability to degrade lignin. However, the aromatic monomers that are released from lignin and other aromatic compounds of plant biomass are toxic for most fungi already at low levels, and therefore conversion of these compounds to less toxic metabolites is essential for fungi. Although the release of aromatic compounds from plant biomass by fungi has been studied extensively, relatively little attention has been given to the metabolic pathways that convert the resulting aromatic monomers. In this review we provide an overview of the aromatic components of plant biomass, and their release and conversion by fungi. Finally, we will summarize the applications of fungal systems related to plant aromatics.

  18. AROMATIC AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN A LAMINAR PREMIXED N-BUTANE FLAME. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane¯oxygen¯argon burner s...

  19. Water-soluble constituents of caraway: aromatic compound, aromatic compound glucoside and glucides.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Tetsuko; Ishikawa, Toru; Kitajima, Junichi

    2002-10-01

    From the water-soluble portion of the methanolic extract of caraway (fruit of Carum carvi L.), an aromatic compound, an aromatic compound glucoside and a glucide were isolated together with 16 known compounds. Their structures were clarified as 2-methoxy-2-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol, junipediol A 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside and L-fucitol, respectively.

  20. An overview of the AROMAT campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Van Roozendael, Michel; Constantin, Daniel; Georgescu, Lucian; Meier, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Den Hoed, Mirjam; Allaart, Marc; Boscornea, Andreea; Vajaiac, Sorin; Bellegante, Livio; Nemuc, Anca; Nicolae, Doina; Shaifangar, Reza; Dörner, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas; Stebel, Kerstin; Schuettemeyer, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign and its follow-up AROMAT-2 were held in September 2014 and August 2015, respectively. Both campaigns focused on two geophysical targets: the city of Bucharest and the large power plants of the Jiu Valley, which are located in a rural area 170 km West of Bucharest. These two areas are complementary in terms of emitted chemical species and their spatial distributions. The objectives of the AROMAT campaigns were (i) to test recently developed airborne observation systems dedicated to air quality satellite validation studies such as the AirMAP imaging DOAS system (University of Bremen), the NO2 sonde (KNMI), and the compact SWING whiskbroom imager (BIRA), and (ii) to prepare the validation programme of the future Atmospheric Sentinels, starting with Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5P) to be launched in early summer 2016. We present results from the different airborne instrumentations and from coincident ground-based measurements (lidar, in-situ, and mobile DOAS systems) performed during both campaigns. The AROMAT dataset addresses several of the mandatory products of TROPOMI/S5P, in particular NO2 and SO2 (horizontal distribution and profile from aircraft, plume image with ground-based SO2 and NO2 cameras, transects with mobile DOAS, in-situ), H2CO (mobile MAX-DOAS), and aerosols (lidar, airborne FUBISS-ASA2 sun-photometer, and aircraft in-situ). We investigate the information content of the AROMAT dataset for satellite validation studies based on co-located OMI and GOME-2 data, and simulations of TROPOMI measurements. The experience gained during AROMAT and AROMAT-2 will be used in support of a large-scale TROPOMI/S5P validation campaign in Romania scheduled for summer 2017.

  1. Hückel's Rule of Aromaticity Categorizes Aromatic closo Boron Hydride Clusters.

    PubMed

    Poater, Jordi; Solà, Miquel; Viñas, Clara; Teixidor, Francesc

    2016-05-23

    A direct connection is established between three-dimensional aromatic closo boron hydride clusters and planar aromatic [n]annulenes for medium and large boron clusters. In particular, the results prove the existence of a link between the two-dimensional Hückel rule, as followed by aromatic [n]annulenes, and Wade-Mingos' rule of three-dimensional aromaticity, as applied to the aromatic [Bn Hn ](2-) closo boron hydride clusters. The closo boron hydride clusters can be categorized into different series, according to the n value of the Hückel (4 n+2) π rule. The distinct categories studied in this work correspond to n=1, 2, and 3. Each category increases in geometrical difficulty but, more importantly, it is possible to associate each category with the number of pentagonal layers in the structure perpendicular to the main axis. Category 1 has one pentagonal layer, category 2 has two, and category 3 has three.

  2. Synthesis of functional aromatic multisulfonyl chlorides and their masked precursors.

    PubMed

    Percec, V; Bera, T K; De, B B; Sanai, Y; Smith, J; Holerca, M N; Barboiu, B; Grubbs, R B; Fréchet, J M

    2001-03-23

    The synthesis of functional aromatic bis(sulfonyl chlorides) containing an acetophenone and two sulfonyl chloride groups, i.e., 3,5-bis[4-(chlorosulfonyl)phenyl]-1-acetophenone (16), 3,5-bis(chlorosulfonyl)-1-acetophenone (17), and 3,5-bis(4-(chlorosulfonyl)phenyloxy)-1-acetophenone (18) via a sequence of reactions, involving in the last step the quantitative oxidative chlorination of S-(aryl)- N,N'-diethylthiocarbamate, alkyl- or benzyl thiophenyl groups as masked nonreactive precursors to sulfonyl chlorides is described. A related sequence of reactions was used for the synthesis of the aromatic trisulfonyl chloride 1,1,1-tris(4-chlorosulfonylphenyl)ethane (24). 4-(Chlorosulfonyl)phenoxyacetic acid, 2,2-bis[[[4-(chlorosulfonyl)phenoxyacetyl]oxy]methyl]-1,3-propanediyl ester (27), 5,11,17,23-tetrakis(chlorosulfonyl)-25,26,27,28-tetrakis(ethoxycarbonylmethoxy)calix[4]arene (38), 5,11,17,23,29,35-hexakis(chlorosulfonyl)-37,38,39,40,41,42-hexakis(ethoxycarbonylmethoxy)calix[6]arene (39), 5,11,17,23,29,35,41,47-octakis(chlorosulfonyl)-49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56-octakis(ethoxycarbonylmethoxy)calix[8]arene (40), 5,11,17,23-tetrakis(tert-butyl)-25,26,27,28-tetrakis(chlorosulfonyl phenoxyacetoxy)calix[4]arene (44), 5,11,17,23,29,35-hexakis(tert-butyl)-37,38,39,40,41,42-hexakis(chlorosulfonylphenoxyacetoxy)calix[6]arene (45), and 5,11,17,23,29,35,41,47-octakis(tert-butyl)-49,40,51,52,53,54,55,56-octakis(chlorosulfonylphenoxyacetoxy)calix[8]arene (46) were synthesized by two different multistep reaction procedures, the last step of both methods consisting of the chlorosulfonation of compounds containing suitable activated aromatic positions. 2,4,6-Tris(chlorosulfonyl)aniline (47) was obtained by the chlorosulfonation of aniline. The conformation of two series of multisulfonyl chlorides i.e., 38, 39, 40 and 44, 45, 46, was investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The masked nonreactive precursor states of the functional aromatic multisulfonyl chlorides and the aromatic

  3. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum species to aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-de-Victoria, G.; Lovell, C.R. )

    1993-09-01

    Azospirillum sspeciesare free-living nitrogen fixing bacteria commonly found in soils and in association with plant roots, including important agricultural crops. Rhizosphere colonization my Azospirillum species has been shown to stimulate growth of a variety of plant species. Chemotaxis is one of the properties which may contribute to survival, rhizosphere colonization and the initiation of mutualistic interactions by Azospirillum species. This study evaluates the chemotactic responses of three Azospirillum stains to a variety of aromatic compounds:benzoate, catechol, 4-HB, and PCA. Results indicate that the same aromatic substance can elicit different chemotactic responses from different Azospirillum species, and that Azospirillum can detect aromatic substrates at concentrations similar to those they encounter naturally. 36 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  4. The fundamental chemical equation of aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Remi; Lepetit, Christine

    2013-03-21

    In the search for the chemical measure of molecular aromaticity, namely the energetic gain of a cyclic delocalized structure for just being cyclic, the numerous definitions of generic aromatic stabilisation energies proposed hitherto stand as approximates of the conceptual limit devised within the framework of spectral graph theory, i.e. the topological resonance energy (TRE). After a 36 year challenge, the TRE acyclic reference of any π-cyclic molecule, originally merely defined by an abstract matching polynomial, is now given a real chemical structure: the Möbius-twisted head-to-tail metathesis cyclo-dimer of the parent ring. The original treatment at the Hückel molecular orbital level of theory can now be extended to DFT or ab initio levels. The corresponding ring opening-closing-twisting chemical transformation provides the observable basis for the measure of aromaticity under either vertical or adiabatic conditions.

  5. Ion exclusion chromatography of aromatic acids.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Fotouh R; Kirkpatrick, Christine L; Danielson, Neil D

    2013-08-01

    The determination of aromatic acids by ion exclusion chromatography is challenging due to peak tailing and the long retention time of hydrophobic solutes. This review discusses the retention mechanisms and the factors affecting retention, eluents and detection methods used in ion exclusion chromatography of aromatic acids such as mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-carboxylic acids, amino acids, sulfonates and phenol. In addition, the different approaches used to improve the chromatographic separation of these compounds are also discussed. These approaches include introducing an internal gradient of the ionic strength, using vacancy ion exclusion chromatography, employing a hydrophilic cation exchange resin or adding a modifier such as heptanol to the dilute sulfuric acid mobile phase. The applications of these methods in the analysis of aromatic acids are provided with a table summarizing the stationary phases, the mobile phases and the detection methods.

  6. Highly Dispersed Pt Nanoparticles for the Production of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by the Catalytic Degrading of Alkali Lignin.

    PubMed

    Sanyoto, Bernardi; Dwiatmoko, Adid Adep; Choi, Jae-Wook; Ha, Jeong-Myeong; Suh, Dong Jin; Kim, Chang Soo; Lim, Jong-Choo

    2016-05-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons were produced from lignin, a complex natural amorphous polymer commonly regarded as by-product of the pulping process and from biofuel production. The catalytic decomposition of lignin using supported Pt catalysts was performed to produce small molecule hydrocarbons. Aromatic small-molecule hydrocarbon products were identified and quantified using GC/MS and GC-FID, which demonstrated that 27.6% of aromatic hydrocarbons were obtained from the activated carbon-supported Pt (Pt/AC) catalyst which had the highest Pt surface area.

  7. Environmental assessment of aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated sediments of the Mexican Salina Cuz Bay.

    PubMed

    González-Macías, C; Schifter, I; Lluch-Cota, D B; Méndez-Rodríguez, L; Hernández-Vázquez, S

    2007-10-01

    Concentrations of total aromatic hydrocarbons and extractable organic matter in the water column and sediment were determined in samples collected in the course of the last 20 years from the Salina Cruz Harbor, México, to assess the degree of organic contamination. In sediments, organic compounds accumulate in shallow areas mostly associated with extractable organic matter and fine fractions. Calculated geocumulation index and enrichment factors suggest that contamination could be derived from anthropogenic activities attributed to harbor and ship scrapping activities, as well as transboundary source. Concentration of total aromatic hydrocarbons (as chrysene equivalents) ranged from 0.01 to 534 microg l(-1) in water, and from 0.10 to 2,160 microg g(-1) in sediments. Total aromatic concentration of 5 microg g(-1) is proposed as background concentration.

  8. AN AROMATIC INVENTORY OF THE LOCAL VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, A. R.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Block, M.; Van Zee, L.; Dale, D. A.; Cohen, S. A.; Schuster, M. D.; Smith, J. D. T.; Gordon, K. D.; Wu, Y.; Lee, J. C.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Skillman, E. D.; Johnson, L. C.; Calzetti, D.; Lee, H.

    2010-05-20

    Using infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we perform the first inventory of aromatic feature emission (also commonly referred to as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission) for a statistically complete sample of star-forming galaxies in the local volume. The photometric methodology involved is calibrated and demonstrated to recover the aromatic fraction of the Infrared Array Camera 8 {mu}m flux with a standard deviation of 6% for a training set of 40 SINGS galaxies (ranging from stellar to dust dominated) with both suitable mid-infrared Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra and equivalent photometry. A potential factor of 2 improvement could be realized with suitable 5.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m photometry, such as what may be provided in the future by the James Webb Space Telescope. The resulting technique is then applied to mid-infrared photometry for the 258 galaxies from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey, a large sample dominated in number by low-luminosity dwarf galaxies for which obtaining comparable mid-infrared spectroscopy is not feasible. We find the total LVL luminosity due to five strong aromatic features in the 8 {mu}m complex to be 2.47 x 10{sup 10} L{sub sun} with a mean volume density of 8.8 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} Mpc{sup -3}. Twenty-four of the LVL galaxies, corresponding to a luminosity cut at M{sub B} = -18.22, account for 90% of the aromatic luminosity. Using oxygen abundances compiled from the literature for 129 of the 258 LVL galaxies, we find a correlation between metallicity and the aromatic-to-total infrared emission ratio but not the aromatic-to-total 8 {mu}m dust emission ratio. A possible explanation is that metallicity plays a role in the abundance of aromatic molecules relative to the total dust content, but other factors, such as star formation and/or the local radiation field, affect the excitation of those molecules.

  9. Production of aromatics from di- and polyoxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Beck, Taylor; Blank, Brian; Jones, Casey; Woods, Elizabeth; Cortright, Randy

    2016-08-02

    Methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing in high yield aromatic chemicals and liquid fuels from a mixture of oxygenates comprising di- and polyoxygenates are disclosed. Also disclosed are methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing aromatic chemicals and liquid fuels from oxygenated hydrocarbons such as carbohydrates, sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar degradation products, and the like; and methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing the mixture of oxygenates from oxygenated hydrocarbons such as carbohydrates, sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar degradation products, and the like. The disclosed catalysts for preparing the mixture of oxygenates comprise a Ni.sub.nSn.sub.m alloy and a crystalline alumina support.

  10. Production of aromatics from di- and polyoxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Beck, Taylor; Blank, Brian; Jones, Casey; Woods, Elizabeth; Cortright, Randy

    2016-09-13

    Methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing in high yield aromatic chemicals and liquid fuels from a mixture of oxygenates comprising di- and polyoxygenates are disclosed. Also disclosed are methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing aromatic chemicals and liquid fuels from oxygenated hydrocarbons such as carbohydrates, sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar degradation products, and the like; and methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing the mixture of oxygenates from oxygenated hydrocarbons such as carbohydrates, sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar degradation products, and the like. The disclosed catalysts for preparing the mixture of oxygenates comprise a Group VIII metal and a crystalline alumina support.

  11. Valorization of essential oils from Moroccan aromatic plants.

    PubMed

    Santana, Omar; Fe Andrés, Maria; Sanz, Jesús; Errahmani, Naima; Abdeslam, Lamiri; González-Coloma, Azucena

    2014-08-01

    The chemical composition and biological activity of cultivated and wild medicinal and aromatic plants from Morocco (Artemisia herba-alba, Lippia citriodora, Mentha pulegium, M. spicata, Myrtus communis, Rosmarinus officinalis, and Thymus satureioides) are described. The essential oils (EOs) of these species have been analyzed by GC-MS. The antifeedant, nematicidal and phytotoxic activities of the EOs were tested on insect pests (Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae and Rhopalosiphum padi), root-knot nematodes (Meloydogine javanica) and plants (Lactuca sativa, Lolium perenne and Lycopersicum esculentum). EOs from A. herba-alba, M. pulegium and R. officinalis were strong antifeedants against S. littoralis, M. persicae and R. padi. EOs from L. citriodora, M. spicata and T. satureioides showed high nematicidal activity. These biological effects are explained by the activity of the major EO components and/or synergistic effects.

  12. Molecular dosimetry of aromatic amines in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Skipper, P.L.; Tannenbaum, S.R.

    1994-10-01

    Certain aromatic amines carcinogenic for the human urinary bladder, such as 4-aminobiphenyl, undergo hepatic metabolic activation to N-hydroxylamines, which are transported to the bladder. During the transport process, these reactive species come in contact with hemoglobin and react with this blood protein. The principal hemoglobin adduct formed is a cysteine sulfinamide, and quantitative methods have been developed for the analysis of sulfinamide adducts at the levels present in ordinary human blood specimens. N-acetylation is an alternative metabolic fate to N-hydroxylation. The amount of hemoglobin adduct is decreased to the extent that this pathway is increased relative to N-hydroxylation. Thus, the hemoglobin adduct is sensitive to dose, cytochrome P-450-mediated activation, and N-acetyltransferase-mediated detoxification. In addition, it has been shown that DNA adduct concentration of 4-aminobiphenyl present in human bladder epithelial cells is significantly associated with hemoglobin adduct levels. Thus, the hemoglobin adduct of 4-aminobiphenyl, and perhaps several other aromatic amines, is a good dosimeter for the target tissue dose of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of these amines. Several studies have been undertaken in which the hemoglobin adducts of aminobiphenyls in human blood specimens were determined quantitatively. Information concerning exposure status and acetylator phenotype of the same individuals was obtained simultaneously. The results of these studies indicate that the hemoglobin adduct of 4-aminobiphenyl is closely associated with three major risk factors for bladder cancer; cigarette smoking, type of tobacco smoked, and acetylator phenotype. They also support a major etiologic role for aromatic amines in much of human bladder cancer. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Robert E.; Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 5-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  14. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  15. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Robert E. [557 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA 94550; Dolbeare, Frank A. [5178 Diane La., Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  16. Assessing aromaticity and the degree of aromatic condensation of pyrogenic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemeier, D. B.; Abiven, S.; Hockaday, W. C.; Keiluweit, M.; Kleber, M.; Masiello, C. A.; McBeath, A. V.; Nico, P. S.; Pyle, L. A.; Schneider, M. P.; Smernik, R. J.; Wiesenberg, G. L.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    Fire-derived, pyrogenic carbon (PyC) is a persistent organic carbon fraction in soils because it is relatively resistant against chemical and biological degradation. PyC thus represents a carbon sequestration potential in the global carbon cycle and was also reported to be potentially beneficial for soil fertility. PyC is naturally added to soils during wildfires and anthropogenically in the form of biochar, after organic waste is pyrolyzed. Aromaticity and the degree of aromatic condensation are the two main quality properties of PyC that probably determine its persistence against degradation. Consequently, the two properties largely influence the PyC's carbon sequestration potential as well as the duration, during which it can provide benefits to the soil. Aromaticity and the degree of aromatic condensation of PyC should theoretically be dependent on pyrolysis conditions, such as highest heating temperature or pyrolysis time, and also depend on the feedstock. In this study, we used two different pyrolysis procedures and four different feedstocks to produce four thermosequences of 38 chars in total, with highest heating temperatures ranging from 100 - 1000° C. The chars were then analyzed with an extensive suite of seven different methods: solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR), diffuse infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), synchrotron-based near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (NEXAFS), benzene polycarboxylic acid analysis (BPCA), lipid analysis, elemental analysis and helium pycnometry. These methods allowed to infer the aromaticity and the degree of aromatic condensation of the differently pyrolyzed materials. Using multivariate statistical methods, aromaticity and the degree of aromatic condensation could successfully be linked to highest heating temperature and other pyrolysis conditions because characteristic patterns of the two aromatic properties could be observed by different methods throughout all four

  17. Catalytic Mechanism of Aromatic Prenylation by NphB

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Miao, Yipu; Wang, Bing; Cui, Guanglei; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    NphB is an aromatic prenyltransferase that catalyzes the attachment of a 10-carbon geranyl group to aromatic substrates. Importantly, NphB exhibits a rich substrate selectivity and product regioselectivity. A systematic computational study has been conducted in order to address several question associated with NphB catalyzed geranylation. The reaction mechanism of the prenylation step has been characterized as a SN1 type dissociative mechanism with a weakly stable carbocation intermediate. A novel π-chamber composed of Tyr121, Tyr216 and 1,6-DHN is found to be important in stabilizing the carbocation. The observed difference in the rates of product formation from 5 and 2-prenylation arises from the differing orientations of the aromatic substrate in the resting state. 4-prenylation shares the same resting state with 5-prenylation, but the lower free energy barrier for carbocation formation makes the latter reaction more facile. The high free energy barrier associated with 7-prenylation is caused by the unfavorable orientation of 1,6-DHN in active site pocket, along with the difficulty of proton elimination after the prenylation step. A water mediated proton transfer facilitates the loss of hydrogen at the prenylation site to form the final prenylated product. Interestingly, the same crystallographically observed water molecule has been found to be responsible for proton loss in all three experimentally identified products. After proton transfer, the relaxation of the final product from a sp3 carbon center to a sp2 center triggers a “spring-loaded” product release mechanism which pushes the final product out of the binding pocket towards the edge of the active site. The hydrogen bond interactions between the two hydroxyl groups of the aromatic product and the sidechains of Ser214 and Tyr288 help to “steer” the movement of the product. In addition, mutagenesis studies identify these same two sidechains as being responsible for the observed regioselectivity

  18. Functional soil metagenomics: Elucidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation potential following 12 years of in situ bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Márcia; Nielsen, Agnes; Camarinha-Silva, Amélia; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Bruls, Thomas; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Jauregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2017-04-12

    A culture-independent function-based screening approach was used to assess the microbial aerobic catabolome for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation of a soil subjected to 12 years of in situ bioremediation. A total of 422,750 fosmid clones were screened for key aromatic ring-cleavage activities using 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl as substrate. Most of the genes encoding ring-cleavage enzymes on the 768 retrieved positive fosmids could not be identified using primer-based approaches and, thus, 205 fosmid inserts were sequenced. Nearly two hundred extradiol dioxygenase encoding genes of three different superfamilies could be identified. Additional key genes of aromatic metabolic pathways were identified, including a high abundance of Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases that provided detailed information on enzymes activating aromatic compounds and enzymes involved in activation of the side chain of methylsubstituted aromatics. The gained insights indicated a complex microbial network acting at the site under study, which comprises organisms similar to recently identified Immundisolibacter cernigliae TR3.2 and Rugosibacter aromaticivorans Ca6 and underlined the great potential of an approach that combines an activity-screening, a cost-effective high-throughput sequencing of fosmid clones and a phylogenomic-routed and manually curated database to carefully identify key proteins dedicated to aerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescent aromatic sensors and their methods of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A. (Inventor); Tyson, Daniel S. (Inventor); Ilan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic molecules that can be used as sensors are described. The aromatic sensors include a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon core with a five-membered imide rings fused to the core and at least two pendant aryl groups. The aromatic sensor molecules can detect target analytes or molecular strain as a result of changes in their fluorescence, in many cases with on-off behavior. Aromatic molecules that fluoresce at various frequencies can be prepared by altering the structure of the aromatic core or the substituents attached to it. The aromatic molecules can be used as sensors for various applications such as, for example, the detection of dangerous chemicals, biomedical diagnosis, and the detection of damage or strain in composite materials. Methods of preparing aromatic sensor molecules are also described.

  20. SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED REACTIONS OF AROMATIC AMINES. 2. QSAR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of aromatic amines in soils and sediments is dominated by irreversible binding through nucleophilic addition and oxidative radical coupling. Despite the common occurrence of the aromatic amine functional group in organic chemicals, the molecular properties useful for pr...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  2. Thermoset/Thermoplastic Aromatic Polyamides for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; St. Clair, A. K.; Barrick, J. D.; Wolfe, J. F.; Greenwood, T. D.

    1983-01-01

    Aromatic polyamides are processed at relatively low temperature, then heat-treated to attain high softening temperature required when polyamides are used as matrix resins in structural composites. New polyamides are compatable with organic fibers often used as reinforcing agents in such composites Pendent propargyl groups serve as latent cross-linking agents in new series of polyamide resins.

  3. DETERMINATION OF AROMATIC AMINES IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid liquid chromatographic(LC)method with ultraviolet(UV)or fluorescence detection was developed for parts-per-billion levels of aromatic amines in soils. 2,4-Diaminotoluene, pyridine,aniline,2-picoline,2-toluidine,5-nitro-2-toluidine,2-methyl-6-ethylaniline,4-aminobiphenyl,4...

  4. Reaction of disubstituted aromatic compounds with styrene

    SciTech Connect

    Grushin, A.I.; Grigor'ev, V.V.; Prokof'ev, K.V.; Kozlova, N.M.

    1988-03-20

    Hydrocarbons of the 1,1-diphenylethane type were obtained by the reaction of styrene with various disubstituted derivatives of benzene in the presence of titanium tetrachloride. It was found that the yield of the desired compound depends on the strength of the electron-donating substituents and on steric factors in the aromatic ring.

  5. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10259 - Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10259 Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN P-09-540) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10259 - Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10259 Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN P-09-540) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10259 - Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10259 Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN P-09-540) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.750 - Aromatic amine compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aromatic amine compound. 721.750... Substances § 721.750 Aromatic amine compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aromatic amine compound (PMN P-86-334) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.875 - Aromatic nitro compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic nitro compound. 721.875... Substances § 721.875 Aromatic nitro compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aromatic nitro compound (PMN P-86-335) is subject to reporting...

  18. 40 CFR 721.750 - Aromatic amine compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic amine compound. 721.750... Substances § 721.750 Aromatic amine compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aromatic amine compound (PMN P-86-334) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.875 - Aromatic nitro compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic nitro compound. 721.875... Substances § 721.875 Aromatic nitro compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aromatic nitro compound (PMN P-86-335) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.750 - Aromatic amine compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic amine compound. 721.750... Substances § 721.750 Aromatic amine compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aromatic amine compound (PMN P-86-334) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.875 - Aromatic nitro compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aromatic nitro compound. 721.875... Substances § 721.875 Aromatic nitro compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aromatic nitro compound (PMN P-86-335) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.875 - Aromatic nitro compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic nitro compound. 721.875... Substances § 721.875 Aromatic nitro compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aromatic nitro compound (PMN P-86-335) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.750 - Aromatic amine compound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic amine compound. 721.750... Substances § 721.750 Aromatic amine compound. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aromatic amine compound (PMN P-86-334) is subject to reporting...

  4. Prenatal Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons /Aromatics, BDNF and Child Development

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Frederica; Phillips, David H.; Wang, Ya; Roen, Emily; Herbstman, Julie; Rauh, Virginia; Wang, Shuang; Tang, Deliang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Within a New York City (NYC) birth cohort, we assessed the associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and other aromatic DNA adducts and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations in umbilical cord blood, and neurodevelopment at age 2 years and whether BDNF is a mediator of the associations between PAH/aromatic-DNA adducts and neurodevelopment. Methods PAH/aromatic-DNA adduct concentrations in cord blood were measured in 505 children born to nonsmoking African-American and Dominican women residing in NYC, and a subset was assessed for neurodevelopment at 2 years using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development Mental Development Index (MDI). A spectrum of PAH/aromatic-DNA adducts was measured using the 32P-postlabeling assay; DNA adducts formed by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a representative PAH, were measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)/fluorescence. BDNF mature protein in cord blood plasma was quantified by an ELISA. Multivariate regression analysis, adjusting for potential confounders, was conducted. Results PAH/aromatic-DNA adduct concentration measured by postlabeling was inversely associated with BDNF concentration (p=0.02) and with MDI scores at 2 years (p=0.04). BDNF level was positively associated with MDI scores (p=0.003). Restricting to subjects having all three measures (PAH/aromatic-DNA adducts by postlabeling, MDI, and BDNF), results were similar but attenuated (p=0.13, p=0.05, p=0.01, respectively). Associations between B[a]P-DNA adducts and BDNF and B[a]P-DNA adducts and MDI at age 2 years were not significant. At age 3 years, the positive association of BDNF with MDI was not observed. Conclusions The results at age 2 suggest that prenatal exposure to a spectrum of PAH/aromatic pollutants may adversely affect early neurodevelopment, in part by reducing BDNF levels during the fetal period. However, the same relationship was not seen at age 3. PMID:26301740

  5. Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators for Degradation Pathways of Aromatic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tropel, David; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2004-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in the release and introduction into the environment of a plethora of aromatic chemicals. The interest in discovering how bacteria are dealing with hazardous environmental pollutants has driven a large research community and has resulted in important biochemical, genetic, and physiological knowledge about the degradation capacities of microorganisms and their application in bioremediation, green chemistry, or production of pharmacy synthons. In addition, regulation of catabolic pathway expression has attracted the interest of numerous different groups, and several catabolic pathway regulators have been exemplary for understanding transcription control mechanisms. More recently, information about regulatory systems has been used to construct whole-cell living bioreporters that are used to measure the quality of the aqueous, soil, and air environment. The topic of biodegradation is relatively coherent, and this review presents a coherent overview of the regulatory systems involved in the transcriptional control of catabolic pathways. This review summarizes the different regulatory systems involved in biodegradation pathways of aromatic compounds linking them to other known protein families. Specific attention has been paid to describing the genetic organization of the regulatory genes, promoters, and target operon(s) and to discussing present knowledge about signaling molecules, DNA binding properties, and operator characteristics, and evidence from regulatory mutants. For each regulator family, this information is combined with recently obtained protein structural information to arrive at a possible mechanism of transcription activation. This demonstrates the diversity of control mechanisms existing in catabolic pathways. PMID:15353566

  6. Lymphocyte aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness in acute leukemia of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Blumer, J.L.; Dunn, R.; Esterhay, M.D.; Yamashita, T.S.; Gross, S.

    1981-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity and inducibility were examined in mitogen-stimulated cultured lymphocytes from children with acute leukemia in remission, with nonleukemic malignancies, and with no family or personal history of malignant disease. Neither morphological differences nor differences in mitogen responsivelness were observed among the three sources of cells studied. Levels of constitutive and dibenzanthracene-induced AHH activity were found to be similar among the three groups by analysis of variance. However, when results were analyzed in terms of inducibility ratios, it was found that cells from leukemic children were significantly less inducible (p < 0.005) than cells from unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancies. The reason for this difference became apparent when statistical criteria were employed for the phenotypic separation of individuals who were highly aromatic hydrocarbon responsive and minimally responsive. A significantly larger proportion (p < 0.001) of leukemic children than unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancy were found to be minimally aromatic hydrocarbon responsive. Moreover, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsing while on therapy, longer durations of the first remission were correlated (r = 0.63, p < 0.05) with the highly inducible AHH phenotype.

  7. Structural basis for biosynthetic programming of fungal aromatic polyketide cyclization.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jason M; Korman, Tyler P; Labonte, Jason W; Vagstad, Anna L; Hill, Eric A; Kamari-Bidkorpeh, Oliver; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Townsend, Craig A

    2009-10-22

    Polyketides are a class of natural products with diverse structures and biological activities. The structural variability of aromatic products of fungal nonreducing, multidomain iterative polyketide synthases (NR-PKS group of IPKSs) results from regiospecific cyclizations of reactive poly-beta-keto intermediates. How poly-beta-keto species are synthesized and stabilized, how their chain lengths are determined, and, in particular, how specific cyclization patterns are controlled have been largely inaccessible and functionally unknown until recently. A product template (PT) domain is responsible for controlling specific aldol cyclization and aromatization of these mature polyketide precursors, but the mechanistic basis is unknown. Here we present the 1.8 A crystal structure and mutational studies of a dissected PT monodomain from PksA, the NR-PKS that initiates the biosynthesis of the potent hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B(1) in Aspergillus parasiticus. Despite having minimal sequence similarity to known enzymes, the structure displays a distinct 'double hot dog' (DHD) fold. Co-crystal structures with palmitate or a bicyclic substrate mimic illustrate that PT can bind both linear and bicyclic polyketides. Docking and mutagenesis studies reveal residues important for substrate binding and catalysis, and identify a phosphopantetheine localization channel and a deep two-part interior binding pocket and reaction chamber. Sequence similarity and extensive conservation of active site residues in PT domains suggest that the mechanistic insights gleaned from these studies will prove general for this class of IPKSs, and lay a foundation for defining the molecular rules controlling NR-PKS cyclization specificity.

  8. Presence and potential significance of aromatic-ketone groups in aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wilson, M.A.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Aquatic humic- and fulvic-acid standards of the International Humic Substances Society were characterized, with emphasis on carbonyl-group nature and content, by carbon-13 nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy, proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. After comparing spectral results of underivatized humic and fulvic acids with spectral results of chemically modified derivatives, that allow improved observation of the carbonyl group, the data clearly indicated that aromatic ketone groups comprised the majority of the carbonyl-group content. About one ketone group per monocyclic aromatic ring was determined for both humic and fulvic acids. Aromatic-ketone groups were hypothesized to form by photolytic rearrangements and oxidation of phenolic ester and hydrocarbon precursors; these groups have potential significance regarding haloform formation in water, reactivity resulting from active hydrogen of the methyl and methylene adjacent to the ketone groups, and formation of hemiketal and lactol structures. Aromatic-ketone groups also may be the point of attachment between aliphatic and aromatic moieties of aquatic humic-substance structure. ?? 1987.

  9. Analysis of preference for carbon source utilization among three strains of aromatic compounds degrading Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Karishma, M; Trivedi, Vikas D; Choudhary, Alpa; Mhatre, Akanksha; Kambli, Pranita; Desai, Jinal; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-10-01

    Soil isolates Pseudomonas putida CSV86, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PP4 and Pseudomonas sp. C5pp degrade naphthalene, phthalate isomers and carbaryl, respectively. Strain CSV86 displayed a diauxic growth pattern on phenylpropanoid compounds (veratraldehyde, ferulic acid, vanillin or vanillic acid) plus glucose with a distinct second lag-phase. The glucose concentration in the medium remained constant with higher cell respiration rates on aromatics and maximum protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity in the first log-phase, which gradually decreased in the second log-phase with concomitant depletion of the glucose. In strains PP4 and C5pp, growth profile and metabolic studies suggest that glucose is utilized in the first log-phase with the repression of utilization of aromatics (phthalate or carbaryl). All three strains utilize benzoate via the catechol 'ortho' ring-cleavage pathway. On benzoate plus glucose, strain CSV86 showed preference for benzoate over glucose in contrast to strains PP4 and C5pp. Additionally, organic acids like succinate were preferred over aromatics in strains PP4 and C5pp, whereas strain CSV86 co-metabolizes them. Preferential utilization of aromatics over glucose and co-metabolism of organic acids and aromatics are found to be unique properties of P. putida CSV86 as compared with strains PP4 and C5pp and this property of strain CSV86 can be exploited for effective bioremediation.

  10. Chemoenzymatic syntheses of prenylated aromatic small molecules using Streptomyces prenyltransferases with relaxed substrate specificities

    PubMed Central

    Kumano, Takuto; Richard, Stéphane B.; Noel, Joseph P.; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa

    2010-01-01

    NphB is a soluble prenyltransferase from Streptomyces sp. strain CL190 that attaches a geranyl group to a 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene-derived polyketide during the biosynthesis of anti-oxidant naphterpin. Here we report multiple chemoenzymatic syntheses of various prenylated compounds from aromatic substrates including flavonoids using two prenyltransferases NphB and SCO7190, a NphB homolog from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), as biocatalysts. NphB catalyzes carbon–carbon-based and carbon–oxygen-based geranylation of a diverse collection of hydroxyl-containing aromatic acceptors. Thus, this simple method using the prenyltransferases can be used to explore novel prenylated aromatic compounds with biological activities. Kinetic studies with NphB reveal that the prenylation reaction follows a sequential ordered mechanism. PMID:18682327

  11. Toxicity of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Topics include effects on metabolism and liver activity, cellular responses, binding characteristics, and the occurrence and path of the compounds in food chains. Bioaccumulation studies in specific areas, and isolation and detection techniques are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Toxicity of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Topics include effects on metabolism and liver activity, cellular responses, binding characteristics, and the occurrence and path of the compounds in food chains. Bioaccumulation studies in specific areas, and isolation and detection techniques are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Lithium BINOL Phosphate Catalyzed Desymmetrization of meso-Epoxides with Aromatic Thiols

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A highly enantioselective method for desymmetrization of meso-epoxides using thiols is reported. This is the first example of epoxide activation achieved using metal BINOL phosphates. The reaction has a broad scope in terms of epoxide substrates and aromatic thiol nucleophiles. The resulting β-hydroxyl sulfides are obtained in excellent yield and enantioselectivity. PMID:25317934

  14. Toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Citations discuss air, water, soil, and sediment pollution and control. Topics include vehicle emissions and control, pollutant pathways, carcinogens and mutagenic activity, and photoinduced toxicity. Food contamination, environmental monitoring, and soil contamination along highways are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Polycyclic Aromatic Aerosol Components: Chemical Analysis and Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, C.; Niessner, R.; Pöschl, U.

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants in the atmosphere and originate primarily from incomplete combustion of organic matter and fossil fuels. Their main sources are anthropogenic (e.g. vehicle emissions, domes- tic heating or tobacco smoke), and PAHs consisting of more than four fused aromatic rings reside mostly on combustion aerosol particles, where they can react with atmo- spheric trace gases like O3, NOx or OH radicals leading to a wide variety of partially oxidized and nitrated derivatives. Such chemical transformations can strongly affect the activity of the aerosol particles as condensation nuclei, their atmospheric residence times, and consequently their direct and indirect climatic effects. Moreover some poly- cyclic aromatic compounds (PACs = PAHs + derivatives) are known to have a high carcinogenic, mutagenic and allergenic potential, and are thus of major importance in air pollution control. Furthermore PACs can be used as well defined soot model sub- stances, since the basic structure of soot can be regarded as an agglomerate of highly polymerized PAC-layers. For the chemical analysis of polycyclic aromatic aerosol components a new analyti- cal method based on LC-APCI-MS has been developed, and a data base comprising PAHs, Oxy-PAHs and Nitro-PAHs has been established. Together with a GC-HRMS method it will be applied to identify and quantify PAHs and Nitro-PAHs in atmo- spheric aerosol samples, diesel exhaust particle samples and model soot samples from laboratory reaction kinetics and product studies. As reported before, the adsorption and surface reaction rate of ozone on soot and PAH-like particle surfaces is reduced by competitive adsorption of water vapor at low relative humidity (< 25 %). Recent results at higher relative humidities (ca. 50 %), however, indicate re-enhanced gas phase ozone loss, which may be due to absorbtion of ozone into an aqueous surface layer. The interaction of ozone and nitrogen

  16. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 560 and 20 per centimeter (approximately 18 to 500 micrometers) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's ice abundances, as well as those of the aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km [1]. The aerosol has a broad emission feature centered approximately at 140 per centimeter (71 micrometers). As seen in Figure 1, this feature cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs [2]. The far-IR is uniquely qualified for investigating low-energy vibrational motions within the lattice structures of COITIDlex aerosol. The feature observed by CIRS is broad, and does not likely arise from individual molecules, but rather is representative of the skeletal movements of macromolecules. Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, benzene (C6H6) has been detected in the atmosphere at ppm levels as well as ions that may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [3]. We speculate that the feature may be a blended composite that can be identified with low-energy vibrations of two-dimensional lattice structures of large molecules, such as PAHs or nitrogenated aromatics. Such structures do not dominate the composition of analog materials generated from CH4 and N2 irradiation. We are performing studies forming aerosol analog via UV irradiation of aromatic precursors - specifically C6H6 - to understand how the unique chemical architecture of the products will influence the observable aerosol characteristics. The optical and chemical properties of the aromatic analog will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures, with a focus on the as-yet unidentified far-IR absorbance feature. Preliminary results indicate that the photochemically-formed aromatic aerosol has distinct chemical composition, and may incorporate nitrogen either into the ring structure or adjoined chemical groups. These compositional differences are

  17. The origin of global and macrocyclic aromaticity in porphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Yuto; Sekine, Rika; Aihara, Jun-ichi

    2012-07-21

    The global and macrocyclic aromaticity of porphyrinoids was characterized using our graph theory of aromaticity. The sequential line plots of topological resonance energy (TRE) against the number of π-electrons (N(π)) for different porphyrinoids are similar with four major extrema to those for five-membered heterocycles. This supports the view that five-membered rings are the main origin of global aromaticity in porphyrinoids. Macrocyclic circuits contribute significantly to macrocyclic π-circulation but modestly to global aromaticity. Macrocyclic aromaticity/antiaromaticity in oligopyrrolic macrocycles can be predicted by formally applying Hückel's [4n + 2] rule to an annulene-like main macrocyclic conjugation pathway (MMCP). This bridged annulene model can be justified by examining the contribution of individual macrocyclic circuits to macrocyclic aromaticity. A Hückel-like rule of macrocyclic aromaticity was found for porphyrinoid species.

  18. Structural insights into the regulation of aromatic amino acid hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    The aromatic amino acid hydroxylases phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and tryptophan hydroxylase are homotetramers, with each subunit containing a homologous catalytic domain and a divergent regulatory domain. The solution structure of the regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase establishes that it contains a core ACT domain similar to that in phenylalanine hydroxylase. The isolated regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase forms a stable dimer, while that of phenylalanine hydroxylase undergoes a monomer-dimer equilibrium, with phenylalanine stabilizing the dimer. These solution properties are consistent with the regulatory mechanisms of the two enzymes, in that phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by phenylalanine binding to an allosteric site, while tyrosine hydroxylase is regulated by binding of catecholamines in the active site.

  19. Biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons by aquifer microorganisms under denitrifying conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, S.R.; Sewell, G.W.; Kovacs, D.A.; Smith, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate whether denitrification would be a suitable alternative for biorestoration of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel. Microcosms were prepared from uncontaminated and contaminated aquifer material, amended with nitrate, nutrients, and aromatic hydrocarbons, and incubated under a nitrogen atmosphere at 12 C. With uncontaminated core material, there was no observable lag period prior to removal of toluene whereas 30 days was required before biodegradation commenced for xylenes, ethylbenzene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. An identical test with contaminated aquifer material exhibited not only much longer lag periods but decreased rates of biodegradation; benzene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene were not significantly degraded within the 6-month time period even though active denitrification occurred at this time. First-order biodegradation rate constants ranged from 0.016 to 0.38/day for uncontaminated core material and from 0.022 to 0.067/day for contaminated core material. Tests with individual compounds in uncontaminated core indicated that benzene and m-xylene inhibited the basal rate of denitrification. These data demonstrate that several aromatic compounds are degraded under denitrifying conditions, but rates of biodegradation may be lower in material contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel.

  20. Aroma characterization based on aromatic series analysis in table grapes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yusen; Duan, Shuyan; Zhao, Liping; Gao, Zhen; Luo, Meng; Song, Shiren; Xu, Wenping; Zhang, Caixi; Ma, Chao; Wang, Shiping

    2016-08-04

    Aroma is an important part of quality in table grape, but the key aroma compounds and the aroma series of table grapes remains unknown. In this paper, we identified 67 aroma compounds in 20 table grape cultivars; 20 in pulp and 23 in skin were active compounds. C6 compounds were the basic background volatiles, but the aroma contents of pulp juice and skin depended mainly on the levels of esters and terpenes, respectively. Most obviously, 'Kyoho' grapevine series showed high contents of esters in pulp, while Muscat/floral cultivars showed abundant monoterpenes in skin. For the aroma series, table grapes were characterized mainly by herbaceous, floral, balsamic, sweet and fruity series. The simple and visualizable aroma profiles were established using aroma fingerprints based on the aromatic series. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the aroma profiles of pulp juice, skin and whole berries could be classified into 5, 3, and 5 groups, respectively. Combined with sensory evaluation, we could conclude that fatty and balsamic series were the preferred aromatic series, and the contents of their contributors (β-ionone and octanal) may be useful as indicators for the improvement of breeding and cultivation measures for table grapes.

  1. The Fermentative and Aromatic Ability of Kloeckera and Hanseniaspora Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Montaño, Dulce M.; de Jesús Ramírez Córdova, J.

    Spontaneous alcoholic fermentation from grape, agave and others musts into an alcoholic beverage is usually characterized by the presence of several non-Saccharomyces yeasts. These genera yeasts are dominant in the early stages of the alcoholic fermentation. However the genera Hanseniaspora and Kloeckera may survive at a significant level during fermentation and can influence the chemical composition of the beverage. Several strains belonging to the species Kloeckera api-culata and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii have been extensively studied in relation to the formation of some metabolic compounds affecting the bouquet of the final product. Indeed some apiculate yeast showed positive oenological properties and their use in the alcoholic fermentations has been suggested to enhance the aroma and flavor profiles. The non- Saccharomyces yeasts have the capability to produce and secrete enzymes in the medium, such as β -glucosidases, which release monoterpenes derived from their glycosylated form. These compounds contribute to the higher fruit-like characteristic of final product. This chapter reviews metabolic activity of Kloeckera and Hanseniaspora yeasts in several aspects: fermentative capability, aromatic compounds production and transformation of aromatic precursor present in the must, also covers the molecular methods for identifying of the yeast

  2. Aroma characterization based on aromatic series analysis in table grapes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yusen; Duan, Shuyan; Zhao, Liping; Gao, Zhen; Luo, Meng; Song, Shiren; Xu, Wenping; Zhang, Caixi; Ma, Chao; Wang, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Aroma is an important part of quality in table grape, but the key aroma compounds and the aroma series of table grapes remains unknown. In this paper, we identified 67 aroma compounds in 20 table grape cultivars; 20 in pulp and 23 in skin were active compounds. C6 compounds were the basic background volatiles, but the aroma contents of pulp juice and skin depended mainly on the levels of esters and terpenes, respectively. Most obviously, ‘Kyoho’ grapevine series showed high contents of esters in pulp, while Muscat/floral cultivars showed abundant monoterpenes in skin. For the aroma series, table grapes were characterized mainly by herbaceous, floral, balsamic, sweet and fruity series. The simple and visualizable aroma profiles were established using aroma fingerprints based on the aromatic series. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the aroma profiles of pulp juice, skin and whole berries could be classified into 5, 3, and 5 groups, respectively. Combined with sensory evaluation, we could conclude that fatty and balsamic series were the preferred aromatic series, and the contents of their contributors (β-ionone and octanal) may be useful as indicators for the improvement of breeding and cultivation measures for table grapes. PMID:27487935

  3. Atmospheric chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Kensaku; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Konishi, Yoshimasa; Kajimura, Keiji; Ohura, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Toriba, Akira

    2014-09-01

    This study estimates atmospheric concentrations of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in East Asia using a Gas Chromatograph with High Resolution Mass Spectrometer (GC-HRMS). ClPAHs are ubiquitously generated from PAHs through substitution, and some ClPAHs show higher aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activities than their parent PAHs. Atmospheric particles were collected using a high-volume air sampler equipped with a quartz-fiber filter. We determined the ClPAH concentrations of atmospheric particles collected in Japan (Sapporo, Sagamihara, Kanazawa, and Kitakyushu), Korea (Busan), and China (Beijing). The concentrations of ClPAHs were highest in the winter Beijing sample, where the total mean concentration was approximately 15-70 times higher than in the winter samples from Japan and Korea. The concentrations of Σ19ClPAHs and Σ9PAHs were significantly correlated in the Kanazawa and the Busan samples. This indicates that within those cities ClPAHs and PAHs share the same origin, implying direct chlorination of parent PAHs. Toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs) of the total ClPAHs and PAHs were lowest in Kanazawa in the summer, reaching 1.18 and 2610fg-TEQm(-3) respectively, and highest in Beijing in the winter, reaching 627 and 4240000fg-TEQm(-3) respectively.

  4. Pyrolysis Mechanisms of Aromatic Carboxylic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.; Eskay, T.P.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-12-31

    Although decarboxylation of carboxylic acids is widely used in organic synthesis, there is limited mechanistic information on the uncatalyzed reaction pathways of aromatic carboxylic acids at 300-400 {degrees} C. The pyrolysis mechanisms of 1,2-(3,3-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane, 1,2-(4,4-dicarboxylphenyl)ethane, 1-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2-(4- biphenyl)ethane, and substituted benzoic acids have been investigated at 325-425 {degrees} C neat and diluted in an inert solvent. Decarboxylation is the dominant pyrolysis path. Arrhenius parameters, substituent effects, and deuterium isotope effects are consistent with decarboxylation by an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. Pyrolysis of benzoic acid in naphthalene, as a solvent, produces significant amounts of 1- and 2-phenylnaphthalenes. The mechanistic pathways for decarboxylation and arylation with be presented.

  5. Aromatic characterization of pot distilled kiwi spirits.

    PubMed

    López-Vázquez, Cristina; García-Llobodanin, Laura; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; López, Francisco; Blanco, Pilar; Orriols, Ignacio

    2012-03-07

    This study contributes fundamental knowledge that will help to develop a distillate of kiwi wine, made from kiwis of the Hayward variety grown in the southwest of Galicia (Spain). Two yeast strains, L1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae ALB-6 from the EVEGA yeast collection) and L2 (S. cerevisiae Uvaferm BDX from Lallemand) were assessed to obtain a highly aromatic distillate. The kiwi spirits obtained were compared with other fruit spirits, in terms of higher alcohols, minor alcohols, monoterpenols, and other minor compounds, which are relevant in determining the quality and taste of the kiwi spirits. It was found that the kiwi juice fermented with yeast L1 produced a more aromatic distillate. In addition, kiwi distillates produced with both yeasts had the same ratio of trans-3-hexen-1-ol and cis-3-hexen-1-ol, which is lower than that found in other fruit distillates.

  6. Ion beam modification of aromatic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukushima, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Shinya; Matsumoto, Yasuyo; Hibino, Yutaka

    1993-06-01

    We studied the optical, mechanical and thermal properties of aromatic polymer films which had been irradiated with 1 MeV H +, H 2+ and He + ions. The examined aromatic polymers were polyetherether ketone (PEEK), polyetherimide (PEI), polycther sulfon (PES), polysulfon (PSF), and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS). The optical densities at 300 nm of PES greatly increased after the irradiation. The optical densities at 400 nm of all the examined polymer linearly increased with the irradiation dose. Elongations of all the polymers at room temperature were reduced after irradiation. The PEEK film which had been irradiated with 1 MeV H + was not deformed above the melting point. This demonstrates that cross-linking occurs in PEEK films by ion beam irradiation. As for the effects, depending on the mass of the irradiated ions, it was found that the ions with a high mass induced larger effects on the arematic polymers for the same absorption energy.

  7. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  8. Reaction Intermediates in Aromatic Fuel Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    distribution is unlimited. 5 ,:-,-,: ;;: , , , ’ : - ..-.. ,., ., ; -.. < ?-’.;.o .’.’.:<. .7/ ABSTRACT 4he oxidation of benzene under fuel-lean conditions has...sensitively on the rate- limiting unimolecular decomposition of benzene & C6H6 4 C6H5 + H The rate constant obtained for the initiation reaction using a...considerable current interest ia the kiuetios and mechanism of benzene oxidatiom because of the iacreasing us* of aromatics as fuel components. Partly’due to

  9. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Longanbach, J. R.; Chan, L. K.; Levy, A.

    1982-11-15

    Samples of middle and heavy SRC-II distillates were distilled into 50 C boiling point range fractions. These were characterized by measurements of their molecular weight, elemental analysis and basic nitrogen content and calculation of average molecular structures. The structures typically consisted of 1 to 3 aromatic rings fused to alicyclic rings with short, 1 to 3 carbon aliphatic side chains. The lower boiling fractions contained significant amounts (1 atom/molecule) of oxygen while the heavier fractions contained so few heteroatoms that they were essentially hydrocarbons. Laboratory scale oxidative-pyrolysis experiments were carried out at pyrolysis temperatures of 500 to 1100 C and oxygen concentrations from 0 to 100 percent of stoichiometry. Analysis of liquid products, collected in condensers cooled with liquid nitrogen showed that aromatization is a major reaction in the absence of oxygen. The oxygen-containing materials (phenolics) seem to be more resistant to thermal pyrolysis than unsubstituted aromatics. Nitrogen converts from basic to nonbasic forms at about 500 C. The nonbasic nitrogen is more stable and survives up to 700 C after which it is slowly removed. A recently constructed 50,000 Btu/hr staged combustor was used to study the chemistry of the nitrogen and aromatics. SRC II combustion was studied under fuel-rich, first-stage conditions at air/fuel ratios from 0.6 to 1.0 times stoichiometric. The chemistry of the fuel during combustion calls for further investigation in order to examine the mechanism by which HCN is evolved as a common intermediate for the formation of the nitrogen-containing gaseous combustion products. 25 references, 45 figures, 25 tables.

  10. Multiple Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Silicon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Hua JIN.; Kuznetsov, A E.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Wang, Lai S.

    2004-12-10

    A series of silicon clusters four atoms, but with different charge states (Si42+, Si4, Si42-, and NaSi4-), are studied using photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Structure evolution and chemical bonding in this series are interpreted in terms of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, allowing prediction of how structures of how structures of the four-atom silicon cluster change upon addition or reduction of two electrons. It is shown that Si42+ is square planar, analogous to the recently discovered aromatic A142- cluster. Upon addition of two electrons, the neutral Si4 becomes ?-antiaromatic, resulting in a rhombus distortion. Adding two more electrons to Si4 leads to two energetically close structures of Si42-: either a double antiaromatic parallelogram structure or an aromatic system with a butterfly distortion. Because of the electronic instability of the doubly charged Si42-, a stabilizing cation Na+ was used to produce Si42- in the gas phase in the form of Na+ [Si42-], which was characterized experimentally using photoelectron spectroscopy. Multiple antiaromaticity in the parallelogram Na+ [Si42] species is highly unusual in chemistry.

  11. Multiple Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Silicon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Hua JIN.; Kuznetsov, A E.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Wang, Lai S.

    2004-12-17

    A series of silicon clusters containing four atoms but with different charge states (Si{sub 4}{sup 2+}, Si{sub 4}, Si{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and NaSi{sub 4}{sup -}) were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Structure evolution and chemical bonding in this series were interpreted in terms of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, which allowed the prediction of how structures of the four-atom silicon clusters change upon addition or removal of two electrons. It is shown that Si{sub 4}{sup 2+} is square-planar, analogous to the recently discovered aromatic Al{sub 4}{sup 2-} cluster. Upon addition of two electrons, neutral Si{sub 4} becomes {sigma}-antiaromatic and exhibits a rhombus distortion. Adding two more electrons to Si{sub 4} leads to two energetically close structures of Si{sub 4}{sup 2-}: either a double antiaromatic parallelogram structure or an aromatic system with a butterfly distortion. Because of the electronic instability of doubly charged Si{sub 4}{sup 2-}, a stabilizing cation (Na{sup +}) was used to produce Si{sub 4}{sup 2-} in the gas phase in the form of Na{sup +}[Si{sub 4}{sup 2-}], which was characterized experimentally by photoelectron spectroscopy. Multiple antiaromaticity in the parallelogram Na{sup +}[Si{sub 4}{sup 2-}] species is highly unusual.

  12. Cyclophanes containing large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ghasemabadi, Parisa Ghods; Yao, Tieguang; Bodwell, Graham J

    2015-09-21

    Cyclophanes have been firmly entrenched as a distinct class of compounds for well over half a century. The two main factors that have kept this field of chemistry going so strongly for such a long time are tremendous structural diversity and the interesting behaviour that is often observed. Although a very large number cyclophanes has been reported, only a very small proportion of them contain polycyclic aromatic systems that can be thought of as "large", i.e. with ≥4 rings. This Review puts the spotlight on such cyclophanes, illuminating both the chemistry that was used to synthesize them and what was learned from studying them. Context for the main body is provided by the careful consideration of the anatomy of a cyclophane and the classification of general synthetic approaches. The subsequent sections cover eleven different PAHs and are organized primarily according to increasing size of the aromatic system, starting with pyrene (C16, the only large polycyclic aromatic system to have been incorporated into numerous cyclophanes) and ending with hexabenzo[bc,ef,hi,kl,no,qr]coronene (C42).

  13. Characterization and analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, G.M.; Smith, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Sampling and analytical procedures were developed for determining the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in animal-exposure chambers during studies on exposure to diesel exhaust, coal dust, or mixtures of these two pollutants. Fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene were used as representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. High-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for analysis. Coal-dust only samples revealed a broad, rising background in the chromatogram with small peaks superimposed corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo(a)anthracene, diesel exhaust only samples showed many peaks on a flat baseline including those corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene. In general, no polynuclear aromatics were noted in the clean air samples. The authors note that relatively minor changes in air/fuel ratio, lubricant, fuel, and load may have substantial effects on very minor components of the exhaust emission.

  14. Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

    2005-03-29

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

  15. The unique aromatic catabolic genes in sphingomonads degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    PubMed

    Pinyakong, Onruthai; Habe, Hiroshi; Omori, Toshio

    2003-02-01

    Many members of the sphingomonad genus isolated from different geological areas can degrade a wide variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related compounds. These sphingomonads such as Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain B1, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans strain F199, and Sphingobium sp. strain P2 have been found to possess a unique group of genes for aromatic degradation, which are distantly related with those in pseudomonads and other genera reported so far both in sequence homology and gene organization. Genes for aromatics degradation in these sphingomonads are complexly arranged; the genes necessary for one degradation pathway are scattered through several clusters. These aromatic catabolic gene clusters seem to be conserved among many other sphingomonads such as Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain Q1, Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain TNE12, S. paucimobilis strain EPA505, Sphingobium agrestis strain HV3, and Sphingomonas chungbukensis strain DJ77. Furthermore, some genes for naphthalenesulfonate degradation found in Sphingomonas xenophaga strain BN6 also share a high sequence homology with their homologues found in these sphingomonads. On the other hand, protocatechuic catabolic gene clusters found in fluorene-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain LB126 appear to be more closely related with those previously found in lignin-degrading S. paucimobilis SYK-6 than the genes in this group of sphingomonads. This review summarizes the information on the distribution of these strains and relationships among their aromatic catabolic genes.

  16. RELATING DAILY SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION DOSE IN SALT MARSH-ASSOCIATED ESTUARINE SYSTEMS TO LABORATORY ASSESSMENTS OF PHOTOACTIVATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries of the southeastern United States not only serve an important nursery function but also are common repositories of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) derived from upland activities. Thus, these habitats may be at risk for PAHphototoxicity. To better characterize ...

  17. SEASONAL VARIATION OF THE PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND OF MAJOR AEROSOL SPECIES IN CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA. (R827352C020)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Southern California Particle Center and Supersite (SCPCS) activities, we measured, during all seasons, particle size distributions of 12 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), concurrently with elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), sul...

  18. In vitro toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons to cetacean cells and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Carvan, M.J. III.

    1993-01-01

    Cetaceans bioaccumulate high aromatic hydrocarbon tissue residues, and elevated levels of PCB residues in tissues are proposed to have occurred concurrently with recent epizootic deaths of dolphins. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and characterize an epithelial cell line derived from dolphin tissues, (2) to investigate the effects of hydrocarbon pollutants on those cells, and (3) to analyze the toxicity of hydrocarbon pollutants on cetacean tissues in vitro. An epithelial cell line, Carvan dolphin kidney (CDK), isolated from a spontaneously aborted female bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, grew rapidly. These cells were neither transformed nor immortal. Velocity sedimentation analysis showed CDK cells contained nuclear aryl hydrocarbon receptor, suggestive of cytochrome P450 inducibility. BaP inhibited mitosis in CDK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Data indicate that CDK cells metabolize BaP, that BaP metabolites bind to cellular DNA initiating unscheduled DNA synthesis, and that the inhibition of cytochrome P450 metabolism decrease the BaP-associated inhibition of mitosis in dolphin cells. The data also suggest that TCDD acts synergistically to increase the levels of DNA damage by the procarcinogen BaP. Cetacean liver microsomes was isolated and evaluated for the presence of cytochrome P450 proteins by SDS-PAGE, apparent minimum molecular weight determination, and immunoblot analysis. P450 activity was induced in cetacean tissue samples and CDK cells by exposure in vitro to one of several cytochrome P450-inducing chemicals. The data suggest that cetacean tissues and cells can be utilized to study the in vitro induction of cytochrome P450, resultant metabolism of xenobiotic contaminants, and the subsequent cellular and molecular responses. However, the identity of specific P450 isozymes involved in this process will remain undetermined until monoclonal antibodies that recognize cetacean P450s can be generated.

  19. Ultrasound assisted Bradsher reaction in aqueous and non-aqueous media: First use of ultrasounds in electrophilic aromatic cyclisation leading to polyacenes.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Emilia; Bałczewski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The present work describes the first use of ultrasounds in the Bradsher cyclisation of activated and non-activated ortho-formyl diarylmethanes. This reaction is also the first example of electrophilic, aromatic cyclisation assisted by ultrasounds which leads to pure polycyclic, fused aromatic hydrocarbons containing 3 and 4 fused rings in excellent yields. The reaction proceeds not only in aqueous but also in non-aqueous media at milder conditions (room temperature) and in much shorter reaction times than in conventional protocols.

  20. A Novel Synthetic Pathway Enables Microbial Production of Polyphenols Independent from the Endogenous Aromatic Amino Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Vogt, Michael; Marienhagen, Jan

    2016-12-14

    Numerous plant polyphenols have potential applications as pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals. Stilbenes and flavonoids as most abundant polyphenols are synthesized from phenylpropanoids, which are exclusively derived from aromatic amino acids in nature. Several microorganisms were engineered for the synthesis of biotechnologically interesting plant polyphenols; however, low activity of heterologous ammonia lyases, linking endogenous microbial aromatic amino acid biosynthesis to phenylpropanoid synthesis, turned out to be the limiting step during microbial synthesis. We here developed an alternative strategy for polyphenol production from cheap benzoic acids by reversal of a β-oxidative phenylpropanoid degradation pathway avoiding any ammonia lyase activity. The synthetic pathway running in the non-natural direction is feasible with respect to thermodynamics and involved reaction mechanisms. Instantly, product titers of 5 mg/L resveratrol could be achieved in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strains indicating that phenylpropanoid synthesis from 4-hydroxybenzoic acid can in principle be implemented independently from aromatic amino acids and ammonia lyase activity.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanxia; Duan, Xiaoyong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing pollution pressures were placed in the coastal and estuarine ecosystems in China because of the elevated pollutants discharged from various sources. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment were closely linked to human activities, which have been intensively studied for their geochemical interest as markers. In this review, the status of PAH contamination in China Sea was assessed by comprehensive reviews of the concentrations, sources, and fates of PAHs in sediments of China Sea. PAH concentrations in China Sea sediments decreased from north to south due to the higher emissions in North China. Atmosphere was probably the main carrier of PAHs in the north due to the higher contents of atmospheric fine particles and higher wind speeds. However, riverine inputs were probably the most important sources of PAHs in the coastal sediments of South China due to higher rainfall.

  2. In situ microbial metabolism of aromatic-hydrocarbon environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Che Ok; Madsen, Eugene L

    2013-06-01

    Microbial processes that eliminate organic environmental contamination are important. Progress in the biotechnology of biodegradation relies upon the underlying sciences of environmental microbiology and analytical geochemistry. Recent key discoveries advancing knowledge of biodegradation (in general) and the aromatic-hydrocarbon biodegradation (in particular) have relied upon characterization of microorganisms: pure-culture isolates, laboratory enrichment cultures, and in contaminated field sites. New analytical and molecular tools (ranging from sequencing the DNA of biodegrading microorganisms to assessing changes in the isotopic ratios of 13C to 12C and 2H to 1H in contaminant pools in field sites) have deepened our insights into the mechanisms (how), the occurrence (what), and the identity (who) of active players that effect biodegradation of organic environmental pollutants.

  3. Metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, U.

    1989-01-01

    During the past decade, knowledge of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the aquatic environment has advanced substantially to encompass studies of bioavailability, metabolism, subsequent toxic effects, and their ecological consequences. In this book, recent advances in the areas of PAH biogeochemistry and bioaccumulation, microbial degradation, enzymes of activation and detoxication, metabolism of PAH, and laboratory and field studies on carcinogenic/toxic effects, are presented. Additionally, important similarities and differences in metabolism of PAH by aquatic and terrestrial organisms are discussed. These chapters also illustrate that although considerable progress has been made in certain areas of PAH metabolism in the aquatic environment, the field is relatively unexplored and many exciting possibilities exist for future investigations. Separate abstracts are included for 9 chapters in this book for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  4. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

    1994-04-26

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

  5. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Reagen, William K.; Schulz, Amber L.; Ingram, Jani C.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for ro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound.

  6. Benzene and Beyond: Pursuing the Core of Aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Kekulé first suggested a hexagonal structure for benzene in 1865. For over a half-century after, chemists struggled to reconcile proposed structures for benzene and other aromatic compounds with their resistance to chemical transformation and tendency to maintain the type during reaction. The combined structural and reactivity features of these compounds were eventually covered by the term 'aromaticity'. Kekulé, Bamberger and Thiele had each proposed a criterion for aromaticity; all were either empirically contradicted or incapable of evaluation. In the 1930s, two rival quantum mechanical methods succeeded in establishing a physical basis for aromaticity. Using valence bond theory, Pauling attributed benzene's stability to its being a resonance hybrid of several Lewis structures. Calculating resonance energies was challenging but manipulating Lewis structures was not; that procedure provided qualitative insights into aromatic structure and reactivity. Resonance theory appealed especially to organic chemists and eclipsed Hückel's contemporaneous molecular orbital approach, which remained relatively inaccessible. In the 1950s, however, simple rules derived from Hückel's mathematics, combined with proton NMR data, provided seemingly universal criteria for aromaticity. In the event, post-1950 discoveries of non-organic, three-dimensional compounds such as ferrocene and the fullerenes that exhibit aromatic properties led chemists to doubt the utility and universality of 'aromaticity' as a concept. A recent consensus maintains that aromaticity is a multi-variable phenomenon that cannot be reduced to a strict definition, a property it shares with other core chemical concepts such as 'acidity' and 'reactivity'.

  7. Hydrotreatment of Irati shale oil; Behavior of the aromatic fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Afonso, J.C.; Schmal, M. ); Cardoso, J.N. ); Frety, R. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper presents the chemical transformations that occur in the aromatic fraction of Irati shale oil under rather drastic hydrotreating conditions, at 400{degrees} C and 125 atm, using a commercial Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in sulfided form. The aromatic fraction was analyzed before and after reaction by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry. Several compounds were identified by using this method. The main reactions are the partial hydrogenation of the aromatic rings forming hydroaromatic compounds and the cracking of the lateral alkyl chains. Hydrotreatment leads to a more complex aromatic fraction due to the formation of new compounds.

  8. Aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethylene by microorganisms that degrade aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.J.; Chang, C.Y.; Lee, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) at an initial concentration of 80 mg/L with and without the presence of an aromatic compound was conducted with a series of batch reactors. The target aromatic compounds were benzene, toluene, and catechol. The aromatics-acclimated microorganisms were used as the cell source for the batch study. The results indicated that the presence of an aromatic compound was required to initiate the aerobic biodegradation of TCE by the aromatic-utilizing microorganisms. The addition of benzene or toluene initiated the removal of TCE. However, TCE removal was not proportional to the initial concentration of the aromatic compounds. The presence of an aromatic compound at an initial concentration of 5 mg/L resulted in better TCE removal in comparison with that at 1 or 20 mg/L. TCE removal was still significant after the depletion of the aromatic compound, but at a lower rate. The presence of catechol, an intermediate of the biodegradation of an aromatic compound, did not initiate the biodegradation of TCE by the catechol-utilizing microorganisms.

  9. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  10. Double photoionization of hydrocarbons and aromatic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehlitz, R.

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews the recent progress in the field of double photoionization of hydrocarbons and aromatic molecules using synchrotron radiation. First I will describe the importance of carbon-based molecules, which are all around us and are literally part of our life. They exhibit intriguing properties some of which can be probed via double photoionization, i.e., the simultaneous emission of two electrons. Furthermore, I will discuss the different mechanisms that can lead to a doubly charged organic molecule and will highlight those findings by comparing them with the results for atoms and other (simple) molecules. Finally, I will give an outlook on future directions on this subject.

  11. High temperature chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.T.

    1991-12-31

    We have not only gained new insight into the mechanism and generality of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) thermal automerization reactions, we have also uncovered several new high temperature reactions and added a third dimension to our program by applying high temperature chemistry to problems in organic synthesis. Our synthesis of corannulene has attracted much recent attention; however, we believe that the uncatalyzed ``cyclodehydrogenation reactions`` which form 5-membered rings and 6-membered rings at high temperatures may prove to be of greater general importance in the long term. This bias is reflected in the accompanying proposal.

  12. High temperature chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.T.

    1991-01-01

    We have not only gained new insight into the mechanism and generality of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) thermal automerization reactions, we have also uncovered several new high temperature reactions and added a third dimension to our program by applying high temperature chemistry to problems in organic synthesis. Our synthesis of corannulene has attracted much recent attention; however, we believe that the uncatalyzed cyclodehydrogenation reactions'' which form 5-membered rings and 6-membered rings at high temperatures may prove to be of greater general importance in the long term. This bias is reflected in the accompanying proposal.

  13. Aromatic ketones with terminal vinyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Uvarova, L.R.; Burykina, L.K.; Zubareva, M.M.; Polyanskii, I.D.

    1988-12-20

    The Friedel-Crafts acylation of a hydrocarbon by an acylating agent containing bromoalkyl substituents gave a series of new ketones. Their subsequent dehydrobromination with potassium tert-butoxide gave high yields of aromatic ketones containing terminal vinyl groups. The reaction was conducted both with /beta/-bromoethylbenzene and with 4-(/beta/-bromoethyl)-benzoyl chloride and also with both compounds simultaneously. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed by the PMR, IR, UV, and mass spectra and also by the data from elemental analysis.

  14. Metabolism of aromatic compounds by Caulobacter crescentus

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, D.K.; Bourquin, A.W.

    1987-05-01

    Cultures of Caulobacter crescentus were found to grow on a variety of aromatic compounds. Degradation of benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and phenol was found to occur via ..beta..-ketoadipate. The induction of degradative enzymes such as benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase, the ring cleavage enzyme catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, and cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme appeared similar to the control mechanism present in Pseudomonas spp. Both benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase had stringent specificities, as revealed by their action toward substituted benzoates and substituted catechols, respectively.

  15. Bioremediation technologies for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1999-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs) are common and challenging contaminants that affect soil and sediments. Methods for treating PAHs have undergone change and refinement in the recent past, and this volume presents the latest trends in PAH remediation theory and practice. The papers in this volume cover topics ranging from the remediation of manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites to the remediation of sediments. The papers present lab and field studies, characterization studies, comparison studies, and descriptions of technologies ranging from composting to thermally enhanced bioremediation to fungal technologies and other innovative approaches.

  16. Some biotransformation enzymes responsible for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism in rat nasal turbinates: effects on enzyme activities of in vitro modifiers and intraperitoneal and inhalation exposure of rats to inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Bond, J A

    1983-10-01

    Respiratory tract biotransformation of many xenobiotics found in inhaled environmental pollutants is generally considered essential for the mutagenic, carcinogenic, and/or toxic response of lung tissue to these xenobiotics. Typical environmental pollutants contain known carcinogens adsorbed onto particles which can deposit in the nasal pharyngeal region of the respiratory tract. The purpose of this study was to characterize the metabolic capacity of rat nasal tissue. Both oxidative and nonoxidative enzyme activities were investigated which included aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), epoxide hydrolase (EH), uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT), and glutathione transferase. Specific enzyme activities of AHH, EH, UDPGT, and glutathione transferase were 0.023, 6.4, 20.4, and 24.8 nmol product per mg protein per min, respectively. Benzo(a)pyrene was metabolized by AHH to dihydrodiols, quinones, and phenols in quantities which were about 10 times greater than those reported for rat lung microsomes. Small, but detectable, quantities of benzo(a)pyrene tetrols were also measured in reaction flasks in which rat nasal tissue was incubated with benzo(a)-pyrene. Attempts to increase the microsomal enzyme activities of AHH, EH, and UDPGT by pretreating rats with various inducing agents by both i.p. injection (phenobarbital, 3-methylcholanthrene, Aroclor 1254, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine) and inhalation exposure (BaP) resulted in rat nasal monooxygenases only being induced (2-fold) after pretreatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine. Phenobarbital increased enzyme activities of EH and UDPGT by about 50%. These data suggest that rat nasal tissue may contain multiple forms of cytochrome P-450 and of EH and UDPGT. The results from this study support the notion that nasal tissue may be important in determining the metabolic fate of inhaled xenobiotics.

  17. Aromaticity of rings-in-molecules (RIMs) from electron localization-delocalization matrices (LDMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumar, Ismat; Cook, Ronald; Ayers, Paul W.; Matta, Chérif F.

    2016-01-01

    A new and powerful molecular descriptor termed the LDM (localization-delocalization matrix) has recently been proposed as a molecular fingerprinting tool and has been shown to yield robust quantitative-structure-to-activity/property-relationships (QSAR/QSPR). An LDM lists the average number of electrons localized within an atom in a molecule along its diagonal while the off-diagonal elements are the pair-wise average number of electrons shared between every pair of atoms in the molecule, bonded or not. Hence, the LDM is a representation of a fuzzy molecular graph that accounts for the whereabouts of all electron(s) in the molecule and can be expected to encode for several facets of its chemistry at once. We show that the LDM captures the aromatic character of a ring-in-a-molecule by comparing the aromaticity ranking based on the LDMs and their eigenvalues of 6-membered carbon rings within (polycyclic) benzenoid hydrocarbons with the ranking based on four well-established local aromaticity measures (harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity, acromatic fluctuation index, para delocalization index, and nucleus independent chemical shift(0)). This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Paul von Ragué Schleyer (1930-2014).

  18. Exploring mild enzymatic sustainable routes for the synthesis of bio-degradable aromatic-aliphatic oligoesters.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Guarneri, Alice; Brandauer, Martin; Acero, Enrique Herrero; Peerlings, Henricus; Gardossi, Lucia; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-05-01

    The application of Candida antarctica lipase B in enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of aromatic-aliphatic oligoesters is here reported. The aim of the present study is to systematically investigate the most favorable conditions for the enzyme catalyzed synthesis of aromatic-aliphatic oligomers using commercially available monomers. Reaction conditions and enzyme selectivity for polymerization of various commercially available monomers were considered using different inactivated/activated aromatic monomers combined with linear polyols ranging from C2 to C12 . The effect of various reaction solvents in enzymatic polymerization was assessed and toluene allowed to achieve the highest conversions for the reaction of dimethyl isophthalate with 1,4-butanediol and with 1,10-decanediol (88 and 87% monomer conversion respectively). Mw as high as 1512 Da was obtained from the reaction of dimethyl isophthalate with 1,10-decanediol. The obtained oligomers have potential applications as raw materials in personal and home care formulations, for the production of aliphatic-aromatic block co-polymers or can be further functionalized with various moieties for a subsequent photo- or radical polymerization.

  19. Evidence for pentagalloyl glucose binding to human salivary alpha-amylase through aromatic amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Zajácz, Agnes; Bécsi, Bálint; Ragunath, Chandran; Ramasubbu, Narayanan; Erdodi, Ferenc; Batta, Gyula; Kandra, Lili

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate here that pentagalloyl glucose (PGG), a main component of gallotannins, was an effective inhibitor of HSA and it exerted similar inhibitory potency to Aleppo tannin used in this study. The inhibition of HSA by PGG was found to be non-competitive and inhibitory constants of K(EI)=2.6 microM and K(ESI)=3.9 microM were determined from Lineweaver-Burk secondary plots. PGG as a model compound for gallotannins was selected to study the inhibitory mechanism and to characterize the interaction of HSA with this type of molecules. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding experiments confirmed the direct interaction of HSA and PGG, and it also established similar binding of Aleppo tannin to HSA. Saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment by NMR clearly demonstrated the aromatic rings of PGG may be involved in the interaction suggesting a possible stacking with the aromatic side chains of HSA. The role of aromatic amino acids of HSA in PGG binding was reinforced by kinetic studies with the W58L and Y151M mutants of HSA: the replacement of the active site aromatic amino acids with aliphatic ones decreased the PGG inhibition dramatically, which justified the importance of these residues in the interaction.

  20. The studies on the aromaticity of fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bisheng; Peng, Rufang; Li, Hongbo; Wang, Bing; Jin, Bo; Chu, Shijin; Long, Xinping

    2011-02-01

    Density functional theory BLYP/DNP was employed to optimize a series of fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds, including C(20), Ho@C(20), Ho(3+)@C(20), C(60), Ho@C(60), Ho(3+)@C(60),C(70), Ho@C(70), Ho(3+)@C(70) C(78), Ho@C(78), Ho(3+)@C(78), C(82),Ho@C(82) and Ho(3+)@C(82). DFT semi core pseudospot approximation was taken into consideration in the calculations of the element holmium because of its particular electronic structure. Fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds' aromaticity were studied in terms of structural criteria, energetic criteria, and reactivity criteria. The results indicate that the aromaticity of fullerenes was reduced when a holmium atom was introduced into the carbon cage, and the endohedral fullerenes' reactive activity enhance; but the aromaticity of the carbon cage increased when a Ho(3+) cation was encapsulated into a fullerene. Calculations of aromaticity and stability indicate that two paths can lead to the similar aim of preparing holmium endohedral fullerenes; that is, they can form from either a holmium atom or a holmium cation (Ho(3+)) reacting with fullerenes, respectively, and the latter is more favorable.

  1. Pseudomonads biodegradation of aromatic compounds in oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-07-15

    Aromatic naphthenic acids (NAs) have been shown to be more toxic than the classical NAs found in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). To reduce this toxicity, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida were used to determine their ability to biodegrade aromatic compounds including treatments considering the impacts of external carbon and iron addition. Results showed that with added carbon P. fluorescens and P. putida have the capability of biodegrading these aromatics. In the presence of external carbon, gene expression of a functional PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHDα) was determined through reverse transcription real-time PCR, suggesting active degradation of OSPW aromatic compounds. Although no significant classical NAs removal was observed during this process, toxicity was reduced by 49.3% under optimal conditions. OSPW toxicity was eliminated with the combination of ozonation at a dose of 80 mg/L followed by biodegradation, indicating that it is a promising combined OSPW treatment approach for the safe discharge to the aquatic environment.

  2. Airborne Exposures to Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds Among Workers in Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Trumbore, David C; Osborn, Linda V; Johnson, Kathleen A; Fayerweather, William E

    2015-01-01

    We studied exposure of 151 workers to polycyclic aromatic compounds and asphalt emissions during the manufacturing of asphalt roofing products-including 64 workers from 10 asphalt plants producing oxidized, straight-run, cutback, and wax- or polymer-modified asphalts, and 87 workers from 11 roofing plants producing asphalt shingles and granulated roll roofing. The facilities were located throughout the United States and used asphalt from many refiners and crude oils. This article helps fill a gap in exposure data for asphalt roofing manufacturing workers by using a fluorescence technique that targets biologically active 4-6 ring polycyclic aromatic compounds and is strongly correlated with carcinogenic activity in animal studies. Worker exposures to polycyclic aromatic compounds were compared between manufacturing plants, at different temperatures and using different raw materials, and to important external benchmarks. High levels of fine limestone particulate in the plant air during roofing manufacturing increased polycyclic aromatic compound exposure, resulting in the hypothesis that the particulate brought adsorbed polycyclic aromatic compounds to the worker breathing zone. Elevated asphalt temperatures increased exposures during the pouring of asphalt. Co-exposures in these workplaces which act as confounders for both the measurement of total organic matter and fluorescence were detected and their influence discussed. Exposures to polycyclic aromatic compounds in asphalt roofing manufacturing facilities were lower than or similar to those reported in hot-mix paving application studies, and much below those reported in studies of hot application of built-up roofing asphalt. These relatively low exposures in manufacturing are primarily attributed to air emission controls in the facilities, and the relatively moderate temperatures, compared to built-up roofing, used in these facilities for oxidized asphalt. The exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds was a very

  3. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-04-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify, and to confirm or determine rate constants for, the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize soot and fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics. Stable and radical species profiles in the aromatics oxidation study are measured using molecular beam sampling with on-line mass spectrometry. The rate of soot formation measured by conventional optical techniques is found to support the hypotheses that particle inception occurs through reactive coagulation of high molecular weight PAH in competition with destruction by OHattack, and that the subsequent growth of the soot mass occurs through addition reactions of PAH and C[sub 2]H[sub 2] with the soot particles. During the first year of this reporting period, fullerenes C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] in substantial quantities were found in the flames being studied. The fullerenes were recovered, purified and spectroscopically identified. The yields of C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] were then determined over ranges of conditions in low-pressure premixed flames of benzene and oxygen.

  4. Catalytic C-H bond silylation of aromatic heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Toutov, Anton A; Liu, Wen-Bo; Betz, Kerry N; Stoltz, Brian M; Grubbs, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    This protocol describes a method for the direct silylation of the carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond of aromatic heterocycles using inexpensive and abundant potassium tert-butoxide (KOt-Bu) as the catalyst. This catalytic cross-dehydrogenative coupling of simple hydrosilanes and various electron-rich aromatic heterocycles enables the synthesis of valuable silylated heteroarenes. The products thus obtained can be used as versatile intermediates, which facilitate the divergent synthesis of pharmaceutically relevant compound libraries from a single Si-containing building block. Moreover, a variety of complex Si-containing motifs, such as those produced by this protocol, are being actively investigated as next-generation therapeutic agents, because they can have improved pharmacokinetic properties compared with the original all-carbon drug molecules. Current competing methods for C-H bond silylation tend to be incompatible with functionalities, such as Lewis-basic heterocycles, that are often found in pharmaceutical substances; this leaves de novo synthesis as the principal strategy for preparation of the target sila-drug analog. Moreover, competing methods tend to be limited in the scope of hydrosilane that can be used, which restricts the breadth of silicon-containing small molecules that can be accessed. The approach outlined in this protocol enables the chemoselective and regioselective late-stage silylation of small heterocycles, including drugs and drug derivatives, with a broad array of hydrosilanes in the absence of precious metal catalysts, stoichiometric reagents, sacrificial hydrogen acceptors or high temperatures. Moreover, H2 is the only by-product generated. The procedure normally requires 48-75 h to be completed.

  5. Aromatic Anchor at an Invariant Hormone-Receptor Interface

    PubMed Central

    Pandyarajan, Vijay; Smith, Brian J.; Phillips, Nelson B.; Whittaker, Linda; Cox, Gabriella P.; Wickramasinghe, Nalinda; Menting, John G.; Wan, Zhu-li; Whittaker, Jonathan; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Lawrence, Michael C.; Weiss, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallographic studies of insulin bound to fragments of the insulin receptor have recently defined the topography of the primary hormone-receptor interface. Here, we have investigated the role of PheB24, an invariant aromatic anchor at this interface and site of a human mutation causing diabetes mellitus. An extensive set of B24 substitutions has been constructed and tested for effects on receptor binding. Although aromaticity has long been considered a key requirement at this position, MetB24 was found to confer essentially native affinity and bioactivity. Molecular modeling suggests that this linear side chain can serve as an alternative hydrophobic anchor at the hormone-receptor interface. These findings motivated further substitution of PheB24 by cyclohexanylalanine (Cha), which contains a nonplanar aliphatic ring. Contrary to expectations, [ChaB24]insulin likewise exhibited high activity. Furthermore, its resistance to fibrillation and the rapid rate of hexamer disassembly, properties of potential therapeutic advantage, were enhanced. The crystal structure of the ChaB24 analog, determined as an R6 zinc-stabilized hexamer at a resolution of 1.5 Å, closely resembles that of wild-type insulin. The nonplanar aliphatic ring exhibits two chair conformations with partial occupancies, each recapitulating the role of PheB24 at the dimer interface. Together, these studies have defined structural requirements of an anchor residue within the B24-binding pocket of the insulin receptor; similar molecular principles are likely to pertain to insulin-related growth factors. Our results highlight in particular the utility of nonaromatic side chains as probes of the B24 pocket and suggest that the nonstandard Cha side chain may have therapeutic utility. PMID:25305014

  6. Liquid clathrate formation in ionic liquid-aromatic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Holbrey, John D; Reichert, W Matthew; Nieuwenhuyzen, Mark; Sheppard, Oonagh; Hardacre, Christopher; Rogers, Robin D

    2003-02-21

    1-Alkyl-3-methylimidazolium containing ionic liquids with hexafluorophosphate, bis(trifyl)imide, tetrafluoroborate, and chloride anions form liquid clathrates when mixed with aromatic hydrocarbons; in the system 1,3-dimethylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate-benzene, the aromatic solute could be trapped in the solid state forming a crystalline 2:1 inclusion compound.

  7. 40 CFR 721.825 - Certain aromatic ether diamines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certain aromatic ether diamines. 721... Substances § 721.825 Certain aromatic ether diamines. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses...,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, diethyl ester, compound with 4,4′- -2,5-diylbis(oxy)]bis (1:1) (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.825 - Certain aromatic ether diamines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certain aromatic ether diamines. 721... Substances § 721.825 Certain aromatic ether diamines. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses...,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, diethyl ester, compound with 4,4′- -2,5-diylbis(oxy)]bis (1:1) (PMN...

  9. High atmosphere-ocean exchange of semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Gaya, Belén; Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Morales, Laura; Méjanelle, Laurence; Abad, Esteban; Piña, Benjamin; Duarte, Carlos M.; Jiménez, Begoña; Dachs, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and other semivolatile aromatic-like compounds, are an important and ubiquitous fraction of organic matter in the environment. The occurrence of semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbons is due to anthropogenic sources such as incomplete combustion of fossil fuels or oil spills, and other biogenic sources. However, their global transport, fate and relevance for the carbon cycle have been poorly assessed, especially in terms of fluxes. Here we report a global assessment of the occurrence and atmosphere-ocean fluxes of 64 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons analysed in paired atmospheric and seawater samples from the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The global atmospheric input of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the global ocean is estimated at 0.09 Tg per month, four times greater than the input from the Deepwater Horizon spill. Moreover, the environmental concentrations of total semivolatile aromatic-like compounds were 102-103 times higher than those of the targeted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with a relevant contribution of an aromatic unresolved complex mixture. These concentrations drive a large global deposition of carbon, estimated at 400 Tg C yr-1, around 15% of the oceanic CO2 uptake.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10676 - Aromatic hydrocarbon mixture (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon mixture (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10676 Aromatic hydrocarbon mixture (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... hydrocarbon mixture (PMN P-12-551) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. The Misuse of the Circle Notation to Represent Aromatic Rings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloli, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the confusion and erroneous conclusions that can result from the overuse and misuse of the circle notation to represent aromaticity in polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons. Includes nature of the problem, textbook treatment, and a possible compromise method of representation. (Author/JN)

  12. Wholly aromatic liquid crystalline polyetherimide (LC-PEI) resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Dingemans, Theodorus J. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Hinkley, Jeffrey A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of liquid crystal polymers and polyetherimides are combined in an all-aromatic thermoplastic liquid crystalline polyetherimide. Because of the unique molecular structure, all-aromatic thermotropic liquid crystal polymers exhibit outstanding processing properties, excellent barrier properties, low solubilities and low coefficients of thermal expansion in the processing direction. These characteristics are combined with the strength, thermal, and radiation stability of polyetherimides.

  13. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  14. Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2006-08-23

    Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories.

  15. N-acetylation of three aromatic amine hair dye precursor molecules eliminates their genotoxic potential.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Andreas; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    N-acetylation has been described as a detoxification reaction for aromatic amines; however, there is only limited data available showing that this metabolic conversion step changes their genotoxicity potential. To extend this database, three aromatic amines, all widely used as precursors in oxidative hair dye formulations, were chosen for this study: p-phenylenediamine (PPD), 2,5-diaminotoluene (DAT) and 4-amino-2-hydroxytoluene (AHT). Aiming at a deeper mechanistic understanding of the interplay between activation and detoxification for this chemical class, we compared the genotoxicity profiles of the parent compounds with those of their N-acetylated metabolites. While PPD, DAT and AHT all show genotoxic potential in vitro, their N-acetylated metabolites completely lack genotoxic potential as shown in the Salmonella typhimurium reversion assay, micronucleus test with cultured human lymphocytes (AHT), chromosome aberration assay with V79 cells (DAT) and Comet assay performed with V79 cells. For the bifunctional aromatic amines studied (PPD and DAT), monoacetylation was sufficient to completely abolish their genotoxic potential. Detoxification through N-acetylation was further confirmed by comparing PPD, DAT and AHT in the Comet assay using standard V79 cells (N-acetyltransferase (NAT) deficient) and two NAT-proficient cell lines,V79NAT1*4 and HaCaT (human keratinocytes). Here we observed a clear shift of dose-response curves towards decreased genotoxicity of the parent aromatic amines in the NAT-proficient cells. These findings suggest that genotoxic effects will only be found at concentrations where the N-acetylation (detoxifying) capacity of the cells is overwhelmed, indicating that a 'first-pass' effect in skin could be taken into account for risk assessment of these topically applied aromatic amines. The findings also indicate that the use of liver S-9 preparations, which generally underestimate Phase II reactions, contributes to the generation of irrelevant

  16. Aromatic interactions promote self-association of collagen triple-helical peptides to higher-order structures.

    PubMed

    Kar, Karunakar; Ibrar, Sajjad; Nanda, Vikas; Getz, Todd M; Kunapuli, Satya P; Brodsky, Barbara

    2009-08-25

    Aromatic residues are relatively rare within the collagen triple helix, but they appear to play a specialized role in higher-order structure and function. The role of aromatic amino acids in the self-assembly of triple-helical peptides was investigated in terms of the kinetics of self-association, the nature of aggregated species formed, and the ability of these species to activate platelet aggregation. The presence of aromatic residues on both ends of a type IV collagen model peptide is observed to greatly accelerate the kinetics of self-association, decreasing the lag time and leading to insoluble, well-defined linear fibrils as well as small soluble aggregates. Both macroscopic visible aggregates and small multimolecular complexes in solution are capable of inducing platelet aggregation through the glycoprotein VI receptor on platelets. Proline-aromatic CH...pi interactions are often observed within globular proteins and in protein complexes, and examination of molecular packing in the crystal structure of the integrin binding collagen peptide shows Phe interacts with Pro/Hyp in a neighboring triple-helical molecule. An intermolecular interaction between aromatic amino acids and imino acids within the triple helix is also supported by the observed inhibitory effect of isolated Phe amino acids on the self-association of (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10). Given the high fraction of Pro and Hyp residues on the surface of collagen molecules, it is likely that imino acid-aromatic CH...pi interactions are important in formation of higher-order structure. We suggest that the catalysis of type I collagen fibrillogenesis by nonhelical telopeptides is due to specific intermolecular CH...pi interactions between aromatic residues in the telopeptides and Pro/Hyp residues within the triple helix.

  17. Neutral Diboron Analogues of Archetypal Aromatic Species by Spontaneous Cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Merle; Böhnke, Julian; Braunschweig, Holger; Celik, Mehmet Ali; Claes, Christina; Ewing, William C; Krummenacher, Ivo; Lubitz, Katharina; Schneider, Christoph

    2016-09-05

    Among the numerous routes organic chemists have developed to synthesize benzene derivatives and heteroaromatic compounds, transition-metal-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions are the most elegant. In contrast, cycloaddition reactions of heavier alkene and alkyne analogues, though limited in scope, proceed uncatalyzed. In this work we present the first spontaneous cycloaddition reactions of lighter alkene and alkyne analogues. Selective addition of unactivated alkynes to boron-boron multiple bonds under ambient conditions yielded diborocarbon equivalents of simple aromatic hydrocarbons, including the first neutral 6 π-aromatic diborabenzene compound, a 2 π-aromatic triplet biradical 1,3-diborete, and a phosphine-stabilized 2 π-homoaromatic 1,3-dihydro-1,3-diborete. DFT calculations suggest that all three compounds are aromatic and show frontier molecular orbitals matching those of the related aromatic hydrocarbons, C6 H6 and C4 H4 (2+) , and homoaromatic C4 H5 (+) .

  18. How does fish metamorphosis affect aromatic amino acid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Pinto, Wilson; Figueira, Luís; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Aragão, Cláudia

    2009-02-01

    Aromatic amino acids (AAs, phenylalanine and tyrosine) may be specifically required during fish metamorphosis, since they are the precursors of thyroid hormones which regulate this process. This project attempted to evaluate aromatic AA metabolism during the ontogenesis of fish species with a marked (Senegalese sole; Solea senegalensis) and a less accentuated metamorphosis (gilthead seabream; Sparus aurata). Fish were tube-fed with three L-[U-14C] AA solutions at pre-metamorphic, metamorphic and post-metamorphic stages of development: controlled AA mixture (Mix), phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (Tyr). Results showed a preferential aromatic AA retention during the metamorphosis of Senegalese sole, rather than in gilthead seabream. Senegalese sole's highly accentuated metamorphosis seems to increase aromatic AA physiological requirements, possibly for thyroid hormone production. Thus, Senegalese sole seems to be especially susceptible to dietary aromatic AA deficiencies during the metamorphosis period, and these findings may be important for physiologists, fish nutritionists and the flatfish aquaculture industry.

  19. Experimental measurement of noncovalent interactions between halogens and aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Adams, Harry; Cockroft, Scott L; Guardigli, Claudio; Hunter, Christopher A; Lawson, Kevin R; Perkins, Julie; Spey, Sharon E; Urch, Christopher J; Ford, Rhonan

    2004-05-03

    Chemical double mutant cycles have been used to quantify the interactions of halogens with the faces of aromatic rings in chloroform. The halogens are forced over the face of an aromatic ring by an array of hydrogen-bonding interactions that lock the complexes in a single, well-defined conformation. These interactions can also be engineered into the crystal structures of simpler model compounds, but experiments in solution show that the halogen-aromatic interactions observed in the solid state are all unfavourable, regardless of whether the aromatic rings contain electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents. The halogen-aromatic interactions are repulsive by 1-3 kJ mol(-1). The interactions with fluorine are slightly less favourable than with chlorine and bromine.

  20. Toxicity of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Topics include effects on metabolism and liver activity, cellular responses, binding characteristics, and the occurrence and path of the compounds in food chains. Bioaccumulation studies in specific areas, and isolation and detection techniques are also considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  1. Toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Topics include effects on metabolism and liver activity, cellular responses, binding characteristics, and the occurrence and path of the compounds in food chains. Bioaccumulation studies in specific areas, and isolation and detection techniques are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 242 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Toxicity of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Topics include effects on metabolism and liver activity, cellular responses, binding characteristics, and the occurrence and path of the compounds in food chains. Bioaccumulation studies in specific areas, and isolation and detection techniques are also considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Biosurfactant production by a soil Pseudomonas strain growing on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Deziel, E.; Paquette, G.; Villemur, R.; Lepine, F.

    1996-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants occurring mostly as a result of fossil fuel combustion and as by-products of industrial activities. The bioremediation of soils contaminated with PAHs is limited by the poor availability of dyrophobic contaminants to microorganisms. Surfactants can help. Recent studies indicate that addition of surfactants can enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation. This study examines whether production of surfactants by PAH-metabolizing microorganisms is part of their strategy for growing on such poorly available substrates.

  4. The Design of Reactions, Catalysts and Materials with Aromatic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandar, Jeffrey Scott

    This thesis details the use of aromatic ions, especially aminocyclopropenium ions, as empowering design elements in the development of new chemical reactions, organic catalysts and polymeric materials. A particular focus is placed throughout on understanding the relationship between the structure of aromatic ions and their performance in these novel applications. Additionally, the benefits that aromatic ions provide in these contexts are highlighted. The first chapter briefly summarizes the Lambert Group's prior efforts toward exploiting the unique reactivity profiles of aromatic ions in the context of new reaction design. Also provided in the first chapter is a comprehensive literature review of aminocyclopropenium ions, upon which the majority of advances described in this thesis are based. To set the stage for the first application of aminocyclopropenium ions, Chapter 2 provides an account of existing highly Bronsted basic functional groups, including guanidines, proazaphosphatranes and iminophosphoranes. The provided review on the synthesis and use in asymmetric catalysis of these bases indicates that there is a high need for conceptually new Bronsted basic functional groups. To address this need, the development of chiral 2,3-bis(dialkylamino)cyclopropenimines as a new platform for asymmetric Bronsted base catalysis is described in Chapter 3. This new class of Bronsted base is readily synthesized on scale, operates efficiently under practical conditions, and greatly outperforms closely related guanidine-based catalysts. Structure-activity relationship studies, mechanistic experiments and computational transition state modeling are all discussed in the context of asymmetric glycinate imine Michael reactions in order to arrive at a working model for cyclopropenimine chemistry. Cumulatively, this chapter provides a "user's guide" to understanding and developing further applications of 2,3-bis(dialkylamino)cyclopropenimines. The use of our optimal chiral 2,3-bis

  5. Rh(III)-catalyzed decarboxylative ortho-heteroarylation of aromatic carboxylic acids by using the carboxylic acid as a traceless directing group.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xurong; Sun, Denan; You, Qiulin; Cheng, Yangyang; Lan, Jingbo; You, Jingsong

    2015-04-03

    Highly selective decarboxylative ortho-heteroarylation of aromatic carboxylic acids with various heteroarenes has been developed through Rh(III)-catalyzed two-fold C-H activation, which exhibits a wide substrate scope of both aromatic carboxylic acids and heteroarenes. The use of naturally occurring carboxylic acid as the directing group avoids troublesome extra steps for installation and removal of an external directing group.

  6. Polymorphisms for aromatic amine metabolism in humans: relevance for human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kadlubar, F F; Butler, M A; Kaderlik, K R; Chou, H C; Lang, N P

    1992-01-01

    The metabolic pathways associated with carcinogenic aromatic amines in humans provide an excellent example of polymorphisms that appear to be relevant to human carcinogenesis. In this regard, the N-acetylation of arylamines and the O-acetylation of their N-hydroxy metabolites are catalyzed preferentially by a genetically polymorphic acetyltransferase, high activity of which has been correlated with decreased risk for urinary bladder cancer and increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Cytochrome P450IA2, the principal liver enzyme involved in aromatic amine N-oxidation, exhibits a wide interindividual variation that appears trimodal in several populations and is clearly inducible by cigarette smoking and probably other host factors as well. UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases, which catalyze the N-glucuronidation of N-hydroxyarylamines and are likely to be responsible for their transport to the colon, show widely varied but unimodal distributions in humans. In contrast, human liver sulfotransferase activity for N-hydroxyarylamines, which would be expected to decrease their transport through the circulation, is catalyzed by a polymorphic enzyme(s) that is expressed at higher levels in blacks, as compared to whites, and could contribute to their relatively lower incidence of urinary bladder cancer. Peroxidative activation of aromatic amines can also occur, especially from prostaglandin H synthase in the urinary bladder and myeloperoxidase in the lungs of cigarette smokers, and both show considerable individual variability, apparently due to the extent of tissue inflammation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1486865

  7. Inversion and rotation processes involving non-planar aromatic compounds catalyzed by extended polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karton, Amir

    2014-10-01

    Using accurate quantum chemical calculations, we show that extended planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can efficiently catalyze a range of chemical processes involving non-planar aromatic systems. These include (i) bowl-to-bowl inversion of curved PAHs (e.g. corannulene and sumanene), (ii) 'flip-flop' inversion of helicenes (e.g. benzo[c]phenanthrene), and (iii) rotation about the Phsbnd Ph bond in biphenyls. Non-covalent π-π interactions between the planar catalyst and the substrate stabilize the planar transition structures to a greater extent than they stabilize the non-planar reactants. These result in surprisingly large catalytic enhancements (namely, the reaction barrier heights are reduced by 21-63% of the uncatalyzed reaction barriers).

  8. Food heating and the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amine and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mutagens/carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Knize, M G; Salmon, C P; Pais, P; Felton, J S

    1999-01-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are mutagens and animal carcinogens sometimes formed when foods are heated or processed. Determining their role in cancer etiology depends on comparing human exposures and determining any significant dose-related effects. Chemical analysis of foods shows that flame-grilling can form both PAH and HAA, and that frying forms predominantly HAA. With detection limits of about 0.1 ng/g, amounts found in commercially processed or restaurant foods range from 0.1 to 14 ng/g for HAA, and levels of PAH up to 1 ng/g in a liquid smoke flavoring. Laboratory fried samples have greater amounts of PAH, up to 38 ng/g in hamburgers, and high levels of HAA, over 300 ng/g, are measured in grilled chicken breast. Understanding the processing conditions that form PAH and HAA can lead to methods to greatly reduce their occurrence in processed foods.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in yogurt samples.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Chiara; Girelli, Anna Maria; Tarola, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations and distributions of major polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in 20 kinds of yogurt specimens collected from Italian supermarkets using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with fluorescence detection. The method was validated by determination of recovery percentages, precision (repeatability) and sensitivity (limits of detection) with yogurt samples fortified at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 µg/kg concentration levels. The recovery of 13 PAHs, with the exception of naphthalene and acenaphthene, ranged from 61% to 130% and from 60% to 97% at all the levels for yogurts with low (0.1%) and high (3.9%) fat content, respectively. The method is repeatable with relative standard deviation values <20% for all analytes. The results obtained demonstrate that acenaphthene, fluorantene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene were found in all samples with a similar distribution, but different content when yogurts with low and high fats were compared.

  10. The oxidation degradation of aromatic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezinsky, Kenneth; Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    A series of experiments were conducted which focused on understanding the role that the O atom addition to aromatic rings plays in the oxidation of benzene and toluene. Flow reactor studies of the oxidation of toluene gave an indication of the amount of O atoms available during an oxidation and the degree to which the O atom adds to the ring. Flow reactor studies of the oxidation of toluene and benzene to which NO2 was added, have shown that NO2 appears to suppress the formation of O atoms and consequently reduce the amount of phenols and cresols formed by O atom addition. A high temperature pyrolysis study of phenol has confirmed that the major decomposition products are carbon monoxide and cyclopentadiene. A preliminary value for the overall decomposition rate constant was also obtained.

  11. Polyenamines from aromatic diacetylenic diketones and diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Bass, Robert G. (Inventor); Sinsky, Mark S. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of several polyenamine ketones are discussed wherein conjugated diacetylenic diketones and aromatic diamines are used as a route to the formation of high molecular weight polyenamine ketones which exhibit good mechanical properties and can be cast into creasible films. Typical polymerization conditions involved the reaction of stoichiometric amounts of 1,4- or 1,3-PPPO and a diamine at 60 to 130 C in m-cresol at (w/w) solids content of 8 to 26% for a specified period of time under a nitrogen atmosphere. Novel polyenamine ketones were prepared with inherent viscosities as high as 1.99 dl/g and tough, clear amber films with tensile strengths of 12,400 psi and tensile moduli of 397,000 psi were cast from solutions of the polymers in chloroform. In most cases, the elemental analyses for the polyenamine ketones agree within + or - 0.3% of the theoretical values.

  12. Neutron Scattering of Aromatic and Aliphatic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Marta; Bowron, Daniel T.; Manyar, Haresh G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Organic solvents, such as cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene, are widely used as both reagents and solvents in industrial processes. Despite the ubiquity of these liquids, the local structures that govern the chemical properties have not been studied extensively. Herein, we report neutron diffraction measurements on liquid cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene at 298 K to obtain a detailed description of the local structure in these compounds. The radial distribution functions of the centres of the molecules, as well as the partial distribution functions for the double bond for cyclohexene and methyl group for methylcyclohexane and toluene have been calculated. Additionally, probability density functions and angular radial distribution functions were extracted to provide a full description of the local structure within the chosen liquids. Structural motifs are discussed and compared for all liquids, referring specifically to the functional group and aromaticity present in the different liquids. PMID:26990367

  13. Predicting regioselectivity in nucleophilic aromatic substitution.

    PubMed

    Liljenberg, Magnus; Brinck, Tore; Herschend, Björn; Rein, Tobias; Tomasi, Simone; Svensson, Mats

    2012-04-06

    We have investigated practical and computationally efficient methods for the quantitative prediction of regioisomer distribution in kinetically controlled nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions. One of the methods is based on calculating the relative stabilities of the isomeric σ-complex intermediates using DFT. We show that predictions from this method can be used quantitatively both for anionic nucleophiles with F(-) as leaving group, as well as for neutral nucleophiles with HF as leaving group. The σ-complex approach failed when the leaving group was Cl/HCl or Br/HBr, both for anionic and neutral nucleophiles, because of difficulties in finding relevant σ-complex structures. An approach where we assumed a concerted substitution step and used such transition state structures gave quantitatively useful results. Our results are consistent with other theoretical works, where a stable σ-complex has been identified in some cases, whereas others have been indicated to proceed via a concerted substitution step.

  14. Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, thanks to significant, parallel advancements in observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques, tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of the role polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Twenty years ago, the notion of an abundant population of large, carbon rich molecules in the ISM was considered preposterous. Today, the unmistakable spectroscopic signatures of PAC - shockingly large molecules by previous interstellar chemistry standards - are recognized throughout the Universe. In this paper, we will examine the interstellar PAC model and its importance to astrophysics, including: (1) the evidence which led to inception of the model; (2) the ensuing laboratory and theoretical studies of the fundamental spectroscopic properties of PAC by which the model has been refined and extended; and (3) a few examples of how the model is being exploited to derive insight into the nature of the interstellar PAC population.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cancer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrangelo, G.; Marzia, V.; Fadda, E.

    1996-11-01

    Various substances and industrial processes, surrogates of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), are currently classified as human carcinogens. This paper reviews recent epidemiological studies reporting direct evidence of the carcinogenic effects of PAHs in occupationally exposed subjects. Risks of lung and bladder cancer were dose dependent when PAHs were measured quantitatively and truly nonexposed groups were chosen for comparison. These new findings suggest that the current threshold limit value of 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} of benzene soluble matter (which indicates PAH exposure) is unacceptable because, after 40 years of exposure, it involves a relative risk of 1.2-1.4 for lung cancer and 2.2 for bladder cancer. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Prediction of seawater solubility of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Y.; Tokura, K.; Kishi, H.; Strachan, W.M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The salting-out effect by seawater constituents on the water solubilities of 11 aromatic compounds, anthracene, pyrene, phenanthrene, biphenyl, naphthalene, p-nitrotoluene, p-toluidine, o-nitrophenol, m-nitrophenol, p-nitrophenol and phenol was investigated. A best fit equation for the salting-out parameters, K, and distilled water solubilities, S/sub 0/, at 20/sup 0/C was found to be K = -0.0298 log S/sub 0/ + 0.114. Seawater solubilities, S, predicted for solutions of ionic strength, I, using the equation log S = (0.0298 I + 1)logS/sub 0/ - 0.114 I were in agreement with observed values within 13% and there were no significant differences between values from the Pacific Ocean seawater and those from 35% NaCl solutions. It was concluded that dissolved organic matter in seawater had an insignificant effect for the test chemicals.

  17. Microbial remediation of nitro-aromatic compounds: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Meenal; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2007-10-01

    Nitro-aromatic compounds are produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuel or nitration reactions and are used as chemical feedstock for synthesis of explosives, pesticides, herbicides, dyes, pharmaceuticals, etc. The indiscriminate use of nitro-aromatics in the past due to wide applications has resulted in inexorable environmental pollution. Hence, nitro-aromatics are recognized as recalcitrant and given Hazardous Rating-3. Although several conventional pump and treat clean up methods are currently in use for the removal of nitro-aromatics, none has proved to be sustainable. Recently, remediation by biological systems has attracted worldwide attention to decontaminate nitro-aromatics polluted sources. The incredible versatility inherited in microbes has rendered these compounds as a part of the biogeochemical cycle. Several microbes catalyze mineralization and/or non-specific transformation of nitro-aromatics either by aerobic or anaerobic processes. Aerobic degradation of nitro-aromatics applies mainly to mono-, dinitro-derivatives and to some extent to poly-nitro-aromatics through oxygenation by: (i) monooxygenase, (ii) dioxygenase catalyzed reactions, (iii) Meisenheimer complex formation, and (iv) partial reduction of aromatic ring. Under anaerobic conditions, nitro-aromatics are reduced to amino-aromatics to facilitate complete mineralization. The nitro-aromatic explosives from contaminated sediments are effectively degraded at field scale using in situ bioremediation strategies, while ex situ techniques using whole cell/enzyme(s) immobilized on a suitable matrix/support are gaining acceptance for decontamination of nitrophenolic pesticides from soils at high chemical loading rates. Presently, the qualitative and quantitative performance of biological approaches of remediation is undergoing improvement due to: (i) knowledge of catabolic pathways of degradation, (ii) optimization of various parameters for accelerated degradation, and (iii) design of microbe

  18. Inhibitory effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on photosynthetic performance are not related to their aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Jajoo, Anjana; Mekala, Nageswara Rao; Tomar, Rupal Singh; Grieco, Michele; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are very toxic and highly persistent environmental pollutants which accumulate in soil and affect growth of the plants adversely. This study aims to investigate inhibitory effects of 3 major PAH particularly on photosynthetic processes in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in soil treated with PAH. The 3 PAH chosen differ from each other in aromaticity (number of rings) comprising their structure (2 rings: naphthalene, 3 rings: anthracene and 4 rings: pyrene). Several growth parameters and Chlorophyll a fluorescence was monitored in PAH treated plants. BN-PAGe analysis was done in order to get information about change in the protein conformation. PAH treatment led to increased value of Fo which collaborated with increase in the amount of free LHC as seen through BN-Page analysis. Thus PAH were found to inhibit PS II photochemistry and caused distinct change in pigment composition. However the results led us to infer that 3-ring anthracence is more inhibitory as compared to 2-ring naphthalene and 4-ring pyrene. This indicates that aromaticity of PAH is unrelated to their response on photosynthetic processes.

  19. Coupling DNA-binding and ATP hydrolysis in Escherichia coli RecQ: role of a highly conserved aromatic-rich sequence.

    PubMed

    Zittel, Morgan C; Keck, James L

    2005-01-01

    RecQ enzymes are broadly conserved Superfamily-2 (SF-2) DNA helicases that play critical roles in DNA metabolism. RecQ proteins use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive DNA unwinding; however, the mechanisms by which RecQ links ATPase activity to DNA-binding/unwinding are unknown. In many Superfamily-1 (SF-1) DNA helicases, helicase sequence motif III links these activities by binding both single-stranded (ss) DNA and ATP. However, the ssDNA-binding aromatic-rich element in motif III present in these enzymes is missing from SF-2 helicases, raising the question of how these enzymes link ATP hydrolysis to DNA-binding/unwinding. We show that Escherichia coli RecQ contains a conserved aromatic-rich loop in its helicase domain between motifs II and III. Although placement of the RecQ aromatic-rich loop is topologically distinct relative to the SF-1 enzymes, both loops map to similar tertiary structural positions. We examined the functions of the E.coli RecQ aromatic-rich loop using RecQ variants with single amino acid substitutions within the segment. Our results indicate that the aromatic-rich loop in RecQ is critical for coupling ATPase and DNA-binding/unwinding activities. Our studies also suggest that RecQ's aromatic-rich loop might couple ATP hydrolysis to DNA-binding in a mechanistically distinct manner from SF-1 helicases.

  20. A DFT-based toxicity QSAR study of aromatic hydrocarbons to Vibrio fischeri: Consideration of aqueous freely dissolved concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Xianhai; Wang, Juying; Cong, Yi; Mu, Jingli; Jin, Fei

    2016-05-05

    In the present study, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) techniques based on toxicity mechanism and density functional theory (DFT) descriptors were adopted to develop predictive models for the toxicity of alkylated and parent aromatic hydrocarbons to Vibrio fischeri. The acute toxicity data of 17 aromatic hydrocarbons from both literature and our experimental results were used to construct QSAR models by partial least squares (PLS) analysis. With consideration of the toxicity process, the partition of aromatic hydrocarbons between water phase and lipid phase and their interaction with the target biomolecule, the optimal QSAR model was obtained by introducing aqueous freely dissolved concentration. The high statistical values of R(2) (0.956) and Q(CUM)(2) (0.942) indicated that the model has good goodness-of-fit, robustness and internal predictive power. The average molecular polarizability (α) and several selected thermodynamic parameters reflecting the intermolecular interactions played important roles in the partition of aromatic hydrocarbons between the water phase and biomembrane. Energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E(HOMO)) was the most influential descriptor which dominated the toxicity of aromatic hydrocarbons through the electron-transfer reaction with biomolecules. The results demonstrated that the adoption of freely dissolved concentration instead of nominal concentration was a beneficial attempt for toxicity QSAR modeling of hydrophobic organic chemicals.

  1. Influence of polychlorinated aromatic compounds on the biotransformation and toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides (OP) to the Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopii, V.; Zagrebin, A.; Sherstneva, L.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of different polychlorinated aromatics (DDT, Aroclor 1254, certain polychlorinated biphenyls and dibenzofurans) on the toxicity of OP (DDVP paraoxon, malaoxon) to Daphnia magna was studied. Pretreatment of daphnids with chlorinated compounds during 72 hours in nontoxic concentrations (1/5--1/20 CL{sub 50}) has been shown to reduce the toxicity of OP for hydrobionts. For study of influence of chlorinated compounds on biotransformation of OP the activity of enzymes which are hydrolyzing the OP was investigated in Daphnia`s homogenates or microsomes. The activity of carboxylesterase (tributyrinase, aliesterase) and arylesterase (phosphorylphosphatase) with usage as substrates accordingly {alpha}-naphthylacetate and paraoxon was measured. Besides that the activity of cholinesterase with application of propionylthiocholine as substrate was determined. After polychlorinated aromatic compounds treatment of daphnids activities of both aryl-and carboxylesterase increased markedly. It decreased the inhibition of Daphnia`s cholinesterase caused by incubation with OP in concentrations 0.5--1.0 CL{sub 50}. Thus the induction by chlorinate aromatics of OP metabolizing enzymes seems to play the important role in reduction of OP toxicity to Daphnia magna. Perhaps the aryl- and carboxylesterase of Daphnia can be used as biomarkers of pollution by polychlorinated aromatics in water.

  2. TRENDS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON LEVELS AND MUTAGENICITY IN SANTIAGO'S INHALABLE AIRBORNE PARTICLES IN THE PERIOD 1992-1996.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Trends of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for 1992-1996 (cold season) and their mutagenic activity were investigated in organic extracts from the Santiago. Chile. inhalable particles (PM10). The highest PAH concentrations were observed in 1992 and decline...

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rock oysters: a baseline study.

    PubMed

    Kagi, R; Alexander, R; Cumbers, M

    1985-01-01

    Coral-rock oysters were collected in September 1982 from six locations in the area of Mermaid Sound in North-Western Australia. Analysis was carried out by digestion of the samples, followed by solvent extraction and analysis of the extracts using HPLC-UVF and GC-MS. The levels of two- and three-ring aromatics ranged from very low for the site outside Mermaid Sound and for one site within the Sound, to low for the four other sites within the Sound. The PAH values at the latter four sites are attributed to occasional petroleum release episodes related to small boat activities and large-scale salt and iron ore shipping and general cargo activities of the Port of Dampier. The levels of PAHs with four or more rings were found to be low or very low at all sites; in fact, in most cases values measured for specific PAHs were below the limits of detection of even the very sensitive methods used in this study. Samples from sites within Mermaid Sound closest to the town and port of Dampier showed noticeably higher levels than those from outside; the present study does not allow the source of the PAHs to be determined. It is interesting to note, however, that the parent PAHs appear to form a greater proportion of the total PAH assemblage in these cases, indicating contributions from material which has been subjected to high temperature processing prior to release into the Sound.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) removal by sorption: A review.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Shanti; Bal Krishna, K C; Sarukkalige, Ranjan

    2016-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic micro pollutants which are persistent compounds in the environment due to their hydrophobic nature. Concerns over their adverse effects in human health and environment have resulted in extensive studies on various types of PAHs removal methods. Sorption is one of the widely used methods as PAHs possess a great sorptive ability into the solid media and their low aqueous solubility property. Several adsorbent media such as activated carbon, biochar, modified clay minerals have been largely used to remove PAHs from aqueous solution and to immobilise PAHs in the contaminated soils. According to the past studies, very high removal efficiency could be achieved using the adsorbents such as removal efficiency of activated carbon, biochar and modified clay mineral were 100%, 98.6% and >99%, respectively. PAHs removal efficiency or adsorption/absorption capacity largely depends on several parameters such as particle size of the adsorbent, pH, temperature, solubility, salinity including the production process of adsorbents. Although many studies have been carried out to remove PAHs using the sorption process, the findings have not been consolidated which potentially hinder to get the correct information for future study and to design the sorption method to remove PAHs. Therefore, this paper summarized the adsorbent media which have been used to remove PAHs especially from aqueous solutions including the factor affecting the sorption process reported in 142 literature published between 1934 and 2015.

  5. Mild Aromatic Palladium-Catalyzed Protodecarboxylation: Kinetic Assessment of the Decarboxylative Palladation and the Protodepalladation Steps

    PubMed Central

    Dickstein, Joshua S.; Curto, John M.; Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Mulrooney, Carol A.; Kozlowski, Marisa C.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanism studies of a mild palladium catalyzed decarboxylation of aromatic carboxylic acids are described. In particular, reaction orders and activation parameters for the two stages of the transformation were determined. These studies guided development of a catalytic system capable of turnover. Further evidence reinforces that the second stage, protonation of the aryl palladium intermediate, is the rate-determining step of the reaction. The first step, decarboxylative palladation is proposed to occur through an intramolecular electrophilic palladation pathway, which is supported by computational and mechansim studies. In contrast to the reverse reaction (C-H insertion), the data support an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism involving a stepwise intramolecular protonation sequence for the protodepalladation portion of the reaction. PMID:23590518

  6. Putting pressure on aromaticity along with in situ experimental electron density of a molecular crystal

    PubMed Central

    Casati, Nicola; Kleppe, Annette; Jephcoat, Andrew P.; Macchi, Piero

    2016-01-01

    When pressure is applied, the molecules inside a crystal undergo significant changes of their stereoelectronic properties. The most interesting are those enhancing the reactivity of systems that would be otherwise rather inert at ambient conditions. Before a reaction can occur, however, a molecule must be activated, which means destabilized. In aromatic compounds, molecular stability originates from the resonance between two electronic configurations. Here we show how the resonance energy can be decreased in molecular crystals on application of pressure. The focus is on syn-1,6:8,13-Biscarbonyl[14]annulene, an aromatic compound at ambient conditions that gradually localizes one of the resonant configurations on compression. This phenomenon is evident from the molecular geometries measured at several pressures and from the experimentally determined electron density distribution at 7.7 GPa; the observations presented in this work are validated by periodic DFT calculations. PMID:26979750

  7. Structural and thermodynamic analysis of the hetero-association of theophylline with aromatic drug molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrejuk, D. D.; Hernandez Santiago, A. A.; Khomich, V. V.; Voronov, V. K.; Davies, D. B.; Evstigneev, M. P.

    2008-10-01

    The hetero-association of theophylline (THP) with other biologically-active aromatic molecules ( e.g. the anti-cancer drugs daunomycin and novantrone, the antibiotic norfloxacin, the vitamin flavin-mononucleotide and two mutagens ethidium bromide and proflavine) has been studied by NMR in aqueous-salt solution (0.1 M Na-phosphate buffer, p D 7.1). It was found that THP shows an essentially similar hetero-association ability as caffeine (CAF) towards aromatic drugs, except for novantrone (NOV), which has much less affinity to THP than CAF as a result of energetically unfavourable orthogonal orientation of the chromophores of THP and NOV in the hetero-complex.

  8. π-Conjugated Discrete Oligomers Containing Planar and Nonplanar Aromatic Motifs.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Terec, Anamaria; Wang, Yue; Joshi, Hrishikesh; Lu, Yunpeng; Sun, Handong; Stuparu, Mihaiela C

    2017-03-01

    A new family of π-conjugated oligomers featuring a nonplanar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, corannulene, and a planar aromatic unit, thiophene, is synthesized through an iterative metal-catalyzed coupling protocol. The two structural motifs are connected through an acetylene linkage. In the shorter oligomers, a thiophene unit is attached to one or two corannulenes. In the higher analogues, two, three, and four thiophene units are placed in an alternating fashion with three, four, and five corannulene units, respectively. Photophysical studies reveal extended π-effects that initially increase and then attenuate as a function of the oligomer length. Notably, longer oligomers are found to be highly active for nonlinear absorption and emission properties. The oligomer with three corannulene and two thiophene units exhibits a two-photon absorption cross section of 600 GM and two-photon-excited intense green luminescence. This work, therefore, introduces the concept of combining planar and nonplanar aromatic motifs in the design of π-conjugated discrete oligomers, establishes synthetic feasibility of such hybrid materials, reports on their photophysical properties that is anticipated to have significant implications for future research targets, and features the discovery that corannulene derivatives can exhibit excellent nonlinear optical activity when extended through π-bridges.

  9. Evidence of laser induced degradation and graphitization of aromatic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, A.; Letardi, T.; di Lazarro, P.

    The laser-induced photodecomposition and graphitization of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons is investigated by irradiating solid pollutant samples with an Nd-YAG laser, leaving a carbon-rich, black powder. The irradiation of anthracene and benzopyrene forms the ions Cn(+)-, CnH(+)-, and CnH2(+)- in a wide plume produced by a pulsed-CO2 laser. The tendency of aromatic compounds to fragment is noted, and the notion that ion formation is governed by the mechanism that produces ablation in the laser cloud is suggested. Optical multichannel analyzer emission spectra indicate the production of the Cn species, suggesting applications to the treatment of aromatic product wastes.

  10. Aromatic polyimides containing a dimethylsilane-linked dianhydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Anne K. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high-temperature stable, optically transparent, low dielectric aromatic polyimide is prepared by chemically combining equimolar quantities of an aromatic dianhydride reactant and an aromatic diamine reactant, which are selected so that one reactant contains at least one Si(CH.sub.3).sub.2 group in its molecular structure, and the other reactant contains at least one --CH.sub.3 group in its molecular structure. The reactants are chemically combined in a solvent medium to form a solution of a high molecular weight polyamic acid, which is then converted to the corresponding polyimide.

  11. Internal rotations of aromatic polyamides: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Joe; Imase, Tatsuya; Koike, Masao; Fukuda, Kaoru; Tokita, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Junji; Kawauchi, Susumu

    2005-05-01

    Internal rotations of benzanilide ( BA) and 4-(4'-aminobenzamido)benzoic acid ( AA) were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. B3LYP/6-31G* optimization for both BA and AA structures gives non-planar trans structures as the most stable conformers with lower energy of 4.60 and 5.08 kcal/mol than cis ones, respectively. The amide bond and aniline moiety are found to be coplanar in transBA, while in trans phenyl benzoate ( PB) the ester bond and benzoyl moiety are coplanar. The relaxed potential energy surface (PES) scans were then carried out with rotations of three single bonds, i.e. amide bond and both adjacent bonds. The discontinuous point is found on the relaxed PES for the amide bond rotation. This indicates that inversion of a pyramidal amino group is involved with the amide bond rotation. Therefore, two transition states (TSs) arise for rotation around the amide bond. Two TS structures ( TS-1 and TS-2) were optimized for both BA and AA, and their activation energies were estimated as 14.34 kcal/mol ( TS-1) and 16.27 kcal/mol ( TS-2) for BA, and 12.20 kcal/mol ( TS-1) for AA, respectively. The TS-2 structure for AA failed to be optimized. The activation energy for the amide bond rotation, which is larger than that of 7.90 kcal/mol for PB, as well as the coplanarity in aromatic amide is ascribed to the partial double bond character of amide bond. This is also confirmed by the Wiberg bond index (bond order). The chain persistence length for poly(4-benzamide) was estimated by the rotation matrix formalism using the calculated structural parameters of transAA. The estimated value of 1131 Å is longer than our previously calculated value of corresponding aromatic polyester, 364 Å for poly( p-hydroxybenzoic acid) [T. Imase, S. Kawauchi, J. Watanabe, Macromol. Theory Simul. 10 (2001) 434].

  12. Chemistry and properties of poly(arylene ether 1,3,4-oxadiazole)s and poly(arylene ether 1,2,4-triazole)s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Wolf, P.

    1992-01-01

    Poly(arylene ether)s containing l,3,4-oxadiazole and 1,2,4-triazole units were prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of bisphenol oxadiazole and bisphenol triazole compounds with activated aromatic dihalides. The polymers exhibited glass transition temperatures (Tg) ranging from 182 to 242 C, and several polymers exhibited melting transitions (Tm) ranging from 265 to 390 C. Inherent viscosities ranged from 1.02 to 3.40 dl/g, indicating relatively high molecular weights. Thin films exhibited tensile strengths, moduli, and elongations at 23 C of 90-110 MPa, 2.7-3.6 GPa, and 4-7 percent, respectively. Titanium-to-titanium tensile shear specimens of a poly(arylene ether 1,3,4-oxadiazole) exhibited tensile shear strengths at 23 and 150 C of 22.1 and 17.9 MPa, respectively.

  13. Branched-chain and aromatic amino acid catabolism into aroma volatiles in Cucumis melo L. fruit.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Itay; Bar, Einat; Portnoy, Vitaly; Lev, Shery; Burger, Joseph; Schaffer, Arthur A; Tadmor, Ya'akov; Gepstein, Shimon; Giovannoni, James J; Katzir, Nurit; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2010-02-01

    The unique aroma of melons (Cucumis melo L., Cucurbitaceae) is composed of many volatile compounds biosynthetically derived from fatty acids, carotenoids, amino acids, and terpenes. Although amino acids are known precursors of aroma compounds in the plant kingdom, the initial steps in the catabolism of amino acids into aroma volatiles have received little attention. Incubation of melon fruit cubes with amino acids and alpha-keto acids led to the enhanced formation of aroma compounds bearing the side chain of the exogenous amino or keto acid supplied. Moreover, L-[(13)C(6)]phenylalanine was also incorporated into aromatic volatile compounds. Amino acid transaminase activities extracted from the flesh of mature melon fruits converted L-isoleucine, L-leucine, L-valine, L-methionine, or L-phenylalanine into their respective alpha-keto acids, utilizing alpha-ketoglutarate as the amine acceptor. Two novel genes were isolated and characterized (CmArAT1 and CmBCAT1) encoding 45.6 kDa and 42.7 kDa proteins, respectively, that displayed aromatic and branched-chain amino acid transaminase activities, respectively, when expressed in Escherichia coli. The expression of CmBCAT1 and CmArAT1 was low in vegetative tissues, but increased in flesh and rind tissues during fruit ripening. In addition, ripe fruits of climacteric aromatic cultivars generally showed high expression of CmBCAT1 and CmArAT1 in contrast to non-climacteric non-aromatic fruits. The results presented here indicate that in melon fruit tissues, the catabolism of amino acids into aroma volatiles can initiate through a transamination mechanism, rather than decarboxylation or direct aldehyde synthesis, as has been demonstrated in other plants.

  14. Interceptor effect of C60 fullerene on the in vitro action of aromatic drug molecules.

    PubMed

    Skamrova, Galyna B; Laponogov, Ivan; Buchelnikov, Anatoly S; Shckorbatov, Yuriy G; Prylutska, Svitlana V; Ritter, Uwe; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2014-07-01

    C60 fullerenes are spherical molecules composed purely of carbon atoms. They inspire a particularly strong scientific interest because of their specific physico-chemical properties and potential medical and nanotechnological applications. In this work we are focusing on studying the influence of the pristine C60 fullerene on biological activity of some aromatic drug molecules in human buccal epithelial cells. Assessment of the heterochromatin structure in the cell nucleus as well as the barrier function of the cell membrane was performed. The methods of cell microelectrophoresis and atomic force microscopy were also applied. A concentration-dependent restoration of the functional activity of the cellular nucleus after exposure to DNA-binding drugs (doxorubicin, proflavine and ethidium bromide) has been observed in human buccal epithelial cells upon addition of C60 fullerene at a concentration of ~10(-5 )M. The results were shown to follow the framework of interceptor/protector action theory, assuming that non-covalent complexation between C60 fullerene and the drugs (i.e., hetero-association) is the major process responsible for the observed biological effects. An independent confirmation of this hypothesis was obtained via investigation of the cellular response of buccal epithelium to the coadministration of the aromatic drugs and caffeine, and it is based on the well-established role of hetero-association in drug-caffeine systems. The results indicate that C60 fullerene may reverse the effects caused by the aromatic drugs, thereby pointing out the potential possibility of the use of aromatic drugs in combination with C60 fullerene for regulation of their medico-biological action.

  15. Antimutagenicity of coriander (Coriandrum sativum) juice on the mutagenesis produced by plant metabolites of aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2004-11-02

    Aromatic amines are metabolically activated into mutagenic compounds by both animal and plant systems. The 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOP) is a well-known direct-acting mutagen whose mutagenic potential can be enhanced by plant metabolism; m-phenylenediamine (m-PDA) is converted to mutagenic products detected by the Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain, and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) is the plant-activated promutagen most extensively studied. Plant cells activate both 2-AF and m-PDA into potent mutagens producing DNA frameshift mutations. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is a common plant included in the Mexican diet, usually consumed uncooked. The antimutagenic activity of coriander juice against the mutagenic activity of 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine, m-phenylenediamine and 2-aminofluorene was investigated using the Ames reversion mutagenicity assay (his- to his+) with the S. typhimurium TA98 strain as indicator organism. The plant cell/microbe coincubation assay was used as the activating system for aromatic transformation and plant extract interaction. Aqueous crude coriander juice significantly decreased the mutagenicity of metabolized aromatic amines (AA) in the following order: 2-AF (92.43%) > m-PDA (87.14%) > NOP (83.21%). The chlorophyll content in vegetable juice was monitored and its concentration showed a positive correlation with the detected antimutagenic effect. Protein content and peroxidase activity were also determined. The concentration of coriander juice (50-1000 microl/coincubation flask) was neither toxic nor mutagenic. The similar shape of the antimutagenic response curves obtained with coriander juice and chlorophyllin (used as a subrogate molecule of chlorophyll) indicated that comparable mechanisms of mutagenic inhibition could be involved. The negative correlation between chlorophyll content and mutagenic response of the promutagenic and direct-acting used amines allows us to deduce that a chemical interaction takes place between the two molecules

  16. Selective Monoarylation of Aromatic Ketones and Esters via Cleavage of Aromatic Carbon-Heteroatom Bonds by Trialkylphosphine Ruthenium Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hikaru; Kochi, Takuya; Kakiuchi, Fumitoshi

    2017-02-17

    We report here the ruthenium-catalyzed selective monoarylation of aromatic ketones bearing two ortho carbon-heteroatom (O or N) bonds. Under the newly developed catalyst system consisting of RuHCl(CO)(P(i)Pr3)2, CsF, and styrene, the C-O arylation of 2',6'-dimethoxyacetophenone with a phenylboronate gave the C-O monoarylation product selectively. The selective C-O monoarylation was applicable to a variety of arylboronates and aromatic ketones and proceeds with high regio- and chemoselectivities. A formal synthesis of altertenuol was also achieved using the C-O monoarylation of an aromatic ester as a key step.

  17. Assessing Uncertainty of Interspecies Correlation Estimation Models for Aromatic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models for aromatic compounds containing 1 to 4 benzene rings to assess uncertainty in toxicity extrapolation in two data compilation approaches. ICE models are mathematical relationships between surrogate and predicted test ...

  18. Cofluorescence of Eu 3+ in complexes of aromatic carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, B. S.; Peter, Susy; Viswanathan, K. S.

    1997-12-01

    The fluorescence of Eu 3+ in certain Eu 3+-aromatic acid complexes were enhanced by over two orders of magnitude, by the addition of La 3+; a process referred to as cofluorescence. Cofluorescence was observed only with certain aromatic acid ligands; trismesic acid, pyromellitic acid and mellitic acid; thereby clearly establishing a correlation between the structure of the ligand and the process of cofluorescence. While cofluorescence has been extensively studied using β-diketones as ligands, our studies demonstrate cofluorescence for the first time in ligands other than β-diketones. Furthermore, the mechanism of cofluorescence in the aromatic acid complexes studied by us appears to be different from that operating in the β-diketones. While intermolecular energy transfer is believed to occur in the β-diketones, formation of polynuclear complexes appears to be responsible for cofluorescence in the aromatic acid ligands.

  19. ADSORPTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AGED HARBOR SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of hydrophobic organic contaminants which have low aqueous solubilities and are common pollutants in harbor sediments. Adsorption and desorption isotherms for PAHs are conducted to study the abiotic sorption of PAHs in uncontami...

  20. Prenyl transfer to aromatic substrates: genetics and enzymology.

    PubMed

    Heide, Lutz

    2009-04-01

    Aromatic prenyltransferases catalyze the transfer of prenyl moieties to aromatic acceptor molecules and give rise to an astounding diversity of primary and secondary metabolites in plants, fungi and bacteria. Significant progress has been made in the biochemistry and genetics of this heterogeneous group of enzymes in the past years. After 30 years of extensive research on plant prenylflavonoid biosynthesis, finally the first aromatic prenyltransferases involved in the formation of these compounds have been cloned. In bacteria, investigations of the newly discovered family of ABBA prenyltransferases revealed a novel type of protein fold, the PT barrel. In fungi, a group of closely related indole prenyltransferase was found to carry out aromatic prenylations with different substrate specificity and regiospecificity, and to catalyze both regular and reverse prenylations.